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Sample records for altered protein phosphorylation

  1. Rapid alteration of protein phosphorylation during postmortem: implication in the study of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanchong; Hu, Wen; Xie, Shutao; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins. Postmortem tissues are widely being utilized in the biomedical studies, but the effects of postmortem on protein phosphorylation have not been received enough attention. In the present study, we found here that most proteins in mouse brain, heart, liver, and kidney were rapidly dephosphorylated to various degrees during 20 sec to 10 min postmortem. Phosphorylation of tau at Thr212 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 was reduced by 50% in the brain with 40 sec postmortem, a regular time for tissue processing. During postmortem, phosphorylation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and AMP activated kinase (AMPK) was increased in the brain, but not in other organs. Perfusion of the brain with cold or room temperature phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) also caused significant alteration of protein phosphorylation. Cooling down and maintaining mouse brains in the ice-cold buffer prevented the alteration effectively. This study suggests that phosphorylation of proteins is rapidly changed during postmortem. Thus, immediate processing of tissues followed by cooling down in ice-cold buffer is vitally important and perfusion has to be avoided when protein phosphorylation is to be studied. PMID:26511732

  2. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz e Silva, Cristóvão B.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer’s disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued. PMID:27466139

  3. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão B; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B

    2016-07-28

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer's disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued.

  4. Mercury Alters B-Cell Protein Phosphorylation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Nicholas J.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Shin, Namhee; Dombkowski, Alan; Caruso, Joseph A.; Gill, Randal; Rosenspire, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to mercury is suggested to contribute to human immune dysfunction. To shed light on the mechanism we identified changes in the phosphoproteomic profile of the WEHI-231 B cell line after intoxication with Hg2+. These changes were compared to changes in the phosphoproteome that were induced by pervanadate or okadaic acid exposure. Both 250 μM HgCl2 and pervanadate, a known phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, caused an increase in the number of proteins identified after TiO2 affinity selection and LC-MS/MS analysis. Pervanadate treatment had a larger effect than Hg2+ on the number of Scansite motifs which were tyrosine-phosphorylated, 17, and Ingenuity canonical signaling pathways activated, 4 with score > 5.0. However, Hg2+ had a more focused effect, primarily causing tyrosine-phosphorylation in SH2 domains in proteins that are in the B cell receptor signaling pathway. The finding that many of the changes induced by Hg2+ overlap with those of pervanadate, indicates that at high concentrations Hg2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:24224561

  5. Microgravity alters protein phosphorylation changes during initiation of sea urchin sperm motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tash, J. S.; Bracho, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) studies demonstrated that bull sperm swim with higher velocity in microgravity (microG) than at 1 G. Coupling between protein phosphorylation and sperm motility during activation in microG and at 1 G was examined in the ESA Biorack on two space shuttle missions. Immotile sperm were activated to swim (86-90% motility) at launch +20 h by dilution into artificial seawater (ASW). Parallel ground controls were performed 2 h after the flight experiment. Activation after 0, 30, and 60 s was terminated with electrophoresis sample buffer and samples analyzed for phosphoamino acids by Western blotting. Phosphorylation of a 130-kDa phosphothreonine-containing protein (FP130) occurred three to four times faster in microG than at 1 G. A 32-kDa phosphoserine-containing protein was significantly stimulated at 30 s but returned to 1 G control levels at 60 s. The rate of FP130 phosphorylation in microG was attenuated by D2O, suggesting that changes in water properties participate in altering signal transduction. Changes in FP130 phosphorylation triggered by the egg peptide speract were delayed in microG. These results demonstrate that previously observed effects of microG on sperm motility are coupled to changes in phosphorylation of specific flagellar proteins and that early events of sperm activation and fertilization are altered in microG.

  6. Microgravity alters protein phosphorylation changes during initiation of sea urchin sperm motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tash, J. S.; Bracho, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) studies demonstrated that bull sperm swim with higher velocity in microgravity (microG) than at 1 G. Coupling between protein phosphorylation and sperm motility during activation in microG and at 1 G was examined in the ESA Biorack on two space shuttle missions. Immotile sperm were activated to swim (86-90% motility) at launch +20 h by dilution into artificial seawater (ASW). Parallel ground controls were performed 2 h after the flight experiment. Activation after 0, 30, and 60 s was terminated with electrophoresis sample buffer and samples analyzed for phosphoamino acids by Western blotting. Phosphorylation of a 130-kDa phosphothreonine-containing protein (FP130) occurred three to four times faster in microG than at 1 G. A 32-kDa phosphoserine-containing protein was significantly stimulated at 30 s but returned to 1 G control levels at 60 s. The rate of FP130 phosphorylation in microG was attenuated by D2O, suggesting that changes in water properties participate in altering signal transduction. Changes in FP130 phosphorylation triggered by the egg peptide speract were delayed in microG. These results demonstrate that previously observed effects of microG on sperm motility are coupled to changes in phosphorylation of specific flagellar proteins and that early events of sperm activation and fertilization are altered in microG.

  7. Dopamine depletion alters phosphorylation of striatal proteins in a model of Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Abigail M; Deutch, Ariel Y; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-07-01

    Nigrostriatal dopamine depletion disrupts striatal medium spiny neuron morphology in Parkinson's disease and modulates striatal synaptic plasticity in animal models of parkinsonism. We demonstrate that long-term nigrostriatal dopamine depletion in the rat induces evolving changes in the phosphorylation of striatal proteins critical for synaptic plasticity. Dopamine depletion increased the phosphorylation of the alpha isoform of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha) at Thr286, a site associated with enhanced autonomous kinase activity, but did not alter total levels of CaMKIIalpha or other synaptic proteins. Dopamine depletion decreased CaMKIIalpha levels in postsynaptic density-enriched fractions without significant changes in other proteins. The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a postsynaptic phosphatase that dephosphorylates CaMKII, is regulated by DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa). Dopamine depletion had no effect on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr34, but increased DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr75. Levodopa administration reversed the increased phosphorylation of both CaMKIIalpha and DARPP-32. Normal ageing increased the levels of PP1(gamma1 isoform) but decreased levels of the PP1gamma1-targeting proteins spinophilin and neurabin. Elevated phosphorylations of CaMKIIalpha and DARPP-32 were maintained for up to 20 months after dopamine depletion. However, phosphorylation of the CaMKII-PP1 substrate, Ser831 in the glutamate receptor GluR1 subunit, was increased only after sustained (9-20 months) dopamine depletion. Interaction of ageing-related changes in PP1 with the dopamine depletion-induced changes in CaMKIIalpha may account for enhanced GluR1 phosphorylation only after long-term dopamine depletion. These evolving changes may impact striatal synaptic plasticity, Parkinson's disease progression and the changing efficacy and side-effects associated with dopamine replacement therapy.

  8. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show alterations in protein phosphorylation and growth control.

    PubMed Central

    Kanik-Ennulat, C; Neff, N

    1990-01-01

    This work describes two spontaneous vanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with constitutive alterations in protein phosphorylation, growth control, and sporulation. Vanadate has been shown by a number of studies to be an efficient competitor of phosphate in biochemical reactions, especially those that involve phosphoproteins as intermediates or substrates. Resistance to toxic concentrations of vanadate can arise in S. cerevisiae by both recessive and dominant spontaneous mutations in a large number of loci. Mutations in two of the recessive loci, van1-18 and van2-93, resulted in alterations in the phosphorylation of a number of proteins. The mutant van1-18 gene also showed an increase in plasma membrane ATPase activity in vitro and a lowered basal phosphatase activity under alkaline conditions. Cells containing the van2-93 mutant allele had normal levels of plasma membrane ATPase activity, but this activity was not inhibited by vanadate. Both of these mutants failed to enter stationary phase, were heat shock sensitive, showed lowered long-term viability, and sporulated on rich medium in the presence of 2% glucose. The wild-type VAN1 gene was isolated and sequenced. The open reading frame predicts a protein of 522 amino acids, with no significant homology to any genes that have been identified. Diploid cells that contained two mutant alleles of this gene demonstrated defects in spore viability. These data suggest that the VAN1 gene product is involved in regulation of the phosphorylation of a number of proteins, some of which appear to be important in cell growth control. Images PMID:2137555

  10. Low dose chronic treatment of human keratinocytes with inorganic arsenic causes hyperproliferation and altered protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.L.; Su, L.; Snow, E.T. |

    1997-10-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenate [As(V)] or arsenite [As(III)] causes hyperproliferation of normal and SV40-transformed human epidermal keratinocytes. Line 327 SV40-infected human keratinocytes were grown in the presence of either As(III) or As(V) (0.01 to 10 {mu}M) in complete medium for seven days prior to harvesting and counting. Both As(III) and As(V) were cytotoxic at micromolar concentrations, however submicromolar arsenic caused a significant increase in cell growth. Cell numbers in cultures exposed to As(V) were increased more than 186% relative to controls, and an even larger stimulation in cell growth was observed after treatment with 50 nM As(III). Normal non-SV40 T-antigen. Preliminary cell cycle analysis using unselected, log-phase cultures of arsenic-treated keratinocytes shows an increased proportion of cells in S- and G2/M-phase. Isoelectric focusing of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins from cells labeled with {sup 32}P-inorganic phosphate showed that the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes grown in low concentrations of arsenic is accompanied by altered tyrosine-specific protein phosphorylation. A number of phosphorylated proteins were observed in As-treated cells that were not observed in the controls; and minor bands at IEPs of 3.0, 4.2, 7.2, 7.5 and 8.2. These results, together with the lack of direct enzyme inhibition by arsenic shown by Su et al., this volume, suggest that arsenic-induced skin lesions and carcinogenesis may be the result of altered cell cycle control rather than DNA damage or reduced DNA repair.

  11. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of the adenovirus DNA-binding protein alter its ability to enhance its own synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, N; Delsert, C; Klessig, D F

    1989-01-01

    The multifunctional adenovirus single-strand DNA-binding protein (DBP) is highly phosphorylated. Its phosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal domain of the protein, and its DNA- and RNA-binding activity resides in the carboxy-terminal half of the polypeptide. We have substituted cysteine or alanine for up to 10 of these potential phosphorylation sites by using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Alteration of one or a few of these sites had little effect on the viability of virus containing the mutated DBP. However, when eight or more sites were altered, viral growth decreased significantly. This suggests that the overall phosphorylation state of the protein was more important than whether any particular site was modified. The reduction in growth correlated with both depressed DNA replication and expression of late genes. This reduction was probably the result of lower DBP accumulation in mutant-infected cells. Interestingly, although the stability of the mutated DBP was not affected, DBP synthesis and the level of its mRNA were depressed 5- to 10-fold for the underphosphorylated protein. These results suggest that DBP enhances its own expression and imply that phosphorylation of the DBP may be important for this function. Similarities to several eucaryotic transcriptional activators, which are composed of negatively charged activating domains and separate binding domains, are discussed. Images PMID:2585602

  12. Altered protein phosphorylation in sciatic nerve from rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schrama, L.H.; Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of experimental diabetes on the phosphorylation of proteins in the rat sciatic nerve was studied. Nerves from animals made diabetic with streptozocin were incubated in vitro with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate and divided into segments from the proximal to the distal end, and proteins from each segment were then separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The principal labeled species were the major myelin proteins, P0, and the basic proteins. After 6 wk of diabetes, the incorporation of isotope into these proteins rose as a function of distance along the nerve in a proximal to distal direction and was significantly higher at the distal end compared with incorporation into nerves from age-matched controls. The overall level of isotope uptake was similar in nerves from diabetic animals and weight-matched controls. The distribution of /sup 32/P among proteins also differed in diabetic nerve compared with both control groups in that P0 and the small basic protein accounted for a greater proportion of total label incorporated along the entire length of nerve. In contrast to intact nerve, there was no significant difference in protein phosphorylation when homogenates from normal and diabetic nerve were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-gamma-ATP. The results suggest that abnormal protein phosphorylation, particularly of myelin proteins, is a feature of experimental diabetic neuropathy and that the changes are most pronounced in the distal portion of the nerve.

  13. Zinc ions and alkaline pH alter the phosphorylation state of human erythrocyte membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fennell, R.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Since the phosphorylation state of the red cell membrane proteins in vitro is likely to be regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, this research was carried out to investigate the possible role of membrane-bound phosphatase activities. These studies were conducted with red blood cell ghosts and IOVs from normal individuals and from an individual with hereditary spherocytosis. In vitro phosphorylation with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP was conducted in the presence and the absence of Zn{sup ++}, or erythrocyte ghosts and IOVs were pretreated for 30 minutes at 37{degree}C and pH 7-11 in the presence and the absence of calf intestine alkaline phosphatase. The resulting phosphoproteins were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained with Coomassie blue, and fluorographed. In the presence of Zn{sup ++}, the red blood ghosts, with or without pretreatment, demonstrated enhanced phosphorylation of membrane proteins, including band 4.2. Preincubation at pH 10 in the presence of absence of exogenous phosphatase further stimulates phosphorylation of these proteins. Under similar conditions, the erythrocyte membranes also demonstrated the ability to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl phosphate and to remove {sup 32}P from red blood cell phosphoproteins.

  14. Experimental manipulation of compaction of the mouse embryo alters patterns of protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, T. )

    1991-03-01

    Compaction, occurring at the eight-cell stage of mouse development, is the process of cell flattening and polarisation by which cellular asymmetry is first established. Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation have been correlated with this early event of development. In the study reported here, groups of embryos were treated in ways known to affect particular features of compaction and were then labeled with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate; the phosphoproteins obtained were examined following electrophoresis in one and two dimensions. Four-cell embryos were treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, which advance cell flattening. This treatment resulted in only minor differences from the phosphoprotein profile of untreated four-cell embryos. Inhibition of protein synthesis at the eight-cell stage has little effect on cell flattening or polarisation. However, some phosphoproteins that are observed normally in eight-cell but not in four-cell embryos were no longer detectable if labeling took place in the presence of protein synthesis inhibitors. Eight-cell embryos incubated in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which disrupts various features of compaction, showed a relative increase in the phosphorylation of a group of phosphoprotein spots associated with the eight-cell but not with the four-cell stage. Embryos incubated in Ca2(+)-free medium, which prevents intercellular flattening and delays polarisation, showed a relative decrease in the phosphorylation of the same group of phosphoprotein spots. The behaviour of these phosphoproteins may therefore be correlated with some of the features of compaction.

  15. Mitosis-specific phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein at Threonine 668 leads to its altered processing and association with centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Atypical expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the molecular mechanisms by which they induce neurodegeneration are not well understood. We examined transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) for changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins to determine whether there is a correlation between cell cycle activation and pathology development in AD. Results Our studies in the AD transgenic mice show significantly higher levels of cyclin E, cyclin D1, E2F1, and P-cdc2 in the cells in the vicinity of the plaques where maximum levels of Threonine 668 (Thr668)-phosphorylated APP accumulation was observed. This suggests that the cell cycle regulatory proteins might be influencing plaque pathology by affecting APP phosphorylation. Using neuroglioma cells overexpressing APP we demonstrate that phosphorylation of APP at Thr668 is mitosis-specific. Cells undergoing mitosis show altered cellular distribution and localization of P-APP at the centrosomes. Also, Thr668 phosphorylation in mitosis correlates with increased processing of APP to generate Aβ and the C-terminal fragment of APP, which is prevented by pharmacological inhibitors of the G1/S transition. Conclusions The data presented here suggests that cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of APP may affect its normal cellular function. For example, association of P-APP with the centrosome may affect spindle assembly and cell cycle progression, further contributing to the development of pathology in AD. The experiments with G1/S inhibitors suggest that cell cycle inhibition may impede the development of Alzheimer's pathology by suppressing modification of βAPP, and thus may represent a novel approach to AD treatment. Finally, the cell cycle regulated phosphorylation and processing of APP into Aβ and the C-terminal fragment suggest that these proteins may have a normal function during mitosis. PMID:22112898

  16. Altered expression and phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein in heat shocked neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G; Refolo, L M; Merril, C R; Wallace, W

    1993-07-01

    The pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal degeneration, indicates that neurons affected by AD exist under conditions of stress. In fact, the brains of AD patients undergo many changes classically associated with the heat shock response, which is one form of a stress response. These changes include reduced protein synthesis, disrupted cytoskeleton, increased number of proteins associated with ubiquitin, and the induction of heat shock proteins. To investigate the response of neurons to stress, we examined neuronal PC12 cells incubated at either 37 degrees C (control cells) or 45 degrees C (heat-shocked cells). After a 30 min exposure at 45 degrees C, the heat-shocked cells exhibited several features characteristic of the classical heat shock response including a 45% reduction in total protein synthesis, the induction of heat shock protein 72, and an increased phosphorylation of the protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-2 alpha. We used this cellular model system to study the neuronal response to stress specifically focusing on protein synthesis elongation factor 2 (EF-2) and the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP), the precursor form of beta-amyloid peptide. Hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 has been observed in the neocortex and hippocampus of AD brain. However, in our system, we find no hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 in response to heat shock. Heat-shocked neuronal PC12 cells exhibited two additional APP-like polypeptides not present in controls. We also found a significant decrease in the phosphorylation state of APP in response to heat shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Retinopathy mutations in the bZIP protein NRL alter phosphorylation and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Friedman, James S; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Swaroop, Anand

    2007-06-01

    The transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (NRL) is required for rod photoreceptor differentiation during mammalian retinal development. NRL interacts with CRX, NR2E3, and other transcription factors and synergistically regulates the activity of photoreceptor-specific genes. Mutations in the human NRL gene are associated with retinal degenerative diseases. Here we report functional analyses of 17 amino acid variations and/or mutations of NRL. We show that 13 of these lead to changes in NRL phosphorylation. Six mutations at residues p.S50 (c.148T>A, c.148T>C, and c.149C>T) and p.P51 (c.151C>A, c.151C>T, and c.152C>T), identified in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, result in a major NRL isoform that exhibits reduced phosphorylation but enhanced activation of the rhodopsin promoter. The truncated NRL mutant proteins-p.L75fs (c.224_225insC) and p.L160fs (c.459_477dup)-do not localize to the nucleus because of the absence of bZIP domain. The p.L160P (c.479T>C), p.L160fs, and p.R218fs (c.654delC) mutant proteins do not bind to the NRL-response element, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. These three and p.S225N (c.674G>A) mutant show reduced transcriptional activity and may contribute to recessive disease. The p.P67S (c.199C>T) and p.L235F (c.703C>T) variations in NRL do not appear to directly cause retinitis pigmentosa, while p.E63K (c.187G>A), p.A76V (c.227C>T), p.G122E (c.365G>A), and p.H125Q (c.375C>G) are of uncertain significance. Our results support the notion that gain-of-function mutations in the NRL gene cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa while loss-of-function NRL mutations lead to autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. We propose that differential phosphorylation of NRL fine-tunes its transcriptional regulatory activity, leading to a more precise control of gene expression. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. [Phosphorylation of tau protein].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Ishiguro, K

    1990-05-01

    In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer's disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the neuronal cell. Recently, it has been found that the highly phosphorylated tau protein, one of the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), is a component of PHF. The authors attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying the accumulation of PHF from the following two aspects; 1) What is the mechanism of phosphorylation of tau protein? 2) Is the highly phosphorylated tau protein capable of forming PHFs? From rat or bovine microtubule proteins we partially purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated tau and MAP2 among many proteins in the brain extract, and which formed a PHF epitope on the phosphorylated human tau. This enzyme was one of the protein serine/threonine kinases and was independent of known second messengers. The phosphorylation of tau by this enzyme was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of tau could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Since this kinase was usually bound to tau but not directly to tubulin, the enzyme was associated with microtubules through tau. From these properties related to tau, this kinase is designated as tau protein kinase. The tau that been phosphorylated with this kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP as a phosphate donor, was digested by endoprotinase Lys-C to produce three labeled fragments, K1, K2 and K3. These three fragments were sequenced and the phosphorylation sites on tau by this kinase were identified. The K2 fragment overlapped with the tau-1 site known to be one of the phosphorylation site in PHF. This result strengthens the possibility that tau protein phosphorylated by tau protein kinase is incorporated into PHF. Tubulin binding sites on tau were located between K1 and K3 fragments, while K2 fragment was located in the neighboring to N-terminus of K1. No phosphorylated sites were

  19. CHOLESTEROL DEPLETION ALTERS DETERGENT-SPECIFIC SOLUBILITY PROFILES OF SELECTED TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEINS AND THE PHOSPHORYLATION OF OCCLUDIN

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Robert D.; Francis, Stacy A.; McCarthy, Karin M.; Casas, Elizabeth; Thiele, Christoph; Schneeberger, Eveline E.

    2007-01-01

    Differential centrifugation of Triton X-100 or CHAPS lysates from control and cholesterol (CH) depleted MDCK II cells, segregated integral tight junction (TJ) proteins associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) into two groups. Group A proteins (occludin, claudin-2 and -3) were detected in large, intermediate and small aggregates in both detergents, whereas group B proteins (claudin-1, -4 and -7) were observed in small aggregates in TX-100 and in intermediate and small aggregates in CHAPS. Depletion of CH altered the distribution of group A and B proteins among the three size categories in a detergent-specific manner. In lysates produced with octyl glucoside, a detergent that selectively extracts proteins from DRMs, group A proteins were undetectable in large aggregates and CH depletion did not alter the distribution of either group A or B proteins in intermediate or small aggregates. Neither occludin (group A) nor claudin-1 (group B) was in intimate enough contact with CH to be cross-linked to [3H]-photo-cholesterol. However, antibodies to either TJ protein co-immunoprecipitated caveolin-1, a CH-binding protein. Unlike claudins, occludin’s presence in TJs and DRMs did not require palmitoylation. Equilibrium density centrifugation on discontinuous OptiPrep gradients revealed detergent-related differences in the densities of TJ-bearing DRMs. There was little or no change in those densities after CH depletion. Removing CH from the plasma membrane increased tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of occludin, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) within 30 min. After 2 h of CH efflux, phospho-occludin levels and TER fell below control values. We conclude that the association of integral TJ proteins with DRMS, pelleted at low speeds, is partially CH dependent. However, the buoyant density of TJ-associated DRMs is a function of the detergent used and is insensitive to decreases in CH. PMID:17574235

  20. Phosphorylation alters the interaction of the Arabidopsis phosphotransfer protein AHP1 with its sensor kinase ETR1.

    PubMed

    Scharein, Benjamin; Groth, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ethylene receptor ethylene response 1 (ETR1) and the Arabidopsis histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein 1 (AHP1) form a tight complex in vitro. According to our current model ETR1 and AHP1 together with a response regulator form a phosphorelay system controlling the gene expression response to the plant hormone ethylene, similar to the two-component signaling in bacteria. The model implies that ETR1 functions as a sensor kinase and is autophosphorylated in the absence of ethylene. The phosphoryl group is then transferred onto a histidine at the canonical phosphorylation site in AHP1. For phosphoryl group transfer both binding partners need to form a tight complex. After ethylene binding the receptor is switched to the non-phosphorylated state. This switch is accompanied by a conformational change that decreases the affinity to the phosphorylated AHP1. To test this model we used fluorescence polarization and examined how the phosphorylation status of the proteins affects formation of the suggested ETR1-AHP1 signaling complex. We have employed various mutants of ETR1 and AHP1 mimicking permanent phosphorylation or preventing phosphorylation, respectively. Our results show that phosphorylation plays an important role in complex formation as affinity is dramatically reduced when the signaling partners are either both in their non-phosphorylated form or both in their phosphorylated form. On the other hand, affinity is greatly enhanced when either protein is in the phosphorylated state and the corresponding partner in its non-phosphorylated form. Our results indicate that interaction of ETR1 and AHP1 requires that ETR1 is a dimer, as in its functional state as receptor in planta.

  1. Phosphorylation Alters the Interaction of the Arabidopsis Phosphotransfer Protein AHP1 with Its Sensor Kinase ETR1

    PubMed Central

    Scharein, Benjamin; Groth, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ethylene receptor ethylene response 1 (ETR1) and the Arabidopsis histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein 1 (AHP1) form a tight complex in vitro. According to our current model ETR1 and AHP1 together with a response regulator form a phosphorelay system controlling the gene expression response to the plant hormone ethylene, similar to the two-component signaling in bacteria. The model implies that ETR1 functions as a sensor kinase and is autophosphorylated in the absence of ethylene. The phosphoryl group is then transferred onto a histidine at the canonical phosphorylation site in AHP1. For phosphoryl group transfer both binding partners need to form a tight complex. After ethylene binding the receptor is switched to the non-phosphorylated state. This switch is accompanied by a conformational change that decreases the affinity to the phosphorylated AHP1. To test this model we used fluorescence polarization and examined how the phosphorylation status of the proteins affects formation of the suggested ETR1−AHP1 signaling complex. We have employed various mutants of ETR1 and AHP1 mimicking permanent phosphorylation or preventing phosphorylation, respectively. Our results show that phosphorylation plays an important role in complex formation as affinity is dramatically reduced when the signaling partners are either both in their non-phosphorylated form or both in their phosphorylated form. On the other hand, affinity is greatly enhanced when either protein is in the phosphorylated state and the corresponding partner in its non-phosphorylated form. Our results indicate that interaction of ETR1 and AHP1 requires that ETR1 is a dimer, as in its functional state as receptor in planta. PMID:21912672

  2. Protein phosphorylation and photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Hodges, M; Jossier, M; Boex-Fontvieille, E; Tcherkez, G

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration allows the recycling of carbon atoms of 2-phosphoglycolate produced by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenase activity, as well as the removal of potentially toxic metabolites. The photorespiratory pathway takes place in the light, encompasses four cellular compartments and interacts with several other metabolic pathways and functions. Therefore, the regulation of this cycle is probably of paramount importance to plant metabolism, however, our current knowledge is poor. To rapidly respond to changing conditions, proteins undergo a number of different post-translational modifications that include acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation, but protein phosphorylation is probably the most common. The reversible covalent addition of a phosphate group to a specific amino acid residue allows the modulation of protein function, such as activity, subcellular localisation, capacity to interact with other proteins and stability. Recent data indicate that many photorespiratory enzymes can be phosphorylated, and thus it seems that the photorespiratory cycle is, in part, regulated by protein phosphorylation. In this review, the known phosphorylation sites of each Arabidopsis thaliana photorespiratory enzyme and several photorespiratory-associated proteins are described and discussed. A brief account of phosphoproteomic protocols is also given since the published data compiled in this review are the fruit of this approach.

  3. Induction of heat-shock response and alterations of protein phosphorylation by a novel topoisomerase II inhibitor, withangulatin A, in 9L rat brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, W C; Lin, K Y; Chen, C M; Chen, Z T; Liu, H J; Lai, Y K

    1991-10-01

    Withangulatin A is a newly identified in vitro topoisomerase II inhibitor isolated from the Chinese antitumor herb Physalis angulata. In vivo, it was found to be cytotoxic, capable of suppressing general protein synthesis and of inducing the synthesis of a small set of proteins including those generated by heat-shock treatment. The 70 kDa protein generated by withangulatin A was unequivocally identified as the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) since both proteins migrated to the same position on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels, could be recognized by a monoclonal antibody to human HSP70, and exhibited identical peptide maps. The induction of protein synthesis by withangulatin A was regulated at the transcriptional level since it was aborted in cells pre-treated with actinomycin D. However, the initiation of this process did not require de novo protein synthesis since it was not affected by cycloheximide. Other cellular effect of withangulatin A was alterations of protein phosphorylation including an enhancement of phosphorylation of a 65 kDa protein which was also detected in the heat-shocked cells. Moreover, this process was observed within 7.5 min after the initial heat treatment which is much faster than the onset of HSP synthesis. Therefore, increased phosphorylation of the 65 kDa protein may represent one of the earliest signals generated by both heat-shock and withangluatin A and may be involved in the upstream regulation of heat-shock response in cells.

  4. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation.

  5. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Waters, B; Vujaklija, D; Gold, M R; Davies, J

    1994-07-01

    Using phosphotyrosine-specific antibodies, we demonstrate that in several Streptomyces spp. a variety of proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Tyrosine phosphorylation was found in a number of Streptomyces species including Streptomyces lividans, Streptomyces hygroscopicus and Streptomyces lavendulae. Each species exhibited a unique pattern of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Moreover, the patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation varied during the growth phase and were also influenced by culture conditions. We suggest that metabolic shifts during the complex growth cycle of these filamentous bacteria, and possibly secondary metabolic pathways, may be controlled by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, as has been demonstrated in signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic organisms.

  7. Cryopreservation-induced alterations in protein tyrosine phosphorylation of spermatozoa from different portions of the boar ejaculate.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Siqueira, A P; Hossain, M S; Bergqvist, A S

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that boar sperm quality after cryopreservation differs depending on the ejaculate fraction used and that spermatozoa contained in the first 10mL (P1) of the sperm-rich fraction (SRF) show better cryosurvival than those in the SRF-P1. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) in spermatozoa is related with the tolerance of spermatozoa to frozen storage and cryocapacitation, we assessed the dynamics of cryopreservation-induced PTP and intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in spermatozoa, using flow cytometry, from P1 and SRF-P1 of the boar ejaculate at different stages of cryopreservation. Sperm kinetics, assessed using a computer-assisted semen analyzer, did not differ between P1 and SRF-P1 during cryopreservation but the decrease in sperm velocity during cryopreservation was significant (P<0.05) in SRF-P1 compared to P1. There were no significant differences in percentages of spermatozoa with high [Ca(2+)]i between P1 and SRF-P1 in fresh as well as in frozen-thawed semen. A higher (P<0.001) proportion of spermatozoa displayed PTP during the course of cryopreservation indicating a definite effect of the cryopreservation process on sperm PTP. The proportion of spermatozoa with PTP did not differ significantly between portions of the boar ejaculate. However at any given step during cryopreservation the percentage of spermatozoa with PTP was comparatively higher in SRF-P1 than P1. A 32kDa tyrosine phosphorylated protein, associated with capacitation, appeared after cooling suggesting that cooling induces capacitation-like changes in boar spermatozoa. In conclusion, the study has shown that the cryopreservation process induced PTP in spermatozoa and their proportions were similar between portions of SRF.

  8. Heat shock in Escherichia coli alters the protein-binding properties of the chaperonin groEL by inducing its phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sherman MYu; Goldberg, A L

    1992-05-14

    When bacterial or eukaryotic cells are exposed to high temperatures or other harsh conditions, they respond by synthesis of a specific set of heat-shock proteins. Certain heat-shock proteins such as groEL, called 'chaperonins', can prevent misfolding and promote the refolding and proper assembly of unfolded polypeptides generated under harmful conditions. We report here a new aspect of the heat-shock response in Escherichia coli: at high temperatures a fraction of groEL becomes modified covalently, altering its interaction with unfolded proteins. The heat-modified form can be eluted with ATP from an unfolded protein more easily than normal groEL. The critical heat-induced modification seems to be phosphorylation, which is reversed on return to low temperature. Treatment of the modified groEL with phosphatases caused its apparent size, charge and binding properties to resemble those of the unmodified form. Thus during heat shock some groEL is reversibly phosphorylated, which allows its ATP-dependent release from protein substrates in the absence of its usual cofactor (groES), and probably promotes the repair of damaged polypeptides.

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  10. Protein kinase A phosphorylation alters Kvbeta1.3 subunit-mediated inactivation of the Kv1.5 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Y G; Hu, N; Wei, J; George, A L; Grobaski, T D; Tamkun, M M; Murray, K T

    1999-05-14

    The human Kv1.5 potassium channel forms the IKur current in atrial myocytes and is functionally altered by coexpression with Kvbeta subunits. To explore the role of protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation in beta-subunit function, we examined the effect of PKA stimulation on Kv1.5 current following coexpression with either Kvbeta1.2 or Kvbeta1.3, both of which coassemble with Kv1.5 and induce fast inactivation. In Xenopus oocytes expressing Kv1.5 and Kvbeta1.3, activation of PKA reduced macroscopic inactivation with an increase in K+ current. Similar results were obtained using HEK 293 cells which lack endogenous K+ channel subunits. These effects did not occur when Kv1.5 was coexpressed with either Kvbeta1.2 or Kvbeta1.3 lacking the amino terminus, suggesting involvement of this region of Kvbeta1.3. Removal of a consensus PKA phosphorylation site on the Kvbeta1.3 NH2 terminus (serine 24), but not alternative sites in either Kvbeta1.3 or Kv1.5, resulted in loss of the functional effects of kinase activation. The effects of phosphorylation appeared to be electrostatic, as replacement of serine 24 with a negatively charged amino acid reduced beta-mediated inactivation, while substitution with a positively charged residue enhanced it. These results indicate that Kvbeta1.3-induced inactivation is reduced by PKA activation, and that phosphorylation of serine 24 in the subunit NH2 terminus is responsible.

  11. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  12. Myofibrillar calcium sensitivity of isometric tension is increased in human dilated cardiomyopathies: role of altered beta-adrenergically mediated protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M R; Buck, S H; Stoker, S W; Greaser, M L; Mentzer, R M

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of alterations in myofibrillar function in human dilated cardiomyopathies, we determined isometric tension-calcium relations in permeabilized myocytesized myofibrillar preparations (n = 16) obtained from left ventricular biopsies from nine patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) during cardiac transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation. Similar preparations (n = 10) were obtained from six normal hearts used for cardiac transplantation. Passive and maximal Ca2+-activated tensions were similar for the two groups. However, the calcium sensitivity of isometric tension was increased in DCM compared to nonfailing preparations ([Ca2+]50=2.46+/-0.49 microM vs 3.24+/-0.51 microM, P < 0.001). In vitro treatment with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) decreased calcium sensitivity of tension to a greater degree in failing than in normal preparations. Further, isometric tension-calcium relations in failing and normal myofibrillar preparations were similar after PKA treatment. These findings suggest that the increased calcium sensitivity of isometric tension in DCM may be due at least in part to a reduction of the beta-adrenergically mediated (PKA-dependent) phosphorylation of myofibrillar regulatory proteins such as troponin I and/or C-protein. PMID:8690789

  13. Protein phosphorylation networks in motor neuron death.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie Hong; Krieger, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the death of specific groups of neurons, especially motor neurons, which innervate skeletal muscle, and neurons connecting the cerebral cortex with motor neurons, such as corticospinal tract neurons. There have been numerous attempts to elucidate why there is selective involvement of motor neurons in ALS. Recent observations have demonstrated altered activities and protein levels of diverse kinases in the brain and spinal cord of transgenic mice that overexpress a mutant superoxide dismutase (mSOD) gene that is found in patients with the familial form of ALS, as well as in patients who have died with ALS. These results suggest that the alteration of protein phosphorylation may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. The changes in protein kinase and phosphatase expression and activity can affect the activation of important neuronal neurotransmitter receptors such as NMDA receptors or other signaling proteins and can trigger, or modify, the process producing neuronal loss in ALS. These various kinases, phosphatases and signaling proteins are involved in many signaling pathways; however, they have close interactions with each other. Therefore, an understanding of the role of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and the molecular organization of protein phosphorylation networks are useful to determine the mechanisms of selective motor neuron death.

  14. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the bovine oviduct in vitro: Alteration by heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wijayagunawardane, Missaka P B; Hambruch, Nina; Haeger, Jan-Dirk; Pfarrer, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be involved in control of the oviductal microenvironment. To elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the detrimental effect of heat stress and to identify the relation with the endocrine status, the effects of EGF on the level of phosphorylated mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) exposed to different cyclic ovarian steroidal environments (luteal phase (LP), follicular phase (FP) and postovulatory phase (PO)) and temperatures (mild heat stress (40 C) and severe heat stress (43 C)) were investigated. Western blot was performed to evaluate phosphorylated MAPK, while proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. Stimulation of OECs with EGF alone or with EGF in the PO and FP environments significantly increased the amount of phosphorylated MAPK, with MAPK 44 phosphorylation being highest during exposure to PO conditions. These effects were not observed in the LP. Heat treatment completely blocked effects of EGF on phosphorylated MAPK. Additionally, severe heat stress led to a significantly lower basal level of phosphorylated MAPK. PD98059 (MAPK inhibitor) completely abolished EGF-stimulated MAPK phosphorylation and OECs proliferation. Overall the results indicate that EGF has the potential to increase the amount of phosphorylated MAPK in OECs and therefore could be involved in regulation of the bovine oviductal microenvironment. However, these regulatory mechanisms may be compromised in the presence of heat stress (high ambient temperature), leading to low fertility rates and impaired embryo survival.

  15. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Maegen A.; Ward, Christopher W.; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7–35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30–70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes. PMID:26287277

  16. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Ward, Christopher W; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-08-19

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7-35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30-70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes.

  17. Pseudo-acetylation of multiple sites on human Tau proteins alters Tau phosphorylation and microtubule binding, and ameliorates amyloid beta toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Sofola-Adesakin, Oyinkan; Dols, Jacqueline; Augustin, Hrvoje; Weigelt, Carina Marianne; Grönke, Sebastian; Partridge, Linda

    2017-08-30

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly soluble and natively unfolded. Its dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), where it aggregates within neurons. Deciphering the physiological and pathogenic roles of human Tau (hTau) is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to its dysfunction in vivo. We have used a knock-out/knock-in strategy in Drosophila to generate a strain with hTau inserted into the endogenous fly tau locus and expressed under the control of the endogenous fly tau promoter, thus avoiding potential toxicity due to genetic over-expression. hTau knock-in (KI) proteins were expressed at normal, endogenous levels, bound to fly microtubules and were post-translationally modified, hence displaying physiological properties. We used this new model to investigate the effects of acetylation on hTau toxicity in vivo. The simultaneous pseudo-acetylation of hTau at lysines 163, 280, 281 and 369 drastically decreased hTau phosphorylation and significantly reduced its binding to microtubules in vivo. These molecular alterations were associated with ameliorated amyloid beta toxicity. Our results indicate acetylation of hTau on multiple sites regulates its biology and ameliorates amyloid beta toxicity in vivo.

  18. Ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) box-containing protein (ASB) 15 alters differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblasts and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt.

    PubMed

    McDaneld, T G; Spurlock, D M

    2008-11-01

    Ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling box-containing protein (ASB) 15 is a novel ASB gene family member predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle. We have previously reported that overexpression of ASB15 delays differentiation and alters protein turnover in mouse C(2)C(12) myoblasts. However, the extent of ASB15 regulation of differentiation and molecular pathways underlying this activity are unknown. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt (PI3K/Akt; Akt is also known as protein kinase B) signaling pathways have a role in skeletal muscle growth. Activation (phosphorylation) of the Erk1/2 signaling pathway promotes proliferation, whereas activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway promotes myoblast differentiation. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that ASB15 controls myoblast differentiation through its regulation of these kinases. Stably transfected myoblasts overexpressing ASB15 (ASB15+) demonstrated decreased differentiation, whereas attenuation of ASB15 expression (ASB15-) increased differentiation. However, ASB15+ cells had less abundance of the phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (active) form, despite decreased differentiation relative to control myoblasts (ASB15Con). The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, U0126, effectively decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and stimulated differentiation in ASB15- and ASB15Con cells. However, inhibition of the Erk1/2 pathway was unable to overcome the inhibitory effect of overexpressing ASB15 on differentiation (ASB15+), suggesting that the Erk1/2 pathway is likely not the predominant mediator of ASB15 activity on differentiation. Expression of ASB15 also altered phosphorylation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, as ASB15+ and ASB15- cells had decreased and increased Akt phosphorylation, respectively. These data were consistent with observed differences in differentiation. Administration of IGF-I, a PI3K

  19. Altered protein phosphatase 2A methylation and Tau phosphorylation in the young and aged brain of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Jean-Marie; Wasek, Brandi; Taleski, Goce; Smith, Josephine; Arning, Erland; Sontag, Estelle; Bottiglieri, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Common functional polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, a key enzyme in folate and homocysteine metabolism, influence risk for a variety of complex disorders, including developmental, vascular, and neurological diseases. MTHFR deficiency is associated with elevation of homocysteine levels and alterations in the methylation cycle. Here, using young and aged Mthfr knockout mouse models, we show that mild MTHFR deficiency can lead to brain-region specific impairment of the methylation of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Relative to wild-type controls, decreased expression levels of PP2A and leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT1) were primarily observed in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and to a lesser extent in the cortex of young null Mthfr−/− and aged heterozygous Mthfr+/− mice. A marked down regulation of LCMT1 correlated with the loss of PP2A/Bα holoenzymes. Dietary folate deficiency significantly decreased LCMT1, methylated PP2A and PP2A/Bα levels in all brain regions examined from aged Mthfr+/+ mice, and further exacerbated the regional effects of MTHFR deficiency in aged Mthfr+/− mice. In turn, the down regulation of PP2A/Bα was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of Tau, a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Our findings identify hypomethylation of PP2A enzymes, which are major CNS phosphatases, as a novel mechanism by which MTHFR deficiency and Mthfr gene-diet interactions could lead to disruption of neuronal homeostasis, and increase the risk for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including age-related diseases like sporadic AD. PMID:25202269

  20. Alterations of ciliate phosducin phosphorylation in Blepharisma japonicum cells.

    PubMed

    Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Fabczak, Hanna; Fabczak, Stanisław

    2005-05-13

    endogenous light-dependent protein kinase-phosphatase system may be engaged in the alteration of phosducin phosphorylation in ciliate B. japonicum thereby to modulate the cell motile photophobic behavior.

  1. Alteration of the major phosphorylation site of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E prevents its association with the 48 S initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Joshi-Barve, S; Rychlik, W; Rhoads, R E

    1990-02-15

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace the serine residue at the primary phosphorylation site of human eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E with an alanine residue. The mutated cDNA was transcribed in vitro, and the transcript was used to direct protein synthesis in a reticulocyte lysate system. The variant protein (eIF-4EAla) was retained on a 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m7GTP)-Sepharose affinity column and was specifically eluted by m7GTP. Examination of eIF-4EAla by isoelectric focusing revealed two species which had the same pI values as the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of unaltered eIF-4E (here designated eIF-4ESer). However, conversion of unphosphorylated eIF-4EAla to the putative phosphorylated eIF-4EAla in the reticulocyte lysate system was slower than the corresponding conversion of eIF-4ESer. The possibility that the more acidic form of eIF-4EAla was due to NH2-terminal acetylation was ruled out by an experiment in which the acetyl-CoA pool of the reticulocyte lysate system was depleted with oxaloacetate and citrate synthase. The more acidic form of eIF-4EAla was, however, eliminated by treatment with calf intestine alkaline phosphatase, suggesting that it results from a second-site phosphorylation. When translation reaction mixtures were resolved on sucrose density gradients, the 35S-labeled eIF-4ESer was found on the 48 S initiation complex in the presence of guanylyl imidodiphosphate, as reported earlier (Hiremath, L.S., Hiremath, S.T., Rychlik, W., Joshi, S., Domier, L.L., and Rhoads, R.E. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 1132-1138). eIF-4EAla, by contrast, was not found on the 48 S complex, suggesting that phosphorylation of eIF-4E is necessary for it to carry out its role of transferring mRNA to the 48 S complex. Supporting this interpretation was the finding that eIF-4ESer isolated from 48 S initiation complexes consisted predominantly of the phosphorylated form.

  2. Troponin I Mutations R146G and R21C Alter Cardiac Troponin Function, Contractile Properties, and Modulation by Protein Kinase A (PKA)-mediated Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuanhua; Rao, Vijay; Tu, An-yue; Lindert, Steffen; Wang, Dan; Oxenford, Lucas; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCammon, J. Andrew; Regnier, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated cardiac troponin I (cTnI) mutations, R146G and R21C, are located in different regions of cTnI, the inhibitory peptide and the cardiac-specific N terminus. We recently reported that these regions may interact when Ser-23/Ser-24 are phosphorylated, weakening the interaction of cTnI with cardiac TnC. Little is known about how these mutations influence the affinity of cardiac TnC for cTnI (KC-I) or contractile kinetics during β-adrenergic stimulation. Here, we tested how cTnIR146G or cTnIR21C influences contractile activation and relaxation and their response to protein kinase A (PKA). Both mutations significantly increased Ca2+ binding affinity to cTn (KCa) and KC-I. PKA phosphorylation resulted in a similar reduction of KCa for all complexes, but KC-I was reduced only with cTnIWT. cTnIWT, cTnIR146G, and cTnIR21C were complexed into cardiac troponin and exchanged into rat ventricular myofibrils, and contraction/relaxation kinetics were measured ± PKA phosphorylation. Maximal tension (Tmax) was maintained for cTnIR146G- and cTnIR21C-exchanged myofibrils, and Ca2+ sensitivity of tension (pCa50) was increased. PKA phosphorylation decreased pCa50 for cTnIWT-exchanged myofibrils but not for either mutation. PKA phosphorylation accelerated the early slow phase relaxation for cTnIWT myofibrils, especially at Ca2+ levels that the heart operates in vivo. Importantly, this effect was blunted for cTnIR146G- and cTnIR21C-exchanged myofibrils. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest both mutations inhibit formation of intra-subunit contacts between the N terminus and the inhibitory peptide of cTnI that is normally seen with WT-cTn upon PKA phosphorylation. Together, our results suggest that cTnIR146G and cTnIR21C blunt PKA modulation of activation and relaxation kinetics by prohibiting cardiac-specific N-terminal interaction with the cTnI inhibitory peptide. PMID:26391394

  3. Impaired contractile responses and altered expression and phosphorylation of Ca2+ sensitization proteins in gastric antrum smooth muscles from ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhetwal, Bhupal P.; An, Changlong; Baker, Salah A.; Lyon, Kristin L.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic gastroparesis is a common complication of diabetes, adversely affecting quality of life with symptoms of abdominal discomfort, nausea, and vomiting. The pathogenesis of this complex disorder is not well understood, involving abnormalities in the extrinsic and enteric nervous systems, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), smooth muscles and immune cells. The ob/ob mouse model of obesity and diabetes develops delayed gastric emptying, providing an animal model for investigating how gastric smooth muscle dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis. Although ROCK2, MYPT1, and CPI-17 activities are reduced in intestinal motility disorders, their functioning has not been investigated in diabetic gastroparesis. We hypothesized that reduced expression and phosphorylation of the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitory proteins MYPT1 and CPI-17 in ob/ob gastric antrum smooth muscles could contribute to the impaired antrum smooth muscle function of diabetic gastroparesis. Spontaneous and carbachol- and high K+-evoked contractions of gastric antrum smooth muscles from 7 to 12 week old male ob/ob mice were reduced compared to age- and strain-matched controls. There were no differences in spontaneous and agonist-evoked intracellular Ca2+ transients and myosin light chain kinase expression. The F-actin:G-actin ratios were similar. Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2) expression was decreased at both ages. Basal and agonist-evoked MYPT1 and myosin light chain 20 phosphorylation, but not CPI-17 phosphorylation, was reduced compared to age-matched controls. These findings suggest that reduced MLCP inhibition due to decreased ROCK2 phosphorylation of MYPT1 in gastric antrum smooth muscles contributes to the antral dysmotility of diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:23576331

  4. Evaluation of protein phosphorylation during adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Zeng, Rong; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is a complex process that involves the sequential expression of various adipocyte-specific genes controlled by signaling pathways and transcription factors for which phosphorylation plays a crucial regulatory role. CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are the most important transcriptional regulators in adipogenesis, and the functions of these proteins are regulated by various phosphorylation events. Because cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes are commonly used as a model for adipocyte differentiation, we used these cells for a proteomic analysis to identify kinases, phosphatases, and phosphosites that participate in adipogenesis. In addition to the phosphoproteomic analysis, we provide a detailed description of Western blotting, an in vitro phosphorylation assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and phosphorylation site mutagenesis to fully characterize the phosphorylation of proteins and verify their roles in adipogenesis. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  6. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  7. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  8. Pathologic complete response after preoperative anti-HER2 therapy correlates with alterations in PTEN, FOXO, phosphorylated Stat5, and autophagy protein signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To define protein molecular characteristics of tumor cells prior to, and immediately following, preoperative human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy that correlate with pathologic complete response (pCR) or non response (no pCR) to preoperative HER2-directed therapy and chemotherapy. Methods This open-label, phase II study randomized patients with HER2-positive stage II or III invasive breast cancer to trastuzumab, lapatinib, or both, 2 weeks prior to and during chemotherapy with FEC75 for 4 courses; then paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 weekly for 12 courses, then surgery. Core needle biopsies were collected at baseline and after 2 weeks of anti-HER2 therapy prior to chemotherapy. Data were correlated with pCR, defined as absence of invasive tumor in breast and lymph nodes. Results Of 100 enrolled patients, the analysis population included those who had surgery and received ≥75% chemotherapy (78% [n = 78]). pCRs by arm are: trastuzumab (n = 26), 54% [n = 14]; lapatinib (n = 29), 45% [n = 13]; trastuzumab plus lapatinib (n = 23), 74% [n = 17]). Paired biopsy specimens were available for 49 patients (63%). Tumor cells of patients with pCR in the trastuzumab or lapatinib treatment arms showed nonphosphorylated FOXO, phosphorylated Stat5, and sparse signal-transduction protein network crosstalk representing different patterns of connections with PI3K and autophagy proteins compared with no pCR. Conclusion In this exploratory study, pCR with preoperative anti-HER2 therapy and chemotherapy correlated with the levels and phosphorylation status of specific baseline signal pathway proteins in tumor cells. These data may provide candidate biomarkers to stratify initial treatment and potential combination therapies for future study. Tissue preservation technology introduced here makes this procedure widely feasible. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00524303 PMID:24304724

  9. Chkl binds and phosphorylates BAD protein.

    PubMed

    Han, Edward Kyu-ho; Butler, Chris; Zhang, Haichao; Severin, Jean M; Qin, Wenying; Holzman, Tom F; Gubbins, Earl J; Simmer, Robert L; Rosenberg, Saul; Giranda, Vincent L; Ng, Shi-Chung; Luo, Y

    2004-01-01

    Chk1 (checkpoint kinase 1) is a serine-threonine kinase that is critical for G2/M arrest in response to DNA damage. Chk1 phosphorylates Cdc25C at serine-216, a major regulatory site, in response to DNA damage. Furthermore, Chk1 also phosphorylates Cdc25A on serine 123 which accelerates its degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and arrests cells in late G2-phase after DNA damage. In the present study, we demonstrated that Chk1 phosphorylates pro-apoptotic protein BAD (Bcl-2/Bcl-XL-Antagonist, causing cell Death) in vitro. In vitro phosphorylation analysis with various mouse BAD peptides has revealed two phosphorylation sites for Chk1 at serine-155 and serine-170. When wild-type and mutant BAD (S155A) constructs were transfected into 293T cells, an association between BAD and Chk1 was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. In addition, there was an increase in the phosphorylation of serine-155 following DNA damage by adriamycin treatment. Our results suggest that Chk1 associates with BAD and phosphorylates the BAD protein at serine-155. Taken together, our results suggest that Chk1 may inactivate BAD by associating with and phosphorylating residues critical for BAD function in response to DNA damage.

  10. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Phosphorylation of Synaptic GTPase-activating Protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII) and Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) Alters the Ratio of Its GAP Activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Carlisle, Holly J.; Graham, Robert L.; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. PMID:25533468

  12. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E. )

    1989-04-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with {sup 32}P-{gamma}-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of {sup 35}S-adenosine thiotriphosphate.

  13. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  14. Phospholipid metabolism and protein kinase C mediated protein phosphorylation in dietary protein deficiency in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Surendra K; Kathayat, Rachna; Tyagi, Manoj; Taneja, Krishna K; Basir, Seemi F

    2005-07-01

    Nutritional deprivation of proteins decreases the protein kinase C (PKC) activity in rat lung. The activity of (PKC) is influenced by lipid metabolism. Changes in PKC activity may influence phosphorylation of its substrate proteins in the tissues. Therefore, alterations in phospholipid metabolism and PKC mediated protein phosphorylation in dietary protein deficiency in rat lung were envisaged. The study was conducted on rats fed on three different types of diet viz., casein (20% protein), deficient (4% protein, rice flour as source of protein) and supplemented (deficient diet supplemented with L-lysine and DL-threoning). Feeding of protein deficient diet caused reduction in incorporation of [3H] myo-inositol in the total phosphoinositides in lungs and an increase in total inositol phosphate pool. There was a significant reduction in the contents and turnover rate of phosphatidyl inositol and phosphatidyl inositol monophosphate. Supplementation of diet with L-lysine and DL-threonine had a reversing effect on total pool of phosphoinositides and, the metabolism of phosphatidyl inositol bisphosphate and phosphatidyl inositol. In phosphatidyl choline metabolism, the dietary protein deficiency led to a decrease in incorporation of [14C-methyl] choline-chloride in total phospholipids. In contrast, its incorporation increased in phosphatidyl choline pool. The contents of phosphatidyl choline and residue, incorporation of [14C-methyl] choline-chloride in them and their turnover rate also increased. Supplementation of diet had a reversal effect on most of these parameters. Phosphorylation of proteins of 84, 47, 35 and 16 kDa was identified to be mediated by PKC. In dietary protein deficiency, phosphorylation of all these proteins, except that of 47 kDa, increased. Supplementation of diet reversed the pattern except that of 84 kDa. The findings suggest that changes in phospholipid metabolism in dietary protein deficiency may effect the activity of PKC thereby influencing the

  15. Small molecules that target phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Protein-protein interaction is one of the key events in the signal transduction pathway. The interaction changes the conformations, activities, localization and stabilities of the proteins, and transduces the signal to the next step. Frequently, this interaction occurs upon the protein phosphorylation. When upstream signals are stimulated, protein kinase(s) is/are activated and phosphorylate(s) their substrates, and induce the phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction. For this interaction, several domains in proteins are known to specifically recognize the phosphorylated residues of target proteins. These specific domains for interaction are important in the progression of the diseases caused by disordered signal transduction such as cancer. Thus small molecules that modulate this interaction are attractive lead compounds for the treatment of such diseases. In this review, we focused on three examples of phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction modules (14-3-3, polo box domain of Plk1 and F-box proteins in SCF ubiquitin ligases) and summarize small molecules that modulate their interaction. We also introduce our original screening system to identify such small molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  17. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  18. Phosphorylation of native porcine olfactory binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Nagnan-Le Meillour, Patricia; Le Danvic, Chrystelle; Brimau, Fanny; Chemineau, Philippe; Michalski, Jean-Claude

    2009-07-01

    The identification of various isoforms of olfactory binding proteins is of major importance to elucidate their involvement in detection of pheromones and other odors. Here, we report the characterization of the phosphorylation of OBP (odorant binding protein) and Von Ebner's gland protein (VEG) from the pig, Sus scrofa. After labeling with specific antibodies raised against the three types of phosphorylation (Ser, Thr, Tyr), the phosphate-modified residues were mapped by using the beta-elimination followed by Michael addition of dithiothreitol (BEMAD) method. Eleven phosphorylation sites were localized in the pOBP sequence and nine sites in the VEG sequence. OBPs are secreted by Bowman's gland cells in the extracellular mucus lining the nasal cavity. After tracking the secretion pathway in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of these cells, we hypothesize that these proteins may be phosphorylated by ectokinases that remain to be characterized. The existence of such a regulatory mechanism theoretically increases the number of OBP variants, and it suggests a more specific role for OBPs in odorant coding than the one of odorant solubilizer and transporter.

  19. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  20. Protein kinase C alpha-dependent phosphorylation of Golgi proteins.

    PubMed

    Radau, B; Otto, A; Müller, E C; Westermann, P

    2000-07-01

    Golgi-enriched membranes were phosphorylated in order to understand the mechanism for protein kinase C (PKC) regulation of exocytic vesicle formation at the trans-Golgi network. Two of the main PKC substrates were identified as MARCKS and Mac-MARCKS by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometric sequencing. Annexin IV and profilin I, two other Golgi-associated proteins--although known as in vitro PKC substrates--were not phosphorylated in the Golgi-bound state.

  1. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Phosphorylation and Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Martin, Lisa A.; Hahn, Harvey S.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Klevitsky, Raisa; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Robbins., Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    The role of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation in cardiac physiology or pathophysiology is unclear. To investigate the status of cMyBP-C phosphorylation in vivo, we determined its phosphorylation state in stressed and unstressed mouse hearts. cMyBP-C phosphorylation is significantly decreased during the development of heart failure or pathologic hypertrophy. We then generated transgenic (TG) mice in which cMyBP-C’s phosphorylation sites were changed to nonphosphorylatable alanines (MyBP-CAllP−). A TG line showing ~40% replacement with MyBP-CAllP− showed no changes in morbidity or mortality but displayed depressed cardiac contractility, altered sarcomeric structure and upregulation of transcripts associated with a hypertrophic response. To explore the effect of complete replacement of endogenous cMyBP-C with MyBP-CAllP−, the mice were bred into the MyBP-C(t/t) background, in which less than 10% of normal levels of a truncated MyBP-C are present. Although MyBP-CAllP− was incorporated into the sarcomere and expressed at normal levels, the mutant protein could not rescue the MyBP-C(t/t) phenotype. The mice developed significant cardiac hypertrophy with myofibrillar disarray and fibrosis, similar to what was observed in the MyBP-C(t/t) animals. In contrast, when the MyBP-C(t/t) mice were bred to a TG line expressing normal MyBP-C (MyBP-CWT), the MyBP-C(t/t) phenotype was rescued. These data suggest that cMyBP-C phosphorylation is essential for normal cardiac function. PMID:16224063

  2. The Timing of Multiple Retrieval Events Can Alter GluR1 Phosphorylation and the Requirement for Protein Synthesis in Fear Memory Reconsolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarome, Timothy J.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Werner, Craig T.; Parsons, Ryan G.; Gafford, Georgette M.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that maintaining a fear memory after retrieval requires de novo protein synthesis. However, no study to date has examined how the temporal dynamics of repeated retrieval events affect this protein synthesis requirement. The present study varied the timing of a second retrieval of an established auditory fear memory…

  3. The Timing of Multiple Retrieval Events Can Alter GluR1 Phosphorylation and the Requirement for Protein Synthesis in Fear Memory Reconsolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarome, Timothy J.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Werner, Craig T.; Parsons, Ryan G.; Gafford, Georgette M.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that maintaining a fear memory after retrieval requires de novo protein synthesis. However, no study to date has examined how the temporal dynamics of repeated retrieval events affect this protein synthesis requirement. The present study varied the timing of a second retrieval of an established auditory fear memory…

  4. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  5. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  6. Survey of phosphorylation near drug binding sites in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and their effects

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle P.; Gifford, Kathleen M.; Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    While it is currently estimated that 40–50% of eukaryotic proteins are phosphorylated, little is known about the frequency and local effects of phosphorylation near pharmaceutical inhibitor binding sites. In this study, we investigated how frequently phosphorylation may affect the binding of drug inhibitors to target proteins. We examined the 453 non-redundant structures of soluble mammalian drug target proteins bound to inhibitors currently available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We cross-referenced these structures with phosphorylation data available from the PhosphoSitePlus database. 322/453 (71%) of drug targets have evidence of phosphorylation that has been validated by multiple methods or labs. For 132/453 (29%) of those, the phosphorylation site is within 12Å of the small molecule-binding site, where it would likely alter small molecule binding affinity. We propose a framework for distinguishing between drug-phosphorylation site interactions that are likely to alter the efficacy of drugs vs. those that are not. In addition we highlight examples of well-established drug targets, such as estrogen receptor alpha, for which phosphorylation may affect drug affinity and clinical efficacy. Our data suggest that phosphorylation may affect drug binding and efficacy for a significant fraction of drug target proteins. PMID:24833420

  7. Alterations of molecular and behavioral responses to cocaine by selective inhibition of Elk-1 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Antoine; Bouveyron, Nicolas; Kappes, Vincent; Pascoli, Vincent; Pagès, Christiane; Heck, Nicolas; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2011-10-05

    Activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway in the striatum is crucial for molecular adaptations and long-term behavioral alterations induced by cocaine. In response to cocaine, ERK controls the phosphorylation levels of both mitogen and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK-1), a nuclear kinase involved in histone H3 (Ser10) and cAMP response element binding protein phosphorylation, and Elk-1, a transcription factor involved in serum response element (SRE)-driven gene regulations. We recently characterized the phenotype of msk-1 knock-out mice in response to cocaine. Herein, we wanted to address the role of Elk-1 phosphorylation in cocaine-induced molecular, morphological, and behavioral responses. We used a cell-penetrating peptide, named TAT-DEF-Elk-1 (TDE), which corresponds to the DEF docking domain of Elk-1 toward ERK and inhibits Elk-1 phosphorylation induced by ERKs without modifying ERK or MSK-1 in vitro. The peptide was injected in vivo before cocaine administration in mice. Immunocytochemical, molecular, morphological, and behavioral studies were performed. The TDE inhibited Elk-1 and H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation induced by cocaine, sparing ERK and MSK-1 activation. Consequently, TDE altered cocaine-induced regulation of genes bearing SRE site(s) in their promoters, including c-fos, zif268, ΔFosB, and arc/arg3.1 (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein). In a chronic cocaine administration paradigm, TDE reversed cocaine-induced increase in dendritic spine density. Finally, the TDE delayed the establishment of cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization and conditioned-place preference. We conclude that Elk-1 phosphorylation downstream from ERK is a key molecular event involved in long-term neuronal and behavioral adaptations to cocaine.

  8. Analysis of Protein Glycosylation and Phosphorylation Using Liquid Phase Separation, Protein Microarray Technology, and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia; Patwa, Tasneem H.; Pal, Manoj; Qiu, Weilian; Lubman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Protein glycosylation and phosphorylation are very common posttranslational modifications. The alteration of these modifications in cancer cells is closely related to the onset and progression of cancer and other disease states. In this protocol, strategies for monitoring the changes in protein glycosylation and phosphorylation in serum or tissue cells on a global scale and specifically characterizing these alterations are included. The technique is based on lectin affinity enrichment for glycoproteins, all liquid-phase two-dimensional fractionation, protein microarray, and mass spectrometry technology. Proteins are separated based on pI in the first dimension using chromatofocusing (CF) or liquid isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by the second-dimension separation using nonporous silica RP-HPLC. Five lectins with different binding specificities to glycan structures are used for screening glycosylation patterns in human serum through a biotin–streptavidin system. Fluorescent phosphodyes and phosphospecific antibodies are employed to detect specific phosphorylated proteins in cell lines or human tissues. The purified proteins of interest are identified by peptide sequencing. Their modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation could be further characterized by mass-spectrometry-based approaches. These strategies can be used in biological samples for large-scale glycoproteome/phosphoproteome screening as well as for individual protein modification analysis. PMID:19241043

  9. Analysis of protein glycosylation and phosphorylation using liquid phase separation, protein microarray technology, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Patwa, Tasneem H; Pal, Manoj; Qiu, Weilian; Lubman, David M

    2009-01-01

    Protein glycosylation and phosphorylation are very common posttranslational modifications. The alteration of these modifications in cancer cells is closely related to the onset and progression of cancer and other disease states. In this protocol, strategies for monitoring the changes in protein glycosylation and phosphorylation in serum or tissue cells on a global scale and specifically characterizing these alterations are included. The technique is based on lectin affinity enrichment for glycoproteins, all liquid-phase two-dimensional fractionation, protein microarray, and mass spectrometry technology. Proteins are separated based on pI in the first dimension using chromatofocusing (CF) or liquid isoelectric focusing (IEF) followed by the second-dimension separation using nonporous silica RP-HPLC. Five lectins with different binding specificities to glycan structures are used for screening glycosylation patterns in human serum through a biotin streptavidin system. Fluorescent phosphodyes and phosphospecific antibodies are employed to detect specific phosphorylated proteins in cell lines or human tissues. The purified proteins of interest are identified by peptide sequencing. Their modifications including glycosylation and phosphorylation could be further characterized by mass-spectrometry-based approaches. These strategies can be used in biological samples for large-scale glycoproteome/phosphoproteome screening as well as for individual protein modification analysis.

  10. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials.

  11. Resolving Acetylated and Phosphorylated Proteins by Neutral Urea Triton-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis, NUT-PAGE

    PubMed Central

    Buehl, Christopher J.; Deng, Xiexiong; Liu, Mengyu; Hovde, Stacy; Xu, Xinjing; Kuo, Min-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Protein acetylation and phosphorylation can be key modifications that regulate both normal and pathological protein functions. Current gel systems used to analyze modified proteins require either expensive reagents or time–consuming second dimension electrophoresis. In this manuscript, we present a neutral pH gel system that allows the analysis of acetylated and phosphorylated proteins. This neutral pH urea Triton-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system, or NUT-PAGE, separates proteins based on their charge at pH 7 and generates discrete bands from each acetylated and phosphorylated species. In addition, the gel is composed of common and inexpensive laboratory reagents, and requires only a single dimension of electrophoresis. We are able to demonstrate the effectiveness of this system by analyzing phosphorylated species of an acidic protein, α-synuclein, and both acetylated and phosphorylated species of a basic protein, histone H3. NUT-PAGE thus provides a cost-effective alternative to resolving acetylated and phosphorylated proteins, and potentially proteins with other post-translational modifications that alter net charge. Method Summary Here we present a single-dimension neutral pH urea Triton-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (NUT-PAGE) system affording high-resolution separation of acetylated and phosphorylated proteins. PMID:25109292

  12. Phosphorylated tyrosine in the flagellum filament protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K.; Anderson, T.; Montie, T.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Purified flagella from two strains of {sup 32}P-labeled Pseudomonas aeruginosa were shown to be phosphorylated. This was confirmed by autoradiography of flagellin protein in polyacrylamide gels. Thin-layer electrophoresis and autoradiography of flagellin partial hydrolysates indicated that phosphotyrosine was the major phosphorylated amino acid. High-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis confirmed the presence of phosphotyrosine in flagellum filament protein. Preliminary data indicated that less than one tyrosine per subunit was phosphorylated. No evidence was found for phosphorylation of serine or threonine. A function related to tyrosine phosphorylation has not been determined.

  13. Protein kinase C phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase α1 Ser487

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Helen R.; Mancini, Sarah J.; Strembitska, Anastasiya; Jamal, Kunzah; Reihill, James A.; Palmer, Timothy M.; Gould, Gwyn W.; Salt, Ian P.

    2016-01-01

    The key metabolic regulator, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), is reported to be down-regulated in metabolic disorders, but the mechanisms are poorly characterised. Recent studies have identified phosphorylation of the AMPKα1/α2 catalytic subunit isoforms at Ser487/491, respectively, as an inhibitory regulation mechanism. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates AMPK and protein kinase B (Akt) in cultured human endothelial cells. As Akt has been demonstrated to be an AMPKα1 Ser487 kinase, the effect of VEGF on inhibitory AMPK phosphorylation in cultured primary human endothelial cells was examined. Stimulation of endothelial cells with VEGF rapidly increased AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation in an Akt-independent manner, without altering AMPKα2 Ser491 phosphorylation. In contrast, VEGF-stimulated AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and PKC activation using phorbol esters or overexpression of PKC-stimulated AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation. Purified PKC and Akt both phosphorylated AMPKα1 Ser487 in vitro with similar efficiency. PKC activation was associated with reduced AMPK activity, as inhibition of PKC increased AMPK activity and phorbol esters inhibited AMPK, an effect lost in cells expressing mutant AMPKα1 Ser487Ala. Consistent with a pathophysiological role for this modification, AMPKα1 Ser487 phosphorylation was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity in human muscle. These data indicate a novel regulatory role of PKC to inhibit AMPKα1 in human cells. As PKC activation is associated with insulin resistance and obesity, PKC may underlie the reduced AMPK activity reported in response to overnutrition in insulin-resistant metabolic and vascular tissues. PMID:27784766

  14. Phosphorylation-related modification at the dimer interface of 14-3-3ω dramatically alters monomer interaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Denison, Fiona C; Gökirmak, Tufan; Ferl, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are generally believed to function as dimers in a broad range of eukaryotic signaling pathways. The consequences of altering dimer stability are not fully understood. Phosphorylation at Ser58 in the dimer interface of mammalian 14-3-3 isoforms has been reported to destabilise dimers. An equivalent residue, Ser62, is present across most Arabidopsis isoforms but the effects of phosphorylation have not been studied in plants. Here, we assessed the effects of phosphorylation at the dimer interface of Arabidopsis 14-3-3ω. Protein kinase A phosphorylated 14-3-3ω at Ser62 and also at a previously unreported residue, Ser67, resulting in a monomer-sized band on native-PAGE. Phosphorylation at Ser62 alone, or with additional Ser67 phosphorylation, was investigated using phosphomimetic versions of 14-3-3ω. In electrophoretic and chromatographic analyses, these mutants showed mobilities intermediate between dimers and monomers. Mobility was increased by detergents, by reducing protein concentration, or by increasing pH or temperature. Urea gradient gels showed complex structural transitions associated with alterations of dimer stability, including a previously unreported 14-3-3 aggregation phenomenon. Overall, our analyses showed that dimer interface modifications such as phosphorylation reduce dimer stability, dramatically affecting the monomer-dimer equilibrium and denaturation trajectory. These findings may have dramatic implications for 14-3-3 structure and function in vivo.

  15. Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of nucleoporins and nuclear pore membrane protein Gp210.

    PubMed

    Favreau, C; Worman, H J; Wozniak, R W; Frappier, T; Courvalin, J C

    1996-06-18

    During mitosis in higher eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope membranes break down into distinct populations of vesicles and the proteins of the nuclear lamina and the nuclear pore complexes disperse in the cytoplasm. Since phosphorylation can alter protein-protein interactions and membrane traffic, we have examined the cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of nuclear pore complex proteins. Nonmembrane nucleoporins Nup153, Nup214, and Nup358 that are modified by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and recognized by a monoclonal antibody were phosphorylated throughout the cell cycle and hyperphosphorylated during M phase. Pore membrane glycoprotein gp210, that has a cytoplasmic, carboxyl-terminal domain facing the pore, was not phosphorylated in interphase but specifically phosphorylated in mitosis. Mutant and wild-type fusion proteins containing the cytoplasmic domain of gp210 were phosphorylated in vitro and their phosphopeptide maps compared to that of mitotic gp210. This analysis showed that Ser1880 of gp210 was phosphorylated in mitosis, possibly by cyclin B-p34cdc2 or a related kinase. Several nuclear pore complex proteins are therefore differentially phosphorylated during mitosis when pore complexes disassemble and reassemble.

  16. Protein phosphorylation and sodium conductance in nerve membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Schoffeniels, E; Dandrifosse, G

    1980-01-01

    High molecular weight proteins extracted from the walking nerves of the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) exhibit a cycle of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation that is influenced by neurotropic compounds and inorganic ions. The net phosphorylation state of the proteins is increased in the presence of K+ ions and decreased with Na+ ions. In the absence of Mg2+ there is no phosphorylation. Ca2+ ions at low concentrations are necessary for optimal phosphorylation. At high concentration (above 0.1 mM), Ca2+ ions are inhibitory. Neurotropic compounds generally inhibit the phosphorylation process. More specifically, tetrodotoxin and veratridine, depending on the ionic composition of the medium, have opposite effects on the phosphorylation process, a result in agreement with their known physiological action. It is suggested that the high molecular weight components thus identified are part of the sodium permeation sites and that the conductance state of those sites is controlled by a phosphorylation process. Images PMID:6928680

  17. Diazinon alters sperm chromatin structure in mice by phosphorylating nuclear protamines

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@mail.cinvestav.mx

    2005-01-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides, widely used in agriculture and pest control, are associated with male reproductive effects, including sperm chromatin alterations, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. The main toxic action of OP is related to phosphorylation of proteins. Chemical alterations in sperm nuclear proteins (protamines), which pack DNA during the last steps of spermatogenesis, contribute to male reproductive toxicity. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the ability of diazinon (DZN), an OP compound, to alter sperm chromatin by phosphorylating nuclear protamines. Mice were injected with a single dose of DZN (8.12 mg/kg, i.p.), and killed 8 and 15 days after treatment. Quality of sperm from epididymis and vas deferens was evaluated through standard methods and chromatin condensation by flow cytometry (DNA Fragmented Index parameters: DFI and DFI%) and fluorescence microscopy using chromomycin-A{sub 3} (CMA{sub 3}). Increases in DFI (15%), DFI% (4.5-fold), and CMA{sub 3} (2-fold) were observed only at 8 days post-treatment, indicating an alteration in sperm chromatin condensation and DNA damage during late spermatid differentiation. In addition, an increase of phosphorous content (approximately 50%) in protamines, especially in the phosphoserine content (approximately 73%), was found at 8 days post-treatment. Sperm viability, motility, and morphology showed significant alterations at this time. These data strongly suggest that spermatozoa exposed during the late steps of maturation were the targets of DZN exposure. The correlation observed between the phosphorous content in nuclear protamines with DFI%, DFI, and CMA{sub 3} provides evidence that phosphorylation of nuclear protamines is involved in the OP effects on sperm chromatin.

  18. Diazinon alters sperm chromatin structure in mice by phosphorylating nuclear protamines.

    PubMed

    Piña-Guzmán, B; Solís-Heredia, M J; Quintanilla-Vega, B

    2005-01-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides, widely used in agriculture and pest control, are associated with male reproductive effects, including sperm chromatin alterations, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. The main toxic action of OP is related to phosphorylation of proteins. Chemical alterations in sperm nuclear proteins (protamines), which pack DNA during the last steps of spermatogenesis, contribute to male reproductive toxicity. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the ability of diazinon (DZN), an OP compound, to alter sperm chromatin by phosphorylating nuclear protamines. Mice were injected with a single dose of DZN (8.12 mg/kg, i.p.), and killed 8 and 15 days after treatment. Quality of sperm from epididymis and vas deferens was evaluated through standard methods and chromatin condensation by flow cytometry (DNA Fragmented Index parameters: DFI and DFI%) and fluorescence microscopy using chromomycin-A(3) (CMA(3)). Increases in DFI (15%), DFI% (4.5-fold), and CMA(3) (2-fold) were observed only at 8 days post-treatment, indicating an alteration in sperm chromatin condensation and DNA damage during late spermatid differentiation. In addition, an increase of phosphorous content (approximately 50%) in protamines, especially in the phosphoserine content (approximately 73%), was found at 8 days post-treatment. Sperm viability, motility, and morphology showed significant alterations at this time. These data strongly suggest that spermatozoa exposed during the late steps of maturation were the targets of DZN exposure. The correlation observed between the phosphorous content in nuclear protamines with DFI%, DFI, and CMA(3) provides evidence that phosphorylation of nuclear protamines is involved in the OP effects on sperm chromatin.

  19. Calcium-Regulated in Vivo Protein Phosphorylation in Zea mays L. Root Tips 1

    PubMed Central

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Friedmann, Michael; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(β-aminoethyl ether)-N-N′-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:11539029

  20. Cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complex protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Covian, Raul

    2012-01-01

    It has become appreciated over the last several years that protein phosphorylation within the cardiac mitochondrial matrix and respiratory complexes is extensive. Given the importance of oxidative phosphorylation and the balance of energy metabolism in the heart, the potential regulatory effect of these classical signaling events on mitochondrial function is of interest. However, the functional impact of protein phosphorylation and the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for it are relatively unknown. Exceptions include the well-characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase regulatory system. The first task of this review is to update the current status of protein phosphorylation detection primarily in the matrix and evaluate evidence linking these events with enzymatic function or protein processing. To manage the scope of this effort, we have focused on the pathways involved in energy metabolism. The high sensitivity of modern methods of detecting protein phosphorylation and the low specificity of many kinases suggests that detection of protein phosphorylation sites without information on the mole fraction of phosphorylation is difficult to interpret, especially in metabolic enzymes, and is likely irrelevant to function. However, several systems including protein translocation, adenine nucleotide translocase, cytochrome c, and complex IV protein phosphorylation have been well correlated with enzymatic function along with the classical dehydrogenase systems. The second task is to review the current understanding of the kinase/phosphatase system within the matrix. Though it is clear that protein phosphorylation occurs within the matrix, based on 32P incorporation and quantitative mass spectrometry measures, the kinase/phosphatase system responsible for this process is ill-defined. An argument is presented that remnants of the much more labile bacterial protein phosphoryl transfer system may be present in the matrix and that the

  1. Removal of Potential Phosphorylation Sites does not Alter Creatine Transporter Response to PKC or Substrate Availability.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Lucia; Darrabie, Marcus D; Mishra, Rajashree; Jacobs, Danny O

    2015-01-01

    Creatine, Phosphocreatine, and creatine kinases, constitute an energy shuttle that links ATP production in mitochondria with cellular consumption sites. Myocytes and neurons cannot synthesize creatine and depend on uptake across the cell membrane by a specialized transporter to maintain intracellular creatine levels. Although recent studies have improved our understanding of creatine transport in cardiomyocytes, the structural elements underlying the creatine transporter protein regulation and the relevant intracellular signaling processes are unknown. The effects of pharmacological activation of kinases or phosphatases on creatine transport in cardiomyocytes in culture were evaluated. Putative phosphorylation sites in the creatine transporter protein were identified by bioinformatics analyses, and ablated using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutant transporter function and their responses to pharmacological PKC activation or changes in creatine availability in the extracellular environment, were evaluated. PKC activation decreases creatine transport in cardiomyocytes in culture. Elimination of high probability potential phosphorylation sites did not abrogate responses to PKC activation or substrate availability. Modulation of creatine transport in cardiomyocytes is a complex process where phosphorylation at predicted sites in the creatine transporter protein does not significantly alter activity. Instead, non-classical structural elements in the creatine transporter and/or interactions with regulatory subunits may modulate its activity. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  3. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  4. Protein phosphorylation in isolated human adipocytes - Adrenergic control of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, R.M. Columbia Univ College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY ); Paul, S.; Browning, M.D.; Leibel, R.L.; Hirsch, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of adrenergic agents on protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes was examined. Freshly isolated human fat cells were incubated with {sup 32}PO{sub 4} in order to label intracellular ATP, then treated with a variety of adrenergic and other pharmacologic agents. Treatment with the {beta}-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol led to a significant increase in phosphate content of at least five protein bands (M{sub r} 52, 53, 63, 67, 84 kDa). The increase in phosphorylation was partially inhibited by the {alpha}-2 agonist clonidine. Epinephrine, a combined {alpha} and {beta} agonist, was less effective at increasing phosphate content of the proteins than was isoproterenol. Neither insulin nor the {alpha}-1 agonist phenylephrine had any discernible effect on the pattern of protein phosphorylation. The 84 kDa phosphorylated peptide band appears to contain hormone-sensitive lipase, a key enzyme in the lipolytic pathway which is activated by phosphorylation. These results are somewhat different than previously reported results for rat adipocytes, and represent the first report of overall pattern and adrenergic modulation of protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes.

  5. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    The conditions present during enamel crystallite development change dramatically as a function of time, including the pH, protein concentration, surface type and ionic strength. In this work, we investigate the role that two of these changing conditions, pH and ionic strength, have in modulating the interaction of amelogenin, LRAP, with hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling and chemical shift data, we investigate the structure, orientation and dynamics of three regions in the N-terminus of the protein, L15 to V19, V19 to L23 and K24 to S28. These regions are also near the only phosphorylated residue in the protein, pS16, therefore, changes in the LRAP-HAP interaction as a function of phosphorylation (LRAP(-P) vs. LRAP(+P)) were also investigated. All of the regions and conditions studies for the surface immobilized proteins showed restricted motion, with more mobility under all conditions for L15(+P) and K24(-P). The structure and orientation of the LRAP-HAP interaction in the N-terminus of the phosphorylated protein is very stable to changing solution conditions. From REDOR dipolar recoupling data, the structure and orientation in the region L15V19(+P) did not change significantly as a function of pH or ionic strength. The structure and orientation of the region V19L23(+P) were also stable to changes in pH, with the only significant change observed at high ionic strength, where the region becomes extended, suggesting this may be an important region in regulating mineral development. Chemical shift studies also suggest minimal changes in all three regions studied for both LRAP(-P) and LRAP(+P) as a function of pH or ionic strength. Phosphorylation also alters the LRAP-HAP interface. All of the three residues investigated (L15, V19, and K24) are closer to the surface in LRAP(+P), but K24S28 also changes structure as a result of phosphorylation, from a random coil to a largely helical structure, and V19L23 becomes more extended at high ionic

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  7. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins.

  8. Regulation of Rho proteins by phosphorylation in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Loirand, Gervaise; Guilluy, Christophe; Pacaud, Pierre

    2006-08-01

    The small G protein Rho signaling pathways are recognized as major regulators of cardiovascular functions, and activation of Rho proteins appears to be a common component for the pathogenesis of hypertension and vascular proliferative disorders. Rho proteins are tightly regulated, and recent evidence suggests that modulation of Rho protein signaling by phosphorylation of Rho proteins provides an additional simple mechanism for coordinating Rho protein functions. This regulation by phosphorylation is particularly important in the arterial wall, where RhoA protein expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells is controlled by the endothelium through the nitric oxide/cGMP-dependent kinase pathway.

  9. Missense Variants of Uncertain Significance (VUS) Altering the Phosphorylation Patterns of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Tram, Eric; Savas, Sevtap; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are responsible for a large proportion of breast-ovarian cancer families. Protein-truncating mutations have been effectively used in the clinical management of familial breast cancer due to their deleterious impact on protein function. However, the majority of missense variants identified throughout the genes continue to pose an obstacle for predictive informative testing due to low frequency and lack of information on how they affect BRCA1/2 function. Phosphorylation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 play an important role in their function as regulators of DNA repair, transcription and cell cycle in response to DNA damage but whether missense variants of uncertain significance (VUS) are able to disrupt this important process is not known. Here we employed a novel approach using NetworKIN which predicts in vivo kinase-substrate relationship, and evolutionary conservation algorithms SIFT, PolyPhen and Align-GVGD. We evaluated whether 191 BRCA1 and 43 BRCA2 VUS from the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) database can functionally alter the consensus phosphorylation motifs and abolish kinase recognition and binding to sites known to be phosphorylated in vivo. Our results show that 13.09% (25/191) BRCA1 and 13.95% (6/43) BRCA2 VUS altered the phosphorylation of BRCA1 and BRCA2. We highlight six BRCA1 (K309T, S632N, S1143F, Q1144H, Q1281P, S1542C) and three BRCA2 (S196I, T207A, P3292L) VUS as potentially clinically significant. These occurred rarely (n<2 in BIC), mutated evolutionarily conserved residues and abolished kinase binding to motifs established in the literature involved in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, transcription or response to DNA damage. Additionally in vivo phosphorylation sites identified via through-put methods are also affected by VUS and are attractive targets for studying their biological and functional significance. We propose that rare VUS affecting phosphorylation may be a novel and important mechanism for which BRCA1 and

  10. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  11. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. © FEMS 2016.

  12. The role of the VQIVYK peptide in tau protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-María, Ismael; Tortosa, Elena; Cuadros, Raquel; Del Valle, Mercedes; Hernández, Felix; Moreno, Francisco J; Avila, Jesús

    2007-11-01

    Although it remains unclear whether they are related to one another, tau aggregation and phosphorylation are the main pathological hallmarks of the neuronal disorders known as tauopathies. The capacity to aggregate is impaired in a variant of the tau 3R isoform that lacks residues 306-311 (nomenclature for the largest CNS tau isoform) and hence, we have taken advantage of this feature to study how phosphorylation and aggregation may be related as well as the role of this six amino acid peptide (VQIVYK). Through these analyses, we found that the phosphorylation of the tau variant was higher than that of the complete tau protein and that not only the deletion of these residues, but also the interaction of these residues, in tau 3R, with thioflavin-S augmented tau phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, the binding of the peptide containing the residues 306-311 to the whole tau protein provoked an increase in tau phosphorylation. This observation could be physiologically relevant as may suggest that tau-tau interactions, through those residues, facilitate tau phosphorylation. In summary, our data indicate that deletion of residues VQIVYK, in tau protein produces an increase in tau phosphorylation, without tau aggregation, because the VQIVYK peptide, that favors aggregation, is missing. On the other hand, when the whole tau protein interacts with thioflavin-S or the peptide VQIVYK, an increase in both aggregation and phosphorylation occurs.

  13. Phosphorylation of human hnRNP protein A1 abrogates in vitro strand annealing activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cobianchi, F; Calvio, C; Stoppini, M; Buvoli, M; Riva, S

    1993-01-01

    In HeLa cells metabolically labeled in vivo with [32P] orthophosphate in the presence of okadaic acid the concentration of phosphorylated A1 protein was increased significantly as compared to controls. Purified recombinant hnRNP protein A1 served as an excellent substrate in vitro for the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and for casein kinase II (CKII). Thin layer electrophoresis of A1 acid hydrolysates showed the protein to be phosphorylated exclusively on serine residue by both kinases. V8 phosphopeptide maps revealed that the target site(s) of in vitro phosphorylation are located in the C-terminal region of A1. Phosphoamino acid sequence analysis and site directed mutagenesis identified Ser 199 as the sole phosphoamino acid in the protein phosphorylated by PKA. Phosphorylation introduced by PKA resulted in the suppression of the ability of protein A1 to promote strand annealing in vitro, without any detectable effect on its nucleic acid binding capacity. This finding indicates that phosphorylation of a single serine residue in the C-terminal domain may significantly alter the properties of protein A1. Images PMID:8451194

  14. Signal processing by protein tyrosine phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification controlling many biological processes. Most phosphorylation occurs on serine and threonine, and to a less extend on tyrosine (Tyr). In animals, Tyr phosphorylation is crucial for the regulation of many responses such as growth or differentiation. Only recently with the development of mass spectrometry, it has been reported that Tyr phosphorylation is as important in plants as in animals. The genes encoding protein Tyr kinases and protein Tyr phosphatases have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Putative substrates of these enzymes, and thus Tyr-phosphorylated proteins have been reported by proteomic studies based on accurate mass spectrometry analysis of the phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins. Biochemical approaches, pharmacology and genetic manipulations have indicated that responses to stress and developmental processes involve changes in protein Tyr phosphorylation. The aim of this review is to present an update on Tyr phosphorylation in plants in order to better assess the role of this post-translational modification in plant physiology. PMID:21628997

  15. Enrichment of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by selective precipitation methods.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Matthias; Bonn, Günther K

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications involved in the regulation of cellular processes. Fundamental understanding of biological processes requires appropriate bioanalytical methods for selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides and proteins. Most of the commonly applied enrichment approaches include chromatographic materials including Fe(3+)-immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography or metal oxides. In the last years, the introduction of several non-chromatographic isolation technologies has increasingly attracted the interest of many scientists. Such approaches are based on the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by applying various metal cations. The excellent performance of precipitation-based enrichment methods can be explained by the absence of any stationary phase, resin or sorbent, which usually leads to unspecific binding. This review provides an overview of recently published methods for the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins.

  16. Incorporation of Phosphorylated Tyrosine into Proteins: In Vitro Translation and Study of Phosphorylated IKB-α and its Interaction with NF-ΚB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengxi; Maini, Rumit; Bai, Xiaoguang; Nangreave, Ryan C; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-09-12

    Phosphorylated proteins play important roles in the regulation of many different cell networks. However, unlike the preparation of proteins containing unmodified proteinogenic amino acids, which can be altered readily by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in vitro and in vivo, the preparation of proteins phosphorylated at predetermined sites cannot be done easily and in acceptable yields. To enable the synthesis of phosphorylated proteins for in vitro studies, we have explored the use of phosphorylated amino acids in which the phosphate moiety bears a chemical protecting group, thus eliminating the negative charges which have been shown to have a negative effect on protein translation. Bis-o-nitrobenzyl protection of tyrosine phosphate enabled its incorporation into DHFR and IΚB-α using wild-type ribosomes, and the elaborated proteins could subsequently be deprotected by photolysis. Also investigated in parallel was the reengineering of the 23S ribosomal RNA of E. coli, guided by the use of a phosphorylated puromycin, to identify modified ribosomes capable of incorporating unprotected phosphotyrosine into proteins from a phosphotyrosyl-tRNACUA by UAG codon suppression during in vitro translation. Selection of a library of modified ribosomal clones with phosphorylated puromycin identified six modified ribosome variants having mutations in nucleotides 2600-2605 of 23S rRNA; these had enhanced sensitivity to the phosphorylated puromycin. The six clones demonstrated some sequence homology in the region 2600-2605 and incorporated unprotected phosphotyrosine into IΚB-α using a modified gene having a TAG codon in the position corresponding to amino acid 42 of the protein. The purified phosphorylated protein bound to a phosphotyrosine specific antibody and permitted NF-ΚB binding to a DNA duplex sequence corresponding to its binding site in the IL-2 gene promoter. Unexpectedly, phosphorylated IΚB-α also mediated the exchange of exogenous DNA into an NF

  17. Phosphorylation of the Goodpasture antigen by type A protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Revert, F; Penadés, J R; Plana, M; Bernal, D; Johansson, C; Itarte, E; Cervera, J; Wieslander, J; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1995-06-02

    Collagen IV is the major component of basement membranes. The human alpha 3 chain of collagen IV contains an antigenic domain called the Goodpasture antigen that is the target for the circulating immunopathogenic antibodies present in patients with Goodpasture syndrome. Characteristically, the gene region encoding the Goodpasture antigen generates multiple alternative products that retain the antigen amino-terminal region with a five-residue motif (KRGDS). The serine therein appears to be the major in vitro cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site in the isolated antigen and can be phosphorylated in vitro by two protein kinases of approximately 50 and 41 kDa associated with human kidney plasma membrane, suggesting that it can also be phosphorylated in vivo. Consistent with this, the Goodpasture antigen is isolated from human kidney in phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms and only the non-phosphorylated form is susceptible to phosphorylation in vitro. Since this motif is exclusive to the human alpha 3(IV) chain and includes the RGD cell adhesion motif, its phosphorylation might play a role in pathogenesis and influence cell attachment to basement membrane.

  18. Altered dopamine transporter function and phosphorylation following chronic cocaine self-administration and extinction in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Balasubramaniam, Annamalai; See, Ronald E; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D

    2010-01-15

    Cocaine binds with the dopamine transporter (DAT), an effect that has been extensively implicated in its reinforcing effects. However, persisting adaptations in DAT regulation after cocaine self-administration have not been extensively investigated. Here, we determined the changes in molecular mechanisms of DAT regulation in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of rats with a history of cocaine self-administration, followed by 3weeks of withdrawal under extinction conditions (i.e., no cocaine available). DA uptake was significantly higher in the CPu of cocaine-experienced animals as compared to saline-yoked controls. DAT V(max) was elevated in the CPu without changes in apparent affinity for DA. In spite of elevated CPu DAT activity, total and surface DAT density and DAT-PP2Ac (protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit) interaction remained unaltered, although p-Ser- DAT phosphorylation was elevated. In contrast to the CPu, there were no differences between cocaine and saline rats in the levels of DA uptake, DAT V(max) and K(m) values, total and surface DAT, p-Ser-DAT phosphorylation, or DAT-PP2Ac interactions in the NAcc. These results show that chronic cocaine self-administration leads to lasting, regionally specific alterations in striatal DA uptake and DAT-Ser phosphorylation. Such changes may be related to habitual patterns of cocaine-seeking observed during relapse. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid changes in plasma membrane protein phosphorylation during initiation of cell wall digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Blowers, D.P.; Boss, W.F.; Trewavas, A.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M{sub r} 22,000. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic {sup 32}P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselas preparation was required for the observed responses.

  20. Rapid Changes in Plasma Membrane Protein Phosphorylation during Initiation of Cell Wall Digestion 1

    PubMed Central

    Blowers, David P.; Boss, Wendy F.; Trewavas, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with [γ-32P]ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of Mr 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of Mr 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at Mr 22,000. These effects appeared not to be due to nonspecific protease activity and neither in vivo nor in vitro exposure to driselase caused a significant loss of Coomassie blue-staining bands on the gels of the isolated plasma membranes. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic 32P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselase preparation was required for the observed responses. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16665936

  1. Rapid Changes in Plasma Membrane Protein Phosphorylation during Initiation of Cell Wall Digestion.

    PubMed

    Blowers, D P; Boss, W F; Trewavas, A J

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with [gamma-(32)P]ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M(r) 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M(r) 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M(r) 22,000. These effects appeared not to be due to nonspecific protease activity and neither in vivo nor in vitro exposure to driselase caused a significant loss of Coomassie blue-staining bands on the gels of the isolated plasma membranes. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic (32)P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselase preparation was required for the observed responses.

  2. Phosphorylation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory subunit modulates PKA-AKAP interaction, substrate phosphorylation, and calcium signaling in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Manni, Sabrina; Mauban, Joseph H; Ward, Christopher W; Bond, Meredith

    2008-08-29

    Subcellular compartmentalization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by protein kinase A-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) facilitates local protein phosphorylation. However, little is known about how PKA targeting to AKAPs is regulated in the intact cell. PKA binds to an amphipathic helical region of AKAPs via an N-terminal domain of the regulatory subunit. In vitro studies showed that autophosphorylation of type II regulatory subunit (RII) can alter its affinity for AKAPs and the catalytic subunit (PKA(cat)). We now investigate whether phosphorylation of serine 96 on RII regulates PKA targeting to AKAPs, downstream substrate phosphorylation and calcium cycling in primary cultured cardiomyocytes. We demonstrated that, whereas there is basal phosphorylation of RII subunits, persistent maximal activation of PKA results in a phosphatase-dependent loss of RII phosphorylation. To investigate the functional effects of RII phosphorylation, we constructed adenoviral vectors incorporating mutants which mimic phosphorylated (RIIS96D), nonphosphorylated (RIIS96A) RII, or wild-type (WT) RII and performed adenoviral infection of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that more AKAP15/18 was pulled down by the phosphomimic, RIIS96D, than RIIS96A. Phosphorylation of phospholamban and ryanodine receptor was significantly increased in cells expressing RIIS96D versus RIIS96A. Expression of recombinant RII constructs showed significant effects on cytosolic calcium transients. We propose a model illustrating a central role of RII phosphorylation in the regulation of local PKA activity. We conclude that RII phosphorylation regulates PKA-dependent substrate phosphorylation and may have significant implications for modulation of cardiac function.

  3. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  4. Protein Phosphorylation during Coconut Zygotic Embryo Development1

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Oropeza, Carlos; Hernández-Sotomayor, S.M. Teresa

    1998-01-01

    Evidence was obtained on the occurrence of protein threonine, serine, and tyrosine (Tyr) kinases in developing coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) zygotic embryos, based on in vitro phosphorylation of proteins in the presence of [γ-32P]ATP, alkaline treatment, and thin-layer chromatography analysis, which showed the presence of [32P]phosphoserine, [32P]phosphothreonine, and [32P]phosphotyrosine in [32P]-labeled protein hydrolyzates. Tyr kinase activity was further confirmed in extracts of embryos at different stages of development using antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies and the synthetic peptide derived from the amino acid sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site in pp60src (RR-SRC), which is specific for Tyr kinases. Anti-phosphotyrosine western blotting revealed a changing profile of Tyr-phosphorylated proteins during embryo development. Tyr kinase activity, as assayed using RR-SRC, also changed during embryo development, showing two peaks of activity, one during early and another during late embryo development. In addition, the use of genistein, a Tyr kinase inhibitor, diminished the ability of extracts to phosphorylate RR-SRC. Results presented here show the occurrence of threonine, serine, and Tyr kinases in developing coconut zygotic embryos, and suggest that protein phosphorylation, and the possible inference of Tyr phosphorylation in particular, may play a role in the coordination of the development of embryos in this species. PMID:9733545

  5. Phosphorylation sites in human erythrocyte band 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Yannoukakos, D; Vasseur, C; Piau, J P; Wajcman, H; Bursaux, E

    1991-01-30

    The human red cell anion-exchanger, band 3 protein, is one of the main phosphorylated proteins of the erythrocyte membrane. Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that ATP-depletion of the red blood cell decreased the anion-exchange rate, suggesting that band 3 protein phosphorylation could be involved in the regulation of anion transport function (Bursaux et al. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 777, 253-260). Phosphorylation occurs mainly on the cytoplasmic domain of the protein and the major site of phosphorylation was assigned to tyrosine-8 (Dekowski et al. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 2750-2753). This site being very far from the integral, anion-exchanger domain, the aim of the present study was to determine whether phosphorylation sites exist in the integral domain. The phosphorylation reaction was carried out on isolated membranes in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and phosphorylated band 3 protein was then isolated. Both the cytoplasmic and the membrane spanning domains were purified. The predominant phosphorylation sites were found on the cytoplasmic domain. RP-HPLC analyses of the tryptic peptides of whole band 3 protein, and of the isolated cytoplasmic and membrane-spanning domains allowed for the precise localization of the phosphorylated residues. 80% of the label was found in the N-terminal tryptic peptide (T-1), (residues 1-56). In this region, all the residues susceptible to phosphorylation were labeled but in varying proportion. Under our conditions, the most active membrane kinase was a tyrosine kinase, activated preferentially by Mn2+ but also by Mg2+. Tyrosine-8 was the main phosphate acceptor residue (50-70%) of the protein, tyrosine-21 and tyrosine-46 residues were also phosphorylated but to a much lesser extent. The main targets of membrane casein kinase, preferentially activated by Mg2+, were serine-29, serine-50, and threonine(s)-39, -42, -44, -48, -49, -54 residue(s) located in the T-1 peptide. A tyrosine phosphatase activity was

  6. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  7. ERM protein moesin is phosphorylated by advanced glycation end products and modulates endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaohua; Wang, Lingjun; Chen, Bo; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jiping; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Ping; Huang, Xuliang; Huang, Qiaobing

    2009-07-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulated in different pathological conditions have the potent capacity to alter cellular properties that include endothelial structural and functional regulations. The disruption of endothelial barrier integrity may contribute to AGE-induced microangiopathy and macrovasculopathy. Previous studies have shown that AGEs induced the rearrangement of actin and subsequent hyperpermeability in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanisms involved in this AGE-evoked EC malfunction are not well understood. This study directly evaluated the involvement of moesin phosphorylation in AGE-induced alterations and the effects of the RhoA and p38 MAPK pathways on this process. Using immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs (HMVECs), we first confirmed that the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein moesin is required in AGE-induced F-actin rearrangement and hyperpermeability responses in ECs by knockdown of moesin protein expression with small interfering RNA. We then detected AGE-induced moesin phosphorylation by Western blot analysis. The mechanisms involved in moesin phosphorylation were analyzed by blocking AGE receptor binding and inhibiting Rho and MAPK pathways. AGE-treated HMVECs exhibited time- and dose-dependent increases in the Thr(558) phosphorylation of moesin. The increased moesin phosphorylation was attenuated by preadministrations of AGE receptor antibody, Rho kinase (ROCK), or p38 inhibitor. Suppression of p38 activation via the expression of dominant negative mutants with Ad.MKK6b or Ad.p38alpha also decreased moesin phosphorylation. The activation of the p38 pathway by transfection of HMVECs with an adenoviral construct of dominant active MKK6b resulted in moesin phosphorylation. These results suggest a critical role of moesin phosphorylation in AGE-induced EC functional and morphological regulations. Activation of the ROCK and p38 pathways is required in moesin phosphorylation.

  8. Genetic Manipulation of Neurofilament Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maria R; Villalón, Eric; Garcia, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Neurofilament biology is important to understanding structural properties of axons, such as establishment of axonal diameter by radial growth. In order to study the function of neurofilaments, a series of genetically modified mice have been generated. Here, we describe a brief history of genetic modifications used to study neurofilaments, as well as an overview of the steps required to generate a gene-targeted mouse. In addition, we describe steps utilized to analyze neurofilament phosphorylation status using immunoblotting. Taken together, these provide comprehensive analysis of neurofilament function in vivo, which can be applied to many systems.

  9. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  10. Phosphorylation of the transit sequence of chloroplast precursor proteins.

    PubMed

    Waegemann, K; Soll, J

    1996-03-15

    A protein kinase was located in the cytosol of pea mesophyll cells. The protein kinase phosphorylates, in an ATP-dependent manner, chloroplast-destined precursor proteins but not precursor proteins, which are located to plant mitochondria or plant peroxisomes. The phosphorylation occurs on either serine or threonine residues, depending on the precursor protein used. We demonstrate the specific phosphorylation of the precursor forms of the chloroplast stroma proteins ferredoxin (preFd), small subunit of ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase (preSSU), the thylakoid localized light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (preLHCP), and the thylakoid lumen-localized proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex of 23 kDa (preOE23) and 33 kDa (preOE33). In the case of thylakoid lumen proteins which possess bipartite transit sequences, the phosphorylation occurs within the stroma-targeting domain. By using single amino acid substitution within the presequences of preSSU, preOE23, and preOE33, we were able to tentatively identify a consensus motif for the precursor protein protein kinase. This motif is (P/G)X(n)(R/K)X(n)(S/T)X(n) (S*/T*), were n = 0-3 amino acids spacer and S*/T* represents the phosphate acceptor. The precursor protein protein kinase is present only in plant extracts, e.g. wheat germ and pea, but not in a reticulocyte lysate. Protein import experiments into chloroplasts revealed that phosphorylated preSSU binds to the organelles, but dephosphorylation seems required to complete the translocation process and to obtain complete import. These results suggest that a precursor protein protein phosphatase is involved in chloroplast import and represents a so far unidentified component of the import machinery. In contrast to sucrose synthase, a cytosolic marker protein, the precursor protein protein kinase seems to adhere partially to the chloroplast surface. A phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle of chloroplast-destined precursor proteins might represent one step

  11. The regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, S C; Woods, A; Jones, N A; Davison, M D; Carling, D

    2000-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade is activated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio within the cell. AMPK is regulated allosterically by AMP and by reversible phosphorylation. Threonine-172 within the catalytic subunit (alpha) of AMPK (Thr(172)) was identified as the major site phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase kinase (AMPKK) in vitro. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to study the role of phosphorylation of Thr(172) on AMPK activity. Mutation of Thr(172) to an aspartic acid residue (T172D) in either alpha1 or alpha2 resulted in a kinase complex with approx. 50% the activity of the corresponding wild-type complex. The activity of wild-type AMPK decreased by greater than 90% following treatment with protein phosphatases, whereas the activity of the T172D mutant complex fell by only 10-15%. Mutation of Thr(172) to an alanine residue (T172A) almost completely abolished kinase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation of Thr(172) accounts for most of the activation by AMPKK, but that other sites are involved. In support of this we have shown that AMPKK phosphorylates at least two other sites on the alpha subunit and one site on the beta subunit. Furthermore, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of Thr(172) may be involved in the sensitivity of the AMPK complex to AMP. PMID:10642499

  12. Synthetic phosphorylation of p38α recapitulates protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chooi, K Phin; Galan, Sébastien R G; Raj, Ritu; McCullagh, James; Mohammed, Shabaz; Jones, Lyn H; Davis, Benjamin G

    2014-02-05

    Through a "tag-and-modify" protein chemical modification strategy, we site-selectively phosphorylated the activation loop of protein kinase p38α. Phosphorylation at natural (180) and unnatural (172) sites created two pure phospho-forms. p38α bearing only a single phosphocysteine (pCys) as a mimic of pThr at 180 was sufficient to switch the kinase to an active state, capable of processing natural protein substrate ATF2; 172 site phosphorylation did not. In this way, we chemically recapitulated triggering of a relevant segment of the MAPK-signaling pathway in vitro. This allowed detailed kinetic analysis of global and stoichiometric phosphorylation events catalyzed by p38α and revealed that site 180 is a sufficient activator alone and engenders dominant mono-phosphorylation activity. Moreover, a survey of kinase inhibition using inhibitors with different (Type I/II) modes (including therapeutically relevant) revealed unambiguously that Type II inhibitors inhibit phosphorylated p38α and allowed discovery of a predictive kinetic analysis based on cooperativity to distinguish Type I vs II.

  13. Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation in the Nervous System: From Regulation to Function

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Anne; Valjent, Emmanuel; Puighermanal, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) about four decades ago, much effort has been made to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of this post-translational modification. In the field of neuroscience, rpS6 phosphorylation is commonly used as a readout of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling activation or as a marker for neuronal activity. Nevertheless, its biological role in neurons still remains puzzling. Here we review the pharmacological and physiological stimuli regulating this modification in the nervous system as well as the pathways that transduce these signals into rpS6 phosphorylation. Altered rpS6 phosphorylation observed in various genetic and pathophysiological mouse models is also discussed. Finally, we examine the current state of knowledge on the physiological role of this post-translational modification and highlight the questions that remain to be addressed. PMID:26733799

  14. Phosphorylation of proteins during human myometrial contractions: A phosphoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Claire A; López Bernal, Andrés

    2017-01-22

    Phasic myometrial contractility is a key component of human parturition and the contractions are driven by reversible phosphorylation of myosin light chains catalyzed by the calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MYLK). Other yet unknown phosphorylation or de-phosphorylation events may contribute to myometrial contraction and relaxation. In this study we have performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis of human myometrial tissue using tandem mass tagging to detect changes in the phosphorylation status of individual myometrial proteins during spontaneous and oxytocin-driven phasic contractions. We were able to detect 22 individual phosphopeptides whose relative ratio changed (fold > 2 or < 0.5) in response to spontaneous or oxytocin-stimulated contraction. The most significant changes in phosphorylation were to MYLK on serine 1760, a site associated with reductions in calmodulin binding and subsequent kinase activity. Phosphorylated MYLK (ser1760) increased significantly during spontaneous (9.83 ± 3.27 fold, P < 0.05) and oxytocin -induced (18.56 ± 8.18 fold, P < 0.01) contractions and we were able to validate these data using immunoblotting. Pathway analysis suggested additional proteins involved in calcium signalling, cGMP-PRKG signalling, adrenergic signalling and oxytocin signalling were also phosphorylated during contractions. This study demonstrates that a global phosphoproteomic analysis of myometrial tissue is a sensitive approach to detect changes in the phosphorylation of proteins during myometrial contractions, and provides a platform for further validation of these changes and for identification of their functional significance.

  15. Puzzling over protein cysteine phosphorylation--assessment of proteomic tools for S-phosphorylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Buchowiecka, A K

    2014-09-07

    Cysteine phosphorylation has recently been discovered in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, and is thought to play crucial roles in signaling and regulation of cellular responses. This article explores the topics of chemical stability of this type of structural modification and the resulting issues regarding affinity enrichment of S-phosphopeptides and their mass spectrometry-based detection in the course of general proteomics studies. Together, this work suggests that the current advances in phosphoproteomic methodologies provide adequate tools for investigating protein cysteine phosphorylation and appear to be immediately available for practical implementation. The article provides useful information necessary for designing experiments in the emerging cysteine phosphoproteomics. The examples of methodological proposals for S-linked phosphorylation detection are included herein in order to stimulate development of new approaches by the phosphoproteomic community.

  16. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knockin mice expressing non-phosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knockin mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knockin mice compared to their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knockin mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knockin and wild type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knockin mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knockin mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth. PMID:25229342

  17. Alteration in MARCKS phosphorylation and expression by methylmercury in SH-SY5Y cells and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Mitsuya; Hangai, Makoto; Yamamoto, Megumi; Sasaki, Masanori; Tanabe, Atsuhiro; Sasaki, Yasuharu; Miyamoto, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating methylmercury (MeHg)-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood. Because myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) plays an essential role in the differentiation and development of neuronal cells, we studied the alteration of MARCKS expression and phosphorylation in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in the rat brain. Exposure to MeHg induced a decrease in cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells, which was accompanied by a significant increase in phosphorylation and a reduction in MARCKS expression. Pretreatment of cells with a protein kinase C inhibitor or an extracellular Ca(2+) chelator suppressed MeHg-induced MARCKS phosphorylation. In MARCKS knock-down cells, MeHg-induced cell death was significantly augmented in comparison to control siRNA. In brain tissue from MeHg-treated rats, MARCKS phosphorylation was enhanced in the olfactory bulb in comparison to control rats. The present study may indicate that alteration in MARCKS expression or phosphorylation has consequences for MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  18. Histamine-stimulated phosphorylation of gastric parietal cell proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, C.S.; Brown, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    Parietal cells from rabbit gastric mucosa respond to histamine with increased HCl secretion. Histamine also increases cAMP and activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase(s) in these cells. cAMP analogues and forskolin appear to mimic these effects. More recently histamine and forskolin but not cAMP-stimulated increases in (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ have been detected in parietal cells enriched to 98 +/- 2% (n=10) purity using a combined Nycodenz density gradient/centrifugal elutriation technique. In the present experiments parietal cells were loaded with /sup 32/P to label ATP pools then stimulated with histamine or chlorophenylthio-cAMP plus the H/sub 2/ receptor antagonist, cimetidine. Total cell extracts were separated via 2D-gel electrophoresis and analyzed with a Masscomp computer and PDQuest software. Results indicate that histamine stimulates phosphorylation of at least two proteins with molecular weights 49 and 33 kDa and respective pI's of 6.4 and 6.0. Changes in phosphorylation are detected within 1 min of stimulation and remain elevated for at least 15 min. No change in specific activity of samples was detected during this time. A third protein also showed increased phosphorylation but the response appeared more transient. They conclude that histamine increases phosphorylation of several parietal cell proteins via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. The relationship between changes in phosphorylation and onset of HCl secretion remains to be determined.

  19. Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Aqeilan, Rami I; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2005-12-15

    Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) is a tumor suppressor protein that interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4A and inhibits protein synthesis. Pdcd4 also suppresses the transactivation of activator protein-1 (AP-1)-responsive promoters by c-Jun. The Akt (protein kinase B) serine/threonine kinase is a key mediator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, and growth. Because Pdcd4 has two putative Akt phosphorylation sites at Ser(67) and Ser(457), we investigated whether Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4. Our results show that Akt specifically phosphorylates Ser(67) and Ser(457) residues of Pdcd4 in vitro and in vivo. We further show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt causes nuclear translocation of Pdcd4. Using luciferase assay, we show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt also causes a significant decrease of the ability of Pdcd4 to interfere with the transactivation of AP-1-responsive promoter by c-Jun.

  20. Huntingtin-Interacting Protein 1 Phosphorylation by Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Heather M.; Wang, Anmin A.; Coughran, Alanna; Evaul, Kristen; Huang, Sha; Graves, Chiron W.; Soyombo, Abigail A.

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) binds inositol lipids, clathrin, actin, and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). HIP1 is elevated in many tumors, and its expression is prognostic in prostate cancer. HIP1 overexpression increases levels of the RTK epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transforms fibroblasts. Here we report that HIP1 is tyrosine phosphorylated in the presence of EGFR and platelet-derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) as well as the oncogenic derivatives EGFRvIII, HIP1/PDGFβR (H/P), and TEL/PDGFβR (T/P). We identified a four-tyrosine “HIP1 phosphorylation motif” (HPM) in the N-terminal region of HIP1 that is required for phosphorylation mediated by both EGFR and PDGFβR but not by the oncoproteins H/P and T/P. We also identified a tyrosine residue (Y152) within the HPM motif of HIP1 that inhibits HIP1 tyrosine phosphorylation. The HPM tyrosines are conserved in HIP1's only known mammalian relative, HIP1-related protein (HIP1r), and are also required for HIP1r phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutations in the HPM of HIP1 result in proapoptotic activity, indicating that an intact HPM may be necessary for HIP1's role in cellular survival. These data suggest that phosphorylation of HIP1 by RTKs in an N-terminal region contributes to the promotion of cellular survival. PMID:23836884

  1. Learning selectively increases protein kinase C substrate phosphorylation in specific regions of the chick brain.

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, F S; McCabe, B J; Horn, G; Routtenberg, A

    1993-01-01

    The effect of imprinting, an early form of exposure learning, on the phosphorylation state of the protein kinase C substrates myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) and protein F1/43-kDa growth-associated protein (F1/GAP-43) was studied in two regions of the chick forebrain. One region, the intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV), is probably a site of long-term memory; the other, the wulst, contains somatic sensory and visual projection areas. After imprinting, a significant increase in MARCKS protein phosphorylation was observed in the left IMHV but not the right IMHV. No significant alteration in F1/GAP-43 was observed in IMHV. MARCKS was resolved into two acidic components of pI approximately 5.0 and approximately 4.0. Phosphorylation of the pI approximately 5.0 MARCKS but not the pI approximately 4.0 MARCKS was significantly altered by imprinting. The partial correlation between preference score (an index of learning) and phosphorylation, holding constant the effect of approach activity during training, was significant only for the pI approximately 5.0 MARCKS in the left IMHV. A significant negative partial correlation between preference score and F1/GAP-43 phosphorylation in the right wulst was observed. Because the imprinting-induced alteration in MARCKS is selective with respect to phosphoprotein moiety, hemispheric location, and brain region, we propose that these alterations may be central to the learning process. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8464879

  2. Phosphorylation of proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum during development

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The phosphoproteins in D. discoideum were studied with respect to their formation, metabolic stability, cellular and subcellular distribution. Special emphasis was on the role of cAMP on the pattern of phosphorylation. Amoebae were metabolically labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/; subsequently proteins of the total lysate, nuclei and membranes were resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to autoradiography. Numerous changes in the profile of phosphoproteins were observed during development. Functions were assigned to four membranal phosphoproteins; only one protein, the heavy chain of myosin, was susceptible to phosphorylation in vitro when purified membranes and /sup 32/P-ATP were used. A comparison between the time of protein synthesis and phosphorylation, as examined in vivo using /sup 35/S-methionine and /sup 32/P/sub i/ labeling of amoebae and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, indicated that phosphorylation is concurrent with synthesis. It appears then that there are two classes of membranal phosphoproteins in D. discoideum which differ with respect to the stability of the phosphate moiety. It is evident that the turnover of the phosphate moiety in myosin heavy chain plays a crucial role in the function of myosin; a role for the metabolically inert phosphate of other membranal proteins remains to be established. The G protein which couples occupancy of hormone receptor to stimulation of adenylate cyclase in higher multicellular eukaryotes was detected in D. discoideum. The G protein is present in approximately equal amounts in vegetative and in developing amoebae.

  3. Plk phosphorylation regulates the microtubule-stabilizing protein TCTP.

    PubMed

    Yarm, Frederic R

    2002-09-01

    The mitotic polo-like kinases have been implicated in the formation and function of bipolar spindles on the basis of their respective localizations and mutant phenotypes. To date, this putative regulation has been limited to a kinesin-like motor protein, a centrosomal structural protein, and two microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). In this study, another spindle-regulating protein, the mammalian non-MAP microtubule-binding and -stabilizing protein, the translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified as a putative Plk-interacting clone by a two-hybrid screen. Plk phosphorylates TCTP on two serine residues in vitro and cofractionates with the majority of kinase activity toward TCTP in mitotic cell lysates. In addition, these sites were demonstrated to be phosphorylated in vivo. Overexpression of a Plk phosphorylation site-deficient mutant of TCTP induced a dramatic increase in the number of multinucleate cells, rounded cells with condensed ball-like nuclei, and cells undergoing cell death, similar to both the reported anti-Plk antibody microinjection and the low-concentration taxol treatment phenotypes. These results suggest that phosphorylation decreases the microtubule-stabilizing activity of TCTP and promotes the increase in microtubule dynamics that occurs after metaphase.

  4. Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Regulation of Neuronal Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-29

    substrate of a GTP- preferring protein kinase, ana the substrates of ectokinase acti- vity . These antibodies will be used in experiments designed to provide...adding y - SP - TP (2uM; lOuCi/well). Intact NG cells utilized extracellu- lar AT 3 2 p to phosphorylate endogenous proteins, as well as exo- genous...began in the preparation of mono- clonal antibodies to the 54KDa protein substrate of a GTP-prefer- ring kinase in neuronal membranes. Specific

  5. Zyxin phosphorylation at serine 142 modulates the zyxin head-tail interaction to alter cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Call, Greg S; Chung, Jarom Y; Davis, John A; Price, Braden D; Primavera, Tyler S; Thomson, Nick C; Wagner, Mark V; Hansen, Marc D H

    2011-01-21

    Zyxin is an actin regulatory protein that is concentrated at sites of actin-membrane association, particularly cell junctions. Zyxin participates in actin dynamics by binding VASP, an interaction that occurs via proline-rich N-terminal ActA repeats. An intramolecular association of the N-terminal LIM domains at or near the ActA repeats can prevent VASP and other binding partners from binding full-length zyxin. Such a head-tail interaction likely accounts for how zyxin function in actin dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration can be regulated by the cell. Since zyxin binding to several partners, via the LIM domains, requires phosphorylation, it seems likely that zyxin phosphorylation might alter the head-tail interaction and, thus, zyxin activity. Here we show that zyxin point mutants at a known phosphorylation site, serine 142, alter the ability of a zyxin fragment to directly bind a separate zyxin LIM domains fragment protein. Further, expression of the zyxin phosphomimetic mutant results in increased localization to cell-cell contacts of MDCK cells and generates a cellular phenotype, namely inability to disassemble cell-cell contacts, precisely like that produced by expression of zyxin mutants that lack the entire regulatory LIM domain region. These data suggest that zyxin phosphorylation at serine 142 results in release of the head-tail interaction, changing zyxin activity at cell-cell contacts.

  6. Phosphorylation of the TAL1 oncoprotein by the extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase ERK1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J T; Cobb, M H; Baer, R

    1993-01-01

    Alteration of the TAL1 gene is the most common genetic lesion found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. TAL1 encodes phosphoproteins, pp42TAL1 and pp22TAL1, that represent phosphorylated versions of the full-length (residues 1 to 331) and truncated (residues 176 to 331) TAL1 gene products, respectively. Both proteins contain the basic helix-loop-helix motif, a DNA-binding and protein dimerization motif common to several known transcriptional regulatory factors. We now report that serine residue 122 (S122) is a major phosphorylation site of pp42TAL1 in leukemic cell lines and transfected COS1 cells. In vivo phosphorylation of S122 is induced by epidermal growth factor with a rapid time course that parallels activation of the ERK/MAP2 protein kinases. Moreover, S122 is readily phosphorylated in vitro by the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK1. These data suggest that TAL1 residue S122 serves as an in vivo substrate for ERK/MAP2 kinases such as ERK1. Therefore, S122 phosphorylation may provide a mechanism whereby the properties of TAL1 polypeptides can be modulated by extracellular stimuli. Images PMID:8423803

  7. Dysregulation of Ezrin phosphorylation prevents metastasis and alters cellular metabolism in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ling; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Chen, Qing-Rong; Briggs, Joseph; Cassavaugh, Jessica; Srinivasan, Satish; Lizardo, Michael M.; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Xia, Ashley Y.; Avadhani, Narayan; Khan, Javed; Khanna, Chand

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin links the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton where it plays a pivotal role in the metastatic progression of several human cancers (1, 2), however, the precise mechanistic basis for its role remains unknown. Here we define transitions between active (phosphorylated open) and inactive (dephosphorylated closed) forms of Ezrin that occur during metastatic progression in osteosarcoma. In our evaluation of these conformations we expressed C-terminal mutant forms of Ezrin that are open (phosphomimetic T567D) or closed (phosphodeficient T567A) and compared their biological characteristics to full length wild-type Ezrin in osteosarcoma cells. Unexpectedly, cells expressing open, active Ezrin could form neither primary orthotopic tumors nor lung metastases. In contrast, cells expressing closed, inactive Ezrin were also deficient in metastasis but were unaffected in their capacity for primary tumor growth. By imaging single metastatic cells in the lung, we found that cells expressing either open or closed Ezrin displayed increased levels of apoptosis early after their arrival in the lung. Gene expression analysis suggested dysregulation of genes that are functionally linked to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. In particular, cells expressing closed, inactive Ezrin exhibited reduced lactate production and basal or ATP-dependent oxygen consumption. Collectively, our results suggest that dynamic regulation of Ezrin phosphorylation at amino acid T567 that controls structural transitions of this protein plays a pivotal role in tumor progression and metastasis, possibly in part by altering cellular metabolism. PMID:22147261

  8. Poliovirus-associated protein kinase: Destabilization of the virus capsid and stimulation of the phosphorylation reaction by Zn sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Ratka, M.; Lackmann, M.; Ueckermann, C.; Karlins, U.; Koch, G. )

    1989-09-01

    The previously described poliovirus-associated protein kinase activity phosphorylates viral proteins VP0 and VP2 as well as exogenous proteins in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. In this paper, the effect of Zn{sup 2+} on the phosphorylation reaction and the stability of the poliovirus capsid has been studied in detail and compared to that of Mg{sup 2+}. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, phosphorylation of capsid proteins VP2 and VP4 is significantly higher while phosphorylation of VP0 and exogenous phosphate acceptor proteins is not detected. The results indicate the activation of more than one virus-associated protein kinase by Zn{sup 2+}. The ion-dependent behavior of the enzyme activities is observed independently of whether the virus was obtained from HeLa or green monkey kidney cells. The poliovirus capsid is destabilized by Zn{sup 2+}. This alteration of the poliovirus capsid structure is a prerequisite for effective phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins. The increased level of phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins results in further destabilization of the viral capsid. As a result of the conformational changes, poliovirus-associated protein kinase activities dissociate from the virus particle. The authors suggest that the destabilizing effect of phosphorylation on the viral capsid plays a role in uncoating of poliovirus.

  9. Phosphorylated proteins of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome: implications in protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer L.; Cimen, Huseyin; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, have their own translation machinery that is solely responsible for synthesis of 13 mitochondrially-encoded protein subunits of oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Phosphorylation is a well-known post-translational modification in regulation of many processes in mammalian mitochondria including oxidative phosphorylation. However, there is still very limited knowledge on phosphorylation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and their role(s) in ribosome function. In this study, we have identified the mitochondrial ribosomal proteins that are phosphorylated at serine, threonine or tyrosine residues. Twenty-four phosphorylated proteins were visualized by phosphorylation-specific techniques including in vitro radiolabeling, residue specific antibodies for phosphorylated residues, or ProQ phospho dye and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Translation assays with isolated ribosomes that were phosphorylated in vitro by kinases PKA, PKCδ, or Abl Tyr showed up to 30% inhibition due to phosphorylation. Findings from this study should serve as the framework for future studies addressing the regulation mechanisms of mitochondrial translation machinery by phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. PMID:19702336

  10. Kindling alters neurosteroid-induced modulation of phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents: role of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kia, Arash; Ribeiro, Fabiola; Nelson, Renee; Gavrilovici, Cezar; Ferguson, Stephen S G; Poulter, Michael O

    2011-03-01

    We have previously shown that after kindling (a model of temporal lobe epilepsy), the neuroactive steroid tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) was unable to augment GABA type A receptor (GABA(A))-mediated synaptic currents occurring on pyramidal cells of the piriform cortex. Phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptors has been shown previously to alter the activity of THDOC, so we tested the hypothesis that kindling induces changes in the phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptors and this accounts for the loss in efficacy. To assay whether GABA(A) receptors are more phosphorylated after kindling, we examined the phosphorylation state of the β3 subunit and found that it was increased. Incubation of brain slices with the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (100 nM) also increased phosphorylation in the same assay. In patch clamp, recordings from non-kindled rat brain slices PMA also reduced the activity of THDOC in a manner that was identical to what is observed after kindling. We also found that the tonic current was no longer augmented by THODC after kindling and PMA treatment. The protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist bisindolylmaleimide I blocked the effects PMA on the synaptic but not the tonic currents. However, the broad spectrum PKC antagonist staurosporine blocked the effects of PMA on the tonic currents, implying that different PKC isoforms phosphorylate GABA(A) receptors responsible for phasic and tonic currents. The phosphatase activator Li(+) palmitate restored the 'normal' activity of THDOC on synaptic currents in kindled brain slices but not the tonic currents. These data demonstrate that kindling enhances the phosphorylation state of GABA(A) receptors expressed in pyramidal neurons reducing THDOC efficacy.

  11. Role of protein phosphorylation in excitation-contraction coupling in taurine deficient hearts.

    PubMed

    Ramila, K C; Jong, Chian Ju; Pastukh, Viktor; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2015-02-01

    Taurine is a beta-amino acid found in very high concentration in the heart. Depletion of these intracellular stores results in the development of cardiomyopathy, thought to be mediated by abnormal sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) Ca(2+) transport. There is also evidence that taurine directly alters the Ca(2+) sensitivity of myofibrillar proteins. Major regulators of SR Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA2a) are the phosphorylation status of a regulatory protein, phospholamban, and SERCA2a expression, which are diminished in the failing heart. The failing heart also exhibits reductions in myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity, a property regulated by the phosphorylation of the muscle protein, troponin I. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that taurine deficiency leads to alterations in SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity related to reduced phospholamban phosphorylation and expression of SERCA2a. We found that a sequence of events, which included elevated protein phosphatase 1 activity, reduced autophosphorylation of CaMKII, and reduced phospholamban phosphorylation, supports the reduction in SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity. However, the reduction in SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity was not caused by reduced SERCA2a expression. Taurine transporter knockout (TauTKO) hearts also exhibited a rightward shift in the Ca(2+) dependence of the myofibrillar Ca(2+) ATPase, a property that is associated with an elevation in phosphorylated troponin I. The findings support the observation that taurine deficient hearts develop systolic and diastolic defects related to reduced SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity, a change mediated in part by reduced phospholamban phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during meiotic divisions of starfish oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peaucellier, G.; Andersen, A.C.; Kinsey, W.H. )

    1990-04-01

    We have used an antibody specific for phosphotyrosine to investigate protein phosphorylation on tyrosine during hormone-induced maturation of starfish oocytes. Analysis of immunoprecipitates from cortices of in vivo labeled Marthasterias glacialis oocytes revealed the presence of labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins only after hormone addition. Six major phosphoproteins of 195, 155, 100, 85, 45, and 35 kDa were detected. Total activity in immunoprecipitates increased until first polar body emission and was greatly reduced upon completion of meiosis but some proteins exhibited different kinetics. The labeling of the 155-kDa protein reached a maximum at germinal vesicle breakdown, while the 35-kDa appeared later and disappeared after polar body emission. Similar results were obtained with Asterias rubens oocytes. In vitro phosphorylation of cortices showed that tyrosine kinase activity is a major protein kinase activity in this fraction, the main endogenous substrate being a 68-kDa protein. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro were almost similar in extracts from oocytes treated or not with the hormone.

  13. Phosphorylation of Yeast Phosphatidylserine Synthase by Protein Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2010-01-01

    The CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated and inhibited by protein kinase A in vitro. CHO1 alleles bearing Ser46 → Ala and/or Ser47 → Ala mutations were constructed and expressed in a cho1Δ mutant lacking phosphatidylserine synthase. In vitro, the S46A/S47A mutation reduced the total amount of phosphorylation by 90% and abolished the inhibitory effect protein kinase A had on phosphatidylserine synthase activity. The enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase A, which was time- and dose-dependent and dependent on the concentration of ATP, caused a electrophoretic mobility shift from a 27-kDa form to a 30-kDa form. The two electrophoretic forms of phosphatidylserine synthase were present in exponential phase cells, whereas only the 27-kDa form was present in stationary phase cells. In vivo labeling with 32Pi and immune complex analysis showed that the 30-kDa form was predominantly phosphorylated when compared with the 27-kDa form. However, the S46A/S47A mutations abolished the protein kinase A-mediated electrophoretic mobility shift. The S46A/S47A mutations also caused a 55% reduction in the total amount of phosphatidylserine synthase in exponential phase cells and a 66% reduction in the amount of enzyme in stationary phase cells. In phospholipid composition analysis, cells expressing the S46A/S47A mutant enzyme exhibited a 57% decrease in phosphatidylserine and a 40% increase in phosphatidylinositol. These results indicate that phosphatidylserine synthase is phosphorylated on Ser46 and Ser47 by protein kinase A, which results in a higher amount of enzyme for the net effect of stimulating the synthesis of phosphatidylserine. PMID:20145252

  14. Heavy metals chromium and neodymium reduced phosphorylation level of heat shock protein 27 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihao; Zhang, Lei; Xiao, Xue; Su, Zhijian; Zou, Ping; Hu, Hao; Huang, Yadong; He, Qing-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Heavy metals may exert their acute and chronic effects on the human skin through stress signals. In the present study, 2DE-based proteomics was used to analyze the protein expression in human keratinocytes exposed to heavy metals, chromium and neodymium, and 10 proteins with altered expression were identified. Among these proteins, small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) was up-regulated significantly and the up-regulation was validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, the mRNA expression level of HSP27 markedly increased as detected by quantitative PCR. More interestingly, the ratio of phosphorylated HSP27 and total HSP27 significantly decreased in keratinocytes treated with the heavy metals. These findings suggested that heavy metals reduced the phosphorylation level of HSP27, and that the ratio of p-HSP27 and HSP27 may represent a potential marker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation caused by chemical products.

  15. Detection of protein phosphorylation and charge isoforms using vertical one-dimensional isoelectric focusing gels.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey C; Peck, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    During many biological responses, changes in protein modifications (e.g., phosphorylation) are often more critical than changes in protein abundance in determining the outcome of cellular responses. These important regulatory changes can alter a protein's location, activity, or binding partners. Monitoring modifications such as phosphorylation is often impeded, or even prevented, because of the need for specialized reagents and equipment that are expensive and/or time-consuming to produce. However, many protein modifications alter the isoelectric point (pI) of a protein. Therefore, we developed a denaturing, one-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IEF) procedure that separates proteins based on their pI to resolve different isoforms, allowing a relatively simple strategy for detecting changes in protein modifications. Although similar results can be achieved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the method described here uses a multi-well SDS-PAGE format that allows many more samples to be assayed within a single gel, thereby greatly decreasing both the time and cost needed to assess modifications of a single protein in response many different treatment conditions. To increase the sensitivity of detection, we also optimized a procedure to transfer proteins from these gels to membranes for subsequent immunodetection. This combination of techniques provides the means of interrogating the number and stoichiometry of isoforms from total protein extracts without a priori knowledge of which modification may occur.

  16. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knock-in mice expressing nonphosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knock-in mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knock-in mice compared with their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild-type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knock-in mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knock-in and wild-type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knock-in mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild-type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knock-in mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth.

  17. Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Webber, Aaron; Warwood, Stacey; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore uncover an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09886.001 PMID:26468616

  18. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated protein phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, P.A.; Sisk, R.B.; Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a 6-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of a cytosolic protein (pp36, M/sub r/ = 36,000, pI = 5.5) in hepatocytes isolated from fasted, male, Wistar rats. Stimulation of /sup 32/P incorporation is observed as early as 1 min following treatment of hepatocytes with EGF and is still present at 30 min after exposure to the growth factor. The phosphate incorporated into pp36 in response to EGF is located predominantly in serine but not tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of pp36 does not occur in response to insulin or to agents which specifically activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (S/sub p/ -cAMPS), protein kinase C (PMA) or Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (A23187) in these cells. Prior treatment of hepatocytes with the cAMP analog, S/sub p/-cAMPS, or ADP-ribosylation of N/sub i/, the inhibitory GTP-binding protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, does not prevent EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of pp36. However, as seen in other cell types, pretreatment of hepatocytes with PMA abolishes all EGF-mediated responses including phosphorylation of pp36. These results suggest that EGP specifically activates an uncharacterized, serine protein kinase in hepatocytes that is distal to the intrinsic EGF receptor tyrosine protein kinase. The rapid activation of this kinase suggests that it may play an important role in the early response of the cell to EGF.

  19. The effect of oviductal fluid on protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cryopreserved boar spermatozoa differs with the freezing method.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Johannisson, A; Saravia, F; Bergqvist, A S

    2012-02-01

    Sperm capacitation takes place in the oviduct and protein tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins is a crucial step in capacitation and acquisition of fertilizing potential. Cryopreserved spermatozoa show altered expression of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the oviduct. The present study compared two freezing methods (conventional-conventional freezing (CF) and simplified-simplified freezing (SF) methods) for their effect on the ability of boar spermatozoa to undergo protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to oviductal fluid (ODF). Cryopreserved boar-spermatozoa were incubated with pre- and post-ovulatory ODF for 6 h at 38 °C under 5% CO(2). Aliquots of sperm samples were taken at hourly intervals and analyzed for kinematics and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Global protein tyrosine phosphorylation in spermatozoa was measured using flow cytometry and different patterns of phosphorylation were assessed using confocal microscopy. Immediately after thawing, no significant difference was observed in post-thaw sperm motility, velocity and global tyrosine phosphorylation between the two methods of freezing although the freezing method significantly (P < 0.05) influenced the effect of oviductal fluid on these parameters during incubation. While spermatozoa frozen by the CF method showed a significantly higher (P < 0.001) proportion of phosphorylation in response to preovulatory ODF during incubation, spermatozoa frozen by the SF method did not elicit such significant response as there was no significant difference in the proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated spermatozoa between treatments at any given time during incubation. If the CF method was used, the proportion of spermatozoa displaying either tail or full sperm phosphorylation increased in response to both preovulatory (EODF) and postovulatory oviductal fluid. However, if the SF method was used, a significant increase in these patterns was noticed only in the EODF treated group. The present study

  20. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Moore, R.; Cardaman, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10/sup -6/ M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml) significantly enhanced (P < 100) /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal /sup 22/P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10/sup -6/ M, /sup 32/P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 /sup +/g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 ..mu..g/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10/sup -6/ M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question.

  1. The phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact neurons

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To complement studies that have demonstrated the prominent phosphorylation of a 50-kD coated vesicle polypeptide in vitro, we have evaluated the phosphorylation of coated membrane proteins in intact cells. A co-assembly assay has been devised in which extracts of cultured rat sympathetic neurons labeled with [32P]-Pi were combined with unlabeled carrier bovine brain coat proteins and reassembled coat structures were isolated by gradient centrifugation. Two groups of phosphorylated polypeptides, of 100-110 kD (pp100-110) and 155 kD (pp155) apparent molecular mass, were incorporated into reassembled coats. The neuronal pp100-110 are structurally and functionally related to the 100-110-kD component of the bovine brain assembly protein (AP), a protein complex that also contains 50-kD and 16.5-kD components and is characterized by its ability to promote the reassembly of clathrin coat structures under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength (Zaremba, S. and J. H. Keen, 1983, J. Cell Biol., 97:1337-1348). The neuronal pp155 detected in reassembled coat structures was readily observable in total extracts of [32P]-Pi-labeled neurons dissolved in SDS-containing buffer. A bovine brain counterpart to the neuronal pp155 was also observed when brain coated vesicles were subjected to two- dimensional gel electrophoresis. Phosphoserine was the predominant phosphoaminoacid found in both the pp100 and pp155. A structural and functional counterpart to the 50-kD brain assembly polypeptide (AP50) was also identified in these neurons. Although the brain AP50 is prominently phosphorylated by an endogenous protein kinase in isolated coated vesicle preparations, the neuronal AP50 was not detectably phosphorylated in intact cells as assessed by two-dimensional non- equilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis of labeled cells dissolved directly in SDS-containing buffers. These results demonstrate that the bovine brain assembly polypeptides of 50 kD and 100-110 kD that we have

  2. The Impact of Protein Phosphorylation on Chlamydial Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Claywell, Ja E.; Matschke, Lea M.; Fisher, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia are Gram negative bacterial pathogens responsible for disease in humans and economically important domesticated animals. As obligate intracellular bacteria, they must gain entry into a host cell where they propagate within a parasitophorous organelle that serves as an interactive interface between the bacterium and the host. Nutrient acquisition, growth, and evasion of host defense mechanisms occur from this location. In addition to these cellular and bacterial dynamics, Chlamydia differentiate between two morphologically distinct forms, the elementary body and reticulate body, that are optimized for either extracellular or intracellular survival, respectively. The mechanisms regulating and mediating these diverse physiological events remain largely unknown. Reversible phosphorylation, including classical two-component signaling systems, partner switching mechanisms, and the more recently appreciated bacterial Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases and phosphatases, has gained increasing attention for its role in regulating important physiological processes in bacteria including metabolism, development, and virulence. Phosphorylation modulates these events via rapid and reversible modification of protein substrates leading to changes in enzyme activity, protein oligomerization, cell signaling, and protein localization. The characterization of several conserved chlamydial protein kinases and phosphatases along with phosphoproteome analysis suggest that Chlamydia are capable of global and growth stage-specific protein phosphorylation. This mini review will highlight the current knowledge of protein phosphorylation in Chlamydia and its potential role in chlamydial physiology and, consequently, virulence. Comparisons with other minimal genome intracellular bacterial pathogens also will be addressed with the aim of illustrating the importance of this understudied regulatory mechanism on pathogenesis and the principle questions that remain unanswered. PMID:28066729

  3. Phosphorylation of GENOMES UNCOUPLED 4 Alters Stimulation of Mg Chelatase Activity in Angiosperms1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hochheuser, Caroline; Fufezan, Christian; Heinze, Laura

    2016-01-01

    GENOMES UNCOUPLED 4 (GUN4) is a positive regulator of light-dependent chlorophyll biosynthesis. GUN4 activates Mg chelatase (MgCh) that catalyzes the insertion of an Mg2+ ion into protoporphyrin IX. We show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GUN4 is phosphorylated at Ser 264 (S264), the penultimate amino acid residue at the C terminus. While GUN4 is preferentially phosphorylated in darkness, phosphorylation is reduced upon accumulation of Mg porphyrins. Expression of a phosphomimicking GUN4(S264D) results in an incomplete complementation of the white gun4-2 null mutant and a chlorotic phenotype comparable to gun4 knockdown mutants. Phosphorylated GUN4 has a reduced stimulatory effect on MgCh in vitro and in vivo but retains its protein stability and tetrapyrrole binding capacity. Analysis of GUN4 found in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms reveals the evolution of a C-terminal extension, which harbors the phosphorylation site of GUN4 expressed in angiosperms. Homologs of GUN4 from Synechocystis and Chlamydomonas lack the conserved phosphorylation site found in a C-terminal extension of angiosperm GUN4. Biochemical studies proved the importance of the C-terminal extension for MgCh stimulation and inactivation of GUN4 by phosphorylation in angiosperms. An additional mechanism regulating MgCh activity is proposed. In conjunction with the dark repression of 5-aminolevulinic acid synthesis, GUN4 phosphorylation minimizes the flow of intermediates into the Mg branch of the tetrapyrrole metabolic pathway for chlorophyll biosynthesis. PMID:27688621

  4. Protein Phosphorylation in Amyloplasts Regulates Starch Branching Enzyme Activity and Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tetlow, Ian J.; Wait, Robin; Lu, Zhenxiao; Akkasaeng, Rut; Bowsher, Caroline G.; Esposito, Sergio; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation in amyloplasts and chloroplasts of Triticum aestivum (wheat) was investigated after the incubation of intact plastids with γ-32P-ATP. Among the soluble phosphoproteins detected in plastids, three forms of starch branching enzyme (SBE) were phosphorylated in amyloplasts (SBEI, SBEIIa, and SBEIIb), and both forms of SBE in chloroplasts (SBEI and SBEIIa) were shown to be phosphorylated after sequencing of the immunoprecipitated 32P-labeled phosphoproteins using quadrupole-orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the phosphorylated SBE forms indicated that the proteins are all phosphorylated on Ser residues. Analysis of starch granule–associated phosphoproteins after incubation of intact amyloplasts with γ-32P-ATP indicated that the granule-associated forms of SBEII and two granule-associated forms of starch synthase (SS) are phosphorylated, including SSIIa. Measurement of SBE activity in amyloplasts and chloroplasts showed that phosphorylation activated SBEIIa (and SBEIIb in amyloplasts), whereas dephosphorylation using alkaline phosphatase reduced the catalytic activity of both enzymes. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation had no effect on the measurable activity of SBEI in amyloplasts and chloroplasts, and the activities of both granule-bound forms of SBEII in amyloplasts were unaffected by dephosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation experiments using peptide-specific anti-SBE antibodies showed that SBEIIb and starch phosphorylase each coimmunoprecipitated with SBEI in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, suggesting that these enzymes may form protein complexes within the amyloplast in vivo. Conversely, dephosphorylation of immunoprecipitated protein complex led to its disassembly. This article reports direct evidence that enzymes of starch metabolism (amylopectin synthesis) are regulated by protein phosphorylation and indicate a wider role for protein phosphorylation and protein–protein

  5. Phosphorylation of phosphatase inhibitor-2 (i-2) by a bovine thymus tyrosine protein kinase, p40

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli-Roach, A.A.; Votaw, P.; Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Phosphatase inhibitor-2, a heat stable protein of Mr 22,800, is a regulatory component of the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase. It has been shown that in the cell tyrosine kinase activation can result in altered phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues, but the mechanism involved is unknown. The authors have found that i-2 is a substrate for a tyrosine specific protein kinase, p40, purified from bovine thymus. The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr 40,000 that is autophosphorylated at tyrosine residue(s). The stoichiometry of phosphorylation of i-2 by this tyrosine protein kinase is up to 1 mol of phosphate per mol of i-2. Phosphoaminoacid analysis revealed that all the phosphate introduced was associated with tyrosine residues. Mapping of TSP-tryptic peptides by TLE and isoelectric focusing showed one major labeled fragment. Using the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase, a lesser extent of phosphorylation of i-2 by p40 was obtained although partial activation of the phosphatase was observed. The effect on the activity was not due to FA/GSK-3 contamination. These results could provide an important link between tyrosine protein kinase activity and modulation of phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues.

  6. Histone H3 phosphorylation near the nucleosome dyad alters chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    North, Justin A; Šimon, Marek; Ferdinand, Michelle B; Shoffner, Matthew A; Picking, Jonathan W; Howard, Cecil J; Mooney, Alex M; van Noort, John; Poirier, Michael G; Ottesen, Jennifer J

    2014-04-01

    Nucleosomes contain ∼146 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer that controls DNA accessibility to transcription and repair complexes. Posttranslational modification (PTM) of histone proteins regulates nucleosome function. To date, only modest changes in nucleosome structure have been directly attributed to histone PTMs. Histone residue H3(T118) is located near the nucleosome dyad and can be phosphorylated. This PTM destabilizes nucleosomes and is implicated in the regulation of transcription and repair. Here, we report gel electrophoretic mobility, sucrose gradient sedimentation, thermal disassembly, micrococcal nuclease digestion and atomic force microscopy measurements of two DNA-histone complexes that are structurally distinct from nucleosomes. We find that H3(T118ph) facilitates the formation of a nucleosome duplex with two DNA molecules wrapped around two histone octamers, and an altosome complex that contains one DNA molecule wrapped around two histone octamers. The nucleosome duplex complex forms within short ∼150 bp DNA molecules, whereas altosomes require at least ∼250 bp of DNA and form repeatedly along 3000 bp DNA molecules. These results are the first report of a histone PTM significantly altering the nucleosome structure.

  7. Coordination of Protein Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation in Synaptic Plasticity*

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A central theme in nervous system function is equilibrium: synaptic strengths wax and wane, neuronal firing rates adjust up and down, and neural circuits balance excitation with inhibition. This push/pull regulatory theme carries through to the molecular level at excitatory synapses, where protein function is controlled through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases. However, these opposing enzymatic activities are only part of the equation as scaffolding interactions and assembly of multi-protein complexes are further required for efficient, localized synaptic signaling. This review will focus on coordination of postsynaptic serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase signaling by scaffold proteins during synaptic plasticity. PMID:26453308

  8. Hierarchical phosphorylation at N-terminal transformation-sensitive sites in c-Myc protein is regulated by mitogens and in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lutterbach, B; Hann, S R

    1994-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the c-Myc protein has been reported to be critical for both the transactivation and biological functions of the c-Myc proteins. Through detailed phosphopeptide mapping analyses, we demonstrate that there is a cluster of four regulated and complex phosphorylation events on the N-terminal domain of Myc proteins, including Thr-58, Ser-62, and Ser-71. An apparent enhancement of Ser-62 phosphorylation occurs on v-Myc proteins having a mutation at Thr-58 which has previously been correlated with increased transforming ability. In contrast, phosphorylation of Thr-58 in cells is dependent on a prior phosphorylation of Ser-62. Hierarchical phosphorylation of c-Myc is also observed in vitro with a specific glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha, unlike the promiscuous phosphorylation observed with other glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha and 3 beta preparations. Although both p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and cdc2 kinase specifically phosphorylate Ser-62 in vitro and cellular phosphorylation of Thr-58/Ser-62 is stimulated by mitogens, other in vivo experiments do not support a role for these kinases in the phosphorylation of Myc proteins. Unexpectedly, both the Thr-58 and Ser-62 phosphorylation events, but not other N-terminal phosphorylation events, can occur in the cytoplasm, suggesting that translocation of the c-Myc proteins to the nucleus is not required for phosphorylation at these sites. In addition, there appears to be an unusual block to the phosphorylation of Ser-62 during mitosis. Finally, although the enhanced transforming properties of Myc proteins correlates with the loss of phosphorylation at Thr-58 and an enhancement of Ser-62 phosphorylation, these phosphorylation events do not alter the ability of c-Myc to transactivate through the CACGTG Myc/Max binding site. Images PMID:8035827

  9. Functional dissection of myosin binding protein C phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish K; Gulick, James; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Lorenz, John N; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation is differentially regulated in the normal heart and during disease development. Our objective was to examine in detail three phosphorylatable sites (Ser-273, Ser-282, and Ser-302) present in the protein's cardiac-specific sequences, as these residues are differentially and reversibly phosphorylated during normal and abnormal cardiac function. Three transgenic lines were generated: DAA, which expressed cMyBP-C containing Asp-273, Ala-282, and Ala-302, in which a charged amino acid was placed at residue 273 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable by substituting alanines for the two serines; AAD containing Ala-273, Ala-282, and Asp-302, in which aspartate was placed at residue 302 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable; and SDS containing Ser-273, Asp-282, and Ser-302. These mice were compared to mice constructed previously along similar lines: wild type, in which normal cMyBP-C is transgenically expressed, AllP-, in which alanines were substituted and ADA mice as well. DAA and AAD mice showed pathology that was more severe than cMyBP-C nulls. DAA and AAD animals exhibited left ventricular chamber dilation, interstitial fibrosis, irregular cardiac rhythm and sudden cardiac death. Our results define the effects of the sites' post-translational modifications on cMyBP-C functionality and together, give a comprehensive picture of the potential consequences of site-specific phosphorylation. Ser-282 is a key residue in controlling S2 interaction with the thick and thin filaments. The new DAA and AAD constructs show that phosphorylation at one site in the absence of the ability to phosphorylate the other sites, depending upon the particular residues involved, can lead to severe cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. © 2013.

  10. The GAGA protein of Drosophila is phosphorylated by CK2.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Carles; Fernández, Irene; Aran, Xavier; Bernués, Jordi; Giralt, Ernest; Azorín, Fernando

    2005-08-19

    The GAGA factor of Drosophila is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that contributes to multiple processes from the regulation of gene expression to the structural organisation of heterochromatin and chromatin remodelling. GAGA is known to interact with various other proteins (tramtrack, pipsqueak, batman and dSAP18) and protein complexes (PRC1, NURF and FACT). GAGA functions are likely regulated at the level of post-translational modifications. Little is known, however, about its actual pattern of modification. It was proposed that GAGA can be O-glycosylated. Here, we report that GAGA519 isoform is a phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated by CK2 at the region of the DNA-binding domain. Our results indicate that phosphorylation occurs at S388 and, to a lesser extent, at S378. These two residues are located in a region of the DNA-binding domain that makes no direct contact with DNA, being dispensable for sequence-specific recognition. Phosphorylation at these sites does not abolish DNA binding but reduces the affinity of the interaction. These results are discussed in the context of the various functions and interactions that GAGA supports.

  11. Changes of testicular phosphorylated proteins in response to restraint stress in male rats*

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Supatcharee; Burawat, Jaturon; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sampannang, Apichakan; Uabundit, Nongnut; Iamsaard, Sitthichai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate male reproductive parameters via changes of potential testicular protein markers in restraint-stress rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups (non-immobilized control and restraint-immobilized/stress groups, n=8 each group). The stress animals were immobilized (12 h/d) by a restraint cage for 7 consecutive days. All reproductive parameters, morphology and histology were observed and compared between groups. In addition, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) and phosphotyrosine proteins (previously localized in Sertoli and late spermatid cells) in testicular lysate was assayed by immuno-Western blotting. Results: Testosterone level, sperm concentration and sperm head normality of stress rats were significantly decreased while the corticosterone level was increased as compared with the control (P<0.05). Histologically, stress rats showed low sperm mass in epididymal lumen and some atrophy of seminiferous tubules. Although the expression of testicular StAR protein was not significantly different between groups, changed patterns of the 131, 95, and 75 kDa testicular phosphorylated proteins were observed in the stress group compared with the control group. The intensity of a testicular 95-kDa phosphorylated protein was significantly decreased in stress rats. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the alteration of testicular phosphorylated protein patterns, associated with adverse male reproductive parameters in stress rats. It could be an explanation of some infertility in stress males. PMID:26739523

  12. Activation of purified calcium channels by stoichiometric protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Nunoki, K.; Florio, V.; Catterall, W.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) on their function. Both the rate and extent of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into vesicles containing reconstituted calcium channels were increased severalfold after incubation with ATP and PK-A. The degree of stimulation of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake was linearly proportional to the extent of phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the calcium channel up to a stoichiometry of approximately 1 mol of phosphate incorporated into each subunit. The calcium channels activated by phosphorylation were determined to be incorporated into the reconstituted vesicles in the inside-out orientation and were completely inhibited by low concentrations of dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines, Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between PK-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the purified calcium channel and activation of the ion conductance activity of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels.

  13. Phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein CAP1 controls its association with cofilin and actin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Wu, Huhehasi; Ghai, Pooja; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Cell signaling can control the dynamic balance between filamentous and monomeric actin by modulating actin regulatory proteins. One family of actin regulating proteins that controls actin dynamics comprises cyclase-associated proteins 1 and 2 (CAP1 and 2, respectively). However, cell signals that regulate CAPs remained unknown. We mapped phosphorylation sites on mouse CAP1 and found S307 and S309 to be regulatory sites. We further identified glycogen synthase kinase 3 as a kinase phosphorylating S309. The phosphomimetic mutant S307D/S309D lost binding to its partner cofilin and, when expressed in cells, caused accumulation of actin stress fibers similar to that in cells with reduced CAP expression. In contrast, the non-phosphorylatable S307A/S309A mutant showed drastically increased cofilin binding and reduced binding to actin. These results suggest that the phosphorylation serves to facilitate release of cofilin for a subsequent cycle of actin filament severing. Moreover, our results suggest that S307 and S309 function in tandem; neither the alterations in binding cofilin and/or actin, nor the defects in rescuing the phenotype of the enlarged cell size in CAP1 knockdown cells was observed in point mutants of either S307 or S309. In summary, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of CAP1 through phosphorylation.

  14. Phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein CAP1 controls its association with cofilin and actin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Wu, Huhehasi; Ghai, Pooja; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell signaling can control the dynamic balance between filamentous and monomeric actin by modulating actin regulatory proteins. One family of actin regulating proteins that controls actin dynamics comprises cyclase-associated proteins 1 and 2 (CAP1 and 2, respectively). However, cell signals that regulate CAPs remained unknown. We mapped phosphorylation sites on mouse CAP1 and found S307 and S309 to be regulatory sites. We further identified glycogen synthase kinase 3 as a kinase phosphorylating S309. The phosphomimetic mutant S307D/S309D lost binding to its partner cofilin and, when expressed in cells, caused accumulation of actin stress fibers similar to that in cells with reduced CAP expression. In contrast, the non-phosphorylatable S307A/S309A mutant showed drastically increased cofilin binding and reduced binding to actin. These results suggest that the phosphorylation serves to facilitate release of cofilin for a subsequent cycle of actin filament severing. Moreover, our results suggest that S307 and S309 function in tandem; neither the alterations in binding cofilin and/or actin, nor the defects in rescuing the phenotype of the enlarged cell size in CAP1 knockdown cells was observed in point mutants of either S307 or S309. In summary, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of CAP1 through phosphorylation. PMID:25315833

  15. The eFIP system for text mining of protein interaction networks of phosphorylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Catalina O; Arighi, Cecilia N; Wang, Qinghua; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a central regulatory mechanism in signal transduction involved in most biological processes. Phosphorylation of a protein may lead to activation or repression of its activity, alternative subcellular location and interaction with different binding partners. Extracting this type of information from scientific literature is critical for connecting phosphorylated proteins with kinases and interaction partners, along with their functional outcomes, for knowledge discovery from phosphorylation protein networks. We have developed the Extracting Functional Impact of Phosphorylation (eFIP) text mining system, which combines several natural language processing techniques to find relevant abstracts mentioning phosphorylation of a given protein together with indications of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and potential evidences for impact of phosphorylation on the PPIs. eFIP integrates our previously developed tools, Extracting Gene Related ABstracts (eGRAB) for document retrieval and name disambiguation, Rule-based LIterature Mining System (RLIMS-P) for Protein Phosphorylation for extraction of phosphorylation information, a PPI module to detect PPIs involving phosphorylated proteins and an impact module for relation extraction. The text mining system has been integrated into the curation workflow of the Protein Ontology (PRO) to capture knowledge about phosphorylated proteins. The eFIP web interface accepts gene/protein names or identifiers, or PubMed identifiers as input, and displays results as a ranked list of abstracts with sentence evidence and summary table, which can be exported in a spreadsheet upon result validation. As a participant in the BioCreative-2012 Interactive Text Mining track, the performance of eFIP was evaluated on document retrieval (F-measures of 78-100%), sentence-level information extraction (F-measures of 70-80%) and document ranking (normalized discounted cumulative gain measures of 93-100% and mean average

  16. Haemophilus ducreyi LspA Proteins Are Tyrosine Phosphorylated by Macrophage-Encoded Protein Tyrosine Kinases▿

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kaiping; Mock, Jason R.; Greenberg, Steven; van Oers, Nicolai S. C.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    The LspA proteins (LspA1 and LspA2) of Haemophilus ducreyi are necessary for this pathogen to inhibit the phagocytic activity of macrophage cell lines, an event that can be correlated with a reduction in the level of active Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in these eukaryotic cells. During studies investigating this inhibitory mechanism, it was discovered that the LspA proteins themselves were tyrosine phosphorylated after wild-type H. ducreyi cells were incubated with macrophages. LspA proteins in cell-free concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid could also be tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophages. This ability to tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins was not limited to immune cell lineages but could be accomplished by both HeLa and COS-7 cells. Kinase inhibitor studies with macrophages demonstrated that the Src family PTKs were required for this tyrosine phosphorylation activity. In silico methods and site-directed mutagenesis were used to identify EPIYG and EPVYA motifs in LspA1 that contained tyrosines that were targets for phosphorylation. A total of four tyrosines could be phosphorylated in LspA1, with LspA2 containing eight predicted tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. Purified LspA1 fusion proteins containing either the EPIYG or EPVYA motifs were shown to be phosphorylated by purified Src PTK in vitro. Macrophage lysates could also tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins and an LspA1 fusion protein via a mechanism that was dependent on the presence of both divalent cations and ATP. Several motifs known to interact with or otherwise affect eukaryotic kinases were identified in the LspA proteins. PMID:18678665

  17. Haemophilus ducreyi LspA proteins are tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophage-encoded protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiping; Mock, Jason R; Greenberg, Steven; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Hansen, Eric J

    2008-10-01

    The LspA proteins (LspA1 and LspA2) of Haemophilus ducreyi are necessary for this pathogen to inhibit the phagocytic activity of macrophage cell lines, an event that can be correlated with a reduction in the level of active Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in these eukaryotic cells. During studies investigating this inhibitory mechanism, it was discovered that the LspA proteins themselves were tyrosine phosphorylated after wild-type H. ducreyi cells were incubated with macrophages. LspA proteins in cell-free concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid could also be tyrosine phosphorylated by macrophages. This ability to tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins was not limited to immune cell lineages but could be accomplished by both HeLa and COS-7 cells. Kinase inhibitor studies with macrophages demonstrated that the Src family PTKs were required for this tyrosine phosphorylation activity. In silico methods and site-directed mutagenesis were used to identify EPIYG and EPVYA motifs in LspA1 that contained tyrosines that were targets for phosphorylation. A total of four tyrosines could be phosphorylated in LspA1, with LspA2 containing eight predicted tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. Purified LspA1 fusion proteins containing either the EPIYG or EPVYA motifs were shown to be phosphorylated by purified Src PTK in vitro. Macrophage lysates could also tyrosine phosphorylate the LspA proteins and an LspA1 fusion protein via a mechanism that was dependent on the presence of both divalent cations and ATP. Several motifs known to interact with or otherwise affect eukaryotic kinases were identified in the LspA proteins.

  18. Alteration of FXR phosphorylation and sumoylation in liver in the development of adult catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Qiao; Zheng, Juan; Kong, Wen; Zhang, Hao-Hao; Zeng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Jiao-Yue; Min, Jie; Wu, Chaodong; Chen, Lu-Lu

    2017-02-01

    Catch-up growth in adult, is increasingly recognized as an important causative factor for the extremely prevalent insulin resistance-related diseases especially in developing countries/territories. We aimed to investigate the alteration of bile acids level, phosphorylation and sumoylation of its interacting protein, bile acid receptor/farnesoid X receptor and their downstream signaling pathway, as well as insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in catch-up growth in adult rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into four groups for two sampling points: caloric restriction group, catch-up growth in adult refed with normal chow and their normal chow controls for four or eight weeks (N4, N8 individually).We found that total serum bile acids and farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation increased without significant changes in farnesoid X receptor sumoylation and its downstream small heterodimer partner expression at the end of caloric restriction stage, while the visceral fat decreased and insulin resistance never occurred in these animals; After refeeding, total serum bile acids, farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation and sumoylation, as well as Cyp7a1, SREBP-1c mRNA levels were higher with significant decrease in small heterodimer partner expression, which is associated fat accumulation, and drastic insulin resistance in whole body and skeletal muscle. Our findings demonstrated that the fat accumulation and insulin resistance are associated with increases of bile acids, alteration of farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation, and sumoylation and its downstream signaling pathway. These changes of bile acids, farnesoid X receptor phosphorylation and sumoylation, as well as their downstream signaling might be of importance in the etiology of fat accumulation and insulin resistance in catch-up growth in adult.

  19. Coupling phosphoryl transfer and substrate interactions in protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Lieser, Scot A; Aubol, Brandon E; Wong, Lilly; Jennings, Patricia A; Adams, Joseph A

    2005-12-30

    Protein kinases control cell signaling events through the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine residues in protein targets. The recognition of these protein substrates by the kinases relies on two principal factors: proper subcellular co-localization and molecular interactions between the kinase and substrate. In this review, we will focus on the kinetic role of the latter in conveying favorable substrate recognition. Using rapid mixing technologies, we demonstrate that the intrinsic thermodynamic affinities of two protein substrates for their respective kinases (Csk with Src and Sky1p with Npl3) are weak compared to their apparent affinities measured in traditional steady-state kinetic assays (i.e.--Km < Kd). The source of the high apparent affinities rests in a very fast and highly favorable phosphoryl transfer step that serves as a clamp for substrate recognition. In this mechanism, both Csk and Sky1p utilize this step to draw the substrate toward product, thereby, converting a high Kd into a low Km. We propose that this one form of substrate recognition employed by protein kinases is advantageous since it simultaneously facilitates high apparent substrate affinity and fast protein turnover.

  20. N-Terminus of the Protein Kinase CLK1 Induces SR Protein Hyper-Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Aubol, Brandon E.; Plocinik, Ryan M.; Keshwani, Malik M.; McGlone, Maria L.; Hagopian, Jonathan C.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are essential splicing factors that are regulated through multisite phosphorylation of their RS (arginine-serine-rich) domains by two major families of protein kinases. The SRPKs efficiently phosphorylate the arginine-serine dipeptides in the RS domain using a conserved docking groove in the kinase domain. In contrast, CLKs lack a docking groove and phosphorylate both arginine-serine and serine-proline dipeptides, modifications that generate a hyper-phosphorylated state important for unique SR protein-dependent splicing activities. All CLKs contain long, flexible N-terminal extensions (140-300 residues) that resemble the RS domains present in their substrate SR proteins. We showed that the N-terminus in CLK1 contacts both the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein SRSF1. This interaction not only is essential for facilitating hyper-phosphorylation but also induces cooperative binding of SRSF1 to RNA. The N-terminus of CLK1 enhances the total phosphoryl contents of a panel of physiological substrates including SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF5 and Tra2β1 by 2–3-fold. These findings suggest that CLK1-dependent hyper-phosphorylation is the result of a general mechanism in which the N-terminus acts as a bridge connecting the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein. PMID:24869919

  1. Structural Mechanism for Regulation of Bcl-2 protein Noxa by phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Christine B.; Michel Espinoza-Fonseca, L.; James, Zachary M.; Hanse, Eric A.; Gaynes, Jeffrey S.; Thomas, David D.; Kelekar, Ameeta

    2015-09-01

    We showed previously that phosphorylation of Noxa, a 54-residue Bcl-2 protein, at serine 13 (Ser13) inhibited its ability to promote apoptosis through interactions with canonical binding partner, Mcl-1. Using EPR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding assays, we offer evidence that a structural alteration caused by phosphorylation partially masks Noxa’s BH3 domain, inhibiting the Noxa-Mcl-1 interaction. EPR of unphosphorylated Noxa, with spin-labeled amino acid TOAC incorporated within the BH3 domain, revealed equilibrium between ordered and dynamically disordered states. Mcl-1 further restricted the ordered component for non-phosphorylated Noxa, but left the pSer13 Noxa profile unchanged. Microsecond MD simulations indicated that the BH3 domain of unphosphorylated Noxa is housed within a flexible loop connecting two antiparallel β-sheets, flanked by disordered N- and C-termini and Ser13 phosphorylation creates a network of salt-bridges that facilitate the interaction between the N-terminus and the BH3 domain. EPR showed that a spin label inserted near the N-terminus was weakly immobilized in unphosphorylated Noxa, consistent with a solvent-exposed helix/loop, but strongly constrained in pSer13 Noxa, indicating a more ordered peptide backbone, as predicted by MD simulations. Together these studies reveal a novel mechanism by which phosphorylation of a distal serine inhibits a pro-apoptotic BH3 domain and promotes cell survival.

  2. Protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in the Archaea.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, Peter J

    2014-04-04

    The third domain of life, the Archaea (formerly Archaebacteria), is populated by a physiologically diverse set of microorganisms, many of which reside at the ecological extremes of our global environment. Although ostensibly prokaryotic in morphology, the Archaea share much closer evolutionary ties with the Eukarya than with the superficially more similar Bacteria. Initial genomic, proteomic, and biochemical analyses have revealed the presence of "eukaryotic" protein kinases and phosphatases and an intriguing set of serine-, threonine-, and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in the Archaea that may offer new insights into this important regulatory mechanism.

  3. Functional dissection of myosin binding protein C phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Manish K.; Gulick, James; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Lorenz, John N.; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation is differentially regulated in the normal heart and during disease development. Our objective was to examine in detail three phosphorylatable sites (Ser-273, Ser-282, and Ser-302) present in the protein’s cardiac-specific sequences, as these residues are differentially and reversibly phosphorylated during normal and abnormal cardiac function. Three transgenic lines were generated: DAA, which expressed cMyBP-C containing Asp-273, Ala-282, Ala302, in which a charged amino acid was placed at residue 273 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable by substituting alanines for the two serines; AAD containing Ala-273, Ala-282, Asp-302), in which aspartate was placed at residue 302 and the remaining two sites rendered nonphosphorylatable; and SDS containing Ser-273, Asp-282, Ser-302. These mice were compared to mice constructed previously along similar lines: wild type, in which normal cMyBP-C is transgenically expressed, AllP−, in which alanines were substituted and ADA mice as well. DAA and AAD mice showed pathology that was more severe than cMyBP-C nulls. DAA and AAD animals exhibited left ventricular chamber dilation, interstitial fibrosis, irregular cardiac rhythm and sudden cardiac death. Our results define the effects of the sites’ post-translational modifications on cMyBP-C functionality and together, give a comprehensive picture of the potential consequences of site-specific phosphorylation. Ser-282 is a key residue in controlling S2 interaction with the thick and thin filaments. The new DAA and AAD constructs show that phosphorylation at one site in the absence of the ability to phosphorylate the other sites, depending upon the particular residues involved, can lead to severe cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. PMID:24001940

  4. Protein phosphorylation and regulation of adaptive responses in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stock, J B; Ninfa, A J; Stock, A M

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria continuously adapt to changes in their environment. Responses are largely controlled by signal transduction systems that contain two central enzymatic components, a protein kinase that uses adenosine triphosphate to phosphorylate itself at a histidine residue and a response regulator that accepts phosphoryl groups from the kinase. This conserved phosphotransfer chemistry is found in a wide range of bacterial species and operates in diverse systems to provide different regulatory outputs. The histidine kinases are frequently membrane receptor proteins that respond to environmental signals and phosphorylate response regulators that control transcription. Four specific regulatory systems are discussed in detail: chemotaxis in response to attractant and repellent stimuli (Che), regulation of gene expression in response to nitrogen deprivation (Ntr), control of the expression of enzymes and transport systems that assimilate phosphorus (Pho), and regulation of outer membrane porin expression in response to osmolarity and other culture conditions (Omp). Several additional systems are also examined, including systems that control complex developmental processes such as sporulation and fruiting-body formation, systems required for virulent infections of plant or animal host tissues, and systems that regulate transport and metabolism. Finally, an attempt is made to understand how cross-talk between parallel phosphotransfer pathways can provide a global regulatory curcuitry. PMID:2556636

  5. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R G; Sadler, Anthony J

    2017-03-10

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity.

  6. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A.; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Sadler, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity. PMID:28281686

  7. AQP2 Plasma Membrane Diffusion Is Altered by the Degree of AQP2-S256 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Arnspang, Eva C; Login, Frédéric H; Koffman, Jennifer S; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Nejsum, Lene N

    2016-10-28

    Fine tuning of urine concentration occurs in the renal collecting duct in response to circulating levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP). AVP stimulates intracellular cAMP production, which mediates exocytosis of sub-apical vesicles containing the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein Kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates AQP2 on serine-256 (S256), which triggers plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2. This mediates insertion of AQP2 into the apical plasma membrane, increasing water permeability of the collecting duct. AQP2 is a homo-tetramer. When S256 on all four monomers is changed to the phosphomimic aspartic acid (S256D), AQP2-S256D localizes to the plasma membrane and internalization is decreased. In contrast, when S256 is mutated to alanine (S256A) to mimic non-phosphorylated AQP2, AQP2-S256A localizes to intracellular vesicles as well as the plasma membrane, with increased internalization from the plasma membrane. S256 phosphorylation is not necessary for exocytosis and dephosphorylation is not necessary for endocytosis, however, the degree of S256 phosphorylation is hypothesized to regulate the kinetics of AQP2 endocytosis and thus, retention time in the plasma membrane. Using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS), we determined how the number of phosphorylated to non-phosphorylated S256 monomers in the AQP2 tetramer affects diffusion speed of AQP2 in the plasma membrane. When all four monomers mimicked constitutive phosphorylation (AQP2-S256D), diffusion was faster than when all four were non-phosphorylated (AQP2-S256A). AQP2-WT diffused at a speed similar to that of AQP2-S256D. When an average of two or three monomers in the tetramer were constitutively phosphorylated, the average diffusion coefficients were not significantly different to that of AQP2-S256D. However, when only one monomer was phosphorylated, diffusion was slower and similar to AQP2-S256A. Thus, AQP2 with two to four phosphorylated monomers has faster plasma membrane kinetics, than the

  8. AQP2 Plasma Membrane Diffusion Is Altered by the Degree of AQP2-S256 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Arnspang, Eva C.; Login, Frédéric H.; Koffman, Jennifer S.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Nejsum, Lene N.

    2016-01-01

    Fine tuning of urine concentration occurs in the renal collecting duct in response to circulating levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP). AVP stimulates intracellular cAMP production, which mediates exocytosis of sub-apical vesicles containing the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein Kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates AQP2 on serine-256 (S256), which triggers plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2. This mediates insertion of AQP2 into the apical plasma membrane, increasing water permeability of the collecting duct. AQP2 is a homo-tetramer. When S256 on all four monomers is changed to the phosphomimic aspartic acid (S256D), AQP2-S256D localizes to the plasma membrane and internalization is decreased. In contrast, when S256 is mutated to alanine (S256A) to mimic non-phosphorylated AQP2, AQP2-S256A localizes to intracellular vesicles as well as the plasma membrane, with increased internalization from the plasma membrane. S256 phosphorylation is not necessary for exocytosis and dephosphorylation is not necessary for endocytosis, however, the degree of S256 phosphorylation is hypothesized to regulate the kinetics of AQP2 endocytosis and thus, retention time in the plasma membrane. Using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS), we determined how the number of phosphorylated to non-phosphorylated S256 monomers in the AQP2 tetramer affects diffusion speed of AQP2 in the plasma membrane. When all four monomers mimicked constitutive phosphorylation (AQP2-S256D), diffusion was faster than when all four were non-phosphorylated (AQP2-S256A). AQP2-WT diffused at a speed similar to that of AQP2-S256D. When an average of two or three monomers in the tetramer were constitutively phosphorylated, the average diffusion coefficients were not significantly different to that of AQP2-S256D. However, when only one monomer was phosphorylated, diffusion was slower and similar to AQP2-S256A. Thus, AQP2 with two to four phosphorylated monomers has faster plasma membrane kinetics, than the

  9. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  10. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  11. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  12. Altered localization and cytoplasmic domain-binding properties of tyrosine-phosphorylated beta 1 integrin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to study tyrosine-phosphorylated (PY) integrins in cells transformed by virally encoded tyrosine kinases. We have synthesized a peptide (PY beta 1 peptide) that represents a portion of the cytoplasmic domain of the beta 1 integrin subunit and is phosphorylated on the tyrosine residue known to be the target of oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Antibodies prepared against the PY beta 1 peptide, after removal of cross-reacting antibodies by absorption and affinity purification, recognized the PY beta 1 peptide and the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of the intact beta 1 subunit, but did not bind the nonphosphorylated beta 1 peptide, the nonphosphorylated beta 1 subunit or other unrelated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. The anti- PY beta 1 antibodies labeled the podosomes of Rous sarcoma virus- transformed fibroblasts, but did not detectably stain nontransformed fibroblasts. The localization of the tyrosine phosphorylated beta 1 subunits appeared distinct from that of the beta 1 subunit. Adhesion plaques were stained by the anti-beta 1 subunit antibodies in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed fibroblasts plated on fibronectin, whereas neither podosomes nor adhesion plaques were labeled on vitronectin or on uncoated plates. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies labeled podosomes, adhesion plaques and cell-cell boundaries regardless of the substratum. One of the SH2 domains of the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3- kinase bound to the PY beta 1 peptide, but not to the non- phosphorylated beta 1 cytoplasmic peptide. Other SH2 domains did not bind to the PY beta 1 peptide. These results show that the phosphorylated form of the beta 1 integrin subunit is detected in a different subcellular localization than the nonphosphorylated form and suggest that the phosphorylation on tyrosine of the beta 1 subunit cytoplasmic domain may affect cellular signaling pathways. PMID:7520449

  13. Protein phosphorylation signaling mechanisms in carotid body chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Z; He, L; Chen, J; Dinger, B; Stensaas, L; Fidone, S

    1999-01-01

    Chemotransduction in the carotid body occurs in specialized type I cells and likely involves a complex series of regulated events which culminates in the release of neurotransmitter agents and the excitation of afferent nerve fibers. Previous studies have shown that multiple factors, including the levels of calcium and cyclic nucleotide second messengers, are important regulators of the chemoreceptor transduction cascade in type I cells. In addition, increases in electrical excitability induced in type I cells by chronic exposure to hypoxia are mimicked by agents which elevate intracellular cyclic AMP levels [Stea et al., J Neurosci 1995;15:2192-2202]. These and other findings suggest that protein kinases, and the phosphorylation of specific protein targets are important components of the hypoxic transduction machinery. Moreover, protein kinase-mediated cascades may participate in the well-known physiological adjustments which occur in the carotid body during prolonged stimulation. In the current study, our data demonstrate (1) the presence of specific protein kinases and target phosphoproteins in the carotid body, and also in the morphologically similar small intensely fluorescent cells of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglia. (2) Nitric oxide production and efferent inhibition in the chemosensory tissue is reduced in the presence of the specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lavendustin A. (3) Hypoxia-induced catecholamine release from type I cells is inhibited by the protein kinase A antagonist, Rp-cAMPs. And finally (4), exposure to chronic hypoxia up-regulates the expression of the tyrosine kinase, fyn, and an important growth regulatory phosphoprotein, growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43). These findings suggest that second messenger-mediated phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of specific protein targets is a mechanism capable of regulating diverse cellular functions in the carotid body during acute and chronic stimulation.

  14. JNK phosphorylates Yes-associated protein (YAP) to regulate apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, V; Gudmundsdottir, K; Luong, P; Leung, K-Y; Knebel, A; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) regulates DNA damage and chemosensitivity, as well as functioning as a pro-growth, cell size regulator. For both of its roles, regulation by phosphorylation is crucial. We undertook an in vitro screen to identify novel YAP kinases to discover new signaling pathways to better understand YAP's function. We identified JNK1 and JNK2 as robust YAP kinases, as well as mapped multiple sites of phosphorylation. Using inhibitors and siRNA, we showed that JNK specifically phosphorylates endogenous YAP in a number of cell types. We show that YAP protects keratinocytes from UV irradiation but promotes UV-induced apoptosis in a squamous cell carcinoma. We defined the mechanism for this dual role to be YAP's ability to bind and stabilize the pro-proliferative ΔNp63α isoform in a JNK-dependent manner. Our report indicates that an evaluation of the expression of the different isoforms of p63 and p73 is crucial in determining YAP's function. PMID:21364637

  15. Protein kinase A dependent membrane protein phosphorylation and chloride conductance in endosomal vesicles from kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reenstra, W.W.; Bae, H.R.; Verkman, A.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Sabolic, I. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA )

    1992-01-14

    Regulation of Cl conductance by protein kinase A action, cell-free measurements of Cl transport and membrane protein phosphorylation were carried out in apical endocytic vesicles from rabbit kidney proximal tubule. Cl transport was measured by a stopped-flow quenching assay in endosomes labeled in vivo with the fluorescent Cl indicator 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium. Phosphorylation was studied in a purified endosomal preparation by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of membrane proteins labeled by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. These results suggest that, in a cell-free system, protein kinase A increases Cl conductance in endosomes from kidney proximal tubule by a phosphorylation mechanism. The labeled protein has a size similar to that of the 64-kDa putative kidney Cl channel reported by Landry et al. but is much smaller than the {approximately}170-kDa cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein.

  16. Protein phosphorylation cascades associated with methamphetamine-induced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M A; O'Callaghan, J P

    2000-09-01

    Reactive gliosis is the most prominent response to diverse forms of central nervous system (CNS) injury. The signaling events that mediate this characteristic response to neural injury are under intense investigation. Several studies have demonstrated the activation of phosphoproteins within the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Janus kinase (JAK) pathways following neural insult. These signaling pathways may be involved or responsible for the glial response following injury, by virtue of their ability to phosphorylate and dynamically regulate the activity of various transcription factors. This study sought to delineate, in vivo, the relative contribution of MAPK- and JAK-signaling components to reactive gliosis as measured by induction of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), following chemical-induced neural damage. At time points (6, 24, and 48 h) following methamphetamine (METH, 10 mg/kg x 4, s.c.) administration, female C57BL/6J mice were sacrificed by focused microwave irradiation, a technique that preserves steady-state phosphorylation. Striatal (target) and nontarget (hippocampus) homogenates were assayed for METH-induced changes in markers of dopamine (DA) neuron integrity as well as differences in the levels of activated phosphoproteins. GFAP upregulation occurred as early as 6 h, reaching a threefold induction 48 h following METH exposure. Neurotoxicant-induced reductions in striatal levels of DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) paralleled the temporal profile of GFAP induction. Blots of striatal homogenates, probed with phosphorylation-state specific antibodies, demonstrated significant changes in activated forms of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2), c-jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK1/2), 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6), cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). MAPK-related phosphoproteins exhibited an

  17. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  18. Spatial distributions of phosphorylated membrane proteins aquaporin 0 and MP20 across young and aged human lenses.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Danielle B; Garland, Donita L; Schwacke, John H; Hachey, David L; Schey, Kevin L

    2016-08-01

    In the human ocular lens it is now realized that post-translational modifications can alter protein function and/or localization in fiber cells that no longer synthesize proteins. The specific sites of post-translational modification to the abundant ocular lens membrane proteins AQP0 and MP20 have been previously identified and their functional effects are emerging. To further understand how changes in protein function and/or localization induced by these modifications alter lens homeostasis, it is necessary to determine the spatial distributions of these modifications across the lens. In this study, a quantitative LC-MS approach was used to determine the spatial distributions of phosphorylated AQP0 and MP20 peptides from manually dissected, concentric layers of fiber cells from young and aged human lenses. The absolute amounts of phosphorylation were determined for AQP0 Ser235 and Ser229 and for MP20 Ser170 in fiber cells from the lens periphery to the lens center. Phosphorylation of AQP0 Ser229 represented a minor portion of the total phosphorylated AQP0. Changes in spatial distributions of phosphorylated APQ0 Ser235 and MP20 Ser170 correlated with regions of physiological interest in aged lenses, specifically, where barriers to water transport and extracellular diffusion form.

  19. Normal phosphorylation of duck hepatitis B virus L protein is dispensable for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Grgacic, E V; Lin, B; Gazina, E V; Snooks, M J; Anderson, D A

    1998-11-01

    A fraction of the large surface protein (L) of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is phosphorylated at serine or threonine residues (E. Grgacic & D. Anderson, Journal of Virology 68, 7344-7350, 1994). We now report the identification of phosphorylation sites in DHBV L protein. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified serine-118 (S118) as the major phosphorylation site, accepting approximately 64% of the total phosphate groups incorporated in L, and resulting in retarded migration of phosphorylated L in SDS-PAGE. Proline-119 is indispensable for S118 phosphorylation. Mutation of other serine/threonine residues which are followed by prolines (T79, T89, S117 and T155) together with S118 further reduced phosphorylation to around 19% of wild-type. Non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis (NEPHGE) and SDS-PAGE of 33P-labelled L protein revealed two phosphorylated L species, while protein with the S118 to alanine mutation was detected as only one labelled species, consistent with multiple phosphorylations in wild-type L. Together, these results demonstrate that serine 118 is the major phosphorylation site for a proline-directed kinase, and that a proportion of L molecules are additionally phosphorylated at one of a number of secondary sites. DHBV mutants encoding L proteins with minimal phosphorylation (alanine mutants) or mimicking constitutive phosphorylation (aspartic acid mutants) remained infectious both in cell culture and in ducks, demonstrating that L phosphorylation may play only a minor role in DHBV replication.

  20. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  1. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  2. Antagonism of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Alters Synaptic ERK Phosphorylation in the Rat Forebrain.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, Henry H; Wang, John Q

    2016-12-28

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key transmitter in the mesocorticolimbic circuit. By interacting with muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR) enriched in the circuit, ACh actively regulates various neuronal and synaptic activities. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family and is subject to the regulation by dopamine receptors, although the regulation of ERKs by limbic mAChRs is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mAChRs in the regulation of ERK phosphorylation (activation) in the mesocorticolimbic system of adult rat brains in vivo. We targeted a sub-pool of ERKs at synaptic sites. We found that a systemic injection of the mAChR antagonist scopolamine increased phosphorylation of synaptic ERKs in the striatum (caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Increases in ERK phosphorylation in both forebrain regions were rapid and transient. Notably, pretreatment with a dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist SCH23390 blocked the scopolamine-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in these brain regions, while a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride did not. Scopolamine and SCH23390 did not change the amount of total ERK proteins. These results demonstrate that mAChRs inhibit synaptic ERK phosphorylation in striatal and mPFC neurons under normal conditions. Blockade of this inhibitory mAChR tone leads to the upregulation of ERK phosphorylation likely through a mechanism involving the level of D1R activity.

  3. Regulation of the EBNA1 Epstein-Barr virus protein by serine phosphorylation and arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Shire, Kathy; Kapoor, Priya; Jiang, Ke; Hing, Margaret Ng Thow; Sivachandran, Nirojini; Nguyen, Tin; Frappier, Lori

    2006-06-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA1 protein is important for the replication and mitotic segregation of EBV genomes in latently infected cells and also activates the transcription of some of the viral latency genes. A Gly-Arg-rich region between amino acids 325 and 376 is required for both the segregation and transcriptional activation functions of EBNA1. Here we show that this region is modified by both arginine methylation and serine phosphorylation. Mutagenesis of the four potentially phosphorylated serines in this region indicated that phosphorylation of multiple serines contributes to the efficient segregation of EBV-based plasmids by EBNA1, at least in part by increasing EBNA1 binding to hEBP2. EBNA1 was also found to bind the arginine methyltransferases PRMT1 and PRMT5. Multiple arginines in the 325-376 region were methylated in vitro by PRMT1 and PRMT5, as was an N-terminal Gly-Arg-rich region between amino acids 41 and 50. EBNA1 was also shown to be methylated in vivo, predominantly in the 325-376 region. Treatment of cells with a methylation inhibitor or down-regulation of PRMT1 altered EBNA1 localization, resulting in the formation of EBNA1 rings around the nucleoli. The results indicate that EBNA1 function is influenced by both serine phosphorylation and arginine methylation.

  4. Xenobiotics that affect oxidative phosphorylation alter differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells at concentrations that are found in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Laura; Toivonen, Janne M.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; López-Gallardo, Ester

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adipogenesis is accompanied by differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells to adipocytes. As part of this differentiation, biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system occurs. Many chemical compounds used in medicine, agriculture or other human activities affect oxidative phosphorylation function. Therefore, these xenobiotics could alter adipogenesis. We have analyzed the effects on adipocyte differentiation of some xenobiotics that act on the oxidative phosphorylation system. The tested concentrations have been previously reported in human blood. Our results show that pharmaceutical drugs that decrease mitochondrial DNA replication, such as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis, such as ribosomal antibiotics, diminish adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion. By contrast, the environmental chemical pollutant tributyltin chloride, which inhibits the ATP synthase of the oxidative phosphorylation system, can promote adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion, leading to obesity and metabolic syndrome as postulated by the obesogen hypothesis. PMID:26398948

  5. Xenobiotics that affect oxidative phosphorylation alter differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells at concentrations that are found in human blood.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Laura; Toivonen, Janne M; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; López-Gallardo, Ester

    2015-11-01

    Adipogenesis is accompanied by differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells to adipocytes. As part of this differentiation, biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system occurs. Many chemical compounds used in medicine, agriculture or other human activities affect oxidative phosphorylation function. Therefore, these xenobiotics could alter adipogenesis. We have analyzed the effects on adipocyte differentiation of some xenobiotics that act on the oxidative phosphorylation system. The tested concentrations have been previously reported in human blood. Our results show that pharmaceutical drugs that decrease mitochondrial DNA replication, such as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis, such as ribosomal antibiotics, diminish adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion. By contrast, the environmental chemical pollutant tributyltin chloride, which inhibits the ATP synthase of the oxidative phosphorylation system, can promote adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion, leading to obesity and metabolic syndrome as postulated by the obesogen hypothesis.

  6. Phosphorylation of spore coat proteins by a family of atypical protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim B.; Sreelatha, Anju; Durrant, Eric S.; Lopez-Garrido, Javier; Muszewska, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Yee, Samantha; Pogliano, Kit; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Dixon, Jack E.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2016-01-01

    The modification of proteins by phosphorylation occurs in all life forms and is catalyzed by a large superfamily of enzymes known as protein kinases. We recently discovered a family of secretory pathway kinases that phosphorylate extracellular proteins. One member, family with sequence similarity 20C (Fam20C), is the physiological Golgi casein kinase. While examining distantly related protein sequences, we observed low levels of identity between the spore coat protein H (CotH), and the Fam20C-related secretory pathway kinases. CotH is a component of the spore in many bacterial and eukaryotic species, and is required for efficient germination of spores in Bacillus subtilis; however, the mechanism by which CotH affects germination is unclear. Here, we show that CotH is a protein kinase. The crystal structure of CotH reveals an atypical protein kinase-like fold with a unique mode of ATP binding. Examination of the genes neighboring cotH in B. subtilis led us to identify two spore coat proteins, CotB and CotG, as CotH substrates. Furthermore, we show that CotH-dependent phosphorylation of CotB and CotG is required for the efficient germination of B. subtilis spores. Collectively, our results define a family of atypical protein kinases and reveal an unexpected role for protein phosphorylation in spore biology. PMID:27185916

  7. Phosphorylation of spore coat proteins by a family of atypical protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kim B.; Sreelatha, Anju; Durrant, Eric S.; Lopez-Garrido, Javier; Muszewska, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Yee, Samantha; Pogliano, Kit; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Dixon, Jack E.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2016-05-16

    The modification of proteins by phosphorylation occurs in all life forms and is catalyzed by a large superfamily of enzymes known as protein kinases. We recently discovered a family of secretory pathway kinases that phosphorylate extracellular proteins. One member, family with sequence similarity 20C (Fam20C), is the physiological Golgi casein kinase. While examining distantly related protein sequences, we observed low levels of identity between the spore coat protein H (CotH), and the Fam20C-related secretory pathway kinases. CotH is a component of the spore in many bacterial and eukaryotic species, and is required for efficient germination of spores in Bacillus subtilis; however, the mechanism by which CotH affects germination is unclear. In this paper, we show that CotH is a protein kinase. The crystal structure of CotH reveals an atypical protein kinase-like fold with a unique mode of ATP binding. Examination of the genes neighboring cotH in B. subtilis led us to identify two spore coat proteins, CotB and CotG, as CotH substrates. Furthermore, we show that CotH-dependent phosphorylation of CotB and CotG is required for the efficient germination of B. subtilis spores. Finally and collectively, our results define a family of atypical protein kinases and reveal an unexpected role for protein phosphorylation in spore biology.

  8. Phosphorylation of spore coat proteins by a family of atypical protein kinases

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, Kim B.; Sreelatha, Anju; Durrant, Eric S.; ...

    2016-05-16

    The modification of proteins by phosphorylation occurs in all life forms and is catalyzed by a large superfamily of enzymes known as protein kinases. We recently discovered a family of secretory pathway kinases that phosphorylate extracellular proteins. One member, family with sequence similarity 20C (Fam20C), is the physiological Golgi casein kinase. While examining distantly related protein sequences, we observed low levels of identity between the spore coat protein H (CotH), and the Fam20C-related secretory pathway kinases. CotH is a component of the spore in many bacterial and eukaryotic species, and is required for efficient germination of spores in Bacillus subtilis;more » however, the mechanism by which CotH affects germination is unclear. In this paper, we show that CotH is a protein kinase. The crystal structure of CotH reveals an atypical protein kinase-like fold with a unique mode of ATP binding. Examination of the genes neighboring cotH in B. subtilis led us to identify two spore coat proteins, CotB and CotG, as CotH substrates. Furthermore, we show that CotH-dependent phosphorylation of CotB and CotG is required for the efficient germination of B. subtilis spores. Finally and collectively, our results define a family of atypical protein kinases and reveal an unexpected role for protein phosphorylation in spore biology.« less

  9. Phosphorylation of spore coat proteins by a family of atypical protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kim B.; Sreelatha, Anju; Durrant, Eric S.; Lopez-Garrido, Javier; Muszewska, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Yee, Samantha; Pogliano, Kit; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Dixon, Jack E.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2016-05-16

    The modification of proteins by phosphorylation occurs in all life forms and is catalyzed by a large superfamily of enzymes known as protein kinases. We recently discovered a family of secretory pathway kinases that phosphorylate extracellular proteins. One member, family with sequence similarity 20C (Fam20C), is the physiological Golgi casein kinase. While examining distantly related protein sequences, we observed low levels of identity between the spore coat protein H (CotH), and the Fam20C-related secretory pathway kinases. CotH is a component of the spore in many bacterial and eukaryotic species, and is required for efficient germination of spores in Bacillus subtilis; however, the mechanism by which CotH affects germination is unclear. In this paper, we show that CotH is a protein kinase. The crystal structure of CotH reveals an atypical protein kinase-like fold with a unique mode of ATP binding. Examination of the genes neighboring cotH in B. subtilis led us to identify two spore coat proteins, CotB and CotG, as CotH substrates. Furthermore, we show that CotH-dependent phosphorylation of CotB and CotG is required for the efficient germination of B. subtilis spores. Finally and collectively, our results define a family of atypical protein kinases and reveal an unexpected role for protein phosphorylation in spore biology.

  10. Spatial proximity statistics suggest a regulatory role of protein phosphorylation on compound binding.

    PubMed

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates protein function by the attachment of negatively charged phosphate groups to phosphorylatable amino acid residues. As a mode of action, an influence of phosphorylation on the binding of compounds to proteins has been discussed and described for a number of proteins in the literature. However, a systematic statistical survey probing for enriched phosphorylation sites close to compound binding sites in support of this notion and with properly chosen random reference distributions has not been presented yet. Using high-resolution protein structures from the Protein Data Bank including their co-crystallized non-covalently bound compounds and experimentally determined phosphorylation sites, we analyzed the pairwise distance distributions of phosphorylation and compound binding sites on protein surfaces. We found that phosphorylation sites are indeed located at significantly closer distances to compounds than expected by chance holding true specifically also for the subset of compound binding sites serving as catalytic sites of metabolic reactions. This tendency was particularly evident when treating phosphorylation sites as collective sets supporting the relevance of phosphorylation hotspots. Interestingly, phosphorylation sites were found to be closer to negatively charged than to positively charged compounds suggesting a stronger modulation of the binding of negatively charged compounds in dependence on phosphorylation status than on positively charged compounds. The enrichment of phosphorylation sites near compound binding sites confirms a regulatory role of phosphorylation in compound binding and provides a solid statistical basis for the literature-reported selected events.

  11. Incorporating hidden Markov models for identifying protein kinase-specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Tzeng, Shih-Wei; Wu, Li-Cheng; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Huang, Kuan-Tsae

    2005-07-30

    Protein phosphorylation, which is an important mechanism in posttranslational modification, affects essential cellular processes such as metabolism, cell signaling, differentiation, and membrane transportation. Proteins are phosphorylated by a variety of protein kinases. In this investigation, we develop a novel tool to computationally predict catalytic kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. The known phosphorylation sites from public domain data sources are categorized by their annotated protein kinases. Based on the concepts of profile Hidden Markov Models (HMM), computational models are trained from the kinase-specific groups of phosphorylation sites. After evaluating the trained models, we select the model with highest accuracy in each kinase-specific group and provide a Web-based prediction tool for identifying protein phosphorylation sites. The main contribution here is that we have developed a kinase-specific phosphorylation site prediction tool with both high sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Regulation of SR protein phosphorylation and alternative splicing by modulating kinetic interactions of SRPK1 with molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Ding, Jian-Hua; Adams, Joseph A.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation is essential for the SR family of splicing factors/regulators to function in constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing; yet both hypo- and hyperphosphorylation of SR proteins are known to inhibit splicing, indicating that SR protein phosphorylation must be tightly regulated in the cell. However, little is known how SR protein phosphorylation might be regulated during development or in response to specific signaling events. Here, we report that SRPK1, a ubiquitously expressed SR protein-specific kinase, directly binds to the cochaperones Hsp40/DNAjc8 and Aha1, which mediate dynamic interactions of the kinase with the major molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 in mammalian cells. Inhibition of the Hsp90 ATPase activity induces dissociation of SRPK1 from the chaperone complexes, which can also be triggered by a stress signal (osmotic shock), resulting in translocation of the kinase from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, differential phosphorylation of SR proteins, and alteration of splice site selection. These findings connect the SRPK to the molecular chaperone system that has been implicated in numerous signal transduction pathways and provide mechanistic insights into complex regulation of SR protein phosphorylation and alternative splicing in response to developmental cues and cellular signaling. PMID:19240134

  13. A novel type of protein kinase phosphorylates actin in the actin-fragmin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, L; Bomblies, L; Vandekerckhove, J; Schleicher, M; Gettemans, J

    1996-01-01

    Actin-fragmin kinase (AFK) from Physarum polycephalum specifically phosphorylates actin in the EGTA-resistant 1:1 actin-fragmin complex. The cDNA deduced amino acid sequence reveals two major domains of approximately 35 kDa each that are separated by a hinge-like proline/serine-rich segment of 50 residues. Whereas the N-terminal domain does not show any significant similarity to protein sequences from databases, there are six complete kelch repeats in the protein that comprise almost the entire C-terminal half of the molecule. To prove the intrinsic phosphorylation activity of AFK, full-length or partial cDNA fragments were expressed both in a reticulocyte lysate and in Escherichia coli. In both expression systems, we obtained specific actin phosphorylation and located the catalytic domain in the N-terminal half. Interestingly, this region did not contain any of the known protein kinase consensus sequences. The only known sequence motif present that could have been involved in nucleotide binding was a nearly perfect phosphate binding loop (P-loop). However, introduction of two different point mutations into this putative P-loop sequence did not alter the catalytic activity of the kinase, which indicates an as yet unknown mechanism for phosphate transfer. Our data suggest that AFK belongs to a new class of protein kinases and that this actin phosphorylation might be the first example of a widely distributed novel type of regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in non-muscle cells. Images PMID:8896448

  14. Phosphorylation of C-protein, troponin I and phospholamban in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, J L; Kranias, E G; Solaro, R J

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myofibrillar and sacroplasmic-reticulum (SR) proteins was studied in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts subjected to various inotropic interventions. Stimulation of hearts with isoprenaline resulted in the phosphorylation of both troponin I (TnI) and C-protein in myofibrils and phospholamban in SR. Phosphorylation of phospholamban could be reversed by a 15 min perfusion with drug-free buffer, after a 1 minute pulse perfusion with isoprenaline, at which time the mechanical effects of isoprenaline stimulation had also been reversed. However, both TnI and C-protein remained phosphorylated at this time. Moreover, the inhibition of Ca2+ activation of the Mg2+-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) activity associated with myofibrillar phosphorylation persisted in myofibrils prepared from hearts frozen after 15 min of washout of isoprenaline. To assess the contribution of C-protein phosphorylation in the decrease of Ca2+ activation of the myofibrillar Mg-ATPase activity, we reconstituted a regulated actomyosin system in which only C-protein was phosphorylated. In this system, C-protein phosphorylation did not contribute to the decrease in Ca2+ activation of Mg-ATPase activity, indicating that TnI phosphorylation is responsible for the diminished sensitivity of the myofibrils to Ca2+. These observations support the hypothesis that phospholamban phosphorylation plays a more dominant role than TnI or C-protein phosphorylation in the mechanical response of the mammalian heart to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2895634

  15. Differentiation of HL60 cells: involvement of protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Spearman, T.N.; Fontana, J.A.; Butcher, F.R.; Durham, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    The addition of retinoic acid (RA) to the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL60 in culture results in the cessation of growth and the acquisition of a more mature phenotype. Previous work in these laboratories has demonstrated a concomitant increase in the activity of calcium-dependent, phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase (PK-C). HL60 cells were incubated with /sup 32/P-P/sub i/ in the absence and presence of RA, homogenized, and aliquots subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis. A comparison of autoradiograms made from these gels revealed several phosphoproteins whose radiolabeling was affected by RA. The radiolabeling of one particular phosphoprotein (49kd, pI 4.8) was found to be increased prior to phenotypic evidence of differentiation. It was demonstrated via incubating HL60 cytosol with /sup 32/P -ATP and Ca/sup 2 +/ in the absence and presence of phosphatidylserine and resolving the labeled proteins as above that this protein is phosphorylated by PK-C. The labeling of this protein was also increased by RA in other leukemic cell lines which showed phenotypic evidence of differentiation while no effect was seen in HL60 sublines resistant to RA or in mature neutrophils (the end product of myeloid differentiation). These results suggest that this protein may be an important intermediate in myeloid differentiation.

  16. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  17. Insulin antagonizes ischemia-induced Thr172 phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha-subunits in heart via hierarchical phosphorylation of Ser485/491.

    PubMed

    Horman, Sandrine; Vertommen, Didier; Heath, Richard; Neumann, Dietbert; Mouton, Véronique; Woods, Angela; Schlattner, Uwe; Wallimann, Theo; Carling, David; Hue, Louis; Rider, Mark H

    2006-03-03

    Previous studies showed that insulin antagonizes AMP-activated protein kinase activation by ischemia and that protein kinase B might be implicated. Here we investigated whether the direct phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase by protein kinase B might participate in this effect. Protein kinase B phosphorylated recombinant bacterially expressed AMP-activated protein kinase heterotrimers at Ser(485) of the alpha1-subunits. In perfused rat hearts, phosphorylation of the alpha1/alpha2 AMP-activated protein kinase subunits on Ser(485)/Ser(491) was increased by insulin and insulin pretreatment decreased the phosphorylation of the alpha-subunits at Thr(172) in a subsequent ischemic episode. It is proposed that the effect of insulin to antagonize AMP-activated protein kinase activation involves a hierarchical mechanism whereby Ser(485)/Ser(491) phosphorylation by protein kinase B reduces subsequent phosphorylation of Thr(172) by LKB1 and the resulting activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  18. Regulation of mitochondrial functions by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangbin; Smith, Kelly R; Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve; Tian, Rong; Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria are double membrane-bound organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. They generate most of the cell's energy supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are critical mechanisms in the regulation of cell signaling networks and are essential for almost all the cellular functions. For many decades, mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles merely functioning to generate energy for cells to survive and proliferate, and were thought to be independent of the cellular signaling networks. Consequently, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation processes of mitochondrial kinases and phosphatases were largely neglected. However, evidence accumulated in recent years on mitochondria-localized kinases/phosphatases has changed this longstanding view. Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as a hub for cell signaling, and many kinases and phosphatases have been reported to localize in mitochondria and play important functions. However, the strength of the evidence on mitochondrial localization and the activities of the reported kinases and phosphatases vary greatly, and the detailed mechanisms on how these kinases/phosphatases translocate to mitochondria, their subsequent function, and the physiological and pathological implications of their localization are still poorly understood. Here, we provide an updated perspective on the recent advancement in this area, with an emphasis on the implications of mitochondrial kinases/phosphatases in cancer and several other diseases.

  19. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  20. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  1. Protein Phosphorylation and Redox Modification in Stomatal Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balmant, Kelly M.; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) is recognized as a major process accounting for protein structural variation, functional diversity, and the dynamics and complexity of the proteome. Since PTMs can change the structure and function of proteins, they are essential to coordinate signaling networks and to regulate important physiological processes in eukaryotes. Plants are constantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce productivity, causing economic losses in crops. The plant responses involve complex physiological, cellular, and molecular processes, with stomatal movement as one of the earliest responses. In order to activate such a rapid response, stomatal guard cells employ cellular PTMs of key protein players in the signaling pathways to regulate the opening and closure of the stomatal pores. Here we discuss two major types of PTMs, protein phosphorylation and redox modification that play essential roles in stomatal movement under stress conditions. We present an overview of PTMs that occur in stomatal guard cells, especially the methods and technologies, and their applications in PTM identification and quantification. Our focus is on PTMs that modify molecular components in guard cell signaling at the stages of signal perception, second messenger production, as well as downstream signaling events and output. Improved understanding of guard cell signaling will enable generation of crops with enhanced stress tolerance, and increased yield and bioenergy through biotechnology and molecular breeding. PMID:26903877

  2. Phosphorylation of the mitochondrial protein Sab by stress-activated protein kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Court, Naomi W; Kuo, Ivana; Quigley, Oonagh; Bogoyevitch, Marie A

    2004-06-18

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) transduce extracellular signals into responses such as growth, differentiation, and death through their phosphorylation of specific substrate proteins. Early studies showed the consensus sequence (Pro/X)-X-(Ser/Thr)-Pro to be phosphorylated by MAPKs. Docking domains such as the "kinase interaction motif" (KIM) also appear to be crucial for efficient substrate phosphorylation. Here, we show that stress-activated protein kinase-3 (SAPK3), a p38 MAPK subfamily member, localizes to the mitochondria. Activated SAPK3 phosphorylates the mitochondrial protein Sab, an in vitro substrate of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Sab phosphorylation by SAPK3 was dependent on the most N-terminal KIM (KIM1) of Sab and occurred primarily on Ser321. This appeared to be dependent on the position of Ser321 within Sab and the sequence immediately surrounding it. Our results suggest that SAPK3 and JNK may share a common target at the mitochondria and provide new insights into the substrate recognition by SAPK3.

  3. Protein kinase A phosphorylation modulates transport of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiuyong; Lee, Ji-Ann; Kress, Tracy L.; Mowry, Kimberly L.; Black, Douglas L.

    2003-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (hnRNP) proteins play important roles in mRNA processing in eukaryotes, but little is known about how they are regulated by cellular signaling pathways. The polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTB, or hnRNP I) is an important regulator of alternative pre-mRNA splicing, of viral RNA translation, and of mRNA localization. Here we show that the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of PTB is regulated by the 3′,5′-cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). PKA directly phosphorylates PTB on conserved Ser-16, and PKA activation in PC12 cells induces Ser-16 phosphorylation. PTB carrying a Ser-16 to alanine mutation accumulates normally in the nucleus. However, export of this mutant protein from the nucleus is greatly reduced in heterokaryon shuttling assays. Conversely, hyperphosphorylation of PTB by coexpression with the catalytic subunit of PKA results in the accumulation of PTB in the cytoplasm. This accumulation is again specifically blocked by the S16A mutation. Similarly, in Xenopus oocytes, the phospho-Ser-16-PTB is restricted to the cytoplasm, whereas the non-Ser-16-phosphorylated PTB is nuclear. Thus, direct PKA phosphorylation of PTB at Ser-16 modulates the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of PTB. This phosphorylation likely plays a role in the cytoplasmic function of PTB. PMID:12851456

  4. Histone H2AX phosphorylation in response to changes in chromatin structure induced by altered osmolarity.

    PubMed

    Baure, Jennifer; Izadi, Atefeh; Suarez, Vannina; Giedzinski, Erich; Cleaver, James E; Fike, John R; Limoli, Charles L

    2009-03-01

    DNA strand breaks trigger marked phosphorylation of histone H2AX (i.e. gamma-H2AX). While DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) provide a strong stimulus for this event, the accompanying structural alterations in chromatin may represent the actual signal that elicits gamma-H2AX. Our data show that changes in chromatin structure are sufficient to elicit extensive gamma-H2AX formation in the relative absence of DNA strand breaks. Cells subjected to hypotonic (0.05 M) treatment exhibit gamma-H2AX levels that are equivalent to those found after the induction of 80-200 DNA DSBs (i.e. 2-5 Gy). Despite this significant increase in phosphorylation, cell survival remains relatively unaffected (<10% cytotoxicity), and there is no significant increase in apoptosis. Nuclear staining profiles indicate that gamma-H2AX-positive cells induced under altered tonicity exhibit variable levels of staining, ranging from uniform pan staining to discrete punctate foci more characteristic of DNA strand breakage. The capability to induce significant gamma-H2AX formation under altered tonicity in the relative absence of DNA strand breaks suggests that this histone modification evolved in response to changes in chromatin structure.

  5. Redox modulation of global phosphatase activity and protein phosphorylation in intact skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Valerie P; Reiser, Peter J; Clanton, Thomas L

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscles produce transient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to intense stimulation, disuse atrophy, heat stress, hypoxia, osmotic stress, stretch and cell receptor activation. The physiological significance is not well understood. Protein phosphatases (PPases) are known to be highly sensitive to oxidants and could contribute to many different signalling responses in muscle. We tested whether broad categories of PPases are inhibited by levels of acute oxidant exposure that do not result in loss of contractile function or gross oxidative stress. We also tested if this exposure results in elevated levels of global protein phosphorylation. Rat diaphragm muscles were treated with either 2,3-dimethoxy-1-naphthoquinone (DMNQ; 1, 10, 100 μm; a mitochondrial O2•−/H2O2 generator) or exogenous H2O2 (5, 50, 500 μm) for 30 min. Supernatants were assayed for serine/threonine PPase (Ser/Thr-PPase) or protein tyrosine PPase (PTP) activities. With the exception of 500 μm H2O2, no other oxidant exposures significantly elevated protein carbonyl formation, nor did they alter the magnitude of twitch force. DMNQ significantly decreased all categories of PPase activity at 10 and 100 μm and reduced PTP at 1 μm. Similar reductions in Ser/Thr-PPase activity were seen in response to 50 and 500 μm H2O2 and PTP at 500 μm H2O2. ROS treatments resulted a dose-dependent increase in the phosphorylation states of many proteins. The data are consistent with the concept that PPases, within intact skeletal muscles, are highly sensitive to acute changes in ROS activity and that localized ROS play a critical role in lowering the barriers for effective phosphorylation events to occur in muscle cells, thus increasing the probability for cell signalling responses to proceed. PMID:19841000

  6. Phosphorylation of human serum amyloid A protein by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Nel, A E; De Beer, M C; Shephard, E G; Strachan, A F; Vandenplas, M L; De Beer, F C

    1988-01-01

    Monokine-induced hepatic secretion of serum amyloid A protein (apo-SAA), an acute-phase reactant, is followed by rapid association with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma. Plasma clearance of apo-SAA is more rapid than any of the other HDL apolipoproteins. It has been shown that, of the acute-phase HDL3 apolipoproteins, apo-SAA preferentially associates with neutrophil membranes. HDL apolipoproteins have been shown to activate protein kinase C in endothelial cells. We therefore investigated potential phosphorylation of HDL3 apolipoproteins by protein kinase C. Apo-SAA was the only apolipoprotein phosphorylated (Km = 12 mM). Phosphorylation of the apo-SAA-containing HDL3 particle was selective for the more basic isoforms of apo-SAA (pI 7.0, 7.4, 7.5 and 8.0), with more acidic isoforms being phosphorylated when delipidated acute-phase apolipoproteins were used as substrate. However, phosphorylation was not in itself responsible for the establishment of the apo-SAA isoforms. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3196320

  7. Increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P J; Thomas, G; Maller, J L

    1982-01-01

    A single ribosomal protein (Mr, 32,000) becomes phosphorylated during progesterone-induced in vitro maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The protein is identified as 40S ribosomal protein S6. Phosphorylation of S6 is monitored by incorporation of 32Pi and by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. S6 is minimally phosphorylated in unstimulated oocytes. After progesterone treatment, phosphorylation of S6 precedes germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and is maximal at the time when 50% of the oocytes have undergone GVBD. S6, when maximally phosphorylated, exists in derivatives that correspond to the most highly phosphorylated forms observed in other systems, and the increase in S6 phosphorylation occurs at approximately the same time as the increase in the overall protein synthesis rate reported to occur during oocyte maturation. S6 is also maximally phosphorylated in unfertilized eggs following maturation in vivo. Injection of a partially purified preparation of maturation-promoting factor into immature oocytes induces immediate phosphorylation of S6 and rapidly increases the rate of protein synthesis. Moreover, incubation of ribosomes with this factor and radiolabeled ATP results in labeling of S6. These findings suggest that S6 phosphorylation may be important in the control of protein synthesis during maturation and may also play a role in the mechanism of action of maturation-promoting factor. Images PMID:7045876

  8. Castration alters protein balance after high-frequency muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Fukuda, David H; Rossetti, Michael L; Hoffman, Jay R; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-01

    Resistance exercise increases muscle mass by shifting protein balance in favor of protein accretion. Androgens independently alter protein balance, but it is unknown whether androgens alter this measure after resistance exercise. To answer this, male mice were subjected to sham or castration surgery 7-8 wk before undergoing a bout of unilateral, high-frequency, electrically induced muscle contractions in the fasted or refed state. Puromycin was injected 30 min before euthanasia to measure protein synthesis. The tibialis anterior was analyzed 4 h postcontraction. In fasted mice, neither basal nor stimulated rates of protein synthesis were affected by castration despite lower phosphorylation of mechanistic target of rapamycin in complex 1 (mTORC1) substrates [p70S6K1 (Thr389) and 4E-BP1 (Ser65)]. Markers of autophagy (LC3 II/I ratio and p62 protein content) were elevated by castration, and these measures remained elevated above sham values after contractions. Furthermore, in fasted mice, the protein content of Regulated in Development and DNA Damage 1 (REDD1) was correlated with LC3 II/I in noncontracted muscle, whereas phosphorylation of uncoordinated like kinase 1 (ULK1) (Ser757) was correlated with LC3 II/I in the contracted muscle. When mice were refed before contractions, protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were not affected by castration in either the noncontracted or contracted muscle. Conversely, markers of autophagy remained elevated in the muscles of refed, castrated mice even after contractions. These data suggest the castration-mediated elevation in baseline autophagy reduces the absolute positive shift in protein balance after muscle contractions in the refed or fasted states.

  9. Phosphorylation at serine 52 and 635 does not alter the transport properties of glucosinolate transporter AtGTR1

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how plants regulate transporters of defense compounds. In A. thaliana, glucosinolates are transported between tissues by NPF2.10 (AtGTR1) and NPF2.11 (AtGTR2). Mining of the PhosPhat4.0 database showed two cytosol exposed phosphorylation sites for AtGTR1 and one membrane-buried phosphorylation site for AtGTR2. In this study, we investigate whether mutation of the two potential regulatory sites of AtGTR1 affected transport of glucosinolates in Xenopus oocytes. Characterization of AtGTR1 phosphorylation mutants showed that phosphorylation of AtGTR1 - at the two reported phosphorylation sites - is not directly involved in regulating AtGTR1 transport activity. We hypothesize a role for AtGTR1-phosphorylation in regulating protein-protein interactions. PMID:26340317

  10. Phosphorylation at serine 52 and 635 does not alter the transport properties of glucosinolate transporter AtGTR1.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how plants regulate transporters of defense compounds. In A. thaliana, glucosinolates are transported between tissues by NPF2.10 (AtGTR1) and NPF2.11 (AtGTR2). Mining of the PhosPhat4.0 database showed two cytosol exposed phosphorylation sites for AtGTR1 and one membrane-buried phosphorylation site for AtGTR2. In this study, we investigate whether mutation of the two potential regulatory sites of AtGTR1 affected transport of glucosinolates in Xenopus oocytes. Characterization of AtGTR1 phosphorylation mutants showed that phosphorylation of AtGTR1 - at the two reported phosphorylation sites - is not directly involved in regulating AtGTR1 transport activity. We hypothesize a role for AtGTR1-phosphorylation in regulating protein-protein interactions.

  11. Revisiting Frank–Starling: regulatory light chain phosphorylation alters the rate of force redevelopment (k tr) in a length‐dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    West, Timothy G.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation has been shown to alter the ability of muscle to produce force and power during shortening and to alter the rate of force redevelopment (k tr) at submaximal [Ca2+].Increasing RLC phosphorylation ∼50% from the in vivo level in maximally [Ca2+]‐activated cardiac trabecula accelerates k tr.Decreasing RLC phosphorylation to ∼70% of the in vivo control level slows k tr and reduces force generation. k tr is dependent on sarcomere length in the physiological range 1.85–1.94 μm and RLC phosphorylation modulates this response.We demonstrate that Frank–Starling is evident at maximal [Ca2+] activation and therefore does not necessarily require length‐dependent change in [Ca2+]‐sensitivity of thin filament activation.The stretch response is modulated by changes in RLC phosphorylation, pinpointing RLC phosphorylation as a modulator of the Frank–Starling law in the heart.These data provide an explanation for slowed systolic function in the intact heart in response to RLC phosphorylation reduction. Abstract Force and power in cardiac muscle have a known dependence on phosphorylation of the myosin‐associated regulatory light chain (RLC). We explore the effect of RLC phosphorylation on the ability of cardiac preparations to redevelop force (k tr) in maximally activating [Ca2+]. Activation was achieved by rapidly increasing the temperature (temperature‐jump of 0.5–20ºC) of permeabilized trabeculae over a physiological range of sarcomere lengths (1.85–1.94 μm). The trabeculae were subjected to shortening ramps over a range of velocities and the extent of RLC phosphorylation was varied. The latter was achieved using an RLC‐exchange technique, which avoids changes in the phosphorylation level of other proteins. The results show that increasing RLC phosphorylation by 50% accelerates k tr by ∼50%, irrespective of the sarcomere length, whereas decreasing phosphorylation by 30% slows k tr by ∼50

  12. dbPPT: a comprehensive database of protein phosphorylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han; Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ren, Jian; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important protein post-translational modifications, the reversible phosphorylation is critical for plants in regulating a variety of biological processes such as cellular metabolism, signal transduction and responses to environmental stress. Numerous efforts especially large-scale phosphoproteome profiling studies have been contributed to dissect the phosphorylation signaling in various plants, while a large number of phosphorylation events were identified. To provide an integrated data resource for further investigations, here we present a comprehensive database of dbPPT (database of Phosphorylation site in PlanTs, at http://dbppt.biocuckoo.org), which contains experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in proteins from plants. The phosphorylation sites in dbPPT were manually curated from the literatures, whereas datasets in other public databases were also integrated. In total, there were 82,175 phosphorylation sites in 31,012 proteins from 20 plant organisms in dbPPT, presenting a larger quantity of phosphorylation sites and a higher coverage of plant species in comparison with other databases. The proportions of residue types including serine, threonine and tyrosine were 77.99, 17.81 and 4.20%, respectively. All the phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites in the database were critically annotated. Since the phosphorylation signaling in plants attracted great attention recently, such a comprehensive resource of plant protein phosphorylation can be useful for the research community. Database URL: http://dbppt.biocuckoo.or © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. dbPPT: a comprehensive database of protein phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ren, Jian; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important protein post-translational modifications, the reversible phosphorylation is critical for plants in regulating a variety of biological processes such as cellular metabolism, signal transduction and responses to environmental stress. Numerous efforts especially large-scale phosphoproteome profiling studies have been contributed to dissect the phosphorylation signaling in various plants, while a large number of phosphorylation events were identified. To provide an integrated data resource for further investigations, here we present a comprehensive database of dbPPT (database of Phosphorylation site in PlanTs, at http://dbppt.biocuckoo.org), which contains experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in proteins from plants. The phosphorylation sites in dbPPT were manually curated from the literatures, whereas datasets in other public databases were also integrated. In total, there were 82 175 phosphorylation sites in 31 012 proteins from 20 plant organisms in dbPPT, presenting a larger quantity of phosphorylation sites and a higher coverage of plant species in comparison with other databases. The proportions of residue types including serine, threonine and tyrosine were 77.99, 17.81 and 4.20%, respectively. All the phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites in the database were critically annotated. Since the phosphorylation signaling in plants attracted great attention recently, such a comprehensive resource of plant protein phosphorylation can be useful for the research community. Database URL: http://dbppt.biocuckoo.org PMID:25534750

  14. The Impact of Phosphorylation on Electron Capture Dissociation of Proteins: A Top-Down Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bifan; Guo, Xiao; Tucholski, Trisha; Lin, Ziqing; McIlwain, Sean; Ge, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) is well suited for the characterization of phosphoproteins, with which labile phosphate groups are generally preserved during the fragmentation process. However, the impact of phosphorylation on ECD fragmentation of intact proteins remains unclear. Here, we have performed a systematic investigation of the phosphorylation effect on ECD of intact proteins by comparing the ECD cleavages of mono-phosphorylated α-casein, multi-phosphorylated β-casein, and immunoaffinity-purified phosphorylated cardiac troponin I with those of their unphosphorylated counterparts, respectively. In contrast to phosphopeptides, phosphorylation has significantly reduced deleterious effects on the fragmentation of intact proteins during ECD. On a global scale, the fragmentation patterns are highly comparable between unphosphorylated and phosphorylated precursors under the same ECD conditions, despite a slight decrease in the number of fragment ions observed for the phosphorylated forms. On a local scale, single phosphorylation of intact proteins imposes minimal effects on fragmentation near the phosphorylation sites, but multiple phosphorylations in close proximity result in a significant reduction of ECD bond cleavages. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-06

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  16. Bioinformatics Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation in Plant Systems Biology Using P3DB.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Xu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most pervasive protein post-translational modification events in plant cells. It is involved in many plant biological processes, such as plant growth, organ development, and plant immunology, by regulating or switching signaling and metabolic pathways. High-throughput experimental methods like mass spectrometry can easily characterize hundreds to thousands of phosphorylation events in a single experiment. With the increasing volume of the data sets, Plant Protein Phosphorylation DataBase (P3DB, http://p3db.org ) provides a comprehensive, systematic, and interactive online platform to deposit, query, analyze, and visualize these phosphorylation events in many plant species. It stores the protein phosphorylation sites in the context of identified mass spectra, phosphopeptides, and phosphoproteins contributed from various plant proteome studies. In addition, P3DB associates these plant phosphorylation sites to protein physicochemical information in the protein charts and tertiary structures, while various protein annotations from hierarchical kinase phosphatase families, protein domains, and gene ontology are also added into the database. P3DB not only provides rich information, but also interconnects and provides visualization of the data in networks, in systems biology context. Currently, P3DB includes the KiC (Kinase Client) assay network, the protein-protein interaction network, the kinase-substrate network, the phosphatase-substrate network, and the protein domain co-occurrence network. All of these are available to query for and visualize existing phosphorylation events. Although P3DB only hosts experimentally identified phosphorylation data, it provides a plant phosphorylation prediction model for any unknown queries on the fly. P3DB is an entry point to the plant phosphorylation community to deposit and visualize any customized data sets within this systems biology framework. Nowadays, P3DB has become one of the major

  17. Partial high-resolution structure of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated leucine-rich amelogenin protein adsorbed to hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Masica, David L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2011-07-21

    The formation of biogenic materials requires the interaction of organic molecules with the mineral phase. In forming enamel, the amelogenin proteins contribute to the mineralization of hydroxyapatite (HAp). Leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is a naturally occurring splice variant of amelogenin that comprises amelogenin’s predicted HAp binding domains. We determined the partial structure of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated LRAP variants bound to HAp using combined solid-state NMR (ssNMR) and ssNMR-biased computational structure prediction. The ssNMR measurements indicate a largely extended structure for both variants, though some measurements are consistent with a partially helical N-terminal segment. Structure prediction was biased using 21 ssNMR measurements at five HAp crystal faces. The predicted fold of LRAP is similar at all HAp faces studied, regardless of phosphorylation. LRAP’s predicted structure is relatively extended with a helix-turn-helix motif in the N-terminal domain and some helix in the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain of the phosphorylated variant binds HAp more tightly than the N-terminal domain of the non-phosphorylated variant. Both variants are predicted to preferentially bind the {010} HAp crystal face providing further evidence that amelogenins block crystal growth on the a and b faces to allow elongated crystals in the c-axis. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  18. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  19. STATE TRANSITION7-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Modulated by Changing Environmental Conditions, and Its Absence Triggers Remodeling of Photosynthetic Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Sonja Verena; Scholz, Martin; Trompelt, Kerstin; Barth, Johannes; Gäbelein, Philipp; Steinbeck, Janina; Xue, Huidan; Clowez, Sophie; Fucile, Geoffrey; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Fufezan, Christian; Hippler, Michael

    2015-06-01

    In plants and algae, the serine/threonine kinase STN7/STT7, orthologous protein kinases in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), respectively, is an important regulator in acclimation to changing light environments. In this work, we assessed STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation under high light in C. reinhardtii, known to fully induce the expression of light-harvesting complex stress-related protein3 (LHCSR3) and a nonphotochemical quenching mechanism, in relationship to anoxia where the activity of cyclic electron flow is stimulated. Our quantitative proteomics data revealed numerous unique STT7 protein substrates and STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation variations that were reliant on the environmental condition. These results indicate that STT7-dependent phosphorylation is modulated by the environment and point to an intricate chloroplast phosphorylation network responding in a highly sensitive and dynamic manner to environmental cues and alterations in kinase function. Functionally, the absence of the STT7 kinase triggered changes in protein expression and photoinhibition of photosystem I (PSI) and resulted in the remodeling of photosynthetic complexes. This remodeling initiated a pronounced association of LHCSR3 with PSI-light harvesting complex I (LHCI)-ferredoxin-NADPH oxidoreductase supercomplexes. Lack of STT7 kinase strongly diminished PSII-LHCII supercomplexes, while PSII core complex phosphorylation and accumulation were significantly enhanced. In conclusion, our study provides strong evidence that the regulation of protein phosphorylation is critical for driving successful acclimation to high light and anoxic growth environments and gives new insights into acclimation strategies to these environmental conditions. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  1. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of PSD-95 PDZ Domains Reveals Fine-Tuned Regulation of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Søren W; Albertsen, Louise; Moran, Griffin E; Levesque, Brié; Pedersen, Stine B; Bartels, Lina; Wapenaar, Hannah; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Mingjie; Bowen, Mark E; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2017-09-15

    The postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa (PSD-95) is a key scaffolding protein that controls signaling at synapses in the brain through interactions of its PDZ domains with the C-termini of receptors, ion channels, and enzymes. PSD-95 is highly regulated by phosphorylation. To explore the effect of phosphorylation on PSD-95, we used semisynthetic strategies to introduce phosphorylated amino acids at four positions within the PDZ domains and examined the effects on interactions with a large set of binding partners. We observed complex effects on affinity. Most notably, phosphorylation at Y397 induced a significant increase in affinity for stargazin, as confirmed by NMR and single molecule FRET. Additionally, we compared the effects of phosphorylation to phosphomimetic mutations, which revealed that phosphomimetics are ineffective substitutes for tyrosine phosphorylation. Our strategy to generate site-specifically phosphorylated PDZ domains provides a detailed understanding of the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of PSD-95 interactions.

  2. Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation and Its Functional Impact on Protein-Protein Interactions via Text Mining of the Scientific Literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghua; Ross, Karen E; Huang, Hongzhan; Ren, Jia; Li, Gang; Vijay-Shanker, K; Wu, Cathy H; Arighi, Cecilia N

    2017-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are one of the main contributors to the diversity of proteoforms in the proteomic landscape. In particular, protein phosphorylation represents an essential regulatory mechanism that plays a role in many biological processes. Protein kinases, the enzymes catalyzing this reaction, are key participants in metabolic and signaling pathways. Their activation or inactivation dictate downstream events: what substrates are modified and their subsequent impact (e.g., activation state, localization, protein-protein interactions (PPIs)). The biomedical literature continues to be the main source of evidence for experimental information about protein phosphorylation. Automatic methods to bring together phosphorylation events and phosphorylation-dependent PPIs can help to summarize the current knowledge and to expose hidden connections. In this chapter, we demonstrate two text mining tools, RLIMS-P and eFIP, for the retrieval and extraction of kinase-substrate-site data and phosphorylation-dependent PPIs from the literature. These tools offer several advantages over a literature search in PubMed as their results are specific for phosphorylation. RLIMS-P and eFIP results can be sorted, organized, and viewed in multiple ways to answer relevant biological questions, and the protein mentions are linked to UniProt identifiers.

  3. Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation in pea epicotyl segments

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Chengappa, S.; Raghothama, K.G.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation were studied by labeling pea epicotyl segments with (/sup 32/P) PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ and analyzing the phosphoproteins by two dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Analysis of phosphoproteins revealed auxin-regulated changes in the phosphorylation of specific polypeptides. In the presence of auxin, phosphorylation of 23,000, 82,000, 105,000 and 110,000 molecular weight polypeptides was markedly decreased whereas phosphorylation of 19,000, 24,000, 28,000 molecular weight polypeptides was increased. Some of these changes are very rapid and could be observed within minutes. Furthermore, their studies with calmodulin antagonists indicate the possible involvement of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and/or phosphatases in auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation. In view of these results, they suggest that auxin-regulated protein phosphorylation could be the one of the earliest events in regulating diverse physiological processes by this hormone.

  4. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Danielle M.; Murray, Christian M.; Ketelaar, KassaDee J.; Thomas, Joseph J.; Villalobos, Jose A.; Wallace, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  5. The Sts Proteins Target Tyrosine Phosphorylated, Ubiquitinated Proteins within TCR Signaling Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Carpino, N.; Chen, Y; Nassar, N; Oh, H

    2009-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) detects the presence of infectious pathogens and activates numerous intracellular signaling pathways. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination serve as key regulatory mechanisms downstream of the TCR. Negative regulation of TCR signaling pathways is important in controlling the immune response, and the Suppressor of TCR Signaling proteins (Sts-1 and Sts-2) have been shown to function as critical negative regulators of TCR signaling. Although their mechanism of action has yet to be fully uncovered, it is known that the Sts proteins possess intrinsic phosphatase activity. Here, we demonstrate that Sts-1 and Sts-2 are instrumental in down-modulating proteins that are dually modified by both protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Specifically, both naive and activated T cells derived from genetically engineered mice that lack the Sts proteins display strikingly elevated levels of tyrosine phosphorylated, ubiquitinated proteins following TCR stimulation. The accumulation of the dually modified proteins is transient, and in activated T cells but not naive T cells is significantly enhanced by co-receptor engagement. Our observations hint at a novel regulatory mechanism downstream of the T cell receptor.

  6. Phosphorylation-dependent interaction of the synaptic vesicle proteins cysteine string protein and synaptotagmin I.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Gareth J O; Morgan, Alan

    2002-01-01

    The secretory vesicle cysteine string proteins (CSPs) are members of the DnaJ family of chaperones, and function at late stages of Ca2+-regulated exocytosis by an unknown mechanism. To determine novel binding partners of CSPs, we employed a pull-down strategy from purified rat brain membrane or cytosolic proteins using recombinant hexahistidine-tagged (His(6)-)CSP. Western blotting of the CSP-binding proteins identified synaptotagmin I to be a putative binding partner. Furthermore, pull-down assays using cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-phosphorylated CSP recovered significantly less synaptotagmin. Complexes containing CSP and synaptotagmin were immunoprecipitated from rat brain membranes, further suggesting that these proteins interact in vivo. Binding assays in vitro using recombinant proteins confirmed a direct interaction between the two proteins and demonstrated that the PKA-phosphorylated form of CSP binds synaptotagmin with approximately an order of magnitude lower affinity than the non-phosphorylated form. Genetic studies have implicated each of these proteins in the Ca2+-dependency of exocytosis and, since CSP does not bind Ca2+, this novel interaction might explain the Ca2+-dependent actions of CSP. PMID:11931641

  7. The Protein Kinase A Pathway Contributes to Hg2+-Induced Alterations in Phosphorylation and Subcellular Distribution of Occludin Associated with Increased Tight Junction Permeability of Salivary Epithelial Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Kawedia, Jitesh D.; Jiang, Mengmeng; Kulkarni, Amit; Waechter, Holly E.; Matlin, Karl S.; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Menon, Anil G.

    2009-01-01

    Hg2+ is commonly used as an inhibitor of many aquaporins during measurements of transcellular water transport. To investigate whether it could also act on the paracellular water transport pathway, we asked whether addition of Hg2+ affected transport of radiolabeled probes through tight junctions of a salivary epithelial cell monolayer. Inclusion of 1 mM Hg2+ decreased transepithelial electrical resistance by 8-fold and augmented mannitol and raffinose flux by 13-fold, which translated into an estimated 44% increase in pore radius at the tight junction. These Hg2+-induced effects could be partially blocked by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl) amino) ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, 2HCl (H89), suggesting that both-PKA dependent and PKA-independent mechanisms contribute to tight junction regulation. Western blot analyses showed a 2-fold decrease in tight junction-associated occludin after Hg2+ treatment and the presence of a novel hyperphosphorylated form of occludin in the cytoplasmic fraction. These findings were corroborated by confocal imaging. The results from this study reveal a novel contribution of the PKA pathway in Hg2+-induced regulation of tight junction permeability in the salivary epithelial barrier. Therapeutically, this could be explored for pharmacological intervention in the treatment of dry mouth, Sjögren’s syndrome, and possibly other disorders of fluid transport. PMID:18550693

  8. The protein kinase A pathway contributes to Hg2+-induced alterations in phosphorylation and subcellular distribution of occludin associated with increased tight junction permeability of salivary epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Jiang, Mengmeng; Kulkarni, Amit; Waechter, Holly E; Matlin, Karl S; Pauletti, Giovanni M; Menon, Anil G

    2008-09-01

    Hg(2+) is commonly used as an inhibitor of many aquaporins during measurements of transcellular water transport. To investigate whether it could also act on the paracellular water transport pathway, we asked whether addition of Hg(2+) affected transport of radiolabeled probes through tight junctions of a salivary epithelial cell monolayer. Inclusion of 1 mM Hg(2+) decreased transepithelial electrical resistance by 8-fold and augmented mannitol and raffinose flux by 13-fold, which translated into an estimated 44% increase in pore radius at the tight junction. These Hg(2+)-induced effects could be partially blocked by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl) amino) ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, 2HCl (H89), suggesting that both-PKA dependent and PKA-independent mechanisms contribute to tight junction regulation. Western blot analyses showed a 2-fold decrease in tight junction-associated occludin after Hg(2+) treatment and the presence of a novel hyperphosphorylated form of occludin in the cytoplasmic fraction. These findings were corroborated by confocal imaging. The results from this study reveal a novel contribution of the PKA pathway in Hg(2+)-induced regulation of tight junction permeability in the salivary epithelial barrier. Therapeutically, this could be explored for pharmacological intervention in the treatment of dry mouth, Sjögren's syndrome, and possibly other disorders of fluid transport.

  9. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Hagedorn, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained /sup 32/P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a approx. 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not.

  10. Changes in protein phosphorylation during the cell cycle of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Westwood, J.T.; Church, R.B.; Wagenaar, E.B.

    1985-08-25

    The phosphorylation patterns of proteins were examined during the cell cycle of Chinese hamster ovary cells. This was accomplished by labeling synchronized cells at various times with (TSP)orthophosphate and separating the proteins by both isoelectric focusing and nonequilibrium pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The most dramatic changes occurred during late G2/M when approximately eight proteins (including vimentin, lamin B, and histones 1 and 3) showed increased phosphorylation. Ten other proteins appeared to be uniquely phosphorylated during late G2/M. Of these 10 proteins, seven were no longer phosphorylated shortly after mitosis. There is also at least one protein which showed a relative decrease in phosphorylation during late G2/M.

  11. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. A-kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Recruits Protein Kinase C to Phosphorylate Roundabout Receptors.

    PubMed

    Samelson, Bret K; Gore, Bryan B; Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Purkey, Alicia M; Colledge, Marcie; Langeberg, Lorene K; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Zweifel, Larry S; Scott, John D

    2015-05-29

    Anchoring proteins direct protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases toward selected substrates to control the efficacy, context, and duration of neuronal phosphorylation events. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 interacts with protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) to modulate second messenger signaling events. In a mass spectrometry-based screen for additional AKAP79/150 binding partners, we have identified the Roundabout axonal guidance receptor Robo2 and its ligands Slit2 and Slit3. Biochemical and cellular approaches confirm that a linear sequence located in the cytoplasmic tail of Robo2 (residues 991-1070) interfaces directly with sites on the anchoring protein. Parallel studies show that AKAP79/150 interacts with the Robo3 receptor in a similar manner. Immunofluorescent staining detects overlapping expression patterns for murine AKAP150, Robo2, and Robo3 in a variety of brain regions, including hippocampal region CA1 and the islands of Calleja. In vitro kinase assays, peptide spot array mapping, and proximity ligation assay staining approaches establish that human AKAP79-anchored PKC selectively phosphorylates the Robo3.1 receptor subtype on serine 1330. These findings imply that anchored PKC locally modulates the phosphorylation status of Robo3.1 in brain regions governing learning and memory and reward. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Photosynthetic control of Arabidopsis leaf cytoplasmic translation initiation by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Daventure, Marlène; Jossier, Mathieu; Zivy, Michel; Hodges, Michael; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation is the carbon source for plant anabolism, including amino acid production and protein synthesis. The biosynthesis of leaf proteins is known for decades to correlate with photosynthetic activity but the mechanisms controlling this effect are not documented. The cornerstone of the regulation of protein synthesis is believed to be translation initiation, which involves multiple phosphorylation events in Eukaryotes. We took advantage of phosphoproteomic methods applied to Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes harvested under controlled photosynthetic gas-exchange conditions to characterize the phosphorylation pattern of ribosomal proteins (RPs) and eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs). The analyses detected 14 and 11 new RP and eIF phosphorylation sites, respectively, revealed significant CO2-dependent and/or light/dark phosphorylation patterns and showed concerted changes in 13 eIF phosphorylation sites and 9 ribosomal phosphorylation sites. In addition to the well-recognized role of the ribosomal small subunit protein RPS6, our data indicate the involvement of eIF3, eIF4A, eIF4B, eIF4G and eIF5 phosphorylation in controlling translation initiation when photosynthesis varies. The response of protein biosynthesis to the photosynthetic input thus appears to be the result of a complex regulation network involving both stimulating (e.g. RPS6, eIF4B phosphorylation) and inhibiting (e.g. eIF4G phosphorylation) molecular events.

  14. Beryllium Alters Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Intracellular Phosphorylation and Cytokine Release in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M.; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T. Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2013-01-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide - mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We find that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1β is enhanced. Additionally, not all lipopolysaccharide - mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1β secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling. PMID:19894180

  15. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of G-Protein Cycle during Nodule Formation in Soybean[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein complexes comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits and their regulatory RGS (Regulator of G-protein Signaling) protein are conserved in all eukaryotes. We have shown that the specific Gβ and Gγ proteins of a soybean (Glycine max) heterotrimeric G-protein complex are involved in regulation of nodulation. We now demonstrate the role of Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1)-mediated phosphorylation in regulation of the G-protein cycle during nodulation in soybean. We also show that during nodulation, the G-protein cycle is regulated by the activity of RGS proteins. Lower or higher expression of RGS proteins results in fewer or more nodules, respectively. NFR1 interacts with RGS proteins and phosphorylates them. Analysis of phosphorylated RGS protein identifies specific amino acids that, when phosphorylated, result in significantly higher GTPase accelerating activity. These data point to phosphorylation-based regulation of G-protein signaling during nodule development. We propose that active NFR1 receptors phosphorylate and activate RGS proteins, which help maintain the Gα proteins in their inactive, trimeric conformation, resulting in successful nodule development. Alternatively, RGS proteins might also have a direct role in regulating nodulation because overexpression of their phospho-mimic version leads to partial restoration of nodule formation in nod49 mutants. PMID:26498905

  16. Desiccation of the resurrection plant Craterostigma plantagineum induces dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Röhrig, Horst; Schmidt, Jürgen; Colby, Thomas; Bräutigam, Anne; Hufnagel, Peter; Bartels, Dorothea

    2006-08-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of proteins is an important mechanism by which organisms regulate their reactions to external stimuli. To investigate the involvement of phosphorylation during acquisition of desiccation tolerance, we have analysed dehydration-induced protein phosphorylation in the desiccation tolerant resurrection plant Craterostigma plantagineum. Several dehydration-induced proteins were shown to be transiently phosphorylated during a dehydration and rehydration (RH) cycle. Two abundantly expressed phosphoproteins are the dehydration- and abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive protein CDeT11-24 and the group 2 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein CDeT6-19. Although both proteins accumulate in leaves and roots with similar kinetics in response to dehydration, their phosphorylation patterns differ. Several phosphorylation sites were identified on the CDeT11-24 protein using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS). The coincidence of phosphorylation sites with predicted coiled-coil regions leads to the hypothesis that CDeT11-24 phosphorylations influence the stability of coiled-coil interactions with itself and possibly other proteins.

  17. Phosphorylation state-dependent interactions of hepadnavirus core protein with host factors.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, Laurie; Adams, Christina; Hu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) are required for multiple steps of the viral life cycle. It remains unknown how the CTD phosphorylation state may modulate core protein functions but phosphorylation state-dependent viral or host interactions may play a role. In an attempt to identify host factors that may interact differentially with the core protein depending on its CTD phosphorylation state, pulldown assays were performed using the CTD of the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and human hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein, either with wild type (WT) sequences or with alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at the phosphorylation sites. Two host proteins, B23 and I2PP2A, were found to interact preferentially with the alanine-substituted CTD. Furthermore, the WT CTD became competent to interact with the host proteins upon dephosphorylation. Intriguingly, the binding site on the DHBV CTD for both B23 and I2PP2A was mapped to a region upstream of the phosphorylation sites even though B23 or I2PP2A binding to this site was clearly modulated by the phosphorylation state of the downstream and non-overlapping sequences. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mode of phosphorylation-regulated protein-protein interaction and provide new insights into virus-host interactions. © 2011 Ludgate et al.

  18. Phosphorylation State-Dependent Interactions of Hepadnavirus Core Protein with Host Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ludgate, Laurie; Adams, Christina; Hu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) are required for multiple steps of the viral life cycle. It remains unknown how the CTD phosphorylation state may modulate core protein functions but phosphorylation state-dependent viral or host interactions may play a role. In an attempt to identify host factors that may interact differentially with the core protein depending on its CTD phosphorylation state, pulldown assays were performed using the CTD of the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and human hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein, either with wild type (WT) sequences or with alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at the phosphorylation sites. Two host proteins, B23 and I2PP2A, were found to interact preferentially with the alanine-substituted CTD. Furthermore, the WT CTD became competent to interact with the host proteins upon dephosphorylation. Intriguingly, the binding site on the DHBV CTD for both B23 and I2PP2A was mapped to a region upstream of the phosphorylation sites even though B23 or I2PP2A binding to this site was clearly modulated by the phosphorylation state of the downstream and non-overlapping sequences. Together, these results demonstrate a novel mode of phosphorylation-regulated protein-protein interaction and provide new insights into virus-host interactions. PMID:22216318

  19. Serine 574 phosphorylation alters transcriptional programming of FOXO3 by selectively enhancing apoptotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhao, J; Tikhanovich, I; Kuravi, S; Helzberg, J; Dorko, K; Roberts, B; Kumer, S; Weinman, S A

    2016-04-01

    Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) is a multispecific transcription factor that is responsible for multiple and conflicting transcriptional programs such as cell survival and apoptosis. The protein is heavily post-translationally modified and there is considerable evidence that post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) regulate protein stability and nuclear-cytosolic translocation. Much less is known about how FOXO3 PTMs determine the specificity of its transcriptional program. In this study we demonstrate that exposure of hepatocytes to ethanol or exposure of macrophages to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent phosphorylation of FOXO3 at serine-574. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), mRNA and protein measurements demonstrate that p-574-FOXO3 selectively binds to promoters of pro-apoptotic genes but not to other well-described FOXO3 targets. Both unphosphorylated and p-574-FOXO3 bound to the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) promoter, but the unphosphorylated form was a transcriptional activator, whereas p-574-FOXO3 was a transcriptional repressor. The combination of increased TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and decreased Bcl-2 was both necessary and sufficient to induce apoptosis. LPS treatment of a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) induced FOXO3 S-574 phosphorylation and apoptosis. LPS-induced apoptosis was prevented by knockdown of FOXO3. It was restored by overexpressing wild-type FOXO3 but not by overexpressing a nonphosphorylatable S-574A FOXO3. Expression of an S-574D phosphomimetic form of FOXO3 induced apoptosis even in the absence of LPS. A similar result was obtained with mouse peritoneal macrophages where LPS treatment increased TRAIL, decreased Bcl-2 and induced apoptosis in wild-type but not FOXO3(-/-) cells. This work thus demonstrates that S-574 phosphorylation generates a specifically apoptotic form of FOXO3 with decreased transcriptional activity for other well-described FOXO3 functions.

  20. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  1. Calmodulin-binding proteins and protein phosphorylation in corn root tips

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, M.; Mannan, R.M.; Poovaiah, B.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a mediator of Ca{sup 2+} action, can regulate enzyme activities either directly or indirectly through protein phosphorylation by activating protein kinases. To detect CaM-binding proteins, microsomal fractions were obtained from the tip and base of corn roots (Zea mays L.) and analyzed for CaM-binding proteins using a ({sup 125}I)CaM gel overlay assay. A distinct difference with respect to number and abundance of CaM-binding proteins was observed between the microsomal membrane fractions fromt he tip an the base of the root. The root tips were found to have more CaM and also more CaM-binding proteins. These results suggest the existence of coordinated regulation in the expression of CaM and its target peptides. Changing the orientation of roots from a vertical to a horizontal position increased the phosphorylation of specific polypeptides. These changes were observed within 3 min after changing the orientation. Likewise, depletion of Ca{sup 2+} with EGTA reduced this phosphorylation, and replenishment of Ca{sup 2+} restored it.

  2. The NMR structure of dematin headpiece reveals a dynamic loop that is conformationally altered upon phosphorylation at a distal site.

    PubMed

    Frank, Benjamin S; Vardar, Didem; Chishti, Athar H; McKnight, C James

    2004-02-27

    Dematin (band 4.9) is found in the junctional complex of the spectrin cytoskeleton that supports the erythrocyte cell membrane. Dematin is a member of the larger class of cytoskeleton-associated proteins that contain a modular "headpiece" domain at their extreme C termini. The dematin headpiece domain provides the second F-actin-binding site required for in vitro F-actin bundling. The dematin headpiece is found in two forms in the cell, one of 68 residues (DHP) and one containing a 22-amino acid insert near its N terminus (DHP+22). In addition, dematin contains the only headpiece domain that is phosphorylated, in vivo. The 22-amino acid insert in DHP+22 appeared unstructured in NMR spectra; therefore, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of DHP by multidimensional NMR methods. Although the overall three-dimensional structure of DHP is similar to that of the villin headpiece, there are two novel characteristics revealed by this structure. First, unlike villin headpiece that contains a single buried salt bridge, DHP contains a buried charged cluster comprising residues Glu(39), Arg(66), Lys(70), and the C-terminal carboxylate of Phe(76). Second, (15)N relaxation experiments indicate that the longer "variable loop" region near the N terminus of DHP (residues 20-29) is dynamic, undergoing significantly greater motions that the rest of the structure. Furthermore, NMR chemical shift changes indicate that the conformation of the dynamic variable loop is altered by phosphorylation of serine 74, which is far in the sequence from the variable loop region. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of the dematin headpiece acts as a conformational switch within this headpiece domain.

  3. Multisite phosphorylation of 14-3-3 proteins by calcium-dependent protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Swatek, Kirby N.; Wilson, Rashaun S.; Ahsan, Nagib; Tritz, Rebecca L.; Thelen, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant 14-3-3 proteins are phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo; however, the protein kinase(s) responsible are unknown. Of the 34 CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) paralogues in Arabidopsis thaliana, three (CPK1, CPK24 and CPK28) contain a canonical 14-3-3-binding motif. These three, in addition to CPK3, CPK6 and CPK8, were tested for activity against recombinant 14-3-3 proteins χ and ε. Using an MS-based quantitative assay we demonstrate phosphorylation of 14-3-3 χ and ε at a total of seven sites, one of which is an in vivo site discovered in Arabidopsis. CPK autophosphorylation was also comprehensively monitored by MS and revealed a total of 45 sites among the six CPKs analysed, most of which were located within the N-terminal variable and catalytic domains. Among these CPK autophosphorylation sites was Tyr463 within the calcium-binding EF-hand domain of CPK28. Of all CPKs assayed, CPK28, which contained an autophosphorylation site (Ser43) within a canonical 14-3-3-binding motif, showed the highest activity against 14-3-3 proteins. Phosphomimetic mutagenesis of Ser72 to aspartate on 14-3-3χ, which is adjacent to the 14-3-3-binding cleft and conserved among all 14-3-3 isoforms, prevented 14-3-3-mediated inhibition of phosphorylated nitrate reductase. PMID:24438037

  4. Topographic regulation of cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation by multimeric complexes in the squid giant fiber system.

    PubMed

    Grant, P; Diggins, M; Pant, H C

    1999-07-01

    In mammalian and squid nervous systems, the phosphorylation of neurofilament proteins (NFs) seems to be topographically regulated. Although NFs and relevant kinases are synthesized in cell bodies, phosphorylation of NFs, particularly in the lys-ser-pro (KSP) repeats in NF-M and NF-H tail domains, seem to be restricted to axons. To explore the factors regulating the cellular compartmentalization of NF phosphorylation, we separated cell bodies (GFL) from axons in the squid stellate ganglion and compared the kinase activity in the respective lysates. Although total kinase activity was similar in each lysate, the profile of endogenous phosphorylated substrates was strikingly different. Neurofilament protein 220 (NF220), high-molecular-weight NF protein (HMW), and tubulin were the principal phosphorylated substrates in axoplasm, while tubulin was the principal GFL phosphorylated substrate, in addition to highly phosphorylated low-molecular-weight proteins. Western blot analysis showed that whereas both lysates contained similar kinases and cytoskeletal proteins, phosphorylated NF220 and HMW were completely absent from the GFL lysate. These differences were highlighted by P13(suc1) affinity chromatography, which revealed in axoplasm an active multimeric phosphorylation complex(es), enriched in cytoskeletal proteins and kinases; the equivalent P13 GFL complex exhibited six to 20 times less endogenous and exogenous phosphorylation activity, respectively, contained fewer cytoskeletal proteins and kinases, and expressed a qualitatively different cdc2-like kinase epitope, 34 kDa rather than 49 kDa. Cell bodies and axons share a similar repertoire of molecular consitutents; however, the data suggest that the cytoskeletal/kinase phosphorylation complexes extracted from each cellular compartment by P13 are fundamentally different. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  6. Single color fluorescent indicators of protein phosphorylation for multicolor imaging of intracellular signal flow dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yasutoshi; Sato, Moritoshi; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2004-10-15

    Existing monitoring methods for protein phosphorylation involved in intracellular signal transduction in vivo are exclusively based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which needs the measurement of the change in fluorescence intensities at two wavelengths. Therefore, it is difficult to monitor protein phosphorylation together with other related signaling processes, such as second messengers and protein translocation. To overcome this problem, we developed novel fluorescent indicators, each containing a differently colored (cyan and green) single fluorophore. The present indicator is a tandem fusion protein containing a kinase substrate domain, a circularly permuted fluorescent protein (cpFP), and a phosphorylation recognition domain. The cpFP is obtained by dividing a green fluorescent protein mutant (GFP) at residue 144-145 and linking the carboxy and amino portions thereof with a peptide linker. The substrate domain used in this study is a peptide sequence that is phosphorylated by insulin receptor. Phosphorylation of the substrate domain induces its interaction with the phosphorylation recognition domain, which causes a conformational change in the cpFP and a change in its fluorescence. The cyan and green indicators exhibited 10% decrease and 15% increase, respectively, in their fluorescence intensities upon phosphorylation. Using this cyan indicator and GFP-tagged mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), we found that insulin-induced protein phosphorylation occurred immediately upon the addition of insulin, whereas nuclear translocation of MAPK occurred 7 min later. By tailoring the substrate domains and the phosphorylation recognition domains in these cyan and green indicators, the present approach should be applicable to the in vivo analysis of a broad range of protein phosphorylation processes, together with other intracellular signaling processes.

  7. Crosstalk between signaling pathways provided by single and multiple protein phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Demir, Emek; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular fate depends on the spatio-temporal separation and integration of signaling processes which can be provided by phosphorylation events. In this study we identify the crucial points in signaling crosstalk which can be triggered by discrete phosphorylation events on a single target protein. We integrated the data on individual human phosphosites with the evidence on their corresponding kinases, the functional consequences on phosphorylation on activity of the target protein and corresponding pathways. Our results show that there is a substantial fraction of phosphosites that can play critical roles in crosstalk between alternative or redundant pathways and regulatory outcome of phosphorylation can be linked to a type of phosphorylated residue. These regulatory phosphosites can serve as hubs in the signal flow and their functional roles are directly connected to their specific properties. Namely, phosphosites with similar regulatory functions are phosphorylated by the same kinases and participate in regulation of similar biochemical pathways. Such sites are more likely to cluster in sequence and space unlike sites with antagonistic outcomes of their phosphorylation on a target protein. In addition we found that in silico phosphorylation of sites with similar functional consequences have comparable outcomes on a target protein stability. An important role of phosphorylation sites in biological crosstalk is evident from the analysis of their evolutionary conservation. PMID:25451034

  8. Auxin effects on in vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in pea. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, S.R.; Ray, P.M.

    1987-04-01

    Terminal 8mm sections from the third internode of dark grown 7 day old Pisum sativum cv Alaska seedlings were separated into membrane and soluble fractions. SDS gradient PAGE identified approximately 50 in vivo phosphorylated proteins and proved superior to 2-D SDS PAGE in terms of resolution and repeatability. Addition of indoleacetic acid (IAA), fusicoccin, or 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to membranes resulted in no detectable change in the number or phosphorylation level of the labeled proteins during in vitro phosphorylation in the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium. Similar results were obtained with soluble proteins. In the absence of calcium, the level of in vitro protein phosphorylation was much less, but not auxin effects could be identified. Furthermore, treatment of the sections with IAA in vivo followed by cell fractionation and in vitro phosphorylation failed to identify auxin responsive proteins. Lastly, when sections were labeled with /sup 32/P inorganic phosphate in the presence of 17 uM IAA, no auxin specific changes were found in the level of phosphorylation or in the number of phosphorylated proteins. Auxin effects on phosphorylation are thus slight or below their detection limit.

  9. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Brinkley, William R.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2007-11-16

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation specific antibody that labels the CPC using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A mitotic phosphorylation motif (PX{G/T/S}{L/M}[pS]P or WGL[pS]P) was identified in 11 proteins including Fzr/Cdh1 and RIC-8, two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B and TD-60, as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A, and Cdk1, a likely kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins including SMAD2, Plk3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and Plk3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation specific antibodies, and in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlates with its localization to the mitotic apparatus. A mutagenesis approach was used to show INCENP phosphorylation is required for midbody localization. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of critical proteins during mitosis.

  10. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Bae, Chang-Dae; Park, Joobae

    2009-11-30

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions.

  11. Characterization of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung Uk; Kim, Hyun-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2), has been recently shown to be involved in the assembly and maintenance of mitotic spindle and also plays an essential role in maintaining the fidelity of chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis, and characterized the mechanism and functional importance of phosphorylation at one of the mitosis-specific phosphorylation residues (i.e., Thr-622). However, the phosphorylation events at the remaining mitotic phosphorylation sites of TMAP have not been fully characterized in detail. Here, we report on generation and characterization of phosphorylated Thr-578- and phosphorylated Thr-596-specific antibodies. Using the antibodies, we show that phosphorylation of TMAP at Thr-578 and Thr-596 indeed occurs specifically during mitosis. Immunofluorescent staining using the antibodies shows that these residues become phosphorylated starting at prophase and then become rapidly dephosphorylated soon after initiation of anaphase. Subtle differences in the kinetics of phosphorylation between Thr-578 and Thr-596 imply that they may be under different mechanisms of phosphorylation during mitosis. Unlike the phosphorylation-deficient mutant form for Thr-622, the mutant in which both Thr-578 and Thr-596 had been mutated to alanines did not induce significant delay in progression of mitosis. These results show that the majority of mitosis-specific phosphorylation of TMAP is limited to pre-anaphase stages and suggest that the multiple phosphorylation may not act in concert but serve diverse functions. PMID:19641375

  12. Spk1, a new kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphorylates proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Stern, D F; Zheng, P; Beidler, D R; Zerillo, C

    1991-02-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae lambda gt11 library was screened with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies in an attempt to identify a gene encoding a tyrosine kinase. A subclone derived from one positive phage was sequenced and found to contain an 821-amino-acid open reading frame that encodes a protein with homology to protein kinases. We tested the activity of the putative kinase by constructing a vector encoding a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein containing most of the predicted polypeptide. The fusion protein phosphorylated endogenous substrates and enolase primarily on serine and threonine. The gene was designated SPK1 for serine-protein kinase. Expression of the Spk1 fusion protein in bacteria stimulated serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation of bacterial proteins. These results, combined with the antiphosphotyrosine immunoreactivity induced by the kinase, indicate that Spk1 is capable of phosphorylating tyrosine as well as phosphorylating serine and threonine. In in vitro assays, the fusion protein kinase phosphorylated the synthetic substrate poly(Glu/Tyr) on tyrosine, but the activity was weak compared with serine and threonine phosphorylation of other substrates. To determine if other serine/threonine kinases would phosphorylate poly(Glu/Tyr), we tested calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The two kinases had similar tyrosine-phosphorylating activities. These results establish that the functional difference between serine/threonine- and tyrosine-protein kinases is not absolute and suggest that there may be physiological circumstances in which tyrosine phosphorylation is mediated by serine/threonine kinases.

  13. Differential Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana Plants during Day and Night

    PubMed Central

    Turkina, Maria V.; Klang Årstrand, Hanna; Vener, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis in plants is characterized by increase in the translation rates for numerous proteins and central metabolic enzymes during the day phase of the photoperiod. The detailed molecular mechanisms of this diurnal regulation are unknown, while eukaryotic protein translation is mainly controlled at the level of ribosomal initiation complexes, which also involves multiple events of protein phosphorylation. We characterized the extent of protein phosphorylation in cytosolic ribosomes isolated from leaves of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana harvested during day or night. Proteomic analyses of preparations corresponding to both phases of the photoperiod detected phosphorylation at eight serine residues in the C-termini of six ribosomal proteins: S2-3, S6-1, S6-2, P0-2, P1 and L29-1. This included previously unknown phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 at Ser-231. Relative quantification of the phosphorylated peptides using stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry revealed a 2.2 times increase in the day/night phosphorylation ratio at this site. Phosphorylation of the S6-1 and S6-2 variants of the same protein at Ser-240 increased by the factors of 4.2 and 1.8, respectively. The 1.6 increase in phosphorylation during the day was also found at Ser-58 of the 60S ribosomal protein L29-1. It is suggested that differential phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins S6-1, S6-2 and L29-1 may contribute to modulation of the diurnal protein synthesis in plants. PMID:22195043

  14. Identification of novel in vivo phosphorylation sites of the human proapoptotic protein BAD: pore-forming activity of BAD is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Polzien, Lisa; Baljuls, Angela; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E E; Fischer, Andreas; Schmitz, Werner; Zahedi, Rene P; Sickmann, Albert; Metz, Renate; Albert, Stefan; Benz, Roland; Hekman, Mirko; Rapp, Ulf R

    2009-10-09

    BAD is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 protein family that is regulated by phosphorylation in response to survival factors. Although much attention has been devoted to the identification of phosphorylation sites in murine BAD, little data are available with respect to phosphorylation of human BAD protein. Using mass spectrometry, we identified here besides the established phosphorylation sites at serines 75, 99, and 118 several novel in vivo phosphorylation sites within human BAD (serines 25, 32/34, 97, and 124). Furthermore, we investigated the quantitative contribution of BAD targeting kinases in phosphorylating serine residues 75, 99, and 118. Our results indicate that RAF kinases represent, besides protein kinase A, PAK, and Akt/protein kinase B, in vivo BAD-phosphorylating kinases. RAF-induced phosphorylation of BAD was reduced to control levels using the RAF inhibitor BAY 43-9006. This phosphorylation was not prevented by MEK inhibitors. Consistently, expression of constitutively active RAF suppressed apoptosis induced by BAD and the inhibition of colony formation caused by BAD could be prevented by RAF. In addition, using the surface plasmon resonance technique, we analyzed the direct consequences of BAD phosphorylation by RAF with respect to association with 14-3-3 and Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) proteins. Phosphorylation of BAD by active RAF promotes 14-3-3 protein association, in which the phosphoserine 99 represented the major binding site. Finally, we show here that BAD forms channels in planar bilayer membranes in vitro. This pore-forming capacity was dependent on phosphorylation status and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Collectively, our findings provide new insights into the regulation of BAD function by phosphorylation.

  15. The NMDA and AMPA/KA receptors are involved in glutamate-induced alterations of occludin expression and phosphorylation in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    András, Ibolya E; Deli, Mária A; Veszelka, Szilvia; Hayashi, Kentaro; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2007-08-01

    Glutamate levels increase dramatically in cerebral ischemia and stroke. This may lead to opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and induce further brain damage. Because endothelial tight junctions are critical elements of the BBB integrity, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of glutamate-induced alterations of the tight-junction protein occludin in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Transient exposure to glutamate resulted in cellular redistribution of occludin, followed by a decrease in the total level of this protein and diminished barrier function of BMECs. Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate/kainate (AMPA/KA) receptors attenuated glutamate-induced changes in occludin redistribution but not in the total protein levels. Treatment with glutamate also increased tyrosine phosphorylation and decreased threonine phosphorylation of occludin. Inhibition of the NMDA receptors by MK-801 partially protected against glutamate-induced elevation of occludin tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, pretreatment with MK-801-attenuated glutamate-mediated disruption of endothelial barrier function. Blocking of the AMPA/KA receptors by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2.3-dione (DNQX) protected against hypophosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin; however, it did not affect disruption of endothelial integrity. These findings indicate the opposite effects of the NMDA and AMPA/KA receptors on occludin phosphorylation and disruption of the BBB functions.

  16. Chronic restraint stress induces sperm acrosome reaction and changes in testicular tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Supatcharee; Burawat, Jaturon; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sampannang, Apichakan; Maneenin, Chanwit; Iamsaard, Sitthichai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress is a cause of male infertility. Although sex hormones and sperm quality have been shown to be low in stress, sperm physiology and testicular functional proteins, such as phosphotyrosine proteins, have not been documented. Objective: To investigate the acrosome status and alterations of testicular proteins involved in spermatogenesis and testosterone synthesis in chronic stress in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, male rats were divided into 2 groups (control and chronic stress (CS), n=7). CS rats were immobilized (4 hr/day) for 42 consecutive days. The blood glucose level (BGL), corticosterone, testosterone, acrosome status, and histopathology were examined. The expressions of testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and phosphorylated proteins were analyzed. Results: Results showed that BGL (71.25±2.22 vs. 95.60±3.36 mg/dl), corticosterone level (24.33±4.23 vs. 36.9±2.01 ng/ml), acrosome reacted sperm (3.25±1.55 vs. 17.71±5.03%), and sperm head abnormality (3.29±0.71 vs. 6.21±1.18%) were significantly higher in CS group in comparison with control. In contrast, seminal vesicle (0.41±0.05 vs. 0.24±0.07 g/100g), testosterone level (3.37±0.79 vs. 0.61±0.29 ng/ml), and sperm concentration (115.33±7.70 vs. 79.13±3.65×106 cells/ml) of CS were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Some atrophic seminiferous tubules and low sperm mass were apparent in CS rats. The expression of CYP11A1 except StAR protein was markedly decreased in CS rats. In contrast, a 55 kDa phosphorylated protein was higher in CS testes. Conclusion: CS decreased the expression of CYP11A, resulting in decreased testosterone, and increased acrosome-reacted sperm, assumed to be the result of an increase of 55 kDa phosphorylated protein. PMID:27525328

  17. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. II. Activation of a protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal protein S6

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P. )

    1989-09-01

    As an initial attempt to identify early steps in insulin action that may be involved in the growth responses of neurons to insulin, we investigated whether insulin receptor activation increases the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 in cultured fetal neurons and whether activation of a protein kinase is involved in this process. When neurons were incubated for 2 h with 32Pi, the addition of insulin (100 ng/ml) for the final 30 min increased the incorporation of 32Pi into a 32K microsomal protein. The incorporation of 32Pi into the majority of other neuronal proteins was unaltered by the 30-min exposure to insulin. Cytosolic extracts from insulin-treated neurons incubated in the presence of exogenous rat liver 40S ribosomes and (gamma-32P)ATP displayed a 3- to 8-fold increase in the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 compared to extracts from untreated cells. Inclusion of cycloheximide during exposure of the neurons to insulin did not inhibit the increased cytosolic kinase activity. Activation of S6 kinase activity by insulin was dose dependent (seen at insulin concentration as low as 0.1 ng/ml) and reached a maximum after 20 min of incubation. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diolein, and Ca2+ to the in vitro kinase reaction had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Likewise, treatment of neurons with (Bu)2cAMP did not alter the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 by neuronal cytosolic extracts. We conclude that insulin activates a cytosolic protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal S6 in neurons and is distinct from protein kinase-C and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Stimulation of this kinase may play a role in insulin signal transduction in neurons.

  18. Protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of the nuclear egress core complex of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Eric; Milbradt, Jens; Svrlanska, Adriana; Strojan, Hanife; Häge, Sigrun; Kraut, Alexandra; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Amin, Bushra; Sonnewald, Uwe; Couté, Yohann; Marschall, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear egress of herpesvirus capsids is mediated by a multi-component nuclear egress complex (NEC) assembled by a heterodimer of two essential viral core egress proteins. In the case of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this core NEC is defined by the interaction between the membrane-anchored pUL50 and its nuclear cofactor, pUL53. NEC protein phosphorylation is considered to be an important regulatory step, so this study focused on the respective role of viral and cellular protein kinases. Multiply phosphorylated pUL50 varieties were detected by Western blot and Phos-tag analyses as resulting from both viral and cellular kinase activities. In vitro kinase analyses demonstrated that pUL50 is a substrate of both PKCα and CDK1, while pUL53 can also be moderately phosphorylated by CDK1. The use of kinase inhibitors further illustrated the importance of distinct kinases for core NEC phosphorylation. Importantly, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses identified five major and nine minor sites of pUL50 phosphorylation. The functional relevance of core NEC phosphorylation was confirmed by various experimental settings, including kinase knock-down/knock-out and confocal imaging, in which it was found that (i) HCMV core NEC proteins are not phosphorylated solely by viral pUL97, but also by cellular kinases; (ii) both PKC and CDK1 phosphorylation are detectable for pUL50; (iii) no impact of PKC phosphorylation on NEC functionality has been identified so far; (iv) nonetheless, CDK1-specific phosphorylation appears to be required for functional core NEC interaction. In summary, our findings provide the first evidence that the HCMV core NEC is phosphorylated by cellular kinases, and that the complex pattern of NEC phosphorylation has functional relevance.

  19. Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins and Phosphorylated Proteins in Rice Seedlings in Response to Strigolactone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangyu; Jiang, Liangrong; Zheng, Jingsheng; Huang, Rongyu; Wang, Houcong; Hong, Zonglie; Huang, Yumin

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are recently identified plant hormones that inhibit shoot branching and control various aspects of plant growth, development and interaction with parasites. Previous studies have shown that plant D10 protein is a carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase that functions in SL biosynthesis. In this work, we used an allelic SL-deficient d10 mutant XJC of rice (Oryza sativa L. spp. indica) to investigate proteins that were responsive to SL treatment. When grown in darkness, d10 mutant seedlings exhibited elongated mesocotyl that could be rescued by exogenous application of SLs. Soluble protein extracts were prepared from d10 mutant seedlings grown in darkness in the presence of GR24, a synthetic SL analog. Soluble proteins were separated on two-dimensional gels and subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteins that were expressed differentially and phosphoproteins whose phosphorylation status changed in response to GR24 treatment were identified. Eight proteins were found to be induced or down-regulated by GR24, and a different set of 8 phosphoproteins were shown to change their phosphorylation intensities in the dark-grown d10 seedlings in response to GR24 treatment. Analysis of these proteins revealed that they are important enzymes of the carbohydrate and amino acid metabolic pathways and key components of the cellular energy generation machinery. These proteins may represent potential targets of the SL signaling pathway. This study provides new insight into the complex and negative regulatory mechanism by which SLs control shoot branching and plant development. PMID:24699514

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylates EMCV, TMEV and SafV leader proteins at different sites.

    PubMed

    Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2014-08-01

    Cardioviruses of the Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and Theilovirus species encode small, amino-terminal proteins called Leaders (L). Phosphorylation of the EMCV L (LE) at two distinct sites by CK2 and Syk kinases is important for virus-induced Nup phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition. Despite similar biological activities, the LE phosphorylation sites are not conserved in the Theiloviruses, Saffold virus (LS, SafV) or Theiler׳s murine encephalitis virus (LT, TMEV) sequences even though these proteins also become phosphorylated in cells and cell-free extracts. Site prediction algorithms, combined with panels of site-specific protein mutations now identify analogous, but not homologous phosphorylation sites in the Ser/Thr and Theilo protein domains of LT and LS, respectively. In both cases, recombinant AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) was reactive with the proteins at these sites, and also with LE, modifying the same residue recognized by CK2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple functions of capsid protein phosphorylation in duck hepatitis B virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, M; Summers, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the role of phosphorylation of the capsid protein of the avian hepadnavirus duck hepatitis B virus in viral replication. We found previously that three serines and one threonine in the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the capsid protein serve as phosphorylation sites and that the pattern of phosphorylation at these sites in intracellular viral capsids is complex. In this study, we present evidence that the phosphorylation state of three of these residues affects distinct steps in viral replication. By substituting these residues with alanine in order to mimic serine, or with aspartic acid in order to mimic phosphoserine, and assaying the effects of these substitutions on various steps in virus replication, we were able to make the following inferences. (i) The presence of phosphoserines at residues 245 and 259 stimulates DNA synthesis within viral nucleocapsids. (ii) The absence of phosphoserine at residue 257 and at residues 257 and 259 stimulates covalently closed circular DNA synthesis and virus production, respectively. (iii) The presence of phosphoserine at position 259 is required for initiation of infection. The results implied that both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated capsid proteins were necessary for a nucleocapsid particle to carry out all its functions in virus replication, explaining why differential phosphorylation of the capsid protein occurs in hepadnaviruses. Whether these differentially phosphorylated proteins coexist on the same nucleocapsid, or whether the nucleocapsid acquires sequential functions through selective phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, is discussed. Images PMID:8207809

  2. In vitro phosphorylation of the movement protein of tomato mosaic tobamovirus by a cellular kinase.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Y; Hanazawa, K; Yoshioka, K; Oguchi, T; Kawakami, S; Watanabe, Y; Nishiguchi, M; Nyunoya, H

    2000-08-01

    The movement protein (MP) of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was produced in E. coli as a soluble fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase. When immobilized on glutathione affinity beads, the recombinant protein was phosphorylated in vitro by incubating with cell extracts of Nicotiana tabacum and tobacco suspension culture cells (BY-2) in the presence of [gamma-(32)P]ATP. Phosphorylation occurred even after washing the beads with a detergent-containing buffer, indicating that the recombinant MP formed a stable complex with some protein kinase(s) during incubation with the cell extract. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the MP was phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues. Phosphorylation of the MP was decreased by addition of kinase inhibitors such as heparin, suramin and quercetin, which are known to be effective for casein kinase II (CK II). The phosphorylation level was not changed by other types of inhibitor. In addition, as shown for animal and plant CK II, [gamma-(32)P]GTP was efficiently used as a phosphoryl donor. Phosphorylation was not affected by amino acid replacements at serine-37 and serine-238, but was completely inhibited by deletion of the carboxy-terminal 9 amino acids, including threonine-256, serine-257, serine-261 and serine-263. These results suggest that the MP of ToMV could be phosphorylated in plant cells by a host protein kinase that is closely related to CK II.

  3. Nuclear import of the Drosophila Rel protein Dorsal is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Drier, E A; Huang, L H; Steward, R

    1999-03-01

    In Drosophila, dorsal-ventral polarity is determined by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway that culminates in the graded nuclear localization of the Rel protein, Dorsal. Dorsal is retained in the cytoplasm by the IkappaB protein, Cactus. Signal-dependent phosphorylation of Cactus results in the degradation of Cactus and the nuclear targeting of Dorsal. We present an in-depth study of the functional importance of Dorsal phosphorylation. We find that Dorsal is phosphorylated by the ventral signal while associated with Cactus, and that Dorsal phosphorylation is essential for its nuclear import. In vivo phospholabeling of Dorsal is limited to serine residues in both ovaries and early embryos. A protein bearing mutations in six conserved serines abolishes Dorsal activity, is constitutively cytoplasmic, and appears to eliminate Dorsal phosphorylation, but still interacts with Cactus. Two individual serine-to-alanine mutations produce unexpected results. In a wild-type signaling background, a mutation in the highly conserved PKA site (S312) produces only a weak loss-of-function; however, it completely destabilizes the protein in a cactus mutant background. Significantly, the phosphorylation of another completely conserved serine (S317) regulates the high level of nuclear import found in ventral cells. We conclude that the formation of a wild-type Dorsal nuclear gradient requires the phosphorylation of both Cactus and Dorsal. The strong conservation of the serines suggests that phosphorylation of other Rel proteins is essential for their proper nuclear targeting.

  4. RegPhos: a system to explore the protein kinase–substrate phosphorylation network in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Bo-Kai Hsu, Justin; Chang, Wen-Chi; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in intracellular signal transduction. With the increasing number of experimental phosphorylation sites that has been identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, the desire to explore the networks of protein kinases and substrates is motivated. Manning et al. have identified 518 human kinase genes, which provide a starting point for comprehensive analysis of protein phosphorylation networks. In this study, a knowledgebase is developed to integrate experimentally verified protein phosphorylation data and protein–protein interaction data for constructing the protein kinase–substrate phosphorylation networks in human. A total of 21 110 experimental verified phosphorylation sites within 5092 human proteins are collected. However, only 4138 phosphorylation sites (∼20%) have the annotation of catalytic kinases from public domain. In order to fully investigate how protein kinases regulate the intracellular processes, a published kinase-specific phosphorylation site prediction tool, named KinasePhos is incorporated for assigning the potential kinase. The web-based system, RegPhos, can let users input a group of human proteins; consequently, the phosphorylation network associated with the protein subcellular localization can be explored. Additionally, time-coursed microarray expression data is subsequently used to represent the degree of similarity in the expression profiles of network members. A case study demonstrates that the proposed scheme not only identify the correct network of insulin signaling but also detect a novel signaling pathway that may cross-talk with insulin signaling network. This effective system is now freely available at http://RegPhos.mbc.nctu.edu.tw. PMID:21037261

  5. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins induced by auxins in maize embryonic tissues. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, L.; Aguilar, R.; Mendez, A.P.; de Jimenez, E.S.

    1990-11-01

    The effect of auxin on ribosomal protein phosphorylation of germinating maize (Zea mays) tissues was investigated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of ({sup 32}P) ribosomal protein patterns for natural and synthetic auxin-treated tissues were performed. Both the rate of {sup 32}P incorporation and the electrophoretic patterns were dependent on {sup 32}P pulse length, suggesting that active protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation occurred in small and large subunit proteins, in control as well as in auxin-treated tissues. The effect of ribosomal protein phosphorylation on in vitro translation was tested. Measurements of poly(U) translation rates as a function of ribosome concentration provided apparent K{sub m} values significantly different for auxin-treated and nontreated tissues. These findings suggest that auxin might exert some kind of translational control by regulating the phosphorylated status of ribosomal proteins.

  6. Involvement of histone phosphorylation in thymocyte apoptosis by protein phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, E; Nakatsuma, A; Hiraoka, R; Ishikawa, E; Enomoto, R; Yamauchi, A

    1999-07-01

    Incubation of rat thymocytes with the inhibitors of protein phosphatase such as calyculin A and okadaic acid resulted in an increase in DNA fragmentation. These effects were dependent on the concentration of the inhibitors and the incubation time. Analyses of the fragmented DNA revealed the production of approximately 50 kbp of DNA and a 180 bp DNA ladder. In addition, a laser scanning-microscopic analysis showed that these compounds caused nuclear condensation. Thus, these results demonstrated that protein phosphatase inhibitors induced thymocyte apoptosis. The inhibitors of protein phosphatase increased the phosphorylation of proteins of approximately 15 kDa. The phosphorylation of proteins preceded the DNA fragmentation induced by these inhibitors. Judging from acetic acid-urea-Triton X-100 gel electrophoresis, the phosphorylated proteins were histone H1 and H2A/H3. Therefore, these results suggest that phosphorylation of histones triggers the DNA fragmentation of thymocytes undergoing apoptosis.

  7. Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Proteins Induced by Auxins in Maize Embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Laura; Aguilar, Raúl; Méndez, Alma Pérez; de Jiménez, Estela Sánchez

    1990-01-01

    The effect of auxin on ribosomal protein phosphorylation of germinating maize (Zea mays) tissues was investigated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of [32P] ribosomal protein patterns for natural and synthetic auxin-treated tissues were performed. Both the rate of 32P incorporation and the electrophoretic patterns were dependent on 32P pulse length, suggesting that active protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation occurred in small and large subunit proteins, in control as well as in auxin-treated tissues. The effect of ribosomal protein phosphorylation on in vitro translation was tested. Measurements of poly(U) translation rates as a function of ribosome concentration provided apparent Km values significantly different for auxin-treated and nontreated tissues. These findings suggest that auxin might exert some kind of translational control by regulating the phosphorylated status of ribosomal proteins. Images Figure 3 PMID:16667828

  8. Cell Cycle Regulated Phosphorylation of the Telomere-Associated Protein TIN2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuqun; Counter, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The protein TIN2 is a member of telomere-binding protein complex that serves to cap and protect mammalian chromosome ends. As a number of proteins in this complex are phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, we investigated whether TIN2 is modified by phosphorylation as well. We performed phospho-proteomic analysis of human TIN2, and identified two phosphorylated residues, serines 295 and 330. We demonstrated that both these sites were phosphorylated during mitosis in human cells, as detected by Phos-tag reagent and phosphorylation-specific antibodies. Phosphorylation of serines 295 and 330 appeared to be mediated, at least in part, by the mitotic kinase RSK2. Specifically, phosphorylation of TIN2 at both these residues was increased upon expression of RSK2 and reduced by an inhibitor of the RSK family of kinases. Moreover, RSK2 phosphorylated TIN2 in vitro. The identification of these specifically timed post-translational events during the cell cycle suggests a potential mitotic regulation of TIN2 by phosphorylation. PMID:23977114

  9. Protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylates and inhibits the cardiac Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1.

    PubMed

    Snabaitis, Andrew K; Cuello, Friederike; Avkiran, Metin

    2008-10-10

    Sarcolemmal Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) activity is mediated by NHE isoform 1 (NHE1), which is subject to regulation by protein kinases. Our objectives were to determine whether NHE1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase B (PKB), identify any pertinent phosphorylation site(s), and delineate the functional consequences of such phosphorylation. Active PKBalpha phosphorylated in vitro a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-NHE1 fusion protein comprising amino acids 516 to 815 of the NHE1 carboxyl-terminal regulatory domain. PKBalpha-mediated phosphorylation of GST-NHE1 fusion proteins containing overlapping segments of this region localized the targeted residues to the carboxyl-terminal 190 amino acids (625 to 815) of NHE1. Mass spectrometry and phosphorylation analysis of mutated (Ser-->Ala) GST-NHE1 fusion proteins revealed that PKBalpha-mediated phosphorylation of NHE1 occurred principally at Ser648. Far-Western assays demonstrated that PKBalpha-mediated Ser648 phosphorylation abrogated calcium-activated calmodulin (CaM) binding to the regulatory domain of NHE1. In adult rat ventricular myocytes, adenovirus-mediated expression of myristoylated PKBalpha (myr-PKBalpha) increased cellular PKB activity, as confirmed by increased glycogen synthase kinase 3beta phosphorylation. Heterologously expressed myr-PKBalpha was present in the sarcolemma, colocalized with NHE1 at the intercalated disc regions, increased NHE1 phosphorylation, and reduced NHE1 activity following intracellular acidosis. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of endogenous PKB increased NHE1 activity following intracellular acidosis. Our data suggest that NHE1 is a novel PKB substrate and that its PKB-mediated phosphorylation at Ser648 inhibits sarcolemmal NHE activity during intracellular acidosis, most likely by interfering with CaM binding and reducing affinity for intracellular H(+).

  10. LHC II protein phosphorylation in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in non-photochemical quenching.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, Hanna-Leena; Srivastava, Renu; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2005-06-01

    Phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex II (LHC II) proteins is induced in light via activation of the LHC II kinase by reduction of cytochrome b(6)f complex in thylakoid membranes. We have recently shown that, besides this activation, the LHC II kinase can be regulated in vitro by a thioredoxin-like component, and H2O2 that inserts an inhibitory loop in the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation in the chloroplast. In order to disclose the complex network for LHC II protein phosphorylation in vivo, we studied phosphorylation of LHC II proteins in the leaves of npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants of Arabidopis thaliana. In comparison to wild-type, these mutants showed reduced non-photochemical quenching and increased excitation pressure of Photosystem II (PS II) under physiological light intensities. Peculiar regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation was observed in mutant leaves under illumination. The npq4-1 mutant was able to maintain a high amount of phosphorylated LHC II proteins in thylakoid membranes at light intensities that induced inhibition of phosphorylation in wild-type leaves. Light intensity-dependent changes in the level of LHC II protein phosphorylation were smaller in the npq1-2 mutant compared to the wild-type. No significant differences in leaf thickness, dry weight, chlorophyll content, or the amount of LHC II proteins were observed between the two mutant and wild-type lines. We propose that the reduced capacity of the mutant lines to dissipate excess excitation energy induces changes in the production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which consequently affects the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation.

  11. Phosphorylation of innate immune adaptor proteins MAVS, STING, and TRIF induces IRF3 activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siqi; Cai, Xin; Wu, Jiaxi; Cong, Qian; Chen, Xiang; Li, Tuo; Du, Fenghe; Ren, Junyao; Wu, You-Tong; Grishin, Nick V; Chen, Zhijian J

    2015-03-13

    During virus infection, the adaptor proteins MAVS and STING transduce signals from the cytosolic nucleic acid sensors RIG-I and cGAS, respectively, to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other antiviral molecules. Here we show that MAVS and STING harbor two conserved serine and threonine clusters that are phosphorylated by the kinases IKK and/or TBK1 in response to stimulation. Phosphorylated MAVS and STING then bind to a positively charged surface of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and thereby recruit IRF3 for its phosphorylation and activation by TBK1. We further show that TRIF, an adaptor protein in Toll-like receptor signaling, activates IRF3 through a similar phosphorylation-dependent mechanism. These results reveal that phosphorylation of innate adaptor proteins is an essential and conserved mechanism that selectively recruits IRF3 to activate the type I IFN pathway. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Connexin43 PDZ2 Binding Domain Mutants Create Functional Gap Junctions and Exhibit Altered Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chengshi; Martyn, Kendra D.; Kurata, Wendy E.; Warn-Cramer, Bonnie J.; Lau, Alan F.

    2010-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) is the most abundantly expressed gap junction protein. The C-terminal tail of Cx43 is important for regulation of gap junctions via phosphorylation of specific tyrosine and serine residues and through interactions with cellular proteins. The C-terminus of Cx43 has been shown to interact with the PDZ2 domain of the tight and adherens junction associated zona occludens 1 (ZO-1) protein. Analysis of the PDZ2 binding domain of Cx43 indicated that positions −3 and −2, and the final hydrophobic amino acid at the C-terminus, are critical for ZO-1 binding. In addition, the C-termini of connexins 40 and 45, but not Cx32, interacted with ZO-1. To evaluate the functional significance of the Cx43-ZO-1 interaction, Cx43 wild type (Cx43wt) and mutants lacking either the C-terminal hydrophobic isoleucine (Cx43ΔI382) or the last five amino acids (Cx43Δ378–382), required for ZO-1 binding in vitro, were introduced into a Cx43-deficient MDCK cell line. In vitro binding studies and coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that these Cx43 mutants failed to interact with ZO-1. Confocal and deconvolution microscopy revealed that a fraction of Cx43wt colocalized with ZO-1 at the plasma membrane. A similar colocalization pattern was observed for the Cx43ΔI382 and Cx43Δ378–382 mutants, which were translocated to the plasma membrane and formed functional gap junction channels. The wt and mutant Cx43 appeared to have similar turnover rates. However, the P2 and P3 phosphoisoforms of the Cx43 mutants were significantly reduced compared to Cx43wt. These studies indicated that the interaction of Cx43 with ZO-1 may contribute to the regulation of Cx43 phosphorylation. PMID:16247852

  13. Modifications of myofilament protein phosphorylation and function in response to cardiac arrest induced in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Mike; Previs, Michael J.; Mader, Timothy J.; Debold, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a prevalent condition with a poor prognosis, attributable in part to persistent myocardial dysfunction following resuscitation. The molecular basis of this dysfunction remains unclear. We induced cardiac arrest in a porcine model of acute sudden death and assessed the impact of ischemia and reperfusion on the molecular function of isolated cardiac contractile proteins. Cardiac arrest was electrically induced, left untreated for 12 min, and followed by a resuscitation protocol. With successful resuscitations, the heart was reperfused for 2 h (IR2) and the muscle harvested. In failed resuscitations, tissue samples were taken following the failed efforts (IDNR). Actin filament velocity, using myosin isolated from IR2 or IDNR cardiac tissue, was nearly identical to myosin from the control tissue in a motility assay. However, both maximal velocity (25% faster than control) and calcium sensitivity (pCa50 6.57 ± 0.04 IDNR vs. 6.34 ± 0.07 control) were significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced using native thin filaments (actin+troponin+tropomyosin) from IDNR samples, suggesting that the enhanced velocity is mediated through an alteration in muscle regulatory proteins (troponin+tropomyosin). Mass spectrometry analysis showed that only samples from the IR2 had an increase in total phosphorylation levels of troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tm), but both IR2 and IDNR samples demonstrated a significant shift from mono-phosphorylated to bis-phosphorylated forms of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) compared to control. This suggests that the shift to bis-phosphorylation of TnI is associated with the enhanced function in IDNR, but this effect may be attenuated when phosphorylation of Tm is increased in tandem, as observed for IR2. There are likely many other molecular changes induced following cardiac arrest, but to our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that this form cardiac arrest can alter the in vitro function of the cardiac contractile proteins

  14. Brain phosphorylation of MeCP2 at serine 164 is developmentally regulated and globally alters its chromatin association

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Gilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Costa, Mario; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Di Marino, Daniele; Barbiero, Isabella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Ausió, Juan; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 is a transcriptional regulator whose functional alterations are responsible for several autism spectrum and mental disorders. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), and particularly differential phosphorylation, modulate MeCP2 function in response to diverse stimuli. Understanding the detailed role of MeCP2 phosphorylation is thus instrumental to ascertain how MeCP2 integrates the environmental signals and directs its adaptive transcriptional responses. The evolutionarily conserved serine 164 (S164) was found phosphorylated in rodent brain but its functional role has remained uncharacterized. We show here that phosphorylation of S164 in brain is dynamically regulated during neuronal maturation. S164 phosphorylation highly impairs MeCP2 binding to DNA in vitro and largely affects its nucleosome binding and chromatin affinity in vivo. Strikingly, the chromatin-binding properties of the global MeCP2 appear also extensively altered during the course of brain maturation. Functional assays reveal that proper temporal regulation of S164 phosphorylation controls the ability of MeCP2 to regulate neuronal morphology. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis of a complex PTM-mediated functional regulation of MeCP2 potentially involving a still poorly characterized epigenetic code. Furthermore, they demonstrate the relevance of the Intervening Domain of MeCP2 for binding to DNA. PMID:27323888

  15. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation Networks in the Hypopharyngeal Gland of Honeybee Workers (Apis mellifera ligustica).

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuping; Fan, Pei; Hao, Yue; Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Cui, Ziyou; Li, Jianke

    2015-11-06

    The hypopharyngeal gland (HG) in honeybee workers changes functions according to physiological age in the bee colony from producing royal jelly (RJ) in nurse bees to digestive enzymes in foragers. The same set of secretory cells expresses different genes or proteins to create these age-dependent changes; however, it is unknown precisely how the phosphorylation network regulates physiological differences across the development of the adult worker HG. We employed high-accuracy mass-spectrometry-based proteomics to survey phosphoproteome changes in the newly emerged, nurse, and forager bees. Overall, 941, 1322, and 1196 phosphorylation sites matching 1007, 1353, and 1199 phosphopeptides from 549, 720, and 698 phosphoproteins were identified in the three ages of the HG, respectively. Specialized, interconnected phosphorylation networks within each age were found by comparing protein abundance and phosphorylation levels. This illustrates that many proteins are regulated by phosphorylation independent of their expression levels. Furthermore, proteins in key biological processes and pathways were dynamically phosphorylated with age development, including the centrosome cycle, mitotic spindle elongation, macromolecular complex disassembly, and ribosome, indicating that phosphorylation tunes protein activity to optimize cellular behavior of the HG over time. Moreover, complementary protein and phosphoprotein expression is required to support the unique physiology of secretory activity in the HG. This reported data set of the honeybee phosphoproteome significantly improves our understanding of a range of regulatory mechanisms controlling a variety of cellular processes and will serve as a valuable resource for those studying the honeybee and other insects.

  16. Antibody Array Revealed PRL-3 Affects Protein Phosphorylation and Cytokine Secretion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongyong; Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) promotes cancer metastasis and progression via increasing cell motility and invasiveness, however the mechanism is still not fully understood. Previous reports showed that PRL-3 increases the phosphorylation of many important proteins and suspected that PRL-3-enhanced protein phosphorylation may be due to its regulation on cytokines. To investigate PRL-3's impact on protein phosphorylation and cytokine secretion, we performed antibody arrays against protein phosphorylation and cytokines separately. The data showed that PRL-3 could enhance tyrosine phosphorylation and serine/threonine phosphorylation of diverse signaling proteins. Meanwhile, PRL-3 could affect the secretion of a subset of cytokines. Furthermore, we discovered the PRL-3-increased IL-1α secretion was regulated by NF-κB and Jak2-Stat3 pathways and inhibiting IL-1α could reduce PRL-3-enhanced cell migration. Therefore, our result indicated that PRL-3 promotes protein phosphorylation by acting as an 'activator kinase' and consequently regulates cytokine secretion.

  17. Antibody Array Revealed PRL-3 Affects Protein Phosphorylation and Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lin; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) promotes cancer metastasis and progression via increasing cell motility and invasiveness, however the mechanism is still not fully understood. Previous reports showed that PRL-3 increases the phosphorylation of many important proteins and suspected that PRL-3-enhanced protein phosphorylation may be due to its regulation on cytokines. To investigate PRL-3’s impact on protein phosphorylation and cytokine secretion, we performed antibody arrays against protein phosphorylation and cytokines separately. The data showed that PRL-3 could enhance tyrosine phosphorylation and serine/threonine phosphorylation of diverse signaling proteins. Meanwhile, PRL-3 could affect the secretion of a subset of cytokines. Furthermore, we discovered the PRL-3-increased IL-1α secretion was regulated by NF-κB and Jak2-Stat3 pathways and inhibiting IL-1α could reduce PRL-3-enhanced cell migration. Therefore, our result indicated that PRL-3 promotes protein phosphorylation by acting as an ‘activator kinase’ and consequently regulates cytokine secretion. PMID:28068414

  18. Impact of SNPs on Protein Phosphorylation Status in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shoukai; Chen, Lijuan; Tao, Huan; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Li, Lin; Ma, Shiwei; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wei; Xue, Lichun; Ai, Yufang; He, Huaqin

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood. In this paper, we firstly updated rice SNP resource based on the new rice genome Ver. 7.0, then systematically analyzed the potential impact of Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on the protein phosphorylation status. There were 3,897,312 SNPs in Ver. 7.0 rice genome, among which 9.9% was nsSNPs. Whilst, a total 2,508,261 phosphorylated sites were predicted in rice proteome. Interestingly, we observed that 150,197 (39.1%) nsSNPs could influence protein phosphorylation status, among which 52.2% might induce changes of protein kinase (PK) types for adjacent phosphorylation sites. We constructed a database, SNP_rice, to deposit the updated rice SNP resource and phosSNPs information. It was freely available to academic researchers at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn. As a case study, we detected five nsSNPs that potentially influenced heterotrimeric G proteins phosphorylation status in rice, indicating that genetic polymorphisms showed impact on the signal transduction by influencing the phosphorylation status of heterotrimeric G proteins. The results in this work could be a useful resource for future experimental identification and provide interesting information for better rice breeding. PMID:27845739

  19. Serine/Threonine/Tyrosine Protein Kinase Phosphorylates Oleosin, a Regulator of Lipid Metabolic Functions1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Parthibane, Velayoudame; Iyappan, Ramachandiran; Vijayakumar, Anitha; Venkateshwari, Varadarajan; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Plant oils are stored in oleosomes or oil bodies, which are surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with oleosin proteins that stabilize the structure. Recently, a structural protein, Oleosin3 (OLE3), was shown to exhibit both monoacylglycerol acyltransferase and phospholipase A2 activities. The regulation of these distinct dual activities in a single protein is unclear. Here, we report that a serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinase phosphorylates oleosin. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, we demonstrate that this kinase interacts with OLE3 and that the fluorescence was associated with chloroplasts. Oleosin-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was exclusively associated with the chloroplasts. Phosphorylated OLE3 exhibited reduced monoacylglycerol acyltransferase and increased phospholipase A2 activities. Moreover, phosphatidylcholine and diacylglycerol activated oleosin phosphorylation, whereas lysophosphatidylcholine, oleic acid, and Ca2+ inhibited phosphorylation. In addition, recombinant peanut (Arachis hypogaea) kinase was determined to predominantly phosphorylate serine residues, specifically serine-18 in OLE3. Phosphorylation levels of OLE3 during seed germination were determined to be higher than in developing peanut seeds. These findings provide direct evidence for the in vivo substrate selectivity of the dual-specificity kinase and demonstrate that the bifunctional activities of oleosin are regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:22434039

  20. Impact of SNPs on Protein Phosphorylation Status in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Shoukai; Chen, Lijuan; Tao, Huan; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Li, Lin; Ma, Shiwei; Tian, Tian; Liu, Wei; Xue, Lichun; Ai, Yufang; He, Huaqin

    2016-11-11

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood. In this paper, we firstly updated rice SNP resource based on the new rice genome Ver. 7.0, then systematically analyzed the potential impact of Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on the protein phosphorylation status. There were 3,897,312 SNPs in Ver. 7.0 rice genome, among which 9.9% was nsSNPs. Whilst, a total 2,508,261 phosphorylated sites were predicted in rice proteome. Interestingly, we observed that 150,197 (39.1%) nsSNPs could influence protein phosphorylation status, among which 52.2% might induce changes of protein kinase (PK) types for adjacent phosphorylation sites. We constructed a database, SNP_rice, to deposit the updated rice SNP resource and phosSNPs information. It was freely available to academic researchers at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn. As a case study, we detected five nsSNPs that potentially influenced heterotrimeric G proteins phosphorylation status in rice, indicating that genetic polymorphisms showed impact on the signal transduction by influencing the phosphorylation status of heterotrimeric G proteins. The results in this work could be a useful resource for future experimental identification and provide interesting information for better rice breeding.

  1. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Pattern in Sperm Proteins Isolated from Normospermic and Teratospermic Men

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Sepideh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mahdi; Ebrahim Habibi, Azadeh; Amirjanati, Naser; Lakpour, Niknam; Asgharpour, Lima; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In mammalian system, spermatozoa are not able to fertilize the oocyte immediately upon ejaculation, thus they undergo a series of biochemical and molecular changes which is termed capacitation. During sperm capacitation, signal transduction pathways are activated which lead to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated proteins have an important role in sperm capacitation such as hyperactive motility, interaction with zona pellucida and acrosome reaction. Evaluation of tyrosine phosphorylation pattern is important for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of fertilization and the etiology of sperm dysfunctions and abnormalities such as teratospermia. The goal of this study is to characterize tyrosine phosphorylation pattern in sperm proteins isolated from normospermic and teratospermic infertile men attending Avicenna Infertility Clinic in Tehran. Materials and Methods Semen samples were collected and the spermatozoa were isolated using Percoll gradient centrifugation. Then the spermatozoa were incubated up to 6h at 37°C with 5% CO2 in 3% Bovine Serum Albumin-supplemented Ham's F-10 for capacitation to take place. The total proteins from spermatozoa were extracted and were subjected to SDS-PAGE before and after capacitation. To evaluate protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern, western blotting with specific antibody against phosphorylated tyrosines was performed. Results The results upon western blotting showed: 1) at least six protein bands were detected before capacitation in the spermatozoa from normospermic samples. However, comparable levels of tyrosine phosphorylation was not observed in the spermatozoa from teratospermic samples. 2) The intensity of protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to have been increased during capacitation in the normospermic relative to the teratospermic group. Conclusion For the first time, these findings demonstrate and suggest that the differences in the types of proteins and diminished

  2. Age-related changes in the synthesis and phosphorylation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Heydari, A.; Richardson, A.

    1986-03-01

    It is well documented that the protein synthetic activity of liver tissue decreases significantly with age. However, very little information is available on the effect of age on the synthesis or phosphorylation of individual proteins. Hepatocytes were isolated from 5- to 30-month-old male Fischer F344 rats, and proteins were labeled with either (/sup 3/H)-valine or (/sup 32/P)-phosphate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to monitor the synthesis and phosphorylation of a wide variety of proteins. A dramatic increase or decrease in the synthesis of approximately 2 to 3% of the proteins was observed. Most of the proteins whose synthesis increased with age were found to be plasma proteins, e.g., acute phase proteins, synthesized by the liver. In general, the synthesis of most proteins decreased 20 to 40% with age. The phosphorylation of most proteins (over 200) did not appear to change with age. However the phosphorylation of two acidic proteins (molecular weights of 148 Kd and 130 Kd and pIs of 5.4 and 5.36, respectively) decreased with age while the phosphorylation of a basic protein (molecular weight of 57 Kd and pI of 8.09) increased with age.

  3. Phosphorylation of the VP16 transcriptional activator protein during herpes simplex virus infection and mutational analysis of putative phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Ottosen, Søren; Herrera, Francisco J.; Doroghazi, James R.; Hull, Angela; Mittal, Sheenu; Lane, William S.; Triezenberg, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    VP16 is a virion phosphoprotein of herpes simplex virus and a transcriptional activator of the viral immediate-early (IE) genes. We identified four novel VP16 phosphorylation sites (Ser18, Ser353, Ser411, and Ser452) at late times in infection, but found no evidence of phosphorylation of Ser375, a residue reportedly phosphorylated when VP16 is expressed from a transfected plasmid. A virus carrying a S375A mutation of VP16 was viable in cell culture but with a slow growth rate. The association of the mutant VP16 protein with IE gene promoters and subsequent IE gene expression was markedly reduced during infection, consistent with prior transfection and in vitro results. Surprisingly, the association of Oct-1 with IE promoters was also diminished during infection by the mutant strain. We propose that Ser375 is important for the interaction of VP16 with Oct-1, and that the interaction is required to enable both proteins to bind to IE promoters. PMID:16297954

  4. Preventing phosphorylation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a by MAP-kinases protects mice from fatty liver and visceral obesity.

    PubMed

    Kotzka, Jorg; Knebel, Birgit; Haas, Jutta; Kremer, Lorena; Jacob, Sylvia; Hartwig, Sonja; Nitzgen, Ulrike; Muller-Wieland, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a plays a pivotal role in lipid metabolism. Using the SREBP-1a expressing human hepatoma cell line HepG2 we have shown previously that human SREBP-1a is phosphorylated at serine 117 by ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Using a combination of cell biology and protein chemistry approach we show that SREBP-1a is also target of other MAPK-families, i.e. c-JUN N-terminal protein kinases (JNK) or p38 stress activated MAP kinases. Serine 117 is also the major phosphorylation site in SREBP-1a for JNK. In contrast to that the major phosphorylation sites of p38 MAPK family are serine 63 and threonine 426. Functional analyses reveal that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a does not alter protein/DNA interaction. The identified phosphorylation sites are specific for both kinase families also in cellular context. To provide direct evidence that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a is a regulatory principle of biological and clinical relevance, we generated transgenic mice expressing mature transcriptionally active N-terminal domain of human SREBP-1a variant lacking all identified phosphorylaton sites designed as alb-SREBP-1aΔP and wild type SREBP-1a designed as alb-SREBP-1a liver specific under control of the albumin promoter and a liver specific enhancer. In contrast to alb-SREBP-1a mice the phosphorylation-deficient mice develop no enlarged fatty livers under normocaloric conditions. Phenotypical examination reveales a massive accumulation of adipose tissue in alb-SREBP-1a but not in the phosphorylation deficient alb-SREBP-1aΔP mice. Moreover, preventing phosphorylation of SREBP-1a protects mice also from dyslipidemia. In conclusion, phosphorylation of SREBP-1a by ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK-families resembles a biological principle and plays a significant role, in vivo.

  5. Identification of kinases phosphorylating 13 sites in the nuclear, DNA-binding protein NUCKS.

    PubMed

    Grundt, Kirsten; Thiede, Bernd; Østvold, Anne Carine

    2017-03-01

    NUCKS is a vertebrate specific, nuclear and DNA-binding phospho protein. The protein is highly expressed in rapidly dividing cells, and is overexpressed in a number of cancer tissues. The phosphorylation of NUCKS is cell cycle and DNA-damage regulated, but little is known about the responsible kinases. By utilizing in vitro and in vivo phosphorylation assays using isolated NUCKS as well as synthetic NUCKS-derived peptides in combination with mass spectrometry, phosphopeptide mapping, phosphphoamino acid analyses, phosphospecific antibodies and the use of specific kinase inhibitors, we found that NUCKS is phosphorylated on 11 sites by CK2. At least 7 of the CK2 sites are phosphorylated in vivo. We also found that NUCKS is phosphorylated on two sites by ATM kinase and DNA-PK in vitro, and is phosphorylated in vivo by ATM kinase in γ-irradiated cells. All together, we identified three kinases phosphorylating 13 out of 39 in vivo phosphorylated sites in mammalian NUCKS. The identification of CK2 and PIKK kinases as kinases phosphorylating NUCKS in vivo provide further evidence for the involvement of NUCKS in cell cycle control and DNA repair.

  6. Cellular progesterone receptor phosphorylation in response to ligands activating protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.V.; Peralta, W.D.; Greene, G.L.; Fox, C.F.

    1987-08-14

    Progesterone receptors were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies KD68 from lysates of human breast carcinoma T47D cells labelled to steady state specific activity with /sup 32/Pi. The 120 kDa /sup 32/P-labelled progesterone receptor band was resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by autoradiography. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed serine phosphorylation, but no threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation. Treatment of the /sup 32/Pi-labelled cells with EGF, TPA or dibutyryl cAMP had no significant quantitative effect on progesterone receptor phosphorylation, though the EGF receptor and the cAMP-dependent protein kinases have been reported to catalyze phosphorylation of purified avian progesterone receptor preparations in cell free systems. Progesterone receptor phosphorylation on serine residues was increased by 2-fold in cells treated with 10 nM progesterone; EGF had no effect on progesterone-mediated progesterone receptor phosphorylation.

  7. The Roles of Phosphorylation and SHAGGY-Like Protein Kinases in Geminivirus C4 Protein Induced Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mills-Lujan, Katherine; Andrews, David L.; Chou, Chau-wen; Deom, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Even though plant cells are highly plastic, plants only develop hyperplasia under very specific abiotic and biotic stresses, such as when exposed to pathogens like Beet curly top virus (BCTV). The C4 protein of BCTV is sufficient to induce hyperplasia and alter Arabidopsis development. It was previously shown that C4 interacts with two Arabidopsis Shaggy-like protein kinases, AtSK21 and 23, which are negative regulators of brassinosteroid (BR) hormone signaling. Here we show that the C4 protein interacts with five additional AtSK family members. Bikinin, a competitive inhibitor of the seven AtSK family members that interact with C4, induced hyperplasia similar to that induced by the C4 protein. The Ser49 residue of C4 was found to be critical for C4 function, since: 1) mutagenesis of Ser49 to Ala abolished the C4-induced phenotype, abolished C4/AtSK interactions, and resulted in a mutant protein that failed to induce changes in the BR signaling pathway; 2) Ser49 is phosphorylated in planta; and 3) plant-encoded AtSKs must be catalytically active to interact with C4. A C4 N-myristoylation site mutant that does not localize to the plasma membrane and does not induce a phenotype, retained the ability to bind AtSKs. Taken together, these results suggest that plasma membrane associated C4 interacts with and co-opts multiple AtSKs to promote its own phosphorylation and activation to subsequently compromise cell cycle control. PMID:25815729

  8. Alterations in the hippocampal phosphorylated CREB expression in drug state-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, Sakineh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sepehri, Houri; Delphi, Ladan

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the possible alterations of hippocampal CREB phosphorylation in drug state-dependent memory retrieval. One-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used to assess memory retrieval in adult male NMRI mice. Pre-training administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p) or nicotine (0.7 mg/kg, s.c.) reversed ethanol-induced amnesia, indicating ethanol- or ethanol-nicotine induced state-dependent learning (STD). Using Western blot analysis, it was found that the p-CREB/CREB ratio in the hippocampus increased in the mice that showed successful memory retrieval as compared with untrained mice. In contrast, pre-training administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) decreased the hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio in comparison with the control group. The hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio enhanced in ethanol- and ethanol-nicotine induced STD. Moreover, memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN (1 mg/kg, i.p.) improved in the animals that received pre-test administration of WIN (1 mg/kg, i.p.), ethanol (0.5 g/kg, i.p.) or nicotine (0.7 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting a cross STD between the drugs. The p-CREB/CREB ratio in the hippocampus decreased in the of WIN-induced amnesia and STD groups in comparison with the control group. In addition, cross state-dependent learning between WIN and ethanol or nicotine was associated with the increase of the hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio. It can be concluded that phosphorylation of CREB in the hippocampus is a critical event underlying the interaction of co-administration of drugs on memory retrieval in passive avoidance learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A retroviral-derived peptide phosphorylates protein kinase D/protein kinase Cmu involving phospholipase C and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Day, Noorbibi K; Hitchcock, Remi; Brown, Pam G; Lerner, Danica L; Rucker, Rajivi P; Cianciolo, George J; Good, Robert A; Haraguchi, Soichi

    2003-05-01

    CKS-17, a synthetic peptide representing a unique amino acid motif which is highly conserved in retroviral transmembrane proteins and other immunoregulatory proteins, induces selective immunomodulatory functions, both in vitro and in vivo, and activates intracellular signaling molecules such as cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. In the present study, using Jurkat T-cells, we report that CKS-17 phosphorylates protein kinase D (PKD)/protein kinase C (PKC) mu. Total cell extracts from CKS-17-stimulated Jurkat cells were immunoblotted with an anti-phospho-PKCmu antibody. The results show that CKS-17 significantly phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with the PKC inhibitors GF 109203X and Ro 31-8220, which do not act directly on PKD/PKCmu, attenuates CKS-17-induced phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu. In contrast, the selective protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 does not reverse the action of CKS-17. Furthermore, a phospholipase C (PLC) selective inhibitor, U-73122, completely blocks the phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu by CKS-17 while a negative control U-73343 does not. In addition, substitution of lysine for arginine residues in the CKS-17 sequence completely abrogates the ability of CKS-17 to phosphorylate PKD/PKCmu. These results clearly indicate that CKS-17 phosphorylates PKD/PKCmu through a PLC- and PKC-dependent mechanism and that arginine residues play an essential role in this activity of CKS-17, presenting a novel modality of the retroviral peptide CKS-17 and molecular interaction of this compound with target cells.

  10. Phosphorylated protein phosphatase 2A determines poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal, I; Manso, R; Rincón, R; Caramés, C; Zazo, S; del Pulgar, T G; Cebrián, A; Madoz-Gúrpide, J; Rojo, F; García-Foncillas, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a tumour suppressor frequently inactivated in human cancer and its tyrosine-307 phosphorylation has been reported as a molecular inhibitory mechanism. Methods: Expression of phosphorylated PP2A (p-PP2A) was evaluated in 250 metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Chi-square, Kaplan–Meier and Cox analyses were used to determine correlations with clinical and molecular parameters and impact on clinical outcomes. Results: High p-PP2A levels were found in 17.2% cases and were associated with ECOG performance status (P=0.001) and presence of synchronous metastasis at diagnosis (P=0.035). This subgroup showed substantially worse overall survival (OS) (median OS, 6.0 vs 26.2 months, P<0.001) and progression-free survival (PFS) (median PFS, 3.8 vs 13.3 months, P<0.001). The prognostic impact of p-PP2A was particularly evident in patients aged <70 years (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that p-PP2A retained its prognostic impact for OS (hazard ratio 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–4.1; P<0.001) and PFS (hazard ratio 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–5.0; P<0.001). Conclusions: Phosphorylated PP2A is an alteration that determines poor outcome in metastatic CRC and represents a novel potential therapeutic target in this disease, thus enabling to define a subgroup of patients who could benefit from future treatments based on PP2A activators. PMID:25003662

  11. Phosphorylation of Human Tristetraprolin in Response to Its Interaction with the Cbl Interacting Protein CIN85

    PubMed Central

    Kedar, Vishram P.; Darby, Martyn K.; Williams, Jason G.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype member of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins and is considered to be an anti-inflammatory protein in mammals. TTP plays a critical role in the decay of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) mRNA, among others, by binding AU-rich RNA elements in the 3′-untranslated regions of this transcript and promoting its deadenylation and degradation. Methodology/Principal Findings We used yeast two-hybrid analysis to identify potential protein binding partners for human TTP (hTTP). Various regions of hTTP recovered 31 proteins that fell into 12 categories based on sequence similarities. Among these, the interactions between hTTP and CIN85, cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP), nucleolin and heat shock protein 70 were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. CIN85 and hTTP co-localized in the cytoplasm of cells as determined by confocal microscopy. CIN85 contains three SH3 domains that specifically bind a unique proline-arginine motif (PXXXPR) found in several CIN85 effectors. We found that the SH3 domains of CIN85 bound to a PXXXPR motif located near the C-terminus of hTTP. Co-expression of CIN85 with hTTP resulted in the increased phosphorylation of hTTP at serine residues in positions 66 and 93, possibly due in part to the demonstrated association of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 (MEKK4) to both proteins. The presence of CIN85 did not appear to alter hTTP's binding to RNA probes or its stimulated breakdown of TNF mRNA. Conclusions/Significance These studies describe interactions between hTTP and nucleolin, cytoplasmic PABP, heat shock protein 70 and CIN85; these interactions were initially discovered by two-hybrid analysis, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We found that CIN85 binding to a C-terminal motif within hTTP led to the increased phosphorylation of hTTP, possibly through enhanced association with MEKK4. The functional consequences to each of the members of this

  12. Machine learning approach to predict protein phosphorylation sites by incorporating evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ashis Kumer; Noman, Nasimul; Sikder, Abdur Rahman

    2010-05-21

    Most of the existing in silico phosphorylation site prediction systems use machine learning approach that requires preparing a good set of classification data in order to build the classification knowledge. Furthermore, phosphorylation is catalyzed by kinase enzymes and hence the kinase information of the phosphorylated sites has been used as major classification data in most of the existing systems. Since the number of kinase annotations in protein sequences is far less than that of the proteins being sequenced to date, the prediction systems that use the information found from the small clique of kinase annotated proteins can not be considered as completely perfect for predicting outside the clique. Hence the systems are certainly not generalized. In this paper, a novel generalized prediction system, PPRED (Phosphorylation PREDictor) is proposed that ignores the kinase information and only uses the evolutionary information of proteins for classifying phosphorylation sites. Experimental results based on cross validations and an independent benchmark reveal the significance of using the evolutionary information alone to classify phosphorylation sites from protein sequences. The prediction performance of the proposed system is better than those of the existing prediction systems that also do not incorporate kinase information. The system is also comparable to systems that incorporate kinase information in predicting such sites. The approach presented in this paper provides an efficient way to identify phosphorylation sites in a given protein primary sequence that would be a valuable information for the molecular biologists working on protein phosphorylation sites and for bioinformaticians developing generalized prediction systems for the post translational modifications like phosphorylation or glycosylation. PPRED is publicly available at the URL http://www.cse.univdhaka.edu/~ashis/ppred/index.php.

  13. An unusual protein kinase phosphorylates the chemotactic receptor of Dictystelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, K.; Klein, C. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors report the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor of Dictyostelium discoideum in partially purified plasma membranes. The protein kinase responsible for receptor phosphorylation is associated with this fraction and preferentially phosphorylates the ligand-occupied form of the receptor. 8-Azido({sup 32}P)cAMP labeling of the cell surface has shown that the cAMP receptor exists in two forms. A 45-kDa protein is predominant on unstimulated cells. cAMP stimulation results in an increased receptor phosphorylation such that the receptor migrates on NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE as a 47-kDa protein. Phosphorylation of the chemotactic receptor is not detected in membrane preparations unless cAMP is added to the incubation mixture. Only under those conditions is the phosphorylated 47-kDa form observed. The requirement for cAMP reflects the fact that the kinase involved preferentially uses the ligand-occupied receptor as a substrate. In vitro phosphorylation of the receptor does not involve tyrosine residues. The enzyme does not appear to be a cAMP- or cGMP-dependent protein kinase nor is it sensitive to guanine nucleotides, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/phospholipid, or EGTA. Similarities with the {beta}-adrenergic receptor protein kinase are discussed.

  14. Regulation of Hepatitis C Virion Production via Phosphorylation of the NS5A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Foss, Katie L.; Treadaway, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen, infecting some 170 million people worldwide. Persistent virus infection often leads to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In the infected cell many RNA directed processes must occur to maintain and spread infection. Viral genomic RNA is constantly replicating, serving as template for translation, and being packaged into new virus particles; processes that cannot occur simultaneously. Little is known about the regulation of these events. The viral NS5A phosphoprotein has been proposed as a regulator of events in the HCV life cycle for years, but the details have remained enigmatic. NS5A is a three-domain protein and the requirement of domains I and II for RNA replication is well documented. NS5A domain III is not required for RNA replication, and the function of this region in the HCV lifecycle is unknown. We have identified a small deletion in domain III that disrupts the production of infectious virus particles without altering the efficiency of HCV RNA replication. This deletion disrupts virus production at an early stage of assembly, as no intracellular virus is generated and no viral RNA and nucleocapsid protein are released from cells. Genetic mapping has indicated a single serine residue within the deletion is responsible for the observed phenotype. This serine residue lies within a casein kinase II consensus motif, and mutations that mimic phosphorylation suggest that phosphorylation at this position regulates the production of infectious virus. We have shown by genetic silencing and chemical inhibition experiments that NS5A requires casein kinase II phosphorylation at this position for virion production. A mutation that mimics phosphorylation at this position is insensitive to these manipulations of casein kinase II activity. These data provide the first evidence for a function of the domain III of NS5A and implicate NS5A as an important regulator of the RNA replication and virion assembly of HCV. The ability to

  15. Pea DNA Topoisomerase I Is Phosphorylated and Stimulated by Casein Kinase 2 and Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Narendra; Reddy, Malireddy Kodandarami; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Yadav, Badam Singh; Chandok, Meena Rani; Sopory, Sudhir Kumar

    2003-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I catalyzes the relaxation of superhelical DNA tension and is vital for DNA metabolism; therefore, it is essential for growth and development of plants. Here, we have studied the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of topoisomerase I from pea (Pisum sativum). The purified enzyme did not show autophosphorylation but was phosphorylated in an Mg2+-dependent manner by endogenous protein kinases present in pea nuclear extracts. This phosphorylation was abolished with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase and lambda phosphatase. It was also phosphorylated by exogenous casein kinase 2 (CK2), protein kinase C (PKC; from animal sources), and an endogenous pea protein, which was purified using a novel phorbol myristate acetate affinity chromatography method. All of these phosphorylations were inhibited by heparin (inhibitor of CK2) and calphostin (inhibitor of PKC), suggesting that pea topoisomerase I is a bona fide substrate for these kinases. Spermine and spermidine had no effect on the CK2-mediated phosphorylation, suggesting that it is polyamine independent. Phospho-amino acid analysis showed that only serine residues were phosphorylated, which was further confirmed using antiphosphoserine antibody. The topoisomerase I activity increased after phosphorylation with exogenous CK2 and PKC. This study shows that these kinases may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity and overall DNA metabolism in plants. PMID:12913165

  16. Phosphorylation of GRK2 by protein kinase C abolishes its inhibition by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Krasel, C; Dammeier, S; Winstel, R; Brockmann, J; Mischak, H; Lohse, M J

    2001-01-19

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are important regulators of G-protein-coupled receptor function. Two members of this family L, GRK2 and GRK5 L, have been shown to be substrates for protein kinase C (PKC). Whereas PKC-mediated phosphorylation results in inhibition of GRK5, it increases the activity of GRK2 toward its substrates probably through increased affinity for receptor-containing membranes. We show here that this increase in activity may be caused by relieving a tonic inhibition of GRK2 by calmodulin. In vitro, GRK2 was preferentially phosphorylated by PKC isoforms alpha, gamma, and delta. Two-dimensional peptide mapping of PKCalpha-phosphorylated GRK2 showed a single site of phosphorylation, which was identified as serine 29 by HPLC-MS. A S29A mutant of GRK2 was not phosphorylated by PKC in vitro and showed no phorbol ester-stimulated phosphorylation when transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. Serine 29 is located in the calmodulin-binding region of GRK2, and binding of calmodulin to GRK2 results in inhibition of kinase activity. This inhibition was almost completely abolished in vitro when GRK2 was phosphorylated by PKC. These data suggest that calmodulin may be an inhibitor of GRK2 whose effects can be abolished with PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GRK2.

  17. The MYC-Associated Protein CDCA7 Is Phosphorylated by AKT To Regulate MYC-Dependent Apoptosis and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gill, R. Montgomery; Gabor, Timothy V.; Couzens, Amber L.

    2013-01-01

    Cell division control protein A7 (CDCA7) is a recently identified target of MYC-dependent transcriptional regulation. We have discovered that CDCA7 associates with MYC and that this association is modulated in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The prosurvival kinase AKT phosphorylates CDCA7 at threonine 163, promoting binding to 14-3-3, dissociation from MYC, and sequestration to the cytoplasm. Upon serum withdrawal, induction of CDCA7 expression in the presence of MYC sensitized cells to apoptosis, whereas CDCA7 knockdown reduced MYC-dependent apoptosis. The transformation of fibroblasts by MYC was reduced by coexpression of CDCA7, while the non-MYC-interacting protein Δ(156–187)-CDCA7 largely inhibited MYC-induced transformation. These studies provide insight into a new mechanism by which AKT signaling to CDCA7 could alter MYC-dependent growth and transformation, contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:23166294

  18. Region-specific alterations of AMPA receptor phosphorylation and signaling pathways in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mark William; Lopes, Samantha Cristiane; Costa, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Rieger, Débora Kurrle; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Eyng, Helena; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Nunes, Jean Costa; Walz, Roger; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2015-08-01

    Disturbances in glutamatergic transmission and signaling pathways have been associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in humans. However, the profile of these alterations within specific regions of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex has not yet been examined. The pilocarpine model in rodents reproduces the main features of TLE in humans. The present study aims to characterize specific alterations of the glutamatergic transmission and signaling pathways in the dorsal (DH) and ventral hippocampus (VH) and temporal cortex (Ctx) of male adult Wistar rats 60 days after pilocarpine treatment (chronic period). The western blotting analyzes show a decrease of AMPA glutamate receptor subunit (GluA1)-Ser(845) phosphorylation; reduction of ERK1 and PKA activity; up-regulation of GFAP and down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAT2 expression in the DH. In contrast, in the VH it was observed a decrease of GluA1-Ser(831) phosphorylation and JNKp54 and PKC activity. In the Ctx, only ERK1 phosphorylation/activity decreased. The level of GluA1-Ser(845) phosphorylation and PKA activity (DH) and the level of GluA1-Ser(831) phosphorylation and PKC activity (VH) appear to be correlated, respectively. These findings suggest a differential imbalance of the signaling pathways involved in the site-specific phosphorylation of AMPA receptor in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we suggest that dorsal hippocampus is probably more susceptible to the impairment of glutamate uptake and gliose, since only this area displayed a significant decrease of EAAT2 and increment of GFAP. Taken together, our study suggests that specific neurochemical alterations take place in hippocampal sub regions. This approach may be valuable for understanding the onset of seizures and the alterations of neuronal excitability in specific regions and may help to establish therapeutic targets for treatment of this neuropathology.

  19. KinasePhos: a web tool for identifying protein kinase-specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Tzeng, Shih-Wei; Horng, Jorng-Tzong

    2005-07-01

    KinasePhos is a novel web server for computationally identifying catalytic kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. The known phosphorylation sites from public domain data sources are categorized by their annotated protein kinases. Based on the profile hidden Markov model, computational models are learned from the kinase-specific groups of the phosphorylation sites. After evaluating the learned models, the model with highest accuracy was selected from each kinase-specific group, for use in a web-based prediction tool for identifying protein phosphorylation sites. Therefore, this work developed a kinase-specific phosphorylation site prediction tool with both high sensitivity and specificity. The prediction tool is freely available at http://KinasePhos.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/.

  20. Computational Study of Pseudo-phosphorylation of the Microtubule associated Protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopovich, Dmitriy; Larini, Luca

    This computational study focuses on the effect of pseudo-phosphorylation on the aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau. In the axon of the neuron, tau regulates the assembly of microtubules in the cytoskeleton. This is important for both stabilization of and transport across the microtubules. One of the hallmarks of the Alzheimer's disease is that tau is hyper-phosphorylated and aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles that lay waste to the neurons. It is not known if hyper-phosphorylation directly causes the aggregation of tau into tangles. Experimentally, pseudo-phosphorylation mimics the effects of phosphorylation by mutating certain residues of the protein chain into charged residues. In this study, we will consider the fragment called PHF43 that belongs to the microtubule binding region and has been shown to readily aggregate.

  1. Identification and analysis of phosphorylation status of proteins in dormant terminal buds of poplar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Cai; Liu, Chang-Fu; Wang, Hong-Xia; Shen, Zhi-Ying; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wei, Zhi-Gang

    2011-11-11

    Although there has been considerable progress made towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of bud dormancy, the roles of protein phosphorylation in the process of dormancy regulation in woody plants remain unclear. We used mass spectrometry combined with TiO₂ phosphopeptide-enrichment strategies to investigate the phosphoproteome of dormant terminal buds (DTBs) in poplar (Populus simonii × P. nigra). There were 161 unique phosphorylated sites in 161 phosphopeptides from 151 proteins; 141 proteins have orthologs in Arabidopsis, and 10 proteins are unique to poplar. Only 34 sites in proteins in poplar did not match well with the equivalent phosphorylation sites of their orthologs in Arabidopsis, indicating that regulatory mechanisms are well conserved between poplar and Arabidopsis. Further functional classifications showed that most of these phosphoproteins were involved in binding and catalytic activity. Extraction of the phosphorylation motif using Motif-X indicated that proline-directed kinases are a major kinase group involved in protein phosphorylation in dormant poplar tissues. This study provides evidence about the significance of protein phosphorylation during dormancy, and will be useful for similar studies on other woody plants.

  2. Interleukin-1 activates a novel protein kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of Hsp27.

    PubMed

    Freshney, N W; Rawlinson, L; Guesdon, F; Jones, E; Cowley, S; Hsuan, J; Saklatvala, J

    1994-09-23

    An IL-1-stimulated protein kinase cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein hsp27 has been identified in KB cells. It is distinct from the p42 MAP kinase cascade. An upstream activator kinase phosphorylated a 40 kDa kinase (p40) upon threonine and tyrosine residues, which in turn phosphorylated a 50 kDa kinase (p50) upon threonine (and some serine) residues. p50 phosphorylated hsp27 upon serine. p40 and p50 were purified to near homogeneity. All three components were inactivated by protein phosphatase 2A, and p40 was inactivated by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. The substrate specificity of p40 differed from that of p42 and p54 MAP kinases. The upstream activator was not a MAP kinase kinase. p50 resembled MAPKAPK-2 and may be identical.

  3. Pin1: Intimate involvement with the regulatory protein kinase networks in the global phosphorylation landscape.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H; Brandl, Christopher J; Gyenis, Laszlo

    2015-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a universal regulatory mechanism that involves an extensive network of protein kinases. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 added an additional layer of complexity to these regulatory networks. We have evaluated interactions between Pin1 and the regulatory kinome and proline-dependent phosphoproteome taking into consideration findings from targeted studies as well as data that has emerged from systematic phosphoproteomic workflows and from curated protein interaction databases. The relationship between Pin1 and the regulatory protein kinase networks is not restricted simply to the recognition of proteins that are substrates for proline-directed kinases. In this respect, Pin1 itself is phosphorylated in cells by protein kinases that modulate its functional properties. Furthermore, the phosphorylation-dependent targets of Pin1 include a number of protein kinases as well as other enzymes such as phosphatases and regulatory subunits of kinases that modulate the actions of protein kinases. As a result of its interactions with numerous protein kinases and their substrates, as well as itself being a target for phosphorylation, Pin1 has an intricate relationship with the regulatory protein kinase and phosphoproteomic networks that orchestrate complex cellular processes and respond to environmental cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Proline-directed Foldases: Cell Signaling Catalysts and Drug Targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphorylation of Single Stranded RNA Virus Proteins and Potential for Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Forrest; Ataey, Pouya; Amaya, Moushimi; Bailey, Charles; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modification of proteins is a critical requirement that regulates function. Among the diverse kinds of protein post translational modifications, phosphorylation plays essential roles in protein folding, protein:protein interactions, signal transduction, intracellular localization, transcription regulation, cell cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. Protein phosphorylation is also essential for many intracellular pathogens to establish a productive infection cycle. Preservation of protein phosphorylation moieties in pathogens in a manner that mirrors the host components underscores the co-evolutionary trajectory of pathogens and hosts, and sheds light on how successful pathogens have usurped, either in part or as a whole, the host enzymatic machinery. Phosphorylation of viral proteins for many acute RNA viruses including Flaviviruses and Alphaviruses has been demonstrated to be critical for protein functionality. This review focuses on phosphorylation modifications that have been documented to occur on viral proteins with emphasis on acutely infectious, single stranded RNA viruses. The review additionally explores the possibility of repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved inhibitors as antivirals for the treatment of acute RNA viral infections. PMID:26473910

  5. 2C Proteins of Enteroviruses Suppress IKKβ Phosphorylation by Recruiting Protein Phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zheng, Zhenhua; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Liu, Qingshi; Meng, Jin; Ke, Xianliang; Hu, Qinxue; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-05-15

    The NF-κB signaling network, which is an ancient signaling pathway, plays a pivotal role in innate immunity and constitutes a first line of defense against invading pathogens, including viruses. However, numerous viruses possess evolved strategies to antagonize the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Our previous study demonstrated that the nonstructural protein 2C of enterovirus 71 (EV71), which is the major pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease, inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing IκB kinase β (IKKβ) phosphorylation. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the inhibition of IKKβ phosphorylation by EV71 2C remains largely elusive. We demonstrate that EV71 2C interacts with all isoforms of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) catalytic subunit (the PP1α, PP1β, and PP1γ isoforms) through PP1-docking motifs. EV71 2C has no influence on the subcellular localization of PP1. In addition, the PP1-binding-deficient EV71 2C mutant 3E3L nearly completely lost the ability to suppress IKKβ phosphorylation and NF-κB activation was markedly restored in the mutant, thereby indicating that PP1 binding is efficient for EV71 2C-mediated inhibition of IKKβ phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. We further demonstrate that 2C forms a complex with PP1 and IKKβ to dephosphorylate IKKβ. Notably, we reveal that other human enteroviruses, including poliovirus (PV), coxsackie A virus 16 (CVA16), and coxsackie B virus 3 (CVB3), use 2C proteins to recruit PP1, leading to the inhibition of IKKβ phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that enteroviruses exploit a novel mechanism to inhibit IKKβ phosphorylation by recruiting PP1 and IKKβ to form a complex through 2C proteins, which ultimately results in the inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The innate antiviral immunity system performs an essential function in recognizing and eliminating invading viruses. Enteroviruses include a number of important human

  6. Multisite phosphorylation of P-Rex1 by protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Juan Carlos; Seoane, Samuel; García-Alonso, Sara; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex proteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that act on the Rho/Rac family of GTP binding proteins. The activity of P-Rex proteins is regulated by several extracellular stimuli. In fact, activation of growth factor receptors has been reported to activate a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle of P-Rex1. Such cycle includes dephosphorylation of serines 313 and 319 which negatively regulate the GEF activity of P-Rex1, together with phosphorylation of serines 605 and 1169 which favour P-Rex1 GEF activity. However, the kinases that regulate phosphorylation at these different regulatory sites are largely unknown. Here we have investigated the potential regulatory action of several kinases on the phosphorylation of P-Rex1 at S313, S319, S605 and S1169. We show that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) caused phosphorylation of S313, S319 and S1169. Activation of growth factor receptors induced phosphorylation of S1169 through a mechanism that was independent of PKC, indicating that distinct kinases and mechanisms control the phosphorylation of P-Rex1 at different regulatory serines. Genetic and biochemical studies confirmed that the PKC isoform PKCδ was able to directly phosphorylate P-Rex1 at S313. Functional studies using cells with very low endogenous P-Rex1 expression, transfected with wild type P-Rex1 or a mutant form in which S313 was substituted by alanine, indicated that phosphorylation at that residue negatively regulated P-Rex1 exchange activity. We suggest that control of P-Rex1 activity depends on a highly dynamic interplay among distinct signalling routes and its multisite phosphorylation is controlled by the action of different kinases. PMID:27788493

  7. Phosphorylation of Serine 225 in Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Regulates Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Goonawardane, Niluka; Gebhardt, Anna; Bartlett, Christopher; Pichlmair, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is a phosphoprotein that plays key, yet poorly defined, roles in both virus genome replication and virion assembly/release. It has been proposed that differential phosphorylation could act as a switch to regulate the various functions of NS5A; however, the mechanistic details of the role of this posttranslational modification in the virus life cycle remain obscure. We previously reported (D. Ross-Thriepland, J. Mankouri, and M. Harris, J Virol 89:3123–3135, 2015, doi:10.1128/JVI.02995-14) a role for phosphorylation at serine 225 (S225) of NS5A in the regulation of JFH-1 (genotype 2a) genome replication. A phosphoablatant (S225A) mutation resulted in a 10-fold reduction in replication and a perinuclear restricted distribution of NS5A, whereas the corresponding phosphomimetic mutation (S225D) had no phenotype. To determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenotype we conducted a label-free proteomics approach to identify cellular NS5A interaction partners. This analysis revealed that the S225A mutation disrupted the interactions of NS5A with a number of cellular proteins, in particular the nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1), bridging integrator 1 (Bin1, also known as amphiphysin II), and vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein A (VAP-A). These interactions were validated by immunoprecipitation/Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assay. Importantly, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of NAP1L1, Bin1 or VAP-A impaired viral genome replication and recapitulated the perinuclear redistribution of NS5A seen in the S225A mutant. These results demonstrate that S225 phosphorylation regulates the interactions of NS5A with a defined subset of cellular proteins. Furthermore, these interactions regulate both HCV genome replication and the subcellular localization of replication complexes. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus is an

  8. Modulation of neurite branching by protein phosphorylation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Cabell, L; Kern, M

    1997-09-20

    The control of branching of axons and dendrites is poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that branching may be produced by changes in the cytoskeleton [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419; P. Friedrich, A. Aszodi, MAP2: a sensitive cross-linker and adjustable spacer in dendritic architecture, FEBS Lett. 295 (1991) 5-9]. The assembly and stability of microtubules, which are prominent cytoskeletal elements in both axons and dendrites, are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins, including tau (predominantly found in axons) and MAP2 (predominantly found in dendrites). The phosphorylation state of tau and MAP2 modulates their interactions with microtubules. In their low-phosphorylation states, tau and MAP2 bind to microtubules and increase microtubule assembly and/or stability. Increased phosphorylation decreases these effects. Diez-Guerra and Avila [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419] found that protein phosphorylation correlates with neurite branching in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and hypothesized that increased protein phosphorylation stimulates neurite branching. To test this hypothesis, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons in the presence of specific modulators of serine-threonine protein kinases and phosphatases. Inhibitors of several protein kinases, which would be expected to decrease protein phosphorylation, reduced branching. KT5720, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN62, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, inhibited branching of both axons and dendrites. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, inhibited branching of axons but not dendrites. Treatments that would be expected to increase protein phosphorylation, including inhibitors of protein

  9. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  10. Phosphorylation of a chloroplast RNA-binding protein changes its affinity to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lisitsky, I; Schuster, G

    1995-01-01

    An RNA-binding protein of 28 kDa (28RNP) was previously isolated from spinach chloroplasts and found to be required for 3' end-processing of chloroplast mRNAs. The amino acid sequence of 28RNP revealed two approximately 80 amino-acid RNA-binding domains, as well as an acidic- and glycine-rich amino terminal domain. Upon analysis of the RNA-binding properties of the 'native' 28RNP in comparison to the recombinant bacterial expressed protein, differences were detected in the affinity to some chloroplastic 3' end RNAs. It was suggested that post-translational modification can modulate the affinity of the 28RNP in the chloroplast to different RNAs. In order to determine if phosphorylation accounts for this post-translational modification, we examined if the 28RNP is a phosphoprotein and if it can serve as a substrate for protein kinases. It was found that the 28RNP was phosphorylated when intact chloroplasts were metabolically labeled with [32P] orthophosphate, and that recombinant 28RNP served as an excellent substrate in vitro for protein kinase isolated from spinach chloroplasts or recombinant alpha subunit of maize casein kinase II. The 28RNP was apparently phosphorylated at one site located in the acidic domain at the N-terminus of the protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of the serines in that region revealed that the phosphorylation of the protein was eliminated when serine number 22 from the N-terminus was changed to tryptophan. RNA-binding analysis of the phosphorylated 28RNP revealed that the affinity of the phosphorylated protein was reduced approximately 3-4-fold in comparison to the non-phosphorylated protein. Therefore, phosphorylation of the 28RNP modulates its affinity to RNA and may play a significant role in its biological function in the chloroplast. Images PMID:7630729

  11. Partial purification of a spinach thylakoid protein kinase that can phosphorylate light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.D.; Hind, G.; Bennett, J.

    1985-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation in plant tissues is particularly marked in chloroplasts, protein kinase activity being associated with the outer envelope, the soluble stromal fraction, and the thylakoid membrane. Furthermore, thylakoid-bound activity probably includes several distinct kinases, as suggested by studies of divalent cation specificity and thermal lability carried out with intact thylakoids and by subfractionation of solubilized membranes. Illumination of thylakoids, particularly with red light, promotes the rapid and extensive phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) on a threonine residue near the amino terminus of the protein. This phosphorylation is thought to be involved in regulating the distribution of absorbed quanta between photosystems II and I and is modulated by the redox state of the thylakoid plastoquinone pool. Neither of the thylakoid kinases reported to date was capable of phosphorylating purified LHCII in vitro or of incorporating phosphate into threonyl residues of exogenous substrates, that some LHCII phosphorylation was catalyzed by a preliminary fraction led workers to suggest that at least one other kinase remained to be isolated. Here, the authors report the solubilization and partial purification of a protein kinase from spinach thylakoids that is capable of phosphorylating LHCII in vitro, and they show that the specific site of phosphorylation is very nearly the same as, if not identical with, the site phosphorylated in organello.

  12. Synaptic activation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation occurs locally in activated dendritic domains.

    PubMed

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6) locally near active synapses. Using antibodies specific for phosphorylation at different sites (ser235/236 versus ser240/244), we show that strong synaptic activation led to dramatic increases in immunostaining throughout postsynaptic neurons with selectively higher staining for p-ser235/236 in the activated dendritic lamina. Following LTP induction, phosphorylation at ser235/236 was detectable by 5 min, peaked at 30 min, and was maintained for hours. Phosphorylation at both sites was completely blocked by local infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist, APV. Despite robust induction of p-rpS6 following high frequency stimulation, assessment of protein synthesis by autoradiography revealed no detectable increases. Exploration of a novel environment led to increases in the number of p-rpS6-positive neurons throughout the forebrain in a pattern reminiscent of immediate early gene induction and many individual neurons that were p-rpS6-positive coexpressed Arc protein. Our results constrain hypotheses about the possible role of rpS6 phosphorylation in regulating postsynaptic protein synthesis during induction of synaptic plasticity.

  13. Myofibrillar Z-discs Are a Protein Phosphorylation Hot Spot with Protein Kinase C (PKCα) Modulating Protein Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Lena; Wiese, Heike; Leber, Yvonne; Schwäble, Anja N; Fricke, Anna L; Rohland, Anne; Knapp, Bettina; Peikert, Christian D; Drepper, Friedel; van der Ven, Peter F M; Radziwill, Gerald; Fürst, Dieter O; Warscheid, Bettina

    2017-03-01

    The Z-disc is a protein-rich structure critically important for the development and integrity of myofibrils, which are the contractile organelles of cross-striated muscle cells. We here used mouse C2C12 myoblast, which were differentiated into myotubes, followed by electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) to generate contracting myotubes comprising mature Z-discs. Using a quantitative proteomics approach, we found significant changes in the relative abundance of 387 proteins in myoblasts versus differentiated myotubes, reflecting the drastic phenotypic conversion of these cells during myogenesis. Interestingly, EPS of differentiated myotubes to induce Z-disc assembly and maturation resulted in increased levels of proteins involved in ATP synthesis, presumably to fulfill the higher energy demand of contracting myotubes. Because an important role of the Z-disc for signal integration and transduction was recently suggested, its precise phosphorylation landscape further warranted in-depth analysis. We therefore established, by global phosphoproteomics of EPS-treated contracting myotubes, a comprehensive site-resolved protein phosphorylation map of the Z-disc and found that it is a phosphorylation hotspot in skeletal myocytes, underscoring its functions in signaling and disease-related processes. In an illustrative fashion, we analyzed the actin-binding multiadaptor protein filamin C (FLNc), which is essential for Z-disc assembly and maintenance, and found that PKCα phosphorylation at distinct serine residues in its hinge 2 region prevents its cleavage at an adjacent tyrosine residue by calpain 1. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments indicated that this phosphorylation modulates FLNc dynamics. Moreover, FLNc lacking the cleaved Ig-like domain 24 exhibited remarkably fast kinetics and exceedingly high mobility. Our data set provides research community resource for further identification of kinase-mediated changes in myofibrillar protein interactions

  14. Cdk5/p35 phosphorylates lemur tyrosine kinase-2 to regulate protein phosphatase-1C phosphorylation and activity.

    PubMed

    Manser, Catherine; Vagnoni, Alessio; Guillot, Florence; Davies, Jennifer; Miller, Christopher C J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5)/p35 and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) are two major enzymes that control a variety of physiological processes within the nervous system including neuronal differentiation, synaptic plasticity and axonal transport. Defective cdk5/p35 and PP1 function are also implicated in several major human neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5/p35 and the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1C) both bind to the brain-enriched, serine-threonine kinase lemur tyrosine kinase-2 (LMTK2). Moreover, LMTK2 phosphorylates PP1C on threonine-320 (PP1Cthr³²⁰) to inhibit its activity. Here, we demonstrate that LMTK2 is phosphorylated on serine-1418 (LMTK2ser¹⁴¹⁸) by cdk5/p35 and present evidence that this regulates its ability to phosphorylate PP1Cthr³²⁰. We thus describe a new signalling pathway within the nervous system that links cdk5/p35 with PP1C and which has implications for a number of neuronal functions and neuronal dysfunction.

  15. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with gravity perception in corn roots. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, J.J.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    A previous paper from this laboratory showed calcium- and calmodulin-dependent in vivo protein phosphorylation in corn root tips. The authors show that rapid changes in calcium-dependent protein phosphorylation are involved in light-dependent graviperception in corn root tips. Corn seedlings (Zea mays L, cv Merit) were grown in the dark for 3 d, then apical root segments were harvested in dim green light to measure in vivo protein phosphorylation. Segments were incubated with 0.5 mCi /sup 32/P for 1 h, then immediately frozen in liquid N/sub 2/ or first treated with either 7 min light, or 7 min light plus 1 mM EGTA and 10 ..mu..M A23187. Labeled proteins were separated by 2D gel electrophoresis and detected by autoradiography. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of 5 polypeptides. The increases in protein phosphorylation were reversed by treating with EGTA and A23187. The authors postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are an essential part of the light-dependent gravity response in Merit roots.

  16. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of human platelet surface proteins by an ecto-protein kinase/phosphatase system.

    PubMed

    Naik, U P; Kornecki, E; Ehrlich, Y H

    1991-04-17

    We have characterized a novel ecto-protein kinase activity and a novel ecto-protein phosphatase activity on the membrane surface of human platelets. Washed intact platelets, when incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP in Tyrode's buffer, showed the phosphorylation of a membrane surface protein migrating with an apparent molecular mass of 42 kDa on 5-15% SDS polyacrylamide gradient gels. The 42 kDa protein could be further resolved on 15% SDS gels into two proteins of 39 kDa and 42 kDa. In this gel system, it was found that the 39 kDa protein became rapidly phosphorylated and dephosphorylated, whereas the 42 kDa protein was phosphorylated and dephosphorylated at a much slower rate. NaF inhibited the dephosphorylation of these proteins indicating the involvement of an ecto-protein phosphatase. The platelet membrane ecto-protein kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of both of these proteins was identified as a serine kinase and showed dependency on divalent cations Mg2+ or Mn2+ ions. Ca2+ ions potentiated the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-protein kinase activity. The ecto-protein kinase rapidly phosphorylated histone and casein added exogenously to the extracellular medium of intact platelets. Following activation of platelets by alpha-thrombin, the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from exogenously added [gamma-32P]ATP by endogenous protein substrates was reduced by 90%, suggesting a role of the ecto-protein kinase system in the regulation of platelet function. The results presented here demonstrate that both protein kinase and protein phosphatase activities reside on the membrane surface of human platelets. These activities are capable of rapidly phosphorylating and dephosphorylating specific surface platelet membrane proteins which may play important roles in early events of platelet activation and secretion.

  17. Analysis of steady-state protein phosphorylation in mitochondria using a novel fluorescent phosphosensor dye.

    PubMed

    Schulenberg, Birte; Aggeler, Robert; Beechem, Joseph M; Capaldi, Roderick A; Patton, Wayne F

    2003-07-18

    The phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins is pivotal to the regulation of respiratory activity in the cell and to signaling pathways leading to apoptosis, as well as for other vital mitochondrial processes. A number of protein kinases have been identified in mitochondria but the physiological substrates for many of these remain unknown or poorly understood. By necessity, most studies of mitochondrial phosphoproteins to date have been conducted using in vitro incorporation of 32P. However, proteins that are highly phosphorylated from in situ reactions are not necessarily detected by this approach. In this study, a new small molecule fluorophore has been employed to characterize steady-state levels of mitochondrial phosphoproteins. The dye is capable of sensitive detection of phosphorylated amino acid residues in proteins separated by gel electrophoresis. When the fluorescent dye is combined with a total protein stain in a sequential gel staining procedure, the phosphorylated proteins can be visualized in the same gel as the total proteins. To optimize resolution of the proteins in mitochondria, a previously described sucrose gradient fractionation method was employed prior to gel electrophoresis. Phosphorylated proteins, as defined by the fluorescence of the phosphosensor, were excised from the gels and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. One novel and prominent phosphoprotein identified in this manner was determined to be the 42-kDa subunit of mitochondrial complex I.

  18. Increased Serine-Arginine (SR) Protein Phosphorylation Changes Pre-mRNA Splicing in Hypoxia*

    PubMed Central

    Jakubauskiene, Egle; Vilys, Laurynas; Makino, Yuichi; Poellinger, Lorenz; Kanopka, Arvydas

    2015-01-01

    The removal of introns from mRNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) is an essential step in eukaryotic gene expression. The splicing machinery heavily contributes to biological complexity and especially to the ability of cells to adapt to altered cellular conditions. Inhibitory PAS domain protein (IPAS), a dominant negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression, is generated from hypoxia inducible transcription factor-3α (HIF-3α) pre-mRNA by an alternative splicing mechanism. Inactivation of the IPAS transcript in mice leads to the neo-vascularization of the cornea, suggesting that IPAS is an important regulator of anti-angiogenesis in this tissue. For the first time we demonstrate that serine-arginine (SR) proteins are involved in oxygen tension-dependent changes in pre-mRNA splicing. SR proteins isolated from hypoxic cells differentially interact with RNA (compared with proteins isolated from cells cultured under normoxic conditions). They possess the differential ability to activate hypoxia-dependent splice sites, and they are more phosphorylated than those isolated from normoxic HeLa cells. We also show that expression of SR protein kinases (CLK1, SRPK1, SRPK2) in hypoxic cells is elevated at mRNA and protein levels. Increased expression of CLK1 kinase is regulated by HIFs. Reduction of CLK1 cellular expression levels reduces hypoxia-dependent full-length carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) mRNA and CAIX protein formation and changes hypoxia-dependent cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61) mRNA isoform formation profiles. PMID:26023237

  19. Hormone-induced protein phosphorylation. I. Relationship between secretagogue action and endogenous protein phosphorylation in intact cells from the exocrine pancreas and parotid

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We undertook studies to determine whether secretagogue action on the exocrine pancreas and parotid is accompanied by phosphorylation of proteins in intact cells. For this purpose, rat pancreatic, and parotid lobules were preincubated with 32Pi for 45 min at 37 degrees C, washed, and then incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence or absence of secretagogues that effect discharge through different second messengers. Among a variety of polypeptides exhibiting enhanced phosphorylation in pancreatic lobules upon a 30-s incubation in the presence of the secretagogues carbamylcholine, cholecystokinin octapeptide, or secretin, one species with an Mr of 29,000 was especially notable for three reasons: (a) its enhanced level of phosphorylation was dependent on the dose of secretagogue used and was still apparent after incubation for 30 min at 37 degrees C; (b) an analogous phosphorylated polypeptide was observed in isoproterenol- stimulated parotid lobules; and (c) in both tissues its selective dephosphorylation was observed upon termination of stimulation by administration of atropine to carbamylcholine-stimulated pancreatic lobules and propranolol to isoproterenol-stimulated parotid lobules. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of one protein with an Mr of 29,000 is closely correlated both temporally and in a dose- dependent fashion with secretagogue action in both the exocrine pancreas and parotid. PMID:6296160

  20. Insulin rapidly stimulates phosphorylation of a 46-kDa membrane protein on tyrosine residues as well as phosphorylation of several soluble proteins in intact fat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Häring, H U; White, M F; Machicao, F; Ermel, B; Schleicher, E; Obermaier, B

    1987-01-01

    It is speculated that the transmission of an insulin signal across the plasma membrane of cells occurs through activation of the tyrosine-specific receptor kinase, autophosphorylation of the receptor, and subsequent phosphorylation of unidentified substrates in the cell. In an attempt to identify possible substrates, we labeled intact rat fat cells with [32P]orthophosphate and used an antiphosphotyrosine antibody to identify proteins that become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in an insulin-stimulated way. In the membrane fraction of the fat cells, we found, in addition to the 95-kDa beta-subunit of the receptor, a 46-kDa phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated exclusively on tyrosine residues. This protein is not immunoprecipitated by antibodies against different regions of the insulin receptor and its HPLC tryptic peptide map is different from the tryptic peptide map of the insulin receptor, suggesting that it is not derived from the receptor beta-subunit. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 46-kDa protein within 150 sec in the intact cell 3- to 4-fold in a dose-dependent way at insulin concentrations between 0.5 nM and 100 nM. The insulin effect starts after 30 sec, is maximal at 150 sec, and declines to almost basal values by 5 min. Furthermore, the antiphosphotyrosine antibody precipitated at least five proteins in the soluble fraction of the fat cell. Insulin (0.5 nM, 100 nM) stimulated within 2 min the 32P incorporation into a 116-kDa band, a 62-kDa band, and three bands between 45 kDa and 50 kDa 2- to 10-fold. We suggest that the 46-kDa membrane protein and possibly also the soluble proteins are endogenous substrates of the receptor tyrosine kinase in fat cells and that their phosphorylation is an early step in insulin signal transmission. Images PMID:3540953

  1. Bcl10 is phosphorylated on Ser138 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Xavier, Ramnik

    2007-03-01

    Ordered assembly of scaffold proteins Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 determines NF-kappaB activation following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Carma1-Bcl10 interaction and the signaling pathway are controlled by Carma1 phosphorylation, which are induced by PKCtheta and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In addition to Carma1 phosphorylation, previous studies have demonstrated that Bcl10 is phosphorylated in the C-terminal Ser/Thr rich region following TCR engagement. However the kinases that phosphorylate Bcl10 are incompletely understood. Here we show that CaMKII phosphorylates Bcl10 on Ser138. Furthermore, a CaMKII inhibitor, KN93, and CaMKII siRNA substantially reduce Bcl10 phosphorylation induced by phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin. S138A mutation prolongs Bcl10-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting that Bcl10 phosphorylation is involved in attenuation of NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that CaMKII modulates NF-kappaB activation via phosphorylating Bcl10 as well as Carma1.

  2. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  3. Matrix density alters zyxin phosphorylation, which limits peripheral process formation and extension in endothelial cells invading 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Colette A; Bayless, Kayla J

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimal conditions required for known pro-angiogenic stimuli to elicit successful endothelial sprouting responses. We used an established, quantifiable model of endothelial cell (EC) sprout initiation where ECs were tested for invasion in low (1 mg/mL) and high density (5 mg/mL) 3D collagen matrices. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) alone, or S1P combined with stromal derived factor-1α (SDF) and phorbol ester (TPA), elicited robust sprouting responses. The ability of these factors to stimulate sprouting was more effective in higher density collagen matrices. S1P stimulation resulted in a significant increase in invasion distance, and with the exception of treatment groups containing phorbol ester, invasion distance was longer in 1mg/mL compared to 5mg/mL collagen matrices. Closer examination of cell morphology revealed that increasing matrix density and supplementing with SDF and TPA enhanced the formation of multicellular structures more closely resembling capillaries. TPA enhanced the frequency and size of lumen formation and correlated with a robust increase in phosphorylation of p42/p44 Erk kinase, while S1P and SDF did not. Also, a higher number of significantly longer extended processes formed in 5mg/mL compared to 1mg/mL collagen matrices. Because collagen matrices at higher density have been reported to be stiffer, we tested for changes in the mechanosensitive protein, zyxin. Interestingly, zyxin phosphorylation levels inversely correlated with matrix density, while levels of total zyxin did not change significantly. Immunofluorescence and localization studies revealed that total zyxin was distributed evenly throughout invading structures, while phosphorylated zyxin was slightly more intense in extended peripheral processes. Silencing zyxin expression increased extended process length and number of processes, while increasing zyxin levels decreased extended process length. Altogether these data indicate that ECs

  4. Bioactives from Artemisia dracunculus L. Enhance Insulin Sensitivity via Modulation of Skeletal Muscle Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kheterpal, Indu; Scherp, Peter; Kelley, Lauren; Wang, Zhong; Johnson, William; Ribnicky, David; Cefalu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    A botanical extract from Artemisia dracunculus L., termed PMI 5011, has been shown previously to improve insulin sensitivity by increasing cellular insulin signaling in in vitro and in vivo studies. These studies suggest that PMI 5011 effects changes in phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in insulin signaling. To explore effects of this promising botanical extract on the human skeletal muscle phosphoproteome, changes in site-specific protein phosphorylation levels in primary skeletal muscle cultures from obese, insulin resistant individuals were evaluated with and without insulin stimulation. Insulin resistance is a condition in which a normal or elevated insulin level results in an abnormal biologic response, e.g., glucose uptake. Using isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ™) followed by phosphopeptide enrichment and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry, 125 unique phosphopeptides and 159 unique phosphorylation sites from 80 unique proteins were identified and quantified. Insulin stimulation of primary cultured muscle cells from insulin resistant individuals resulted in minimal increase in phosphorylation, demonstrating impaired insulin action in this condition. Treatment with PMI 5011 resulted in significant up regulation of 35 phosphopeptides that were mapped to proteins participating in the regulation of transcription, translation, actin cytoskeleton signaling, caveolae translocation and GLUT4 transport. These data further showed that PMI 5011 increased phosphorylation levels of specific amino acids in proteins in the insulin resistant state that are normally phosphorylated by insulin (thus, increasing cellular insulin signaling) and PMI 5011 also increased the abundance of phosphorylation sites of proteins regulating anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, the phosphoproteomics analysis demonstrated conclusively that PMI 5011 effects changes in phosphorylation levels of proteins and identified novel pathways by which

  5. Identifying protein phosphorylation sites with kinase substrate specificity on human viruses.

    PubMed

    Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Chiang, Chiu-Yun; Su, Min-Gang; Huang, Kai-Yao; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Weng, Shun-Long

    2012-01-01

    Viruses infect humans and progress inside the body leading to various diseases and complications. The phosphorylation of viral proteins catalyzed by host kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in enhancing replication and inhibition of normal host-cell functions. Due to its biological importance, there is a desire to identify the protein phosphorylation sites on human viruses. However, the use of mass spectrometry-based experiments is proven to be expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, previous studies which have identified phosphorylation sites in human viruses do not include the investigation of the responsible kinases. Thus, we are motivated to propose a new method to identify protein phosphorylation sites with its kinase substrate specificity on human viruses. The experimentally verified phosphorylation data were extracted from virPTM--a database containing 301 experimentally verified phosphorylation data on 104 human kinase-phosphorylated virus proteins. In an attempt to investigate kinase substrate specificities in viral protein phosphorylation sites, maximal dependence decomposition (MDD) is employed to cluster a large set of phosphorylation data into subgroups containing significantly conserved motifs. The experimental human phosphorylation sites are collected from Phospho.ELM, grouped according to its kinase annotation, and compared with the virus MDD clusters. This investigation identifies human kinases such as CK2, PKB, CDK, and MAPK as potential kinases for catalyzing virus protein substrates as confirmed by published literature. Profile hidden Markov model is then applied to learn a predictive model for each subgroup. A five-fold cross validation evaluation on the MDD-clustered HMMs yields an average accuracy of 84.93% for Serine, and 78.05% for Threonine. Furthermore, an independent testing data collected from UniProtKB and Phospho.ELM is used to make a comparison of predictive performance on three popular kinase-specific phosphorylation site

  6. Phosphorylation of the Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) on serine-807 is required for association with Bax.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Lisa A; Egger, Jacklynn V; Krucher, Nancy A

    2014-01-01

    The recent finding that the Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is able to regulate apoptosis in a non-transcriptional manner directly at the mitochondria by interaction with the pro-apoptotic protein Bax prompted this investigation of the complex formed between Rb and Bax. Because the function of Rb in the cellular processes of proliferation, apoptosis, senescence and differentiation is regulated by phosphorylation we endeavored to elucidate the phosphorylation status of Rb with respect to its association with Bax and its role in apoptosis. In this study we found that Rb phosphorylated on at least 4 C-terminal phosphorylation sites (S608, S795, S807/S811, and T821) is present at the mitochondria under non-stressed cellular conditions. An in vitro binding assay showed that Bax binds to Rb phosphorylated at S807/S811 in 3 cancer cell types. Physiologically relevant association between Bax and Rb phosphorylated on S807/S811 was demonstrated by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies specific for Rb phosphorylated on S807/S811 and Bax. Mutant Rb proteins expressed in Rb-null C33A cells showed that phosphorylation of S807 of Rb promotes association with Bax and that mimicking phosphorylation at S807 of Rb can block the induction of apoptosis due to PNUTS downregulation. Finally using siRNA to activate phosphatase activity in MCF7 cells, Rb is dephosphorylated at several sites including S807/S811, dissociates from Bax and apoptosis is triggered. These studies show that phosphorylation of Rb regulates its association with Bax and its role in apoptosis.

  7. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Brassinosteroid-induced Protein Phosphorylation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuxuan; Qiu, Jiehua; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Zhiyong; Zhao, Juan; Tong, Xiaohong; Lin, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The group of polyhydroxysteroid phytohormones referred to as the brassinosteroids (BRs) is known to act on plant development and the stress response. BR signal transduction relies largely on protein phosphorylation. By employing a label-free, MS (Mass Spectrometry)-based phosphoproteomic approach, we report here the largest profiling of 4,034 phosphosites on 1,900 phosphoproteins from rice young seedlings and their dynamic response to BR. 1,821 proteins, including kinases, transcription factors and core components of BR and other hormone signaling pathways, were found to be differentially phosphorylated during the BR treatment. A Western blot analysis verified the differential phosphorylation of five of these proteins, implying that the MS-based phosphoproteomic data were robust. It is proposed that the dephosphorylation of gibberellin (GA) signaling components could represent an important mechanism for the BR-regulated antagonism to GA, and that BR influences the plant architecture of rice by regulating cellulose synthesis via phosphorylation. PMID:28439285

  8. Protein synthesis during cellular quiescence is inhibited by phosphorylation of a translational elongation factor.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandro F F; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Dworkin, Jonathan

    2015-06-23

    In nature, most organisms experience conditions that are suboptimal for growth. To survive, cells must fine-tune energy-demanding metabolic processes in response to nutrient availability. Here, we describe a novel mechanism by which protein synthesis in starved cells is down-regulated by phosphorylation of the universally conserved elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Phosphorylation impairs the essential GTPase activity of EF-Tu, thereby preventing its release from the ribosome. As a consequence, phosphorylated EF-Tu has a dominant-negative effect in elongation, resulting in the overall inhibition of protein synthesis. Importantly, this mechanism allows a quick and robust regulation of one of the most abundant cellular proteins. Given that the threonine that serves as the primary site of phosphorylation is conserved in all translational GTPases from bacteria to humans, this mechanism may have important implications for growth-rate control in phylogenetically diverse organisms.

  9. Synergistic activation by cis-fatty acid and diacylglycerol of protein kinase C and protein phosphorylation in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Chen, S G; Murakami, K

    1995-10-01

    cis-Unsaturated fatty acid, which activates protein kinase C in vitro, stimulates protein phosphorylation in intact hippocampal slices. Two protein bands (44,000 and 47,000 mol. wt) are particularly sensitive to cis-fatty acid and are phosphorylated in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cis-fatty acid-stimulated protein phosphorylation can be further potentiated with diacylglycerol or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. Several lines of evidence indicate that the cis-fatty acid-stimulated phosphorylation of these proteins is mediated by protein kinase C. First, the cis-fatty acid effect is mimicked by other protein kinase C activators such as diacylglycerol. Second, the stimulation of the phosphorylation by these activators can be blocked by staurosporine, which potently inhibits protein kinase C. Third, a concomitant application of cis-fatty acid and diacylglycerol or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate enhances the 44,000 and 47,000 mol. wt phosphorylation in a synergistic manner, which is a novel activation mode for protein kinase C. Fourth, they can be phosphorylated by purified protein kinase C (type III: alpha). Moreover, the synergistic activation of purified protein kinase C by cis-fatty acid and diacylglycerol leads to a drastic increase in the phosphorylation of these two protein bands. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis revealed that they are both acidic proteins. The 47,000 mol. wt band consists of two protein components; one is found to be F1/growth-associated protein-43 (pI = 4.5), and the other 47,000 mol, wt protein has broad pI ranging from 4.6 to 4.9. The 44,000 mol. wt component is a major phosphoprotein with pI of 4.8-5.1. Our results strongly indicate that cis-fatty acid can act as a regulator of endogenous protein kinase C in concert with diacylglycerol, and stimulate protein phosphorylation of its substrates such as F1/growth-associated protein-43 in the hippocampus.

  10. The herpes simplex virus UL37 protein is phosphorylated in infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Albright, A G; Jenkins, F J

    1993-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) UL37 open reading frame encodes a 120-kDa late (gamma 1), nonstructural protein in infected cells. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the UL37 protein interacts in the cytoplasm of infected cells with ICP8, the major HSV-1 DNA-binding protein. As a result of this interaction, the UL37 protein is transported to the nucleus and can be coeluted with ICP8 from single-stranded DNA columns. Pulse-labeling and pulse-chase studies of HSV-1-infected cells with [35S]methionine and 32Pi demonstrated that UL37 was a phosphoprotein which did not have a detectable rate of turnover. The protein was phosphorylated soon after translation and remained phosphorylated throughout the viral replicative cycle. UL37 protein expressed from a vaccinia virus recombinant was also phosphorylated during infection, suggesting that the UL37 protein was phosphorylated by a cellular kinase and that interaction with the ICP8 protein was not a prerequisite for UL37 phosphorylation. Images PMID:8392618

  11. Propofol reduced myocardial contraction of vertebrates partly by mediating the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xinyu; Bo, Qiyu; Meng, Tao; Lei, Zhen; Li, Jingxin; Hou, Yonghao; Yu, Xiaoqian; Yu, Jingui

    2016-07-15

    Propofol inhibits myocardial contraction in a dose dependent manner. The present study is designed to examine the effect of propofol on PKA mediated myocardial contraction in the absence of adrenoreceptor agonist. The contraction of isolated rat heart was measured in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using a pressure transducer. The levels of cAMP and PKA kinase activity were detected by ELISA. The mRNA and total protein or phosphorylation level of PKA and downstream proteins were tested in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using RT-PCR, QPCR and western blotting. The phosphorylation level of PKA was examined thoroughly using immunofluorescence and PKA activity non-radioactive detection kit. Propofol induced a dose-dependent negative contractile response on the rat heart. The inhibitory effect of high concentration propofol (50μM) with 45% decease of control could be partly reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89 (10μM) and the depressant effect of propofol decreased from 45% to 10%. PKA kinase activity was inhibited by propofol in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol also induced a decrease in phosphorylation of PKA, which was also inhibited by H89, but did not alter the production of cAMP and the mRNA levels of PKA. The downstream proteins of PKA, PLN and RyR2 were phosphorylated to a lesser extent with propofol or H89 than control. These results demonstrated that propofol induced a negative myocardial contractile response partly by mediating the PKA phosphorylation pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential phosphorylation of tau proteins during kitten brain development and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Riederer, B M; Mourton-Gilles, C; Frey, P; Delacourte, A; Probst, A

    2001-02-01

    Differential distribution and phosphorylation of tau proteins were studied in developing kitten brain by using several antibodies, and was compared to phosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease. Several antibodies demonstrated the presence of phosphorylated tau proteins during kitten brain development and identified pathological structures in human brain tissue. Antibody AD2, recognized tau in kittens and adult cats, but reacted in Alzheimer's tissue only with a pathological tau form. Antibody AT8 was prominent in developing kitten neurons and was found in axons and dendrites. After the first postnatal month this phosphorylation type disappeared from axons. Furthermore, dephosphorylation of kitten tau with alkaline phosphatase abolished immunoreactivity of AT8, but not that of AD2, pointing to a protection of the AD2 epitope in cats. Tau proteins during early cat brain development are phosphorylated at several sites that are also phosphorylated in paired helical filaments during Alzheimer's disease. In either event, phosphorylation of tau may play a crucial role to modulate microtubule dynamics, contributing to increased microtubule instability and promoting growth of processes during neuronal development or changing dynamic properties of the cytoskeleton and contributing to the formation of pathological structures in neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Lectin-induced activation of platelets may require only limited phosphorylation of the 47K protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, C.; Chelladurai, M.; Ganguly, P.

    1986-05-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an N-acetylglucosamine (Glc-NAc) specific lectin which can activate platelets. Like thrombin, stimulation of platelets by WGA is accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of two polypeptides of M/sub r/ 47K and 20K. Addition of GlcNAc at different time intervals arrested that aggregation of platelets by WGA and paralleled the modification of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide. So, the phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide may regulate the WGA-receptor mediated stimulation of platelets. However, the ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine in the 47K protein was markedly different in WGA-activated than thrombin-stimulated platelets. Thus, the molecular mechanism of action of thrombin and WGA could be different. To explore this idea, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled platelets were stimulated with WGA and the activation arrested with N-acetyl-glucosamine at different times. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of total protein at 5s showed only two phosphorylated species of 47K protein. At 60s, maximally four phosphorylated species were noted. In contrast, with thrombin using the same technique, seven to nine phosphorylated components have been reported. These results suggest that the different activators of platelets may act by different mechanisms. In addition, activation of platelets may require only limited levels of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide.

  14. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on sperm capacitation and protein phosphorylation of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Lilian; Bussalleu, Eva; Yeste, Marc; Bonet, Sergi

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have reported the detrimental effects that bacteriospermia causes on boar sperm quality, but little is known about its effects on IVC. Considering that, the present study sought to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on different indicators of capacitation status (sperm viability, membrane lipid disorder, sperm motility kinematics, and protein phosphorylation of boar spermatozoa) after IVC. Flow cytometry and computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA) revealed that the presence of P aeruginosa in boar sperm samples, mostly at concentrations greater than 10(6) CFU/mL, is associated with a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the percentages of both sperm membrane integrity and sperm with low membrane lipid disorder, and also with a reduction in sperm motility kinetic parameters when compared with results obtained from the control sample, which presented the typical motility pattern of capacitated-like boar spermatozoa. Moreover, Western blot results also showed significant (P < 0.05) changes in the levels of tyrosine, serine, and threonine protein phosphorylation because of bacterial contamination, the decrease in phosphotyrosine levels of p32, a well-known marker of IVC achievement in boar sperm, being the most relevant. Indeed, after 3 hours of IVC, phosphotyrosine levels of p32 in the control sample were 3.13 ± 0.81, whereas in the tubes with 10(6) and 10(8) CFU/mL were 1.05 ± 0.20 and 0.36 ± 0.07, respectively. Therefore, the present study provides novel data regarding the effects of bacterial contamination on boar sperm, suggesting that the presence of P aeruginosa affects the fertilizing ability of boar sperm by altering its ability to accomplish IVC.

  15. Remodeled respiration in ndufs4 with low phosphorylation efficiency suppresses Arabidopsis germination and growth and alters control of metabolism at night.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Etienne H; Tomaz, Tiago; Carroll, Adam J; Estavillo, Gonzalo; Delannoy, Etienne; Tanz, Sandra K; Small, Ian D; Pogson, Barry J; Millar, A Harvey

    2009-10-01

    Respiratory oxidative phosphorylation is a cornerstone of cellular metabolism in aerobic multicellular organisms. The efficiency of this process is generally assumed to be maximized, but the presence of dynamically regulated nonphosphorylating bypasses implies that plants can alter phosphorylation efficiency and can benefit from lowered energy generation during respiration under certain conditions. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ndufs4 (for NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] fragment S subunit 4), lacking complex I of the respiratory chain, which has constitutively lowered phosphorylation efficiency. Through analysis of the changes to mitochondrial function as well as whole cell transcripts and metabolites, we provide insights into how cellular metabolism flexibly adapts to reduced phosphorylation efficiency and why this state may benefit the plant by providing moderate stress tolerance. We show that removal of the single protein subunit NDUFS4 prevents assembly of complex I and removes its function from mitochondria without pleiotropic effects on other respiratory components. However, the lack of complex I promotes broad changes in the nuclear transcriptome governing growth and photosynthetic function. We observed increases in organic acid and amino acid pools in the mutant, especially at night, concomitant with alteration of the adenylate content. While germination is delayed, this can be rescued by application of gibberellic acid, and root growth assays of seedlings show enhanced tolerance to cold, mild salt, and osmotic stress. We discuss these observations in the light of recent data on the knockout of nonphosphorylating respiratory bypass enzymes that show opposite changes in metabolites and stress sensitivity. Our data suggest that the absence of complex I alters the adenylate control of cellular metabolism.

  16. Transcription factor SP4 phosphorylation is altered in the postmortem cerebellum of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia subjects.

    PubMed

    Pinacho, Raquel; Saia, Gregory; Meana, J Javier; Gill, Grace; Ramos, Belén

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors play important roles in the control of neuronal function in physiological and pathological conditions. We previously reported reduced levels of transcription factor SP4 protein, but not transcript, in the cerebellum in bipolar disorder and associated with more severe negative symptoms in schizophrenia. We have recently reported phosphorylation of Sp4 at S770, which is regulated by membrane depolarization and NMDA receptor activity. The aim of this study was to investigate SP4 S770 phosphorylation in bipolar disorder and its association with negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and to explore the potential relationship between phosphorylation and protein abundance. Here we report a significant increase in SP4 phosphorylation in the cerebellum, but not the prefrontal cortex, of bipolar disorder subjects (n=10) (80% suicide) compared to matched controls (n=10). We found that SP4 phosphorylation inversely correlated with SP4 levels independently of disease status in both areas of the human brain. Moreover, SP4 phosphorylation in the cerebellum positively correlated with negative symptoms in schizophrenia subjects (n=15). Further, we observed that a phospho-mimetic mutation in truncated Sp4 was sufficient to significantly decrease Sp4 steady-state levels, while a non-phosphorylatable mutant showed increased stability in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Our results indicate that SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in the cerebellum in bipolar disorder subjects that committed suicide and in severe schizophrenia subjects, and may be part of a degradation signal that controls Sp4 abundance in cerebellar granule neurons. This opens the possibility that modulation of SP4 phosphorylation may contribute to the molecular pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcription factor SP4 phosphorylation is altered in the postmortem cerebellum of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia subjects

    PubMed Central

    Meana, J. Javier; Gill, Grace; Ramos, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors play important roles in the control of neuronal function in physiological and pathological conditions. We previously reported reduced levels of transcription factor SP4 protein, but not transcript, in the cerebellum in bipolar disorder and associated with more severe negative symptoms in schizophrenia. We have recently reported phosphorylation of Sp4 at S770, which is regulated by membrane depolarization and NMDA receptor activity. The aim of this study was to investigate SP4 S770 phosphorylation in bipolar disorder and its association with negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and to explore the potential relationship between phosphorylation and protein abundance. Here we report a significant increase in SP4 phosphorylation in the cerebellum, but not the prefrontal cortex, of bipolar disorder subjects (n=10) (80% suicide) compared to matched controls (n=10). We found that SP4 phosphorylation inversely correlated with SP4 levels independently of disease status in both areas of the human brain. Moreover, SP4 phosphorylation in the cerebellum positively correlated with negative symptoms in schizophrenia subjects (n=15). Further, we observed that a phospho-mimetic mutation in truncated Sp4 was sufficient to significantly decrease Sp4 steady-state levels, while a non-phosphorylatable mutant showed increased stability in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Our results indicate that SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in the cerebellum in bipolar disorder subjects that committed suicide and in severe schizophrenia subjects, and may be part of a degradation signal that controls Sp4 abundance in cerebellar granule neurons. This opens the possibility that modulation of SP4 phosphorylation may contribute to the molecular pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. PMID:26049820

  18. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) phosphorylates the small SPOC family protein Spenito.

    PubMed

    Dewald, D N; Steinmetz, E L; Walldorf, U

    2014-12-01

    The Drosophila homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) is a versatile regulator involved in a variety of pathways, such as Notch and Wingless signalling, thereby acting in processes including the promotion of eye development or control of cell numbers in the nervous system. In vertebrates, extensive studies have related its homologue HIPK2 to important roles in the control of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumour suppression. Spenito (Nito) belongs to the group of small SPOC family proteins and has a role, amongst others, as a regulator of Wingless signalling downstream of Armadillo. In the present study, we show that both proteins have an enzyme-substrate relationship, adding a new interesting component to the broad range of Hipk interactions, and we map several phosphorylation sites of Nito. Furthermore, we were able to define a preliminary consensus motif for Hipk target sites, which will simplify the identification of new substrates of this kinase.

  19. ATP counteracts the rundown of gap junctional channels of rat ventricular myocytes by promoting protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Verrecchia, F; Duthe, F; Duval, S; Duchatelle, I; Sarrouilhe, D; Herve, J C

    1999-04-15

    1. The degree of cell-to-cell coupling between ventricular myocytes of neonatal rats appeared well preserved when studied in the perforated version of the patch clamp technique or, in double whole-cell conditions, when ATP was present in the patch pipette solution. In contrast, when ATP was omitted, the amplitude of junctional current rapidly declined (rundown). 2. To examine the mechanism(s) of ATP action, an 'internal perfusion technique' was adapted to dual patch clamp conditions, and reintroduction of ATP partially reversed the rundown of junctional channels. 3. Cell-to-cell communication was not preserved by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue (5'-adenylimidodiphosphate, AMP-PNP), indicating that the effect most probably did not involve direct interaction of ATP with the channel-forming proteins. 4. An ATP analogue supporting protein phosphorylation but not active transport processes (adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), ATPgammaS) maintained normal intercellular communication, suggesting that the effect was due to kinase activity rather than to altered intracellular Ca2+. 5. A broad spectrum inhibitor of endogenous serine/threonine protein kinases (H7) reversibly reduced the intercellular coupling. A non-specific exogenous protein phosphatase (alkaline phosphatase) mimicked the effects of ATP deprivation. The non-specific inhibition of endogenous protein phosphatases resulted in the preservation of substantial cell-to-cell communication in ATP-free conditions. 6. The activity of gap junctional channels appears to require both the presence of ATP and protein kinase activity to counteract the tonic activity of endogenous phosphatase(s).

  20. Protein phosphorylation and prevention of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by ATP: coupled mechanisms of energy metabolism regulation

    PubMed Central

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Gatti, Domenico L.; Bai, Yidong; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Summary Rapid regulation of oxidative phosphorylation is crucial for mitochondrial adaptation to swift changes in fuels availability and energy demands. An intra-mitochondrial signaling pathway regulates cytochrome oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, through reversible phosphorylation. We find that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of a COX subunit dictates mammalian mitochondrial energy fluxes, and identify the specific residue (S58) of COX subunit IV-1 (COXIV-1) that is involved in this mechanism of metabolic regulation. Using protein mutagenesis, molecular dynamics simulations, and induced fit docking, we show that mitochondrial energy metabolism regulation by phosphorylation of COXIV-1 is coupled with prevention of COX allosteric inhibition by ATP. This regulatory mechanism is essential for efficient oxidative metabolism and cell survival. We propose that S58 COXIV-1 phosphorylation has evolved as a metabolic switch that allows mammalian mitochondria to rapidly toggle between energy utilization and energy storage. PMID:21641552

  1. Phosphorylation of the human-transforming-growth-factor-beta-binding protein endoglin.

    PubMed Central

    Lastres, P; Martín-Perez, J; Langa, C; Bernabéu, C

    1994-01-01

    Endoglin is an homodimeric membrane antigen with capacity to bind transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Phosphorylation of human endoglin was demonstrated in endothelial cells as well as in mouse fibroblast transfectants expressing two isoforms, L-endoglin or S-endoglin, with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The extent of L-endoglin phosphorylation was found to be 8-fold higher than that of S-endoglin, and phosphopeptide analyses revealed at least three different phosphorylation sites for L-endoglin, whereas S-endoglin produces only one phosphopeptide. The immunoprecipitated L-endoglin was found to be phosphorylated mainly on serine, and, to a minor extent, on threonine, residues. Treatment of the cells with TGF-beta 1 or the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 resulted in a reduction of the levels of endoglin phosphorylation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8053900

  2. Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase C: identification of Ser(462) and Thr(455) as major sites of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Martin, Shelley S; Baldwin, Enoch P; Carman, George M

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by mammalian protein kinase C was examined. Using purified Escherichia coli-expressed CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was time- and dose-dependent and dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CTP synthetase 1. The protein kinase C phosphorylation of the recombinant enzyme was accompanied by a 95-fold increase in CTP synthetase 1 activity. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analyses showed that CTP synthetase 1 was phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues. The induction of PKC1(R398A)-encoded protein kinase C resulted in a 50% increase for human CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Delta ura8Delta mutant lacking yeast CTP synthetase activity. Synthetic peptides that contain the protein kinase C motif for Ser(462) and Thr(455) were substrates for mammalian protein kinase C, and S462A and T455A mutations resulted in decreases in the extent of CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation that occurred in vivo. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of S. cerevisiae-expressed CTP synthetase 1 mutant enzymes phosphorylated with mammalian protein kinase C confirmed that Ser(462) and Thr(455) were phosphorylation sites. The S. cerevisiae-expressed and purified S462A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold reduction in CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas the purified T455A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold elevation in CTP synthetase 1 activity (Choi, M.-G., and Carman, G.M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5367-5377). These data indicated that protein kinase C phosphorylation at Ser(462) stimulates human CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas phosphorylation at Thr(455) inhibits activity.

  3. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase C IDENTIFICATION OF Ser462 AND Thr455 AS MAJOR SITES OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Martin, Shelley S.; Baldwin, Enoch P.; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by mammalian protein kinase C was examined. Using purified Escherichia coli-expressed CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was time-and dose-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CTP synthetase 1. The protein kinase C phosphorylation of the recombinant enzyme was accompanied by a 95-fold increase in CTP synthetase 1 activity. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analyses showed that CTP synthetase 1 was phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues. The induction of PKC1R398A-encoded protein kinase C resulted in a 50% increase for human CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant lacking yeast CTP synthetase activity. Synthetic peptides that contain the protein kinase C motif for Ser462 and Thr455 were substrates for mammalian protein kinase C, and S462A and T455A mutations resulted in decreases in the extent of CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation that occurred in vivo. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of S. cerevisiae-expressed CTP synthetase 1 mutant enzymes phosphorylated with mammalian protein kinase C confirmed that Ser462 and Thr455 were phosphorylation sites. The S. cerevisiae-expressed and purified S462A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold reduction in CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas the purified T455A mutant enzyme exhibits a 2-fold elevation in CTP synthetase 1 activity (Choi, M.-G., and Carman, G.M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5367–5377). These data indicated that protein kinase C phosphorylation at Ser462 stimulates human CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas phosphorylation at Thr455 inhibits activity. PMID:17463002

  4. The viral transactivator HBx protein exhibits a high potential for regulation via phosphorylation through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) encodes an oncogenic factor, HBx, which is a multifunctional protein that can induce dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways, transcription, and cell cycle progression, among other processes, through interactions with target host factors. The subcellular localization of HBx is both cytoplasmic and nuclear. This dynamic distribution of HBx could be essential to the multiple roles of the protein at different stages during HBV infection. Transactivational functions of HBx may be exerted both in the nucleus, via interaction with host DNA-binding proteins, and in the cytoplasm, via signaling pathways. Although there have been many studies describing different pathways altered by HBx, and its innumerable binding partners, the molecular mechanism that regulates its different roles has been difficult to elucidate. Methods In the current study, we took a bioinformatics approach to investigate whether the viral protein HBx might be regulated via phosphorylation by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Results We found that the phylogenetically conserved residues Ser25 and Ser41 (both within the negative regulatory domain), and Thr81 (in the transactivation domain) are predicted to be phosphorylated. By molecular 3D modeling of HBx, we further show these residues are all predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein, making them easily accesible to these types of modifications. Furthermore, we have also identified Yin Yang sites that might have the potential to be phosphorylated and O-β-GlcNAc interplay at the same residues. Conclusions Thus, we propose that the different roles of HBx displayed in different subcellular locations might be regulated by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranslational modification, via phosphorylation. PMID:23079056

  5. HMMpTM: improving transmembrane protein topology prediction using phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction.

    PubMed

    Tsaousis, Georgios N; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2014-02-01

    During the last two decades a large number of computational methods have been developed for predicting transmembrane protein topology. Current predictors rely on topogenic signals in the protein sequence, such as the distribution of positively charged residues in extra-membrane loops and the existence of N-terminal signals. However, phosphorylation and glycosylation are post-translational modifications (PTMs) that occur in a compartment-specific manner and therefore the presence of a phosphorylation or glycosylation site in a transmembrane protein provides topological information. We examine the combination of phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction with transmembrane protein topology prediction. We report the development of a Hidden Markov Model based method, capable of predicting the topology of transmembrane proteins and the existence of kinase specific phosphorylation and N/O-linked glycosylation sites along the protein sequence. Our method integrates a novel feature in transmembrane protein topology prediction, which results in improved performance for topology prediction and reliable prediction of phosphorylation and glycosylation sites. The method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/HMMpTM.

  6. Feedback Control of Snf1 Protein and Its Phosphorylation Is Necessary for Adaptation to Environmental Stress.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-En; Liu, Tzu-Ning; Yeh, Chung-Shu; Chang, Tien-Hsien; Lo, Yi-Chen; Kao, Cheng-Fu

    2015-07-03

    Snf1, a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, plays a critical role in metabolic energy control in yeast cells. Snf1 activity is activated by phosphorylation of Thr-210 on the activation loop of its catalytic subunit; following activation, Snf1 regulates stress-responsive transcription factors. Here, we report that the level of Snf1 protein is dramatically decreased in a UBP8- and UBP10-deleted yeast mutant (ubp8Δ ubp10Δ), and this is independent of transcriptional regulation and proteasome-mediated degradation. Surprisingly, most Snf1-mediated functions, including glucose limitation regulation, utilization of alternative carbon sources, stress responses, and aging, are unaffected in this strain. Snf1 phosphorylation in ubp8Δ ubp10Δ cells is hyperactivated upon stress, which may compensate for the loss of the Snf1 protein and protect cells against stress and aging. Furthermore, artificial elevation of Snf1 phosphorylation (accomplished through deletion of REG1, which encodes a protein that regulates Snf1 dephosphorylation) restored Snf1 protein levels and the regulation of Snf1 activity in ubp8Δ ubp10Δ cells. Our results reveal the existence of a feedback loop that controls Snf1 protein level and its phosphorylation, which is masked by Ubp8 and Ubp10 through an unknown mechanism. We propose that this dynamic modulation of Snf1 phosphorylation and its protein level may be important for adaptation to environmental stress. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Geminivirus C4 protein alters Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Mills-Lujan, Katherine; Deom, Carl Michael

    2010-03-01

    The C4 protein of beet curly top virus [BCTV-B (US:Log:76)] induces hyperplasia in infected phloem tissue and tumorigenic growths in transgenic plants. The protein offers an excellent model for studying cell cycle control, cell differentiation, and plant development. To investigate the role of the C4 protein in plant development, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants were generated in which the C4 transgene was expressed under the control of an inducible promoter. A detailed analysis of the developmental changes that occur in cotyledons and hypocotyls of seedlings expressing the C4 transgene showed extensive cell division in all tissues types examined, radically altered tissue layer organization, and the absence of a clearly defined vascular system. Induced seedlings failed to develop true leaves, lateral roots, and shoot and root apical meristems, as well as vascular tissue. Specialized epidermis structures, such as stomata and root hairs, were either absent or developmentally impaired in seedlings that expressed C4 protein. Exogenous application of brassinosteroid and abscisic acid weakly rescued the C4-induced phenotype, while induced seedlings were hypersensitive to gibberellic acid and kinetin. These results indicate that ectopic expression of the BCTV C4 protein in A. thaliana drastically alters plant development, possibly through the disruption of multiple hormonal pathways.

  8. Molecular modeling of phosphorylation sites in proteins using a database of local structure segments.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Godzik, Adam; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2005-11-01

    A new bioinformatics tool for molecular modeling of the local structure around phosphorylation sites in proteins has been developed. Our method is based on a library of short sequence and structure motifs. The basic structural elements to be predicted are local structure segments (LSSs). This enables us to avoid the problem of non-exact local description of structures, caused by either diversity in the structural context, or uncertainties in prediction methods. We have developed a library of LSSs and a profile--profile-matching algorithm that predicts local structures of proteins from their sequence information. Our fragment library prediction method is publicly available on a server (FRAGlib), at http://ffas.ljcrf.edu/Servers/frag.html . The algorithm has been applied successfully to the characterization of local structure around phosphorylation sites in proteins. Our computational predictions of sequence and structure preferences around phosphorylated residues have been confirmed by phosphorylation experiments for PKA and PKC kinases. The quality of predictions has been evaluated with several independent statistical tests. We have observed a significant improvement in the accuracy of predictions by incorporating structural information into the description of the neighborhood of the phosphorylated site. Our results strongly suggest that sequence information ought to be supplemented with additional structural context information (predicted with our segment similarity method) for more successful predictions of phosphorylation sites in proteins.

  9. A Comprehensive Proteomic Survey of ABA-Induced Protein Phosphorylation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiehua; Hou, Yuxuan; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Zhiyong; Zhao, Juan; Tong, Xiaohong; Lin, Haiyan; Wei, Xiangjin; Ao, Hejun; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    abscisic acid (ABA) is a key phytohormone regulating plant development and stress response. The signal transduction of ABA largely relies on protein phosphorylation. However; little is known about the phosphorylation events occurring during ABA signaling in rice thus far. By employing a label-free; MS (Mass Spectrometry)-based phosphoproteomic approach; we identified 2271 phosphosites of young rice seedlings and their intensity dynamics in response to ABA; during which 1060 proteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated. Western-blot analysis verified the differential phosphorylation pattern of D1, SMG1 and SAPK9 as indicated by the MS result; suggesting the high reliability of our phosphoproteomic data. The DP (differentially phosphorylated) proteins are extensively involved in ABA as well as other hormone signaling pathways. It is suggested that ABA antagonistically regulates brassinosteroid (BR) signaling via inhibiting BR receptor activity. The result of this study not only expanded our knowledge of rice phosphoproteome, but also shed more light on the pattern of protein phosphorylation in ABA signaling. PMID:28054942

  10. Analysis of Phosphorylation of the Receptor-Like Protein Kinase HAESA during Arabidopsis Floral Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Isaiah; Wang, Ying; Seitz, Kati; Baer, John; Bennewitz, Stefan; Mooney, Brian P.; Walker, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) are the largest family of plant transmembrane signaling proteins. Here we present functional analysis of HAESA, an RLK that regulates floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis. Through in vitro and in vivo analysis of HAE phosphorylation, we provide evidence that a conserved phosphorylation site on a region of the HAE protein kinase domain known as the activation segment positively regulates HAE activity. Additional analysis has identified another putative activation segment phosphorylation site common to multiple RLKs that potentially modulates HAE activity. Comparative analysis suggests that phosphorylation of this second activation segment residue is an RLK specific adaptation that may regulate protein kinase activity and substrate specificity. A growing number of RLKs have been shown to exhibit biologically relevant dual specificity toward serine/threonine and tyrosine residues, but the mechanisms underlying dual specificity of RLKs are not well understood. We show that a phospho-mimetic mutant of both HAE activation segment residues exhibits enhanced tyrosine auto-phosphorylation in vitro, indicating phosphorylation of this residue may contribute to dual specificity of HAE. These results add to an emerging framework for understanding the mechanisms and evolution of regulation of RLK activity and substrate specificity. PMID:26784444

  11. A Comprehensive Proteomic Survey of ABA-Induced Protein Phosphorylation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiehua; Hou, Yuxuan; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Zhiyong; Zhao, Juan; Tong, Xiaohong; Lin, Haiyan; Wei, Xiangjin; Ao, Hejun; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-03

    abscisic acid (ABA) is a key phytohormone regulating plant development and stress response. The signal transduction of ABA largely relies on protein phosphorylation. However; little is known about the phosphorylation events occurring during ABA signaling in rice thus far. By employing a label-free; MS (Mass Spectrometry)-based phosphoproteomic approach; we identified 2271 phosphosites of young rice seedlings and their intensity dynamics in response to ABA; during which 1060 proteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated. Western-blot analysis verified the differential phosphorylation pattern of D1, SMG1 and SAPK9 as indicated by the MS result; suggesting the high reliability of our phosphoproteomic data. The DP (differentially phosphorylated) proteins are extensively involved in ABA as well as other hormone signaling pathways. It is suggested that ABA antagonistically regulates brassinosteroid (BR) signaling via inhibiting BR receptor activity. The result of this study not only expanded our knowledge of rice phosphoproteome, but also shed more light on the pattern of protein phosphorylation in ABA signaling.

  12. Pulmonary exposure of rats to ultrafine titanium dioxide enhances cardiac protein phosphorylation and substance P synthesis in nodose ganglia.

    PubMed

    Kan, Hong; Wu, Zhongxin; Young, Shih-Houng; Chen, Teh-Hsun; Cumpston, Jared L; Chen, Fei; Kashon, Michael L; Castranova, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    The inhalation of engineered nanoparticles stimulates the development of atherosclerosis and impairs vascular function. However, the cardiac effects of inhaled engineered nanoparticles are unknown. Here, we investigate the effects of ultrafine titanium dioxide (UFTiO(2)) on the heart, and we define the possible mechanisms underlying the measured effects. Pulmonary exposure of rats to UFTiO(2) increased the phosphorylation levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and cardiac troponin I, but not Akt, in the heart and substance P synthesis in nodose ganglia. Circulatory levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and blood cell counts and differentials were not significantly changed after pulmonary exposure. Separately, the incubation of cardiac myocytes isolated from naïve adult rat hearts in vitro with UFTiO(2) did not alter the phosphorylation status of the same cardiac proteins. In conclusion, the inhalation of UFTiO(2) enhanced the phosphorylation levels of cardiac proteins. Such responses are likely independent of systemic inflammation, but may involve a lung-neuron-regulated pathway.

  13. Cyclic AMP-modulated phosphorylation of intermediate filament proteins in cultured avian myogenic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gard, D L; Lazarides, E

    1982-01-01

    The intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin and the muscle tropomyosins were the major protein phosphate acceptors in 8-day-old myotubes incubated for 4 h in medium containing radiolabeled phosphate. The addition of isoproterenol or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (BrcAMP) resulted in a two- to threefold increase in incorporation of 32PO4 into both desmin and vimentin, whereas no changes in the incorporation of 32PO4 into tropomyosin or other cellular proteins were observed. The BrcAMP- or hormonally induced increase in 32PO4 incorporation into desmin and vimentin was independent of protein synthesis and was not caused by stimulation of protein phosphate turnover. In addition, BrcAMP did not induce significant changes in the specific activity of the cellular ATP pool. These data suggest that the observed increase in 32PO4 incorporation represented an actual increase in phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin. Two-dimensional tryptic analysis of desmin from 8-day-old myotubes revealed five phosphopeptides of which two showed a 7- to 10-fold increase in 32PO4 incorporation in BrcAMP-treated myotubes. Four of the phosphopeptides identified in desmin labeled in vivo were also observed in desmin phosphorylated in vitro by bovine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Although phosphorylation of desmin and vimentin was apparent in myogenic cells at all stages of differentiation, BrcAMP- and isoproterenol-induced increases in phosphorylation of these proteins were restricted to mature myotubes. These data strongly suggest that in vivo phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin is catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinases and that such phosphorylation may be regulated during muscle differentiation. Images PMID:6294504

  14. Protein supplements: do they alter dietary intakes?

    PubMed

    Mallard, Alistair R; McLay-Cooke, Rebecca T; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2014-06-01

    Effects of protein versus mixed macronutrient supplementation on total energy intake (TEI) and protein intake during an ad libitum diet were examined. Trained males undertook two, 2-week dietary interventions which were randomized, double blinded, and separated by 2 weeks. These were high-protein supplementation (HP: 1034.5 kJ energy, 29.6 g protein, 8.7 g fat and 12.3 g CHO) and standard meal supplementation (SM: 1039 kJ energy, 9.9 g protein, 9.5 g fat, and 29.4 g CHO) consumed daily following a week of baseline measures. Eighteen participants finished both interventions and one only completed HP. TEI (mean ± SD) was not different between baseline (11148 ± 3347 kJ) and HP (10705 ± 3143 kJ) nor between baseline and SM (12381 ± 3877 kJ), however, TEI was greater with SM than HP (923 ± 4015 kJ p = .043). Protein intake (%TEI) was greater with HP (22.4 ± 6.2%) than baseline (19.4 ± 5.4%; p = .008) but not SM (20.0 ± 5.0%). No differences in absolute daily protein intake were found. Absolute CHO intake was greater with SM than HP (52.0 ± 89.5 g, p = .006). No differences in fat intake were found. Body mass did not change between baseline (82.7 ± 11.2 kg) and either HP (83.1 ± 11.7 kg) or SM (82.9 ± 11.0 kg). Protein supplementation increases the relative proportion of protein in the diet, but doesn't increase the absolute amount of total protein or energy consumed. Thus some compensation by a reduction in other foods occurs. This is in contrast to a mixed nutrient supplement, which does not alter the proportion of protein consumed but does increase TEI.

  15. Global protein phosphorylation dynamics during deoxynivalenol-induced ribotoxic stress response in the macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiao; Whitten, Douglas A.; Wu, Ming; Chan, Christina; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Pestka, James J.

    2013-04-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium that commonly contaminates food, is capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes of the innate immune system via a process termed the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). To encapture global signaling events mediating RSR, we quantified the early temporal (≤ 30 min) phosphoproteome changes that occurred in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage during exposure to a toxicologically relevant concentration of DON (250 ng/mL). Large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis employing stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with titanium dioxide chromatography revealed that DON significantly upregulated or downregulated phosphorylation of 188 proteins at both known and yet-to-be functionally characterized phosphosites. DON-induced RSR is extremely complex and goes far beyond its prior known capacity to inhibit translation and activate MAPKs. Transcriptional regulation was the main target during early DON-induced RSR, covering over 20% of the altered phosphoproteins as indicated by Gene Ontology annotation and including transcription factors/cofactors and epigenetic modulators. Other biological processes impacted included cell cycle, RNA processing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, monocyte differentiation and cytoskeleton organization. Some of these processes could be mediated by signaling networks involving MAPK-, NFκB-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways. Fuzzy c-means clustering revealed that DON-regulated phosphosites could be discretely classified with regard to the kinetics of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The cellular response networks identified provide a template for further exploration of the mechanisms of trichothecenemycotoxins and other ribotoxins, and ultimately, could contribute to improved mechanism-based human health risk assessment. - Highlights: ► Mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces immunotoxicity via ribotoxic stress response. ► SILAC phosphoproteomics using

  16. Phosphorylation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G; O'Reilly, D; O'Hare, P

    1996-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22 is known to be highly phosphorylated during infection. Here we show that two electrophoretic forms of VP22 can be identified in infected cell extracts and that this heterogeneity is accounted for by phosphorylation. Furthermore, the nonphosphorylated form of VP22 appears to be specifically incorporated into virions. We also show that the phosphorylated form of VP22 is the only form detected during transient transfection and as such that VP22 can act as a substrate for a cellular kinase. Phospho-amino acid and phospho-peptide analyses of in vivo labeled VP22 were utilized to demonstrate that the phosphorylation profiles of VP22 synthesized during transfection and infection are the same. In both cases VP22 was modified solely on serine residues located in the N-terminal 120 residues of the protein. Moreover, in vitro phosphorylation was utilized to show that the constitutive cellular kinase, casein kinase II, which has four serine consensus recognition sites at the N-terminus of VP22, phosphorylates VP22 in the same manner as observed in vivo. This kinase also phosphorylates VP22 at the N-terminus in intact capsid-tegument structures. Casein kinase II is therefore likely to be the major kinase of VP22 during infection.

  17. Identification and functional analysis of novel phosphorylation sites in the RNA surveillance protein Upf1.

    PubMed

    Lasalde, Clarivel; Rivera, Andrea V; León, Alfredo J; González-Feliciano, José A; Estrella, Luis A; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N; Correa, María E; Cajigas, Iván J; Bracho, Dina P; Vega, Irving E; Wilkinson, Miles F; González, Carlos I

    2014-02-01

    One third of inherited genetic diseases are caused by mRNAs harboring premature termination codons as a result of nonsense mutations. These aberrant mRNAs are degraded by the Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) pathway. A central component of the NMD pathway is Upf1, an RNA-dependent ATPase and helicase. Upf1 is a known phosphorylated protein, but only portions of this large protein have been examined for phosphorylation sites and the functional relevance of its phosphorylation has not been elucidated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using tandem mass spectrometry analyses, we report the identification of 11 putative phosphorylated sites in S. cerevisiae Upf1. Five of these phosphorylated residues are located within the ATPase and helicase domains and are conserved in higher eukaryotes, suggesting a biological significance for their phosphorylation. Indeed, functional analysis demonstrated that a small carboxy-terminal motif harboring at least three phosphorylated amino acids is important for three Upf1 functions: ATPase activity, NMD activity and the ability to promote translation termination efficiency. We provide evidence that two tyrosines within this phospho-motif (Y-738 and Y-742) act redundantly to promote ATP hydrolysis, NMD efficiency and translation termination fidelity.

  18. The DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit phosphorylation sites in human Artemis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunmei; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lu, Haihui; Niewolik, Doris; Schwarz, Klaus; Lieber, Michael R

    2005-10-07

    Artemis protein has irreplaceable functions in V(D)J recombination and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) as a hairpin and 5' and 3' overhang endonuclease. The kinase activity of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is necessary in activating Artemis as an endonuclease. Here we report that three basal phosphorylation sites and 11 DNA-PKcs phosphorylation sites within the mammalian Artemis are all located in the C-terminal domain. All but one of these phosphorylation sites deviate from the SQ or TQ motif of DNA-PKcs that was predicted previously from in vitro phosphorylation studies. Phosphatase-treated mammalian Artemis and Artemis that is mutated at the three basal phosphorylation sites still retain DNA-PKcs-dependent endonucleolytic activities, indicating that basal phosphorylation is not required for the activation. In vivo studies of Artemis lacking the C-terminal domain have been reported to be sufficient to complement V(D)J recombination in Artemis null cells. Therefore, the C-terminal domain may have a negative regulatory effect on the Artemis endonucleolytic activities, and phosphorylation by DNA-PKcs in the C-terminal domain may relieve this inhibition.

  19. Binding of AP-2 adaptor complex to brain membrane is regulated by phosphorylation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alberdi, A. . E-mail: aalberdi@fcm.uncu.edu.ar; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2005-05-13

    Phosphorylation of proteins appears as a key process in early steps of clathrin coated vesicle formation. Here, we report that treatment of post-nuclear fraction with alkaline phosphatase induced redistribution of {alpha} subunits of AP-2 adaptor complex to cytosol and this effect was higher in the {alpha}2 subunit. A high serine phosphorylation status of {alpha} subunits correlated with the higher affinity of AP-2 to membranes. Using a simple binding assay, where membranes were incubated with either purified adaptors or cytosols, we observed an inhibitory effect of tyrphostin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on the binding of AP-2 to membranes, but also an unexpected decrease induced by the phosphatase inhibitor cyclosporine. We also show an inhibitory effect of ATP mediated by cytosolic proteins, although it could not be related to the phosphorylation of AP-2, suggesting an action upstream a cascade of phosphorylations that participate in the regulation of the assembly of AP-2 to membranes.

  20. The P body protein Dcp1a is hyper-phosphorylated during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Aizer, Adva; Kafri, Pinhas; Kalo, Alon; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    Processing bodies (PBs) are non-membranous cytoplasmic structures found in all eukaryotes. Many of their components such as the Dcp1 and Dcp2 proteins are highly conserved. Using live-cell imaging we found that PB structures disassembled as cells prepared for cell division, and then began to reassemble during the late stages of cytokinesis. During the cell cycle and as cells passed through S phase, PB numbers increased. However, there was no memory of PB numbers between mother and daughter cells. Examination of hDcp1a and hDcp1b proteins by electrophoresis in mitotic cell extracts showed a pronounced slower migrating band, which was caused by hyper-phosphorylation of the protein. We found that hDcp1a is a phospho-protein during interphase that becomes hyper-phosphorylated in mitotic cells. Using truncations of hDcp1a we localized the region important for hyper-phosphorylation to the center of the protein. Mutational analysis demonstrated the importance of serine 315 in the hyper-phosphorylation process, while other serine residues tested had a minor affect. Live-cell imaging demonstrated that serine mutations in other regions of the protein affected the dynamics of hDcp1a association with the PB structure. Our work demonstrates the control of PB dynamics during the cell cycle via phosphorylation.

  1. Zinc inhibits protein synthesis in neurons. Potential role of phosphorylation of translation initiation factor-2alpha.

    PubMed

    Alirezaei, M; Nairn, A C; Glowinski, J; Prémont, J; Marin, P

    1999-11-05

    In the central nervous system, Zn(2+) is concentrated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and has been found to be toxic to neurons. In this study, we show that exposure of cultured cortical neurons from mouse to increasing concentrations of Zn(2+) (10-300 microM) induces a progressive decrease in global protein synthesis. The potency of Zn(2+) was increased by about 2 orders of magnitude in the presence of Na(+)-pyrithione, a Zn(2+) ionophore. The basal rate of protein synthesis was restored 3 h after Zn(2+) removal. Zn(2+) induced a sustained increase in phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of the translation eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF-2alpha), whereas it triggered a transient increase in phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2). Protein synthesis was still depressed 60 min after the onset of Zn(2+) exposure while the state of eEF-2 phosphorylation had already returned to its basal level. Moreover, Zn(2+) was less effective than glutamate to increase eEF-2 phosphorylation, whereas it induced a more profound inhibition of protein synthesis. These results suggest that Zn(2+)-induced inhibition of protein synthesis mainly correlates with the increase in eIF-2alpha phosphorylation. Supporting further that Zn(2+) acts at the initiation step of protein synthesis, it strongly decreased the amount of polyribosomes.

  2. Serum Protein Profile Alterations in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G A; Davies, R W; Choi, M W; Perkins, J; Turteltaub, K W; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Langlois, R G; Curzi, M P; Trebes, J E; Fitch, J P; Dalmasso, E A; Colston, B W; Ying, Y; Chromy, B A

    2003-11-18

    Background: Serum protein profiling patterns can reflect the pathological state of a patient and therefore may be useful for clinical diagnostics. Here, we present results from a pilot study of proteomic expression patterns in hemodialysis patients designed to evaluate the range of serum proteomic alterations in this population. Methods: Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOFMS) was used to analyze serum obtained from patients on periodic hemodialysis treatment and healthy controls. Serum samples from patients and controls were first fractionated into six eluants on a strong anion exchange column, followed by application to four array chemistries representing cation exchange, anion exchange, metal affinity and hydrophobic surfaces. A total of 144 SELDI-TOF-MS spectra were obtained from each serum sample. Results: The overall profiles of the patient and control samples were consistent and reproducible. However, 30 well-defined protein differences were observed; 15 proteins were elevated and 15 were decreased in patients compared to controls. Serum from one patient exhibited novel protein peaks suggesting possible additional changes due to a secondary disease process. Conclusion: SELDI-TOF-MS demonstrated dramatic serum protein profile differences between patients and controls. Similarity in protein profiles among dialysis patients suggests that patient physiological responses to end-stage renal disease and/or dialysis therapy have a major effect on serum protein profiles.

  3. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  4. Human TNF-α induces differential protein phosphorylation in Schistosoma mansoni adult male worms.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Katia C; Carvalho, Mariana L P; Bonatto, José Matheus C; Schechtman, Debora; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and its vertebrate host have a complex and intimate connection in which several molecular stimuli are exchanged and affect both organisms. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-α), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is known to induce large-scale gene expression changes in the parasite and to affect several parasite biological processes such as metabolism, egg laying, and worm development. Until now, the molecular mechanisms for TNF-α activity in worms are not completely understood. Here, we aimed at exploring the effect of hTNF-α on S. mansoni protein phosphorylation by 2D gel electrophoresis followed by a quantitative analysis of phosphoprotein staining and protein identification by mass spectrometry. We analyzed three biological replicates of adult male worms exposed to hTNF-α and successfully identified 32 protein spots with a statistically significant increase in phosphorylation upon in vitro exposure to hTNF-α. Among the differentially phosphorylated proteins, we found proteins involved in metabolism, such as glycolysis, galactose metabolism, urea cycle, and aldehyde metabolism, as well as proteins related to muscle contraction and to cytoskeleton remodeling. The most differentially phosphorylated protein (30-fold increase in phosphorylation) was 14-3-3, whose function is known to be modulated by phosphorylation, belonging to a signal transduction protein family that regulates a variety of processes in all eukaryotic cells. Further, 75% of the identified proteins are known in mammals to be related to TNF-α signaling, thus suggesting that TNF-α response may be conserved in the parasite. We propose that this work opens new perspectives to be explored in the study of the molecular crosstalk between host and pathogen.

  5. Effect of zinc sulphate on gelling properties of phosphorylated protein isolate from yellow stripe trevally.

    PubMed

    Arfat, Yasir Ali; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2013-12-01

    Impacts of zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) (0-140 μmol/kg) on gel properties of yellow stripe trevally surimi added with sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) (0.25% and 0.5%, w/w) and protein isolate phosphorylated with STPP at 0.25% and 0.5% (w/w) were studied. Gels from surimi added with 60 μmol ZnSO4/kg in the absence and presence of 0.5% STPP had the increases in breaking force and deformation by 20.9% and 33.3%, and 11.6% and 18.6%, respectively, compared with the control surimi gel (without additives). Gel of protein isolate phosphorylated with 0.5% STPP containing 100 μmol ZnSO4/kg had the increases in breaking force and deformation by 14.87% and 5.6%, respectively, compared with the gel from non-phosphorylated protein isolate at the same ZnSO4 level, suggesting that the phosphorylated protein isolate was more crosslinked by Zn(2+). The addition of ZnSO4 at the suitable level lowered the expressible moisture content, but increased whiteness of surimi or protein isolate gels (P<0.05). Non-covalent bonds, more likely salt bridge and ionic interactions, played a major role in cross-linking of proteins in both surimi and protein isolate added with ZnSO4, regardless of phosphates incorporated. Microstructure study revealed that a gel having highly interconnected and denser network with smaller voids was formed when protein isolate phosphorylated with 0.5% STPP was added with ZnSO4 at a level of 100 μmol/kg. Thus, gel with improved properties could be obtained from protein isolate from yellow stripe trevally phosphorylated with STPP in conjunction with addition of ZnSO4 at an appropriate level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of Phosphorylation-Dependent Binding Partners of Aquaporin-2 Using Protein Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zwang, Nicholas A.; Hoffert, Jason D.; Pisitkun, Trairak; Moeller, Hanne B.; Fenton, Robert A.; Knepper, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin-mediated control of water permeability in the renal collecting duct occurs in part through regulation of the distribution of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) between the apical plasma membrane and intracellular membrane compartments. Phosphorylation of Ser-256 at AQP2's cytoplasmic COOH-terminus is well-accepted as a critical step for translocation. The aim of this study was to identify binding partners to phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated forms of the AQP2 COOH-terminus via a targeted comparative proteomic approach. Cytosol from inner medullary collecting ducts isolated from rat kidneys was incubated with “bait” peptides, representing the COOH-terminal AQP2 tail in its nonphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, to capture differentially-bound proteins prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Mass spectrometric results were confirmed by immunoblotting. Immunoprecipitation was performed using an AQP2 COOH-terminal antibody combined with immunblotting against the proposed binding partners in order to demonstrate interactions with native AQP2. Our studies confirmed previously identified interactions between AQP2 and hsc70, hsp70−1 and −2, as well as annexin II. These proteins were found to bind less to the Ser-256-phosphorylated AQP2 than to the non-phosphorylated form. In contrast, another heat shock protein, hsp70−5 (BiP/grp78), bound to phosphorylated AQP2 more avidly than to non-phosphorylated AQP2. Immunogold EM studies demonstrated that BiP is present not only in the ER, but in the cytoplasm and apical plasma membrane of rat collecting duct cells. Furthermore, confocal immunofluorescence studies showed partial colocalization of BiP with AQP2 in non-ER compartments. These results suggest that phosphorylation of AQP2 at Ser-256 may regulate AQP2 trafficking in part by mediating differential binding of hsp70 family proteins to the COOH-terminal tail. PMID:19209902

  7. Platelet-derived growth factor induces phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shawver, L.K.; Pierce, G.F.; Kawahara, R.S.; Deuel, T.F.

    1989-01-15

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulated the phosphorylation of a nuclear protein of 64 kDa (pp64) in nuclei of nontransformed normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. Low levels of phosphorylation of pp64 were observed in nuclei of serum-starved NRK cells. Fetal calf serum (FCS), PDGF, and homodimeric v-sis and PDGF A-chain protein enhanced the incorporation of 32P into pp64 over 4-fold within 30 min and over 8-fold within 2 h of exposure of NRK cells to the growth factors. In contrast, constitutive phosphorylation of 32P-labeled pp64 in nuclei of NRK cells transformed by the simian sarcoma virus (SSV) was high and only minimally stimulated by PDGF and FCS. 32P-Labeled pp64 was isolated from nuclei of PDGF-stimulated nontransformed NRK cells; the 32P of pp64 was labile in 1 M KOH, and pp64 was not significantly recognized by anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that the PDGF-induced phosphorylation of pp64 occurred on serine or on threonine residues. However, pp64 from SSV-transformed NRK cell nuclei was significantly stable to base hydrolysis and was immunoprecipitated with anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that pp64 from SSV-transformed cell nuclei is phosphorylated also on tyrosine. FCS, PDGF, and PDGF A- and B-chain homodimers thus stimulate the rapid time-dependent phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein shortly after stimulation of responsive cells. The growth factor-stimulated phosphorylation of pp64 and the constitutive high levels of pp64 phosphorylation in cells transformed by SSV suggest important roles for pp64 and perhaps regulated nuclear protein kinases and phosphatases in cell division and proliferation.

  8. Regulation of carbon metabolism in gram-positive bacteria by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, J; Fischer, C; Charrier, V; Galinier, A; Lindner, C; Darbon, E; Dossonnet, V

    1997-01-01

    The main function of the bacterial phosphotransferase system is to transport and to phosphorylate mono- and disaccharides as well as sugar alcohols. However, the phosphotransferase system is also involved in regulation of carbon metabolism. In Gram-positive bacteria, it is implicated in carbon catabolite repression and regulation of expression of catabolic genes by controlling either catabolic enzyme activities, transcriptional activators or antiterminators. All these different regulations follow a protein phosphorylation mechanism.

  9. Phosphatidylethanolamine deficiency in Mammalian mitochondria impairs oxidative phosphorylation and alters mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Tasseva, Guergana; Bai, Helin Daniel; Davidescu, Magdalena; Haromy, Alois; Michelakis, Evangelos; Vance, Jean E

    2013-02-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders, but the role of phospholipids, particularly the nonbilayer-forming lipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), in mitochondrial function is poorly understood. Elimination of mitochondrial PE (mtPE) synthesis via phosphatidylserine decarboxylase in mice profoundly alters mitochondrial morphology and is embryonic lethal (Steenbergen, R., Nanowski, T. S., Beigneux, A., Kulinski, A., Young, S. G., and Vance, J. E. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 40032-40040). We now report that moderate <30% depletion of mtPE alters mitochondrial morphology and function and impairs cell growth. Acute reduction of mtPE by RNAi silencing of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase and chronic reduction of mtPE in PSB-2 cells that have only 5% of normal phosphatidylserine synthesis decreased respiratory capacity, ATP production, and activities of electron transport chain complexes (C) I and CIV but not CV. Blue native-PAGE analysis revealed defects in the organization of CI and CIV into supercomplexes in PE-deficient mitochondria, correlated with reduced amounts of CI and CIV proteins. Thus, mtPE deficiency impairs formation and/or membrane integration of respiratory supercomplexes. Despite normal or increased levels of mitochondrial fusion proteins in mtPE-deficient cells, and no reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondria were extensively fragmented, and mitochondrial ultrastructure was grossly aberrant. In general, chronic reduction of mtPE caused more pronounced mitochondrial defects than did acute mtPE depletion. The functional and morphological changes in PSB-2 cells were largely reversed by normalization of mtPE content by supplementation with lyso-PE, a mtPE precursor. These studies demonstrate that even a modest reduction of mtPE in mammalian cells profoundly alters mitochondrial functions.

  10. Depolarization-dependent protein phosphorylation in rat cortical synaptosomes: the effects of calcium, strontium and barium.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P J; Dunkley, P R

    1983-12-23

    Depolarization of synaptosomes increases the phosphorylation of a number of proteins in a calcium-dependent manner. The concentration of calcium required for optimum stimulation was 0.1 mM, with higher concentrations up to 2.5 mM being progressively less effective. Calcium was significantly better than strontium at increasing depolarization-dependent protein phosphorylation, while barium had no stimulating effect at concentrations above 0.1 mM. The order of potency of these ions is consistent with a calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase being activated on entry of calcium into synaptosomes, but is not consistent with the known efficacy of these ions in stimulating neurotransmitter release. The data show for the first time that phosphorylation of proteins may not be a prerequisite for neurotransmitter release.

  11. Reconstitution of LHC phosphorylation by a protein kinase isolated from spinach thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hind, G.; Coughlan, S.

    1986-01-01

    Protein kinase activity is responsible for phosphorylating the (LHC) light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II, leading to its migration in the thylakoid membrane, the fractional redistribution of excitation energy between photosystems II and I, and the phenomenon of state transition. Previous work from this laboratory described the purification to homogeneity of a thylakoid protein kinase which catalyzes the phosphorylation of isolated LHC at 1-10% of a rate estimated for this enzyme and substrate when resident together in the thylakoid membrane. In this communication, we report rates of LHC phosphorylation that are close to physiological, in a system comprised of isolated purified protein kinase (LHCK) and native LHC. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    PubMed

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  13. Phosphorylation site mapping of soluble proteins: bioinformatical filtering reveals potential plastidic phosphoproteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lohrig, Katharina; Müller, Bernd; Davydova, Joulia; Leister, Dario; Wolters, Dirk Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mode of regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cell architecture. A combination of phosphopeptide enrichment strategies based on TiO(2) and IMAC in addition to our MudPIT strategy revealed the detection of 181 phosphorylation sites which are located on 125 potentially plastidic proteins predicted by GoMiner, TargetP/Predotar in Arabidopsis thaliana. In our study phosphorylation on serine is favored over threonine and this in turn over phosphorylation on tyrosine residues, showing a percentage of 67.4% to 24.3% to 8.3% for pS:pT:pY. Four phosphorylated residues (S208, Y239, T246 and T330), identified by our approach have been fitted to the structure of the activated form of spinach RuBisCO, which are located in close proximity to the substrate binding site for ribulosebisphosphate. Potentially, these phosphorylation sites exert a direct influence on the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Such examples show nicely the value of the presented mass spectrometric dataset for further biochemical applications, since alternative mutation analysis often turns out to be unsuccessful, caused by mutations in essential proteins which result in lethal phenotypes.

  14. Structure of phosphorylated enzyme I, the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system sugar translocation signal protein.

    PubMed

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Lim, Kap; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Kapadia, Geeta; Chen, Celia C H; Schwartz, Jennifer; Howard, Andrew; Reddy, Prasad T; Peterkofsky, Alan; Herzberg, Osnat

    2006-10-31

    Bacterial transport of many sugars, coupled to their phosphorylation, is carried out by the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):sugar phosphotransferase system and involves five phosphoryl group transfer reactions. Sugar translocation initiates with the Mg(2+)-dependent phosphorylation of enzyme I (EI) by PEP. Crystals of Escherichia coli EI were obtained by mixing the protein with Mg(2+) and PEP, followed by oxalate, an EI inhibitor. The crystal structure reveals a dimeric protein where each subunit comprises three domains: a domain that binds the partner PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system protein, HPr; a domain that carries the phosphorylated histidine residue, His-189; and a PEP-binding domain. The PEP-binding site is occupied by Mg(2+) and oxalate, and the phosphorylated His-189 is in-line for phosphotransfer to/from the ligand. Thus, the structure represents an enzyme intermediate just after phosphotransfer from PEP and before a conformational transition that brings His-189 approximately P in proximity to the phosphoryl group acceptor, His-15 of HPr. A model of this conformational transition is proposed whereby swiveling around an alpha-helical linker disengages the His domain from the PEP-binding domain. Assuming that HPr binds to the HPr-binding domain as observed by NMR spectroscopy of an EI fragment, a rotation around two linker segments orients the His domain relative to the HPr-binding domain so that His-189 approximately P and His-15 are appropriately stationed for an in-line phosphotransfer reaction.

  15. Artemis phosphorylated by DNA-dependent protein kinase associates preferentially with discrete regions of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Pope, Louise; De Chasseval, Régina; Gosselin, Dominique; Dong, Fumin; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Haché, Robert J G

    2006-05-19

    Artemis is a nuclear phosphoprotein required for genomic integrity whose phosphorylation is increased subsequent to DNA damage. Artemis phosphorylation by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and the association of Artemis with DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) have been proposed to be crucial for the variable, diversity, joining (V(D)J) reaction, genomic stability and cell survival in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. The exact nature of the effectors of Artemis phosphorylation is presently being debated. Here, we have delimited the interface on Artemis required for its association with DNA-PKcs and present the characterization of six DNA-PK phosphorylation sites on Artemis whose phosphorylation shows dependence on its association with DNA-PKcs and is induced by double-stranded DNA damage. Surprisingly, DNA-PKcs Artemis association appeared to be dispensable in a V(D)J recombination assay with stably integrated DNA substrates. Phosphorylation at two of the sites on Artemis, S516 and S645, was verified in vivo using phosphospecific antibodies. Basal Artemis S516 and S645 phosphorylation in vivo showed a significant dependence on DNA-PKcs association. However, regardless of its association with DNA-PKcs, phosphorylation of Artemis at both S516 and S645 was stimulated in response to the double-stranded DNA-damaging agent bleomycin, albeit to a lesser extent. This suggests that additional factors contribute to promote DNA damage-induced Artemis phosphorylation. Intriguingly, pS516/pS645 Artemis was concentrated in chromatin-associated nuclear foci in naïve cells. These foci were maintained upon DNA damage but failed to overlap with the damage-induced gammaH2AX. These results provide the expectation of a specific role for DNA-PK-phosphorylated Artemis in both naïve and damaged cells.

  16. Muscarinic Stimulation Facilitates Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca Release by Modulating Ryanodine Receptor 2 Phosphorylation Through Protein Kinase G and Ca/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Belevych, Andriy E; Liu, Bin; Bonilla, Ingrid M; Radwański, Przemysław B; Kubasov, Igor V; Valdivia, Héctor H; Schober, Karsten; Carnes, Cynthia A; Györke, Sándor

    2016-11-01

    Although the effects and the underlying mechanism of sympathetic stimulation on cardiac Ca handling are relatively well established both in health and disease, the modes of action and mechanisms of parasympathetic modulation are poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that parasympathetic stimulation initiates a novel mode of excitation-contraction coupling that enhances the efficiency of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca store utilization. This efficient mode of excitation-contraction coupling involves reciprocal changes in the phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor 2 at Ser-2808 and Ser-2814. Specifically, Ser-2808 phosphorylation was mediated by muscarinic receptor subtype 2 and activation of PKG (protein kinase G), whereas dephosphorylation of Ser-2814 involved activation of muscarinic receptor subtype 3 and decreased reactive oxygen species-dependent activation of CaMKII (Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II). The overall effect of these changes in phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor 2 is an increase in systolic Ca release at the low sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca content and a paradoxical reduction in aberrant Ca leak. Accordingly, cholinergic stimulation of cardiomyocytes isolated from failing hearts improved Ca cycling efficiency by restoring altered ryanodine receptor 2 phosphorylation balance. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Rictor regulates phosphorylation of the novel protein kinase C Apl II in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Labban, Margaret; Dyer, John R; Sossin, Wayne S

    2012-09-01

    Rapamycin-insensitive companion of TOR (Rictor) is a conserved component of target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2), a complex implicated in phosphorylation of a number of signal transduction-related kinases, including protein kinase Cs (PKCs) at their 'hydrophobic' site in the carboxy-terminal extension domain. In the marine mollusk, Aplysia californica, an increase in phosphorylation of the novel PKC, Apl II, at the hydrophobic site is associated with a protein synthesis-dependent increase in synaptic strength seen after continuous application of serotonin. To determine if Rictor plays a role in this increase, we cloned the Aplysia ortholog of Rictor (ApRictor). An siRNA-mediated decrease in ApRictor levels in Aplysia sensory neurons led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site suggesting a role for ApRictor in hydrophobic site phosphorylation. However, over-expression of ApRictor was not sufficient to increase phosphorylation of PKC Apl II. Continuous application of serotonin increased phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site in cultured sensory neurons, and this was blocked by Torin, which inhibits both TORC1 and TORC2. Over-expression of ApRictor did not lead to change in the magnitude of serotonin-mediated phosphorylation, but did lead to a small increase in the membrane localization of phosphorylated PKC Apl II. In conclusion, these studies implicate Rictor in phosphorylation of a novel PKC during synaptic plasticity and suggest an additional role for Rictor in regulating the localization of PKCs.

  18. Blue Light-Induced Phosphorylation of a Plasma Membrane-Associated Protein in Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J. M.; Short, T. W.; Gallagher, S.; Briggs, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Blue light induces a variety of photomorphogenic responses in higher plants, among them phototropic curvature, the bending of seedlings toward a unidirectional light source. In dark-grown coleoptiles of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings, blue light induces rapid phosphorylation of a 114-kD protein at fluence levels that are sufficient to stimulate phototropic curvature. Phosphorylation in response to blue light can be detected in vivo in coleoptile tips preincubated in 32Pi or in vitro in isolated membranes supplemented with [[gamma]-32P]ATP. Phosphorylation reaches a maximum level in vitro within 2 min following an inductive light pulse, but substantial labeling occurs within the first 15 s. Isolated membranes remain activated for several minutes following an in vitro blue light stimulus, even in the absence of exogenous ATP. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the 114-kD protein detected phosphoserine and a trace of phosphothreonine. The kinase involved in phosphorylating the protein in vitro is not dependent on calcium. The 114-kD protein itself has an apparent binding site for ATP, detected by incubating with the nonhydrolyzable analog, 5[prime]-p-fluorosulfonyl-benzoyladenosine. This result suggests that the 114-kD protein, which becomes phosphorylated in response to blue light, may also be capable of kinase activity. PMID:12231896

  19. The Pivotal Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Control of Yeast Central Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vlastaridis, Panayotis; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Stratikos, Efstratios; Oliver, Stephen G.; Amoutzias, Grigorios D.

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is the most frequent eukaryotic post-translational modification and can act as either a molecular switch or rheostat for protein functions. The deliberate manipulation of protein phosphorylation has great potential for regulating specific protein functions with surgical precision, rather than the gross effects gained by the over/underexpression or complete deletion of a protein-encoding gene. In order to assess the impact of phosphorylation on central metabolism, and thus its potential for biotechnological and medical exploitation, a compendium of highly confident protein phosphorylation sites (p-sites) for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been analyzed together with two more datasets from the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Our analysis highlights the global properties of the regulation of yeast central metabolism by protein phosphorylation, where almost half of the enzymes involved are subject to this sort of post-translational modification. These phosphorylated enzymes, compared to the nonphosphorylated ones, are more abundant, regulate more reactions, have more protein–protein interactions, and a higher fraction of them are ubiquitinated. The p-sites of metabolic enzymes are also more conserved than the background p-sites, and hundreds of them have the potential for regulating metabolite production. All this integrated information has allowed us to prioritize thousands of p-sites in terms of their potential phenotypic impact. This multi-source compendium should enable the design of future high-throughput (HTP) mutation studies to identify key molecular switches/rheostats for the manipulation of not only the metabolism of yeast, but also that of many other biotechnologically and medically important fungi and eukaryotes. PMID:28250014

  20. Long-term obesity promotes alterations in diastolic function induced by reduction of phospholamban phosphorylation at serine-16 without affecting calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Leopoldo, André S.; da Silva, Danielle C. T.; do Nascimento, André F.; de Campos, Dijon H. S.; Luvizotto, Renata A. M.; de Deus, Adriana F.; Freire, Paula P.; Medeiros, Alessandra; Okoshi, Katashi; Cicogna, Antonio C.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between the duration of obesity, cardiac function, and the proteins involved in myocardial calcium (Ca2+) handling. We hypothesized that long-term obesity promotes cardiac dysfunction due to a reduction of expression and/or phosphorylation of myocardial Ca2+-handling proteins. Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups (n = 10 each): control (C; standard diet) and obese (Ob; high-fat diet) for 30 wk. Morphological and histological analyses were assessed. Left ventricular cardiac function was assessed in vivo by echocardiographic evaluation and in vitro by papillary muscle. Cardiac protein expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a), calsequestrin, L-type Ca2+ channel, and phospholamban (PLB), as well as PLB serine-16 phosphorylation (pPLB Ser16) and PLB threonine-17 phosphorylation (pPLB Thr17) were determined by Western blot. The adiposity index was higher (82%) in Ob rats than in C rats. Obesity promoted cardiac hypertrophy without alterations in interstitial collagen levels. Ob rats had increased endocardial and midwall fractional shortening, posterior wall shortening velocity, and A-wave compared with C rats. Cardiac index, early-to-late diastolic mitral inflow ratio, and isovolumetric relaxation time were lower in Ob than in C. The Ob muscles developed similar baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to increased extracellular Ca2+. Obesity caused a reduction in cardiac pPLB Ser16 and the pPLB Ser16/PLB ratio in Ob rats. Long-term obesity promotes alterations in diastolic function, most likely due to the reduction of pPLB Ser16, but does not impair the myocardial Ca2+ entry and recapture to SR. PMID:24970855

  1. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  2. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case.

    PubMed

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  3. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  4. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-05-19

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems.

  5. Nucleolar proteins change in altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, M. A.; Kordyum, E. L.; Gonzalez-Camacho, F.; Medina, F. J.

    Discovery of gravisensitivity of cells no specified to gravity perception focused continuous attention on an elucidation of mechanisms involved in altered gravity effects at the different levels of cellular organization A nucleolus is the nuclear domain in which the major portion of ribosome biogenesis takes place This is a basic process for cell vitality beginning with the transcription of rDNA followed by processing newly synthesized pre-rRNA molecules A wide range of nucleolar proteins plays a highly significant role in all stages of biosynthesis of ribosomes Different steps of ribosome biogenesis should respond to various external factors affecting generally the cell metabolism Nevertheless a nucleolus remains not enough studied under the influence of altered environmental conditions For this reason we studied root apices from 2-day old Lepidium sativum seedlings germinated and grown under slow horizontal clinorotation and stationary conditions in darkness The extraction of cell nuclei followed by sequential fractionation of nuclear proteins according to their solubility in buffers of increasing ionic strength was carried out This procedure gave rise to 5 distinct fractions We analyzed nuclear subproteomes of the most soluble fraction called S2 It is actually a functionally significant fraction consisting of ribonucleoproteins actively engaged in pre-rRNA synthesis and processing 2D-electrophoresis of S2 fraction proteins was carried out The gels were silver stained and stained gels were scanned and analyzed

  6. Phosphorylation of the mitochondrial autophagy receptor Nix enhances its interaction with LC3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Rogov, Vladimir V; Suzuki, Hironori; Marinković, Mija; Lang, Verena; Kato, Ryuichi; Kawasaki, Masato; Buljubašić, Maja; Šprung, Matilda; Rogova, Natalia; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Dötsch, Volker; Dikic, Ivan; Brady, Nathan R; Novak, Ivana

    2017-04-25

    The mitophagy receptor Nix interacts with LC3/GABARAP proteins, targeting mitochondria into autophagosomes for degradation. Here we present evidence for phosphorylation-driven regulation of the Nix:LC3B interaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR indicate a ~100 fold enhanced affinity of the serine 34/35-phosphorylated Nix LC3-interacting region (LIR) to LC3B and formation of a very rigid complex compared to the non-phosphorylated sequence. Moreover, the crystal structure of LC3B in complex with the Nix LIR peptide containing glutamic acids as phosphomimetic residues and NMR experiments revealed that LIR phosphorylation stabilizes the Nix:LC3B complex via formation of two additional hydrogen bonds between phosphorylated serines of Nix LIR and Arg11, Lys49 and Lys51 in LC3B. Substitution of Lys51 to Ala in LC3B abrogates binding of a phosphomimetic Nix mutant. Functionally, serine 34/35 phosphorylation enhances autophagosome recruitment to mitochondria in HeLa cells. Together, this study provides cellular, biochemical and biophysical evidence that phosphorylation of the LIR domain of Nix enhances mitophagy receptor engagement.

  7. Predicting protein phosphorylation from gene expression: top methods from the IMPROVER Species Translation Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Michael; Bilal, Erhan; Hormoz, Sahand; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Bhanot, Gyan; Luo, Feng; Tarca, Adi L.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Using gene expression to infer changes in protein phosphorylation levels induced in cells by various stimuli is an outstanding problem. The intra-species protein phosphorylation challenge organized by the IMPROVER consortium provided the framework to identify the best approaches to address this issue. Results: Rat lung epithelial cells were treated with 52 stimuli, and gene expression and phosphorylation levels were measured. Competing teams used gene expression data from 26 stimuli to develop protein phosphorylation prediction models and were ranked based on prediction performance for the remaining 26 stimuli. Three teams were tied in first place in this challenge achieving a balanced accuracy of about 70%, indicating that gene expression is only moderately predictive of protein phosphorylation. In spite of the similar performance, the approaches used by these three teams, described in detail in this article, were different, with the average number of predictor genes per phosphoprotein used by the teams ranging from 3 to 124. However, a significant overlap of gene signatures between teams was observed for the majority of the proteins considered, while Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways were enriched in the union of the predictor genes of the three teams for multiple proteins. Availability and implementation: Gene expression and protein phosphorylation data are available from ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-2091). Software implementation of the approach of Teams 49 and 75 are available at http://bioinformaticsprb.med.wayne.edu and http://people.cs.clemson.edu/∼luofeng/sbv.rar, respectively. Contact: gyanbhanot@gmail.com or luofeng@clemson.edu or atarca@med.wayne.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25061067

  8. Depolarisation-dependent protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in rat cortical synaptosomes is modulated by calcium.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P J; Dunkley, P R

    1985-02-01

    The effect of calcium on protein phosphorylation was investigated using intact synaptosomes isolated from rat cerebral cortex and prelabelled with 32Pi. For nondepolarised synaptosomes a group of calcium-sensitive phosphoproteins were maximally labelled in the presence of 0.1 mM calcium. The phosphorylation of these proteins was slightly decreased in the presence of strontium and absent in the presence of barium, consistent with the decreased ability of these cations to activate calcium-stimulated protein kinases. Addition of calcium alone to synaptosomes prelabelled in its absence increased phosphorylation of a number of proteins. On depolarisation in the presence of calcium certain of the calcium-sensitive phosphoproteins were further increased in labelling above nondepolarised levels. These increases were maximal and most sustained after prelabelling at 0.1 mM calcium. On prolonged depolarisation at this calcium concentration a slow decrease in labelling was observed for most phosphoproteins, whereas a greater rate and extent of decrease occurred at higher calcium concentrations. At 2.5 mM calcium a rapid and then a subsequent slow dephosphorylation was observed, indicating two distinct phases of dephosphorylation. Of all the phosphoproteins normally stimulated by depolarisation, only phosphoprotein 59 did not exhibit the rapid phase of dephosphorylation at high calcium concentrations. Replacing calcium with strontium markedly decreased the extent of change observed on depolarisation whereas barium decreased phosphorylation changes even further. Taken together these data suggest that an influx of calcium into synaptosomes initially activates protein phosphorylation, but as the levels of intrasynaptosomal calcium rise protein dephosphorylation predominates. Other phosphoproteins were dephosphorylated immediately on depolarisation in the presence of calcium. The fine control of protein phosphorylation levels exerted by calcium supports the idea that the

  9. Mild metabolic perturbations alter succinylation of mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanlian; Xu, Hui; Potash, Samuel; Starkov, Anatoly; Belousov, Vsevolod V; Bilan, Dmitry S; Denton, Travis T; Gibson, Gary E

    2017-06-20

    Succinylation of proteins is widespread, modifies both the charge and size of the molecules, and can alter their function. For example, liver mitochondrial proteins have 1,190 unique succinylation sites representing multiple metabolic pathways. Succinylation is sensitive to both increases and decreases of the NAD(+) -dependent desuccinylase, SIRT5. Although the succinyl group for succinylation is derived from metabolism, the effects of systematic variation of metabolism on mitochondrial succinylation are not known. Changes in succinylation of mitochondrial proteins following variations in metabolism were compared against the mitochondrial redox state as estimated by the mitochondrial NAD(+) /NADH ratio using fluorescent probes. The ratio was decreased by reduced glycolysis and/or glutathione depletion (iodoacetic acid; 2-deoxyglucose), depressed tricarboxylic acid cycle activity (carboxyethyl ester of succinyl phosphonate), and impairment of electron transport (antimycin) or ATP synthase (oligomycin), while uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine or tyrphostin) increased the NAD(+) /NADH ratio. All of the conditions decreased succinylation. In contrast, reducing the oxygen from 20% to 2.4% increased succinylation. The results demonstrate that succinylation varies with metabolic states, is not correlated to the mitochondrial NAD(+) /NADH ratio, and may help coordinate the response to metabolic challenge. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Construction of protein phosphorylation networks by data mining, text mining and ontology integration: analysis of the spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Ren, Jia; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge representation of the role of phosphorylation is essential for the meaningful understanding of many biological processes. However, such a representation is challenging because proteins can exist in numerous phosphorylated forms with each one having its own characteristic protein–protein interactions (PPIs), functions and subcellular localization. In this article, we evaluate the current state of phosphorylation event curation and then present a bioinformatics framework for the annotation and representation of phosphorylated proteins and construction of phosphorylation networks that addresses some of the gaps in current curation efforts. The integrated approach involves (i) text mining guided by RLIMS-P, a tool that identifies phosphorylation-related information in scientific literature; (ii) data mining from curated PPI databases; (iii) protein form and complex representation using the Protein Ontology (PRO); (iv) functional annotation using the Gene Ontology (GO); and (v) network visualization and analysis with Cytoscape. We use this framework to study the spindle checkpoint, the process that monitors the assembly of the mitotic spindle and blocks cell cycle progression at metaphase until all chromosomes have made bipolar spindle attachments. The phosphorylation networks we construct, centered on the human checkpoint kinase BUB1B (BubR1) and its yeast counterpart MAD3, offer a unique view of the spindle checkpoint that emphasizes biologically relevant phosphorylated forms, phosphorylation-state–specific PPIs and kinase–substrate relationships. Our approach for constructing protein phosphorylation networks can be applied to any biological process that is affected by phosphorylation. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:23749465

  11. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases.

  12. Phosphorylation of Connexin 50 by Protein Kinase A Enhances Gap Junction and Hemichannel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialu; Ek Vitorin, Jose F.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Gu, Sumin; Shi, Qian; Burt, Janis M.; Jiang, Jean X.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of connexins is an important mechanism regulating gap junction channels. However, the role(s) of connexin (Cx) phosphorylation in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we showed by mass spectrometry that Ser-395 in the C terminus of chicken Cx50 was phosphorylated in the lens. Ser-395 is located within a PKA consensus site. Analyses of Cx50 phosphorylation by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography tryptic phosphopeptide profiles suggested that Ser-395 was targeted by PKA in vivo. PKA activation increased both gap junction dye coupling and hemichannel dye uptake in a manner not involving increases in total Cx50 expression or relocation to the cell surface or gap junctional plaques. Single channel recordings indicated PKA enhanced transitions between the closed and ∼200-pS open state while simultaneously reducing transitions between this open state and a ∼65-pS subconductance state. The mutation of Ser-395 to alanine significantly attenuated PKA-induced increases in dye coupling and uptake by Cx50. However, channel records indicated that phosphorylation at this site was unnecessary for enhanced transitions between the closed and ∼200-pS conductance state. Together, these results suggest that Cx50 is phosphorylated in vivo by PKA at Ser-395 and that this event, although unnecessary for PKA-induced alterations in channel conductance, promotes increased dye permeability of Cx50 channels, which plays an important role in metabolic coupling and transport in lens fibers. PMID:21454606

  13. Phosphorylation site of NtrC, a protein phosphatase whose covalent intermediate activates transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, D A; Gillece-Castro, B L; Burlingame, A L; Koshland, D E

    1992-01-01

    The NtrC transcription factor is a member of a family of homologous prokaryotic regulatory proteins that participate in the transduction of extracellular and nutritional signals. It has been demonstrated that the phosphate group from a histidine residue of the phosphorylated NtrB protein autokinase is transferred to the NtrC protein. Phosphorylation of the NtrC protein is transient and activates its transcriptional enhancement activity. We have investigated the site of phosphorylation of the Salmonella typhimurium NtrC protein and find that it is an aspartate residue (Asp-54) that is found within a sequence conserved in all of the members of the family of regulatory proteins. We propose that this phosphorylation is an NtrC protein histidine phosphatase catalytic intermediate. This conclusion suggests that the NtrC family should be viewed not as kinase substrates but as enzymes that can catalyze the hydrolysis of their activated forms in a concentration-independent fashion. They are similar in this sense to eukaryotic signal-transducing GTPases. Images PMID:1321122

  14. Subproteomics analysis of phosphorylated proteins: application to the study of B-lymphoblasts from a patient with Scott syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imam-Sghiouar, Naïma; Laude-Lemaire, Isabelle; Labas, Valérie; Pflieger, Delphine; Le Caër, Jean-Pierre; Caron, Michel; Nabias, Danièle Kerbiriou; Joubert-Caron, Raymonde

    2002-07-01

    Proteomics based approaches, which examine the expressed proteins of a tissue or cell type, complement the genome initiatives and are increasingly used to address biomedical questions. Proteins are the main functional output, and post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation are very important in determining protein function. To address this question, we developed a method for specific immunoprecipitation using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. This method is directly compatible with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). In this report data are presented on B-lymphoblasts from a patient suffering of Scott syndrome. Scott syndrome is an orphan inherited hemorrhagic disorder due to a lack of exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine at the exoplasmic leaflet of plasma membrane of blood cells. We hypothesized that a consequence of the mutation is to alter phosphorylation of proteins involved in signal transduction leading to breakdown in cellular signaling pathways mediating phosphatidylserine exposure. An immunoprecipitation method combined with 2-DE was applied to search for modifications in the expression of phosphorylated polypeptides related to Scott syndrome phenotype. We report here the construction of a B-lymphoblast subproteomic map comprising of polypeptides observed after immunoprecipitation using antibodies to phosphotyrosine. The polypeptides were identified either by mass fingerprinting, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and/or by matching with various lymphoid cell 2-DE maps included in the Laboratoire de Biochimie des Protéines et Protéomique 2-DE database. A differential analysis was further performed to explore several hundred proteins in Scott B-lymphoblasts in comparison with control B-lymphoblasts. Then, image analysis allowed detection of variations between control and Scott syndrome phenotype lymphoblasts. Five spots were specifically found on 2-DE from Scott syndrome phenotype lymphoblasts, and

  15. Integration of phosphoproteomic, chemical, and biological strategies for the functional analysis of targeted protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingquan; Huang, Bill X

    2013-02-01

    Reversible phosphorylation, tightly controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, plays a central role in mediating biological processes, such as protein-protein interactions, subcellular translocation, and activation of cellular enzymes. MS-based phosphoproteomics has now allowed the detection and quantification of tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites from a typical biological sample in a single experiment, which has posed new challenges in functional analysis of each and every phosphorylation site on specific signaling phosphoproteins of interest. In this article, we review recent advances in the functional analysis of targeted phosphorylation carried out by various chemical and biological approaches in combination with the MS-based phosphoproteomics. This review focuses on three types of strategies, including forward functional analysis, defined for the result-driven phosphoproteomics efforts in determining the substrates of a specific protein kinase; reverse functional analysis, defined for tracking the kinase(s) for specific phosphosite(s) derived from the discovery-driven phosphoproteomics efforts; and MS-based analysis on the structure-function relationship of phosphoproteins. It is expected that this review will provide a state-of-the-art overview of functional analysis of site-specific phosphorylation and explore new perspectives and outline future challenges.

  16. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-01-01

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis. PMID:10582239

  17. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-09-29

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis.

  18. Identification of phosphorylation sites in proteins by nanospray quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, S; Rogado, R; Marina, A; Moreno, F; Redondo, J M; Vázquez, J

    2000-04-01

    A method is described for identifying serine phosphorylation sites in proteins, based on conventional (32)P labeling followed by electrophoretic separation, 'in-gel' digestion with a protease, peptide extraction, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic separation and collection and off-line analysis of the radioactive fractions by nanospray ion trap mass spectrometry. The method was successfully applied to the identification of three phosphorylation sites in two proteins which were subjected to in vitro phosphorylation under physiological conditions. Different combinations of the various scanning modes of the ion trap, including high-resolution, multiple subfragmentation (or MS(n)) and fast scan analysis, were employed to identify the phosphopeptides, determine their sequence and localize the exact site of phosphorylation. 'Blind' fragmentation using fast scans was used to analyze a phosphopeptide which was undetectable in other scanning modes. The sequence, phosphorylation site and double cysteine modification of the potassium adduct of a peptide containing 35 residues were also determined by multiple fragmentation. The results not only support the validity of the proposed method for routine identification of phosphorylation sites, but also demonstrate the exceptional capability of off-line ion trap mass spectrometry in combination with nanospray ionization for performing very detailed studies on the structure of peptides. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Phosphorylation of multifunctional galectins by protein kinases CK1, CK2, and PKA.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Dieter; Seidler, Jörg; André, Sabine; Kumar, Sonu; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-15

    Phosphorylation is known to have a strong impact on protein functions. We analyzed members of the lectin family of multifunctional galectins as targets of the protein kinases CK1, CK2, and PKA. Galectins are potent growth regulators able to bind both glycan and peptide motifs at intra- and extracellular sites. Performing in vitro kinase assays, galectin phosphorylation was detected by phosphoprotein staining and autoradiography. The insertion of phosphoryl groups varied to a large extent depending on the type of kinase applied and the respective galectin substrate. Sites of phosphorylation observed in the recombinant galectins were determined by a strategic combination of phosphopeptide enrichment and nano-ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nanoUPLC-MS/MS). By in silico modeling, phosphorylation sites were visualized three-dimensionally. Our results reveal galectin-type-specific Ser-/Thr-dependent phosphorylation beyond the known example of galectin-3. These data are the basis for functional studies and also illustrate the analytical sensitivity of the applied methods for further work on human lectins.

  20. Phosphorylation of human aquaporin 2 (AQP2) allosterically controls its interaction with the lysosomal trafficking protein LIP5.

    PubMed

    Roche, Jennifer Virginia; Survery, Sabeen; Kreida, Stefan; Nesverova, Veronika; Ampah-Korsah, Henry; Gourdon, Maria; Deen, Peter M T; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    The interaction between the renal water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and the lysosomal trafficking regulator-interacting protein LIP5 targets AQP2 to multivesicular bodies and facilitates lysosomal degradation. This interaction is part of a process that controls AQP2 apical membrane abundance in a vasopressin-dependent manner, allowing for urine volume adjustment. Vasopressin regulates phosphorylation at four sites within the AQP2 C terminus (Ser(256), Ser(261), Ser(264), and Thr(269)), of which Ser(256) is crucial and sufficient for AQP2 translocation from storage vesicles to the apical membrane. However, whether AQP2 phosphorylation modulates AQP2-LIP5 complex affinity is unknown. Here we used far-Western blot analysis and microscale thermophoresis to show that the AQP2 binds LIP5 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We constructed five phospho-mimicking mutants (S256E, S261E, S264E, T269E, and S256E/T269E) and a C-terminal truncation mutant (ΔP242) that lacked all phosphorylation sites but retained a previously suggested LIP5-binding site. CD spectroscopy indicated that wild-type AQP2 and the phospho-mimicking mutants had similar overall structure but displayed differences in melting temperatures possibly arising from C-terminal conformational changes. Non-phosphorylated AQP2 bound LIP5 with the highest affinity, whereas AQP2-ΔP242 had 20-fold lower affinity as determined by microscale thermophoresis. AQP2-S256E, S261E, T269E, and S256E/T269E all had reduced affinity. This effect was most prominent for AQP2-S256E, which fits well with its role in apical membrane targeting. AQP2-S264E had affinity similar to non-phosphorylated AQP2, possibly indicating a role in exosome excretion. Our data suggest that AQP2 phosphorylation allosterically controls its interaction with LIP5, illustrating how altered affinities to interacting proteins form the basis for regulation of AQP2 trafficking by post-translational modifications. © 2017 by The American Society for

  1. Transcription factor AP-2 activity is modulated by protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    García, M A; Campillos, M; Marina, A; Valdivieso, F; Vázquez, J

    1999-02-05

    We recently reported that APOE promoter activity is stimulated by cAMP, this effect being mediated by factor AP-2 [Garcia et al. (1996) J. Neurosci. 16, 7550-7556]. Here, we study whether cAMP-induced phosphorylation modulates the activity of AP-2. Recombinant AP-2 was phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase A (PKA) at Ser239. Mutation of Ser239 to Ala abolished in vitro phosphorylation of AP-2 by PKA, but not the DNA binding activity of AP-2. Cotransfection studies showed that PKA stimulated the effect of AP-2 on the APOE promoter, but not that of the S239A mutant. Therefore, cAMP may modulate AP-2 activity by PKA-induced phosphorylation of this factor.

  2. Altered phosphorylation of Bacillus subtilis DegU caused by single amino acid changes in DegS.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T; Kawata, M; Mukai, K

    1991-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis sacU locus consists of the degS and degU genes, which play a major role in controlling the production of degradative enzymes including extracellular proteases. DegS has been shown to be autophosphorylated and to transfer the phosphoryl group to DegU. In this study, we partially purified the DegS proteins which carry amino acid changes resulting from various mutations and examined the phosphorylation reaction. The mutations used were degS42, causing a reduction in exoprotease production, and degS100(Hy) and degS200(Hy), causing overproduction of the enzymes. The following results were obtained. The DegS protein derived from degS42 was deficient in both autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphate transfer to DegU. Compared with wild-type DegS, the DegS proteins derived from the overproduction mutations, degS100(Hy) and degS200(Hy), were less active in the autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of DegU. However, the DegU phosphates produced by the mutant DegS proteins were more stable than that produced by the wild-type DegS. These results suggest that phosphorylation is tightly linked to exoprotease production and that the prolonged retention of the phosphoryl moiety on DegU activates the genes for the extracellular proteases. It was also shown that the rate of dephosphorylation of DegU-phosphate was increased as the amount of DegS was increased. All of these results suggest that DegS is involved in the dephosphorylation of DegU-phosphate. Images PMID:1909319

  3. Nerve Agent Exposure Elicits Site-Specific Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongwen; O’Brien, Jennifer J.; O’Callaghan, James P.; Miller, Diane B.; Zhang, Qiang; Rana, Minal; Tsui, Tiffany; Peng, Youyi; Tomesch, John; Hendrick, Joseph P.; Wennogle, Lawrence P; Snyder, Gretchen L.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compounds cause toxic symptoms, including convulsions, coma, and death, as the result of irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The development of effective treatments to block these effects and attenuate long-term cognitive and motor disabilities that result from OP intoxication is hampered by a limited understanding of the CNS pathways responsible for these actions. We employed a candidate method (called CNSProfile™) to identify changes in the phosphorylation state of key neuronal phosphoproteins evoked by the OP compound, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). Focused microwave fixation was used to preserve the phosphorylation state of phosphoproteins in brains of DFP-treated mice; hippocampus and striatum were analyzed by immunoblotting with a panel of phospho-specific antibodies. DFP exposure elicited comparable effects on phosphorylation of brain phosphoproteins in both C57BL/6 and FVB mice. DFP treatment significantly altered phosphorylation at regulatory residues on glutamate receptors, including Serine897 (S897) of the NR1 NMDA receptor. NR1 phosphorylation was bi-directionally regulated after DFP in striatum versus hippocampus. NR1 phosphorylation was reduced in striatum, but elevated in hippocampus, compared with controls. DARPP-32 phosphorylation in striatum was selectively increased at the Cdk5 kinase substrate, Threonine75 (T75). Phencynonate hydrochloride, a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, prevented seizure-like behaviors and the observed changes in phosphorylation induced by DFP. The data reveal region-specific effects of nerve agent exposure on intracellular signaling pathways that correlate with seizure-like behavior and which are reversed by the muscarinic receptor blockade. This approach identifies specific targets for nerve agents, including substrates for Cdk5 kinase, which may be the basis for new anti-convulsant therapies. PMID:20423708

  4. Microtubule-damaging drugs triggered bcl2 phosphorylation-requirement of phosphorylation on both serine-70 and serine-87 residues of bcl2 protein.

    PubMed

    Basu, A; Haldar, S

    1998-10-01

    Specifically anti-microtubule agents such as taxol, vincristine, vinblastine and dolastatin can trigger Bcl2 phosphorylation at G2-M phase of the cell cycle in malignant cells derived from a variety of human cancers. In this study, the status of Bcl2 phosphorylation was investigated in response to more antimicrotubule agents such as colchicine, colcemid or podophyllotoxin. Although these agents are not currently used for cancer therapy, they were able to trigger Bcl2 phosphorylation with simultaneous apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously, by using extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies we determined that mutation of serine-70 to alanine could not completely abrogate taxol induced Bcl2 phosphorylation. Studies reported here clearly indicate that serine-87 residue along with serine-70 of Bcl2 protein are necessary for microtubule damaging drug induced phosphorylation.

  5. Effects of experiences on synaptic protein phosphorylation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn-Cook, B.D.; Wilson, J.E.

    1983-06-01

    In vitro transfer of /sup 32/P from (gamma-/sup 32/P)-ATP into proteins of particulate fractions from osmotically shocked preparations enriched in rat brain synaptosomes was studied. Phosphate incorporation into protein bands of apparent molecular weights (MW) 44,000, 24,000, 21,000, and 19,000 was affected by the prior experiences of the rats from which the particulate fractions were prepared. Incorporation into all four proteins was increased in particulate fraction from previously naive rats that received active avoidance training. Handling of the subjects prior to training prevented the response of the 24,000 MW protein to training. Phosphate incorporation into 24,000 and 19,000 MW proteins was increased in preparations from previously naive rats that underwent a yoked experience, while incorporation into the 21,000 MW protein was slightly decreased. The yoked experience did not affect in vitro phosphate incorporation into any of these proteins in particulate fractions from previously handled rats.

  6. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Suraya A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Howell, Steven A.; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W.; Green, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity. PMID

  7. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Suraya A; Martin, Stephen R; Howell, Steven A; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W; Green, Judith L; Holder, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity.

  8. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  9. Phosphorylation and calcium antagonistically tune myosin-binding protein C’s structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Previs, Michael J.; Mun, Ji Young; Michalek, Arthur J.; Previs, Samantha Beck; Gulick, James; Robbins, Jeffrey; Warshaw, David M.; Craig, Roger

    2016-01-01

    During each heartbeat, cardiac contractility results from calcium-activated sliding of actin thin filaments toward the centers of myosin thick filaments to shorten cellular length. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a component of the thick filament that appears to tune these mechanochemical interactions by its N-terminal domains transiently interacting with actin and/or the myosin S2 domain, sensitizing thin filaments to calcium and governing maximal sliding velocity. Both functional mechanisms are potentially further tunable by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered, extensible region of cMyBP-C’s N terminus, the M-domain. Using atomic force spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and mutant protein expression, we demonstrate that phosphorylation reduced the M-domain’s extensibility and shifted the conformation of the N-terminal domain from an extended structure to a compact configuration. In combination with motility assay data, these structural effects of M-domain phosphorylation suggest a mechanism for diminishing the functional potency of individual cMyBP-C molecules. Interestingly, we found that calcium levels necessary to maximally activate the thin filament mitigated the structural effects of phosphorylation by increasing M-domain extensibility and shifting the phosphorylated N-terminal fragments back to the extended state, as if unphosphorylated. Functionally, the addition of calcium to the motility assays ablated the impact of phosphorylation on maximal sliding velocities, fully restoring cMyBP-C’s inhibitory capacity. We conclude that M-domain phosphorylation may have its greatest effect on tuning cMyBP-C’s calcium-sensitization of thin filaments at the low calcium levels between contractions. Importantly, calcium levels at the peak of contraction would allow cMyBP-C to remain a potent contractile modulator, regardless of cMyBP-C’s phosphorylation state. PMID:26908872

  10. Quantitative Assays for RAS Pathway Proteins and Phosphorylation States

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI CPTAC program is applying its expertise in quantitative proteomics to develop assays for RAS pathway proteins. Targets include key phosphopeptides that should increase our understanding of how the RAS pathway is regulated.

  11. Effects of Yiqi Tongyang on HCN4 Protein Phosphorylation in Damaged Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Ruxiu; Peng, Jie; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (If) is closely associated with sinoatrial node pacing function. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pacing function improvements of damaged sinoatrial node cells and the consequent treatment effects on sick sinus syndrome (SSS) after the use of Yiqi Tongyang. HCN4 channel protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting and fluorescent quantitation. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (model group), the HCN4 protein and the optical density (OD) of the phosphorylated HCN4 protein as well as intracellular PKA activity in the sinoatrial node cells decreased significantly. However, the OD values and PKA activity increased to different degrees after treatment with serum containing different doses of Yiqi Tongyang; in contrast, no significant improvement was seen in the control group compared to the model group. These findings demonstrated that the use of the traditional Chinese medicine Yiqi Tongyang could increase HCN4 protein expression and phosphorylation as well as PKA activity within sinoatrial node cells damaged by ischemia-reperfusion. The HCN4 protein is involved in the If-related ion channel. Here, we speculated that these effects could be associated with upregulation of HCN4 protein