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Sample records for altered protein phosphorylation

  1. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz e Silva, Cristóvão B.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer’s disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued. PMID:27466139

  2. Microgravity alters protein phosphorylation changes during initiation of sea urchin sperm motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tash, J. S.; Bracho, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) studies demonstrated that bull sperm swim with higher velocity in microgravity (microG) than at 1 G. Coupling between protein phosphorylation and sperm motility during activation in microG and at 1 G was examined in the ESA Biorack on two space shuttle missions. Immotile sperm were activated to swim (86-90% motility) at launch +20 h by dilution into artificial seawater (ASW). Parallel ground controls were performed 2 h after the flight experiment. Activation after 0, 30, and 60 s was terminated with electrophoresis sample buffer and samples analyzed for phosphoamino acids by Western blotting. Phosphorylation of a 130-kDa phosphothreonine-containing protein (FP130) occurred three to four times faster in microG than at 1 G. A 32-kDa phosphoserine-containing protein was significantly stimulated at 30 s but returned to 1 G control levels at 60 s. The rate of FP130 phosphorylation in microG was attenuated by D2O, suggesting that changes in water properties participate in altering signal transduction. Changes in FP130 phosphorylation triggered by the egg peptide speract were delayed in microG. These results demonstrate that previously observed effects of microG on sperm motility are coupled to changes in phosphorylation of specific flagellar proteins and that early events of sperm activation and fertilization are altered in microG.

  3. Tumor promoters alter gene expression and protein phosphorylation in avian cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Laszlo, A.; Radke, K.; Chin, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1981-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) on the synthesis and modification of polypeptides in normal avian cells and cells infected by wild-type and temperature-sensitive Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have detected alterations in both the abundance of cellular polypeptides and in their phosphorylation that seem unique to TPA treatment. However, the state of phosphorylation of the major putative substrate for the action of the src gene-associated protein kinase, the 34- to 36-kilodalton protein, was not altered. Moreover, examination of the phosphorylated amino acid content of total cellular phosphoproteins revealed that the response to TPA was not associated with detectable increases in their phosphotyrosine content. These results make it unlikely that TPA acts by the activation of the phosphorylating activity of the cellular proto-src gene or by the activation of other cellular phosphotyrosine-specific kinases. We have shown previously that temperature-sensitive RSV-infected cells at nonpermissive temperature demonstrate an increased sensitivity to TPA treatment (Bissell, M.J., Hatie, C. and Calfin, M. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 348-352). Our present results indicate that this is not due to reactivation of the phosphorylating activity of the defective src gene product or to its leakiness, and they lend support to the notion of multistep viral carcinogenesis.

  4. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. H2O2 alters rat cardiac sarcomere function and protein phosphorylation through redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Avner, Benjamin S; Hinken, Aaron C; Yuan, Chao; Solaro, R John

    2010-09-01

    ROS, such as H(2)O(2), are a component of pathological conditions in many organ systems and have been reported to be elevated in cardiac pathophysiology. The experiments presented here test the hypothesis that H(2)O(2) induces alterations in cardiac myofilament function by the posttranslational modification of sarcomeric proteins indirectly through PKC signaling. In vitro assessment of actomyosin Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of myofibrillar fractions showed blunted relative ATP consumption in the relaxed state (pCa 8.0) in response to treatment with 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) before myofilament isolation. The effect was attributable to downstream "redox signaling," inasmuch as the direct application of H(2)O(2) to isolated myofibrils did not alter Mg(2+)-ATPase activity. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity, which was used as a measure of myofibrillar myosin function, was unaffected by H(2)O(2). Functional experiments using rat cardiac trabeculae treated with 0.5 or 5 mM H(2)O(2) followed by detergent extraction of membranes demonstrated increased Ca(2+) sensitivity of force production, a faster rate of force redevelopment, and (for 5 mM) decreased maximum tension. Biochemical analysis of myocardial samples treated with 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) demonstrated increased phosphorylation of two sarcomeric proteins: cardiac troponin I and myosin-binding protein-C. These changes were eliminated by a general PKC inhibitor. However, H(2)O(2) and the general PKC activator PMA induced different phosphorylation patterns in cardiomyocytes in which PKC-delta was elevated by viral infection. These data provide evidence that PKC-dependent redox signaling affects the function of cardiac myofilaments and indicate modification of specific proteins through this signaling mechanism.

  6. Acrylamide administration alters protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism in rat sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.; Schrama, L.; LoPachin, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of ACR on protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism were assessed in rat sciatic nerve. After 5 days of ACR administration (50 mg/kg/day) an increase in the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, and phosphatidylcholine was detected in proximal sciatic nerve segments. In contrast, no changes in phospholipid metabolism were observed in distal segments. After 9 days of ACR treatment when neurotoxicological symptoms were clearly apparent, a generalized increase in radiolabel uptake into phospholipids was noted exclusively in proximal nerve regions. ACR-induced increases in phospholipid metabolism were toxicologically specific since comparable administration of MBA (108 mg/kg/day X 5 or 9 days) produced only minor changes. ACR intoxication was also associated with a rise in sciatic nerve protein phosphorylation. After 9 days of ACR treatment, phosphorylation of beta-tubulin, P0, and several unidentified proteins (38 and 180 kDa) was increased in distal segments. In contrast, chronic administration of MBA caused increases in phosphorylation of beta-tubulin and the major myelin proteins of proximal nerve segments. In cell free homogenates prepared from sciatic nerves of treated and control rats, MBA caused an increase in phosphorylation of major myelin proteins similar to its effect in intact proximal nerve segments. The most striking effect observed in nerve homogenates of ACR-treated rats was a marked decrease in phosphorylation of an 80-kDa protein. Addition of ACR (1 mM) to homogenates of normal nerve had no effect on protein phosphorylation. Our results indicate that changes in the phosphorylation of phospholipids and proteins in sciatic nerve might be a component of the neurotoxic mechanism of ACR.

  7. Mitosis-specific phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein at Threonine 668 leads to its altered processing and association with centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Atypical expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the molecular mechanisms by which they induce neurodegeneration are not well understood. We examined transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) for changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins to determine whether there is a correlation between cell cycle activation and pathology development in AD. Results Our studies in the AD transgenic mice show significantly higher levels of cyclin E, cyclin D1, E2F1, and P-cdc2 in the cells in the vicinity of the plaques where maximum levels of Threonine 668 (Thr668)-phosphorylated APP accumulation was observed. This suggests that the cell cycle regulatory proteins might be influencing plaque pathology by affecting APP phosphorylation. Using neuroglioma cells overexpressing APP we demonstrate that phosphorylation of APP at Thr668 is mitosis-specific. Cells undergoing mitosis show altered cellular distribution and localization of P-APP at the centrosomes. Also, Thr668 phosphorylation in mitosis correlates with increased processing of APP to generate Aβ and the C-terminal fragment of APP, which is prevented by pharmacological inhibitors of the G1/S transition. Conclusions The data presented here suggests that cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of APP may affect its normal cellular function. For example, association of P-APP with the centrosome may affect spindle assembly and cell cycle progression, further contributing to the development of pathology in AD. The experiments with G1/S inhibitors suggest that cell cycle inhibition may impede the development of Alzheimer's pathology by suppressing modification of βAPP, and thus may represent a novel approach to AD treatment. Finally, the cell cycle regulated phosphorylation and processing of APP into Aβ and the C-terminal fragment suggest that these proteins may have a normal function during mitosis. PMID:22112898

  8. Cardiac-specific deletion of protein phosphatase 1β promotes increased myofilament protein phosphorylation and contractile alterations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Correll, Robert N.; Davis, Jennifer; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; York, Allen J.; Sargent, Michelle A.; Nairn, Angus C.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2015-01-01

    There are 3 protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) catalytic isoforms (α, β and γ) encoded within the mammalian genome. These 3 gene products share ~90% amino acid homology within their catalytic domains but each has unique N- and C-termini that likely underlie distinctive subcellular localization or functionality. In this study, we assessed the effect associated with loss of each PP1 isoform in the heart using a conditional Cre-loxP targeting approach in mice. Ppp1ca-loxP, Ppp1cb-loxP and Ppp1cc-oxP alleles were crossed with either an Nkx2.5-Cre knock-in containing allele for early embryonic deletion or a tamoxifen inducible α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC)-MerCreMer transgene for adult and cardiac-specific deletion. We determined that while deletion of Ppp1ca (PP1α) or Ppp1cc (PP1γ) had little effect on the whole heart, deletion of Ppp1cb (PP1β) resulted in concentric remodeling of the heart, interstitial fibrosis and contractile dysregulation, using either the embryonic or adult-specific Cre-expressing alleles. However, myocytes isolated from Ppp1cb deleted hearts surprisingly showed enhanced contractility. Mechanistically we found that deletion of any of the 3 PP1 gene-encoding isoforms had no effect on phosphorylation of phospholamban, nor were Ca2+ handling dynamics altered in adult myocytes from Ppp1cb deleted hearts. However, loss of Ppp1cb from the heart, but not Ppp1ca or Ppp1cc, resulted in elevated phosphorylation of myofilament proteins such as myosin light chain 2 and cardiac myosin binding protein C, consistent with an enriched localization profile of this isoform to the sarcomeres. These results suggest a unique functional role for the PP1β isoform in affecting cardiac contractile function. PMID:26334248

  9. The cyclic nucleotide cGMP is involved in plant hormone signalling and alters phosphorylation of Arabidopsis thaliana root proteins

    PubMed Central

    Isner, Jean Charles; Nühse, Thomas; Maathuis, Frans J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide cGMP has been shown to play important roles in plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. Yet much controversy remains regarding the exact role of this second messenger. Progress in unravelling cGMP function in plants was hampered by laborious and time-consuming methodology to measure changes in cellular [cGMP] but the development of fluorescence-based reporters has removed this disadvantage. This study used the FlincG cGMP reporter to investigate potential interactions between phytohormone and cGMP signalling and found a rapid and significant effect of the hormones abscisic acid (ABA), auxin (IAA), and jasmonic acid (JA) on cytoplasmic cGMP levels. In contrast, brassinosteroids and cytokinin did not evoke a cGMP signal. The effects of ABA, IAA, and JA were apparent at external concentrations in the nanomolar range with EC50 values of around 1000, 300, and 0.03 nmoles for ABA, IAA, and JA respectively. To examine potential mechanisms for how hormone-induced cGMP signals are propagated, the role of protein phosphorylation was tested. A phosphoproteomics analysis on Arabidopsis thaliana root microsomal proteins in the absence and presence of membrane-permeable cGMP showed 15 proteins that rapidly (within minutes) changed in phosphorylation status. Out of these, nine were previously shown to also alter phosphorylation status in response to plant hormones, pointing to protein phosphorylation as a target for hormone-induced cGMP signalling. PMID:22345640

  10. CHOLESTEROL DEPLETION ALTERS DETERGENT-SPECIFIC SOLUBILITY PROFILES OF SELECTED TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEINS AND THE PHOSPHORYLATION OF OCCLUDIN

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Robert D.; Francis, Stacy A.; McCarthy, Karin M.; Casas, Elizabeth; Thiele, Christoph; Schneeberger, Eveline E.

    2007-01-01

    Differential centrifugation of Triton X-100 or CHAPS lysates from control and cholesterol (CH) depleted MDCK II cells, segregated integral tight junction (TJ) proteins associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) into two groups. Group A proteins (occludin, claudin-2 and -3) were detected in large, intermediate and small aggregates in both detergents, whereas group B proteins (claudin-1, -4 and -7) were observed in small aggregates in TX-100 and in intermediate and small aggregates in CHAPS. Depletion of CH altered the distribution of group A and B proteins among the three size categories in a detergent-specific manner. In lysates produced with octyl glucoside, a detergent that selectively extracts proteins from DRMs, group A proteins were undetectable in large aggregates and CH depletion did not alter the distribution of either group A or B proteins in intermediate or small aggregates. Neither occludin (group A) nor claudin-1 (group B) was in intimate enough contact with CH to be cross-linked to [3H]-photo-cholesterol. However, antibodies to either TJ protein co-immunoprecipitated caveolin-1, a CH-binding protein. Unlike claudins, occludin’s presence in TJs and DRMs did not require palmitoylation. Equilibrium density centrifugation on discontinuous OptiPrep gradients revealed detergent-related differences in the densities of TJ-bearing DRMs. There was little or no change in those densities after CH depletion. Removing CH from the plasma membrane increased tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of occludin, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) within 30 min. After 2 h of CH efflux, phospho-occludin levels and TER fell below control values. We conclude that the association of integral TJ proteins with DRMS, pelleted at low speeds, is partially CH dependent. However, the buoyant density of TJ-associated DRMs is a function of the detergent used and is insensitive to decreases in CH. PMID:17574235

  11. Phosphorylation Alters the Interaction of the Arabidopsis Phosphotransfer Protein AHP1 with Its Sensor Kinase ETR1

    PubMed Central

    Scharein, Benjamin; Groth, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ethylene receptor ethylene response 1 (ETR1) and the Arabidopsis histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein 1 (AHP1) form a tight complex in vitro. According to our current model ETR1 and AHP1 together with a response regulator form a phosphorelay system controlling the gene expression response to the plant hormone ethylene, similar to the two-component signaling in bacteria. The model implies that ETR1 functions as a sensor kinase and is autophosphorylated in the absence of ethylene. The phosphoryl group is then transferred onto a histidine at the canonical phosphorylation site in AHP1. For phosphoryl group transfer both binding partners need to form a tight complex. After ethylene binding the receptor is switched to the non-phosphorylated state. This switch is accompanied by a conformational change that decreases the affinity to the phosphorylated AHP1. To test this model we used fluorescence polarization and examined how the phosphorylation status of the proteins affects formation of the suggested ETR1−AHP1 signaling complex. We have employed various mutants of ETR1 and AHP1 mimicking permanent phosphorylation or preventing phosphorylation, respectively. Our results show that phosphorylation plays an important role in complex formation as affinity is dramatically reduced when the signaling partners are either both in their non-phosphorylated form or both in their phosphorylated form. On the other hand, affinity is greatly enhanced when either protein is in the phosphorylated state and the corresponding partner in its non-phosphorylated form. Our results indicate that interaction of ETR1 and AHP1 requires that ETR1 is a dimer, as in its functional state as receptor in planta. PMID:21912672

  12. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  13. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  14. Cryopreservation-induced alterations in protein tyrosine phosphorylation of spermatozoa from different portions of the boar ejaculate.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Siqueira, A P; Hossain, M S; Bergqvist, A S

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that boar sperm quality after cryopreservation differs depending on the ejaculate fraction used and that spermatozoa contained in the first 10mL (P1) of the sperm-rich fraction (SRF) show better cryosurvival than those in the SRF-P1. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) in spermatozoa is related with the tolerance of spermatozoa to frozen storage and cryocapacitation, we assessed the dynamics of cryopreservation-induced PTP and intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in spermatozoa, using flow cytometry, from P1 and SRF-P1 of the boar ejaculate at different stages of cryopreservation. Sperm kinetics, assessed using a computer-assisted semen analyzer, did not differ between P1 and SRF-P1 during cryopreservation but the decrease in sperm velocity during cryopreservation was significant (P<0.05) in SRF-P1 compared to P1. There were no significant differences in percentages of spermatozoa with high [Ca(2+)]i between P1 and SRF-P1 in fresh as well as in frozen-thawed semen. A higher (P<0.001) proportion of spermatozoa displayed PTP during the course of cryopreservation indicating a definite effect of the cryopreservation process on sperm PTP. The proportion of spermatozoa with PTP did not differ significantly between portions of the boar ejaculate. However at any given step during cryopreservation the percentage of spermatozoa with PTP was comparatively higher in SRF-P1 than P1. A 32kDa tyrosine phosphorylated protein, associated with capacitation, appeared after cooling suggesting that cooling induces capacitation-like changes in boar spermatozoa. In conclusion, the study has shown that the cryopreservation process induced PTP in spermatozoa and their proportions were similar between portions of SRF. PMID:21893053

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  16. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  17. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert.

  18. Effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the bovine oviduct in vitro: Alteration by heat stress

    PubMed Central

    WIJAYAGUNAWARDANE, Missaka P. B.; HAMBRUCH, Nina; HAEGER, Jan-Dirk; PFARRER, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be involved in control of the oviductal microenvironment. To elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the detrimental effect of heat stress and to identify the relation with the endocrine status, the effects of EGF on the level of phosphorylated mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) exposed to different cyclic ovarian steroidal environments (luteal phase (LP), follicular phase (FP) and postovulatory phase (PO)) and temperatures (mild heat stress (40 C) and severe heat stress (43 C)) were investigated. Western blot was performed to evaluate phosphorylated MAPK, while proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. Stimulation of OECs with EGF alone or with EGF in the PO and FP environments significantly increased the amount of phosphorylated MAPK, with MAPK 44 phosphorylation being highest during exposure to PO conditions. These effects were not observed in the LP. Heat treatment completely blocked effects of EGF on phosphorylated MAPK. Additionally, severe heat stress led to a significantly lower basal level of phosphorylated MAPK. PD98059 (MAPK inhibitor) completely abolished EGF-stimulated MAPK phosphorylation and OECs proliferation. Overall the results indicate that EGF has the potential to increase the amount of phosphorylated MAPK in OECs and therefore could be involved in regulation of the bovine oviductal microenvironment. However, these regulatory mechanisms may be compromised in the presence of heat stress (high ambient temperature), leading to low fertility rates and impaired embryo survival. PMID:26050642

  19. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Maegen A.; Ward, Christopher W.; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7–35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30–70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes. PMID:26287277

  20. Platelet activation via the collagen receptor GPVI is not altered in platelets from chronic myeloid leukaemia patients despite the presence of the constitutively phosphorylated adapter protein CrkL.

    PubMed

    Best, D; Pasquet, S; Littlewood, T J; Brunskill, S J; Pallister, C J; Watson, S P

    2001-03-01

    In this study, we show that the adapter proteins CrkL and Cbl undergo increases in tyrosine phosphorylation and form an intracellular complex in platelets stimulated with the snake venom toxin convulxin, a selective agonist at the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of CrkL has previously been reported in platelets from chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients. This was confirmed in the present study, and shown to result in a weak constitutive association of CrkL with Cbl and a number of other unidentified tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. There was no further increase in phosphorylation of CrkL in CML platelets in response to GPVI activation, whereas phosphorylation of Cbl and its association with CrkL were potentiated. In addition, this was accompanied by a small increase in p42/ 44 mapkinase (MAPK) activity in CML platelets. The functional consequence of the presence of constitutively phosphorylated proteins in CML platelets was investigated by measurement of aminophospholipid exposure and alpha-granule secretion. This revealed little alteration in the concentration-response curves for either in CML platelets stimulated via GPVI, although maximal levels of P-selectin were depressed. Despite the minimal effect on platelet activation in CML patients, we cannot exclude a role for CrkL or Cbl in signal transduction pathways stimulated via GPVI. PMID:11260061

  1. Alterations of ciliate phosducin phosphorylation in Blepharisma japonicum cells.

    PubMed

    Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Fabczak, Hanna; Fabczak, Stanisław

    2005-05-13

    endogenous light-dependent protein kinase-phosphatase system may be engaged in the alteration of phosducin phosphorylation in ciliate B. japonicum thereby to modulate the cell motile photophobic behavior.

  2. Protein phosphorylation in isolated hepatocytes of septic and endotoxemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Deaciuc, I.V.; Spitzer, J.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible alterations induced by sepsis and endotoxicosis in the late phase of Ca2+-dependent signaling in rat liver. Hepatocytes isolated from septic or chronically endotoxin (ET)-treated rats were labeled with (32P)H3PO4 and stimulated with various agents. Proteins were resolved by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiographed. Vasopressin (VP)- and phenylephrine (PE)-induced responses were attenuated in both septic and ET-treated rats for cytosolic and membrane proteins compared with their respective controls. Glucagon and 12-O-myristate phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) affected only the phosphorylation of membrane proteins. Glucagon-induced changes in the phosphorylation of membrane proteins were affected by both sepsis and endotoxicosis, whereas TPA-stimulated phosphorylation was lowered only in endotoxicosis. Response to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was depressed in septic rats for cytosolic proteins. The phosphorylation of two cytosolic proteins, i.e., 93 and 61 kDa (previously identified as glycogen phosphorylase and pyruvate kinase, respectively), in response to VP, PE, and A23187 was severely impaired by endotoxicosis and sepsis. TPA did not affect the phosphorylation state of these two proteins. The results show that sepsis and endotoxicosis produce perturbations of the phosphorylation step in Ca2+ transmembrane signaling. Such changes can explain alterations of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis associated with sepsis and endotoxicosis.

  3. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    PubMed

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  4. In the Beginning, There Was Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakis, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of reversible protein phosphorylation to cellular regulation cannot be overstated. In eukaryotic cells, protein kinase/phosphatase signaling pathways regulate a staggering number of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, cell death (apoptosis, necroptosis, necrosis), metabolism (at both the cellular and organismal levels), behavior and neurological function, development, and pathogen resistance. Although protein phosphorylation as a mode of eukaryotic cell regulation is familiar to most biochemists, many are less familiar with protein kinase/phosphatase signaling networks that function in prokaryotes. In this thematic minireview series, we present four minireviews that cover the important field of prokaryotic protein phosphorylation. PMID:24554697

  5. Salt stress-induced protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Godoy, J.A.; Torres-Schumann, S.; Llobell, A.; Pintor-Toro, J.A.

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation induced by salt stress in tomato germinating seeds were investigated by two-dimensional polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)-Phosphate. NaCl induced the phosphorylation of a 14 Kd polypeptide. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the phosphorylated molecules of this polypeptide are only stable while the stress is present. Phosphorylated 14 Kd polypeptides could be detected in radicles of salt-shocked seedlings after 6 hours stress period. 14 Kd polypeptide phosphorylation was also observed in seeds germinating in the presence of abscisic acid (ABA). The amount of phosphorylated 14 Kd polypeptide was significantly increased in seeds treated simultaneously with NaCl and ABA.

  6. Altered phosphorylation of rhodopsin in retinal dystrophic Irish Setters

    SciTech Connect

    Cunnick, J.; Takemoto, D.J.; Takemoto, L.J.

    1986-03-05

    The carboxyl-terminus of rhodopsin in retinal dystrophic (rd) Irish Setters is altered near a possible phosphorylation site. To determine if this alteration affects ATP-mediated phosphorylation they compared the phosphorylation of rhodopsin from rd affected Irish Setters and normal unaffected dogs. Retinas from 8-week-old Irish Setters were phosphorylated with ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP and separated on SDS-PAGE. Compared to unaffected normal retinas, equalized for rhodopsin content, phosphorylation of rd rhodopsin was drastically reduced. When rd retinas were mixed with normal dog retinas, phosphorylation of the latter was inhibited. Inhibition also occurred when bovine retinas were mixed with rd retinas. The rd-mediated inhibition of phosphorylation was prevented by including 1mM NaF in the reaction mixture. Likewise, 1mM NaF restored phosphorylation of rd rhodopsin to normal levels. Phosphopeptide maps of rd and normal rhodopsin were identical and indicated 5 phosphopeptides present in each. Results suggest that one cause of the depressed rd rhodopsin phosphorylation is an increased phosphatase activity.

  7. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  8. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  9. Charge environments around phosphorylation sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, James; Saunders, Rebecca E; Warwicker, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background Phosphorylation is a central feature in many biological processes. Structural analyses have identified the importance of charge-charge interactions, for example mediating phosphorylation-driven allosteric change and protein binding to phosphopeptides. Here, we examine computationally the prevalence of charge stabilisation around phosphorylated sites in the structural database, through comparison with locations that are not phosphorylated in the same structures. Results A significant fraction of phosphorylated sites appear to be electrostatically stabilised, largely through interaction with sidechains. Some examples of stabilisation across a subunit interface are evident from calculations with biological units. When considering the immediately surrounding environment, in many cases favourable interactions are only apparent after conformational change that accompanies phosphorylation. A simple calculation of potential interactions at longer-range, applied to non-phosphorylated structures, recovers the separation exhibited by phosphorylated structures. In a study of sites in the Phospho.ELM dataset, for which structural annotation is provided by non-phosphorylated proteins, there is little separation of the known phospho-acceptor sites relative to background, even using the wider interaction radius. However, there are differences in the distributions of patch polarity for acceptor and background sites in the Phospho.ELM dataset. Conclusion In this study, an easy to implement procedure is developed that could contribute to the identification of phospho-acceptor sites associated with charge-charge interactions and conformational change. Since the method gives information about potential anchoring interactions subsequent to phosphorylation, it could be combined with simulations that probe conformational change. Our analysis of the Phospho.ELM dataset also shows evidence for mediation of phosphorylation effects through (i) conformational change associated with

  10. Pathologic complete response after preoperative anti-HER2 therapy correlates with alterations in PTEN, FOXO, phosphorylated Stat5, and autophagy protein signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To define protein molecular characteristics of tumor cells prior to, and immediately following, preoperative human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy that correlate with pathologic complete response (pCR) or non response (no pCR) to preoperative HER2-directed therapy and chemotherapy. Methods This open-label, phase II study randomized patients with HER2-positive stage II or III invasive breast cancer to trastuzumab, lapatinib, or both, 2 weeks prior to and during chemotherapy with FEC75 for 4 courses; then paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 weekly for 12 courses, then surgery. Core needle biopsies were collected at baseline and after 2 weeks of anti-HER2 therapy prior to chemotherapy. Data were correlated with pCR, defined as absence of invasive tumor in breast and lymph nodes. Results Of 100 enrolled patients, the analysis population included those who had surgery and received ≥75% chemotherapy (78% [n = 78]). pCRs by arm are: trastuzumab (n = 26), 54% [n = 14]; lapatinib (n = 29), 45% [n = 13]; trastuzumab plus lapatinib (n = 23), 74% [n = 17]). Paired biopsy specimens were available for 49 patients (63%). Tumor cells of patients with pCR in the trastuzumab or lapatinib treatment arms showed nonphosphorylated FOXO, phosphorylated Stat5, and sparse signal-transduction protein network crosstalk representing different patterns of connections with PI3K and autophagy proteins compared with no pCR. Conclusion In this exploratory study, pCR with preoperative anti-HER2 therapy and chemotherapy correlated with the levels and phosphorylation status of specific baseline signal pathway proteins in tumor cells. These data may provide candidate biomarkers to stratify initial treatment and potential combination therapies for future study. Tissue preservation technology introduced here makes this procedure widely feasible. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00524303 PMID:24304724

  11. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  12. The Chemical Biology of Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain. PMID:19489734

  13. The chemical biology of protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A

    2009-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain.

  14. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders.

  15. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons.

  16. dimerization and DNA binding alter phosphorylation of Fos and Jun

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, C.; Baker, S.J.; Curran, T. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Marshak, D.R. )

    1993-07-15

    Fos and Jun form dimeric complexes that bind to activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. The levels of expression and activities of these proteins are regulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. They are thought to function in nuclear signal transduction processes in many different cell types. The role of Fos and Jun in gene transcription is complex and may be regulated in several ways including association with different dimerization partners, interactions with other transcription factors, effects on DNA topology, and reduction/oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding domain. In addition, phosphorylation has been suggested to control the activity of Fos and Jun. Here the authors show that phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by several protein kinases is affected by dimerization and binding to DNA. Jun homodimers are phosphorylated efficiently by casein kinase II, whereas Fos-Jun heterodimers are not. DNA binding also reduces phosphorylation of Jun by casein kinase II, p34[sup cdc2] (cdc2) kinase, and protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of Fos by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cdc2 is relatively insensitive to dimerization and DNA binding, whereas phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by DNA-dependent protein kinase is dramatically stimulated by binding to the AP-1 site. These results imply that different protein kinases can distinguish among Fos and Jun proteins in the form of monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers and between DNA-bound and non-DNA-bound proteins. Thus, potentially, these different states of Fos and Jun can be recognized and regulated independently by phosphorylation. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling.

  18. Effect of ethanol on protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, A.Y.; Wixom, P.M.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-03-11

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are important processes in regulating neuronal membrane function. Since ethanol is known to affect neural activity by acting on the membrane, the possibility that chronic ethanol administration results in alteration of protein kinase activity which in turn affects cellular processes is under investigation in this project. Experiments involve pair-feeding C57Bl mice with a liquid diet containing either 5% ethanol or an equal caloric amount of sucrose for 6-8 weeks. Synaptosomes were isolated from cerebral cortex and assayed for (Na,K)-ATPase and protein phosphorylation. Brain tissue was homogenized in buffer and used for assay of protein kinase C in both cytosol and membrane fractions. Chronic ethanol feeding was found to increase phosphorylation as well as the dephosphorylation activities of (Na,K)-ATPase and a 43 kD ecto-protein. In spite of large individual variances, there was a trend towards an enhanced protein kinase C activity in the membrane fraction in the chronic ethanol group. Results indicate chronic ethanol administration tends to enhance the cyclic activity of protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

  19. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E. )

    1989-04-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with {sup 32}P-{gamma}-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of {sup 35}S-adenosine thiotriphosphate.

  20. Small molecules that target phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Protein-protein interaction is one of the key events in the signal transduction pathway. The interaction changes the conformations, activities, localization and stabilities of the proteins, and transduces the signal to the next step. Frequently, this interaction occurs upon the protein phosphorylation. When upstream signals are stimulated, protein kinase(s) is/are activated and phosphorylate(s) their substrates, and induce the phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction. For this interaction, several domains in proteins are known to specifically recognize the phosphorylated residues of target proteins. These specific domains for interaction are important in the progression of the diseases caused by disordered signal transduction such as cancer. Thus small molecules that modulate this interaction are attractive lead compounds for the treatment of such diseases. In this review, we focused on three examples of phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction modules (14-3-3, polo box domain of Plk1 and F-box proteins in SCF ubiquitin ligases) and summarize small molecules that modulate their interaction. We also introduce our original screening system to identify such small molecules.

  1. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  2. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  3. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  4. Endogenous protein phosphorylation and protein kinase activity in winged bean.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, K; Singh, M

    1997-10-01

    In winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) protein kinases (E.C. 2.7.1.37) were found in all tissues studied. There was a significant increase in kinase activity during seed development, with a concomitant enhancement in the phosphorylation of a number of polypeptides; this was reversed in germinating seed cotyledons. Protein phosphorylation was apparently correlated with the increase in the protein content of the developing seed and the growing axis. At least three distinct autophosphorylating proteins could be distinguished in the developing seeds after SDS-PAGE, indicating the presence of different types of protein kinases in winged bean.

  5. Protein kinase C mediates cholinergically regulated protein phosphorylation in a Cl(-)-secreting epithelium.

    PubMed

    Cohn, J A

    1990-02-01

    T84 cell monolayers were used to study the cholinergic regulation of protein phosphorylation in epithelial cells. When T84 cell monolayers are labeled with 32Pi and stimulated with carbachol, six proteins exhibit altered phosphorylation. The most prominent response is a fivefold increase in labeling of p83, an acidic protein of Mr 83,000. Increasing labeling of p83 parallels stimulated secretion with respect to the onset of agonist action, agonist potency, and antagonism by atropine. However, the p83 and secretory responses differ in that the p83 response is more sustained. When T84 cell fractions are incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, Ca2(+)-phospholipid stimulates p83 labeling. Phosphorylation of p83 also occurs when a T84 cell extract is incubated with purified protein kinase C and when intact cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate. p83 does not become phosphorylated in cell fractions incubated with adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or in monolayers stimulated with agonists acting via cAMP. Thus carbachol stimulates the phosphorylation of an endogenous substrate for protein kinase C in T84 cells. The duration of this phosphorylation response suggests that protein kinase C may mediate a sustained response to carbachol, possibly acting to limit the duration of stimulated secretion.

  6. The Timing of Multiple Retrieval Events Can Alter GluR1 Phosphorylation and the Requirement for Protein Synthesis in Fear Memory Reconsolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarome, Timothy J.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Werner, Craig T.; Parsons, Ryan G.; Gafford, Georgette M.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that maintaining a fear memory after retrieval requires de novo protein synthesis. However, no study to date has examined how the temporal dynamics of repeated retrieval events affect this protein synthesis requirement. The present study varied the timing of a second retrieval of an established auditory fear memory…

  7. Induction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages incubated with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, A; Shrivastava, A; Kumar, R

    1995-03-01

    The cellular and molecular interaction between monocyte/macrophage and tumor cells leading to macrophage activation is not clearly understood. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event, we checked whether the tumor cells alter tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in macrophages. We found that both L929 and Yac-1 tumor cells induced increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several polypeptides in peritoneal as well as P388D-1 and IC-21 macrophages. Macrophages co-cultured with tumor cells also showed increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These observations suggest that increased tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in tumor cell-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539664

  8. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  9. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  10. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  11. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials.

  12. Correct interpretation of comprehensive phosphorylation dynamics requires normalization by protein expression changes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ronghu; Dephoure, Noah; Haas, Wilhelm; Huttlin, Edward L; Zhai, Bo; Sowa, Mathew E; Gygi, Steven P

    2011-08-01

    The interpretation of quantitative phosphoproteomics studies is complicated because each differential phosphorylation event integrates both changes in protein expression and phosphorylation. Here we investigated this phenomenon by performing parallel comparisons of protein expression and phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae. In each of two experiments comparing yeast mutants bearing deletions in FUS3 or STE7 with their wild-type counterparts, we quantified over 4100 proteins, including all members of the yeast mating pathway. We also identified 12,499 unique phosphorylation sites in this work. We demonstrate the critical importance of controlling the protein-level false-discovery rate and provide a novel method to assess the accuracy of protein false-discovery rate estimates. For the first time, 96% of nonredundant phosphopeptide ratios could be calibrated by protein levels, allowing truly differential phosphorylation to be distinguished from altered protein expression. This revealed a starkly different view, with 25% of seemingly differential phosphopeptides now attributed to changes in protein expression. Combined protein expression and phosphorylation surveys uncovered both independent and concerted changes in protein expression and phosphorylation, while highlighting the partially redundant role of a second MAPK (Kss1) in the mating pathway. PMID:21551504

  13. Phosphorylation-related modification at the dimer interface of 14-3-3ω dramatically alters monomer interaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Denison, Fiona C; Gökirmak, Tufan; Ferl, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are generally believed to function as dimers in a broad range of eukaryotic signaling pathways. The consequences of altering dimer stability are not fully understood. Phosphorylation at Ser58 in the dimer interface of mammalian 14-3-3 isoforms has been reported to destabilise dimers. An equivalent residue, Ser62, is present across most Arabidopsis isoforms but the effects of phosphorylation have not been studied in plants. Here, we assessed the effects of phosphorylation at the dimer interface of Arabidopsis 14-3-3ω. Protein kinase A phosphorylated 14-3-3ω at Ser62 and also at a previously unreported residue, Ser67, resulting in a monomer-sized band on native-PAGE. Phosphorylation at Ser62 alone, or with additional Ser67 phosphorylation, was investigated using phosphomimetic versions of 14-3-3ω. In electrophoretic and chromatographic analyses, these mutants showed mobilities intermediate between dimers and monomers. Mobility was increased by detergents, by reducing protein concentration, or by increasing pH or temperature. Urea gradient gels showed complex structural transitions associated with alterations of dimer stability, including a previously unreported 14-3-3 aggregation phenomenon. Overall, our analyses showed that dimer interface modifications such as phosphorylation reduce dimer stability, dramatically affecting the monomer-dimer equilibrium and denaturation trajectory. These findings may have dramatic implications for 14-3-3 structure and function in vivo.

  14. Diazinon alters sperm chromatin structure in mice by phosphorylating nuclear protamines

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@mail.cinvestav.mx

    2005-01-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides, widely used in agriculture and pest control, are associated with male reproductive effects, including sperm chromatin alterations, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. The main toxic action of OP is related to phosphorylation of proteins. Chemical alterations in sperm nuclear proteins (protamines), which pack DNA during the last steps of spermatogenesis, contribute to male reproductive toxicity. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the ability of diazinon (DZN), an OP compound, to alter sperm chromatin by phosphorylating nuclear protamines. Mice were injected with a single dose of DZN (8.12 mg/kg, i.p.), and killed 8 and 15 days after treatment. Quality of sperm from epididymis and vas deferens was evaluated through standard methods and chromatin condensation by flow cytometry (DNA Fragmented Index parameters: DFI and DFI%) and fluorescence microscopy using chromomycin-A{sub 3} (CMA{sub 3}). Increases in DFI (15%), DFI% (4.5-fold), and CMA{sub 3} (2-fold) were observed only at 8 days post-treatment, indicating an alteration in sperm chromatin condensation and DNA damage during late spermatid differentiation. In addition, an increase of phosphorous content (approximately 50%) in protamines, especially in the phosphoserine content (approximately 73%), was found at 8 days post-treatment. Sperm viability, motility, and morphology showed significant alterations at this time. These data strongly suggest that spermatozoa exposed during the late steps of maturation were the targets of DZN exposure. The correlation observed between the phosphorous content in nuclear protamines with DFI%, DFI, and CMA{sub 3} provides evidence that phosphorylation of nuclear protamines is involved in the OP effects on sperm chromatin.

  15. Global discovery of high-NaCl-induced changes of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Ferraris, Joan D.; Izumi, Yuichiro; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Ramkissoon, Kevin; Wang, Guanghui; Gucek, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    High extracellular NaCl, such as in the renal medulla, can perturb and even kill cells, but cells mount protective responses that enable them to survive and function. Many high-NaCl-induced perturbations and protective responses are known, but the signaling pathways involved are less clear. Change in protein phosphorylation is a common mode of cell signaling, but there was no unbiased survey of protein phosphorylation in response to high NaCl. We used stable isotopic labeling of amino acids in cell culture coupled to mass spectrometry to identify changes in protein phosphorylation in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells exposed to high NaCl. We reproducibly identify >8,000 unique phosphopeptides in 4 biological replicate samples with a 1% false discovery rate. High NaCl significantly changed phosphorylation of 253 proteins. Western analysis and targeted ion selection mass spectrometry confirm a representative sample of the phosphorylation events. We analyze the affected proteins by functional category to infer how altered protein phosphorylation might signal cellular responses to high NaCl, including alteration of cell cycle, cyto/nucleoskeletal organization, DNA double-strand breaks, transcription, proteostasis, metabolism of mRNA, and cell death. PMID:24965592

  16. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non‐structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post‐translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho‐site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double‐stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG‐I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon‐antagonistic activity are needed. PMID:26687707

  17. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post-translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho-site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double-stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG-I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon-antagonistic activity are needed.

  18. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  19. P(3)DB: An Integrated Database for Plant Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Bollinger, Curtis; Gao, Jianjiong; Xu, Dong; Thelen, Jay J

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is widely recognized as the most widespread, enzyme-catalyzed post-translational modification in eukaryotes. In particular, plants have appropriated this signaling mechanism as evidenced by the twofold higher frequency of protein kinases within the genome compared to other eukaryotes. While all aspects of plant protein phosphorylation research have grown in the past 10 years; phosphorylation site mapping using high-resolution mass spectrometry has grown exponentially. In Arabidopsis alone there are thousands of experimentally determined phosphorylation sites. To archive these events in a user-intuitive format we have developed P(3)DB, the Plant Protein Phosphorylation Database (p3db.org). This database is a repository for plant protein phosphorylation site data, currently hosting information on 32,963 non-redundant sites collated from 23 experimental studies from six plant species. These data can be queried for a protein-of-interest using an integrated BLAST module to query similar sequences with known phosphorylation sites among the multiple plants currently investigated. The paper demonstrates how this resource can help identify functionally conserved phosphorylation sites in plants using a multi-system approach.

  20. Feedback phosphorylation of an RGS protein by MAP kinase in yeast.

    PubMed

    Garrison, T R; Zhang, Y; Pausch, M; Apanovitch, D; Aebersold, R; Dohlman, H G

    1999-12-17

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins) are well known to accelerate G protein GTPase activity in vitro and to promote G protein desensitization in vivo. Less is known about how RGS proteins are themselves regulated. To address this question we purified the RGS in yeast, Sst2, and used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify post-translational modifications. This analysis revealed that Sst2 is phosphorylated at Ser-539 and that phosphorylation occurs in response to pheromone stimulation. Ser-539 lies within a consensus mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation site, Pro-X-Ser-Pro. Phosphorylation is blocked by mutations in the MAP kinase genes (FUS3, KSS1), as well as by mutations in components needed for MAP kinase activation (STE11, STE7, STE4, STE18). Phosphorylation is also blocked by replacing Ser-539 with Ala, Asp, or Glu (but not Thr). These point mutations do not alter pheromone sensitivity, as determined by growth arrest and reporter transcription assays. However, phosphorylation appears to slow the rate of Sst2 degradation. These findings indicate that the G protein-regulated MAP kinase in yeast can act as a feedback regulator of Sst2, itself a regulator of G protein signaling. PMID:10593933

  1. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    The conditions present during enamel crystallite development change dramatically as a function of time, including the pH, protein concentration, surface type and ionic strength. In this work, we investigate the role that two of these changing conditions, pH and ionic strength, have in modulating the interaction of amelogenin, LRAP, with hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling and chemical shift data, we investigate the structure, orientation and dynamics of three regions in the N-terminus of the protein, L15 to V19, V19 to L23 and K24 to S28. These regions are also near the only phosphorylated residue in the protein, pS16, therefore, changes in the LRAP-HAP interaction as a function of phosphorylation (LRAP(-P) vs. LRAP(+P)) were also investigated. All of the regions and conditions studies for the surface immobilized proteins showed restricted motion, with more mobility under all conditions for L15(+P) and K24(-P). The structure and orientation of the LRAP-HAP interaction in the N-terminus of the phosphorylated protein is very stable to changing solution conditions. From REDOR dipolar recoupling data, the structure and orientation in the region L15V19(+P) did not change significantly as a function of pH or ionic strength. The structure and orientation of the region V19L23(+P) were also stable to changes in pH, with the only significant change observed at high ionic strength, where the region becomes extended, suggesting this may be an important region in regulating mineral development. Chemical shift studies also suggest minimal changes in all three regions studied for both LRAP(-P) and LRAP(+P) as a function of pH or ionic strength. Phosphorylation also alters the LRAP-HAP interface. All of the three residues investigated (L15, V19, and K24) are closer to the surface in LRAP(+P), but K24S28 also changes structure as a result of phosphorylation, from a random coil to a largely helical structure, and V19L23 becomes more extended at high ionic

  2. Environmentally modulated phosphorylation and dynamics of proteins in photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Vener, Alexander V

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in vectorial proteomics of protein domains exposed to the surface of photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of plants and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii allowed mapping of in vivo phosphorylation sites in integral and peripheral membrane proteins. In plants, significant changes of thylakoid protein phosphorylation are observed in response to stress, particularly in photosystem II under high light or high temperature stress. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation in the algae is much more responsive to the ambient redox and light conditions, as well as to CO(2) availability. The light-dependent multiple and differential phosphorylation of CP29 linker protein in the green algae is suggested to control photosynthetic state transitions and uncoupling of light harvesting proteins from photosystem II under high light. The similar role for regulation of the dynamic distribution of light harvesting proteins in plants is proposed for the TSP9 protein, which together with other recently discovered peripheral proteins undergoes specific environment- and redox-dependent phosphorylation at the thylakoid surface. This review focuses on the environmentally modulated reversible phosphorylation of thylakoid proteins related to their membrane dynamics and affinity towards particular photosynthetic protein complexes. PMID:17184728

  3. Protein phosphorylation in isolated human adipocytes - Adrenergic control of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, R.M. Columbia Univ College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY ); Paul, S.; Browning, M.D.; Leibel, R.L.; Hirsch, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of adrenergic agents on protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes was examined. Freshly isolated human fat cells were incubated with {sup 32}PO{sub 4} in order to label intracellular ATP, then treated with a variety of adrenergic and other pharmacologic agents. Treatment with the {beta}-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol led to a significant increase in phosphate content of at least five protein bands (M{sub r} 52, 53, 63, 67, 84 kDa). The increase in phosphorylation was partially inhibited by the {alpha}-2 agonist clonidine. Epinephrine, a combined {alpha} and {beta} agonist, was less effective at increasing phosphate content of the proteins than was isoproterenol. Neither insulin nor the {alpha}-1 agonist phenylephrine had any discernible effect on the pattern of protein phosphorylation. The 84 kDa phosphorylated peptide band appears to contain hormone-sensitive lipase, a key enzyme in the lipolytic pathway which is activated by phosphorylation. These results are somewhat different than previously reported results for rat adipocytes, and represent the first report of overall pattern and adrenergic modulation of protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  5. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  6. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  7. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  8. Signal processing by protein tyrosine phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification controlling many biological processes. Most phosphorylation occurs on serine and threonine, and to a less extend on tyrosine (Tyr). In animals, Tyr phosphorylation is crucial for the regulation of many responses such as growth or differentiation. Only recently with the development of mass spectrometry, it has been reported that Tyr phosphorylation is as important in plants as in animals. The genes encoding protein Tyr kinases and protein Tyr phosphatases have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Putative substrates of these enzymes, and thus Tyr-phosphorylated proteins have been reported by proteomic studies based on accurate mass spectrometry analysis of the phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins. Biochemical approaches, pharmacology and genetic manipulations have indicated that responses to stress and developmental processes involve changes in protein Tyr phosphorylation. The aim of this review is to present an update on Tyr phosphorylation in plants in order to better assess the role of this post-translational modification in plant physiology. PMID:21628997

  9. Enrichment of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by selective precipitation methods.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Matthias; Bonn, Günther K

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications involved in the regulation of cellular processes. Fundamental understanding of biological processes requires appropriate bioanalytical methods for selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides and proteins. Most of the commonly applied enrichment approaches include chromatographic materials including Fe(3+)-immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography or metal oxides. In the last years, the introduction of several non-chromatographic isolation technologies has increasingly attracted the interest of many scientists. Such approaches are based on the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by applying various metal cations. The excellent performance of precipitation-based enrichment methods can be explained by the absence of any stationary phase, resin or sorbent, which usually leads to unspecific binding. This review provides an overview of recently published methods for the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins. PMID:25587840

  10. COMPARTMENTALIZED PHOSPHORYLATION OF IAP BY PROTEIN KINASE A REGULATES CYTOPROTECTION

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Takehiko; Xia, Fang; Altieri, Dario C.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell death pathways are likely regulated in specialized subcellular microdomains, but how this occurs is not understood. Here, we show that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) protein survivin on Ser20 in the cytosol, but not in mitochondria. This phosphorylation event disrupts the binding interface between survivin and its antiapoptotic cofactor, XIAP. Conversely, mitochondrial survivin or a non-PKA phosphorylatable survivin mutant binds XIAP avidly, enhances XIAP stability, synergistically inhibits apoptosis, and accelerates tumor growth, in vivo. Therefore, differential phosphorylation of survivin by PKA in subcellular microdomains regulates tumor cell apoptosis via its interaction with XIAP. PMID:17612487

  11. Rapid changes in plasma membrane protein phosphorylation during initiation of cell wall digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Blowers, D.P.; Boss, W.F.; Trewavas, A.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M{sub r} 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M{sub r} 22,000. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic {sup 32}P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselas preparation was required for the observed responses.

  12. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  13. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-09-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4-7 and 8-12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  14. Aberrant protein phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease brain disturbs pro-survival and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, M; Barone, E; Di Domenico, F; Butterfield, D A

    2016-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is one of the most prevalent post-translational modifications fundamental in mediating diverse cellular functions in living cells. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is currently recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation of different brain regions are suggested to promote AD transition from a presymptomatic to a symptomatic state in response to accumulating amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Several experimental approaches have been utilized to profile alteration of protein phosphorylation in the brain, including proteomics. Among central pathways regulated by kinases/phosphatases those involved in the activation/inhibition of both pro survival and cell death pathways play a central role in AD pathology. We discuss in detail how aberrant phosphorylation could contribute to dysregulate p53 activity and insulin-mediated signaling. Taken together these results highlight that targeted therapeutic intervention, which can restore phosphorylation homeostasis, either acting on kinases and phosphatases, conceivably may prove to be beneficial to prevent or slow the development and progression of AD.

  15. Aberrant protein phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease brain disturbs pro-survival and cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Perluigi, M; Barone, E; Di Domenico, F; Butterfield, D A

    2016-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is one of the most prevalent post-translational modifications fundamental in mediating diverse cellular functions in living cells. Aberrant protein phosphorylation is currently recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Changes in the pattern of protein phosphorylation of different brain regions are suggested to promote AD transition from a presymptomatic to a symptomatic state in response to accumulating amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Several experimental approaches have been utilized to profile alteration of protein phosphorylation in the brain, including proteomics. Among central pathways regulated by kinases/phosphatases those involved in the activation/inhibition of both pro survival and cell death pathways play a central role in AD pathology. We discuss in detail how aberrant phosphorylation could contribute to dysregulate p53 activity and insulin-mediated signaling. Taken together these results highlight that targeted therapeutic intervention, which can restore phosphorylation homeostasis, either acting on kinases and phosphatases, conceivably may prove to be beneficial to prevent or slow the development and progression of AD. PMID:27425034

  16. Global analysis of protein expression and phosphorylation levels in nicotine-treated pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor in pancreatic disease, however, the biochemical mechanisms correlating smoking with pancreatic dysfunction remain poorly understood. Strategies using multiplexed isobaric tag-based mass spectrometry facilitate the study of drug-induced perturbations on biological systems. Here, we present the first large scale analysis of the proteomic and phosphoproteomic alterations in pancreatic stellate cells following treatment with two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands: nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. We treated cells with nicotine or α-bungarotoxin for 12hr in triplicate and compared alterations in protein expression and phosphorylation levels to mock treated cells using a tandem mass tag (TMT9plex)-based approach. Over 8,100 proteins were quantified across all nine samples of which 46 were altered in abundance upon treatment with nicotine. Proteins with increased abundance included those associated with neurons, defense mechanisms, indicators of pancreatic disease and lysosomal proteins. In addition, we measured differences for ∼16,000 phosphorylation sites across all nine samples using a titanium dioxide-based strategy, of which 132 sites were altered with nicotine and 451 with α-bungarotoxin treatment. Many altered phosphorylation sites were involved in nuclear function and transcriptional events. This study supports the development of future targeted investigations to establish a better understanding for the role of nicotine and associated receptors in pancreatic disease. PMID:26265067

  17. Predicting and analyzing protein phosphorylation sites in plants using musite.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Gao, Jianjiong; Bollinger, Curtis; Thelen, Jay J; Xu, Dong

    2012-01-01

    Although protein phosphorylation sites can be reliably identified with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the experimental approach is time-consuming and resource-dependent. Furthermore, it is unlikely that an experimental approach could catalog an entire phosphoproteome. Computational prediction of phosphorylation sites provides an efficient and flexible way to reveal potential phosphorylation sites and provide hypotheses in experimental design. Musite is a tool that we previously developed to predict phosphorylation sites based solely on protein sequence. However, it was not comprehensively applied to plants. In this study, the phosphorylation data from Arabidopsis thaliana, B. napus, G. max, M. truncatula, O. sativa, and Z. mays were collected for cross-species testing and the overall plant-specific prediction as well. The results show that the model for A. thaliana can be extended to other organisms, and the overall plant model from Musite outperforms the current plant-specific prediction tools, Plantphos, and PhosphAt, in prediction accuracy. Furthermore, a comparative study of predicted phosphorylation sites across orthologs among different plants was conducted to reveal potential evolutionary features. A bipolar distribution of isolated, non-conserved phosphorylation sites, and highly conserved ones in terms of the amino acid type was observed. It also shows that predicted phosphorylation sites conserved within orthologs do not necessarily share more sequence similarity in the flanking regions than the background, but they often inherit protein disorder, a property that does not necessitate high sequence conservation. Our analysis also suggests that the phosphorylation frequencies among serine, threonine, and tyrosine correlate with their relative proportion in disordered regions. Musite can be used as a web server (http://musite.net) or downloaded as an open-source standalone tool (http://musite.sourceforge.net/).

  18. Conserved proline-directed phosphorylation regulates SR protein conformation and splicing function.

    PubMed

    Keshwani, Malik M; Aubol, Brandon E; Fattet, Laurent; Ma, Chen-Ting; Qiu, Jinsong; Jennings, Patricia A; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A

    2015-03-01

    The alternative splicing of human genes is dependent on SR proteins, a family of essential splicing factors whose name derives from a signature C-terminal domain rich in arginine-serine dipeptide repeats (RS domains). Although the SRPKs (SR-specific protein kinases) phosphorylate these repeats, RS domains also contain prolines with flanking serines that are phosphorylated by a second family of protein kinases known as the CLKs (Cdc2-like kinases). The role of specific serine-proline phosphorylation within the RS domain has been difficult to assign since CLKs also phosphorylate arginine-serine dipeptides and, thus, display overlapping residue specificities with the SRPKs. In the present study, we address the effects of discrete serine-proline phosphorylation on the conformation and cellular function of the SR protein SRSF1 (SR protein splicing factor 1). Using chemical tagging and dephosphorylation experiments, we show that modification of serine-proline dipeptides broadly amplifies the conformational ensemble of SRSF1. The induction of these new structural forms triggers SRSF1 mobilization in the nucleus and alters its binding mechanism to an exonic splicing enhancer in precursor mRNA. These physical events correlate with changes in the alternative splicing of over 100 human genes based on a global splicing assay. Overall, these studies draw a direct causal relationship between a specific type of chemical modification in an SR protein and the regulation of alternative gene splicing programmes.

  19. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  20. Genetic Manipulation of Neurofilament Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maria R; Villalón, Eric; Garcia, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Neurofilament biology is important to understanding structural properties of axons, such as establishment of axonal diameter by radial growth. In order to study the function of neurofilaments, a series of genetically modified mice have been generated. Here, we describe a brief history of genetic modifications used to study neurofilaments, as well as an overview of the steps required to generate a gene-targeted mouse. In addition, we describe steps utilized to analyze neurofilament phosphorylation status using immunoblotting. Taken together, these provide comprehensive analysis of neurofilament function in vivo, which can be applied to many systems.

  1. Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation in the Nervous System: From Regulation to Function

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Anne; Valjent, Emmanuel; Puighermanal, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) about four decades ago, much effort has been made to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of this post-translational modification. In the field of neuroscience, rpS6 phosphorylation is commonly used as a readout of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling activation or as a marker for neuronal activity. Nevertheless, its biological role in neurons still remains puzzling. Here we review the pharmacological and physiological stimuli regulating this modification in the nervous system as well as the pathways that transduce these signals into rpS6 phosphorylation. Altered rpS6 phosphorylation observed in various genetic and pathophysiological mouse models is also discussed. Finally, we examine the current state of knowledge on the physiological role of this post-translational modification and highlight the questions that remain to be addressed. PMID:26733799

  2. Phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins during transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, N; Keller, S J

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins has been studied in vitro during viral transcription. The incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP into protein is linear for the first 2 min of the reaction, whereas incorporation of [3H]UTP into RNA lags for 1 to 2 min before linear synthesis. At least 12 different proteins are phosphorylated on autoradiograms of acrylamide gels, and the majority of label is associated with low-molecular-weight proteins. If the transcription reaction is reduced by dropping the pH to 7 from its optimal of 8.5, two proteins (70 and 80 kDa) are no longer phosphorylated. RNA isolated from the pH 7 transcription reaction hybridized primarily to the vaccinia virus HindIII DNA fragments D to F, whereas the transcripts synthesized at pH 8.5 hybridized to almost all of the HindIII-digested vaccinia virus DNA fragments. The differences between the pH 7.0 and 8.5 transcription reactions in phosphorylation and transcription could be eliminated by preincubating the viral cores with 2 mM ATP. In sum, the results suggest that the phosphorylation of the 70- and 80-kDa peptides may contribute to the regulation of early transcription. Images PMID:2016772

  3. Regulation of cilia assembly, disassembly, and length by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Muqing; Li, Guihua; Pan, Junmin

    2009-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which cells are able to assemble, regulate, and disassemble cilia or flagella is not yet completely understood. Recent studies in several model systems, including Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, Leishmania, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammals, provide increasing biochemical and genetic evidence that phosphorylation of multiple protein kinases plays a key role in cilia assembly, disassembly, and length regulation. Members of several protein kinase families--including aurora kinases, never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and a novel cyclin-dependent protein kinase--are involved in the ciliary regulation process. Among the newly identified protein kinase substrates are Chlamydomonas kinesin-13 (CrKinesin13), a microtubule depolymerizer, and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a microtubule deacetylase. Chlamydomonas aurora/Ipl1p-like protein kinase (CALK) and CrKinesin13 are two proteins that undergo phosphorylation changes correlated with flagellar assembly or disassembly. CALK becomes phosphorylated when flagella are lost, whereas CrKinesin13 is phosphorylated when new flagella are assembled. Conversely, suppressing CrKinesin13 expression results in cells with shorter flagella. PMID:20362099

  4. Conserved Proline-Directed Phosphorylation Regulates SR Protein Conformation and Splicing Function

    PubMed Central

    Keshwani, Malik M.; Aubol, Brandon E.; Fattet, Laurent; Ma, Chen-Ting; Qiu, Jinsong; Jennings, Patricia A.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The alternative splicing of human genes is dependent on SR proteins, a family of essential splicing factors whose name derives from a signature C-terminal domain rich in arginine-serine dipeptide repeats (RS domains). Although the SRPKs (SR-specific protein kinases) phosphorylate these repeats, RS domains also contain prolines with flanking serines that are phosphorylated by a second family of protein kinases known as the CLKs (Cdc2-like kinases). The role of specific serine-proline phosphorylation within the RS domain has been difficult to assign since CLKs also phosphorylate arginine-serine dipeptides and, thus, display overlapping residue specificities with the SRPKs. In this study, we address the effects of discrete serine-proline phosphorylation on the conformation and cellular function of the SR protein SRSF1. Using chemical tagging and dephosphorylation experiments, we show that modification of serine-proline dipeptides broadly amplifies the conformational ensemble of SRSF1. The induction of these new structural forms triggers SRSF1 mobilization in the nucleus and alters its binding mechanism to an exonic splicing enhancer in precursor mRNA. These physical events correlate with changes in the alternative splicing of over one hundred human genes based on a global splicing assay. Overall, these studies draw a direct causal relationship between a specific type of chemical modification in an SR protein and the regulation of alternative gene splicing programs. PMID:25529026

  5. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  6. Phosphorylation of proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum during development

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The phosphoproteins in D. discoideum were studied with respect to their formation, metabolic stability, cellular and subcellular distribution. Special emphasis was on the role of cAMP on the pattern of phosphorylation. Amoebae were metabolically labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/; subsequently proteins of the total lysate, nuclei and membranes were resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to autoradiography. Numerous changes in the profile of phosphoproteins were observed during development. Functions were assigned to four membranal phosphoproteins; only one protein, the heavy chain of myosin, was susceptible to phosphorylation in vitro when purified membranes and /sup 32/P-ATP were used. A comparison between the time of protein synthesis and phosphorylation, as examined in vivo using /sup 35/S-methionine and /sup 32/P/sub i/ labeling of amoebae and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, indicated that phosphorylation is concurrent with synthesis. It appears then that there are two classes of membranal phosphoproteins in D. discoideum which differ with respect to the stability of the phosphate moiety. It is evident that the turnover of the phosphate moiety in myosin heavy chain plays a crucial role in the function of myosin; a role for the metabolically inert phosphate of other membranal proteins remains to be established. The G protein which couples occupancy of hormone receptor to stimulation of adenylate cyclase in higher multicellular eukaryotes was detected in D. discoideum. The G protein is present in approximately equal amounts in vegetative and in developing amoebae.

  7. Phosphorylation of Cysteine String Protein Triggers a Major Conformational Switch.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pryank; Prescott, Gerald R; Burgoyne, Robert D; Lian, Lu-Yun; Morgan, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 chaperone family that localizes to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Impaired CSP function leads to neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms as a result of misfolding of client proteins involved in neurotransmission. Mammalian CSP is phosphorylated in vivo on Ser10, and this modulates its protein interactions and effects on neurotransmitter release. However, there are no data on the structural consequences of CSP phosphorylation to explain these functional effects. We show that Ser10 phosphorylation causes an order-to-disorder transition that disrupts CSP's extreme N-terminal α helix. This triggers the concomitant formation of a hairpin loop stabilized by ionic interactions between phosphoSer10 and the highly conserved J-domain residue, Lys58. These phosphorylation-induced effects result in significant changes to CSP conformation and surface charge distribution. The phospho-switch revealed here provides structural insight into how Ser10 phosphorylation modulates CSP function and also has potential implications for other DnaJ phosphoproteins.

  8. Phosphorylation of Cysteine String Protein Triggers a Major Conformational Switch.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pryank; Prescott, Gerald R; Burgoyne, Robert D; Lian, Lu-Yun; Morgan, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 chaperone family that localizes to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Impaired CSP function leads to neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms as a result of misfolding of client proteins involved in neurotransmission. Mammalian CSP is phosphorylated in vivo on Ser10, and this modulates its protein interactions and effects on neurotransmitter release. However, there are no data on the structural consequences of CSP phosphorylation to explain these functional effects. We show that Ser10 phosphorylation causes an order-to-disorder transition that disrupts CSP's extreme N-terminal α helix. This triggers the concomitant formation of a hairpin loop stabilized by ionic interactions between phosphoSer10 and the highly conserved J-domain residue, Lys58. These phosphorylation-induced effects result in significant changes to CSP conformation and surface charge distribution. The phospho-switch revealed here provides structural insight into how Ser10 phosphorylation modulates CSP function and also has potential implications for other DnaJ phosphoproteins. PMID:27452402

  9. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06120.001 PMID:25789606

  10. HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. MR Blanton and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Sponsor: JM Rogers.
    Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) formed during the disinfection process are present in drin...

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during meiotic divisions of starfish oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peaucellier, G.; Andersen, A.C.; Kinsey, W.H. )

    1990-04-01

    We have used an antibody specific for phosphotyrosine to investigate protein phosphorylation on tyrosine during hormone-induced maturation of starfish oocytes. Analysis of immunoprecipitates from cortices of in vivo labeled Marthasterias glacialis oocytes revealed the presence of labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins only after hormone addition. Six major phosphoproteins of 195, 155, 100, 85, 45, and 35 kDa were detected. Total activity in immunoprecipitates increased until first polar body emission and was greatly reduced upon completion of meiosis but some proteins exhibited different kinetics. The labeling of the 155-kDa protein reached a maximum at germinal vesicle breakdown, while the 35-kDa appeared later and disappeared after polar body emission. Similar results were obtained with Asterias rubens oocytes. In vitro phosphorylation of cortices showed that tyrosine kinase activity is a major protein kinase activity in this fraction, the main endogenous substrate being a 68-kDa protein. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro were almost similar in extracts from oocytes treated or not with the hormone.

  12. Role of primary constitutive phosphorylation of Sendai virus P and V proteins in viral replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, C J; Kato, A; Bowman, M C; Kiyotani, K; Yoshida, T; Moyer, S A; Nagai, Y; Gupta, K C

    1999-10-10

    Functional analysis of the primary constitutive phosphorylation of Sendai virus P and V proteins was performed using both in vitro and in vivo systems. Sendai virus minigenome transcription and replication in transfected cells were not significantly affected in the presence of primary phosphorylation deficient P protein (S249A, S249D, P250A) as measured by either the luciferase activity or the Northern blot analysis. Similarly, recombinant Sendai viruses lacking the primary phosphorylation in P grew to titers close to the wild-type virus in cell cultures and in the natural host of Sendai virus, the mouse. Mutant viruses showed no altered pathogenesis in mice lungs. Oligomerization of P by binding WT P or mutant P to GST-P (WT) Sepharose beads revealed that the primary phosphorylation was not crucial for P protein oligomerization. Similar to P protein primary phosphorylation, the V protein primary phosphorylation at serine249 was not essential for minigenome transcription and replication, as both WT and mutant V proteins were found equally inhibitory to the minigenome replication. These results show that the primary phosphorylation of P protein has no essential role in Sendai virus transcription, replication, and pathogenesis.

  13. Glucose deprivation increases tau phosphorylation via P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Elisabetta; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Alterations of glucose metabolism have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Previous studies showed that glucose deprivation increases amyloidogenesis via a BACE-1-dependent mechanism. However, no data are available on the effect that this condition may have on tau phosphorylation. In this study, we exposed neuronal cells to a glucose-free medium and investigated the effect on tau phosphorylation. Compared with controls, cells incubated in the absence of glucose had a significant increase in tau phosphorylation at epitopes Ser202/Thr205 and Ser404, which was associated with a selective activation of the P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Pharmacological inhibition of this kinase prevented the increase in tau phosphorylation, while fluorescence studies revealed its co-localization with phosphorylated tau. The activation of P38 was secondary to the action of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, as its down-regulation prevented it. Finally, glucose deprivation induced cell apoptosis, which was associated with a significant increase in both caspase 3 and caspase 12 active forms. Taken together, our studies reveal a new mechanism whereby glucose deprivation can modulate AD pathogenesis by influencing tau phosphorylation and suggest that this pathway may be a new therapeutic target for AD.

  14. Phosphorylation of Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C is a Critical Mediator of Diastolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Paola C.; Liu, Yang; Abdalla, Mohamed I.; Thomas, Candice M.; Kidwell, David T.; Dusio, Giuseppina F.; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Kumar, Rajesh; Baker, Kenneth M.; Mitchell, Brett M.; Powers, Patricia A.; Fitzsimons, Daniel P.; Patel, Bindiya G.; Warren, Chad M.; Solaro, R. John; Moss, Richard L.; Tong, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for approximately 50% of all cases of heart failure and currently has no effective treatment. Diastolic dysfunction underlies HFpEF; therefore, elucidation of the mechanisms that mediate relaxation can provide new potential targets for treatment. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is a thick filament protein that modulates cross-bridge cycling rates via alterations in its phosphorylation status. Thus, we hypothesize that phosphorylated cMyBP-C accelerates rate of cross-bridge detachment, thereby enhancing relaxation to mediate diastolic function. Methods and Results We compared mouse models expressing phosphorylation deficient cMyBP-C(S273A/S282A/S302A)-cMyBP-C(t3SA), phosphomimetic cMyBP-C(S273D/S282D/S302D)-cMyBP-C(t3SD), and WT-control cMyBP-C(tWT) to elucidate the functional effects of cMyBP-C phosphorylation. Decreased voluntary running distances, increased lung/body weight ratios, and increased brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in cMyBP-C(t3SA) mice demonstrate that phosphorylation deficiency is associated with signs of heart failure. Echocardiography (ejection fraction, myocardial relaxation velocity) and pressure/volume measurements (−dP/dtmin, pressure decay time constant Tau-Glantz, passive filling stiffness) show that cMyBP-C phosphorylation enhances myocardial relaxation in cMyBP-C(t3SD) mice while deficient cMyBP-C phosphorylation causes diastolic dysfunction with preserved ejection fraction in cMyBP-C(t3SA) mice. Simultaneous force and [Ca2+]i measurements on intact papillary muscles show that enhancement of relaxation in cMyBP-C(t3SD) mice and impairment of relaxation in cMyBP-C(t3SA) mice are not due to altered [Ca2+]i handling, implicating that altered cross-bridge detachment rates mediate these changes in relaxation rates. Conclusions cMyBP-C phosphorylation enhances relaxation while deficient phosphorylation causes diastolic dysfunction and phenotypes

  15. Protein phosphorylation in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, D.B.; Emerich, D.W. )

    1989-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids in vivo and in cultures in vivo and in vitro. Comparison of in vivo-labeled phosphoproteins of bacteroids and of cultured cells showed differences in both the pattern and intensity of labeling. In cultured cells, comparison of the labeling patterns and intensities of in vivo- and in vitro-labeled phosphoproteins showed a number of similarities; however, several phosphoproteins were found only after one of the two labeling conditions. The labeling intensity was time dependent in both in vivo and in vitro assays and was dependent on the presence of magnesium in in vitro assays. Differences in the rates of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were noted for a number of proteins. The level of incorporation of {sup 32}P into protein was only 2% or less of the total phosphate accumulated during the in vivo labeling period. Several isolation and sample preparation procedures resulted in differences in labeling patterns. Phosphatase inhibitors and several potential metabolic effectors had negligible effects on the phosphorylation pattern. There were no significant changes in the phosphorylation patterns of cells cultured on mannitol, acetate, and succinate, although the intensity of the labeling did vary with the carbon source.

  16. Hierarchical phosphorylation at N-terminal transformation-sensitive sites in c-Myc protein is regulated by mitogens and in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lutterbach, B; Hann, S R

    1994-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the c-Myc protein has been reported to be critical for both the transactivation and biological functions of the c-Myc proteins. Through detailed phosphopeptide mapping analyses, we demonstrate that there is a cluster of four regulated and complex phosphorylation events on the N-terminal domain of Myc proteins, including Thr-58, Ser-62, and Ser-71. An apparent enhancement of Ser-62 phosphorylation occurs on v-Myc proteins having a mutation at Thr-58 which has previously been correlated with increased transforming ability. In contrast, phosphorylation of Thr-58 in cells is dependent on a prior phosphorylation of Ser-62. Hierarchical phosphorylation of c-Myc is also observed in vitro with a specific glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha, unlike the promiscuous phosphorylation observed with other glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha and 3 beta preparations. Although both p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and cdc2 kinase specifically phosphorylate Ser-62 in vitro and cellular phosphorylation of Thr-58/Ser-62 is stimulated by mitogens, other in vivo experiments do not support a role for these kinases in the phosphorylation of Myc proteins. Unexpectedly, both the Thr-58 and Ser-62 phosphorylation events, but not other N-terminal phosphorylation events, can occur in the cytoplasm, suggesting that translocation of the c-Myc proteins to the nucleus is not required for phosphorylation at these sites. In addition, there appears to be an unusual block to the phosphorylation of Ser-62 during mitosis. Finally, although the enhanced transforming properties of Myc proteins correlates with the loss of phosphorylation at Thr-58 and an enhancement of Ser-62 phosphorylation, these phosphorylation events do not alter the ability of c-Myc to transactivate through the CACGTG Myc/Max binding site. Images PMID:8035827

  17. Protein Phosphorylation: A Major Switch Mechanism for Metabolic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Sean J; James, David E; Mann, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Metabolism research is undergoing a renaissance because many diseases are increasingly recognized as being characterized by perturbations in intracellular metabolic regulation. Metabolic changes can be conferred through changes to the expression of metabolic enzymes, the concentrations of substrates or products that govern reaction kinetics, or post-translational modification (PTM) of the proteins that facilitate these reactions. On the 60th anniversary since its discovery, reversible protein phosphorylation is widely appreciated as an essential PTM regulating metabolism. With the ability to quantitatively measure dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation on a global scale - hereafter referred to as phosphoproteomics - we are now entering a new era in metabolism research, with mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics at the helm. PMID:26498855

  18. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation: Regulation of light energy distribution in photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has become apparent that green plants possess the ability to adapt to changes in the spectral quality of ambient light. This phenomenon, state transitions, involves a reversible distribution of light energy between the two photosystems in response to changes in the excitation state of photosystems 1 and 2. Thus, the quantum efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport is maintained under different illumination conditions, and damage caused by excessive energetic input of light (photoinhibition) is prevented. This model comprises a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle of three major components: substrates, the protein kinase(s) and protein phosphatase(s) responsible for the specific phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these of substrates, and the control mechanisms whereby the protein kinase(s) is activated/deactivated in response to redox and /or conformational changes in the thylakoid. This report considers the three components in some detail.

  19. Contractility and protein phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes: effects of isoproterenol and AR-L57.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J S; Bowling, N; Boder, G B

    1984-08-01

    The cardiotonic drugs AR-L57 [2-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1H-imidazo(4,5b)-pyridine] and isoproterenol stimulated contractility in cultured heart cells in concentration-dependent manners; only the effects of isoproterenol were blocked by propranolol. Isoproterenol, but not AR-L57, enhanced the phosphorylation state of seven protein bands [relative molecular weights (MrS) 155,000, 96,000, 27,000, 24,000, 20,000, 16,000, 12,000] and resulted in the dephosphorylation of one protein band (Mr 21,000). Also, only isoproterenol increased the activation states of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase and glycogen phosphorylase. The eight protein bands resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and detected by autoradiography were altered by isoproterenol in time- and concentration-dependent manners. The 24,000-Mr protein substrate phosphorylated in response to isoproterenol was converted to a 12,000-Mr species by heating in the presence of SDS prior to electrophoresis, suggesting that the two substrates were in fact identical proteins. A comparison of the 2-min responses to varying concentrations of isoproterenol resulted in excellent correlations between the phosphorylation states of individual protein bands and contractility. This was true even for the 21,000-Mr species that was dephosphorylated. However, only the 27,000-, 24-12,000-, and 16,000-Mr substrates were phosphorylated rapidly enough to be associated with the onset of the inotropic response. Cultured myocytes are an important feature of these studies as they are 84% pure ventricular cells that remain 100% viable throughout an experiment. Because this system is suitable for biochemical measurements and the effects of agents on heart cell contractility can be determined, it is possible to correlate changes in biochemical parameters with alterations in physiological state.

  20. Phosphorylation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase InhA Impacts Mycobacterial Growth and Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shazia; Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan; Parikh, Amit; Samantaray, Sharmishtha; Singh, Albel; Kumar, Devanand; Roy, Rajendra P.; Bhatt, Apoorva; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    InhA, the primary target for the first line anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid, is a key enzyme of the fatty-acid synthase II system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we show that InhA is a substrate for mycobacterial serine/threonine protein kinases. Using a novel approach to validate phosphorylation of a substrate by multiple kinases in a surrogate host (Escherichia coli), we have demonstrated efficient phosphorylation of InhA by PknA, PknB, and PknH, and to a lower extent by PknF. Additionally, the sites targeted by PknA/PknB have been identified and shown to be predominantly located at the C terminus of InhA. Results demonstrate in vivo phosphorylation of InhA in mycobacteria and validate Thr-266 as one of the key sites of phosphorylation. Significantly, our studies reveal that the phosphorylation of InhA by kinases modulates its biochemical activity, with phosphorylation resulting in decreased enzymatic activity. Co-expression of kinase and InhA alters the growth dynamics of Mycobacterium smegmatis, suggesting that InhA phosphorylation in vivo is an important event in regulating its activity. An InhA-T266E mutant, which mimics constitutive phosphorylation, is unable to rescue an M. smegmatis conditional inhA gene replacement mutant, emphasizing the critical role of Thr-266 in mediating post-translational regulation of InhA activity. The involvement of various serine/threonine kinases in modulating the activity of a number of enzymes of the mycolic acid synthesis pathway, including InhA, accentuates the intricacies of mycobacterial signaling networks in parallel with the changing environment. PMID:20864541

  1. Coordination of Protein Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation in Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Woolfrey, Kevin M; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2015-11-27

    A central theme in nervous system function is equilibrium: synaptic strengths wax and wane, neuronal firing rates adjust up and down, and neural circuits balance excitation with inhibition. This push/pull regulatory theme carries through to the molecular level at excitatory synapses, where protein function is controlled through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases. However, these opposing enzymatic activities are only part of the equation as scaffolding interactions and assembly of multi-protein complexes are further required for efficient, localized synaptic signaling. This review will focus on coordination of postsynaptic serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase signaling by scaffold proteins during synaptic plasticity.

  2. Changes of testicular phosphorylated proteins in response to restraint stress in male rats*

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Supatcharee; Burawat, Jaturon; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sampannang, Apichakan; Uabundit, Nongnut; Iamsaard, Sitthichai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate male reproductive parameters via changes of potential testicular protein markers in restraint-stress rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups (non-immobilized control and restraint-immobilized/stress groups, n=8 each group). The stress animals were immobilized (12 h/d) by a restraint cage for 7 consecutive days. All reproductive parameters, morphology and histology were observed and compared between groups. In addition, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) and phosphotyrosine proteins (previously localized in Sertoli and late spermatid cells) in testicular lysate was assayed by immuno-Western blotting. Results: Testosterone level, sperm concentration and sperm head normality of stress rats were significantly decreased while the corticosterone level was increased as compared with the control (P<0.05). Histologically, stress rats showed low sperm mass in epididymal lumen and some atrophy of seminiferous tubules. Although the expression of testicular StAR protein was not significantly different between groups, changed patterns of the 131, 95, and 75 kDa testicular phosphorylated proteins were observed in the stress group compared with the control group. The intensity of a testicular 95-kDa phosphorylated protein was significantly decreased in stress rats. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the alteration of testicular phosphorylated protein patterns, associated with adverse male reproductive parameters in stress rats. It could be an explanation of some infertility in stress males. PMID:26739523

  3. Covalent modifications of ribosomal proteins in growing and aggregation-competent dictyostelium discoideum: phosphorylation and methylation.

    PubMed

    Ramagopal, S

    1991-04-01

    Phosphorylated and methylated ribosomal proteins were identified in vegetatively growing amoebae and in the starvation-induced, aggregation-competent cells of Dictyostelium discoideum. Of the 15 developmentally regulated cell-specific ribosomal proteins reported earlier, protein A and the acidic proteins A1, A2, and A3 were identified as phosphoproteins, and S5, S6, S10, and D were identified as methylated proteins. Three other ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated and 19 others methylated. S19, L13, A1, A2, and A3 were the predominant phosphoproteins in growing amoebae, whereas S20 and A were the predominant ones in the aggregation-competent cells. Among the methylated proteins, eight (S6, S10, S13, S30, D, L1, L2, and L31) were modified only during growth phase, six (S5, S7, S8, S24, S31, and L36) were altered only during aggregation-competent phase, and nine (S9, S27, S28, S29, S34, L7, L35, L41, and L42) were modified under both phases. Five proteins (S6, S24, L7, L41, and L42) were heavily methylated and of these, the large subunit proteins were present in both growing amoebae and aggregation-competent cells. These findings demonstrate that covalent modification of specific ribosomal proteins is regulated during cell differentiation in D. discoideum.

  4. Regulation of Rnd3 localization and function by protein kinase C alpha-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Madigan, James P; Bodemann, Brian O; Brady, Donita C; Dewar, Brian J; Keller, Patricia J; Leitges, Michael; Philips, Mark R; Ridley, Anne J; Der, Channing J; Cox, Adrienne D

    2009-11-15

    The Rnd proteins (Rnd1, Rnd2 and Rnd3/RhoE) form a distinct branch of the Rho family of small GTPases. Altered Rnd3 expression causes changes in cytoskeletal organization and cell cycle progression. Rnd3 functions to decrease RhoA activity, but how Rnd3 itself is regulated to cause these changes is still under investigation. Unlike other Rho family proteins, Rnd3 is regulated not by GTP/GDP cycling, but at the level of expression and by post-translational modifications such as prenylation and phosphorylation. We show in the present study that, upon PKC (protein kinase C) agonist stimulation, Rnd3 undergoes an electrophoretic mobility shift and its subcellular localization becomes enriched at internal membranes. These changes are blocked by inhibition of conventional PKC isoforms and do not occur in PKCalpha-null cells or to a non-phosphorylatable mutant of Rnd3. We further show that PKCalpha directly phosphorylates Rnd3 in an in vitro kinase assay. Additionally, we provide evidence that the phosphorylation status of Rnd3 has a direct effect on its ability to block signalling from the Rho-ROCK (Rho-kinase) pathway. These results identify an additional mechanism of regulation and provide clarification of how Rnd3 modulates Rho signalling to alter cytoskeletal organization.

  5. N-Terminus of the Protein Kinase CLK1 Induces SR Protein Hyper-Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Aubol, Brandon E.; Plocinik, Ryan M.; Keshwani, Malik M.; McGlone, Maria L.; Hagopian, Jonathan C.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are essential splicing factors that are regulated through multisite phosphorylation of their RS (arginine-serine-rich) domains by two major families of protein kinases. The SRPKs efficiently phosphorylate the arginine-serine dipeptides in the RS domain using a conserved docking groove in the kinase domain. In contrast, CLKs lack a docking groove and phosphorylate both arginine-serine and serine-proline dipeptides, modifications that generate a hyper-phosphorylated state important for unique SR protein-dependent splicing activities. All CLKs contain long, flexible N-terminal extensions (140-300 residues) that resemble the RS domains present in their substrate SR proteins. We showed that the N-terminus in CLK1 contacts both the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein SRSF1. This interaction not only is essential for facilitating hyper-phosphorylation but also induces cooperative binding of SRSF1 to RNA. The N-terminus of CLK1 enhances the total phosphoryl contents of a panel of physiological substrates including SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF5 and Tra2β1 by 2–3-fold. These findings suggest that CLK1-dependent hyper-phosphorylation is the result of a general mechanism in which the N-terminus acts as a bridge connecting the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein. PMID:24869919

  6. Structural Mechanism for Regulation of Bcl-2 protein Noxa by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Christine B.; Michel Espinoza-Fonseca, L.; James, Zachary M.; Hanse, Eric A.; Gaynes, Jeffrey S.; Thomas, David D.; Kelekar, Ameeta

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that phosphorylation of Noxa, a 54-residue Bcl-2 protein, at serine 13 (Ser13) inhibited its ability to promote apoptosis through interactions with canonical binding partner, Mcl-1. Using EPR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding assays, we offer evidence that a structural alteration caused by phosphorylation partially masks Noxa’s BH3 domain, inhibiting the Noxa-Mcl-1 interaction. EPR of unphosphorylated Noxa, with spin-labeled amino acid TOAC incorporated within the BH3 domain, revealed equilibrium between ordered and dynamically disordered states. Mcl-1 further restricted the ordered component for non-phosphorylated Noxa, but left the pSer13 Noxa profile unchanged. Microsecond MD simulations indicated that the BH3 domain of unphosphorylated Noxa is housed within a flexible loop connecting two antiparallel β-sheets, flanked by disordered N- and C-termini and Ser13 phosphorylation creates a network of salt-bridges that facilitate the interaction between the N-terminus and the BH3 domain. EPR showed that a spin label inserted near the N-terminus was weakly immobilized in unphosphorylated Noxa, consistent with a solvent-exposed helix/loop, but strongly constrained in pSer13 Noxa, indicating a more ordered peptide backbone, as predicted by MD simulations. Together these studies reveal a novel mechanism by which phosphorylation of a distal serine inhibits a pro-apoptotic BH3 domain and promotes cell survival. PMID:26411306

  7. Structural Mechanism for Regulation of Bcl-2 protein Noxa by phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Christine B.; Michel Espinoza-Fonseca, L.; James, Zachary M.; Hanse, Eric A.; Gaynes, Jeffrey S.; Thomas, David D.; Kelekar, Ameeta

    2015-09-01

    We showed previously that phosphorylation of Noxa, a 54-residue Bcl-2 protein, at serine 13 (Ser13) inhibited its ability to promote apoptosis through interactions with canonical binding partner, Mcl-1. Using EPR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding assays, we offer evidence that a structural alteration caused by phosphorylation partially masks Noxa’s BH3 domain, inhibiting the Noxa-Mcl-1 interaction. EPR of unphosphorylated Noxa, with spin-labeled amino acid TOAC incorporated within the BH3 domain, revealed equilibrium between ordered and dynamically disordered states. Mcl-1 further restricted the ordered component for non-phosphorylated Noxa, but left the pSer13 Noxa profile unchanged. Microsecond MD simulations indicated that the BH3 domain of unphosphorylated Noxa is housed within a flexible loop connecting two antiparallel β-sheets, flanked by disordered N- and C-termini and Ser13 phosphorylation creates a network of salt-bridges that facilitate the interaction between the N-terminus and the BH3 domain. EPR showed that a spin label inserted near the N-terminus was weakly immobilized in unphosphorylated Noxa, consistent with a solvent-exposed helix/loop, but strongly constrained in pSer13 Noxa, indicating a more ordered peptide backbone, as predicted by MD simulations. Together these studies reveal a novel mechanism by which phosphorylation of a distal serine inhibits a pro-apoptotic BH3 domain and promotes cell survival.

  8. Rapid Oligo-Galacturonide Induced Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Hoon, Divya; Minkoff, Benjamin B; Sussman, Michael R; Kohorn, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs)(1)are receptor protein kinases that bind to long polymers of cross-linked pectin in the cell wall. These plasma-membrane-associated protein kinases also bind soluble pectin fragments called oligo-galacturonides (OGs) released from the wall after pathogen attack and damage. WAKs are required for cell expansion during development but bind water soluble OGs generated from walls with a higher affinity than the wall-associated polysaccharides. OGs activate a WAK-dependent, distinct stress-like response pathway to help plants resist pathogen attack. In this report, a quantitative mass-spectrometric-based phosphoproteomic analysis was used to identify Arabidopsis cellular events rapidly induced by OGsin planta Using N(14/)N(15)isotopicin vivometabolic labeling, we screened 1,000 phosphoproteins for rapid OG-induced changes and found 50 proteins with increased phosphorylation, while there were none that decreased significantly. Seven of the phosphosites within these proteins overlap with those altered by another signaling molecule plants use to indicate the presence of pathogens (the bacterial "elicitor" peptide Flg22), indicating distinct but overlapping pathways activated by these two types of chemicals. Genetic analysis of genes encoding 10 OG-specific and two Flg22/OG-induced phosphoproteins reveals that null mutations in eight proteins compromise the OG response. These phosphorylated proteins with genetic evidence supporting their role in the OG response include two cytoplasmic kinases, two membrane-associated scaffold proteins, a phospholipase C, a CDPK, an unknown cadmium response protein, and a motor protein. Null mutants in two proteins, the putative scaffold protein REM1.3, and a cytoplasmic receptor like kinase ROG2, enhance and suppress, respectively, a dominantWAKallele. Altogether, the results of these chemical and genetic experiments reveal the identity of several phosphorylated proteins involved in the kinase

  9. Modulation of P1798 lymphosarcoma proliferation by protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, C.A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of protein kinases in modulating cell proliferation was examined. Studies characterized the regulation of cell proliferation by adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (cA-Pk). Calcium/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) was isolated and examined as a potential substrate regulated by cA-PK in the rapidly proliferating P1798 lymphosarcoma. Modulation of cell proliferation by cA-PK was characterized by quantitating cell division by (methyl-/sup 3/H) thymidine ((/sup 3/H)-dT) incorporation into DNA, cAMP accumulations, and activation of cA-PK using P1798 lymphosarcoma cells. Epinephrine and prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) were demonstrated to suppress (/sup 3/H)-dT incorporation into DNA, to stimulate cAMP accumulation, and to activate cA-PK with dose-dependency. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent MLCK was partially purified from P1798 lymphosarcoma. P1798 MLCK phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chains (P-LC) from thymus, cardiac and skeletal muscles. One mol (/sup 32/Pi) was transferred into one mol cardiac or skeletal P-LC by P1798 MLCK. Apparent Km values of 65 ..mu..M and 51 ..mu..M were determined for ATP and cardiac P-LC, respectively. The apparent molecular weight of P1798 MLCK was 135,000. P1798 MLCK was phosphorylated by cA-PK. Phosphorylated MLCK showed a 41% decrease in calcium-dependent activity. Two additional protein kinases from P1798 lymphosarcoma phosphorylated cardiac and skeletal light chains (MLC).

  10. Protein Ser/Thr/Tyr Phosphorylation in the Archaea*

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The third domain of life, the Archaea (formerly Archaebacteria), is populated by a physiologically diverse set of microorganisms, many of which reside at the ecological extremes of our global environment. Although ostensibly prokaryotic in morphology, the Archaea share much closer evolutionary ties with the Eukarya than with the superficially more similar Bacteria. Initial genomic, proteomic, and biochemical analyses have revealed the presence of “eukaryotic” protein kinases and phosphatases and an intriguing set of serine-, threonine-, and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in the Archaea that may offer new insights into this important regulatory mechanism. PMID:24554702

  11. Protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in the Archaea.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    The third domain of life, the Archaea (formerly Archaebacteria), is populated by a physiologically diverse set of microorganisms, many of which reside at the ecological extremes of our global environment. Although ostensibly prokaryotic in morphology, the Archaea share much closer evolutionary ties with the Eukarya than with the superficially more similar Bacteria. Initial genomic, proteomic, and biochemical analyses have revealed the presence of "eukaryotic" protein kinases and phosphatases and an intriguing set of serine-, threonine-, and tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in the Archaea that may offer new insights into this important regulatory mechanism.

  12. Antibody microarray analyses of signal transduction protein expression and phosphorylation during porcine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Pelech, Steven; Jelinkova, Lucie; Susor, Andrej; Zhang, Hong; Shi, Xiaoqing; Pavlok, Antonin; Kubelka, Michal; Kovarova, Hana

    2008-07-01

    Kinex antibody microarray analyses was used to investigate the regulation of 188 protein kinases, 24 protein phosphatases, and 170 other regulatory proteins during meiotic maturation of immature germinal vesicle (GV+) pig oocytes to maturing oocytes that had completed meiosis I (MI), and fully mature oocytes arrested at metaphase of meiosis II (MII). Increases in apparent protein levels of protein kinases accounted for most of the detected changes during the GV to MI transition, whereas reduced protein kinase levels and increased protein phosphorylation characterized the MI to MII transition. During the MI to MII period, many of the MI-associated increased levels of the proteins and phosphosites were completely or partially reversed. The regulation of these proteins were also examined in parallel during the meiotic maturation of bovine, frog, and sea star oocytes with the Kinex antibody microarray. Western blotting analyses confirmed altered expression levels of Bub1A, IRAK4, MST2, PP4C, and Rsk2, and the phosphorylation site changes in the kinases Erk5 (T218 + Y220), FAK (S722), GSK3-beta (Y216), MEK1 (S217 + S221) and PKR1 (T451), and nucleophosmin/B23 (S4) during pig oocyte maturation.

  13. Synthesis and phosphorylation of the glial fibrillary acidic protein during brain development: A tissue slice study

    SciTech Connect

    Noetzel, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Brain slices were incubated with either (3H) amino acids or (32P) orthophosphate in order to characterize the synthesis and phosphorylation of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the rat nervous system. The incorporation of (3H) amino acids into GFAP was found to increase significantly during early postnatal development, reaching a peak of activity on day 5 of life and then declining over the next 2 weeks. Concomitant with this peak of synthetic activity the content of GFAP in rat brain was also observed to increase dramatically. GFAP continued to accumulate in brain through postnatal day 30 despite a decrease in the synthesis of the protein. These results indicate that the increase in GFAP during the first month of life cannot be ascribed solely to the rate of GFAP synthesis. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that during later stages of astrocytic development the accumulation of GFAP may be primarily dependent upon a low rate of protein degradation. The pattern of GFAP phosphorylation in the developing rat brain differed from that observed for the incorporation of (3H) amino acids. The peak incorporation of 32P into GFAP occurred on postnatal day 10 at a time when synthesis of the protein had declined by 43%. These findings suggest that during development phosphorylation of GFAP is mediated by factors different from those directing its synthesis. In addition, phosphorylation of GFAP did not alter its solubility in cytoskeletal preparations indicating that GFAP phosphorylation is probably not a major regulatory mechanism in disassembly of the astroglial filaments.

  14. Protein kinase C does not phosphorylate the externalized form of the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, M A; Johnstone, R M

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the phosphorylation of transferrin receptors both in intact sheep reticulocytes and in isolated plasma membranes. Phosphorylation of the receptor in intact cells or isolated plasma membranes is stimulated by phorbol diesters, suggesting that protein kinase C may be involved. Identical [32P] phosphopeptide tryptic maps are formed in the presence and absence of phorbol diesters. Using heat-treated membranes (which are devoid of endogenous kinase activity) exogenous protein kinase C phosphorylates the same peptides as the endogenous kinase(s). During maturation of reticulocytes to erythrocytes, the transferrin receptor is released to the medium in vesicular form. In cells labelled with [32P]Pi, the released receptor is not labelled with 32P and the exocytosed vesicles do not phosphorylate receptor with [gamma-32P]ATP. The absence of 32P in the released receptor appears to be due to a change in the receptor, since, even in the presence of exogenous protein kinase C, the exocytosed receptor is phosphorylated to approximately 8% of the level obtained with receptors from the plasma membrane. These data suggest that during maturation and externalization the receptor is altered so that it loses its capacity to act as a substrate for exogenous protein kinase C as well as the endogenous kinase(s). This change may be a signal which segregates the receptor for externalization from the receptor pool remaining for transferrin recycling during the final stages of red cell maturation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3593234

  15. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  16. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  17. Protein kinase A dependent membrane protein phosphorylation and chloride conductance in endosomal vesicles from kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reenstra, W.W.; Bae, H.R.; Verkman, A.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Sabolic, I. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA )

    1992-01-14

    Regulation of Cl conductance by protein kinase A action, cell-free measurements of Cl transport and membrane protein phosphorylation were carried out in apical endocytic vesicles from rabbit kidney proximal tubule. Cl transport was measured by a stopped-flow quenching assay in endosomes labeled in vivo with the fluorescent Cl indicator 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium. Phosphorylation was studied in a purified endosomal preparation by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of membrane proteins labeled by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. These results suggest that, in a cell-free system, protein kinase A increases Cl conductance in endosomes from kidney proximal tubule by a phosphorylation mechanism. The labeled protein has a size similar to that of the 64-kDa putative kidney Cl channel reported by Landry et al. but is much smaller than the {approximately}170-kDa cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein.

  18. Discrete phosphorylated Retinoblastoma protein isoform expression in mouse tooth development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weibo; Vazquez, Betsy; Andreeva, Viktoria; Spear, Daisy; Kong, Elizabeth; Hinds, Philip W.; Yelick, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that Retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation plays a central role in mediating cell cycle G1/S stage transition, together with E2 promoter-binding factors (E2F). The binding of pRb to E2F is controlled by the sequential and cumulative phosphorylation of pRb at various amino acids. In addition to the well characterized roles for pRb as a tumor suppressor, pRb has more recently been implicated in osteoprogenitor and other types of stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation, thereby influencing the morphogenesis of developing organs. In this study, we present data characterizing the expression of three phosphorylated pRb (ppRb) isoforms - ppRbS780, ppRbS795, and ppRbS807/811- in developing mouse molar and incisor tooth buds. Also, we analyzed the co-localization of pRb isoforms and histone H3 expression in incisor tooth buds. Our results reveal distinct developmental expression patterns for individual ppRb isoforms in differentiating dental epithelial and dental mesenchymal cells, suggesting discrete functions for each in tooth development. PMID:22476877

  19. Spatial distributions of phosphorylated membrane proteins aquaporin 0 and MP20 across young and aged human lenses.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Danielle B; Garland, Donita L; Schwacke, John H; Hachey, David L; Schey, Kevin L

    2016-08-01

    In the human ocular lens it is now realized that post-translational modifications can alter protein function and/or localization in fiber cells that no longer synthesize proteins. The specific sites of post-translational modification to the abundant ocular lens membrane proteins AQP0 and MP20 have been previously identified and their functional effects are emerging. To further understand how changes in protein function and/or localization induced by these modifications alter lens homeostasis, it is necessary to determine the spatial distributions of these modifications across the lens. In this study, a quantitative LC-MS approach was used to determine the spatial distributions of phosphorylated AQP0 and MP20 peptides from manually dissected, concentric layers of fiber cells from young and aged human lenses. The absolute amounts of phosphorylation were determined for AQP0 Ser235 and Ser229 and for MP20 Ser170 in fiber cells from the lens periphery to the lens center. Phosphorylation of AQP0 Ser229 represented a minor portion of the total phosphorylated AQP0. Changes in spatial distributions of phosphorylated APQ0 Ser235 and MP20 Ser170 correlated with regions of physiological interest in aged lenses, specifically, where barriers to water transport and extracellular diffusion form. PMID:27339748

  20. Xenobiotics that affect oxidative phosphorylation alter differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells at concentrations that are found in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Laura; Toivonen, Janne M.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; López-Gallardo, Ester

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adipogenesis is accompanied by differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells to adipocytes. As part of this differentiation, biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system occurs. Many chemical compounds used in medicine, agriculture or other human activities affect oxidative phosphorylation function. Therefore, these xenobiotics could alter adipogenesis. We have analyzed the effects on adipocyte differentiation of some xenobiotics that act on the oxidative phosphorylation system. The tested concentrations have been previously reported in human blood. Our results show that pharmaceutical drugs that decrease mitochondrial DNA replication, such as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis, such as ribosomal antibiotics, diminish adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion. By contrast, the environmental chemical pollutant tributyltin chloride, which inhibits the ATP synthase of the oxidative phosphorylation system, can promote adipocyte differentiation and leptin secretion, leading to obesity and metabolic syndrome as postulated by the obesogen hypothesis. PMID:26398948

  1. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  2. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-01-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8506352

  3. Cross-talk between calcium signalling and protein phosphorylation at the thylakoid

    PubMed Central

    Stael, Simon; Rocha, Agostinho G.; Wimberger, Terje; Anrather, Dorothea; Vothknecht, Ute C.; Teige, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The role of protein phosphorylation for adjusting chloroplast functions to changing environmental needs is well established, whereas calcium signalling in the chloroplast is only recently becoming appreciated. The work presented here explores the potential cross-talk between calcium signalling and protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts and provides the first evidence for targets of calcium-dependent protein phosphorylation at the thylakoid membrane. Thylakoid proteins were screened for calcium-dependent phosphorylation by 2D gel electrophoresis combined with phospho-specific labelling and PsaN, CAS, and VAR1, among other proteins, were identified repeatedly by mass spectrometry. Subsequently their calcium-dependent phosphorylation was confirmed in kinase assays using the purified proteins and chloroplast extracts. This is the first report on the protein targets of calcium-dependent phosphorylation of thylakoid proteins and provides ground for further studies in this direction. PMID:22197893

  4. Spatial proximity statistics suggest a regulatory role of protein phosphorylation on compound binding.

    PubMed

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates protein function by the attachment of negatively charged phosphate groups to phosphorylatable amino acid residues. As a mode of action, an influence of phosphorylation on the binding of compounds to proteins has been discussed and described for a number of proteins in the literature. However, a systematic statistical survey probing for enriched phosphorylation sites close to compound binding sites in support of this notion and with properly chosen random reference distributions has not been presented yet. Using high-resolution protein structures from the Protein Data Bank including their co-crystallized non-covalently bound compounds and experimentally determined phosphorylation sites, we analyzed the pairwise distance distributions of phosphorylation and compound binding sites on protein surfaces. We found that phosphorylation sites are indeed located at significantly closer distances to compounds than expected by chance holding true specifically also for the subset of compound binding sites serving as catalytic sites of metabolic reactions. This tendency was particularly evident when treating phosphorylation sites as collective sets supporting the relevance of phosphorylation hotspots. Interestingly, phosphorylation sites were found to be closer to negatively charged than to positively charged compounds suggesting a stronger modulation of the binding of negatively charged compounds in dependence on phosphorylation status than on positively charged compounds. The enrichment of phosphorylation sites near compound binding sites confirms a regulatory role of phosphorylation in compound binding and provides a solid statistical basis for the literature-reported selected events.

  5. Alterations in connexin 43 during diabetic cardiomyopathy: competition of tyrosine nitration versus phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    COOK, Angela C.; SCHANBACHER, Brandon L.; BAUER, John Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiac conduction abnormalities are observed early in the progression of Type I diabetes, but the mechanism(s) involved are undefined. Connexin 43, a critical component of ventricular gap junctions, depends on tyrosine phosphorylation status to modulate channel conductance - alterations in connexin 43 content, distributions, and/or phosphorylation status may be involved in cardiac rhythm disturbances. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac content/distribution of connexin 43 are altered in a rat model of Type I diabetic cardiomyopathy, investigating a mechanistic role for tyrosine. Methods We conducted electrocardiographic analyses during the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy in rats dosed with streptozotocin (65mg/kg), at 3, 7, and 35 days post-induction of diabetes. Following functional analyses, we conducted immunohistochemical and immunoprecipitation studies to assess alterations in connexin 43. Results We observed significant evidence of ventricular conduction abnormalities (QRS complex, Q-T interval) as early as 7 days post-streptozotocin, persisting throughout the study. Connexin 43 levels were increased 7d post- streptozotocin and remained elevated throughout the study. Connexin 40 content was unchanged relative to controls throughout the study. Changes in Connexin 43 distribution were also observed; connexin 43 staining was dispersed from myocyte short axis junctions. Connexin 43 tyrosine phosphorylation declined during the progression of diabetes, with concurrent increases in tyrosine nitration. Conclusions These data suggest that alterations in connexin 43 content and distribution occur during experimental diabetes and likely contribute to alterations in cardiac function, and that oxidative modification of tyrosine-mediated signaling may play a mechanistic role. PMID:24796789

  6. Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor Specificity Protein 4 Is Increased in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, Montserrat; Meléndez-Pérez, Iria; Villalta-Gil, Victoria; Haro, Josep Maria; Gill, Grace; Ramos, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Background Altered expression of transcription factor specificity protein 4 (SP4) has been found in the postmortem brain of patients with psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Reduced levels of SP4 protein have recently been reported in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis. Also, SP4 levels are modulated by lithium treatment in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of SP4 at S770 is increased in the cerebellum of bipolar disorder subjects and upon inhibition of NMDA receptor signaling in cultured neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes of first-episode psychosis patients and the effect of lithium treatment on this phosphorylation. Methods A cross-sectional study of S770 phosphorylation relative to total SP4 immunoreactivity using specific antibodies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis patients (n = 14, treated with lithium or not) and matched healthy controls (n = 14) by immunoblot was designed. We also determined the effects of the prescribed drugs lithium, olanzapine or valproic acid on SP4 phosphorylation in rat primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Results We found that SP4 S770 phosphorylation was significantly increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis compared to controls and decreased in patients treated with lithium compared to patients who did not receive lithium. Moreover, incubation with lithium but not olanzapine or valproic acid reduced SP4 phosphorylation in rat cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Conclusions The findings presented here indicate that SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis which may be reduced by lithium treatment in patients. Moreover, our study shows lithium treatment prevents this phosphorylation in vitro in neurons. This pilot study suggests that S770 SP4 phosphorylation could be a peripheral biomarker of psychosis, and may

  7. GluA1 phosphorylation alters evoked firing pattern in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barkóczi, Balázs; Juhász, Gábor; Averkin, Robert G; Vörös, Imre; Vertes, Petra; Penke, Botond; Szegedi, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    AMPA and NMDA receptors convey fast synaptic transmission in the CNS. Their relative contribution to synaptic output and phosphorylation state regulate synaptic plasticity. The AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is central in synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of GluA1 regulates channel properties and trafficking. The firing rate averaged over several hundred ms is used to monitor cellular input. However, plasticity requires the timing of spiking within a few ms; therefore, it is important to understand how phosphorylation governs these events. Here, we investigate whether the GluA1 phosphorylation (p-GluA1) alters the spiking patterns of CA1 cells in vivo. The antidepressant Tianeptine was used for inducing p-GluA1, which resulted in enhanced AMPA-evoked spiking. By comparing the spiking patterns of AMPA-evoked activity with matched firing rates, we show that the spike-trains after Tianeptine application show characteristic features, distinguishing from spike-trains triggered by strong AMPA stimulation. The interspike-interval distributions are different between the two groups, suggesting that neuronal output may differ when new inputs are activated compared to increasing the gain of previously activated receptors. Furthermore, we also show that NMDA evokes spiking with different patterns to AMPA spike-trains. These results support the role of the modulation of NMDAR/AMPAR ratio and p-GluA1 in plasticity and temporal coding. PMID:22567428

  8. Phosphorylation of C-protein, troponin I and phospholamban in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, J L; Kranias, E G; Solaro, R J

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myofibrillar and sacroplasmic-reticulum (SR) proteins was studied in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts subjected to various inotropic interventions. Stimulation of hearts with isoprenaline resulted in the phosphorylation of both troponin I (TnI) and C-protein in myofibrils and phospholamban in SR. Phosphorylation of phospholamban could be reversed by a 15 min perfusion with drug-free buffer, after a 1 minute pulse perfusion with isoprenaline, at which time the mechanical effects of isoprenaline stimulation had also been reversed. However, both TnI and C-protein remained phosphorylated at this time. Moreover, the inhibition of Ca2+ activation of the Mg2+-dependent ATPase (Mg-ATPase) activity associated with myofibrillar phosphorylation persisted in myofibrils prepared from hearts frozen after 15 min of washout of isoprenaline. To assess the contribution of C-protein phosphorylation in the decrease of Ca2+ activation of the myofibrillar Mg-ATPase activity, we reconstituted a regulated actomyosin system in which only C-protein was phosphorylated. In this system, C-protein phosphorylation did not contribute to the decrease in Ca2+ activation of Mg-ATPase activity, indicating that TnI phosphorylation is responsible for the diminished sensitivity of the myofibrils to Ca2+. These observations support the hypothesis that phospholamban phosphorylation plays a more dominant role than TnI or C-protein phosphorylation in the mechanical response of the mammalian heart to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2895634

  9. Visualizing an ultra-weak protein-protein interaction in phosphorylation signaling.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qiong; Huang, Peng; Yang, Ju; Sun, Jian-Qiang; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Guo, Da-Chuan; Chen, Shao-Min; Yang, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ming-Hui; Yi, Ming; Ding, Yi-Ming; Liu, Mai-Li; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Tang, Chun

    2014-10-20

    Proteins interact with each other to fulfill their functions. The importance of weak protein-protein interactions has been increasingly recognized. However, owing to technical difficulties, ultra-weak interactions remain to be characterized. Phosphorylation can take place via a K(D)≈25 mM interaction between two bacterial enzymes. Using paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy and with the introduction of a novel Gd(III)-based probe, we determined the structure of the resulting complex to atomic resolution. The structure accounts for the mechanism of phosphoryl transfer between the two enzymes and demonstrates the physical basis for their ultra-weak interaction. Further, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that the complex has a lifetime in the micro- to millisecond regimen. Hence such interaction is termed a fleeting interaction. From mathematical modeling, we propose that an ultra-weak fleeting interaction enables rapid flux of phosphoryl signal, providing a high effective protein concentration.

  10. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  11. Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor-1 by Protein Kinase C*s

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Nairn, Angus C.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr35. Moreover, Ser67 of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser65 in vitro. In contrast, Ser67 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser65. Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser65 and Ser67, but not Ser65 alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser67 protects phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser65 and/or Ser67 did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser67 and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. PMID:16772299

  12. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  13. The effect of oviductal fluid on protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cryopreserved boar spermatozoa differs with the freezing method.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Johannisson, A; Saravia, F; Bergqvist, A S

    2012-02-01

    Sperm capacitation takes place in the oviduct and protein tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins is a crucial step in capacitation and acquisition of fertilizing potential. Cryopreserved spermatozoa show altered expression of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the oviduct. The present study compared two freezing methods (conventional-conventional freezing (CF) and simplified-simplified freezing (SF) methods) for their effect on the ability of boar spermatozoa to undergo protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to oviductal fluid (ODF). Cryopreserved boar-spermatozoa were incubated with pre- and post-ovulatory ODF for 6 h at 38 °C under 5% CO(2). Aliquots of sperm samples were taken at hourly intervals and analyzed for kinematics and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Global protein tyrosine phosphorylation in spermatozoa was measured using flow cytometry and different patterns of phosphorylation were assessed using confocal microscopy. Immediately after thawing, no significant difference was observed in post-thaw sperm motility, velocity and global tyrosine phosphorylation between the two methods of freezing although the freezing method significantly (P < 0.05) influenced the effect of oviductal fluid on these parameters during incubation. While spermatozoa frozen by the CF method showed a significantly higher (P < 0.001) proportion of phosphorylation in response to preovulatory ODF during incubation, spermatozoa frozen by the SF method did not elicit such significant response as there was no significant difference in the proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated spermatozoa between treatments at any given time during incubation. If the CF method was used, the proportion of spermatozoa displaying either tail or full sperm phosphorylation increased in response to both preovulatory (EODF) and postovulatory oviductal fluid. However, if the SF method was used, a significant increase in these patterns was noticed only in the EODF treated group. The present study

  14. Regulation of mitochondrial functions by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangbin; Smith, Kelly R; Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve; Tian, Rong; Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria are double membrane-bound organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. They generate most of the cell's energy supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are critical mechanisms in the regulation of cell signaling networks and are essential for almost all the cellular functions. For many decades, mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles merely functioning to generate energy for cells to survive and proliferate, and were thought to be independent of the cellular signaling networks. Consequently, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation processes of mitochondrial kinases and phosphatases were largely neglected. However, evidence accumulated in recent years on mitochondria-localized kinases/phosphatases has changed this longstanding view. Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as a hub for cell signaling, and many kinases and phosphatases have been reported to localize in mitochondria and play important functions. However, the strength of the evidence on mitochondrial localization and the activities of the reported kinases and phosphatases vary greatly, and the detailed mechanisms on how these kinases/phosphatases translocate to mitochondria, their subsequent function, and the physiological and pathological implications of their localization are still poorly understood. Here, we provide an updated perspective on the recent advancement in this area, with an emphasis on the implications of mitochondrial kinases/phosphatases in cancer and several other diseases.

  15. Protein kinase C catalyses the phosphorylation and activation of rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, M; Pajares, M A; Renart, M F; Mato, J M

    1987-01-01

    When a partially purified rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase is incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP and rat brain protein kinase C, phospholipid methyltransferase (Mr 50,000, pI 4.75) becomes phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of the enzyme showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase was accompanied by an approx. 2-fold activation of the enzyme activity. Activity changes and enzyme phosphorylation showed the same time course. Activation of the enzyme also showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C mediates phosphorylation of predominantly serine residues of the methyltransferase. One major peak of phosphorylation was identified by analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides by isoelectrofocusing. This peak (pI 5.2) differs from that phosphorylated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (pI 7.2), demonstrating the specificity of phosphorylation of protein kinase C. Tryptic-peptide mapping by h.p.l.c. of the methyltransferase phosphorylated by protein kinase C revealed one major peak of radioactivity, which could be resolved into two labelled phosphopeptides by t.l.c. The significance of protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3593229

  16. Protein Phosphorylation and Redox Modification in Stomatal Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Balmant, Kelly M; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) is recognized as a major process accounting for protein structural variation, functional diversity, and the dynamics and complexity of the proteome. Since PTMs can change the structure and function of proteins, they are essential to coordinate signaling networks and to regulate important physiological processes in eukaryotes. Plants are constantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce productivity, causing economic losses in crops. The plant responses involve complex physiological, cellular, and molecular processes, with stomatal movement as one of the earliest responses. In order to activate such a rapid response, stomatal guard cells employ cellular PTMs of key protein players in the signaling pathways to regulate the opening and closure of the stomatal pores. Here we discuss two major types of PTMs, protein phosphorylation and redox modification that play essential roles in stomatal movement under stress conditions. We present an overview of PTMs that occur in stomatal guard cells, especially the methods and technologies, and their applications in PTM identification and quantification. Our focus is on PTMs that modify molecular components in guard cell signaling at the stages of signal perception, second messenger production, as well as downstream signaling events and output. Improved understanding of guard cell signaling will enable generation of crops with enhanced stress tolerance, and increased yield and bioenergy through biotechnology and molecular breeding.

  17. Protein Phosphorylation and Redox Modification in Stomatal Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balmant, Kelly M.; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) is recognized as a major process accounting for protein structural variation, functional diversity, and the dynamics and complexity of the proteome. Since PTMs can change the structure and function of proteins, they are essential to coordinate signaling networks and to regulate important physiological processes in eukaryotes. Plants are constantly challenged by both biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce productivity, causing economic losses in crops. The plant responses involve complex physiological, cellular, and molecular processes, with stomatal movement as one of the earliest responses. In order to activate such a rapid response, stomatal guard cells employ cellular PTMs of key protein players in the signaling pathways to regulate the opening and closure of the stomatal pores. Here we discuss two major types of PTMs, protein phosphorylation and redox modification that play essential roles in stomatal movement under stress conditions. We present an overview of PTMs that occur in stomatal guard cells, especially the methods and technologies, and their applications in PTM identification and quantification. Our focus is on PTMs that modify molecular components in guard cell signaling at the stages of signal perception, second messenger production, as well as downstream signaling events and output. Improved understanding of guard cell signaling will enable generation of crops with enhanced stress tolerance, and increased yield and bioenergy through biotechnology and molecular breeding. PMID:26903877

  18. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins influences subunit association and translation of poly (U) in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Ziková, Alice; Smětáková, Magdalena; Bezoušková, Silvie

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of phosphorylated proteins in ribosomes of Streptomyces coelicolor was investigated. Little is known about which biological functions these posttranslational modifications might fulfil. A protein kinase associated with ribosomes phosphorylated six ribosomal proteins of the small subunit (S3, S4, S12, S13, S14 and S18) and seven ribosomal proteins of the large subunit (L2, L3, L7/L12, L16, L17, L23 and L27). The ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated mainly on the Ser/Thr residues. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins influences ribosomal subunits association. Ribosomes with phosphorylated proteins were used to examine poly (U) translation activity. Phosphorylation induced about 50% decrease in polyphenylalanine synthesis. After preincubation of ribosomes with alkaline phosphatase the activity of ribosomes was greatly restored. Small differences were observed between phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ribosomes in the kinetic parameters of the binding of Phe-tRNA to the A-site of poly (U) programmed ribosomes, suggesting that the initial binding of Phe-tRNA is not significantly affected by phosphorylation. On contrary, the rate of peptidyl transferase was about two-fold lower than that in unphosphorylated ribosomes. The data presented demonstrate that phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins affects critical steps of protein synthesis.

  19. Revisiting Frank–Starling: regulatory light chain phosphorylation alters the rate of force redevelopment (k tr) in a length‐dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    West, Timothy G.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation has been shown to alter the ability of muscle to produce force and power during shortening and to alter the rate of force redevelopment (k tr) at submaximal [Ca2+].Increasing RLC phosphorylation ∼50% from the in vivo level in maximally [Ca2+]‐activated cardiac trabecula accelerates k tr.Decreasing RLC phosphorylation to ∼70% of the in vivo control level slows k tr and reduces force generation. k tr is dependent on sarcomere length in the physiological range 1.85–1.94 μm and RLC phosphorylation modulates this response.We demonstrate that Frank–Starling is evident at maximal [Ca2+] activation and therefore does not necessarily require length‐dependent change in [Ca2+]‐sensitivity of thin filament activation.The stretch response is modulated by changes in RLC phosphorylation, pinpointing RLC phosphorylation as a modulator of the Frank–Starling law in the heart.These data provide an explanation for slowed systolic function in the intact heart in response to RLC phosphorylation reduction. Abstract Force and power in cardiac muscle have a known dependence on phosphorylation of the myosin‐associated regulatory light chain (RLC). We explore the effect of RLC phosphorylation on the ability of cardiac preparations to redevelop force (k tr) in maximally activating [Ca2+]. Activation was achieved by rapidly increasing the temperature (temperature‐jump of 0.5–20ºC) of permeabilized trabeculae over a physiological range of sarcomere lengths (1.85–1.94 μm). The trabeculae were subjected to shortening ramps over a range of velocities and the extent of RLC phosphorylation was varied. The latter was achieved using an RLC‐exchange technique, which avoids changes in the phosphorylation level of other proteins. The results show that increasing RLC phosphorylation by 50% accelerates k tr by ∼50%, irrespective of the sarcomere length, whereas decreasing phosphorylation by 30% slows k tr by ∼50

  20. Phosphorylation at serine 52 and 635 does not alter the transport properties of glucosinolate transporter AtGTR1

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how plants regulate transporters of defense compounds. In A. thaliana, glucosinolates are transported between tissues by NPF2.10 (AtGTR1) and NPF2.11 (AtGTR2). Mining of the PhosPhat4.0 database showed two cytosol exposed phosphorylation sites for AtGTR1 and one membrane-buried phosphorylation site for AtGTR2. In this study, we investigate whether mutation of the two potential regulatory sites of AtGTR1 affected transport of glucosinolates in Xenopus oocytes. Characterization of AtGTR1 phosphorylation mutants showed that phosphorylation of AtGTR1 - at the two reported phosphorylation sites - is not directly involved in regulating AtGTR1 transport activity. We hypothesize a role for AtGTR1-phosphorylation in regulating protein-protein interactions. PMID:26340317

  1. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  2. Deciphering the Interplay among Multisite Phosphorylation, Interaction Dynamics, and Conformational Transitions in a Tripartite Protein System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation is a common pathway to regulate protein function, activity, and interaction pattern in vivo, but routine biochemical analysis is often insufficient to identify the number and order of individual phosphorylation reactions and their mechanistic impact on the protein behavior. Here, we integrate complementary mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches to characterize a multisite phosphorylation-regulated protein system comprising Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and its coactivators Aurora kinase A (Aur-A) and Bora, the interplay of which is essential for mitotic entry after DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest. Native MS and cross-linking–MS revealed that Aur-A/Bora-mediated Plk1 activation is accompanied by the formation of Aur-A/Bora and Plk1/Bora heterodimers. We found that the Aur-A/Bora interaction is independent of the Bora phosphorylation state, whereas the Plk1/Bora interaction is dependent on extensive Bora multisite phosphorylation. Bottom-up and top-down proteomics analyses showed that Bora multisite phosphorylation proceeds via a well-ordered sequence of site-specific phosphorylation reactions, whereby we could reveal the involvement of up to 16 phosphorylated Bora residues. Ion mobility spectrometry–MS demonstrated that this multisite phosphorylation primes a substantial structural rearrangement of Bora, explaining the interdependence between extensive Bora multisite phosphorylation and Plk1/Bora complex formation. These results represent a first benchmark of our multipronged MS strategy, highlighting its potential to elucidate the mechanistic and structural implications of multisite protein phosphorylation. PMID:27504491

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 K48M) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5–3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 K48M under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 K48M mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 K48M, mpk6, and PTP1 S7AS8A under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  4. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  5. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Danielle M; Murray, Christian M; Ketelaar, KassaDee J; Thomas, Joseph J; Villalobos, Jose A; Wallace, Ian S

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  6. Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation in pea epicotyl segments

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Chengappa, S.; Raghothama, K.G.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation were studied by labeling pea epicotyl segments with (/sup 32/P) PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ and analyzing the phosphoproteins by two dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Analysis of phosphoproteins revealed auxin-regulated changes in the phosphorylation of specific polypeptides. In the presence of auxin, phosphorylation of 23,000, 82,000, 105,000 and 110,000 molecular weight polypeptides was markedly decreased whereas phosphorylation of 19,000, 24,000, 28,000 molecular weight polypeptides was increased. Some of these changes are very rapid and could be observed within minutes. Furthermore, their studies with calmodulin antagonists indicate the possible involvement of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and/or phosphatases in auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation. In view of these results, they suggest that auxin-regulated protein phosphorylation could be the one of the earliest events in regulating diverse physiological processes by this hormone.

  7. The Emerging Role of Protein Phosphorylation as a Critical Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Danielle M.; Murray, Christian M.; Ketelaar, KassaDee J.; Thomas, Joseph J.; Villalobos, Jose A.; Wallace, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are extracellular matrices that surround plant cells and critically influence basic cellular processes, such as cell division and expansion. Cellulose is a major constituent of plant cell walls, and this paracrystalline polysaccharide is synthesized at the plasma membrane by a large protein complex known as the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). Recent efforts have identified numerous protein components of the CSC, but relatively little is known about regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. Numerous phosphoproteomic surveys have identified phosphorylation events in CSC associated proteins, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may represent an important regulatory control of CSC activity. In this review, we discuss the composition and dynamics of the CSC in vivo, the catalog of CSC phosphorylation sites that have been identified, the function of experimentally examined phosphorylation events, and potential kinases responsible for these phosphorylation events. Additionally, we discuss future directions in cellulose synthase kinase identification and functional analyses of CSC phosphorylation sites. PMID:27252710

  8. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  9. Characterization of a Drosophila phosphorylation-dependent nuclear-localization-signal-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Cserpán, I; Máthé, E; Patthy, A; Udvardy, A

    1997-01-01

    A 94 kDa nuclear-localization-signal (NLS)-binding protein was purified from Drosophila embryos. The NLS of the simian-virus-40 T-antigen is specifically bound by the dephosphorylated form of the protein. After phosphorylation, the affinity of the protein for the NLS is sharply decreased. In the dephosphorylated form, p94 (protein of 94 kDa) is the major NLS-binding protein in Drosophila embryos. Immunoprecipitation confirmed the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of p94, and co-precipitation of two additional phosphorylated proteins, indicated that the NLS-binding protein is part of a larger complex in Drosophila embryos. In agreement with the immunoprecipitation results, cross-linking experiments demonstrated the interaction of p94 with three additional proteins. These protein-protein interactions were also phosphorylation-dependent. PMID:9396726

  10. The Sts Proteins Target Tyrosine Phosphorylated, Ubiquitinated Proteins within TCR Signaling Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Carpino, N.; Chen, Y; Nassar, N; Oh, H

    2009-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) detects the presence of infectious pathogens and activates numerous intracellular signaling pathways. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination serve as key regulatory mechanisms downstream of the TCR. Negative regulation of TCR signaling pathways is important in controlling the immune response, and the Suppressor of TCR Signaling proteins (Sts-1 and Sts-2) have been shown to function as critical negative regulators of TCR signaling. Although their mechanism of action has yet to be fully uncovered, it is known that the Sts proteins possess intrinsic phosphatase activity. Here, we demonstrate that Sts-1 and Sts-2 are instrumental in down-modulating proteins that are dually modified by both protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Specifically, both naive and activated T cells derived from genetically engineered mice that lack the Sts proteins display strikingly elevated levels of tyrosine phosphorylated, ubiquitinated proteins following TCR stimulation. The accumulation of the dually modified proteins is transient, and in activated T cells but not naive T cells is significantly enhanced by co-receptor engagement. Our observations hint at a novel regulatory mechanism downstream of the T cell receptor.

  11. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Hagedorn, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained /sup 32/P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a approx. 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not.

  12. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. PMID:24239485

  13. G protein beta gamma subunits stimulate phosphorylation of Shc adapter protein.

    PubMed Central

    Touhara, K; Hawes, B E; van Biesen, T; Lefkowitz, R J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation by pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi-coupled receptors is known to involve the beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (G beta gamma), p21ras activation, and an as-yet-unidentified tyrosine kinase. To investigate the mechanism of G beta gamma-stimulated p21ras activation, G beta gamma-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation was examined by overexpressing G beta gamma or alpha 2-C10 adrenergic receptors (ARs) that couple to Gi in COS-7 cells. Immunoprecipitation of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins revealed a 2- to 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation of two proteins of approximately 50 kDa (designated as p52) in G beta gamma-transfected cells or in alpha 2-C10 AR-transfected cells stimulated with the agonist UK-14304. The latter response was pertussis toxin sensitive. These proteins (p52) were also specifically immunoprecipitated with anti-Shc antibodies and comigrated with two Shc proteins, 46 and 52 kDa. The G beta gamma- or alpha 2-C10 AR-stimulated p52 (Shc) phosphorylation was inhibited by coexpression of the carboxyl terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (a G beta gamma-binding pleckstrin homology domain peptide) or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, but not by a dominant negative mutant of p21ras. Worthmannin, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibited phosphorylation of p52 (Shc), implying involvement of PI3K. These results suggest that G beta gamma-stimulated Shc phosphorylation represents an early step in the pathway leading to p21ras activation, similar to the mechanism utilized by growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7568118

  14. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of G-Protein Cycle during Nodule Formation in Soybean[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein complexes comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits and their regulatory RGS (Regulator of G-protein Signaling) protein are conserved in all eukaryotes. We have shown that the specific Gβ and Gγ proteins of a soybean (Glycine max) heterotrimeric G-protein complex are involved in regulation of nodulation. We now demonstrate the role of Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1)-mediated phosphorylation in regulation of the G-protein cycle during nodulation in soybean. We also show that during nodulation, the G-protein cycle is regulated by the activity of RGS proteins. Lower or higher expression of RGS proteins results in fewer or more nodules, respectively. NFR1 interacts with RGS proteins and phosphorylates them. Analysis of phosphorylated RGS protein identifies specific amino acids that, when phosphorylated, result in significantly higher GTPase accelerating activity. These data point to phosphorylation-based regulation of G-protein signaling during nodule development. We propose that active NFR1 receptors phosphorylate and activate RGS proteins, which help maintain the Gα proteins in their inactive, trimeric conformation, resulting in successful nodule development. Alternatively, RGS proteins might also have a direct role in regulating nodulation because overexpression of their phospho-mimic version leads to partial restoration of nodule formation in nod49 mutants. PMID:26498905

  15. A-kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Recruits Protein Kinase C to Phosphorylate Roundabout Receptors.

    PubMed

    Samelson, Bret K; Gore, Bryan B; Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Purkey, Alicia M; Colledge, Marcie; Langeberg, Lorene K; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Zweifel, Larry S; Scott, John D

    2015-05-29

    Anchoring proteins direct protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases toward selected substrates to control the efficacy, context, and duration of neuronal phosphorylation events. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 interacts with protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) to modulate second messenger signaling events. In a mass spectrometry-based screen for additional AKAP79/150 binding partners, we have identified the Roundabout axonal guidance receptor Robo2 and its ligands Slit2 and Slit3. Biochemical and cellular approaches confirm that a linear sequence located in the cytoplasmic tail of Robo2 (residues 991-1070) interfaces directly with sites on the anchoring protein. Parallel studies show that AKAP79/150 interacts with the Robo3 receptor in a similar manner. Immunofluorescent staining detects overlapping expression patterns for murine AKAP150, Robo2, and Robo3 in a variety of brain regions, including hippocampal region CA1 and the islands of Calleja. In vitro kinase assays, peptide spot array mapping, and proximity ligation assay staining approaches establish that human AKAP79-anchored PKC selectively phosphorylates the Robo3.1 receptor subtype on serine 1330. These findings imply that anchored PKC locally modulates the phosphorylation status of Robo3.1 in brain regions governing learning and memory and reward.

  16. Beryllium alters lipopolysaccharide-mediated intracellular phosphorylation and cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide-mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We found that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1beta is enhanced. In addition, not all lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate-treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1beta secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling.

  17. GSK-3β Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Dynein Reduces Ndel1 Binding to Intermediate Chains and Alters Dynein Motility.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng J; Hebbar, Sachin; Gao, Xu A; Alexander, Michael; Pandey, Jai P; Walla, Michael D; Cotham, William E; King, Stephen J; Smith, Deanna S

    2015-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) has been linked to regulation of kinesin-dependent axonal transport in squid and flies, and to indirect regulation of cytoplasmic dynein. We have now found evidence for direct regulation of dynein by mammalian GSK-3β in both neurons and non-neuronal cells. GSK-3β coprecipitates with and phosphorylates mammalian dynein. Phosphorylation of dynein intermediate chain (IC) reduces its interaction with Ndel1, a protein that contributes to dynein force generation. Two conserved residues, S87/T88 in IC-1B and S88/T89 in IC-2C, have been identified as GSK-3 targets by both mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. These sites are within an Ndel1-binding domain, and mutation of both sites alters the interaction of IC's with Ndel1. Dynein motility is stimulated by (i) pharmacological and genetic inhibition of GSK-3β, (ii) an insulin-sensitizing agent (rosiglitazone) and (iii) manipulating an insulin response pathway that leads to GSK-3β inactivation. Thus, our study connects a well-characterized insulin-signaling pathway directly to dynein stimulation via GSK-3 inhibition.

  18. Cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of proteins in rod outer segments in frog retina: characteristics of the phosphorylated proteins and their dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    To clarify the function of cyclic nucleotides in rod outer segments (ROS) of frog retinas, the cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of protein was studied. cGMP or cAMP with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the dark enhanced the phosphorylation of two ROS proteins with M/sub r/ = 10,500 (Band 1) and 8500 (Band 2) according to sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The phosphorylation was maximally enhanced at 2.0 mM cGMP and cAMP in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/. The cGMP-activated protein kinase showed near-optimal activity between pH 6.5 and 8.0. GMP, GDP, GTP, AMP, and ADP did not enhance the phosphorylation. Both /sup 32/P-phosphorylated Bands 1 and 2 were solubilized during preparation and the molecular weight of each was 19,000. Their isoelectric point was 5.2. The sites of phosphorylation were the serine residue(s). Dephosphorylation of /sup 37/P-Bands 1 and 2 in dark-adapted ROS suspension required Mn/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were inhibited by Zn/sup 2 +/.

  19. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  20. Differential effects of vasopressin and phenylephrine on protein kinase C-mediated protein phosphorylations in isolated hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.H.; Johanson, R.A.; Wiliamson, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Receptor-mediated breakdown of inositol lipids produces two intracellular signals, diacylglycerol, which activates protein kinase C, and inositol trisphosphate, which causes release of intracellular vesicular Ca/sup 2 +/. This study examined the effects of Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophores, vasopressin, phenylephrine, and phorbol ester (PMA) on hepatocyte protein phosphorylations. (/sup 32/P) Phosphoproteins from hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/P were resolved by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE and corresponding autoradiographs were quantitated by densitometric analysis. The phosphorylation of five proteins, a plasma membrane bound 16 kDa protein with pI 6.4, a cytosolic 16 kDa protein with pI 5.8, and proteins with Mr's of 36 kDa, 52 kDa, and 68 kDa, could be attributed to phosphorylation by protein kinase C since the phosphorylation was stimulated by PMA. When the vasopressin concentration was varied, low vasopressin stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein of the above set of proteins, while higher vasopressin concentrations were required to stimulate the phosphorylation of all five proteins. Phenylephrine, even at supramaximal concentrations, stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein. These results suggest that phenylephrine is a less potent activator of protein kinase C than vasopressin by virtue of limited or localized diacylglycerol production.

  1. Topographic regulation of cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation by multimeric complexes in the squid giant fiber system.

    PubMed

    Grant, P; Diggins, M; Pant, H C

    1999-07-01

    In mammalian and squid nervous systems, the phosphorylation of neurofilament proteins (NFs) seems to be topographically regulated. Although NFs and relevant kinases are synthesized in cell bodies, phosphorylation of NFs, particularly in the lys-ser-pro (KSP) repeats in NF-M and NF-H tail domains, seem to be restricted to axons. To explore the factors regulating the cellular compartmentalization of NF phosphorylation, we separated cell bodies (GFL) from axons in the squid stellate ganglion and compared the kinase activity in the respective lysates. Although total kinase activity was similar in each lysate, the profile of endogenous phosphorylated substrates was strikingly different. Neurofilament protein 220 (NF220), high-molecular-weight NF protein (HMW), and tubulin were the principal phosphorylated substrates in axoplasm, while tubulin was the principal GFL phosphorylated substrate, in addition to highly phosphorylated low-molecular-weight proteins. Western blot analysis showed that whereas both lysates contained similar kinases and cytoskeletal proteins, phosphorylated NF220 and HMW were completely absent from the GFL lysate. These differences were highlighted by P13(suc1) affinity chromatography, which revealed in axoplasm an active multimeric phosphorylation complex(es), enriched in cytoskeletal proteins and kinases; the equivalent P13 GFL complex exhibited six to 20 times less endogenous and exogenous phosphorylation activity, respectively, contained fewer cytoskeletal proteins and kinases, and expressed a qualitatively different cdc2-like kinase epitope, 34 kDa rather than 49 kDa. Cell bodies and axons share a similar repertoire of molecular consitutents; however, the data suggest that the cytoskeletal/kinase phosphorylation complexes extracted from each cellular compartment by P13 are fundamentally different.

  2. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  3. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C decreases catalytic activity of avian phospholipase C-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Filtz, T M; Cunningham, M L; Stanig, K J; Paterson, A; Harden, T K

    1999-01-01

    The potential role of protein kinase C (PKC)-promoted phosphorylation has been examined in the G-protein-regulated inositol lipid signalling pathway. Incubation of [32P]Pi-labelled turkey erythrocytes with either the P2Y1 receptor agonist 2-methylthioadenosine triphosphate (2MeSATP) or with PMA resulted in a marked increase in incorporation of 32P into the G-protein-activated phospholipase C PLC-betaT. Purified PLC-betaT also was phosphorylated by PKC in vitro to a stoichiometry (mean+/-S. E.M.) of 1.06+/-0.2 mol of phosphate/mol of PLC-betaT. Phosphorylation by PKC was isoenzyme-specific because, under identical conditions, mammalian PLC-beta2 also was phosphorylated to a stoichiometry near unity, whereas mammalian PLC-beta1 was not phosphorylated by PKC. The effects of PKC-promoted phosphorylation on enzyme activity were assessed by reconstituting purified PLC-betaT with turkey erythrocyte membranes devoid of endogenous PLC activity. Phosphorylation resulted in a decrease in basal activity, AlF4(-)-stimulated activity, and activity stimulated by 2MeSATP plus guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate in the reconstituted membranes. The decreases in enzyme activities were proportional to the extent of PKC-promoted phosphorylation. Catalytic activity assessed by using mixed detergent/phospholipid micelles also was decreased by up to 60% by phosphorylation. The effect of phosphorylation on Gqalpha-stimulated PLC-betaT in reconstitution experiments with purified proteins was not greater than that observed on basal activity alone. Taken together, these results illustrate that PKC phosphorylates PLC-betaT in vivo and to a physiologically relevant stoichiometry in vitro. Phosphorylation is accompanied by a concomitant loss of enzyme activity, reflected as a decrease in overall catalytic activity rather than as a specific modification of G-protein-regulated activity. PMID:10024500

  4. Auxin effects on in vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in pea. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, S.R.; Ray, P.M.

    1987-04-01

    Terminal 8mm sections from the third internode of dark grown 7 day old Pisum sativum cv Alaska seedlings were separated into membrane and soluble fractions. SDS gradient PAGE identified approximately 50 in vivo phosphorylated proteins and proved superior to 2-D SDS PAGE in terms of resolution and repeatability. Addition of indoleacetic acid (IAA), fusicoccin, or 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to membranes resulted in no detectable change in the number or phosphorylation level of the labeled proteins during in vitro phosphorylation in the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium. Similar results were obtained with soluble proteins. In the absence of calcium, the level of in vitro protein phosphorylation was much less, but not auxin effects could be identified. Furthermore, treatment of the sections with IAA in vivo followed by cell fractionation and in vitro phosphorylation failed to identify auxin responsive proteins. Lastly, when sections were labeled with /sup 32/P inorganic phosphate in the presence of 17 uM IAA, no auxin specific changes were found in the level of phosphorylation or in the number of phosphorylated proteins. Auxin effects on phosphorylation are thus slight or below their detection limit.

  5. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Brinkley, William R.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2007-11-16

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation specific antibody that labels the CPC using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A mitotic phosphorylation motif (PX{G/T/S}{L/M}[pS]P or WGL[pS]P) was identified in 11 proteins including Fzr/Cdh1 and RIC-8, two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B and TD-60, as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A, and Cdk1, a likely kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins including SMAD2, Plk3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and Plk3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation specific antibodies, and in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlates with its localization to the mitotic apparatus. A mutagenesis approach was used to show INCENP phosphorylation is required for midbody localization. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of critical proteins during mitosis.

  6. Crosstalk between signaling pathways provided by single and multiple protein phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Hafumi; Demir, Emek; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-01-30

    Cellular fate depends on the spatiotemporal separation and integration of signaling processes that can be provided by phosphorylation events. In this study, we identify the crucial points in signaling crosstalk that can be triggered by discrete phosphorylation events on a single target protein. We integrated the data on individual human phosphosites with the evidence on their corresponding kinases, the functional consequences of phosphorylation on activity of the target protein and corresponding pathways. Our results show that there is a substantial fraction of phosphosites that can play critical roles in crosstalk between alternative and redundant pathways and regulatory outcome of phosphorylation can be linked to a type of phosphorylated residue. These regulatory phosphosites can serve as hubs in the signal flow and their functional roles are directly connected to their specific properties. Namely, phosphosites with similar regulatory functions are phosphorylated by the same kinases and participate in regulation of similar biochemical pathways. Such sites are more likely to cluster in sequence and space unlike sites with antagonistic outcomes of their phosphorylation on a target protein. In addition, we found that in silico phosphorylation of sites with similar functional consequences has comparable outcomes on a target protein stability. An important role of phosphorylation sites in biological crosstalk is evident from the analysis of their evolutionary conservation.

  7. Crosstalk between signaling pathways provided by single and multiple protein phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Demir, Emek; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular fate depends on the spatio-temporal separation and integration of signaling processes which can be provided by phosphorylation events. In this study we identify the crucial points in signaling crosstalk which can be triggered by discrete phosphorylation events on a single target protein. We integrated the data on individual human phosphosites with the evidence on their corresponding kinases, the functional consequences on phosphorylation on activity of the target protein and corresponding pathways. Our results show that there is a substantial fraction of phosphosites that can play critical roles in crosstalk between alternative or redundant pathways and regulatory outcome of phosphorylation can be linked to a type of phosphorylated residue. These regulatory phosphosites can serve as hubs in the signal flow and their functional roles are directly connected to their specific properties. Namely, phosphosites with similar regulatory functions are phosphorylated by the same kinases and participate in regulation of similar biochemical pathways. Such sites are more likely to cluster in sequence and space unlike sites with antagonistic outcomes of their phosphorylation on a target protein. In addition we found that in silico phosphorylation of sites with similar functional consequences have comparable outcomes on a target protein stability. An important role of phosphorylation sites in biological crosstalk is evident from the analysis of their evolutionary conservation. PMID:25451034

  8. Phosphorylated TandeMBP: A unique protein substrate for protein phosphatase assay.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yasunori; Yamashita, Sho; Uezato, Yuuki; Senga, Yukako; Katayama, Syouichi; Goshima, Naoki; Shigeri, Yasushi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu

    2016-11-15

    To analyze a variety of protein phosphatases, we developed phosphorylated TandeMBP (P-TandeMBP), in which two different mouse myelin basic protein isoforms were fused in tandem, as a protein phosphatase substrate. P-TandeMBP was prepared efficiently in four steps: (1) phosphorylation of TandeMBP by a protein kinase mixture (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Iδ, casein kinase 1δ, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2); (2) precipitation of both P-TandeMBP and protein kinases to remove ATP, Pi, and ADP; (3) acid extraction of P-TandeMBP with HCl to remove protein kinases; and (4) neutralization of the solution that contains P-TandeMBP with Tris. In combination with the malachite green assay, P-TandeMBP can be used to detect protein phosphatase activity without using radioactive materials. Moreover, P-TandeMBP served as an efficient substrate for PPM family phosphatases (PPM1A, PPM1B, PPM1D, PPM1F, PPM1G, PPM1H, PPM1K, and PPM1M) and PPP family phosphatase PP5. Various phosphatase activities were also detected with high sensitivity in gel filtration fractions from mouse brain using P-TandeMBP. These results indicate that P-TandeMBP might be a powerful tool for the detection of protein phosphatase activities. PMID:27565380

  9. Chronic restraint stress induces sperm acrosome reaction and changes in testicular tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Supatcharee; Burawat, Jaturon; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sampannang, Apichakan; Maneenin, Chanwit; Iamsaard, Sitthichai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress is a cause of male infertility. Although sex hormones and sperm quality have been shown to be low in stress, sperm physiology and testicular functional proteins, such as phosphotyrosine proteins, have not been documented. Objective: To investigate the acrosome status and alterations of testicular proteins involved in spermatogenesis and testosterone synthesis in chronic stress in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, male rats were divided into 2 groups (control and chronic stress (CS), n=7). CS rats were immobilized (4 hr/day) for 42 consecutive days. The blood glucose level (BGL), corticosterone, testosterone, acrosome status, and histopathology were examined. The expressions of testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and phosphorylated proteins were analyzed. Results: Results showed that BGL (71.25±2.22 vs. 95.60±3.36 mg/dl), corticosterone level (24.33±4.23 vs. 36.9±2.01 ng/ml), acrosome reacted sperm (3.25±1.55 vs. 17.71±5.03%), and sperm head abnormality (3.29±0.71 vs. 6.21±1.18%) were significantly higher in CS group in comparison with control. In contrast, seminal vesicle (0.41±0.05 vs. 0.24±0.07 g/100g), testosterone level (3.37±0.79 vs. 0.61±0.29 ng/ml), and sperm concentration (115.33±7.70 vs. 79.13±3.65×106 cells/ml) of CS were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Some atrophic seminiferous tubules and low sperm mass were apparent in CS rats. The expression of CYP11A1 except StAR protein was markedly decreased in CS rats. In contrast, a 55 kDa phosphorylated protein was higher in CS testes. Conclusion: CS decreased the expression of CYP11A, resulting in decreased testosterone, and increased acrosome-reacted sperm, assumed to be the result of an increase of 55 kDa phosphorylated protein. PMID:27525328

  10. Decreased phosphorylation levels of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C in human and experimental heart failure.

    PubMed

    El-Armouche, Ali; Pohlmann, Lutz; Schlossarek, Saskia; Starbatty, Jutta; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie

    2007-08-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is an important regulator of cardiac contractility, and its phosphorylation by PKA is a mechanism that contributes to increased cardiac output in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation. It is presently unknown whether heart failure alters cMyBP-C phosphorylation. The present study determined the level of phosphorylated cMyBP-C in failing human hearts and in a canine model of pacing-induced heart failure. A polyclonal antibody directed against the major phosphorylation site of cMyBP-C (Ser-282) was generated and its specificity was confirmed by PKA phosphorylation with isoprenaline in cardiomyocytes and Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. Left ventricular myocardial tissue from (i) patients with terminal heart failure (hHF; n=12) and nonfailing donor hearts (hNF; n=6) and (ii) dogs with rapid-pacing-induced end-stage heart failure (dHF; n=10) and sham-operated controls (dNF; n=10) were used for quantification of total cMyBP-C and phospho-cMyBP-C by Western blotting. Total cMyBP-C protein levels were similar in hHF and hNF as well as in dHF and dNF. In contrast, the ratio of phospho-cMyBP-C to total cMyBP-C levels were >50% reduced in hHF and >40% reduced in dHF. In summary, cMyBP-C phosphorylation levels are markedly decreased in human and experimental heart failure. Thus, the compromised contractile function of the failing heart might be in part attributable to reduced cMyBP-C phosphorylation levels.

  11. Combinations of Physiologic Estrogens with Xenoestrogens Alter ERK Phosphorylation Profiles in Rat Pituitary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Watson, Cheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Estrogens are potent nongenomic phospho-activators of extracellular-signal–regulated kinases (ERKs). A major concern about the toxicity of xenoestrogens (XEs) is potential alteration of responses to physiologic estrogens when XEs are present simultaneously. Objectives We examined estrogen-induced ERK activation, comparing the abilities of structurally related XEs (alkylphenols and bisphenol A) to alter ERK responses induced by physiologic concentrations (1 nM) of estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and estriol (E3). Methods We quantified hormone/mimetic-induced ERK phosphorylations in the GH3/B6/F10 rat pituitary cell line using a plate immunoassay, comparing effects with those on cell proliferation and by estrogen receptor subtype-selective ligands. Results Alone, these structurally related XEs activate ERKs in an oscillating temporal pattern similar (but not identical) to that with physiologic estrogens. The potency of all estrogens was similar (active between femtomolar and nanomolar concentrations). XEs potently disrupted physiologic estrogen signaling at low, environmentally relevant concentrations. Generally, XEs potentiated (at the lowest, subpicomolar concentrations) and attenuated (at the highest, picomolar to 100 nM concentrations) the actions of the physiologic estrogens. Some XEs showed pronounced nonmonotonic responses/inhibitions. The phosphorylated ERK and proliferative responses to receptor-selective ligands were only partially correlated. Conclusions XEs are both imperfect potent estrogens and endocrine disruptors; the more efficacious an XE, the more it disrupts actions of physiologic estrogens. This ability to disrupt physiologic estrogen signaling suggests that XEs may disturb normal functioning at life stages where actions of particular estrogens are important (e.g., development, reproductive cycling, pregnancy, menopause). PMID:20870566

  12. Phosphorylation of five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in reticulocytes and identification of the protein kinases phosphorylating threonyl-tRNA synthetase from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, A.M.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with /sup 32/P. The five synthetases phosphorylated were the glutamyl-, glutaminyl-, lysyl-, aspartyl- and methionyl-tRNA synthetases. In addition, a 37,000 dalton protein, associated with the synthetase complex and tentatively identified as casein kinase I, was also phosphorylated in intact cells. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the proteins indicated all of the phosphate was on seryl residues. Incubation of reticulocytes with /sup 32/P in the presence of 8-bromo-cAMP and o, the 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine resulted in a six-fold increase in phosphorylation of the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, a two-fold increase in phosphorylation of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and a 50 to 60% decrease in phosphorylation of the glutamyl-, methionyl- and lysyl-tRNA synthetases and the M/sub r/ 37,000 protein. When the site(s) on the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase phosphorylated in response to 8-bromo-cAMP was analyzed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping, a single phosphopeptide was observed which was identical to that obtained in vitro upon phosphorylation with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also, the authors identify here, the protein kinases phosphorylating threonyl-tRNA synthetase from rat liver. They are protease activated kinase I, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C.

  13. Cyclic GMP kinase II (cGKII) inhibits NHE3 by altering its trafficking and phosphorylating NHE3 at three required sites: identification of a multifunctional phosphorylation site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiane; Kocinsky, Hetal S; Cha, Boyoung; Murtazina, Rakhilya; Yang, Jianbo; Tse, C Ming; Singh, Varsha; Cole, Robert; Aronson, Peter S; de Jonge, Hugo; Sarker, Rafiquel; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-23

    The epithelial brush-border Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3 is acutely inhibited by cGKII/cGMP, but how cGKII inhibits NHE3 is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that cGMP inhibits NHE3 by phosphorylating it and altering its membrane trafficking. Studies were carried out in PS120/NHERF2 and in Caco-2/Bbe cells overexpressing HA-NHE3 and cGKII, and in mouse ileum. NHE3 activity was measured with 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-S-(and 6)carboxyfluorescein acetoxy methylester/fluorometry. Surface NHE3 was determined by cell surface biotinylation. Identification of NHE3 phosphorylation sites was by iTRAQ/LC-MS/MS with TiO2 enrichment and immunoblotting with specific anti-phospho-NHE3 antibodies. cGMP/cGKII rapidly inhibited NHE3, which was associated with reduced surface NHE3. cGMP/cGKII increased NHE3 phosphorylation at three sites (rabbit Ser(554), Ser(607), and Ser(663), equivalent to mouse Ser(552), Ser(605), and Ser(659)), all of which had to be present at the same time for cGMP to inhibit NHE3. NHE3-Ser(663) phosphorylation was not necessary for cAMP inhibition of NHE3. Dexamethasone (4 h) stimulated wild type NHE3 activity and increased surface expression but failed to stimulate NHE3 activity or increase surface expression when NHE3 was mutated to either S663A or S663D. We conclude that 1) cGMP inhibition of NHE3 is associated with phosphorylation of NHE3 at Ser(554), Ser(607), and Ser(663), all of which are necessary for cGMP/cGKII to inhibit NHE3. 2) Dexamethasone stimulates NHE3 by phosphorylation of a single site, Ser(663). The requirement for three phosphorylation sites in NHE3 for cGKII inhibition, and for phosphorylation of one of these sites for dexamethasone stimulation of NHE3, is a unique example of regulation by phosphorylation.

  14. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  15. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins induced by auxins in maize embryonic tissues. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, L.; Aguilar, R.; Mendez, A.P.; de Jimenez, E.S.

    1990-11-01

    The effect of auxin on ribosomal protein phosphorylation of germinating maize (Zea mays) tissues was investigated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of ({sup 32}P) ribosomal protein patterns for natural and synthetic auxin-treated tissues were performed. Both the rate of {sup 32}P incorporation and the electrophoretic patterns were dependent on {sup 32}P pulse length, suggesting that active protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation occurred in small and large subunit proteins, in control as well as in auxin-treated tissues. The effect of ribosomal protein phosphorylation on in vitro translation was tested. Measurements of poly(U) translation rates as a function of ribosome concentration provided apparent K{sub m} values significantly different for auxin-treated and nontreated tissues. These findings suggest that auxin might exert some kind of translational control by regulating the phosphorylated status of ribosomal proteins.

  16. Protein phosphorylation in mitochondria --a study on fermentative and respiratory growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Bergmann, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    Phosphorylation as a posttranslational protein modification is a common subject of proteomic studies, but phosphorylation in mitochondria is still poorly investigated. The study presented here applied 2-DE to characterize phosphorylation in the yeast mitochondrial proteome and identified 59 spots corresponding to 34 phosphorylated mitochondrial or mitochondria-associated proteins. Most of these proteins presented putative substrates of mitogen-activated protein and target of rapamycin kinases, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent kinases and Snf1p suggesting them as key players in the phosphorylation of mitochondrial or mitochondria-associated proteins. The dynamic behaviour of the phosphoproteome under a major metabolic change, the shift from fermentation to respiration (diauxic shift), was further studied. Eight proteins (Ald4p, Eft1p/2p, Eno1p, Eno2p, Om14p, Pda1p, Qcr2p, Sdh1p) had growth dependent changes in their phosphorylation, indicating a role of phosphorylation-dependent regulation of translation, metabolic pathways (e.g. glucose fermentation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, pyruvate dehydrogenase and its bypass) and respiratory chain.

  17. K depletion increases protein tyrosine kinase-mediated phosphorylation of ROMK

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Lerea, Kenneth M.; Welling, Paul; Jin, Lianhong; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2010-01-01

    We purified Histagged ROMK1 and carried out in vitro phosphorylation assays with 32P-radiolabeled ATP to determine whether ROMK1 protein is a substrate for PTK. Addition of active c-Src and [32P]ATP to the purified ROMK1 protein resulted in the phosphorylation of the ROMK1 protein. However, c-Src did not phosphorylate R1Y337A in which tyrosine residue 337 was mutated to alanine. Furthermore, phosphopeptide mapping identified two phosphopeptides from the trypsin-digested ROMK1 protein. In contrast, no phosphorylated peptide has been found in the trypsin-digested R1Y337A protein. This suggested that two phosphorylated peptides might contain the same tyrosine residue. Also, addition of c-Src and [32P]ATP phosphorylated the synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid sequence 333–362 of the COOH terminus of ROMK1. We then examined the effect of dietary K intake on the tyrosine-phosphorylated ROMK level. Although the ROMK channels pulled down by immunoprecipitation with ROMK antibody were the same from rats on a K-deficient diet or on a high-K diet, more ROMK channels were phosphorylated by PTK in rats on a K-deficient diet than those on a high-K diet. We conclude that ROMK1 can be phosphorylated by PTK and that tyrosine residue 337 is the key site for the phosphorylation. Also, the tyrosine phosphorylation of ROMK is modulated by dietary K intake. This strongly suggests that PTK is an important member of the aldosterone-independent signal transduction pathway for regulating renal K secretion. PMID:12217858

  18. Lead induced changes in phosphorylation of PSII proteins in low light grown pea plants.

    PubMed

    Wioleta, Wasilewska; Anna, Drożak; Ilona, Bacławska; Kamila, Kąkol; Elżbieta, Romanowska

    2015-02-01

    Light-intensity and redox-state induced thylakoid proteins phosphorylation involved in structural changes and in regulation of protein turnover. The presence of heavy metal ions triggers a wide range of cellular responses including changes in plant growth and photosynthesis. Plants have evolved a number of mechanisms to protect photosynthetic apparatus. We have characterized the effect of lead on PSII protein phosphorylation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants grown in low light conditions. Pb ions affected only slightly photochemical efficiency of PSII and had no effect on organization of thylakoid complexes. Lead activated strongly phosphorylation of PSII core D1 protein and dephosphorylation of this protein did not proceed in far red light. D1 protein was also not degraded in this conditions. However, phosphorylation of LHCII proteins was not affected by lead. These results indicate that Pb(2+) stimulate the phosphorylation of PSII core proteins and by disturbing the disassembly of supercomplexes play a role in PSII repair mechanism. LHCII phosphorylation could control the distribution of energy between the photosystems in low light conditions. This demonstrates that plants may respond to heavy metals by induction different pathways responsible for protein protection under stress conditions.

  19. Brain phosphorylation of MeCP2 at serine 164 is developmentally regulated and globally alters its chromatin association

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Gilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Costa, Mario; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Di Marino, Daniele; Barbiero, Isabella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Ausió, Juan; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 is a transcriptional regulator whose functional alterations are responsible for several autism spectrum and mental disorders. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), and particularly differential phosphorylation, modulate MeCP2 function in response to diverse stimuli. Understanding the detailed role of MeCP2 phosphorylation is thus instrumental to ascertain how MeCP2 integrates the environmental signals and directs its adaptive transcriptional responses. The evolutionarily conserved serine 164 (S164) was found phosphorylated in rodent brain but its functional role has remained uncharacterized. We show here that phosphorylation of S164 in brain is dynamically regulated during neuronal maturation. S164 phosphorylation highly impairs MeCP2 binding to DNA in vitro and largely affects its nucleosome binding and chromatin affinity in vivo. Strikingly, the chromatin-binding properties of the global MeCP2 appear also extensively altered during the course of brain maturation. Functional assays reveal that proper temporal regulation of S164 phosphorylation controls the ability of MeCP2 to regulate neuronal morphology. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis of a complex PTM-mediated functional regulation of MeCP2 potentially involving a still poorly characterized epigenetic code. Furthermore, they demonstrate the relevance of the Intervening Domain of MeCP2 for binding to DNA. PMID:27323888

  20. Light, redox state, thylakoid-protein phosphorylation and signaling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zer, Hagit; Ohad, Itzhak

    2003-09-01

    Two recent publications concerning the chloroplast membrane-protein phosphorylation and state transition might lead to further progress in the elucidation of the mechanism and role of this process. A thylakoid-bound protein TSP9 is released to the chloroplast matrix upon redox-dependent stepwise phosphorylation of three threonine sites and might signal redox-dependent gene transcription. The state-transition process and phosphorylation of the light-harvesting complex II require the activity of a novel protein kinase Stt7. PMID:13678955

  1. Eukaryotic-Type Ser/Thr Protein Kinase Mediated Phosphorylation of Mycobacterial Phosphodiesterase Affects its Localization to the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase enzymes, involved in cAMP hydrolysis reaction, are present throughout phylogeny and their phosphorylation mediated regulation remains elusive in prokaryotes. In this context, we focused on this enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene encoded by Rv0805 was PCR amplified and expressed as a histidine-tagged protein (mPDE) utilizing Escherichia coli based expression system. In kinase assays, upon incubation with mycobacterial Clade I eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases (PknA, PknB, and PknL), Ni-NTA purified mPDE protein exhibited transphosphorylation ability albeit with varying degree. When mPDE was co-expressed one at a time with these kinases in E. coli, it was also recognized by an anti-phosphothreonine antibody, which further indicates its phosphorylating ability. Mass spectrometric analysis identified Thr-309 of mPDE as a phosphosite. In concordance with this observation, anti-phosphothreonine antibody marginally recognized mPDE-T309A mutant protein; however, such alteration did not affect the enzymatic activity. Interestingly, mPDE expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis yielded a phosphorylated protein that preferentially localized to cell wall. In contrast, mPDE-T309A, the phosphoablative variant of mPDE, did not show such behavior. On the other hand, phosphomimics of mPDE (T309D or T309E), exhibited similar cell wall anchorage as was observed with the wild-type. Thus, our results provide credence to the fact that eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinase mediated phosphorylation of mPDE renders negative charge to the protein, promoting its localization on cell wall. Furthermore, multiple sequence alignment revealed that Thr-309 is conserved among mPDE orthologs of M. tuberculosis complex, which presumably emphasizes evolutionary significance of phosphorylation at this residue.

  2. Eukaryotic-Type Ser/Thr Protein Kinase Mediated Phosphorylation of Mycobacterial Phosphodiesterase Affects its Localization to the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase enzymes, involved in cAMP hydrolysis reaction, are present throughout phylogeny and their phosphorylation mediated regulation remains elusive in prokaryotes. In this context, we focused on this enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene encoded by Rv0805 was PCR amplified and expressed as a histidine-tagged protein (mPDE) utilizing Escherichia coli based expression system. In kinase assays, upon incubation with mycobacterial Clade I eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases (PknA, PknB, and PknL), Ni-NTA purified mPDE protein exhibited transphosphorylation ability albeit with varying degree. When mPDE was co-expressed one at a time with these kinases in E. coli, it was also recognized by an anti-phosphothreonine antibody, which further indicates its phosphorylating ability. Mass spectrometric analysis identified Thr-309 of mPDE as a phosphosite. In concordance with this observation, anti-phosphothreonine antibody marginally recognized mPDE-T309A mutant protein; however, such alteration did not affect the enzymatic activity. Interestingly, mPDE expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis yielded a phosphorylated protein that preferentially localized to cell wall. In contrast, mPDE-T309A, the phosphoablative variant of mPDE, did not show such behavior. On the other hand, phosphomimics of mPDE (T309D or T309E), exhibited similar cell wall anchorage as was observed with the wild-type. Thus, our results provide credence to the fact that eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinase mediated phosphorylation of mPDE renders negative charge to the protein, promoting its localization on cell wall. Furthermore, multiple sequence alignment revealed that Thr-309 is conserved among mPDE orthologs of M. tuberculosis complex, which presumably emphasizes evolutionary significance of phosphorylation at this residue. PMID:26904001

  3. A Protein Phosphorylation Threshold for Functional Stacking of Plant Photosynthetic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Granath, Pontus; Vener, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation of photosystem II (PSII) proteins affects macroscopic structure of thylakoid photosynthetic membranes in chloroplasts of the model plant Arabidopsis. In this study, light-scattering spectroscopy revealed that stacking of thylakoids isolated from wild type Arabidopsis and the mutant lacking STN7 protein kinase was highly influenced by cation (Mg++) concentrations. The stacking of thylakoids from the stn8 and stn7stn8 mutants, deficient in STN8 kinase and consequently in light-dependent phosphorylation of PSII, was increased even in the absence of Mg++. Additional PSII protein phosphorylation in wild type plants exposed to high light enhanced Mg++-dependence of thylakoid stacking. Protein phosphorylation in the plant leaves was analyzed during day, night and prolonged darkness using three independent techniques: immunoblotting with anti-phosphothreonine antibodies; Diamond ProQ phosphoprotein staining; and quantitative mass spectrometry of peptides released from the thylakoid membranes by trypsin. All assays revealed dark/night-induced increase in phosphorylation of the 43 kDa chlorophyll-binding protein CP43, which compensated for decrease in phosphorylation of the other PSII proteins in wild type and stn7, but not in the stn8 and stn7stn8 mutants. Quantitative mass spectrometry determined that every PSII in wild type and stn7 contained on average 2.5±0.1 or 1.4±0.1 phosphoryl groups during day or night, correspondingly, while less than every second PSII had a phosphoryl group in stn8 and stn7stn8. It is postulated that functional cation-dependent stacking of plant thylakoid membranes requires at least one phosphoryl group per PSII, and increased phosphorylation of PSII in plants exposed to high light enhances stacking dynamics of the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:20532038

  4. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  5. The Roles of Phosphorylation and SHAGGY-Like Protein Kinases in Geminivirus C4 Protein Induced Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mills-Lujan, Katherine; Andrews, David L.; Chou, Chau-wen; Deom, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Even though plant cells are highly plastic, plants only develop hyperplasia under very specific abiotic and biotic stresses, such as when exposed to pathogens like Beet curly top virus (BCTV). The C4 protein of BCTV is sufficient to induce hyperplasia and alter Arabidopsis development. It was previously shown that C4 interacts with two Arabidopsis Shaggy-like protein kinases, AtSK21 and 23, which are negative regulators of brassinosteroid (BR) hormone signaling. Here we show that the C4 protein interacts with five additional AtSK family members. Bikinin, a competitive inhibitor of the seven AtSK family members that interact with C4, induced hyperplasia similar to that induced by the C4 protein. The Ser49 residue of C4 was found to be critical for C4 function, since: 1) mutagenesis of Ser49 to Ala abolished the C4-induced phenotype, abolished C4/AtSK interactions, and resulted in a mutant protein that failed to induce changes in the BR signaling pathway; 2) Ser49 is phosphorylated in planta; and 3) plant-encoded AtSKs must be catalytically active to interact with C4. A C4 N-myristoylation site mutant that does not localize to the plasma membrane and does not induce a phenotype, retained the ability to bind AtSKs. Taken together, these results suggest that plasma membrane associated C4 interacts with and co-opts multiple AtSKs to promote its own phosphorylation and activation to subsequently compromise cell cycle control. PMID:25815729

  6. The roles of phosphorylation and SHAGGY-like protein kinases in geminivirus C4 protein induced hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mills-Lujan, Katherine; Andrews, David L; Chou, Chau-Wen; Deom, C Michael

    2015-01-01

    Even though plant cells are highly plastic, plants only develop hyperplasia under very specific abiotic and biotic stresses, such as when exposed to pathogens like Beet curly top virus (BCTV). The C4 protein of BCTV is sufficient to induce hyperplasia and alter Arabidopsis development. It was previously shown that C4 interacts with two Arabidopsis Shaggy-like protein kinases, AtSK21 and 23, which are negative regulators of brassinosteroid (BR) hormone signaling. Here we show that the C4 protein interacts with five additional AtSK family members. Bikinin, a competitive inhibitor of the seven AtSK family members that interact with C4, induced hyperplasia similar to that induced by the C4 protein. The Ser49 residue of C4 was found to be critical for C4 function, since: 1) mutagenesis of Ser49 to Ala abolished the C4-induced phenotype, abolished C4/AtSK interactions, and resulted in a mutant protein that failed to induce changes in the BR signaling pathway; 2) Ser49 is phosphorylated in planta; and 3) plant-encoded AtSKs must be catalytically active to interact with C4. A C4 N-myristoylation site mutant that does not localize to the plasma membrane and does not induce a phenotype, retained the ability to bind AtSKs. Taken together, these results suggest that plasma membrane associated C4 interacts with and co-opts multiple AtSKs to promote its own phosphorylation and activation to subsequently compromise cell cycle control.

  7. Protein phosphorylation analysis in archival clinical cancer samples by shotgun and targeted proteomics approaches.

    PubMed

    Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Calvo, Enrique; Díaz, Esther; Miguel-Martín, María; López, Rocío; Agulló, Teresa; Camafeita, Emilio; Espinosa, Enrique; López, Juan Antonio; Nistal, Manuel; Vara, Juan Ángel Fresno

    2011-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation affects most eukaryotic cellular processes and its deregulation is considered a hallmark of cancer and other diseases. Phosphoproteomics may enable monitoring of altered signaling pathways as a means of stratifying tumors and facilitating the discovery of new drugs. Unfortunately, the development of molecular tests for clinical use is constrained by the limited availability of fresh frozen, clinically annotated samples. Here we report phosphopeptide analysis in human archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer samples based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry and selected reaction monitoring techniques. Our results indicate the equivalence of detectable phosphorylation rates in archival FFPE and fresh frozen tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate the applicability of targeted assays for phosphopeptide analysis in clinical archival FFPE samples, using an experimental workflow suitable for processing and analyzing large sample series. This work paves the way for the application of shotgun and targeted phosphoproteomics approaches in clinically relevant studies using archival clinical samples.

  8. Protein phosphorylation analysis in archival clinical cancer samples by shotgun and targeted proteomics approaches.

    PubMed

    Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Calvo, Enrique; Díaz, Esther; Miguel-Martín, María; López, Rocío; Agulló, Teresa; Camafeita, Emilio; Espinosa, Enrique; López, Juan Antonio; Nistal, Manuel; Vara, Juan Ángel Fresno

    2011-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation affects most eukaryotic cellular processes and its deregulation is considered a hallmark of cancer and other diseases. Phosphoproteomics may enable monitoring of altered signaling pathways as a means of stratifying tumors and facilitating the discovery of new drugs. Unfortunately, the development of molecular tests for clinical use is constrained by the limited availability of fresh frozen, clinically annotated samples. Here we report phosphopeptide analysis in human archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer samples based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry and selected reaction monitoring techniques. Our results indicate the equivalence of detectable phosphorylation rates in archival FFPE and fresh frozen tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate the applicability of targeted assays for phosphopeptide analysis in clinical archival FFPE samples, using an experimental workflow suitable for processing and analyzing large sample series. This work paves the way for the application of shotgun and targeted phosphoproteomics approaches in clinically relevant studies using archival clinical samples. PMID:21617801

  9. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Højlund, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that multiple proteins involved in key regulatory processes in mitochondria are phosphorylated in mammalian tissues. Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent signaling and has been shown to stimulate ATP synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo. Using a combination of TiO(2) phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC-MS/MS, we compared the phosphoproteomes of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle samples obtained from healthy individuals before and after 4 h of insulin infusion. In total, we identified 207 phosphorylation sites in 95 mitochondrial proteins. Of these phosphorylation sites, 45% were identified in both basal and insulin-stimulated samples. Insulin caused a 2-fold increase in the number of different mitochondrial phosphopeptides (87 ± 7 vs 40 ± 7, p = 0.015) and phosphoproteins (46 ± 2 vs 26 ± 3, p = 0.005) identified in each mitochondrial preparation. Almost half of the mitochondrial phosphorylation sites (n = 94) were exclusively identified in the insulin-stimulated state and included the majority of novel sites. Phosphorylation sites detected more often or exclusively in insulin-stimulated samples include multiple sites in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and fatty acid metabolism, as well as several components of the newly defined mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that insulin increases the phosphorylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo and provides a first step in the understanding of how insulin potentially regulates mitochondrial processes by phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms.

  10. Phosphorylated protein phosphatase 2A determines poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal, I; Manso, R; Rincón, R; Caramés, C; Zazo, S; del Pulgar, T G; Cebrián, A; Madoz-Gúrpide, J; Rojo, F; García-Foncillas, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a tumour suppressor frequently inactivated in human cancer and its tyrosine-307 phosphorylation has been reported as a molecular inhibitory mechanism. Methods: Expression of phosphorylated PP2A (p-PP2A) was evaluated in 250 metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Chi-square, Kaplan–Meier and Cox analyses were used to determine correlations with clinical and molecular parameters and impact on clinical outcomes. Results: High p-PP2A levels were found in 17.2% cases and were associated with ECOG performance status (P=0.001) and presence of synchronous metastasis at diagnosis (P=0.035). This subgroup showed substantially worse overall survival (OS) (median OS, 6.0 vs 26.2 months, P<0.001) and progression-free survival (PFS) (median PFS, 3.8 vs 13.3 months, P<0.001). The prognostic impact of p-PP2A was particularly evident in patients aged <70 years (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that p-PP2A retained its prognostic impact for OS (hazard ratio 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–4.1; P<0.001) and PFS (hazard ratio 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–5.0; P<0.001). Conclusions: Phosphorylated PP2A is an alteration that determines poor outcome in metastatic CRC and represents a novel potential therapeutic target in this disease, thus enabling to define a subgroup of patients who could benefit from future treatments based on PP2A activators. PMID:25003662

  11. Increased 14-3-3 phosphorylation observed in Parkinson's disease reduces neuroprotective potential of 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Slone, Sunny Rae; Lavalley, Nicholas; McFerrin, Michael; Wang, Bing; Yacoubian, Talene Alene

    2015-07-01

    14-3-3 proteins are key regulators of cell survival. We have previously demonstrated that 14-3-3 levels are decreased in an alpha-synuclein (αsyn) mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD), and that overexpression of certain 14-3-3 isoforms is protective in several PD models. Here we examine whether changes in 14-3-3 phosphorylation may contribute to the neurodegenerative process in PD. We examine three key 14-3-3 phosphorylation sites that normally regulate 14-3-3 function, including serine 58 (S58), serine 184 (S184), and serine/threonine 232 (S/T232), in several models of PD and in human PD brain. We observed that an increase in S232 phosphorylation is observed in rotenone-treated neuroblastoma cells, in cells overexpressing αsyn, and in human PD brains. Alterations in S58 phosphorylation were less consistent in these models, and we did not observe any phosphorylation changes at S184. Phosphorylation at S232 induced by rotenone is reduced by casein kinase inhibitors, and is not dependent on αsyn. Mutation of the S232 site affected 14-3-3θ's neuroprotective effects against rotenone and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), with the S232D mutant lacking any protective effect compared to wildtype or S232A 14-3-3θ. The S232D mutant partially reduced the ability of 14-3-3θ to inhibit Bax activation in response to rotenone. Based on these findings, we propose that phosphorylation of 14-3-3s at serine 232 contributes to the neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:25862939

  12. Comparative analysis reveals conserved protein phosphorylation networks implicated in multiple diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chris Soon Heng; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Pasculescu, Adrian; Jovanovic, Marko; Hengartner, Michael O; Jørgensen, Claus; Bader, Gary D; Aebersold, Ruedi; Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases enable cellular information processing. Although numerous human phosphorylation sites and their dynamics have been characterized, the evolutionary history and physiological importance of many signaling events remain unknown. Using target phosphoproteomes determined with a similar experimental and computational pipeline, we investigated the conservation of human phosphorylation events in distantly related model organisms (fly, worm, and yeast). With a sequence-alignment approach, we identified 479 phosphorylation events in 344 human proteins that appear to be positionally conserved over approximately 600 million years of evolution and hence are likely to be involved in fundamental cellular processes. This sequence-alignment analysis suggested that many phosphorylation sites evolve rapidly and therefore do not display strong evolutionary conservation in terms of sequence position in distantly related organisms. Thus, we devised a network-alignment approach to reconstruct conserved kinase-substrate networks, which identified 778 phosphorylation events in 698 human proteins. Both methods identified proteins tightly regulated by phosphorylation as well as signal integration hubs, and both types of phosphoproteins were enriched in proteins encoded by disease-associated genes. We analyzed the cellular functions and structural relationships for these conserved signaling events, noting the incomplete nature of current phosphoproteomes. Assessing phosphorylation conservation at both site and network levels proved useful for exploring both fast-evolving and ancient signaling events. We reveal that multiple complex diseases seem to converge within the conserved networks, suggesting that disease development might rely on common molecular networks.

  13. [Suppressive effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on tumor cell function via phosphorylation of p53 protein in mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Shinozuka, K; Kunitomo, M

    2000-12-01

    We examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the phosphorylation of a p53 protein. Exposure to a protein kinase inhibitor, 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H7), increased the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein, whereas exposure to a tumor promoter phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), decreased it in vivo after incubation with mouse epidermal JB6 cells for 3 h. Exposure to a cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) activator, forskolin, did not decrease the phosphorylation of p53 protein. In the transient transfection/luciferase reporter transactivation assay, H7 slightly increased the mouse double minute (MDM) 2 reporter transactivation activity of the p53 protein after treatment for 24 h, whereas TPA completely blocked it. Exposure to H7 and a specific PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide (bis), dose-dependently reduced the lung-colonizing potential of highly metastatic B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells in syngeneic mice. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein is inversely related to PKC activation, and also suggest that the phosphorylation of the p53 protein is involved in the function of its transcription factor. The PKC inhibitor may exhibit a potent anti-metastatic effect through the phosphorylation of wild type p53 protein and the activation of its function. PMID:11193387

  14. Modulation of maturation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation in Xenopus oocytes by microinjection of oncogenic ras protein and protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, T; Kung, H F

    1990-01-01

    Using Xenopus oocytes as a model system, we investigated the possible involvement of ras proteins in the pathway leading to phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Our results indicate that microinjection of oncogenic T24 H-ras protein (which contains valine at position 12) markedly stimulated S6 phosphorylation on serine residues in oocytes, whereas normal ras protein (which contains glycine at position 12) was without effect. The S6 phosphorylation activity in the cell extract from T24 ras protein-injected oocytes was increased significantly. In addition, injection of protein kinase C potentiated the induction of maturation and S6 phosphorylation by the oncogenic ras protein. A similar potentiation was detected when T24 ras protein-injected oocytes were incubated with active phorbol ester. These findings suggest that ras proteins activate the pathway linked to S6 phosphorylation and that protein kinase C has a synergistic effect on the ras-mediated pathway. Images PMID:2406569

  15. Computational Study of Pseudo-phosphorylation of the Microtubule associated Protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopovich, Dmitriy; Larini, Luca

    This computational study focuses on the effect of pseudo-phosphorylation on the aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau. In the axon of the neuron, tau regulates the assembly of microtubules in the cytoskeleton. This is important for both stabilization of and transport across the microtubules. One of the hallmarks of the Alzheimer's disease is that tau is hyper-phosphorylated and aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles that lay waste to the neurons. It is not known if hyper-phosphorylation directly causes the aggregation of tau into tangles. Experimentally, pseudo-phosphorylation mimics the effects of phosphorylation by mutating certain residues of the protein chain into charged residues. In this study, we will consider the fragment called PHF43 that belongs to the microtubule binding region and has been shown to readily aggregate.

  16. Phosphorylation of Single Stranded RNA Virus Proteins and Potential for Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Forrest; Ataey, Pouya; Amaya, Moushimi; Bailey, Charles; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modification of proteins is a critical requirement that regulates function. Among the diverse kinds of protein post translational modifications, phosphorylation plays essential roles in protein folding, protein:protein interactions, signal transduction, intracellular localization, transcription regulation, cell cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. Protein phosphorylation is also essential for many intracellular pathogens to establish a productive infection cycle. Preservation of protein phosphorylation moieties in pathogens in a manner that mirrors the host components underscores the co-evolutionary trajectory of pathogens and hosts, and sheds light on how successful pathogens have usurped, either in part or as a whole, the host enzymatic machinery. Phosphorylation of viral proteins for many acute RNA viruses including Flaviviruses and Alphaviruses has been demonstrated to be critical for protein functionality. This review focuses on phosphorylation modifications that have been documented to occur on viral proteins with emphasis on acutely infectious, single stranded RNA viruses. The review additionally explores the possibility of repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved inhibitors as antivirals for the treatment of acute RNA viral infections. PMID:26473910

  17. Partial purification of a spinach thylakoid protein kinase that can phosphorylate light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.D.; Hind, G.; Bennett, J.

    1985-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation in plant tissues is particularly marked in chloroplasts, protein kinase activity being associated with the outer envelope, the soluble stromal fraction, and the thylakoid membrane. Furthermore, thylakoid-bound activity probably includes several distinct kinases, as suggested by studies of divalent cation specificity and thermal lability carried out with intact thylakoids and by subfractionation of solubilized membranes. Illumination of thylakoids, particularly with red light, promotes the rapid and extensive phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) on a threonine residue near the amino terminus of the protein. This phosphorylation is thought to be involved in regulating the distribution of absorbed quanta between photosystems II and I and is modulated by the redox state of the thylakoid plastoquinone pool. Neither of the thylakoid kinases reported to date was capable of phosphorylating purified LHCII in vitro or of incorporating phosphate into threonyl residues of exogenous substrates, that some LHCII phosphorylation was catalyzed by a preliminary fraction led workers to suggest that at least one other kinase remained to be isolated. Here, the authors report the solubilization and partial purification of a protein kinase from spinach thylakoids that is capable of phosphorylating LHCII in vitro, and they show that the specific site of phosphorylation is very nearly the same as, if not identical with, the site phosphorylated in organello.

  18. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  19. Protein kinase A alterations in adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Espiard, S; Ragazzon, B; Bertherat, J

    2014-11-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP pathway by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is essential for adrenal cortex maintenance, glucocorticoid and adrenal androgens synthesis, and secretion. Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cAMP pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway. Molecular alterations of PKA subunits have been observed in adrenocortical tumors. PKA molecular defects can be germline in hereditary disorders or somatic in sporadic tumors. Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) can be observed in patients with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome (CS) due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. Germline gene duplication of the catalytic subunits Cα (PRKACA) has been observed in patients with PPNAD. Furthermore, exome sequencing revealed recently activating somatic mutations of PRKACA in about 40% of cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies help in the progress to understand the mechanisms of adrenocortical tumors development due to PKA regulatory subunits alterations. All these alterations are observed in benign oversecreting tumors and are mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. On the long term, unraveling these alterations will open new strategies of pharmacological treatment targeting the cAMP pathway in adrenal tumors and cortisol-secretion disorders. PMID:25105543

  20. [In vitro protein phosphorylation as a template for SRM method development].

    PubMed

    Zav'ialova, M G; Zgoda, V G; Kharybin, O N; Nikolaev, E N

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most common posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins. Main challenge of phosphoprotein detection is their low abundance comparing to abundance of unmodified proteins. The method of selected reactions monitoring (SRM) allows to perform very sensitive and selective analysis of desired PTMs. Using myelin basic protein (MBP) as a model we have developed a method for phosphoprotein detection by SRM. The method is based on obtaining of phosphoproteins in a reconstituted kinase system and following usage these phosphorylated protein as a template for the development of the SRM method. The developed method was successfully applied for detection of phosphopeptides of myelin basic protein in the samples of human brain glioma.

  1. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth.

  2. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth. PMID:24984624

  3. Altered Proteins in the Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Elobeid, Adila; Libard, Sylwia; Leino, Marina; Popova, Svetlana N.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of common altered brain proteins in 296 cognitively unimpaired subjects ranging from age 50 to 102 years. The incidence and the stage of hyperphosphorylated-τ (HPτ), β-amyloid, α-synuclein (αS), and transactive response DNA (TDP) binding protein 43 (TDP43)-immunoreactivity (-IR) increased with age. HPτ-IR was observed in 98% of the subjects; the locus coeruleus was solely affected in 46%, and 79% of the subjects were in Braak stages a to II. β-Amyloid was seen in 47% of subjects and the Thal phase correlated with the HPτ Braak stage and age. Intermediate Alzheimer disease-related pathology (ADRP) was seen in 12%; 52% of the subjects with HPτ-IR fulfilled criteria for definite primary age-related tauopathy (PART). The incidence of concomitant pathology (αS, TDP43) did not differ between those with PART and those with ADRP but the former were younger. TDP43-IR was observed in 36%; the most frequently affected region was the medulla; αS-IR was observed in 19% of subjects. In 41% of the subjects from 80 to 89 years at death, 3 altered proteins were seen in the brain. Thus, altered proteins are common in the brains of cognitively unimpaired aged subjects; this should be considered while developing diagnostic biomarkers, particularly for identifying subjects at early stages of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26979082

  4. Altered Proteins in the Aging Brain.

    PubMed

    Elobeid, Adila; Libard, Sylwia; Leino, Marina; Popova, Svetlana N; Alafuzoff, Irina

    2016-04-01

    We assessed the prevalence of common altered brain proteins in 296 cognitively unimpaired subjects ranging from age 50 to 102 years. The incidence and the stage of hyperphosphorylated-τ (HPτ), β-amyloid, α-synuclein (αS), and transactive response DNA (TDP) binding protein 43 (TDP43)-immunoreactivity (-IR) increased with age. HPτ-IR was observed in 98% of the subjects; the locus coeruleus was solely affected in 46%, and 79% of the subjects were in Braak stages a to II. β-Amyloid was seen in 47% of subjects and the Thal phase correlated with the HPτ Braak stage and age. Intermediate Alzheimer disease-related pathology (ADRP) was seen in 12%; 52% of the subjects with HPτ-IR fulfilled criteria for definite primary age-related tauopathy (PART). The incidence of concomitant pathology (αS, TDP43) did not differ between those with PART and those with ADRP but the former were younger. TDP43-IR was observed in 36%; the most frequently affected region was the medulla; αS-IR was observed in 19% of subjects. In 41% of the subjects from 80 to 89 years at death, 3 altered proteins were seen in the brain. Thus, altered proteins are common in the brains of cognitively unimpaired aged subjects; this should be considered while developing diagnostic biomarkers, particularly for identifying subjects at early stages of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26979082

  5. Preventing Phosphorylation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a by MAP-Kinases Protects Mice from Fatty Liver and Visceral Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jutta; Kremer, Lorena; Jacob, Sylvia; Hartwig, Sonja; Nitzgen, Ulrike; Muller–Wieland, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a plays a pivotal role in lipid metabolism. Using the SREBP-1a expressing human hepatoma cell line HepG2 we have shown previously that human SREBP-1a is phosphorylated at serine 117 by ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Using a combination of cell biology and protein chemistry approach we show that SREBP-1a is also target of other MAPK-families, i.e. c-JUN N-terminal protein kinases (JNK) or p38 stress activated MAP kinases. Serine 117 is also the major phosphorylation site in SREBP-1a for JNK. In contrast to that the major phosphorylation sites of p38 MAPK family are serine 63 and threonine 426. Functional analyses reveal that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a does not alter protein/DNA interaction. The identified phosphorylation sites are specific for both kinase families also in cellular context. To provide direct evidence that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a is a regulatory principle of biological and clinical relevance, we generated transgenic mice expressing mature transcriptionally active N-terminal domain of human SREBP–1a variant lacking all identified phosphorylaton sites designed as alb-SREBP-1aΔP and wild type SREBP-1a designed as alb-SREBP-1a liver specific under control of the albumin promoter and a liver specific enhancer. In contrast to alb-SREBP–1a mice the phosphorylation–deficient mice develop no enlarged fatty livers under normocaloric conditions. Phenotypical examination reveales a massive accumulation of adipose tissue in alb-SREBP-1a but not in the phosphorylation deficient alb-SREBP-1aΔP mice. Moreover, preventing phosphorylation of SREBP-1a protects mice also from dyslipidemia. In conclusion, phosphorylation of SREBP-1a by ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK-families resembles a biological principle and plays a significant role, in vivo. PMID:22384276

  6. Age- and brain region-dependent α-synuclein oligomerization is attributed to alterations in intrinsic enzymes regulating α-synuclein phosphorylation in aging monkey brains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Yang, Weiwei; Li, Xin; Li, Xuran; Wang, Peng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Hui; Chan, Piu; Yu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the levels of α-syn oligomers, which play pivotal pathogenic roles in age-related Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, increase heterogeneously in the aging brain. Here, we show that exogenous α-syn incubated with brain extracts from older cynomolgus monkeys and in Lewy body pathology (LBP)-susceptible brain regions (striatum and hippocampus) forms higher amounts of phosphorylated and oligomeric α-syn than that in extracts from younger monkeys and LBP-insusceptible brain regions (cerebellum and occipital cortex). The increased α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization in the brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions were associated with higher levels of polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2), an enzyme promoting α-syn phosphorylation, and lower activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an enzyme inhibiting α-syn phosphorylation, in these brain extracts. Further, the extent of the age- and brain-dependent increase in α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization was reduced by inhibition of PLK2 and activation of PP2A. Inversely, phosphorylated α-syn oligomers reduced the activity of PP2A and showed potent cytotoxicity. In addition, the activity of GCase and the levels of ceramide, a product of GCase shown to activate PP2A, were lower in brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions. Our results suggest a role for altered intrinsic metabolic enzymes in age- and brain region-dependent α-syn oligomerization in aging brains. PMID:27032368

  7. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  8. Correlation between persistent forms of zeaxanthin-dependent energy dissipation and thylakoid protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ebbert, V; Demmig-Adams, B; Adams, W W; Mueh, K E; Staehelin, L A

    2001-01-01

    High light stress induced not only a sustained form of xanthophyll cycle-dependent energy dissipation but also sustained thylakoid protein phosphorylation. The effect of protein phosphatase inhibitors (fluoride and molybdate ions) on recovery from a 1-h exposure to a high PFD was examined in leaf discs of Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper). Inhibition of protein dephosphorylation induced zeaxanthin retention and sustained energy dissipation (NPQ) upon return to low PFD for recovery, but had no significant effects on pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics under high light exposure. In addition, whole plants of Monstera deliciosa and spinach grown at low to moderate PFDs were transferred to high PFDs, and thylakoid protein phosphorylation pattern (assessed with anti-phosphothreonine antibody) as well as pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics were examined over several days. A correlation was obtained between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and dark-sustained zeaxanthin retention and maintenance of PS II in a state primed for energy dissipation in both species. The degree of these dark-sustained phenomena was more pronounced in M. deliciosa compared with spinach. Moreover, M. deliciosa but not spinach plants showed unusual phosphorylation patterns of Lhcb proteins with pronounced dark-sustained Lhcb phosphorylation even under low PFD growth conditions. Subsequent to the transfer to a high PFD, dark-sustained Lhcb protein phosphorylation was further enhanced. Thus, phosphorylation patterns of D1/D2 and Lhcb proteins differed from each other as well as among plant species. The results presented here suggest an association between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and sustained retention of zeaxanthin and energy dissipation (NPQ) in light-stressed, and particularly 'photoinhibited', leaves. Functional implications of these observations are discussed.

  9. Bioactives from Artemisia dracunculus L. Enhance Insulin Sensitivity via Modulation of Skeletal Muscle Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kheterpal, Indu; Scherp, Peter; Kelley, Lauren; Wang, Zhong; Johnson, William; Ribnicky, David; Cefalu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    A botanical extract from Artemisia dracunculus L., termed PMI 5011, has been shown previously to improve insulin sensitivity by increasing cellular insulin signaling in in vitro and in vivo studies. These studies suggest that PMI 5011 effects changes in phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in insulin signaling. To explore effects of this promising botanical extract on the human skeletal muscle phosphoproteome, changes in site-specific protein phosphorylation levels in primary skeletal muscle cultures from obese, insulin resistant individuals were evaluated with and without insulin stimulation. Insulin resistance is a condition in which a normal or elevated insulin level results in an abnormal biologic response, e.g., glucose uptake. Using isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ™) followed by phosphopeptide enrichment and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry, 125 unique phosphopeptides and 159 unique phosphorylation sites from 80 unique proteins were identified and quantified. Insulin stimulation of primary cultured muscle cells from insulin resistant individuals resulted in minimal increase in phosphorylation, demonstrating impaired insulin action in this condition. Treatment with PMI 5011 resulted in significant up regulation of 35 phosphopeptides that were mapped to proteins participating in the regulation of transcription, translation, actin cytoskeleton signaling, caveolae translocation and GLUT4 transport. These data further showed that PMI 5011 increased phosphorylation levels of specific amino acids in proteins in the insulin resistant state that are normally phosphorylated by insulin (thus, increasing cellular insulin signaling) and PMI 5011 also increased the abundance of phosphorylation sites of proteins regulating anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, the phosphoproteomics analysis demonstrated conclusively that PMI 5011 effects changes in phosphorylation levels of proteins and identified novel pathways by which

  10. Insulin rapidly stimulates phosphorylation of a 46-kDa membrane protein on tyrosine residues as well as phosphorylation of several soluble proteins in intact fat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Häring, H U; White, M F; Machicao, F; Ermel, B; Schleicher, E; Obermaier, B

    1987-01-01

    It is speculated that the transmission of an insulin signal across the plasma membrane of cells occurs through activation of the tyrosine-specific receptor kinase, autophosphorylation of the receptor, and subsequent phosphorylation of unidentified substrates in the cell. In an attempt to identify possible substrates, we labeled intact rat fat cells with [32P]orthophosphate and used an antiphosphotyrosine antibody to identify proteins that become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in an insulin-stimulated way. In the membrane fraction of the fat cells, we found, in addition to the 95-kDa beta-subunit of the receptor, a 46-kDa phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated exclusively on tyrosine residues. This protein is not immunoprecipitated by antibodies against different regions of the insulin receptor and its HPLC tryptic peptide map is different from the tryptic peptide map of the insulin receptor, suggesting that it is not derived from the receptor beta-subunit. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 46-kDa protein within 150 sec in the intact cell 3- to 4-fold in a dose-dependent way at insulin concentrations between 0.5 nM and 100 nM. The insulin effect starts after 30 sec, is maximal at 150 sec, and declines to almost basal values by 5 min. Furthermore, the antiphosphotyrosine antibody precipitated at least five proteins in the soluble fraction of the fat cell. Insulin (0.5 nM, 100 nM) stimulated within 2 min the 32P incorporation into a 116-kDa band, a 62-kDa band, and three bands between 45 kDa and 50 kDa 2- to 10-fold. We suggest that the 46-kDa membrane protein and possibly also the soluble proteins are endogenous substrates of the receptor tyrosine kinase in fat cells and that their phosphorylation is an early step in insulin signal transmission. Images PMID:3540953

  11. Cdk5/p35 phosphorylates lemur tyrosine kinase-2 to regulate protein phosphatase-1C phosphorylation and activity.

    PubMed

    Manser, Catherine; Vagnoni, Alessio; Guillot, Florence; Davies, Jennifer; Miller, Christopher C J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5)/p35 and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) are two major enzymes that control a variety of physiological processes within the nervous system including neuronal differentiation, synaptic plasticity and axonal transport. Defective cdk5/p35 and PP1 function are also implicated in several major human neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5/p35 and the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1C) both bind to the brain-enriched, serine-threonine kinase lemur tyrosine kinase-2 (LMTK2). Moreover, LMTK2 phosphorylates PP1C on threonine-320 (PP1Cthr³²⁰) to inhibit its activity. Here, we demonstrate that LMTK2 is phosphorylated on serine-1418 (LMTK2ser¹⁴¹⁸) by cdk5/p35 and present evidence that this regulates its ability to phosphorylate PP1Cthr³²⁰. We thus describe a new signalling pathway within the nervous system that links cdk5/p35 with PP1C and which has implications for a number of neuronal functions and neuronal dysfunction.

  12. Protein kinase C directly phosphorylates the insulin receptor in vitro and reduces its protein-tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bollag, G E; Roth, R A; Beaudoin, J; Mochly-Rosen, D; Koshland, D E

    1986-01-01

    The beta subunit of purified insulin receptor is phosphorylated on a serine residue by purified preparations of protein kinase C (ATP: protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37). This phosphorylation is inhibited by antibodies to protein kinase C and stimulated by phospholipids, diacylglycerol, and Ca2+. The phosphorylation of the receptor by protein kinase C does not affect its insulin-binding activity but does inhibit by 65% the receptor's intrinsic tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity (ATP: protein-tyrosine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.112). These results indicate that activators of protein kinase C, such as phorbol esters, desensitize cells to insulin by direct protein kinase C action on the insulin receptor. Images PMID:3526339

  13. In vitro protein phosphorylation in head preparations from normal and mutant Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, J D; Dudai, Y

    1987-10-01

    We have characterized protein phosphorylation in vitro in subcellular fractions from Drosophila melanogaster heads. Optimal conditions for the incorporation of 32P into proteins, and its dependence on ATP, divalent cations, and cyclic nucleotides have been determined, as well as the effect of inhibitors of ATPase, protein phosphatase, and protein kinase on protein phosphorylation. Among these inhibitors, Zn2+ was found to affect the incorporation of 32P into specific bands and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate was found to be most suited for freezing the activity of both kinases and phosphatases. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-dPK) activity was present in both supernatant (S2) and particulate (P2) fractions, with the majority (60-85%, depending on the homogenization medium) being associated with S2, as determined by phosphorylation of exogenous synapsin I. cAMP-dPK catalyzed the phosphorylation of at least 18 endogenous polypeptides in S2 and at least 10 endogenous polypeptides in P2. These proteins could be classified on the basis of the extent of stimulation of phosphorylation by cyclic nucleotides, dependence on cyclic nucleotide concentration, and rate of phosphorylation. A phosphoprotein of 51 kilodaltons (pp51) was a major component of the S2 and P2 fractions and displayed properties expected from the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dPK, R-II. A phosphoprotein doublet of approximately 37 kilodaltons (pp37) was stimulated to the largest extent by cAMP in the P2 and S2 fractions. The phosphorylation of several proteins in both fractions was significantly lowered by the mammalian Walsh inhibitor of cAMP-dPK, whereas in some cases the stimulation of phosphorylation of the same proteins by exogeneous cAMP was relatively small. Phosphoproteins from two learning mutants known to be deficient in cAMP metabolism, dnc and rut, were analyzed for their extent of phosphorylation in the presence of a stable cAMP analogue; no significant differences from normal were

  14. Propofol reduced myocardial contraction of vertebrates partly by mediating the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xinyu; Bo, Qiyu; Meng, Tao; Lei, Zhen; Li, Jingxin; Hou, Yonghao; Yu, Xiaoqian; Yu, Jingui

    2016-07-15

    Propofol inhibits myocardial contraction in a dose dependent manner. The present study is designed to examine the effect of propofol on PKA mediated myocardial contraction in the absence of adrenoreceptor agonist. The contraction of isolated rat heart was measured in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using a pressure transducer. The levels of cAMP and PKA kinase activity were detected by ELISA. The mRNA and total protein or phosphorylation level of PKA and downstream proteins were tested in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using RT-PCR, QPCR and western blotting. The phosphorylation level of PKA was examined thoroughly using immunofluorescence and PKA activity non-radioactive detection kit. Propofol induced a dose-dependent negative contractile response on the rat heart. The inhibitory effect of high concentration propofol (50μM) with 45% decease of control could be partly reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89 (10μM) and the depressant effect of propofol decreased from 45% to 10%. PKA kinase activity was inhibited by propofol in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol also induced a decrease in phosphorylation of PKA, which was also inhibited by H89, but did not alter the production of cAMP and the mRNA levels of PKA. The downstream proteins of PKA, PLN and RyR2 were phosphorylated to a lesser extent with propofol or H89 than control. These results demonstrated that propofol induced a negative myocardial contractile response partly by mediating the PKA phosphorylation pathway. PMID:27495954

  15. Remodeled Respiration in ndufs4 with Low Phosphorylation Efficiency Suppresses Arabidopsis Germination and Growth and Alters Control of Metabolism at Night1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Etienne H.; Tomaz, Tiago; Carroll, Adam J.; Estavillo, Gonzalo; Delannoy, Etienne; Tanz, Sandra K.; Small, Ian D.; Pogson, Barry J.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory oxidative phosphorylation is a cornerstone of cellular metabolism in aerobic multicellular organisms. The efficiency of this process is generally assumed to be maximized, but the presence of dynamically regulated nonphosphorylating bypasses implies that plants can alter phosphorylation efficiency and can benefit from lowered energy generation during respiration under certain conditions. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ndufs4 (for NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] fragment S subunit 4), lacking complex I of the respiratory chain, which has constitutively lowered phosphorylation efficiency. Through analysis of the changes to mitochondrial function as well as whole cell transcripts and metabolites, we provide insights into how cellular metabolism flexibly adapts to reduced phosphorylation efficiency and why this state may benefit the plant by providing moderate stress tolerance. We show that removal of the single protein subunit NDUFS4 prevents assembly of complex I and removes its function from mitochondria without pleiotropic effects on other respiratory components. However, the lack of complex I promotes broad changes in the nuclear transcriptome governing growth and photosynthetic function. We observed increases in organic acid and amino acid pools in the mutant, especially at night, concomitant with alteration of the adenylate content. While germination is delayed, this can be rescued by application of gibberellic acid, and root growth assays of seedlings show enhanced tolerance to cold, mild salt, and osmotic stress. We discuss these observations in the light of recent data on the knockout of nonphosphorylating respiratory bypass enzymes that show opposite changes in metabolites and stress sensitivity. Our data suggest that the absence of complex I alters the adenylate control of cellular metabolism. PMID:19675153

  16. Effects of anti-Alzheimer drugs on phosphorylation and assembly of microtubules from brain microtubular proteins.

    PubMed

    Shevtsov, P N; Shevtsova, E F; Burbaeva, G Sh; Bachurin, S O

    2014-04-01

    We studied the effects of anti-Alzheimer drugs (tacrine, amiridine, and memantine) on phosphorylation of tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins isolated from rat brain, evaluated the capacity of these proteins to polymerize into microtubules after addition of study pharmacological agents, and analyzed the structure of generated microtubules. It was shown that test substances impair assembly of microtubules to a different extent. Dose-dependent effects of these agents on phosphorylation of tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins were observed. Triazolam (not approved for clinical use as anti-Alzheimer drug) in the same concentrations was used as the reference substance in the same tests. It was observed that this substance even in minimal concentration induced the most pronounced changes in microtubule structure. A direct correlation between the capacity of the test substances to modulate tubulin phosphorylation and to impair microtubule structure was found: the more the substance inhibited tubulin phosphorylation, the more it disordered microtubule structure.

  17. Novel type of phorbol ester-dependent protein phosphorylation in the particulate fraction of mouse epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwendt, M.; Kittstein, W.; Marks, F.

    1986-06-13

    In a Triton X100-extract from the particulate fraction of mouse epidermis but also of other murine tissues, the phosphorylation of a protein with the relative molecular mass of 82,000 (p82) is found to be dependent on phosphatidyl serine and the tumor promoting phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Unlike protein kinase C-catalyzed phosphorylation, p82 phosphorylation is neither observed in the presence of high concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidyl serine alone nor after addition of exogenous protein kinase C. Dioctanoylglycerol and the incomplete promoter 12-O-retinoylphorbol-13-acetate are also capable of stimulating p82 phosphorylation, whereas the non-promoting phorbol ester 4-O-methyl-TPA is at least 100-fold less active in this respect.

  18. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity of CD45 is activated by sequential phosphorylation by two kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1994-01-01

    We describe a potential regulatory mechanism for the transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Phosphorylation on both tyrosine and serine residues in vitro results in an activation of CD45 specifically toward one artificial substrate but not another. The activation of these kinases appears to be order dependent, as it is enhanced when phosphorylation of tyrosine precedes that of serine but phosphorylation in the reverse order yields no activation. Any of four protein-tyrosine kinases tested, in combination with the protein-serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II, was capable of mediating this activation in vitro. The time course of phosphorylation of CD45 in response to T-cell activation is consistent with the possibility that this regulatory mechanism is utilized in vivo. Images PMID:7518565

  19. Synaptic protein alterations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Ilse S; Burn, David; Morris, Christopher; Dexter, David

    2012-02-01

    Alterations occur within distal neuronal compartments, including axons and synapses, during the course of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). These changes could hold important implications for the functioning of neural networks, especially since research studies have shown a loss of dendritic spines locating to medium spiny projection neurons and impaired axonal transport in PD-affected brains. However, despite ever-increasing awareness of the vulnerability of synapses and axons, inadequate understanding of the independent mechanisms regulating non-somatic neurodegeneration prevails. This has resulted in limited therapeutic strategies capable of targeting these distinct cellular compartments. Deregulated protein synthesis, folding and degrading proteins, and protein quality-control systems have repeatedly been linked with morphological and functional alterations of synapses in the PD-affected brains. Here, we review current understanding concerning the proteins involved in structural and functional changes that affect synaptic contact-points in PD. The collection of studies discussed emphasizes the need for developing therapeutics aimed at deregulated protein synthesis and degradation pathways operating at axonal and dendritic synapses for preserving "normal" circuitry and function, for as long as possible.

  20. Evidence for the phosphorylation of serine259 of histone deacetylase 5 by protein kinase Cδ.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Q Khai

    2011-02-15

    Signaling via pro-growth G protein coupled receptors triggers phosphorylation of HDAC5 on two serine residues (Ser₂₅₉ and Ser₄₉₈), resulting in nuclear export of HDAC5 and de-repression of downstream target genes. In the previous paper we reported the important role of PKD isozymes in the regulation of HDAC5 by phosphorylating Ser₄₉₈ of HDAC5 [Q.K. Huynh, T.A. Mckinsey, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 450 (2006) 141-148]. In the present paper, we provide evidence that PKCδ can directly phosphorylate Ser₂₅₉ of HDAC5. The evidence is based on the following facts (a) isolated kinase fraction from human failing heart tissues contained PKCδ that phosphorylated HDAC5 Ser₂₅₉ peptide and no significant activity was found for the unbound fraction after they were immunoprecipitated with PKCδ specific antibody; (b) specific inhibitors for PKCδ inhibited kinase activity from isolated fraction and recombinant human PKCδ with similar IC₅₀ values; (c) recombinant human PKCδ can directly phosphorylate full length Ser₂₅₉ HDAC5 protein and HDAC5 Ser₂₅₉ peptide. The results suggest that in addition to activation of protein kinase D isozymes by phosphorylating Ser₇₄₄ and Ser₇₄₈ at their activation sites, PKCδ may also play a role in the regulation of HDAC5 by phosphorylation of Ser₂₅₉. PMID:21146494

  1. DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of the human telomere-associated protein TRF2

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromi; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bradshaw, Paul S.; Hoelz, Derek J.; Malkas, Linda H.; Meyn, M. Stephen; Gilley, David

    2005-01-01

    Several protein kinases from diverse eukaryotes known to perform important roles in DNA repair have also been shown to play critical roles in telomere maintenance. Here, we report that the human telomere-associated protein TRF2 is rapidly phosphorylated in response to DNA damage. We find that the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is not bound to telomeric DNA, as is the ground form of TRF2, and is rapidly localized to damage sites. Our results suggest that the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein kinase signal-transduction pathway is primarily responsible for the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of TRF2. Unlike DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of other ATM targets, the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is transient, being detected rapidly at DNA damage sites postirradiation, but largely dissipated by 2 hours. In addition, we report that the phosphorylated form of TRF2 is present at telomeres in cell types undergoing telomere-based crisis and a recombination-driven, telomerase-independent, alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway, likely as a consequence of a telomere-based DNA damage response. Our results link the induction of TRF2 phosphorylation to the DNA damage-response system, providing an example of direct cross-talk via a signaling pathway between these two major cellular processes essential for genomic stability, telomere maintenance, and DNA repair. PMID:16223874

  2. Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on sperm capacitation and protein phosphorylation of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Lilian; Bussalleu, Eva; Yeste, Marc; Bonet, Sergi

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have reported the detrimental effects that bacteriospermia causes on boar sperm quality, but little is known about its effects on IVC. Considering that, the present study sought to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on different indicators of capacitation status (sperm viability, membrane lipid disorder, sperm motility kinematics, and protein phosphorylation of boar spermatozoa) after IVC. Flow cytometry and computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA) revealed that the presence of P aeruginosa in boar sperm samples, mostly at concentrations greater than 10(6) CFU/mL, is associated with a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the percentages of both sperm membrane integrity and sperm with low membrane lipid disorder, and also with a reduction in sperm motility kinetic parameters when compared with results obtained from the control sample, which presented the typical motility pattern of capacitated-like boar spermatozoa. Moreover, Western blot results also showed significant (P < 0.05) changes in the levels of tyrosine, serine, and threonine protein phosphorylation because of bacterial contamination, the decrease in phosphotyrosine levels of p32, a well-known marker of IVC achievement in boar sperm, being the most relevant. Indeed, after 3 hours of IVC, phosphotyrosine levels of p32 in the control sample were 3.13 ± 0.81, whereas in the tubes with 10(6) and 10(8) CFU/mL were 1.05 ± 0.20 and 0.36 ± 0.07, respectively. Therefore, the present study provides novel data regarding the effects of bacterial contamination on boar sperm, suggesting that the presence of P aeruginosa affects the fertilizing ability of boar sperm by altering its ability to accomplish IVC.

  3. Protein kinase D negatively regulates hepatitis C virus secretion through phosphorylation of oxysterol-binding protein and ceramide transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Amako, Yutaka; Syed, Gulam H; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2011-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replicates its genome on specialized endoplasmic reticulum modified membranes termed membranous web and utilizes lipid droplets for initiating the viral nucleocapsid assembly. HCV maturation and/or the egress pathway requires host sphingolipid synthesis, which occur in the Golgi. Ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) play a crucial role in sphingolipid biosynthesis. Protein kinase D (PKD), a serine/threonine kinase, is recruited to the trans-Golgi network where it influences vesicular trafficking to the plasma membrane by regulation of several important mediators via phosphorylation. PKD attenuates the function of both CERT and OSBP by phosphorylation at their respective Ser(132) and Ser(240) residues (phosphorylation inhibition). Here, we investigated the functional role of PKD in HCV secretion. Our studies show that HCV gene expression down-regulated PKD activation. PKD depletion by shRNA or inhibition by pharmacological inhibitor Gö6976 enhanced HCV secretion. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of PKD suppressed HCV secretion. The suppression by PKD was subverted by the ectopic expression of nonphosphorylatable serine mutant CERT S132A or OSBP S240A. These observations imply that PKD negatively regulates HCV secretion/release by attenuating OSBP and CERT functions by phosphorylation inhibition. This study identifies the key role of the Golgi components in the HCV maturation process. PMID:21285358

  4. Phosphorylation and nitration levels of photosynthetic proteins are conversely regulated by light stress.

    PubMed

    Galetskiy, Dmitry; Lohscheider, Jens N; Kononikhin, Alexey S; Popov, Igor A; Nikolaev, Eugene N; Adamska, Iwona

    2011-11-01

    Using a label-free mass spectrometric approach, we investigated light-induced changes in the distribution of phosphorylated and nitrated proteins within subpopulations of native photosynthetic complexes in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves adapted to growth light (GL) and subsequently exposed to high light (HL). Eight protein phosphorylation sites were identified in photosystem II (PSII) and the phosphorylation level of seven was regulated by HL as determined based on peak areas from ion chromatograms of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides. Although the phosphorylation of PSII proteins was reported in the past, we demonstrated for the first time that two minor antenna LHCB4 isoforms are alternately phosphorylated under GL and HL conditions in PSII monomers, dimers and supercomplexes. A role of LHCB4 phosphorylation in state transition and monomerization of PSII under HL conditions is proposed. We determined changes in the nitration level of 23 tyrosine residues in five photosystem I (PSI) and nine PSII proteins and demonstrated for the majority of them a lower nitration level in PSI and PSII complexes and supercomplexes under HL conditions, as compared to GL. In contrast, the nitration level significantly increased in assembled/disassembled PSI and PSII subcomplexes under HL conditions. A possible role of nitration in (1) monomerization of LHCB1-3 trimers under HL conditions (2) binding properties of ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase to photosystem I, and (3) PSII photodamage and repair cycle, is discussed. Based on these data, we propose that the conversely regulated phosphorylation and nitration levels regulate the stability and turnover of photosynthetic complexes under HL conditions.

  5. The viral transactivator HBx protein exhibits a high potential for regulation via phosphorylation through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) encodes an oncogenic factor, HBx, which is a multifunctional protein that can induce dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways, transcription, and cell cycle progression, among other processes, through interactions with target host factors. The subcellular localization of HBx is both cytoplasmic and nuclear. This dynamic distribution of HBx could be essential to the multiple roles of the protein at different stages during HBV infection. Transactivational functions of HBx may be exerted both in the nucleus, via interaction with host DNA-binding proteins, and in the cytoplasm, via signaling pathways. Although there have been many studies describing different pathways altered by HBx, and its innumerable binding partners, the molecular mechanism that regulates its different roles has been difficult to elucidate. Methods In the current study, we took a bioinformatics approach to investigate whether the viral protein HBx might be regulated via phosphorylation by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Results We found that the phylogenetically conserved residues Ser25 and Ser41 (both within the negative regulatory domain), and Thr81 (in the transactivation domain) are predicted to be phosphorylated. By molecular 3D modeling of HBx, we further show these residues are all predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein, making them easily accesible to these types of modifications. Furthermore, we have also identified Yin Yang sites that might have the potential to be phosphorylated and O-β-GlcNAc interplay at the same residues. Conclusions Thus, we propose that the different roles of HBx displayed in different subcellular locations might be regulated by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranslational modification, via phosphorylation. PMID:23079056

  6. Protein phosphorylation and prevention of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by ATP: coupled mechanisms of energy metabolism regulation.

    PubMed

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Gatti, Domenico L; Bai, Yidong; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-06-01

    Rapid regulation of oxidative phosphorylation is crucial for mitochondrial adaptation to swift changes in fuels availability and energy demands. An intramitochondrial signaling pathway regulates cytochrome oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, through reversible phosphorylation. We find that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of a COX subunit dictates mammalian mitochondrial energy fluxes and identify the specific residue (S58) of COX subunit IV-1 (COXIV-1) that is involved in this mechanism of metabolic regulation. Using protein mutagenesis, molecular dynamics simulations, and induced fit docking, we show that mitochondrial energy metabolism regulation by phosphorylation of COXIV-1 is coupled with prevention of COX allosteric inhibition by ATP. This regulatory mechanism is essential for efficient oxidative metabolism and cell survival. We propose that S58 COXIV-1 phosphorylation has evolved as a metabolic switch that allows mammalian mitochondria to rapidly toggle between energy utilization and energy storage.

  7. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  8. Phosphorylation of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter by protein kinase C: localization of the site of in vivo and in vitro phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deziel, M R; Lippes, H A; Rampal, A L; Jung, C Y

    1989-01-01

    1. The human erythrocyte glucose transporter was phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C. 2. Tryptic cleavage of phosphorylated native transporter produced two major unphosphorylated membrane-embedded fragments weighing 23 and 19 kDa and released numerous water-soluble peptides. 3. Ion-exchange FPLC of the soluble tryptic peptides resolved the mixture into two phosphopeptide peaks. 4. Tryptic digestion of glucose transporter that was phosphorylated in vivo in response to phorbol esters produced soluble phosphopeptides that eluted at identical salt concentrations. 5. Proteolytic digestion and peptide mapping of the transporter revealed that the site(s) of phosphorylation lie within the large cytoplasmic domain that bisects the molecule.

  9. Protein supplements: do they alter dietary intakes?

    PubMed

    Mallard, Alistair R; McLay-Cooke, Rebecca T; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2014-06-01

    Effects of protein versus mixed macronutrient supplementation on total energy intake (TEI) and protein intake during an ad libitum diet were examined. Trained males undertook two, 2-week dietary interventions which were randomized, double blinded, and separated by 2 weeks. These were high-protein supplementation (HP: 1034.5 kJ energy, 29.6 g protein, 8.7 g fat and 12.3 g CHO) and standard meal supplementation (SM: 1039 kJ energy, 9.9 g protein, 9.5 g fat, and 29.4 g CHO) consumed daily following a week of baseline measures. Eighteen participants finished both interventions and one only completed HP. TEI (mean ± SD) was not different between baseline (11148 ± 3347 kJ) and HP (10705 ± 3143 kJ) nor between baseline and SM (12381 ± 3877 kJ), however, TEI was greater with SM than HP (923 ± 4015 kJ p = .043). Protein intake (%TEI) was greater with HP (22.4 ± 6.2%) than baseline (19.4 ± 5.4%; p = .008) but not SM (20.0 ± 5.0%). No differences in absolute daily protein intake were found. Absolute CHO intake was greater with SM than HP (52.0 ± 89.5 g, p = .006). No differences in fat intake were found. Body mass did not change between baseline (82.7 ± 11.2 kg) and either HP (83.1 ± 11.7 kg) or SM (82.9 ± 11.0 kg). Protein supplementation increases the relative proportion of protein in the diet, but doesn't increase the absolute amount of total protein or energy consumed. Thus some compensation by a reduction in other foods occurs. This is in contrast to a mixed nutrient supplement, which does not alter the proportion of protein consumed but does increase TEI.

  10. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  11. Phosphorylation drives a dynamic switch in serine/arginine-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shengqi; Gapsys, Vytautas; Kim, Hai-Young; Bessonov, Sergey; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Möhlmann, Sina; Klaukien, Volker; Ficner, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; de Groot, Bert; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important players in RNA metabolism and are extensively phosphorylated at serine residues in RS repeats. Here, we show that phosphorylation switches the RS domain of the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 from a fully disordered state to a partially rigidified arch-like structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the conformational switch is restricted to RS repeats, critically depends on the phosphate charge state and strongly decreases the conformational entropy of RS domains. The dynamic switch also occurs in the 100 kDa SR-related protein hPrp28, for which phosphorylation at the RS repeat is required for spliceosome assembly. Thus, a phosphorylation-induced dynamic switch is common to the class of serine/arginine-rich proteins and provides a molecular basis for the functional redundancy of serine/arginine-rich proteins and the profound influence of RS domain phosphorylation on protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. PMID:24183573

  12. Regulation and Function of Phosphorylation on VP8, the Major Tegument Protein of Bovine Herpesvirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Afroz, Sharmin; Brownlie, Robert; Snider, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major tegument protein of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), VP8, is essential for virus replication in cattle. VP8 is phosphorylated in vitro by casein kinase 2 (CK2) and BoHV-1 unique short protein 3 (US3). In this study, VP8 was found to be phosphorylated in both transfected and infected cells but was detected as a nonphosphorylated form in mature virions. This suggests that phosphorylation of VP8 is strictly controlled during different stages of the viral life cycle. The regulation and function of VP8 phosphorylation by US3 and CK2 were further analyzed. An in vitro kinase assay, site-directed mutagenesis, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to identify the active sites for US3 and CK2. The two kinases phosphorylate VP8 at different sites, resulting in distinct phosphopeptide patterns. S16 is a primary phosphoreceptor for US3, and it subsequently triggers phosphorylation at S32. CK2 has multiple active sites, among which T107 appears to be the preferred residue. Additionally, CK2 consensus motifs in the N terminus of VP8 are essential for phosphorylation. Based on these results, a nonphosphorylated VP8 mutant was constructed and used for further studies. In transfected cells phosphorylation was not required for nuclear localization of VP8. Phosphorylated VP8 appeared to recruit promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein and to remodel the distribution of PML in the nucleus; however, PML protein did not show an association with nonphosphorylated VP8. This suggests that VP8 plays a role in resisting PML-related host antiviral defenses by redistributing PML protein and that this function depends on the phosphorylation of VP8. IMPORTANCE The progression of VP8 phosphorylation over time and its function in BoHV-1 replication have not been characterized. This study demonstrates that activation of S16 initiates further phosphorylation at S32 by US3. Additionally, VP8 is phosphorylated by CK2 at several residues, with T107 having the highest level

  13. Serum Protein Profile Alterations in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G A; Davies, R W; Choi, M W; Perkins, J; Turteltaub, K W; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Langlois, R G; Curzi, M P; Trebes, J E; Fitch, J P; Dalmasso, E A; Colston, B W; Ying, Y; Chromy, B A

    2003-11-18

    Background: Serum protein profiling patterns can reflect the pathological state of a patient and therefore may be useful for clinical diagnostics. Here, we present results from a pilot study of proteomic expression patterns in hemodialysis patients designed to evaluate the range of serum proteomic alterations in this population. Methods: Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOFMS) was used to analyze serum obtained from patients on periodic hemodialysis treatment and healthy controls. Serum samples from patients and controls were first fractionated into six eluants on a strong anion exchange column, followed by application to four array chemistries representing cation exchange, anion exchange, metal affinity and hydrophobic surfaces. A total of 144 SELDI-TOF-MS spectra were obtained from each serum sample. Results: The overall profiles of the patient and control samples were consistent and reproducible. However, 30 well-defined protein differences were observed; 15 proteins were elevated and 15 were decreased in patients compared to controls. Serum from one patient exhibited novel protein peaks suggesting possible additional changes due to a secondary disease process. Conclusion: SELDI-TOF-MS demonstrated dramatic serum protein profile differences between patients and controls. Similarity in protein profiles among dialysis patients suggests that patient physiological responses to end-stage renal disease and/or dialysis therapy have a major effect on serum protein profiles.

  14. Histamine stimulates calcium-mediated protein phosphorylation in a colonic epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Cohn, J A; Dougherty, N C; King, W F

    1989-12-15

    Protein phosphorylation responses in intact enterocytes were examined by stimulating 32Pi-labeled T84 cell monolayers with histamine and resolving proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Histamine increases 32P-incorporation into two acidic proteins of Mr 83,000 and of Mr 29,000, designated p83 and p29. Labeling of p83 and p29 is also increased in cells exposed to ionomycin, but not in cells exposed to vasoactive intestinal peptide under conditions resulting in cAMP-mediated secretion and cAMP-stimulated protein phosphorylation. When T84 cell fractions are incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, labeling of p83 is stimulated by Ca++, but not by cAMP. Thus, histamine stimulates Ca++-mediated protein phosphorylation during the regulation of Cl- secretion.

  15. Developmentally regulated phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of ribosomal proteins from maize embryonic axes

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, A.; Aguilar, R.; Sanchez-de-Jimenez, E.

    1990-05-01

    Previous work in our lab suggests translational control during maize germination. To test this possibility the present research focuses on the phosphorylated status of the ribosomal proteins of maize axes during germination. Ribosomes from embryonic axes incubated for different periods were in vitro or in vivo labeled by 1h-pulse for {sup 32}P orthophosphate. Electrophoretic analysis of the ribosomal proteins and autoradiographs revealed: (a) in vitro, several {sup 32}P bands and very similar patterns for all stages tested (0 to 24h); in vivo, less number of labeled bands and a changing pattern from 3 to 24h of incubation. A protein of 30,900 MW did not appear phosphorylated until 8h of incubation, while a 17,000 MW protein was strongly labeled at 3h and fastly dephosphorylated toward 24h. Phosphorylated proteins belong to both the small and the large subunits. The implication of this process will be discussed.

  16. Chromosomal Protein HMGN1 Modulates the Phosphorylation of Serine 1 in Histone H2A

    PubMed Central

    Postnikov, Yuri V.; Belova, Galina I.; Lim, Jae-Hwan; Bustin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that HMGN1, a nuclear protein that binds specifically to nucleosomes, modulates the level of histone H2A phosphorylation. In Hmgn1-/- cells, loss of HMGN1 elevates the steady-state levels of H2AS1ph throughout the cell cycle. In vitro, HMGN1 reduces the rate of Rsk2- and Msk1-mediated phosphorylation of nucleosomal, but not free, histone H2A. HMGN1 inhibits H2A phosphorylation by binding to nucleosomes since an HMGN mutant, which cannot bind to chromatin, does not inhibit the Rsk2- mediated H2A phosphorylation. HMGN2 also inhibits H2A phosphorylation, suggesting that the inhibition of H2A phosphorylation is not specific to only one member of this protein family. Thus, the present data add modifications of histone H2A to the list of histone modifications affected by HMGN proteins. It supports the suggestion that structural chromatin binding proteins can modify the whole profile of post-translational modifications of core histones. PMID:17154547

  17. Analysis of Phosphorylation of the Receptor-Like Protein Kinase HAESA during Arabidopsis Floral Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Isaiah; Wang, Ying; Seitz, Kati; Baer, John; Bennewitz, Stefan; Mooney, Brian P.; Walker, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) are the largest family of plant transmembrane signaling proteins. Here we present functional analysis of HAESA, an RLK that regulates floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis. Through in vitro and in vivo analysis of HAE phosphorylation, we provide evidence that a conserved phosphorylation site on a region of the HAE protein kinase domain known as the activation segment positively regulates HAE activity. Additional analysis has identified another putative activation segment phosphorylation site common to multiple RLKs that potentially modulates HAE activity. Comparative analysis suggests that phosphorylation of this second activation segment residue is an RLK specific adaptation that may regulate protein kinase activity and substrate specificity. A growing number of RLKs have been shown to exhibit biologically relevant dual specificity toward serine/threonine and tyrosine residues, but the mechanisms underlying dual specificity of RLKs are not well understood. We show that a phospho-mimetic mutant of both HAE activation segment residues exhibits enhanced tyrosine auto-phosphorylation in vitro, indicating phosphorylation of this residue may contribute to dual specificity of HAE. These results add to an emerging framework for understanding the mechanisms and evolution of regulation of RLK activity and substrate specificity. PMID:26784444

  18. Phosphorylation of human small heat shock protein HspB8 (Hsp22) by ERK1 protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Shemetov, Anton A; Seit-Nebi, Alim S; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2011-09-01

    A number of phosphomimicking mutants (replacement of Ser/Thr residues by Asp) of human small heat shock protein HspB8 were obtained and phosphorylation of the wild type HspB8 and its mutants by ERK1 kinase was analyzed in vitro. Mutation S159D does not affect phosphorylation, whereas mutations S24D and S27D equally moderately inhibited and mutation T87D strongly inhibited phosphorylation of HspB8. The double mutations S24D/T87D and S27D/T87D induced very strong inhibitory effect and the triple mutations S24D/S27D/T87D completely prevented phosphorylation catalyzed by ERK1. Thus, Ser24 and Thr87, found to be phosphorylated in vivo, are among the sites phosphorylated by ERK1 in HspB8 in vitro. Mutations S24D and T87D affect intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and susceptibility to chymotrypsinolysis of HspB8. Phosphomimicking mutations and phosphorylation promote concentration-dependent association of HspB8 subunits. Mutations S24D and S27D decrease, whereas mutation T87D increases the chaperone-like activity of HspB8. It is concluded that phosphorylation catalyzed by ERK1 might affect the structure and chaperone-like activity of HspB8 and therefore can be important for regulation of interaction of HspB8 with different target proteins.

  19. DNA-dependent protein phosphorylation activity in Xenopus is coupled to a Ku-like protein.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, J; Cameron, R S; Takeda, Y; Hardin, J A

    1997-10-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a nuclear enzyme and functions as a serine/threonine kinase that has been well characterized in both the human and the mouse. The regulatory subunit of DNA-PK is the Ku autoantigen. To demonstrate that a Ku-like protein is present in Xenopus oocytes, we used immunoprecipitation analysis with a monoclonal antibody raised against human Ku antigen and autoimmune serum containing anti-Ku antibodies. Metabolic labeling studies indicate that the Ku-like protein is synthesized mainly in late vitellogenic oocytes. By using a specific peptide substrate for DNA-PK, we demonstrate the activity of a DNA-dependent protein kinase in oocyte extracts. The kinase activity requires the Ku-like protein, since extracts depleted of Ku protein by immunoadsorption with human anti-Ku antibodies fail to demonstrate the DNA-dependent phosphorylation activity. The increased enzyme activity in vitellogenic oocytes may be correlated to the increased levels of Ku protein observed in these oocytes compared to the pre- and early vitellogenic oocytes.

  20. Protein kinase A alterations in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ragazzon, B; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J

    2012-09-01

    Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Since protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway, studies of the alterations of PKA subunits in endocrine tumors reveal new aspects of the mechanisms of cAMP pathway alterations in human diseases. So far, most alterations have been observed for the regulatory subunits, mainly PRKAR1A and to a lower extent, PRKAR2B. One of the best examples of such alteration today is the multiple neoplasia syndrome Carney complex (CNC). The most common endocrine gland manifestations of CNC are pituitary GH-secreting adenomas, thyroid tumors, testicular tumors, and ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) are observed in about two-third of CNC patients, and also in patients with isolated PPNAD. PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic endocrine tumors. More than 120 different PRKAR1A mutations have been found today. Most of them lead to an unstable mutant mRNA, which will be degraded by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. In vitro and in vivo functional studies are in progress to understand the mechanisms of endocrine tumor development due to PKA regulatory subunits inactivation. PRKAR1A mutations stimulate in most models PKA activity, mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. Cross-talks with other signaling pathways summarized in this review have been described and might participate in endocrine tumorigenesis. PMID:22752956

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  2. Identification and functional analysis of novel phosphorylation sites in the RNA surveillance protein Upf1

    PubMed Central

    Lasalde, Clarivel; Rivera, Andrea V.; León, Alfredo J.; González-Feliciano, José A.; Estrella, Luis A.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N.; Correa, María E.; Cajigas, Iván J.; Bracho, Dina P.; Vega, Irving E.; Wilkinson, Miles F.; González, Carlos I.

    2014-01-01

    One third of inherited genetic diseases are caused by mRNAs harboring premature termination codons as a result of nonsense mutations. These aberrant mRNAs are degraded by the Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) pathway. A central component of the NMD pathway is Upf1, an RNA-dependent ATPase and helicase. Upf1 is a known phosphorylated protein, but only portions of this large protein have been examined for phosphorylation sites and the functional relevance of its phosphorylation has not been elucidated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using tandem mass spectrometry analyses, we report the identification of 11 putative phosphorylated sites in S. cerevisiae Upf1. Five of these phosphorylated residues are located within the ATPase and helicase domains and are conserved in higher eukaryotes, suggesting a biological significance for their phosphorylation. Indeed, functional analysis demonstrated that a small carboxy-terminal motif harboring at least three phosphorylated amino acids is important for three Upf1 functions: ATPase activity, NMD activity and the ability to promote translation termination efficiency. We provide evidence that two tyrosines within this phospho-motif (Y-738 and Y-742) act redundantly to promote ATP hydrolysis, NMD efficiency and translation termination fidelity. PMID:24198248

  3. Identification and functional analysis of novel phosphorylation sites in the RNA surveillance protein Upf1.

    PubMed

    Lasalde, Clarivel; Rivera, Andrea V; León, Alfredo J; González-Feliciano, José A; Estrella, Luis A; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N; Correa, María E; Cajigas, Iván J; Bracho, Dina P; Vega, Irving E; Wilkinson, Miles F; González, Carlos I

    2014-02-01

    One third of inherited genetic diseases are caused by mRNAs harboring premature termination codons as a result of nonsense mutations. These aberrant mRNAs are degraded by the Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) pathway. A central component of the NMD pathway is Upf1, an RNA-dependent ATPase and helicase. Upf1 is a known phosphorylated protein, but only portions of this large protein have been examined for phosphorylation sites and the functional relevance of its phosphorylation has not been elucidated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using tandem mass spectrometry analyses, we report the identification of 11 putative phosphorylated sites in S. cerevisiae Upf1. Five of these phosphorylated residues are located within the ATPase and helicase domains and are conserved in higher eukaryotes, suggesting a biological significance for their phosphorylation. Indeed, functional analysis demonstrated that a small carboxy-terminal motif harboring at least three phosphorylated amino acids is important for three Upf1 functions: ATPase activity, NMD activity and the ability to promote translation termination efficiency. We provide evidence that two tyrosines within this phospho-motif (Y-738 and Y-742) act redundantly to promote ATP hydrolysis, NMD efficiency and translation termination fidelity.

  4. Regulation of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3 activity by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Yao, Yan; Jiang, Huidi; Lu, Chuan; Zeng, Su; Yu, Lushan

    2015-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a vital post-translational modification. This study investigated the effect of phosphorylation on human uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3 (UGT1A3) activity. Curcumin and calphostin C suppressed the activity and phosphorylation of recombinant UGT1A3 expressed in Sf9 cells. These results indicate that UGT1A3 undergoes phosphorylation, which is required for its catalytic activity. Calphostin C is a highly specific protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, so three predicted PKC phosphorylation sites in UGT1A3 were examined. Site-directed mutation analysis at residues 28, 43 and 436 (from serine to glycine) was conducted. Compared with the wild-type, the S43G-mutant showed significantly decreased UGT1A3 catalytic activity. Furthermore, the UGT1A3 activity of wild-type and S43G-mutant was down-regulated by calphostin C, whereas the calphostin C inhibitory effect was much weaker on the S43G-mutant than the wild-type. In conclusion, phosphorylation plays an important role in UGT1A3 activity, and the serine at site 43 in UGT1A3 is most likely a phosphorylation site. PMID:26094731

  5. Global protein phosphorylation dynamics during deoxynivalenol-induced ribotoxic stress response in the macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiao; Whitten, Douglas A.; Wu, Ming; Chan, Christina; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Pestka, James J.

    2013-04-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium that commonly contaminates food, is capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes of the innate immune system via a process termed the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). To encapture global signaling events mediating RSR, we quantified the early temporal (≤ 30 min) phosphoproteome changes that occurred in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage during exposure to a toxicologically relevant concentration of DON (250 ng/mL). Large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis employing stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with titanium dioxide chromatography revealed that DON significantly upregulated or downregulated phosphorylation of 188 proteins at both known and yet-to-be functionally characterized phosphosites. DON-induced RSR is extremely complex and goes far beyond its prior known capacity to inhibit translation and activate MAPKs. Transcriptional regulation was the main target during early DON-induced RSR, covering over 20% of the altered phosphoproteins as indicated by Gene Ontology annotation and including transcription factors/cofactors and epigenetic modulators. Other biological processes impacted included cell cycle, RNA processing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, monocyte differentiation and cytoskeleton organization. Some of these processes could be mediated by signaling networks involving MAPK-, NFκB-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways. Fuzzy c-means clustering revealed that DON-regulated phosphosites could be discretely classified with regard to the kinetics of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The cellular response networks identified provide a template for further exploration of the mechanisms of trichothecenemycotoxins and other ribotoxins, and ultimately, could contribute to improved mechanism-based human health risk assessment. - Highlights: ► Mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces immunotoxicity via ribotoxic stress response. ► SILAC phosphoproteomics using

  6. Interplay between phosphorylation and SUMOylation events determines CESTA protein fate in brassinosteroid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mamoona; Rozhon, Wilfried; Unterholzner, Simon Josef; Chen, Tingting; Eremina, Marina; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Bachmair, Andreas; Teige, Markus; Sieberer, Tobias; Isono, Erika; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are steroid hormones that are essential for plant growth. Responses to these hormones are mediated by transcription factors of the BES1/BZR1 subfamily, and brassinosteroids activate these factors by impairing their inhibitory phosphorylation by GSK3/shaggy-like kinases. Here we show that brassinosteroids induce nuclear compartmentalization of CESTA (CES), a bHLH transcription factor that regulates brassinosteroid responses, and reveal that this process is regulated by CES SUMOylation. We demonstrate that CES contains an extended SUMOylation motif, and that SUMOylation of this motif is antagonized by phosphorylation to control CES subnuclear localization. Moreover, we provide evidence that phosphorylation regulates CES transcriptional activity and protein turnover by the proteasome. A coordinated modification model is proposed in which, in a brassinosteroid-deficient situation, CES is phosphorylated to activate target gene transcription and enable further posttranslational modification that controls CES protein stability. PMID:25134617

  7. Binding of AP-2 adaptor complex to brain membrane is regulated by phosphorylation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alberdi, A. . E-mail: aalberdi@fcm.uncu.edu.ar; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2005-05-13

    Phosphorylation of proteins appears as a key process in early steps of clathrin coated vesicle formation. Here, we report that treatment of post-nuclear fraction with alkaline phosphatase induced redistribution of {alpha} subunits of AP-2 adaptor complex to cytosol and this effect was higher in the {alpha}2 subunit. A high serine phosphorylation status of {alpha} subunits correlated with the higher affinity of AP-2 to membranes. Using a simple binding assay, where membranes were incubated with either purified adaptors or cytosols, we observed an inhibitory effect of tyrphostin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on the binding of AP-2 to membranes, but also an unexpected decrease induced by the phosphatase inhibitor cyclosporine. We also show an inhibitory effect of ATP mediated by cytosolic proteins, although it could not be related to the phosphorylation of AP-2, suggesting an action upstream a cascade of phosphorylations that participate in the regulation of the assembly of AP-2 to membranes.

  8. Recognition of protein phosphorylation site based on amino acids sequence features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important reversible post-translational modifications (PTMs), and the theoretical recognition of the phosphorylation site is one of the important content of the computational biology. In the paper, we use the amino acid component, the position-dependent residue statistics and the non-adjacent residue pair frequency as the recognition parameters, and use Jensen-Shannon Divergence with Quadratic Discriminant analysis(JSDQD) as the method for predicting the phosphorylation sites. The 7-fold cross-validation test accuracies for the CK2, PKA and PKC kinase families are 90%, 90% and 86%, respectively.

  9. Evidence for selective regulation of the phosphorylation of myocyte proteins by isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J S; Bowling, N; King, K L; Boder, G B

    1982-01-12

    Both isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1 increased the activation state of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in cultured myocytes; however, only isoproterenol enhanced phosphorylase activity and contractile state. Following the incubation of intact myocytes with 32PO3-(4), 32 phosphoproteins were resolved from total cellular proteins by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels followed by autoradiography. Isoproterenol stimulated 32PO3-(4) incorporation into 16 proteins, including 2 phosphoproteins not observed under control conditions. By contrast, prostaglandin E1 neither caused a measurable change in the protein phosphorylation pattern nor interfered with isoproterenol's capacity to do so. Isoproterenol stimulated myocyte protein phosphorylation in either the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. The results suggest that the regulation of protein phosphorylation following adenylate cyclase stimulation is: (1) an agonist-specific process and not due solely to a random accumulation of intracellular cycle AMP and activation of protein kinase; (2) the Ca2+ mobilization component of beta-receptor activation does not account for the paradoxical effects of isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1; (3) activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase does not always result in an enhancement of protein phosphorylation.

  10. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  11. Altered phosphorylation and desensitization patterns of a human beta 2-adrenergic receptor lacking the palmitoylated Cys341.

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, S; Mouillac, B; Bonin, H; Bouvier, M

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of beta 2-adrenergic receptors to agonists causes a rapid desensitization of the receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase, associated with an increased phosphorylation of the receptor. Agonist-promoted phosphorylation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) by protein kinase A and the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is believed to promote a functional uncoupling of the receptor from the guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein Gs. More recently, palmitoylation of Cys341 of the receptor has also been proposed to play an important role in the coupling of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor to Gs. Here we report that substitution of the palmitoylated cysteine by a glycine (Gly341 beta 2 AR) using site directed mutagenesis leads to a receptor being highly phosphorylated and largely uncoupled from Gs. In Chinese hamster fibroblasts (CHW), stably transfected with the human receptor cDNAs, the basal phosphorylation level of Gly341 beta 2AR was found to be approximately 4 times that of the wild type receptor. This elevated phosphorylation level was accompanied by a depressed ability of the receptor to stimulate the adenylyl cyclase and to form a guanyl nucleotide-sensitive high affinity state for agonists. Moreover, exposure of this unpalmitoylated receptor to an agonist did not promote any further phosphorylation or uncoupling. A modest desensitization of the receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase response was observed but resulted from the agonist-induced sequestration of the unpalmitoylated receptor and could be blocked by concanavalin A. This contrasts with the agonist-promoted phosphorylation and uncoupling of the wild type receptor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8381352

  12. Effect of zinc sulphate on gelling properties of phosphorylated protein isolate from yellow stripe trevally.

    PubMed

    Arfat, Yasir Ali; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2013-12-01

    Impacts of zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) (0-140 μmol/kg) on gel properties of yellow stripe trevally surimi added with sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) (0.25% and 0.5%, w/w) and protein isolate phosphorylated with STPP at 0.25% and 0.5% (w/w) were studied. Gels from surimi added with 60 μmol ZnSO4/kg in the absence and presence of 0.5% STPP had the increases in breaking force and deformation by 20.9% and 33.3%, and 11.6% and 18.6%, respectively, compared with the control surimi gel (without additives). Gel of protein isolate phosphorylated with 0.5% STPP containing 100 μmol ZnSO4/kg had the increases in breaking force and deformation by 14.87% and 5.6%, respectively, compared with the gel from non-phosphorylated protein isolate at the same ZnSO4 level, suggesting that the phosphorylated protein isolate was more crosslinked by Zn(2+). The addition of ZnSO4 at the suitable level lowered the expressible moisture content, but increased whiteness of surimi or protein isolate gels (P<0.05). Non-covalent bonds, more likely salt bridge and ionic interactions, played a major role in cross-linking of proteins in both surimi and protein isolate added with ZnSO4, regardless of phosphates incorporated. Microstructure study revealed that a gel having highly interconnected and denser network with smaller voids was formed when protein isolate phosphorylated with 0.5% STPP was added with ZnSO4 at a level of 100 μmol/kg. Thus, gel with improved properties could be obtained from protein isolate from yellow stripe trevally phosphorylated with STPP in conjunction with addition of ZnSO4 at an appropriate level.

  13. Effect of zinc sulphate on gelling properties of phosphorylated protein isolate from yellow stripe trevally.

    PubMed

    Arfat, Yasir Ali; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2013-12-01

    Impacts of zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) (0-140 μmol/kg) on gel properties of yellow stripe trevally surimi added with sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) (0.25% and 0.5%, w/w) and protein isolate phosphorylated with STPP at 0.25% and 0.5% (w/w) were studied. Gels from surimi added with 60 μmol ZnSO4/kg in the absence and presence of 0.5% STPP had the increases in breaking force and deformation by 20.9% and 33.3%, and 11.6% and 18.6%, respectively, compared with the control surimi gel (without additives). Gel of protein isolate phosphorylated with 0.5% STPP containing 100 μmol ZnSO4/kg had the increases in breaking force and deformation by 14.87% and 5.6%, respectively, compared with the gel from non-phosphorylated protein isolate at the same ZnSO4 level, suggesting that the phosphorylated protein isolate was more crosslinked by Zn(2+). The addition of ZnSO4 at the suitable level lowered the expressible moisture content, but increased whiteness of surimi or protein isolate gels (P<0.05). Non-covalent bonds, more likely salt bridge and ionic interactions, played a major role in cross-linking of proteins in both surimi and protein isolate added with ZnSO4, regardless of phosphates incorporated. Microstructure study revealed that a gel having highly interconnected and denser network with smaller voids was formed when protein isolate phosphorylated with 0.5% STPP was added with ZnSO4 at a level of 100 μmol/kg. Thus, gel with improved properties could be obtained from protein isolate from yellow stripe trevally phosphorylated with STPP in conjunction with addition of ZnSO4 at an appropriate level. PMID:23871033

  14. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  15. The prokaryotic enhancer binding protein NTRC has an ATPase activity which is phosphorylation and DNA dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S; Dixon, R

    1992-01-01

    The prokaryotic activator protein NTRC binds to enhancer-like elements and activates transcription in response to nitrogen limitation by catalysing open complex formation by sigma 54 RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Formation of open complexes requires the phosphorylated form of NTRC and the reaction is ATP dependent. We find that NTRC has an ATPase activity which is activated by phosphorylation and is strongly stimulated by the presence of DNA containing specific NTRC binding sites. Images PMID:1534752

  16. Balance between DBT/CKIε kinase and protein phosphatase activities regulate phosphorylation and stability of Drosophila CLOCK protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Edery, Isaac

    2006-01-01

    The first circadian-relevant kinase to be identified was DOUBLE-TIME (DBT) in Drosophila, a homolog of vertebrate CKIε, which regulates the progressive phosphorylation and stability of PERIOD (PER) proteins in animals. A negative feedback loop wherein PER directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimer is central to the generation of molecular rhythms and normal progression of the clock in Drosophila. We show that DBT activity is required for the phase-specific hyperphosphorylation of CLK in vivo, an event that correlates with times of maximal repression in per RNA levels. The ability of DBT to hyperphosphorylate CLK, enhance its degradation, and evoke modest inhibition of CLK-dependent transactivation from circadian promoter elements was directly shown in cultured Drosophila cells. Intriguingly, DBT seems to function in close partnership with the PER-relevant protein phosphatase 2A, resulting in dynamic equilibrium between hypo- and hyperphosphorylated isoforms of CLK. This balancing mechanism might act to stabilize the limiting levels of CLK against stochastic fluctuations minimizing the propagation of “molecular noise” in the feedback circuitry. Also, the subcellular localization of CLK was altered from predominately nuclear to strong cytoplasmic staining in the presence of PER. These results suggest that, in contrast to mammalian clocks, circadian transcriptional inhibition in Drosophila involves displacement of the positive factors from chromatin. These results also demonstrate that DBT can target both negative and positive factors in circadian feedback loops and support a conserved role for dynamic regulation of reversible phosphorylation in directly modulating the activities of circadian transcription factors. PMID:16603629

  17. Construction of protein phosphorylation networks by data mining, text mining and ontology integration: analysis of the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Ren, Jia; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge representation of the role of phosphorylation is essential for the meaningful understanding of many biological processes. However, such a representation is challenging because proteins can exist in numerous phosphorylated forms with each one having its own characteristic protein-protein interactions (PPIs), functions and subcellular localization. In this article, we evaluate the current state of phosphorylation event curation and then present a bioinformatics framework for the annotation and representation of phosphorylated proteins and construction of phosphorylation networks that addresses some of the gaps in current curation efforts. The integrated approach involves (i) text mining guided by RLIMS-P, a tool that identifies phosphorylation-related information in scientific literature; (ii) data mining from curated PPI databases; (iii) protein form and complex representation using the Protein Ontology (PRO); (iv) functional annotation using the Gene Ontology (GO); and (v) network visualization and analysis with Cytoscape. We use this framework to study the spindle checkpoint, the process that monitors the assembly of the mitotic spindle and blocks cell cycle progression at metaphase until all chromosomes have made bipolar spindle attachments. The phosphorylation networks we construct, centered on the human checkpoint kinase BUB1B (BubR1) and its yeast counterpart MAD3, offer a unique view of the spindle checkpoint that emphasizes biologically relevant phosphorylated forms, phosphorylation-state-specific PPIs and kinase-substrate relationships. Our approach for constructing protein phosphorylation networks can be applied to any biological process that is affected by phosphorylation. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/

  18. A Proteome-wide Domain-centric Perspective on Protein Phosphorylation *

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Antonio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Gherardini, Pier Federico

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a widespread post-translational modification that modulates the function of a large number of proteins. Here we show that a significant proportion of all the domains in the human proteome is significantly enriched or depleted in phosphorylation events. A substantial improvement in phosphosites prediction is achieved by leveraging this observation, which has not been tapped by existing methods. Phosphorylation sites are often not shared between multiple occurrences of the same domain in the proteome, even when the phosphoacceptor residue is conserved. This is partly because of different functional constraints acting on the same domain in different protein contexts. Moreover, by augmenting domain alignments with structural information, we were able to provide direct evidence that phosphosites in protein-protein interfaces need not be positionally conserved, likely because they can modulate interactions simply by sitting in the same general surface area. PMID:24830415

  19. Nucleolar proteins change in altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, M. A.; Kordyum, E. L.; Gonzalez-Camacho, F.; Medina, F. J.

    Discovery of gravisensitivity of cells no specified to gravity perception focused continuous attention on an elucidation of mechanisms involved in altered gravity effects at the different levels of cellular organization A nucleolus is the nuclear domain in which the major portion of ribosome biogenesis takes place This is a basic process for cell vitality beginning with the transcription of rDNA followed by processing newly synthesized pre-rRNA molecules A wide range of nucleolar proteins plays a highly significant role in all stages of biosynthesis of ribosomes Different steps of ribosome biogenesis should respond to various external factors affecting generally the cell metabolism Nevertheless a nucleolus remains not enough studied under the influence of altered environmental conditions For this reason we studied root apices from 2-day old Lepidium sativum seedlings germinated and grown under slow horizontal clinorotation and stationary conditions in darkness The extraction of cell nuclei followed by sequential fractionation of nuclear proteins according to their solubility in buffers of increasing ionic strength was carried out This procedure gave rise to 5 distinct fractions We analyzed nuclear subproteomes of the most soluble fraction called S2 It is actually a functionally significant fraction consisting of ribonucleoproteins actively engaged in pre-rRNA synthesis and processing 2D-electrophoresis of S2 fraction proteins was carried out The gels were silver stained and stained gels were scanned and analyzed

  20. Protein kinase A and casein kinases mediate sequential phosphorylation events in the circadian negative feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guocun; Chen, She; Li, Shaojie; Cha, Joonseok; Long, Chengzu; Li, Lily; He, Qiyang; Liu, Yi

    2007-12-15

    Regulation of circadian clock components by phosphorylation plays essential roles in clock functions and is conserved from fungi to mammals. In the Neurospora circadian negative feedback loop, FREQUENCY (FRQ) protein inhibits WHITE COLLAR (WC) complex activity by recruiting the casein kinases CKI and CKII to phosphorylate the WC proteins, resulting in the repression of frq transcription. On the other hand, CKI and CKII progressively phosphorylate FRQ to promote FRQ degradation, a process that is a major determinant of circadian period length. Here, by using whole-cell isotope labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry methods, we show that the WC-1 phosphorylation events critical for the negative feedback process occur sequentially-first by a priming kinase, then by the FRQ-recruited casein kinases. We further show that the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is essential for clock function and inhibits WC activity by serving as a priming kinase for the casein kinases. In addition, PKA also regulates FRQ phosphorylation, but unlike CKI and CKII, PKA stabilizes FRQ, similar to the stabilization of human PERIOD2 (hPER2) due to the phosphorylation at the familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS) site. Thus, PKA is a key clock component that regulates several critical processes in the circadian negative feedback loop. PMID:18079175

  1. Protein kinase CK2 interacts with Chk2 and phosphorylates Mre11 on serine 649

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong-Tae . E-mail: stkim@med.skku.ac.kr

    2005-05-27

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 protein complex has been known to be involved in a variety of DNA metabolic events that involve DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The phosphorylation of Mre11 is increased in response to ionizing radiation, which suggests that phosphorylation of Mre11 may be an important regulatory mechanism of this complex. Mre11-phosphorylating kinase activities were observed in Chk2 immunoprecipitates and HeLa nuclear extracts. Through the tandem affinity tagging system and conventional chromatography, this kinase was purified and identified as protein kinase CK2. CK2 phosphorylates Mre11 in vitro. In vitro kinase assay with a series of truncated Mre11 proteins as substrates for CK2 and site-directed mutagenesis showed that serine 649 of Mre11 is mainly phosphorylated by CK2 in vitro. In vivo labeling and phosphopeptide mapping analysis revealed that this phosphorylation occurs in vivo. These data implicate CK2 as a potential upstream regulator of Mre11 function.

  2. Phosphorylation of protein synthesis initiation factor 2 (elF-2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Initiation Factor 2 (elF-2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is comprised of 3 subunits. The control of protein synthesis in mammalian cells have been shown to involve the phosphorylation of the small (alpha) subunit by a specific protein kinase. Phosphorylation results in an inhibition of protein synthesis. In order to determine whether or not an analogous system is operative in yeast, the phosphorylation state of the alpha subunit of elF-2 in Saccharomyces was determined during various growth and nongrowth conditions. Cells were radiolabelled with /sup 32/P and /sup 35/S, and the whole cell lysates were analyzed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. These experiments revealed that the smallest subunit (alpha, M/sub r/ = 31,000) is a phosphoprotein in vivo under a variety of growth and nongrowth conditions. This is in direct contrast to the pattern exhibited in mammalian cells. The fact that the small subunit of elF-2 in yeast is phosphorylated under a variety of physiological conditions indicates that such a covalent modification is important for some aspects of elF-2 function. In order to investigate this problem further, a protein kinase that specifically labels the alpha subunit of elF-2 in vitro was isolated. The kinase is not autophosphorylating, utilizes ATP as a phosphate donor, phosphorylates an exogenous protein, casein, modifies serine residues in elF-2, is cyclic nucleotide-independent, and is strongly inhibited by heparin.

  3. Quantitative profiling of spreading-coupled protein tyrosine phosphorylation in migratory cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yajun; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Yuanya; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaorong; Liu, Kehui; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important mechanism that regulates cytoskeleton reorganization and cell spreading of migratory cells. A number of cytoskeletal proteins are known to be tyrosine phosphorylated (pY) in different cellular processes. However, the profile of pY proteins during different stages of cell spreading has not been available. Using immunoafffinity enrichment of pY proteins coupled with label free quantitative proteomics, we quantitatively identified 447 pY proteins in the migratory ECV-304 cells at the early spreading (adhesion) and the active spreading stages. We found that pY levels of the majority of the quantified proteins were significantly increased in the active spreading stage compared with the early spreading stage, suggesting that active cell spreading is concomitant with extra tyrosine phosphorylation. The major categories of proteins impacted by tyrosine phosphorylation are involved in cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, protein translation and degradation. Our findings, for the first time, dissect the cell spreading-specific pY signals from the adhesion induced pY signals, and provide a valuable resource for the future mechanistic research regarding the regulation of cell spreading. PMID:27554326

  4. Quantitative profiling of spreading-coupled protein tyrosine phosphorylation in migratory cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yajun; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Yuanya; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaorong; Liu, Kehui; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important mechanism that regulates cytoskeleton reorganization and cell spreading of migratory cells. A number of cytoskeletal proteins are known to be tyrosine phosphorylated (pY) in different cellular processes. However, the profile of pY proteins during different stages of cell spreading has not been available. Using immunoafffinity enrichment of pY proteins coupled with label free quantitative proteomics, we quantitatively identified 447 pY proteins in the migratory ECV-304 cells at the early spreading (adhesion) and the active spreading stages. We found that pY levels of the majority of the quantified proteins were significantly increased in the active spreading stage compared with the early spreading stage, suggesting that active cell spreading is concomitant with extra tyrosine phosphorylation. The major categories of proteins impacted by tyrosine phosphorylation are involved in cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, protein translation and degradation. Our findings, for the first time, dissect the cell spreading-specific pY signals from the adhesion induced pY signals, and provide a valuable resource for the future mechanistic research regarding the regulation of cell spreading. PMID:27554326

  5. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  6. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  7. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-05-19

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems.

  8. Signal-transducing protein phosphorylation cascades mediated by Ras/Rho proteins in the mammalian cell: the potential for multiplex signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    The features of three distinct protein phosphorylation cascades in mammalian cells are becoming clear. These signalling pathways link receptor-mediated events at the cell surface or intracellular perturbations such as DNA damage to changes in cytoskeletal structure, vesicle transport and altered transcription factor activity. The best known pathway, the Ras-->Raf-->MEK-->ERK cascade [where ERK is extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and MEK is mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase/ERK kinase], is typically stimulated strongly by mitogens and growth factors. The other two pathways, stimulated primarily by assorted cytokines, hormones and various forms of stress, predominantly utilize p21 proteins of the Rho family (Rho, Rac and CDC42), although Ras can also participate. Diagnostic of each pathway is the MAP kinase component, which is phosphorylated by a unique dual-specificity kinase on both tyrosine and threonine in one of three motifs (Thr-Glu-Tyr, Thr-Phe-Tyr or Thr-Gly-Tyr), depending upon the pathway. In addition to activating one or more protein phosphorylation cascades, the initiating stimulus may also mobilize a variety of other signalling molecules (e.g. protein kinase C isoforms, phospholipid kinases, G-protein alpha and beta gamma subunits, phospholipases, intracellular Ca2+). These various signals impact to a greater or lesser extent on multiple downstream effectors. Important concepts are that signal transmission often entails the targeted relocation of specific proteins in the cell, and the reversible formation of protein complexes by means of regulated protein phosphorylation. The signalling circuits may be completed by the phosphorylation of upstream effectors by downstream kinases, resulting in a modulation of the signal. Signalling is terminated and the components returned to the ground state largely by dephosphorylation. There is an indeterminant amount of cross-talk among the pathways, and many of the proteins in the pathways belong to families

  9. Construction of protein phosphorylation networks by data mining, text mining and ontology integration: analysis of the spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Ren, Jia; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge representation of the role of phosphorylation is essential for the meaningful understanding of many biological processes. However, such a representation is challenging because proteins can exist in numerous phosphorylated forms with each one having its own characteristic protein–protein interactions (PPIs), functions and subcellular localization. In this article, we evaluate the current state of phosphorylation event curation and then present a bioinformatics framework for the annotation and representation of phosphorylated proteins and construction of phosphorylation networks that addresses some of the gaps in current curation efforts. The integrated approach involves (i) text mining guided by RLIMS-P, a tool that identifies phosphorylation-related information in scientific literature; (ii) data mining from curated PPI databases; (iii) protein form and complex representation using the Protein Ontology (PRO); (iv) functional annotation using the Gene Ontology (GO); and (v) network visualization and analysis with Cytoscape. We use this framework to study the spindle checkpoint, the process that monitors the assembly of the mitotic spindle and blocks cell cycle progression at metaphase until all chromosomes have made bipolar spindle attachments. The phosphorylation networks we construct, centered on the human checkpoint kinase BUB1B (BubR1) and its yeast counterpart MAD3, offer a unique view of the spindle checkpoint that emphasizes biologically relevant phosphorylated forms, phosphorylation-state–specific PPIs and kinase–substrate relationships. Our approach for constructing protein phosphorylation networks can be applied to any biological process that is affected by phosphorylation. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:23749465

  10. Expression and phosphorylation of a MARCKS-like protein in gastric chief cells: further evidence for modulation of pepsinogen secretion by interaction of Ca2+/calmodulin with protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Raufman, J P; Malhotra, R; Xie, Q; Raffaniello, R D

    1997-03-01

    In gastric chief cells, agents that activate protein kinase C (PKC) stimulate pepsinogen secretion and phosphorylation of an acidic 72-kDa protein. The isoelectric point and molecular mass of this protein are similar to those for a common PKC substrate; the MARCKS (for Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) protein. We examined expression and phosphorylation of the MARCKS-like protein in a nearly homogeneous suspension of chief cells from guinea pig stomach. Western blotting of fractions from chief cell lysates with a specific MARCKS antibody resulted in staining of a myristoylated 72-kDA protein (pp72), associated predominantly with the membrane fraction. Using permeabilized chief cells, we examined the effect of PKC activation (with the phorbol ester PMA), in the presence of basal (100 nM) or elevated cellular calcium (1 microM), on pepsinogen secretion and phosphorylation of the 72-KDa MARCKS-like protein. Secretion was increased 2.3-, 2.6-, and 4.5-fold by incubation with 100 nM PMA, 1 microM calcium, and PMA plus calcium, respectively. A PKC inhibitor (1 microM CGP 41 251) abolished PMA-induced secretion, but did not alter calcium-induced secretion. This indicates that calcium-induced secretion is independent of PKC activation. Chief cell proteins were labeled with 32P-orthophosphate and phosphorylation of pp72 was detected by autoradiography of 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. In the presence of basal calcium, PMA (100 nM) caused a > two-fold increase in phosphorylation of pp72. Without PMA, calcium did not alter phosphorylation of pp72. However, 1 microM calcium caused an approx. 50% attenuation of PMA-induced phosphorylation of pp72. Experiments with a MARCKS "phosphorylation/calmodulin binding domain peptide" indicated that calcium/calmodulin inhibits phosphorylation of pp72 by binding to the phosphorylation/calmodulin binding domain and not by inhibiting PKC activity. These observations support the hypothesis that, in gastric chief cells

  11. The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, T

    1998-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of tyrosines in proteins plays a key role in regulating many different processes in eukaryotic organisms, such as growth control, cell cycle control, differentiation cell shape and movement, gene transcription, synaptic transmission, and insulin action. Phosphorylation of proteins is brought about by enzymes called protein-tyrosine kinases that add phosphate to specific tyrosines in target proteins; phosphate is removed from phosphorylated tyrosines by enzymes called protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Phosphorylated tyrosines are recognized by specialized binding domains on other proteins, and such interactions are used to initiate intracellular signaling pathways. Currently, more than 95 protein-tyrosine kinases and more than 55 protein-tyrosine phosphatase genes are known in Homo sapiens. Aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation is a hallmark of many types of cancer and other human diseases. Drugs are being developed that antagonize the responsible protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in order to combat these diseases. PMID:9602534

  12. Predicting protein phosphorylation from gene expression: top methods from the IMPROVER Species Translation Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Michael; Bilal, Erhan; Hormoz, Sahand; Meyer, Pablo; Norel, Raquel; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Bhanot, Gyan; Luo, Feng; Tarca, Adi L.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Using gene expression to infer changes in protein phosphorylation levels induced in cells by various stimuli is an outstanding problem. The intra-species protein phosphorylation challenge organized by the IMPROVER consortium provided the framework to identify the best approaches to address this issue. Results: Rat lung epithelial cells were treated with 52 stimuli, and gene expression and phosphorylation levels were measured. Competing teams used gene expression data from 26 stimuli to develop protein phosphorylation prediction models and were ranked based on prediction performance for the remaining 26 stimuli. Three teams were tied in first place in this challenge achieving a balanced accuracy of about 70%, indicating that gene expression is only moderately predictive of protein phosphorylation. In spite of the similar performance, the approaches used by these three teams, described in detail in this article, were different, with the average number of predictor genes per phosphoprotein used by the teams ranging from 3 to 124. However, a significant overlap of gene signatures between teams was observed for the majority of the proteins considered, while Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways were enriched in the union of the predictor genes of the three teams for multiple proteins. Availability and implementation: Gene expression and protein phosphorylation data are available from ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-2091). Software implementation of the approach of Teams 49 and 75 are available at http://bioinformaticsprb.med.wayne.edu and http://people.cs.clemson.edu/∼luofeng/sbv.rar, respectively. Contact: gyanbhanot@gmail.com or luofeng@clemson.edu or atarca@med.wayne.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25061067

  13. Soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha inhibits tau phosphorylation through modulation of GSK3β signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Juan; Habib, Ahsan; Obregon, Demian F; Barger, Steven W; Giunta, Brian; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Hou, Huayan; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    We recently found that sAPPα decreases amyloid-beta generation by directly associating with β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-converting enzyme 1 (BACE1), thereby modulating APP processing. Because inhibition of BACE1 decreases glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β)-mediated Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like tau phosphorylation in AD patient-derived neurons, we determined whether sAPPα also reduces GSK3β-mediated tau phosphorylation. We initially found increased levels of inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser9) in primary neurons from sAPPα over-expressing mice. Further, recombinant human sAPPα evoked the same phenomenon in SH-SY5Y cells. Further, in SH-SY5Y cells over-expressing BACE1, and HeLa cells over-expressing human tau, sAPPα reduced GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation. Importantly, the reductions in GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation elicited by sAPPα were prevented by BACE1 but not γ-secretase inhibition. In accord, AD mice over-expressing human sAPPα had less GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation compared with controls. These results implicate a direct relationship between APP β-processing and GSK3β-mediated tau phosphorylation and further define the central role of sAPPα in APP autoregulation and AD pathogenesis. PMID:26342176

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 protein in Ca2+/A23187-treated human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, G; Piccinini, G; Balduini, C; Seppi, C; Brovelli, A

    1996-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were induced to release membrane vesicles by treatment with Ca2+ and ionophore A23187. In addition to the biochemical changes already known to accompany loading of human erythrocytes with Ca2+, the present study reveals that tyrosine phosphorylation of the anion exchanger band 3 protein also occurs. The relationship between tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 and membrane vesiculation was analysed using quinine (a non-specific inhibitor of the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel, and the only known inhibitor of Ca(2+)-induced vesiculation) and charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of the apamin-insensitive K(+)-channel. Both inhibitors suppressed tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3. In the presence of quinine, membrane vesiculation was also suppressed. In contrast, at the concentration of charybdotoxin required to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3, membrane vesiculation was only mildly inhibited (16-23% inhibition), suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 is not necessary for membrane vesiculation. Phosphorylation of band 3 was in fact observed when erythrocytes were induced to shrink in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, e.g. by treatment with the K+ ionophore valinomycin or with hypertonic solutions. These observations suggest that band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation occurs when cell volume regulation is required. PMID:8973551

  15. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  16. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  17. Molecular characterization of recombinant mouse adenosine kinase and evaluation as a target for protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Kansy, Janice W; Nairn, Angus C; Spychala, Jozef; Ealick, Steven E; Fienberg, Allen A; Greene, Robert W; Bibb, James A

    2004-09-01

    The regulation of adenosine kinase (AK) activity has the potential to control intracellular and interstitial adenosine (Ado) concentrations. In an effort to study the role of AK in Ado homeostasis in the central nervous system, two isoforms of the enzyme were cloned from a mouse brain cDNA library. Following overexpression in bacterial cells, the corresponding proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both isoforms were enzymatically active and found to possess K(m) and V(max) values in agreement with kinetic parameters described for other forms of AK. The distribution of AK in discrete brain regions and various peripheral tissues was defined. To investigate the possibility that AK activity is regulated by protein phosphorylation, a panel of protein kinases was screened for ability to phosphorylate recombinant mouse AK. Data from these in vitro phosphorylation studies suggest that AK is most likely not an efficient substrate for PKA, PKG, CaMKII, CK1, CK2, MAPK, Cdk1, or Cdk5. PKC was found to phosphorylate recombinant AK efficiently in vitro. Further analysis revealed, however, that this PKC-dependent phosphorylation occurred at one or more serine residues associated with the N-terminal affinity tag used for protein purification.

  18. Monitoring Protein Kinase Expression and Phosphorylation in Cell Lysates with Antibody Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Shi, Xiaoqing; Pelech, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Fuelled by advances in our understanding of the human kinome and phosphoproteome and the increasing availability of pan- and phosphosite-specific antibodies, antibody microarrays have emerged as powerful tools for interrogating protein phosphorylation-mediated signaling systems in ex vivo studies. This economical platform permits ultra-sensitive, semiquantitative measurements of the levels of hundreds of protein kinases and their substrates along with their phosphorylation status simultaneously with minute amounts of specimens. Recent technological innovations in the design and fabrication of antibody microarrays and sample preparation have permitted further refinements of the technology to yield improvements in data quality. In this chapter, we describe a detailed protocol that we have developed for tracking the expression and phosphorylation of protein kinases and their substrates in crude cell lysate samples using a high-content antibody microarray.

  19. Phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein SB401 from Solanum berthaultii regulates its effect on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao-Quan; Jin, Lifeng; Zhu, Lei; Li, Jiejie; Huang, Shuli; Yuan, Ming

    2009-03-01

    We reported previously that the protein SB401 from Solanum berthaultii binds to and bundles both microtubules and F-actin. In the current study, we investigated the regulation of SB401 activity by its phosphorylation. Our experimental results showed that the phosphorylation of SB401 by casein kinase II (CKII) downregulates the activities of SB401, namely the bundling of microtubules and enhancement of the polymerization of tubulin. However, phosphorylation of SB401 had no observable effect on its bundling of F-actin. Further investigation using extract of potato pollen indicated that a CKII-like kinase may exist in potato pollen. Antibodies against CKII alpha recognized specifically a major band from the pollen extract and the pollen extract was able to phosphorylate the SB401 protein in vitro. The CKII-like kinase showed a similar ability to downregulate the bundling of microtubules. Our experiments demonstrated that phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of SB401 activity. We propose that this phosphorylation may regulate the effects of SB401 on microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. Altered phosphorylation of Bacillus subtilis DegU caused by single amino acid changes in DegS.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T; Kawata, M; Mukai, K

    1991-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis sacU locus consists of the degS and degU genes, which play a major role in controlling the production of degradative enzymes including extracellular proteases. DegS has been shown to be autophosphorylated and to transfer the phosphoryl group to DegU. In this study, we partially purified the DegS proteins which carry amino acid changes resulting from various mutations and examined the phosphorylation reaction. The mutations used were degS42, causing a reduction in exoprotease production, and degS100(Hy) and degS200(Hy), causing overproduction of the enzymes. The following results were obtained. The DegS protein derived from degS42 was deficient in both autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphate transfer to DegU. Compared with wild-type DegS, the DegS proteins derived from the overproduction mutations, degS100(Hy) and degS200(Hy), were less active in the autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of DegU. However, the DegU phosphates produced by the mutant DegS proteins were more stable than that produced by the wild-type DegS. These results suggest that phosphorylation is tightly linked to exoprotease production and that the prolonged retention of the phosphoryl moiety on DegU activates the genes for the extracellular proteases. It was also shown that the rate of dephosphorylation of DegU-phosphate was increased as the amount of DegS was increased. All of these results suggest that DegS is involved in the dephosphorylation of DegU-phosphate. Images PMID:1909319

  1. Insulin alters heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein binding to DNA and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, J.; Kawata, Y.; Schullery, D. S.; Denisenko, O. N.; Higaki, Y.; Abrass, C. K.; Bomsztyk, K.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of the multimodular heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K protein with many of its protein and nucleic acid partners is regulated by extracellular signals. Acting as a docking platform, K protein could link signal-transduction pathways to DNA- and RNA-directed processes such as transcription, mRNA processing, transport, and translation. Treatment of hepatocyte culture with insulin increased K protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Insulin altered K protein interaction with RNA and DNA in vitro. Administration of insulin into mice had similar effects on K protein in liver. Coimmunoprecipitations of RNA with K protein revealed preferential in vivo K protein binding of a subset of transcripts, including the insulin-inducible c-fos mRNA. These results suggest a class of insulin pathways that signal nucleic acid-directed processes that involve K protein. PMID:11470915

  2. Phosphorylation of the proapoptotic BH3-only protein bid primes mitochondria for apoptosis during mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengbo; Lindsay, Jennefer; Owens, Thomas W; Mularczyk, Ewa J; Warwood, Stacey; Foster, Fiona; Streuli, Charles H; Brennan, Keith; Gilmore, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    Mitosis is a moment of exquisite vulnerability for a metazoan cell. Failure to complete mitosis accurately can lead to aneuploidy and cancer initiation. Therefore, if the exit from mitosis is delayed, normal cells are usually removed by apoptosis. However, how failure to complete mitosis activates apoptosis is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a phosphorylated form of the BH3-only protein Bid regulates apoptosis if mitotic exit is delayed. Bid is phosphorylated on serine 66 as cells enter mitosis, and this phosphorylation is lost during the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Cells expressing a nonphosphorylatable version of Bid or a BH3-domain mutant were resistant to mitotic-arrest-induced apoptosis. Thus, we show that Bid phosphorylation primes cells to undergo mitochondrial apoptosis if mitotic exit is delayed. Avoidance of this mechanism may explain the selective pressure for cancer cells to undergo mitotic slippage. PMID:24767991

  3. Phosphorylation status of human RNA-binding protein 8A in cells and its inhibitory regulation by Magoh

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuka; Tatsuno, Takanori; Ma, Shaofu; Tomosugi, Naohisa

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein 8A (RBM8A)–mago-nashi homolog, proliferation-associated (Magoh) complex is a component of the exon junction complex (EJC) required for mRNA metabolism involving nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). RBM8A is a phosphorylated protein that plays some roles in NMD. However, the detailed status and mechanism of the phosphorylation of RBM8A is not completely understood. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed in detail RBM8A phosphorylation in human cells. Accordingly, analysis of the phosphorylation status of RBM8A protein in whole-cell lysates by using Phos-tag gels revealed that the majority of endogenous RBM8A was phosphorylated throughout the cell-cycle progression. Nuclear and cytoplasmic RBM8A and RBM8A in the EJC were also found to be mostly phosphorylated. We also screened the phosphorylated serine by mutational analysis using Phos-tag gels to reveal modifications of serine residues 166 and 168. A single substitution at position 168 that concomitantly abolished the phosphorylation of serine 166 suggested the priority of kinase reaction between these sites. Furthermore, analysis of the role of the binding protein Magoh in RBM8A phosphorylation revealed its inhibitory effect in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we conclude that almost all synthesized RBM8A proteins are rapidly phosphorylated in cells and that phosphorylation occurs before the complex formation with Magoh. PMID:25349214

  4. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Suraya A; Martin, Stephen R; Howell, Steven A; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W; Green, Judith L; Holder, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity. PMID

  5. The Binding of Plasmodium falciparum Adhesins and Erythrocyte Invasion Proteins to Aldolase Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Suraya A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Howell, Steven A.; Grainger, Munira; Moon, Robert W.; Green, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase has been implicated as a protein coupling the actomyosin motor and cell surface adhesins involved in motility and host cell invasion in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It binds to the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) of type 1 membrane proteins of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. Other type 1 membrane proteins located in the apical organelles of merozoites, the form of the parasite that invades red blood cells, including apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and members of the erythrocyte binding ligand (EBL) and reticulocyte binding homologue (RH) protein families have been implicated in host cell binding and invasion. Using a direct binding method we confirm that TRAP and merozoite TRAP (MTRAP) bind aldolase and show that the interaction is mediated by more than just the C-terminal six amino acid residues identified previously. Single amino acid substitutions in the MTRAP CTD abolished binding to aldolase. The CTDs of AMA1 and members of the EBL and RH protein families also bound to aldolase. MTRAP competed with AMA1 and RH4 for binding to aldolase, indicating overlapping binding sites. MTRAP CTD was phosphorylated in vitro by both calcium dependent kinase 1 (CDPK1) and protein kinase A, and this modification increased the affinity of binding to aldolase by ten-fold. Phosphorylation of the CTD of members of the EBL and RH protein families also increased their affinity for aldolase in some cases. To examine whether or not MTRAP expressed in asexual blood stage parasites is phosphorylated, it was tagged with GFP, purified and analysed, however no phosphorylation was detected. We propose that CTD binding to aldolase may be dynamically modulated by phosphorylation, and there may be competition for aldolase binding between different CTDs. The use and efficiency of alternate invasion pathways may be determined by the affinity of adhesins and cell invasion proteins for aldolase, in addition to their host ligand specificity. PMID

  6. Nerve Agent Exposure Elicits Site-Specific Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongwen; O’Brien, Jennifer J.; O’Callaghan, James P.; Miller, Diane B.; Zhang, Qiang; Rana, Minal; Tsui, Tiffany; Peng, Youyi; Tomesch, John; Hendrick, Joseph P.; Wennogle, Lawrence P; Snyder, Gretchen L.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compounds cause toxic symptoms, including convulsions, coma, and death, as the result of irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The development of effective treatments to block these effects and attenuate long-term cognitive and motor disabilities that result from OP intoxication is hampered by a limited understanding of the CNS pathways responsible for these actions. We employed a candidate method (called CNSProfile™) to identify changes in the phosphorylation state of key neuronal phosphoproteins evoked by the OP compound, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). Focused microwave fixation was used to preserve the phosphorylation state of phosphoproteins in brains of DFP-treated mice; hippocampus and striatum were analyzed by immunoblotting with a panel of phospho-specific antibodies. DFP exposure elicited comparable effects on phosphorylation of brain phosphoproteins in both C57BL/6 and FVB mice. DFP treatment significantly altered phosphorylation at regulatory residues on glutamate receptors, including Serine897 (S897) of the NR1 NMDA receptor. NR1 phosphorylation was bi-directionally regulated after DFP in striatum versus hippocampus. NR1 phosphorylation was reduced in striatum, but elevated in hippocampus, compared with controls. DARPP-32 phosphorylation in striatum was selectively increased at the Cdk5 kinase substrate, Threonine75 (T75). Phencynonate hydrochloride, a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, prevented seizure-like behaviors and the observed changes in phosphorylation induced by DFP. The data reveal region-specific effects of nerve agent exposure on intracellular signaling pathways that correlate with seizure-like behavior and which are reversed by the muscarinic receptor blockade. This approach identifies specific targets for nerve agents, including substrates for Cdk5 kinase, which may be the basis for new anti-convulsant therapies. PMID:20423708

  7. Phosphorylation and calcium antagonistically tune myosin-binding protein C's structure and function.

    PubMed

    Previs, Michael J; Mun, Ji Young; Michalek, Arthur J; Previs, Samantha Beck; Gulick, James; Robbins, Jeffrey; Warshaw, David M; Craig, Roger

    2016-03-22

    During each heartbeat, cardiac contractility results from calcium-activated sliding of actin thin filaments toward the centers of myosin thick filaments to shorten cellular length. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a component of the thick filament that appears to tune these mechanochemical interactions by its N-terminal domains transiently interacting with actin and/or the myosin S2 domain, sensitizing thin filaments to calcium and governing maximal sliding velocity. Both functional mechanisms are potentially further tunable by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered, extensible region of cMyBP-C's N terminus, the M-domain. Using atomic force spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and mutant protein expression, we demonstrate that phosphorylation reduced the M-domain's extensibility and shifted the conformation of the N-terminal domain from an extended structure to a compact configuration. In combination with motility assay data, these structural effects of M-domain phosphorylation suggest a mechanism for diminishing the functional potency of individual cMyBP-C molecules. Interestingly, we found that calcium levels necessary to maximally activate the thin filament mitigated the structural effects of phosphorylation by increasing M-domain extensibility and shifting the phosphorylated N-terminal fragments back to the extended state, as if unphosphorylated. Functionally, the addition of calcium to the motility assays ablated the impact of phosphorylation on maximal sliding velocities, fully restoring cMyBP-C's inhibitory capacity. We conclude that M-domain phosphorylation may have its greatest effect on tuning cMyBP-C's calcium-sensitization of thin filaments at the low calcium levels between contractions. Importantly, calcium levels at the peak of contraction would allow cMyBP-C to remain a potent contractile modulator, regardless of cMyBP-C's phosphorylation state.

  8. Phosphorylation of platelet actin-binding protein during platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.C.; Gerrard, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    In this study we have followed the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein as a function of platelet activation. Utilizing polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to resolve total platelet protein samples, we found 2 to 3-fold labeling increases in actin-binding protein 30 to 60 sec after thrombin stimulation. Somewhat larger increases were observed for 40,000 and 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptides. The actin-binding protein was identified on the gels by coelectrophoresis with purified actin-binding protein, its presence in cytoskeletal cores prepared by detergent extraction of activated 32P-labeled platelets, and by direct immunoprecipitation with antibodies against guinea pig vas deferens filamin (actin-binding protein). In addition, these cytoskeletal cores indicated that the 32P-labeled actin-binding protein was closely associated with the activated platelet's cytoskeleton. Following the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein over an 8-min time course revealed that in aggregating platelet samples rapid dephosphorylation to almost initial levels occurred between 3 and 5 min. A similar curve was obtained for the 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptide. However, rapid dephosphorylation was not observed if platelet aggregation was prevented by chelating external calcium or by using thrombasthenic platelets lacking the aggregation response. Thus, cell-cell contact would seem to be crucial in initiating the rapid dephosphorylation response.

  9. Effects of Yiqi Tongyang on HCN4 Protein Phosphorylation in Damaged Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Ruxiu; Peng, Jie; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (I f ) is closely associated with sinoatrial node pacing function. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pacing function improvements of damaged sinoatrial node cells and the consequent treatment effects on sick sinus syndrome (SSS) after the use of Yiqi Tongyang. HCN4 channel protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting and fluorescent quantitation. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (model group), the HCN4 protein and the optical density (OD) of the phosphorylated HCN4 protein as well as intracellular PKA activity in the sinoatrial node cells decreased significantly. However, the OD values and PKA activity increased to different degrees after treatment with serum containing different doses of Yiqi Tongyang; in contrast, no significant improvement was seen in the control group compared to the model group. These findings demonstrated that the use of the traditional Chinese medicine Yiqi Tongyang could increase HCN4 protein expression and phosphorylation as well as PKA activity within sinoatrial node cells damaged by ischemia-reperfusion. The HCN4 protein is involved in the I f -related ion channel. Here, we speculated that these effects could be associated with upregulation of HCN4 protein phosphorylation, which consequently improved cell automaticity, increased heart rate, and had treatment effects on SSS.

  10. Effects of Yiqi Tongyang on HCN4 Protein Phosphorylation in Damaged Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Ruxiu; Peng, Jie; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (If) is closely associated with sinoatrial node pacing function. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pacing function improvements of damaged sinoatrial node cells and the consequent treatment effects on sick sinus syndrome (SSS) after the use of Yiqi Tongyang. HCN4 channel protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting and fluorescent quantitation. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (model group), the HCN4 protein and the optical density (OD) of the phosphorylated HCN4 protein as well as intracellular PKA activity in the sinoatrial node cells decreased significantly. However, the OD values and PKA activity increased to different degrees after treatment with serum containing different doses of Yiqi Tongyang; in contrast, no significant improvement was seen in the control group compared to the model group. These findings demonstrated that the use of the traditional Chinese medicine Yiqi Tongyang could increase HCN4 protein expression and phosphorylation as well as PKA activity within sinoatrial node cells damaged by ischemia-reperfusion. The HCN4 protein is involved in the If-related ion channel. Here, we speculated that these effects could be associated with upregulation of HCN4 protein phosphorylation, which consequently improved cell automaticity, increased heart rate, and had treatment effects on SSS. PMID:27069490

  11. The virion N protein of infectious bronchitis virus is more phosphorylated than the N protein from infected cell lysates

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, Jyothi; Youn, Soonjeon; Collisson, Ellen W. . E-mail: ecollisson@cvm.tamu.edu

    2005-08-15

    Because phosphorylation of the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) nucleocapsid protein (N) may regulate its multiple roles in viral replication, the dynamics of N phosphorylation were examined. {sup 32}P-orthophosphate labeling and Western blot analyses confirmed that N was the only viral protein that was phosphorylated. Pulse labeling with {sup 32}P-orthophosphate indicated that the IBV N protein was phosphorylated in the virion, as well as at all times during infection in either chicken embryo kidney cells or Vero cells. Pulse-chase analyses followed by immunoprecipitation of IBV N proteins using rabbit anti-IBV N polyclonal antibody demonstrated that the phosphate on the N protein was stable for at least 1 h. Simultaneous labeling with {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and {sup 3}H-leucine identified a 3.5-fold increase in the {sup 32}P:{sup 3}H counts per minute (cpm) ratio of N in the virion as compared to the {sup 32}P:{sup 3}H cpm ratio of N in the cell lysates from chicken embryo kidney cells, whereas in Vero cells the {sup 32}P:{sup 3}H cpm ratio of N from the virion was 10.5-fold greater than the {sup 32}P:{sup 3}H cpm ratio of N from the cell lysates. These studies are consistent with the phosphorylation of the IBV N playing a role in assembly or maturation of the viral particle.

  12. Upregulation of calpain activity precedes tau phosphorylation and loss of synaptic proteins in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kurbatskaya, Ksenia; Phillips, Emma C; Croft, Cara L; Dentoni, Giacomo; Hughes, Martina M; Wade, Matthew A; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; O'Neill, Michael J; Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Hanger, Diane P; Noble, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in calcium homeostasis are widely reported to contribute to synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations lead to activation of the calcium-sensitive cysteine protease, calpain, which has a number of substrates known to be abnormally regulated in disease. Analysis of human brain has shown that calpain activity is elevated in AD compared to controls, and that calpain-mediated proteolysis regulates the activity of important disease-associated proteins including the tau kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen kinase synthase-3. Here, we sought to investigate the likely temporal association between these changes during the development of sporadic AD using Braak staged post-mortem brain. Quantification of protein amounts in these tissues showed increased activity of calpain-1 from Braak stage III onwards in comparison to controls, extending previous findings that calpain-1 is upregulated at end-stage disease, and suggesting that activation of calcium-sensitive signalling pathways are sustained from early stages of disease development. Increases in calpain-1 activity were associated with elevated activity of the endogenous calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, itself a known calpain substrate. Activation of the tau kinases, glycogen-kinase synthase-3 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 were also found to occur in Braak stage II-III brain, and these preceded global elevations in tau phosphorylation and the loss of post-synaptic markers. In addition, we identified transient increases in total amyloid precursor protein and pre-synaptic markers in Braak stage II-III brain, that were lost by end stage Alzheimer's disease, that may be indicative of endogenous compensatory responses to the initial stages of neurodegeneration. These findings provide insight into the molecular events that underpin the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and further highlight the rationale for investigating novel treatment

  13. Upregulation of calpain activity precedes tau phosphorylation and loss of synaptic proteins in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kurbatskaya, Ksenia; Phillips, Emma C; Croft, Cara L; Dentoni, Giacomo; Hughes, Martina M; Wade, Matthew A; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; O'Neill, Michael J; Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Hanger, Diane P; Noble, Wendy

    2016-03-31

    Alterations in calcium homeostasis are widely reported to contribute to synaptic degeneration and neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations lead to activation of the calcium-sensitive cysteine protease, calpain, which has a number of substrates known to be abnormally regulated in disease. Analysis of human brain has shown that calpain activity is elevated in AD compared to controls, and that calpain-mediated proteolysis regulates the activity of important disease-associated proteins including the tau kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and glycogen kinase synthase-3. Here, we sought to investigate the likely temporal association between these changes during the development of sporadic AD using Braak staged post-mortem brain. Quantification of protein amounts in these tissues showed increased activity of calpain-1 from Braak stage III onwards in comparison to controls, extending previous findings that calpain-1 is upregulated at end-stage disease, and suggesting that activation of calcium-sensitive signalling pathways are sustained from early stages of disease development. Increases in calpain-1 activity were associated with elevated activity of the endogenous calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, itself a known calpain substrate. Activation of the tau kinases, glycogen-kinase synthase-3 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 were also found to occur in Braak stage II-III brain, and these preceded global elevations in tau phosphorylation and the loss of post-synaptic markers. In addition, we identified transient increases in total amyloid precursor protein and pre-synaptic markers in Braak stage II-III brain, that were lost by end stage Alzheimer's disease, that may be indicative of endogenous compensatory responses to the initial stages of neurodegeneration. These findings provide insight into the molecular events that underpin the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and further highlight the rationale for investigating novel treatment

  14. Beta 2 integrin-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the FGR protein tyrosine kinase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of adherent human neutrophils (PMN) with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) triggers protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Fuortes, M., W. W. Jin, and C. Nathan. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:777-784). We investigated the dependence of this response on beta 2 integrins by using PMN isolated from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, which do not express beta 2 integrins, and by plating PMN on surface bound anti-beta 2 (CD18) antibodies. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in PMN plated on fibrinogen and this phosphorylation was enhanced by TNF. Triggering of protein tyrosine phosphorylation did not occur in LAD PMN plated on fibrinogen either in the absence or the presence of TNF. Surface bound anti-CD18, but not isotype-matched anti- Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, antibodies triggered tyrosine phosphorylation in normal, but not in LAD PMN. As the major tyrosine phosphorylated proteins we found in our assay conditions migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 56-60 kD, we investigated whether beta 2 integrins are implicated in activation of members of the src family of intracellular protein-tyrosine kinases. We found that the fgr protein-tyrosine kinase (p58fgr) activity, and its extent of phosphorylation in tyrosine, in PMN adherent to fibrinogen, was enhanced by TNF. Activation of p58fgr in response to TNF was evident within 10 min of treatment and increased with times up to 30 min. Also other activators of beta 2 integrins such as phorbol-12- myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced activation of p58fgr kinase activity. Activation of p58fgr kinase activity, and phosphorylation in tyrosine, did not occur in PMN of a LAD patient in response to TNF. Soluble anti-CD18, but not anti-Class I MHC antigens, antibodies inhibited activation of p58fgr kinase activity in PMN adherent to fibrinogen in response to TNF, PMA, and FMLP. These findings demonstrate that, in PMN, beta 2 integrins

  15. Diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility in mammal: the focusing of tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphotyrosine proteins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2014-11-01

    Male infertility refers to the inability of a man to achieve a pregnancy in a fertile female. In more than one-third of cases, infertility arises due to the male factor. Therefore, developing strategies for the diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility is critical. Simultaneously, a satisfactory model for the cellular mechanisms that regulate normal sperm function must be established. In this regard, tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the most common mechanisms through which several signal transduction pathways are adjusted in spermatozoa. It regulates the various aspects of sperm function, for example, motility, hyperactivation, capacitation, the acrosome reaction, fertilization, and beyond. Several recent large-scale studies have identified the proteins that are phosphorylated in spermatozoa to acquire fertilization competence. However, most of these studies are basal and have not presented an overall mechanism through which tyrosine phosphorylation regulates male infertility. In this review, we focus of this mechanism, discussing most of the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that have been identified to date. We categorized tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that regulate male infertility using MedScan Reader (v5.0) and Pathway Studio (v9.0).

  16. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals the Role of Protein Arginine Phosphorylation in the Bacterial Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Andreas; Trentini, Débora Broch; Spiess, Silvia; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Ammerer, Gustav; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging protein modification implicated in the general stress response of Gram-positive bacteria. The modification is mediated by the arginine kinase McsB, which phosphorylates and inactivates the heat shock repressor CtsR. In this study, we developed a mass spectrometric approach accounting for the peculiar chemical properties of phosphoarginine. The improved methodology was used to analyze the dynamic changes in the Bacillus subtilis arginine phosphoproteome in response to different stress situations. Quantitative analysis showed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the YwlE arginine phosphatase accumulated a strikingly large number of arginine phosphorylations (217 sites in 134 proteins), however only a minor fraction of these sites was increasingly modified during heat shock or oxidative stress. The main targets of McsB-mediated arginine phosphorylation comprise central factors of the stress response system including the CtsR and HrcA heat shock repressors, as well as major components of the protein quality control system such as the ClpCP protease and the GroEL chaperonine. These findings highlight the impact of arginine phosphorylation in orchestrating the bacterial stress response. PMID:24263382

  17. Structural Modulation of Phosducin by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rezabkova, Lenka; Kacirova, Miroslava; Sulc, Miroslav; Herman, Petr; Vecer, Jaroslav; Stepanek, Miroslav; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Phosducin (Pdc), a highly conserved phosphoprotein, plays an important role in the regulation of G protein signaling, transcriptional control, and modulation of blood pressure. Pdc is negatively regulated by phosphorylation followed by binding to the 14-3-3 protein, whose role is still unclear. To gain insight into the role of 14-3-3 in the regulation of Pdc function, we studied structural changes of Pdc induced by phosphorylation and 14-3-3 protein binding using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our data show that the phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of Pdc at Ser-54 and Ser-73 affects the structure of the whole Pdc molecule. Complex formation with 14-3-3 reduces the flexibility of both the N- and C-terminal domains of phosphorylated Pdc, as determined by time-resolved tryptophan and dansyl fluorescence. Therefore, our data suggest that phosphorylated Pdc undergoes a conformational change when binding to 14-3-3. These changes involve the Gtβγ binding surface within the N-terminal domain of Pdc, and thus could explain the inhibitory effect of 14-3-3 on Pdc function. PMID:23199924

  18. The selective phosphorylation of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor-activated signal transduction pathways regulate the responsiveness of cells to external stimuli. These transduction pathways themselves are subject to regulation, most commonly by phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G Proteins), as requisite signal transducing elements for many plasma membrane receptors, are considered likely targets for regulation by phosphorylation. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to phosphorylate the {alpha} subunit of G{sub i} and other G proteins in solution. However, the occurrence of the phosphorylation of G{sub 1} within intact cells in response to activation of PKC has not been rigorously demonstrated. In this thesis, the extent to which the {alpha} subunits of G{sub i} undergo phosphorylation within human platelets in response to activation of PKC was examined by means of radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation. Incubation of platelets with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of PKC, promoted the phosphorylation of several proteins within saponin-permeabilized and intact platelets incubated with ({gamma}{sup 32}P)ATP and ({sup 32}P)H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, respectively. None of the phosphoproteins, however, were precipitated by either of two antisera containing antibodies differing in specificities for epitopes within G{sub i{alpha}}-despite precipitation of a substantial fraction of the subunit itself. In contrast, other antisera, containing antibodies specific for the recently describe G{sub z{alpha}}, or antibodies for both G{sub z{alpha}} and G{sub i{alpha}}, precipitated a 40-kDa phosphoprotein.

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion. PMID:25572400

  20. Phosphorylation-dependent trafficking of plasma membrane proteins in animal and plant cells.

    PubMed

    Offringa, Remko; Huang, Fang

    2013-09-01

    In both unicellular and multicellular organisms, transmembrane (TM) proteins are sorted to and retained at specific membrane domains by endomembrane trafficking mechanisms that recognize sorting signals in the these proteins. The trafficking and distribution of plasma membrane (PM)-localized TM proteins (PM proteins), especially of those PM proteins that show an asymmetric distribution over the PM, has received much attention, as their proper PM localization is crucial for elementary signaling and transport processes, and defects in their localization often lead to severe disease symptoms or developmental defects. The subcellular localization of PM proteins is dynamically regulated by post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These modificaitons mostly occur on sorting signals that are located in the larger cytosolic domains of the cargo proteins. Here we review the effects of phosphorylation of PM proteins on their trafficking, and present the key examples from the animal field that have been subject to studies for already several decades, such as that of aquaporin 2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Our knowledge on cargo trafficking in plants is largely based on studies of the family of PIN FORMED (PIN) carriers that mediate the efflux of the plant hormone auxin. We will review what is known on the subcellular distribution and trafficking of PIN proteins, with a focus on how this is modulated by phosphorylation, and identify and discuss analogies and differences in trafficking with the well-studied animal examples. PMID:23945267

  1. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  2. STATE TRANSITION7-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Modulated by Changing Environmental Conditions, and Its Absence Triggers Remodeling of Photosynthetic Protein Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Bergner, Sonja Verena; Scholz, Martin; Trompelt, Kerstin; Barth, Johannes; Gäbelein, Philipp; Steinbeck, Janina; Xue, Huidan; Clowez, Sophie; Fucile, Geoffrey; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Fufezan, Christian; Hippler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In plants and algae, the serine/threonine kinase STN7/STT7, orthologous protein kinases in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), respectively, is an important regulator in acclimation to changing light environments. In this work, we assessed STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation under high light in C. reinhardtii, known to fully induce the expression of LIGHT-HARVESTING COMPLEX STRESS-RELATED PROTEIN3 (LHCSR3) and a nonphotochemical quenching mechanism, in relationship to anoxia where the activity of cyclic electron flow is stimulated. Our quantitative proteomics data revealed numerous unique STT7 protein substrates and STT7-dependent protein phosphorylation variations that were reliant on the environmental condition. These results indicate that STT7-dependent phosphorylation is modulated by the environment and point to an intricate chloroplast phosphorylation network responding in a highly sensitive and dynamic manner to environmental cues and alterations in kinase function. Functionally, the absence of the STT7 kinase triggered changes in protein expression and photoinhibition of photosystem I (PSI) and resulted in the remodeling of photosynthetic complexes. This remodeling initiated a pronounced association of LHCSR3 with PSI-LIGHT HARVESTING COMPLEX I (LHCI)-ferredoxin-NADPH oxidoreductase supercomplexes. Lack of STT7 kinase strongly diminished PSII-LHCII supercomplexes, while PSII core complex phosphorylation and accumulation were significantly enhanced. In conclusion, our study provides strong evidence that the regulation of protein phosphorylation is critical for driving successful acclimation to high light and anoxic growth environments and gives new insights into acclimation strategies to these environmental conditions. PMID:25858915

  3. A novel plant protein undergoing light-induced phosphorylation and release from the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Carlberg, Inger; Hansson, Maria; Kieselbach, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang P.; Andersson, Bertil; Vener, Alexander V.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of a phosphoprotein with a relative electrophoretic mobility of 12 kDa have been unknown during two decades of studies on redox-dependent protein phosphorylation in plant photosynthetic membranes. Digestion of this protein from spinach thylakoid membranes with trypsin and subsequent tandem nanospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the peptides revealed a protein sequence that did not correspond to any previously known protein. Sequencing of the corresponding cDNA uncovered a gene for a precursor protein with a transit peptide followed by a strongly basic mature protein with a molecular mass of 8,640 Da. Genes encoding homologous proteins were found on chromosome 3 of Arabidopsis and rice as well as in ESTs from 20 different plant species, but not from any other organisms. The protein can be released from the membrane with high salt and is also partially released in response to light-induced phosphorylation of thylakoids, in contrast to all other known thylakoid phosphoproteins, which are integral to the membrane. On the basis of its properties, this plant-specific protein is named thylakoid soluble phosphoprotein of 9 kDa (TSP9). Mass spectrometric analyses revealed the existence of non-, mono-, di-, and triphosphorylated forms of TSP9 and phosphorylation of three distinct threonine residues in the central part of the protein. The phosphorylation and release of TSP9 from the photosynthetic membrane on illumination favor participation of this basic protein in cell signaling and regulation of plant gene expression in response to changing light conditions. PMID:12524456

  4. A novel plant protein undergoing light-induced phosphorylation and release from the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, Inger; Hansson, Maria; Kieselbach, Thomas; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Andersson, Bertil; Vener, Alexander V

    2003-01-21

    The characteristics of a phosphoprotein with a relative electrophoretic mobility of 12 kDa have been unknown during two decades of studies on redox-dependent protein phosphorylation in plant photosynthetic membranes. Digestion of this protein from spinach thylakoid membranes with trypsin and subsequent tandem nanospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the peptides revealed a protein sequence that did not correspond to any previously known protein. Sequencing of the corresponding cDNA uncovered a gene for a precursor protein with a transit peptide followed by a strongly basic mature protein with a molecular mass of 8,640 Da. Genes encoding homologous proteins were found on chromosome 3 of Arabidopsis and rice as well as in ESTs from 20 different plant species, but not from any other organisms. The protein can be released from the membrane with high salt and is also partially released in response to light-induced phosphorylation of thylakoids, in contrast to all other known thylakoid phosphoproteins, which are integral to the membrane. On the basis of its properties, this plant-specific protein is named thylakoid soluble phosphoprotein of 9 kDa (TSP9). Mass spectrometric analyses revealed the existence of non-, mono-, di-, and triphosphorylated forms of TSP9 and phosphorylation of three distinct threonine residues in the central part of the protein. The phosphorylation and release of TSP9 from the photosynthetic membrane on illumination favor participation of this basic protein in cell signaling and regulation of plant gene expression in response to changing light conditions. PMID:12524456

  5. Phosphorylation of the RNA-binding protein Dazl by MAPKAP kinase 2 regulates spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Patrick A.; Krug, Michael S.; McMillan, Emily A.; Peake, Jasmine D.; Davis, Tara L.; Cocklin, Simon; Strochlic, Todd I.

    2016-01-01

    Developing male germ cells are exquisitely sensitive to environmental insults such as heat and oxidative stress. An additional characteristic of these cells is their unique dependence on RNA-binding proteins for regulating posttranscriptional gene expression and translational control. Here we provide a mechanistic link unifying these two features. We show that the germ cell–specific RNA-binding protein deleted in azoospermia-like (Dazl) is phosphorylated by MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), a stress-induced protein kinase activated downstream of p38 MAPK. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of Dazl by MK2 on an evolutionarily conserved serine residue inhibits its interaction with poly(A)-binding protein, resulting in reduced translation of Dazl-regulated target RNAs. We further show that transgenic expression of wild-type human Dazl but not a phosphomimetic form in the Drosophila male germline can restore fertility to flies deficient in boule, the Drosophila orthologue of human Dazl. These results illuminate a novel role for MK2 in spermatogenesis, expand the repertoire of RNA-binding proteins phosphorylated by this kinase, and suggest that signaling by the p38-MK2 pathway is a negative regulator of spermatogenesis via phosphorylation of Dazl. PMID:27280388

  6. Characterization of protein phosphatase 2A acting on phosphorylated plasma membrane aquaporin of tulip petals.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    A protein phosphatase holo-type enzyme (38, 65, and 75 kDa) preparation and a free catalytic subunit (38 kDa) purified from tulip petals were characterized as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by immunological and biochemical approaches. The plasma membrane containing the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP) was prepared from tulip petals, phosphorylated in vitro, and used as the substrate for both of the purified PP2A preparations. Although both preparations dephosphorylated the phosphorylated PM-AQP at 20 degrees C, only the holo-type enzyme preparation acted at 5 degrees C on the phosphorylated PM-AQP with higher substrate specificity, suggesting that regulatory subunits are required for low temperature-dependent dephosphorylation of PM-AQP in tulip petals.

  7. Role of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin in phosphorylation of proteins in plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier, M.J.

    1984-04-04

    The objective of the research is to provide an understanding of in vitro requirements for Ca/sup +2/ dependent protein phosphorylation in plant cells and determine whether this Ca/sup +2/ mediated phosphorylation represents one of the underlying mechanisms by which plants respond to external stimuli. A higher plant model system (soybean cells) has been identified. Both membrane and supernatant fractions were found to contain Ca/sup +2/ dependent protein kinases. Further work will concentrate on the supernatant protein fraction in order to isolate, to homogeneity, the proteins of interest. Casein and lysine-rich histones were found to be good substrates for use in an assay for one of the Ca/sup +2/ dependent kinases. Current work involves isolating and characterizing the Ca/sup +2/ dependent protein kinases, and some of their substrates from the soluble fraction of extracts of soybean cell cultures.

  8. Monoclonal antibody PHF-1 recognizes tau protein phosphorylated at serine residues 396 and 404.

    PubMed

    Otvos, L; Feiner, L; Lang, E; Szendrei, G I; Goedert, M; Lee, V M

    1994-12-15

    The microtubule-associated protein tau is hyperphosphorylated in the paired helical filaments (PHFs) of Alzheimer's disease. Immunological and direct chemical studies have identified Ser396 and Ser404 as two of the phosphorylated sites. Previously, we have demonstrated, using synthetic tau peptides containing phosphorylated Ser396, that this site is recognized by the monoclonal antibody PHF-1. The present study extends this observation by showing that PHF-1 recognizes tau peptides containing either individually phosphorylated Ser396 or Ser404, but that there is a > 10-fold increase in the sensitivity of detection of tau peptides by PHF-1 when both serines are phosphorylated. The recognition of singly or doubly phosphorylated Ser396 and Ser404 in tau by PHF-1 can also be demonstrated in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with full-length wild-type tau constructs or mutant constructs with Ala substituted for Ser396 or Ser404. We conclude that the PHF-1 epitope contains both phosphorylated Ser396 and Ser404.

  9. Acute Footshock Stress Induces Time-Dependent Modifications of AMPA/NMDA Protein Expression and AMPA Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Daniela; Mora, Cristina; Tornese, Paolo; Sala, Nathalie; Filippini, Alice; La Via, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Calza, Stefano; Bonanno, Gianbattista; Racagni, Giorgio; Gennarelli, Massimo; Popoli, Maurizio; Musazzi, Laura; Barbon, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on patients with stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders reported functional and morphological changes in brain areas where glutamatergic transmission is predominant, including frontal and prefrontal areas. In line with this evidence, several preclinical works suggest that glutamate receptors are targets of both rapid and long-lasting effects of stress. Here we found that acute footshock- (FS-) stress, although inducing no transcriptional and RNA editing alterations of ionotropic AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits, rapidly and transiently modulates their protein expression, phosphorylation, and localization at postsynaptic spines in prefrontal and frontal cortex. In total extract, FS-stress increased the phosphorylation levels of GluA1 AMPA subunit at Ser845 immediately after stress and of GluA2 Ser880 2 h after start of stress. At postsynaptic spines, stress induced a rapid decrease of GluA2 expression, together with an increase of its phosphorylation at Ser880, suggesting internalization of GluA2 AMPA containing receptors. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA receptor subunits were found markedly upregulated in postsynaptic spines, 2 h after start of stress. These results suggest selected time-dependent changes in glutamatergic receptor subunits induced by acute stress, which may suggest early and transient enhancement of AMPA-mediated currents, followed by a transient activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:26966584

  10. Quantitative methods for the analysis of protein phosphorylation in drug development.

    PubMed

    Olive, D Michael

    2004-10-01

    Most signal transduction and cell signaling pathways are mediated by protein kinases. Protein kinases have emerged as important cellular regulatory proteins in many aspects of neoplasia. Protein kinase inhibitors offer the opportunity to target diseases such as cancer with chemotherapeutic agents specific for the causative molecular defect. In order to identify possible targets and assess kinase inhibitors, quantitative methods for analyzing protein phosphorylation have been developed. This review examines some of the current formats used for quantifying kinase function for drug development. PMID:15966829

  11. Alteration of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in aged skeletal muscle involves modification of adenine nucleotide translocator.

    PubMed

    Gouspillou, Gilles; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Rouland, Richard; Calmettes, Guillaume; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Deschodt-Arsac, Véronique; Diolez, Philippe

    2010-02-01

    The process of skeletal muscle aging is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass and functionality. The underlying mechanisms are highly complex and remain unclear. This study was designed to further investigate the consequences of aging on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in rat gastrocnemius muscle, by comparing young (6 months) and aged (21 months) rats. Maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity was clearly reduced in older rats, while mitochondrial efficiency was unaffected. Inner membrane properties were unaffected in aged rats since proton leak kinetics were identical to young rats. Application of top-down control analysis revealed a dysfunction of the phosphorylation module in older rats, responsible for a dysregulation of oxidative phosphorylation under low activities close to in vivo ATP turnover. This dysregulation is responsible for an impaired mitochondrial response toward changes in cellular ATP demand, leading to a decreased membrane potential which may in turn affect ROS production and ion homeostasis. Based on our data, we propose that modification of ANT properties with aging could partly explain these mitochondrial dysfunctions.

  12. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Zhuang, Yugang; Harbeck, Mark C; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity. PMID:26560496

  13. Glucose Regulated Protein 78 Phosphorylation in Sperm Undergoes Dynamic Changes during Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Vivian; Rao, Parimala; Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kulkarni, Vijay; Parte, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    GRP78, a resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone involved in protein transport, folding and assembly, has been reported in sperm. It is shown to be localized in the neck region of human sperm. We have previously reported GRP78 to be less phosphorylated in asthenozoosperm.The present study aimed to determine whether sperm GRP78 undergoes phosphorylation changes during epididymal maturation and whether there are any differences in GRP78 phosphoforms in asthenozoosperm vis-à-vis normozoosperm. Testicular- and cauda epididymal- sperm from adult male Holtzman rats, and semen ejaculates collected from normal and asthenozoospermic individuals were investigated. DIGE carried out to determine phosphorylation of GRP78 in asthenozoosperm and normal sperm reveals a shift in the location of GRP78 of asthenozoosperm towards the alkaline pH, indicative of reduced GRP78 phosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation studies using antibodies specific to GRP78, serine-, threonine-, and tyrosine phosphorylation and Pan phospho antibody demonstrates GRP78 to be phosphorylated at all three residues in rat spermatozoa. Phosphatase assays using Calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase and Lambda protein phosphatase followed by nanofluidic proteomic immunoassay (NIA) show that in rat, GP4.96, GP4.94 and GP4.85 are the three phosphoforms in mature (caudal) sperm as against two phosphoforms GP4.96and GP4.94in immature (testicular) sperm. In mature human sperm GP5.04, GP4.96, and GP4.94were the 3 phosphoforms observed. GP4.94[P = 0.014]andGP5.04 [P = 0.02] are significantly reduced in asthenozoosperm. Ours is the first report indicating GRP78 in sperm to be phosphorylated at serine, threonine and tyrosine residues contrary to published literature reporting GRP78 not to be tyrosine phosphorylated. We report the presence of GRP78 phosphoforms in rat- and human- sperm and our data suggest that GRP78 phosphorylation in sperm undergoes spatial reorganization during epididymal maturation. Significant

  14. Pr-specific phytochrome phosphorylation in vitro by a protein kinase present in anti-phytochrome maize immunoprecipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, B. J.; Pao, L. I.; Feldman, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase activity has repeatedly been found to co-purify with the plant photoreceptor phytochrome, suggesting that light signals received by phytochrome may be transduced or modulated through protein phosphorylation. In this study immunoprecipitation techniques were used to characterize protein kinase activity associated with phytochrome from maize (Zea mays L.). A protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated phytochrome was present in washed anti-phytochrome immunoprecipitates of etiolated coleoptile proteins. No other substrate tested was phosphorylated by this kinase. Adding salts or detergents to disrupt low-affinity protein interactions reduced background phosphorylation in immunoprecipitates without affecting phytochrome phosphorylation, indicating that the protein kinase catalytic activity is either intrinsic to the phytochrome molecule or associated with it by high-affinity interactions. Red irradiation (of coleoptiles or extracts) sufficient to approach photoconversion saturation reduced phosphorylation of immunoprecipitated phytochrome. Subsequent far-red irradiation reversed the red-light effect. Phytochrome phosphorylation was stimulated about 10-fold by a co-immunoprecipitated factor. The stimulatory factor was highest in immunoprecipitates when Mg2+ was present in immunoprecipitation reactions but remained in the supernatant in the absence of Mg2+. These observations provide strong support for the hypothesis that phytochrome-associated protein kinase modulates light responses in vivo. Since only phytochrome was found to be phosphorylated, the co-immunoprecipitated protein kinase may function to regulate receptor activity.

  15. Differential protein phosphorylation in induction of thyroid cell proliferation by thyrotropin, epidermal growth factor, or phorbol ester.

    PubMed Central

    Contor, L; Lamy, F; Lecocq, R; Roger, P P; Dumont, J E

    1988-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation was studied in primary cultures of thyroid epithelial cells after the addition of different mitogens: thyrotropin (TSH) acting through cyclic AMP, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). EGF or TPA increased the phosphorylation of five common polypeptides. Among these, two 42-kilodalton proteins contained phosphotyrosine and phosphoserine with or without phosphothreonine. Their characteristics suggested that they are similar to the two 42-kilodalton target proteins for tyrosine protein phosphorylation demonstrated in fibroblasts in response to mitogens. No common phosphorylated proteins were detected in TSH-treated cells and in EGF- or TPA-treated cells. The differences in the protein phosphorylation patterns in response to TSH, EGF, and TPA suggested that the newly emerging cyclic AMP-mediated mitogenic pathway is distinct from the better known growth factor- and tumor promoter-induced pathways. Images PMID:3261388

  16. Circles within circles: crosstalk between protein Ser/Thr/Tyr-phosphorylation and Met oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Reversible posttranslational protein modifications such as phosphorylation of Ser/Thr/Tyr and Met oxidation are critical for both metabolic regulation and cellular signalling. Although these modifications are typically studied individually, herein we describe the potential for cross-talk...

  17. Kaposi΄s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF36 protein induces chromosome condensation and phosphorylation of histone H3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunmi; Cha, Seho; Jang, Jun Hyeong; Kim, Yejin; Seo, Taegun

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi΄s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has been known as an agent causing Kaposi΄s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman΄s disease. In the lytic phase of the virus cycle, various viral genes are expressed, which causes host cell dysregulation. Among the lytic genes, viral protein kinase (vPK) encoded by ORF36 is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase (CHPK) family, which is involved in viral gene expression, viral DNA replication and encapsidation, and nuclear egress of virions. Recent studies have shown that the BGLF4 protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of the CHPK family, alters the host cell chromatin structure through phosphorylation of its key regulators. The role of KSHV ORF36 in cellular mitotic events, however, is not yet understood. In the current study, we showed that KSHV ORF36 induced chromosome condensation and phosphorylation of histone H3 on Ser 10, which are known as cellular mitosis markers. These processes have occurred in a kinase activity-dependent manner. PMID:23530827

  18. In situ phosphorylation of proteins in MCTs microdissected from rat kidney: Effect of AVP

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, S.; Gapstur, S.M.; Yusufi, N.K.; Dousa, T.P. )

    1988-04-01

    Adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein phosphorylation is considered a key step in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) to regulate water permeability in collecting tubules. However, the proteins serving as a substrate(s) for phosphorylation in undisrupted cells have not yet been identified. In the present study, the authors developed a method for investigation of in situ phosphorylation of microdissected segments of medullary collecting tubules (MCT) from rat kidney. Incubation of microdissected MCT segments with low concentrations of saponin, semipermeabilization, increased permeability of the membrane for ATP but did not allow leakage of macromolecules such as lactate dehydrogenase. This treatment also did not cause major disruption of cell structure, or impairment of AVP-sensitive adenylate cyclase. Incubation of semipermeabilized MCT with {gamma}-({sup 32}P)ATP resulted in corporation of {sup 32}P{sub i} into two major protein bands detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent autoradiography. Similar incubation of tubules disrupted by hyposmotic solutions and a stronger detergent Triton X-100 resulted in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into multiple protein bands. These findings demonstrate a novel method for identification of endogenous protein substrate(s) for cAMP-dependent protein kinase and other protein kinases and phosphatases that are probably involved in post-cAMP steps in the cellular action of AVP in the intact cells of collecting tubules.

  19. Protein phosphorylation detection using dual-mode field-effect devices and nanoplasmonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; di Lorenzo, Mirella; Pula, Giordano; Estrela, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylation by kinases is an important post-translational modification of proteins. It is a critical control for the regulation of vital cellular activities, and its dysregulation is implicated in several diseases. A common drug discovery approach involves, therefore, time-consuming screenings of large libraries of candidate compounds to identify novel inhibitors of protein kinases. In this work, we propose a novel method that combines localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and electrolyte insulator semiconductor (EIS)-based proton detection for the rapid identification of novel protein kinase inhibitors. In particular, the selective detection of thiophosphorylated proteins by LSPR is achieved by changing their resonance properties via a pre-binding with gold nanoparticles. In parallel, the EIS field-effect structure allows the real-time electrochemical monitoring of the protein phosphorylation by detecting the release of protons associated with the kinases activity. This innovative combination of both field-effect and nanoplasmonic sensing makes the detection of protein phosphorylation more reliable and effective. As a result, the screening of protein kinase inhibitors becomes more rapid, sensitive, robust and cost-effective.

  20. Protein phosphorylation detection using dual-mode field-effect devices and nanoplasmonic sensors

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Di Lorenzo, Mirella; Pula, Giordano; Estrela, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation by kinases is an important post-translational modification of proteins. It is a critical control for the regulation of vital cellular activities, and its dysregulation is implicated in several diseases. A common drug discovery approach involves, therefore, time-consuming screenings of large libraries of candidate compounds to identify novel inhibitors of protein kinases. In this work, we propose a novel method that combines localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and electrolyte insulator semiconductor (EIS)-based proton detection for the rapid identification of novel protein kinase inhibitors. In particular, the selective detection of thiophosphorylated proteins by LSPR is achieved by changing their resonance properties via a pre-binding with gold nanoparticles. In parallel, the EIS field-effect structure allows the real-time electrochemical monitoring of the protein phosphorylation by detecting the release of protons associated with the kinases activity. This innovative combination of both field-effect and nanoplasmonic sensing makes the detection of protein phosphorylation more reliable and effective. As a result, the screening of protein kinase inhibitors becomes more rapid, sensitive, robust and cost-effective. PMID:25732235

  1. Analysis of phosphorylated proteins and inhibition of kinase activity during Giardia intestinalis excystation.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Magda E; Wasserman, Moisés

    2010-03-01

    The parasite Giardia intestinalis undergoes a differentiation process that allows it to infect its mammal host. That process is excystation. We examined the importance of protein phosphorylation during the passage from cyst to trophozoite. Cysts obtained from patients with giardiasis were excysted in vitro and the soluble cytoplasmic proteins were analyzed during the three phases of the process, using a specific staining for phosphoproteins. We found two phosphorylated proteins and identified them with MALDI-TOF as 14-3-3 and Hsp70. Modifications were detected in both proteins, which could indicate a role in differentiation of the parasite. In addition, the inhibition of serine-threonine kinases during excystation specifically affected the cytokinesis of the excyzoite, thus inhibiting the completion of trophozoite formation.

  2. Phosphorylation Reaction in cAPK Protein Kinase - Free Energy Quantum Mechanic/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Yang, Jie; Adams, Joseph; Taylor, Susan S.; Weare, John H.

    2007-11-29

    Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP, a key regulatory process governing signalling pathways in eukaryotic cells. The structure of the active site in these enzymes is highly conserved implying common catalytic mechanism. In this work we investigate the reaction process in cAPK protein kinase (PKA) using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics approach. The novel computational features of our work include reaction pathway determination with nudged elastic band methodology and calculation of free energy profiles of the reaction process taking into account finite temperature fluctuations of the protein environment. We find that the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group in the protein environment is an exothermic reaction with the reaction barrier of 15 kcal/mol.

  3. The Allosteric Mechanism Induced by Protein Kinase A (PKA) Phosphorylation of Dematin (Band 4.9)*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Brown, Jeffrey W.; Mok, Yee-Foong; Hatters, Danny M.; McKnight, C. James

    2013-01-01

    Dematin (band 4.9) is an F-actin binding and bundling protein best known for its role within red blood cells, where it both stabilizes as well as attaches the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton to the erythrocytic membrane. Here, we investigate the structural consequences of phosphorylating serine 381, a covalent modification that turns off F-actin bundling activity. In contrast to the canonical doctrine, in which phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered region/protein confers affinity for another domain/protein, we found the converse to be true of dematin: phosphorylation of the well folded C-terminal villin-type headpiece confers affinity for its intrinsically disordered N-terminal core domain. We employed analytical ultracentrifugation to demonstrate that dematin is monomeric, in contrast to the prevailing view that it is trimeric. Next, using a series of truncation mutants, we verified that dematin has two F-actin binding sites, one in the core domain and the other in the headpiece domain. Although the phosphorylation-mimicking mutant, S381E, was incapable of bundling microfilaments, it retains the ability to bind F-actin. We found that a phosphorylation-mimicking mutant, S381E, eliminated the ability to bundle, but not bind F-actin filaments. Lastly, we show that the S381E point mutant caused the headpiece domain to associate with the core domain, leading us to the mechanism for cAMP-dependent kinase control of dematin's F-actin bundling activity: when unphosphorylated, dematin's two F-actin binding domains move independent of one another permitting them to bind different F-actin filaments. Phosphorylation causes these two domains to associate, forming a compact structure, and sterically eliminating one of these F-actin binding sites. PMID:23355471

  4. New Phosphospecific Antibody Reveals Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation of CPEB3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Kapil; Sylvester, Marc; Skubal, Magdalena; Josten, Michele; Steinhäuser, Christian; De Koninck, Paul; Theis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding proteins (CPEBs) are a family of polyadenylation factors interacting with 3’UTRs of mRNA and thereby regulating gene expression. Various functions of CPEBs in development, synaptic plasticity, and cellular senescence have been reported. Four CPEB family members of partially overlapping functions have been described to date, each containing a distinct alternatively spliced region. This region is highly conserved between CPEBs-2-4 and contains a putative phosphorylation consensus, overlapping with the exon seven of CPEB3. We previously found CPEBs-2-4 splice isoforms containing exon seven to be predominantly present in neurons, and the isoform expression pattern to be cell type-specific. Here, focusing on the alternatively spliced region of CPEB3, we determined that putative neuronal isoforms of CPEB3 are phosphorylated. Using a new phosphospecific antibody directed to the phosphorylation consensus we found Protein Kinase A and Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II to robustly phosphorylate CPEB3 in vitro and in primary hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, status epilepticus induced by systemic kainate injection in mice led to specific upregulation of the CPEB3 isoforms containing exon seven. Extensive analysis of CPEB3 phosphorylation in vitro revealed two other phosphorylation sites. In addition, we found plethora of potential kinases that might be targeting the alternatively spliced kinase consensus site of CPEB3. As this site is highly conserved between the CPEB family members, we suggest the existence of a splicing-based regulatory mechanism of CPEB function, and describe a robust phosphospecific antibody to study it in future. PMID:26915047

  5. New Phosphospecific Antibody Reveals Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation of CPEB3 Protein.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Labrie-Dion, Étienne; Sehgal, Kapil; Sylvester, Marc; Skubal, Magdalena; Josten, Michele; Steinhäuser, Christian; De Koninck, Paul; Theis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding proteins (CPEBs) are a family of polyadenylation factors interacting with 3'UTRs of mRNA and thereby regulating gene expression. Various functions of CPEBs in development, synaptic plasticity, and cellular senescence have been reported. Four CPEB family members of partially overlapping functions have been described to date, each containing a distinct alternatively spliced region. This region is highly conserved between CPEBs-2-4 and contains a putative phosphorylation consensus, overlapping with the exon seven of CPEB3. We previously found CPEBs-2-4 splice isoforms containing exon seven to be predominantly present in neurons, and the isoform expression pattern to be cell type-specific. Here, focusing on the alternatively spliced region of CPEB3, we determined that putative neuronal isoforms of CPEB3 are phosphorylated. Using a new phosphospecific antibody directed to the phosphorylation consensus we found Protein Kinase A and Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II to robustly phosphorylate CPEB3 in vitro and in primary hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, status epilepticus induced by systemic kainate injection in mice led to specific upregulation of the CPEB3 isoforms containing exon seven. Extensive analysis of CPEB3 phosphorylation in vitro revealed two other phosphorylation sites. In addition, we found plethora of potential kinases that might be targeting the alternatively spliced kinase consensus site of CPEB3. As this site is highly conserved between the CPEB family members, we suggest the existence of a splicing-based regulatory mechanism of CPEB function, and describe a robust phosphospecific antibody to study it in future. PMID:26915047

  6. Effect of growth hormone on protein phosphorylation in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, K.; Lipson, K.E.; Marino, M.W.; Donner, D.B.

    1987-02-10

    Hepatocytes from male rats were incubated with (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/ for 40 min at 37/sup 0/C, thereby equilibrating the cellular ATP pool with /sup 32/P. Subsequent exposure to bovine growth hormone for 10 additional min did not change the specific activity of cellular (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or chromatofocusing followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to fractionate phosphoproteins solubilized from control or hormone-stimulated cells. Stimulation of hepatocytes with 5 nM growth hormone for 10 min at 37/sup 0/C affected the phosphorylation of a number of proteins including an M/sub r/ 46,000 species of pI 4.7 whose phosphorylation was augmented (2.65 +/- 0.50)-fold. A significant fraction of the maximal effect of growth hormone on phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 46,000 species was elicited by 1-5% receptor occupancy. Bovine growth hormone, which binds to somatogenic receptors with great specificity, or recombinant human growth hormone, which is not contaminated with other hormones, affected phosphorylation of hepatic proteins similarly. The M/sub r/ 46,000 phosphoprotein was isolated in a fraction enriched in cytosol after centrifugation of cellular homogenates. Phosphorylation of the M/sub r/ 46,000 phosphoprotein was also increased (1.75 +/- 0.35)-fold and (2.15 +/- 0.50)-fold by insulin and glucagon, respectively. These observations are consistent with the possibility that selective changes in the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins may mediate growth hormone actions in cells.

  7. Inhibition of protein phosphorylation by synthetic peptides from the Fc region of human IgG during the mixed lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, M.R.; Hahn, G.S.; Plummer, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    Certain synthetic peptides derived from the Fc region of human IgG suppressed protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis during mixed lymphocyte reactions. Responder mononuclear cells were incubated with medium or agents that alter phosphorylation of cellular proteins before immunomodulatory Fc peptides and stimulator cells were added. Incubating cells with trifluoperazine which inhibits calcium binding to calmodulin and inhibits protein kinase C (PKC) increased inhibition of the MLR induced by Fc peptides. Conversely, incubating cells with dubutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP), calmodulin, 1,2-diolein, or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) abolished inhibition of the MLR induced by Fc peptides. Inhibition of the MLR by Fc ..gamma.. peptides was not affected when DBcAMP or PMA was added after peptide addition. The PKC activity of cell homogenates was decreased by 69% when Fc..gamma.. peptides were present during the MLR. The in vitro phosphorylation of histone Hl by partially purified PKC from lymphocytes was inhibited 74% in the presence of Fc..gamma.. peptides. These results indicate that suppression of the MLR induced by Fc..gamma.. peptides is dependent on inhibition of protein phosphorylation by kinases including protein kinase C. The inhibition of phosphorylation may be related to the ability of Fc..gamma.. peptides to reverse animal models of autoimmune disease.

  8. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRA per se (KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  9. Membrane association of sucrose synthase: changes during the graviresponse and possible control by protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) plays an important role in sucrose degradation and occurs both as a soluble and as a membrane-associated enzyme in higher plants. We show that membrane association can vary in vivo in response to gravistimulation, apparently involving SuSy dephosphorylation, and is a reversible process in vitro. Phosphorylation of SuSy has little effect on its activity but decreases its surface hydrophobicity as reported with the fluorescent probe bis-ANS. We postulate that phosphorylation of SuSy (and perhaps other membrane proteins) is involved in the release of the membrane-bound enzyme in part as a result of decreased surface hydrophobicity.

  10. Phosphorylation of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP1.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, J I; Consigli, R A

    1992-01-01

    The structural proteins of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus, the first known nonmammalian polyomavirus, were analyzed by isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The major capsid protein VP1 was found to be composed of at least five distinct species having isoelectric points ranging from pH 6.45 to 5.85. By analogy with the murine polyomavirus, these species apparently result from different modifications of an initial translation product. Primary chicken embryo cells were infected in the presence of 32Pi to determine whether the virus structural proteins were modified by phosphorylation. SDS-PAGE of the purified virus structural proteins demonstrated that VP1 (along with both minor capsid proteins) was phosphorylated. Two-dimensional analysis of the radiolabeled virus showed phosphorylation of only the two most acidic isoelectric species of VP1, indicating that this posttranslational modification contributes to VP1 species heterogeneity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP1 revealed that phosphoserine is the only phosphoamino acid present in the VP1 protein. Images PMID:1318417

  11. Phosphorylation of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The structural proteins of the budgerigar fledgling disease virus, the first known nonmammalian polyomavirus, were analyzed by isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The major capsid protein VP1 was found to be composed of at least five distinct species having isoelectric points ranging from pH 6.45 to 5.85. By analogy with the murine polyomavirus, these species apparently result from different modifications of an initial translation product. Primary chicken embryo cells were infected in the presence of 32Pi to determine whether the virus structural proteins were modified by phosphorylation. SDS-PAGE of the purified virus structural proteins demonstrated that VP1 (along with both minor capsid proteins) was phosphorylated. Two-dimensional analysis of the radiolabeled virus showed phosphorylation of only the two most acidic isoelectric species of VP1, indicating that this posttranslational modification contributes to VP1 species heterogeneity. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP1 revealed that phosphoserine is the only phosphoamino acid present in the VP1 protein.

  12. Regulated phosphorylation of secretory granule membrane proteins of the rat parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, C.R.; Castle, J.D.; Gorelick, F.S. )

    1990-07-01

    An antiserum raised against purified rat parotid secretory granule membrane proteins has been used to identify organelle-specific protein phosphorylation events following stimulation of intact cells from the rat parotid gland. After lobules were prelabeled with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and exposed to secretagogues, phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated with the granule membrane protein antiserum, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography. Parallel studies of stimulated amylase release were performed. Isoproterenol treatment of parotid lobules resulted in an increase in the phosphate content of immunoprecipitable 60- and 72-kDa proteins that correlated with amylase release in a time-dependent manner. Forskolin addition mimicked these effects, but only the isoproterenol effects were reversed by propranolol treatment. To confirm the specificity of the antiserum to the secretory granule membrane fraction, subcellular isolation techniques were employed following in situ phosphorylation. The 60- and 72-kDa phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated from both a particulate fraction and a purified secretory granule fraction. Furthermore, the extraction properties of both species suggest that they are integral membrane proteins. These findings support the possibility that stimulus-regulated secretion may involve phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins of the exocrine secretory granule.

  13. Learning from each other: ABC transporter regulation by protein phosphorylation in plant and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Laurent, Christophe; Geisler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter family in higher plants is highly expanded compared with those of mammalians. Moreover, some members of the plant ABC subfamily B (ABCB) display very high substrate specificity compared with their mammalian counterparts that are often associated with multi-drug resistance phenomena. In this review, we highlight prominent functions of plant and mammalian ABC transporters and summarize our knowledge on their post-transcriptional regulation with a focus on protein phosphorylation. A deeper comparison of regulatory events of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and ABCB1 from the model plant Arabidopsis reveals a surprisingly high degree of similarity. Both physically interact with orthologues of the FK506-binding proteins that chaperon both transporters to the plasma membrane in an action that seems to involve heat shock protein (Hsp)90. Further, both transporters are phosphorylated at regulatory domains that connect both nt-binding folds. Taken together, it appears that ABC transporters exhibit an evolutionary conserved but complex regulation by protein phosphorylation, which apparently is, at least in some cases, tightly connected with protein-protein interactions (PPI). PMID:26517911

  14. Phosphorylation mediates the nuclear targeting of the maize Rab17 protein.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A B; Goday, A; Figueras, M; Jessop, A C; Pagès, M

    1998-03-01

    The maize abscisic acid-responsive Rab17 protein localizes to the nucleus and cytoplasm in maize cells. In-frame fusion of Rab17 to the reporter protein beta-glucuronidase (GUS) directed GUS to the nucleus and cytoplasm in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and in transiently transformed onion cells. Analysis of chimeric constructs identified one region between amino acid positions 66-96, which was necessary for targeting GUS to the nucleus. This region contains a serine cluster followed by a putative consensus site for protein kinase CK2 phosphorylation, and a stretch of basic amino acids resembling the simian virus 40 large T antigen-type nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutation of two basic amino acids in the putative NLS had a weak effect on nuclear targeting in the onion cell system and did not modify the percentage of nuclear fusion protein in the Arabidopsis cells. The mutation of three amino acids in the consensus site for CK2 recognition resulted in the absence of in vitro phosphorylated forms of Rab17 and in a strong decrease of GUS enzymatic activity in isolated nuclei of transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Rab17 by protein kinase CK2 is the relevant step for its nuclear location, either by facilitating binding to specific proteins or as a direct part of the nuclear targeting apparatus. PMID:9681011

  15. The PhosphoGRID Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphorylation site database: version 2.0 update

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Ivan; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Stark, Chris; Su, Ting-Cheng; Dahabieh, Matthew; Raithatha, Sheetal; Bernhard, Wendy; Oughtred, Rose; Dolinski, Kara; Barreto, Kris; Tyers, Mike

    2013-01-01

    PhosphoGRID is an online database that curates and houses experimentally verified in vivo phosphorylation sites in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome (www.phosphogrid.org). Phosphosites are annotated with specific protein kinases and/or phosphatases, along with the condition(s) under which the phosphorylation occurs and/or the effects on protein function. We report here an updated data set, including nine additional high-throughput (HTP) mass spectrometry studies. The version 2.0 data set contains information on 20 177 unique phosphorylated residues, representing a 4-fold increase from version 1.0, and includes 1614 unique phosphosites derived from focused low-throughput (LTP) studies. The overlap between HTP and LTP studies represents only ∼3% of the total unique sites, but importantly 45% of sites from LTP studies with defined function were discovered in at least two independent HTP studies. The majority of new phosphosites in this update occur on previously documented proteins, suggesting that coverage of phosphoproteins in the yeast proteome is approaching saturation. We will continue to update the PhosphoGRID data set, with the expectation that the integration of information from LTP and HTP studies will enable the development of predictive models of phosphorylation-based signaling networks. Database URL: http://www.phosphogrid.org/ PMID:23674503

  16. Identification of four novel phosphorylation sites in estrogen receptor α: impact on receptor-dependent gene expression and phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα) phosphorylation is important for estrogen-dependent transcription of ER-dependent genes, ligand-independent receptor activation and endocrine therapy response in breast cancer. However ERα phosphorylation at the previously identified sites does not fully account for these receptor functions. To determine if additional ERα phosphorylation sites exist, COS-1 cells expressing human ERα were labeled with [32P]H3PO4 in vivo and ERα tryptic phosphopeptides were isolated to identify phosphorylation sites. Results Previously uncharacterized phosphorylation sites at serines 46/47, 282, 294, and 559 were identified by manual Edman degradation and phosphoamino acid analysis and confirmed by mutagenesis and phospho-specific antibodies. Antibodies detected phosphorylation of endogenous ERα in MCF-7, MCF-7-LCC2, and Ishikawa cancer cell lines by immunoblot. Mutation of Ser-282 and Ser-559 to alanine (S282A, S559A) resulted in ligand independent activation of ERα as determined by both ERE-driven reporter gene assays and endogenous pS2 gene expression in transiently transfected HeLa cells. Mutation of Ser-46/47 or Ser-294 to alanine markedly reduced estradiol dependent reporter activation. Additionally protein kinase CK2 was identified as a kinase that phosphorylated ERα at S282 and S559 using motif analysis, in vitro kinase assays, and incubation of cells with CK2 kinase inhibitor. Conclusion These novel ERα phosphorylation sites represent new means for modulation of ERα activity. S559 represents the first phosphorylation site identified in the extreme C-terminus (F domain) of a steroid receptor. PMID:20043841

  17. The identification and analysis of phosphorylation sites on the Atg1 protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Shah, Khyati H; Chou, Chi-Chi; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Wrasman, Kristie M; Stephan, Joseph S; Stamatakos, Demetra; Khoo, Kay-Hooi

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved, degradative process that has been implicated in a number of human diseases and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. It is therefore important that we develop a thorough understanding of the mechanisms regulating this trafficking pathway. The Atg1 protein kinase is a key element of this control as a number of signaling pathways target this enzyme and its associated protein partners. These studies have established that Atg1 activities are controlled, at least in part, by protein phosphorylation. To further this understanding, we used a combined mass spectrometry and molecular biology approach to identify and characterize additional sites of phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Atg1. Fifteen candidate sites of phosphorylation were identified, including nine that had not been noted previously. Interestingly, our data suggest that the phosphorylation at one of these sites, Ser-34, is inhibitory for both Atg1 kinase activity and autophagy. This site is located within a glycine-rich loop that is highly conserved in protein kinases. Phosphorylation at this position in several cyclin-dependent kinases has also been shown to result in diminished enzymatic activity. In addition, these studies identified Ser-390 as the site of autophosphorylation responsible for the anomalous migration exhibited by Atg1 on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Finally, a mutational analysis suggested that a number of the sites identified here are important for full autophagy activity in vivo. In all, these studies identified a number of potential sites of regulation within Atg1 and will serve as a framework for future work with this enzyme. PMID:21460632

  18. Comparison of phosphorylation kinetics in DNA repair proteins after exposure to high and low LET radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, R.; Okabe, A.; Takakura, K.

    We irradiated plateau phase normal human fibroblasts with 2 Gy X-rays 70 keV um carbon 290MeV n and 200 keV um iron ions 500 MeV n and observed the kinetics of phosphorylation in various proteins associated with DNA double strand break DSB repair GammaH2AX foci a marker for DSBs were detected immediately after irradiation and the peak of phosphorylation was seen 30 to 60 min post-irradiation for three kinds of radiations Disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci was much faster for X-irradiated samples than that for heavy ion irradiated samples the phosphorylation kinetics for carbon and iron ions are similar for gamma-H2AX foci In contrast phosphorylation of an NHEJ protein DNA-PKcs threonine 2609 was significantly delayed in carbon and iron irradiated cells when compared to X-irradiated cells Disappearance of DNA-PKcs sites was much faster in X-irradiated samples than carbon and iron samples which showed a similar pattern as in the case of gamma-H2AX Furthermore in the case of ATM protein phosphorylation serine 1981 iron irradiation alone caused a significant initial delay but the kinetics of disappearance is similar for iron and carbon samples with much higher remaining number of foci in iron samples than those for X-rays and carbon ions These results suggest that 1 high LET irradiation induces complex and or severe DNA DSB damage which affects the function of DSB repair proteins 2 Both ATM and DNA-PKcs may recognize the complexity of DSBs but ATM may be more sensitive to detecting the complexity of DSB damage 3 gamma-H2AX may

  19. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case

    PubMed Central

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  20. Phosphorylation of farnesoid X receptor by protein kinase C promotes its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Gineste, Romain; Sirvent, Audrey; Paumelle, Réjane; Helleboid, Stéphane; Aquilina, Alexis; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2008-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and is activated by bile acids such as chenodeoxycholic acid, or synthetic ligands such as GW4064. FXR is implicated in the regulation of bile acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Posttranslational modifications regulating its activity have not been investigated yet. Here, we demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition impairs ligand-mediated regulation of FXR target genes. Moreover, in a transactivation assay, we show that FXR transcriptional activity is modulated by PKC. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate , a PKC activator, induces the phosphorylation of endogenous FXR in HepG2 cells and PKCalpha phosphorylates in vitro FXR in its DNA-binding domain on S135 and S154. Mutation of S135 and S154 to alanine residues reduces in cell FXR phosphorylation. In contrast to wild-type FXR, mutant FXRS135AS154A displays an impaired PKCalpha-induced transactivation and a decreased ligand-dependent FXR transactivation. Finally, phosphorylation of FXR by PKC promotes the recruitment of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha. In conclusion, these findings show that the phosphorylation of FXR induced by PKCalpha directly modulates the ability of agonists to activate FXR.

  1. The unfolded protein response mediates reversible tau phosphorylation induced by metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    van der Harg, J M; Nölle, A; Zwart, R; Boerema, A S; van Haastert, E S; Strijkstra, A M; Hoozemans, J JM; Scheper, W

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) in close connection with early stages of tau pathology. Metabolic disturbances are strongly associated with increased risk for AD and are a potent inducer of the UPR. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic stress induces the phosphorylation of endogenous tau via activation of the UPR. Strikingly, upon restoration of the metabolic homeostasis, not only the levels of the UPR markers pPERK, pIRE1α and BiP, but also tau phosphorylation are reversed both in cell models as well as in torpor, a physiological hypometabolic model in vivo. Intervention in the UPR using the global UPR inhibitor TUDCA or a specific small-molecule inhibitor of the PERK signaling pathway, inhibits the metabolic stress-induced phosphorylation of tau. These data support a role for UPR-mediated tau phosphorylation as part of an adaptive response to metabolic stress. Failure to restore the metabolic homeostasis will lead to prolonged UPR activation and tau phosphorylation, and may thus contribute to AD pathogenesis. We demonstrate that the UPR is functionally involved in the early stages of tau pathology. Our data indicate that targeting of the UPR may be employed for early intervention in tau-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25165879

  2. Exaggerated phosphorylation of brain tau protein in CRH KO mice exposed to repeated immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Novak, Petr; Vargovic, Peter; Lejavova, Katarina; Horvathova, Lubica; Ondicova, Katarina; Manz, George; Filipcik, Peter; Novak, Michal; Mravec, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses are orchestrated by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and norepinephrine (NE) synthesizing neurons. Recent findings indicate that stress may promote development of neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we investigated relationships among stress, tau protein phosphorylation, and brain NE using wild-type (WT) and CRH-knockout (CRH KO) mice. We assessed expression of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) at the PHF-1 epitope and NE concentrations in the locus coeruleus (LC), A1/C1 and A2/C2 catecholaminergic cell groups, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and frontal cortex of unstressed, singly stressed or repeatedly stressed mice. Moreover, gene expression and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and CRH receptor mRNA were determined in the LC. Plasma corticosterone levels were also measured. Exposure to a single stress increases tau phosphorylation throughout the brain in WT mice when compared to singly stressed CRH KO animals. In contrast, repeatedly stressed CRH KO mice showed exaggerated tau phosphorylation relative to WT controls. We also observed differences in extent of tau phosphorylation between investigated structures, e.g. the LC and hippocampus. Moreover, CRH deficiency leads to different responses to stress in gene expression of TH, NE concentrations, CRH receptor mRNA, and plasma corticosterone levels. Our data indicate that CRH effects on tau phosphorylation are dependent on whether stress is single or repeated, and differs between brain regions. Our findings indicate that CRH attenuates mechanisms responsible for development of stress-induced tau neuropathology, particularly in conditions of chronic stress. However, the involvement of central catecholaminergic neurons in these mechanisms remains unclear and is in need of further investigation. PMID:27484105

  3. Exaggerated phosphorylation of brain tau protein in CRH KO mice exposed to repeated immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Novak, Petr; Vargovic, Peter; Lejavova, Katarina; Horvathova, Lubica; Ondicova, Katarina; Manz, George; Filipcik, Peter; Novak, Michal; Mravec, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses are orchestrated by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and norepinephrine (NE) synthesizing neurons. Recent findings indicate that stress may promote development of neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we investigated relationships among stress, tau protein phosphorylation, and brain NE using wild-type (WT) and CRH-knockout (CRH KO) mice. We assessed expression of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) at the PHF-1 epitope and NE concentrations in the locus coeruleus (LC), A1/C1 and A2/C2 catecholaminergic cell groups, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and frontal cortex of unstressed, singly stressed or repeatedly stressed mice. Moreover, gene expression and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and CRH receptor mRNA were determined in the LC. Plasma corticosterone levels were also measured. Exposure to a single stress increases tau phosphorylation throughout the brain in WT mice when compared to singly stressed CRH KO animals. In contrast, repeatedly stressed CRH KO mice showed exaggerated tau phosphorylation relative to WT controls. We also observed differences in extent of tau phosphorylation between investigated structures, e.g. the LC and hippocampus. Moreover, CRH deficiency leads to different responses to stress in gene expression of TH, NE concentrations, CRH receptor mRNA, and plasma corticosterone levels. Our data indicate that CRH effects on tau phosphorylation are dependent on whether stress is single or repeated, and differs between brain regions. Our findings indicate that CRH attenuates mechanisms responsible for development of stress-induced tau neuropathology, particularly in conditions of chronic stress. However, the involvement of central catecholaminergic neurons in these mechanisms remains unclear and is in need of further investigation.

  4. Phospholamban remains associated with the Ca2+- and Mg2+-dependent ATPase following phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Negash, S; Yao, Q; Sun, H; Li, J; Bigelow, D J; Squier, T C

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescence and spin-label EPR spectroscopy to investigate how the phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB) by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) modifies structural interactions between PLB and the Ca(2+)- and Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase (Ca-ATPase) that result in enzyme activation. Following covalent modification of N-terminal residues of PLB with dansyl chloride or the spin label 4-isothiocyanato-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl ('ITC-TEMPO'), we have co-reconstituted PLB with affinity-purified Ca-ATPase isolated from skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) with full retention of catalytic function. The Ca(2+)-dependence of the ATPase activity of this reconstituted preparation is virtually identical with that observed using native cardiac SR before and after PLB phosphorylation, indicating that co-reconstituted sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (SERCA1) and PLB provide an equivalent experimental model for SERCA2a-PLB interactions. Phosphorylation of PLB in the absence of the Ca-ATPase results in a greater amplitude of rotational mobility, suggesting that the structural linkage between the transmembrane region and the N-terminus is destabilized. However, whereas co-reconstitution with the Ca-ATPase restricts the amplitude of rotational motion of PLB, subsequent phosphorylation of PLB does not significantly alter its rotational dynamics. Thus structural interactions between PLB and the Ca-ATPase that restrict the rotational mobility of the N-terminus of PLB are retained following the phosphorylation of PLB by PKA. On the other hand, the fluorescence intensity decay of bound dansyl is sensitive to the phosphorylation state of PLB, indicating that there are changes in the tertiary structure of PLB coincident with enzyme activation. These results suggest that PLB phosphorylation alters its structural interactions with the Ca-ATPase by inducing structural rearrangements between PLB and the Ca-ATPase within a defined complex that modulates Ca

  5. In vitro binding and phosphorylation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein by serine/threonine protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Bodéus, M; Marie-Cardine, A; Bougeret, C; Ramos-Morales, F; Benarous, R

    1995-06-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nef gene still has no precisely defined function, in vivo studies have demonstrated that Nef is an important pathogenic determinant of HIV. In order to identify cellular proteins capable of binding to Nef, the HIV-1LAI nef gene product was expressed in the bacterial vector pGEX-2T as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Nef fusion protein. Deletion mutants corresponding to 86 and 35 N-terminal residues of the Nef protein were prepared. The GST-Nef constructs were used to identify cellular kinases capable of interacting with Nef. After incubation with a Jurkat cell lysate, the GST-Nef constructs immobilized on glutathione-agarose beads bound to cellular kinase(s) and were phosphorylated at three sites in vitro: one on threonine at position 15, one on serine between residues 1 and 35, and one on threonine between residues 36 and 86. The Nef-phosphorylating activity was inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC)-selective inhibitors. Cell fractionation showed that this Nef-binding kinase was mainly in the membrane-associated fraction. These results suggest that kinase(s) of the PKC family are specifically bound to and phosphorylate Nef in vitro. The interaction of Nef with cellular kinases and its phosphorylation may be important in mediating the effects of Nef in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  6. Phosphorylation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine kinase A PtkA by Ser/Thr protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peifu; Wong, Dennis; Li, Wu; Xie, Jianping; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2015-11-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), has inflicted about one third of mankind and claims millions of deaths worldwide annually. Signalling plays an important role in Mtb pathogenesis and persistence, and thus represents attractive resource for drug target candidates. Here, we show that protein tyrosine kinase A (PtkA) can be phosphorylated by Mtb endogenous eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinases (eSTPKs). Kinase assays showed that PknA, PknD, PknF, and PknK can phosphorylate PtkA in dose- and time-dependent manner. Enzyme kinetics suggests that PknA has the highest affinity and enzymatic efficiency towards PtkA. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction assay in surrogate host showed that PtkA interacts with multi-eSTPKs in vivo, including PknA. Lastly, we show that PtkA phosphorylation by eSTPKs occurs on threonine residues and may effect tyrosine phosphorylation levels and thus PtkA activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that PtkA can serve as a substrate to many eSTPKs and suggests that's its activity can be regulated. PMID:26417687

  7. Redox-sensitive protein phosphatase activity regulates the phosphorylation state of p38 protein kinase in primary astrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, K A; Stewart, C A; Pye, Q N; Nguyen, X; Kenney, L; Salzman, S; Floyd, R A; Hensley, K

    1999-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as second messengers that activate protein kinase cascades, although the means by which ROS regulate signal transduction remains unclear. In the present study, we show that interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), H2O2, and sorbitol-induced hyperosmolarity mediate a 5- to 10-fold increase in phosphorylation (activation) of the p38 protein kinase in rat primary glial cells as measured by analyses of Western blots using an antibody directed against the dually phosphorylated (active) p38. Additionally, IL1beta was found to elicit H2O2 synthesis in these cells. Concurrent with p38 phosphorylation, all three stimulation paradigms caused an inhibition of protein phosphatase activity. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), a nitrone-based free radical trap and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a thiol reducing agent, were examined for their effects on the phosphorylation of p38 as well as phosphatase activity. Pretreatment of cells with either PBN or NAC at 1.0 mM suppressed IL1beta H2O2, and sorbitol-mediated activation of p38 and significantly increased phosphatase activity. These data suggest that ROS, particularly H2O2, are used as second messenger substances that activate p38 in part via the transient inactivation of regulatory protein phosphatases.

  8. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  9. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  10. Phosphorylation of human respiratory syncytial virus P protein at serine 54 regulates viral uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Ana; Gonzalez-Armas, Juan C.; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-10-10

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) structural P protein, phosphorylated at serine (S) and threonine (T) residues, is a co-factor of viral RNA polymerase. The phosphorylation of S54 is controlled by the coordinated action of two cellular enzymes: a lithium-sensitive kinase, probably glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3) {beta} and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of lithium-sensitive kinase, soon after infection, blocks the viral growth cycle by inhibiting synthesis and/or accumulation of viral RNAs, proteins and extracellular particles. P protein phosphorylation at S54 is required to liberate viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) from M protein, during the uncoating process. Kinase inhibition, late in infection, produces a decrease in genomic RNA and infectious viral particles. LiCl, intranasally applied to mice infected with HRSV A2 strain, reduces the number of mice with virus in their lungs and the virus titre. Administration of LiCl to humans via aerosol should prevent HRSV infection, without secondary effects.

  11. Correction: Learning from each other: ABC transporter regulation by protein phosphorylation in plant and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Laurent, Christophe; Geisler, Markus

    2016-04-15

    The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter family in higher plants is highly expanded compared with those of mammalians. Moreover, some members of the plant ABCB subfamily display very high substrate specificity compared with their mammalian counterparts that are often associated with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomena. In this review we highlight prominent functions of plant and mammalian ABC transporters and summarize our knowledge on their post-transcriptional regulation with a focus on protein phosphorylation. A deeper comparison of regulatory events of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and ABCB1 from the model plantArabidopsisreveals a surprisingly high degree of similarity. Both physically interact with orthologues of the FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) that chaperon both transporters to the plasma membrane in an action that seems to involve Hsp90. Further both transporters are phosphorylated at regulatory domains that connect both nucleotide-binding folds. Taken together it appears that ABC transporters exhibit an evolutionary conserved but complex regulation by protein phosphorylation, which apparently is, at least in some cases, tightly connected with protein-protein interactions (PPI). PMID:27068986

  12. G Protein independent phosphorylation and internalization of the δ-opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Faye A.; Zelnik, Jennifer C.; Traynor, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Agonist activation of the δ-opioid receptor leads to internalization via Gβγ recruitment of G protein coupled receptor kinase-2, which phosphorylates the receptor at several sites, including Ser363, allowing β-arrestin binding and localization to clathrin coated pits. Using HEK cells expressing a δ-opioid receptor we tested the hypothesis that prevention of receptor coupling to G protein by treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) will block these processes. PTX treatment did not reduce phosphorylation of δ-opioid receptor Ser363 in response to the agonist DPDPE, or recruitment of β-arrestin 2-GFP to the membrane and only slowed, but did not prevent, DPDPE-induced internalization. Similarly PTX treatment only partially prevented the ability of the δ-opioid peptide agonists deltorphin II and [Met5]enkephalin and the non-peptide agonist BW373U86 to induce receptor internalization. No internalization was seen with morphine, oxymorphindole or the putative δ1-opioid agonist TAN-67 in the presence or absence of PTX, even though TAN-67 showed a strong activation of G protein, as measured by [35S]GTPγS binding. The ability of an agonist to stimulate phosphorylation at Ser363 was predictive of its capacity to induce internalization. The results suggest a role for G protein in δ-opioid receptor internalization, but show that alternative G protein independent pathways exist. PMID:19344370

  13. Expanding the proteome of an RNA virus by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered viral protein.

    PubMed

    Cordek, Daniel G; Croom-Perez, Tayler J; Hwang, Jungwook; Hargittai, Michele R S; Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Han, Qingxia; Lodeiro, Maria Fernanda; Ning, Gang; McCrory, Thomas S; Arnold, Jamie J; Koc, Hasan; Lindenbach, Brett D; Showalter, Scott A; Cameron, Craig E

    2014-08-29

    The human proteome contains myriad intrinsically disordered proteins. Within intrinsically disordered proteins, polyproline-II motifs are often located near sites of phosphorylation. We have used an unconventional experimental paradigm to discover that phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) occurs in the intrinsically disordered domain of hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) on Thr-2332 near one of its polyproline-II motifs. Phosphorylation shifts the conformational ensemble of the NS5A intrinsically disordered domain to a state that permits detection of the polyproline motif by using (15)N-, (13)C-based multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. PKA-dependent proline resonances were lost in the presence of the Src homology 3 domain of c-Src, consistent with formation of a complex. Changing Thr-2332 to alanine in hepatitis C virus genotype 1b reduced the steady-state level of RNA by 10-fold; this change was lethal for genotype 2a. The lethal phenotype could be rescued by changing Thr-2332 to glutamic acid, a phosphomimetic substitution. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy showed that the inability to produce Thr(P)-2332-NS5A caused loss of integrity of the virus-induced membranous web/replication organelle. An even more extreme phenotype was observed in the presence of small molecule inhibitors of PKA. We conclude that the PKA-phosphorylated form of NS5A exhibits unique structure and function relative to the unphosphorylated protein. We suggest that post-translational modification of viral proteins containing intrinsic disorder may be a general mechanism to expand the viral proteome without a corresponding expansion of the genome. PMID:25031324

  14. Soybean nodule autoregulation receptor kinase phosphorylates two kinase-associated protein phosphatases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Akira; Hirani, Tripty A; Oakes, Marie; Kereszt, Attila; Kobe, Bostjan; Djordjevic, Michael A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2008-09-12

    The NARK (nodule autoregulation receptor kinase) gene, a negative regulator of cell proliferation in nodule primordia in several legumes, encodes a receptor kinase that consists of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat and an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The putative catalytic domain of NARK was expressed and purified as a maltose-binding or a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant NARK proteins showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Several regions of the NARK kinase domain were shown by mass spectrometry to possess phosphoresidues. The kinase-inactive protein K724E failed to autophosphorylate, as did three other proteins corresponding to phenotypically detected mutants defective in whole plant autoregulation of nodulation. A wild-type NARK fusion protein transphosphorylated a kinase-inactive mutant NARK fusion protein, suggesting that it is capable of intermolecular autophosphorylation in vitro. In addition, Ser-861 and Thr-963 in the NARK kinase catalytic domain were identified as phosphorylation sites through site-directed mutagenesis. The genes coding for the kinase-associated protein phosphatases KAPP1 and KAPP2, two putative interacting components of NARK, were isolated. NARK kinase domain phosphorylated recombinant KAPP proteins in vitro. Autophosphorylated NARK kinase domain was, in turn, dephosphorylated by both KAPP1 and KAPP2. Our results suggest a model for signal transduction involving NARK in the control of nodule development.

  15. Src family protein tyrosine kinase regulates the basolateral K channel in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) by phosphorylation of KCNJ10 protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengbiao; Wang, Lijun; Thomas, Sherin; Wang, Kemeng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Rinehart, Jesse; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-09-01

    The loss of function of the basolateral K channels in the distal nephron causes electrolyte imbalance. The aim of this study is to examine the role of Src family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in regulating K channels in the basolateral membrane of the mouse initial distal convoluted tubule (DCT1). Single-channel recordings confirmed that the 40-picosiemen (pS) K channel was the only type of K channel in the basolateral membrane of DCT1. The suppression of SFK reversibly inhibited the basolateral 40-pS K channel activity in cell-attached patches and decreased the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K currents in DCT1. Inhibition of SFK also shifted the K reversal potential from -65 to -43 mV, suggesting a role of SFK in determining the membrane potential in DCT1. Western blot analysis showed that KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a key component of the basolateral 40-pS K channel in DCT1, was a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. LC/MS analysis further confirmed that SFK phosphorylated KCNJ10 at Tyr(8) and Tyr(9). The single-channel recording detected the activity of a 19-pS K channel in KCNJ10-transfected HEK293T cells and a 40-pS K channel in the cells transfected with KCNJ10+KCNJ16 (Kir.5.1) that form a heterotetramer in the basolateral membrane of the DCT. Mutation of Tyr(9) did not alter the channel conductance of the homotetramer and heterotetramer. However, it decreased the whole-cell K currents, the probability of finding K channels, and surface expression of KCNJ10 in comparison to WT KCNJ10. We conclude that SFK stimulates the basolateral K channel activity in DCT1, at least partially, by phosphorylating Tyr(9) on KCNJ10. We speculate that the modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of KCNJ10 should play a role in regulating membrane transport function in DCT1.

  16. Phosphorylation Regulates the Endocytic Function of the Yeast Dynamin-Related Protein Vps1.

    PubMed

    Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I; Marklew, Christopher J; Allwood, Ellen G; Palmer, Sarah E; Booth, Wesley I; Mishra, Ritu; Goldberg, Martin W; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2016-03-01

    The family of dynamin proteins is known to function in many eukaryotic membrane fusion and fission events. The yeast dynamin-related protein Vps1 functions at several stages of membrane trafficking, including Golgi apparatus to endosome and vacuole, peroxisomal fission, and endocytic scission. We have previously shown that in its endocytic role, Vps1 functions with the amphiphysin heterodimer Rvs161/Rvs167 to facilitate scission and release of vesicles. Phosphoproteome studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified a phosphorylation site in Vps1 at serine 599. In this study, we confirmed this phosphorylation event, and we reveal that, like Rvs167, Vps1 can be phosphorylated by the yeast cyclin-associated kinase Pho85 in vivo and in vitro. The importance of this posttranslational modification was revealed when mutagenesis of S599 to a phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable form caused defects in endocytosis but not in other functions associated with Vps1. Mutation to nonphosphorylatable valine inhibited the Rvs167 interaction, while both S599V and S599D caused defects in vesicle scission, as shown by both live-cell imaging and electron microscopy of endocytic invaginations. Our data support a model in which phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Vps1 promote distinct interactions and highlight the importance of such regulatory events in facilitating sequential progression of the endocytic process. PMID:26711254

  17. Male-specific phosphorylated SR proteins in adult flies of the Mediterranean fruitfly Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Giuseppe; Louis, Christos; Zhang, Hongyou; Petrella, Valeria; Di Natale, Manuela; Perri, Maria; Salvemini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a widely used mechanism of gene regulation in sex determination pathways of Insects. In species from orders as distant as Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera, female differentiation relies on the activities of conserved splicing regulators, TRA and TRA-2, promoting female-specific expression of the global effector doublesex (dsx). Less understood is to what extent post-translational modifications of splicing regulators plays a role in this pathway. In Drosophila melanogaster phosphorylation of TRA, TRA-2 and the general RBP1 factor by the LAMMER kinase doa (darkener of apricot) is required for proper female sex determination. To explore whether this is a general feature of the pathway we examined sex-specific differences in phosphorylation levels of SR splicing factors in the dipteran species D. melanogaster, Ceratitis capitata (Medfly) and Musca domestica (Housefly). We found a distinct and reproducible pattern of male-specific phosphorylation on protein extracts enriched for SR proteins in C. capitata suggesting that differential phosphorylation may also contribute to the regulation of sex-specific splicing in the Medfly. PMID:25472723

  18. Membrane protein assembly: two cytoplasmic phosphorylated serine sites of Vpu from HIV-1 affect oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Pei; Lin, Meng-Han; Chan, Ya-Ting; Chen, Li-Chyong; Ma, Che; Fischer, Wolfgang B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral protein U (Vpu) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a short integral membrane protein which is known to self-assemble within the lipid membrane and associate with host factors during the HIV-1 infectivity cycle. In this study, full-length Vpu (M group) from clone NL4-3 was over-expressed in human cells and purified in an oligomeric state. Various single and double mutations were constructed on its phosphorylation sites to mimic different degrees of phosphorylation. Size exclusion chromatography of wild-type Vpu and mutants indicated that the smallest assembly unit of Vpu was a dimer and over time Vpu formed higher oligomers. The rate of oligomerization increased when (i) the degree of phosphorylation at serines 52 and 56 was decreased and (ii) when the ionic strength was increased indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of Vpu affects oligomerization. Coarse-grained molecular dynamic simulations with models of wild-type and mutant Vpu in a hydrated lipid bilayer supported the experimental data in demonstrating that, in addition to a previously known role in downregulation of host factors, the phosphorylation sites of Vpu also modulate oligomerization. PMID:27353136

  19. Phosphorylation Regulates the Endocytic Function of the Yeast Dynamin-Related Protein Vps1

    PubMed Central

    Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I.; Marklew, Christopher J.; Allwood, Ellen G.; Palmer, Sarah E.; Booth, Wesley I.; Mishra, Ritu; Goldberg, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    The family of dynamin proteins is known to function in many eukaryotic membrane fusion and fission events. The yeast dynamin-related protein Vps1 functions at several stages of membrane trafficking, including Golgi apparatus to endosome and vacuole, peroxisomal fission, and endocytic scission. We have previously shown that in its endocytic role, Vps1 functions with the amphiphysin heterodimer Rvs161/Rvs167 to facilitate scission and release of vesicles. Phosphoproteome studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified a phosphorylation site in Vps1 at serine 599. In this study, we confirmed this phosphorylation event, and we reveal that, like Rvs167, Vps1 can be phosphorylated by the yeast cyclin-associated kinase Pho85 in vivo and in vitro. The importance of this posttranslational modification was revealed when mutagenesis of S599 to a phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable form caused defects in endocytosis but not in other functions associated with Vps1. Mutation to nonphosphorylatable valine inhibited the Rvs167 interaction, while both S599V and S599D caused defects in vesicle scission, as shown by both live-cell imaging and electron microscopy of endocytic invaginations. Our data support a model in which phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Vps1 promote distinct interactions and highlight the importance of such regulatory events in facilitating sequential progression of the endocytic process. PMID:26711254

  20. ATM-dependent Phosphorylation of the Fanconi Anemia Protein PALB2 Promotes the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingying; Feng, Wanjuan; Sy, Shirley M H; Huen, Michael S Y

    2015-11-13

    The Fanconi anemia protein PALB2, also known as FANCN, protects genome integrity by regulating DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints. Exactly how PALB2 functions may be temporally coupled with detection and signaling of DNA damage is not known. Intriguingly, we found that PALB2 is transformed into a hyperphosphorylated state in response to ionizing radiation (IR). IR treatment specifically triggered PALB2 phosphorylation at Ser-157 and Ser-376 in manners that required the master DNA damage response kinase Ataxia telangiectasia mutated, revealing potential mechanistic links between PALB2 and the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent DNA damage responses. Consistently, dysregulated PALB2 phosphorylation resulted in sustained activation of DDRs. Full-blown PALB2 phosphorylation also required the breast and ovarian susceptible gene product BRCA1, highlighting important roles of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction in orchestrating cellular responses to genotoxic stress. In summary, our phosphorylation analysis of tumor suppressor protein PALB2 uncovers new layers of regulatory mechanisms in the maintenance of genome stability and tumor suppression. PMID:26420486

  1. Newly Identified Phosphorylation Site in the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus P Protein Is Required for Viral RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Arindam; Victor, Ken G.; Pudupakam, R. S.; Lyons, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase consists of two viral proteins; the large (L) protein is the main catalytic subunit, and the phosphoprotein (P) is an essential cofactor for polymerase function. The P protein interacts with the L protein and the N-RNA template, thus connecting the polymerase to the template. P protein also binds to free N protein to maintain it in a soluble, encapsidation-competent form. Previously, five sites of phosphorylation were identified on the P protein and these sites were reported to be differentially important for mRNA synthesis or genomic replication. The previous studies were carried out by biochemical analysis of portions of the authentic viral P protein or by analysis of bacterium-expressed, exogenously phosphorylated P protein by mutagenesis. However, there has been no systematic biochemical search for phosphorylation sites on authentic, virus-expressed P protein. In this study, we analyzed the P protein isolated from VSV-infected cells for sites of phosphorylation by mass spectrometry. We report the identification of Tyr14 as a previously unidentified phosphorylation site of VSV P and show that it is essential for viral transcription and replication. However, our mass spectral analysis failed to observe the phosphorylation of previously reported C-terminal residues Ser226 and Ser227 and mutagenic analyses did not demonstrate a role for these sites in RNA synthesis. PMID:24257610

  2. Brain-Wide Insulin Resistance, Tau Phosphorylation Changes, and Hippocampal Neprilysin and Amyloid-β Alterations in a Monkey Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Corraliza, Jose; Wong, Harrison; Mazzella, Matthew J.; Che, Shaoli; Lee, Sang Han; Petkova, Eva; Wagner, Janice D.; Hemby, Scott E.; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that diabetic individuals are at a greater risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). To examine the mechanisms by which diabetes mellitus (DM) may contribute to AD pathology in humans, we examined brain tissue from streptozotocin-treated type 1 diabetic adult male vervet monkeys receiving twice-daily exogenous insulin injections for 8–20 weeks. We found greater inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 in each brain region examined of the diabetic monkeys when compared with controls, consistent with a pattern of brain insulin resistance that is similar to that reported in the human AD brain. Additionally, a widespread increase in phosphorylated tau was seen, including brain areas vulnerable in AD, as well as relatively spared structures, such as the cerebellum. An increase in active ERK1/2 was also detected, consistent with DM leading to changes in tau-kinase activity broadly within the brain. In contrast to these widespread changes, we found an increase in soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) levels that was restricted to the temporal lobe, with the greatest increase seen in the hippocampus. Consistent with this localized Aβ increase, a hippocampus-restricted decrease in the protein and mRNA for the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP) was found, whereas various Aβ-clearing and -degrading proteins were unchanged. Thus, we document multiple biochemical changes in the insulin-controlled DM monkey brain that can link DM with the risk of developing AD, including dysregulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, changes in tau phosphorylation, and a decrease in NEP expression in the hippocampus that is coupled with a localized increase in Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Given that diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), understanding the mechanisms by which DM promotes AD is important. We report that DM in a nonhuman primate brain leads to changes in the levels or

  3. Roles of the phosphorylation of specific serines and threonines in the NS1 protein of human influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, Tien-Ying; Zhou, Ligang; Krug, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate that phosphorylation of the NS1 protein of a human influenza A virus occurs not only at the threonine (T) at position 215 but also at serines (Ss), specifically at positions 42 and 48. By generating recombinant influenza A/Udorn/72 (Ud) viruses that encode mutant NS1 proteins, we determined the roles of these phosphorylations in virus replication. At position 215 only a T-to-A substitution attenuated replication, whereas other substitutions (T to E to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, T to N, and T to P, the amino acid in avian influenza A virus NS1 proteins) had no effect. We conclude that attenuation resulting from the T-to-A substitution at position 215 is attributable to a deleterious structural change in the NS1 protein that is not caused by other amino acid substitutions and that phosphorylation of T215 does not affect virus replication. At position 48 neither an S-to-A substitution nor an S-to-D substitution that mimics constitutive phosphorylation affected virus replication. In contrast, at position 42, an S-to-D, but not an S-to-A, substitution caused attenuation. The S-to-D substitution eliminates detectable double-stranded RNA binding by the NS1 protein, accounting for attenuation of virus replication. We show that protein kinase C α (PKCα) catalyzes S42 phosphorylation. Consequently, the only phosphorylation of the NS1 protein of this human influenza A virus that regulates its replication is S42 phosphorylation catalyzed by PKCα. In contrast, phosphorylation of Ts or Ss in the NS1 protein of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was not detected, indicating that NS1 phosphorylation probably does not play any role in the replication of this virus.

  4. Evidence for phosphorylation of the major seed storage protein of the common bean and its phosphorylation-dependent degradation during germination.

    PubMed

    López-Pedrouso, María; Alonso, Jana; Zapata, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Phaseolin is the major seed storage protein of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., accounting for up to 50 % of the total seed proteome. The regulatory mechanisms responsible for the synthesis, accumulation and degradation of phaseolin in the common bean seed are not yet sufficiently known. Here, we report on a systematic study in dormant and 4-day germinating bean seeds from cultivars Sanilac (S) and Tendergreen (T) to explore the presence and dynamics of phosphorylated phaseolin isoforms. High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis in combination with the phosphoprotein-specific Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein fluorescent stain and chemical dephosphorylation by hydrogen fluoride-pyridine enabled us to identify differentially phosphorylated phaseolin polypeptides in dormant and germinating seeds from cultivars S and T. Phosphorylated forms of the two subunits of type α and β that compose the phaseolin were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem MS. In addition, we found that the levels of phosphorylation of the phaseolin changed remarkably in the seed transition from dormancy to early germination stage. Temporal changes in the extent of phosphorylation in response to physiological and metabolic variations suggest that phosphorylated phaseolin isoforms have functional significance. In particular, this prospective study supports the hypothesis that mobilization of the phaseolin in germinating seeds occurs through the degradation of highly phosphorylated isoforms. Taken together, our results indicate that post-translational phaseolin modifications through phosphorylations need to be taken into consideration for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation.

  5. Band 3 Erythrocyte Membrane Protein Acts as Redox Stress Sensor Leading to Its Phosphorylation by p72 Syk

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, Antonella; Ferru, Emanuela; Pau, Maria Carmina; Khadjavi, Amina; Mandili, Giorgia; Mattè, Alessandro; Spano, Alessandra; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pippia, Proto; Turrini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In erythrocytes, the regulation of the redox sensitive Tyr phosphorylation of band 3 and its functions are still partially defined. A role of band 3 oxidation in regulating its own phosphorylation has been previously suggested. The current study provides evidences to support this hypothesis: (i) in intact erythrocytes, at 2 mM concentration of GSH, band 3 oxidation, and phosphorylation, Syk translocation to the membrane and Syk phosphorylation responded to the same micromolar concentrations of oxidants showing identical temporal variations; (ii) the Cys residues located in the band 3 cytoplasmic domain are 20-fold more reactive than GSH; (iii) disulfide linked band 3 cytoplasmic domain docks Syk kinase; (iv) protein Tyr phosphatases are poorly inhibited at oxidant concentrations leading to massive band 3 oxidation and phosphorylation. We also observed that hemichromes binding to band 3 determined its irreversible oxidation and phosphorylation, progressive hemolysis, and serine hyperphosphorylation of different cytoskeleton proteins. Syk inhibitor suppressed the phosphorylation of band 3 also preventing serine phosphorylation changes and hemolysis. Our data suggest that band 3 acts as redox sensor regulating its own phosphorylation and that hemichromes leading to the protracted phosphorylation of band 3 may trigger a cascade of events finally leading to hemolysis. PMID:27034738

  6. Myophilin of Echinococcus granulosus: isoforms and phosphorylation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Martin, R M; Csar, X F; Gasser, R B; Felleisen, R; Lightowlers, M W

    1997-08-01

    Myophilin is a muscle-associated antigen of the taeniid cestode Echinococcus granulosus. This protein shows a high amino acid sequence homology with calponins and calponin-like proteins, which are proposed to be associated with the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. In order to provide supportive evidence for a relationship between these proteins, we characterized myophilin using electrophoretic, biochemical and molecular biological approaches. Two-dimensional protein electrophoretic separation of E. granulosus larval proteins defined 4 isoelectric isoforms of myophilin (alpha, beta, gamma and delta), which appeared to be a consequence of post-translational modification of a single gene product. It was also demonstrated biochemically that E. granulosus myophilin undergoes specific phosphorylation in vitro by protein kinase C (PKC). Finally, myophilin homologues were identified in extracts of Taenia hydatigena and T. ovis by immunoblot. A partial cDNA of the closely related species, E. multilocularis, was isolated by cloning procedures and showed 99% homology with the E. granulosus myophilin gene. The similarities of E. granulosus myophilin with calponins in their tissue localization, protein isoforms patterns, ability to be phosphorylated in vitro by PKC, and the relatively conserved nature of the protein among related parasites suggest that myophilin may be associated with smooth muscle contraction.

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKY(Y115E) phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  9. Cholecystokinin receptors regulate sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation via uptake of HCO3-.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchuan; Ru, Yanfei; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Yanjiao; Wu, Bin; Upur, Halmurat; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-10-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide hormone and a neurotransmitter, was detected in mature sperm two decades ago. However, the exact role of CCK and the types of CCK receptors (now termed CCK1 and CCK2) in sperm have not been identified. Here, we find that CCK1 and CCK2 receptors are immunolocalized to the acrosomal region of mature sperm. The antagonist of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor strongly activated the soluble adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway that drives sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in dose- and time-dependent manners. But these actions of stimulation were abolished when sperm were incubated in the medium in the absence of HCO3-. Further investigation demonstrated that the inhibitor of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor could accelerate the uptake of HCO3- and significantly elevate the intracellular pH of sperm. Interestingly, the synthetic octapeptide of CCK (CCK8) showed the same action and mechanism as antagonists of CCK receptors. Moreover, CCK8 and the antagonist of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor were also able to accelerate human sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation by stimulating the influx of HCO3-. Thus, the present results suggest that CCK and its receptors may regulate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation by modulating the uptake of HCO3-.

  10. Selective Phosphorylation Inhibitor of Delta Protein Kinase C-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Protein-Protein Interactions: Application for Myocardial Injury in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Sho, Eiketsu; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-22

    Protein kinases regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, metabolism, and cell death. Because the primary sequence and the three-dimensional structure of many kinases are highly similar, the development of selective inhibitors for only one kinase is challenging. Furthermore, many protein kinases are pleiotropic, mediating diverse and sometimes even opposing functions by phosphorylating multiple protein substrates. Here, we set out to develop an inhibitor of a selective protein kinase phosphorylation of only one of its substrates. Focusing on the pleiotropic delta protein kinase C (δPKC), we used a rational approach to identify a distal docking site on δPKC for its substrate, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). We reasoned that an inhibitor of PDK's docking should selectively inhibit the phosphorylation of only PDK without affecting phosphorylation of the other δPKC substrates. Our approach identified a selective inhibitor of PDK docking to δPKC with an in vitro Kd of ∼50 nM and reducing cardiac injury IC50 of ∼5 nM. This inhibitor, which did not affect the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates even at 1 μM, demonstrated that PDK phosphorylation alone is critical for δPKC-mediated injury by heart attack. The approach we describe is likely applicable for the identification of other substrate-specific kinase inhibitors. PMID:27218445

  11. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Bioassay of Two Protein Kinases Incorporating Peptide Phosphorylation and Versatile Probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Dong, Manman; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-09-01

    A sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) bioassay was developed for the detection of two protein kinases incorporating the peptide phosphorylation and a versatile ECL probe. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and casein kinase II (CK2) were used as proof-of-concept targets while a PKA-specific peptide (CLRRASLG) and a CK2-specific peptide (CRRRADDSDDDDD) were used as the recognition substrates. Taking advantage of the ability of protein A binding with the Fc region of a variety of antibodies with high affinity, a ruthenium derivative-labeled protein A was utilized as a versatile ECL probe for bioassay of multiple protein kinases. A specific peptide substrate toward target protein kinase was first self-assembled on the surface of gold electrode and then serine in the specific peptide on the electrode was phosphorylated by target protein kinase in the presence of adenosine-5'-triphosphate. After recognition of the phosphorylated peptide by monoclonal antiphosphoserine antibody, the versatile ECL probe was specifically bound to the antiphosphoserine antibody on the electrode surface. The ECL bioassay was developed successfully in the individual detection of PKA and CK2 with detection limit of 0.005 U/mL and 0.004 U/mL, respectively. In addition, the ECL bioassay was applied to quantitative analysis of the kinase inhibitors and monitoring drug-triggered kinase activation in cell lysates. Moreover, an ECL imaging bioassay using electron-multiplying charged coupled device as detector on the gold electrode array was developed for the simultaneous detection of PKA and CK2 activity from 0.01 U/mL to 0.4 U/mL, respectively, at one time. This work demonstrates that the ingenious design and use of a versatile ECL probe are promising to simultaneous detection of multiple protein kinases and screening of kinase inhibitor. PMID:27518533

  12. Control of MAPK specificity by feedback phosphorylation of shared adaptor protein Ste50.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Zeng, Yaxue; Elston, Timothy C; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2008-12-01

    Many different signaling pathways share common components but nevertheless invoke distinct physiological responses. In yeast, the adaptor protein Ste50 functions in multiple mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways, each with unique dynamical and developmental properties. Although Kss1 activity is sustained and promotes invasive growth, Hog1 activity is transient and promotes cell adaptation to osmotic stress. Here we show that osmotic stress activates Kss1 as well as Hog1. We show further that Hog1 phosphorylates Ste50 and that phosphorylation of Ste50 limits the duration of Kss1 activation and prevents invasive growth under high osmolarity growth conditions. Thus feedback regulation of a shared component can restrict the activity of a competing MAP kinase to ensure signal fidelity. PMID:18854322

  13. The Clinical Significance of Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSPB1) in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Mitsuru; Adachi, Seiji; Kozawa, Osamu; Shimizu, Masahito; Yasuda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most aggressive forms of cancer. After clinical detection it exhibits fast metastatic growth. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27; HSPB1) has been characterized as a molecular chaperone which modifies the structures and functions of other proteins in cells when they are exposed to various stresses, such as chemotherapy. While the administration of gemcitabine, an anti-tumor drug, has been the standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, accumulating evidence shows that HSP27 plays a key role in the chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. In addition, phosphorylated HSP27 induced by gemcitabine has been associated with the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In this review, we summarize the role of phosphorylated HSP27, as well as HSP27, in the regulation of chemosensitivity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26805817

  14. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  15. Regulation of T-cell interaction with fibronectin by transforming growth factor-beta is associated with altered Pyk2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Brill, A; Franitza, S; Lider, O; Hershkoviz, R

    2001-10-01

    Although the involvement of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in inflammatory reactions has been extensively studied, its mode of action in the context of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is still not fully understood. We undertook this study in an attempt to reveal the putative roles of TGF-beta in T-cell adhesion and migration. We found that a 60-min treatment of T cells with TGF-beta regulates T-cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN), a prototype cell adhesion protein of the ECM, depending on the presence of other activators. At 5 pg/ml to 1 ng/ml, TGF-beta alone induced T-cell adhesion to FN in an integrin alpha4/beta1- and integrin alpha5/beta1-dependent manner. TGF-beta also attenuated T-cell migration on the stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha gradients. These effects of TGF-beta were not accompanied by alteration in the expression of very-late activation antigen type 4 (VLA-4) and VLA-5, nor were they mediated by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. The cellular mechanism underlying the adhesion-regulating activities of TGF-beta involves adhesion-associated cytoskeletal elements. TGF-beta induced the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase Pyk2, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and this effect was markedly increased in the presence of immobilized FN, suggesting a collaborative role for FN-specific integrins. Indeed, TGF-beta-induced Pyk2 phosphorylation was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against VLA-4, VLA-5 and CD29. Thus, TGF-beta, which may appear at extravascular sites during inflammation, affects the adhesion of T cells to ECM glycoproteins and their migration by its ability to differentially induce or inhibit the phosphorylation of Pyk2. PMID:11683954

  16. Bisphenol A accelerates capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation of rat sperm by activating protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaofeng; Ru, Yanfei; Chu, Chen; Ni, Zimei; Zhou, Yuchuan; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic estrogen-mimic chemical. It has been shown to affect many reproductive endpoints. However, the effect of BPA on the mature sperm and the mechanism of its action are not clear yet. Here, our in vitro studies indicated that BPA could accelerate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in time- and dose-dependent manners. In vivo, the adult male rats exposed to a high dose of BPA could result in a significant increase in sperm activity. Further investigation demonstrated that BPA could accelerate capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation even if sperm were incubated in medium devoid of BSA, HCO3 (-), and Ca(2+) However, this action of BPA stimulation could be blocked by H89, a highly selective blocker of protein kinase A (PKA), but not by KH7, a specific inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase. These data suggest that BPA may activate PKA to affect sperm functions and male fertility. PMID:27174873

  17. Phenotypically Dormant and Immature Leukaemia Cells Display Increased Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pallis, Monica; Harvey, Tamsin; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity drives a number of key metabolic processes including growth and protein synthesis. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway promotes cellular dormancy. Since cells from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) can be phenotypically dormant (quiescent), we examined biomarkers of their mTOR pathway activity concurrently with Ki-67 and CD71 (indicators of cycling cells) by quantitative flow cytometry. Using antibodies to phosphorylated epitopes of mTOR (S2448) and its downstream targets ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6, S235/236) and 4E-BP1 (T36/45), we documented that these phosphorylations were negligible in lymphocytes, but evident in dormant as well as proliferating subsets of both mobilised normal stem cell harvest CD34+ cells and AML blasts. Although mTOR phosphorylation in AML blasts was lower than that of the normal CD34+ cells, p-4E-BP1 was 2.6-fold higher and p-rpS6 was 22-fold higher. Moreover, in contrast to 4E-BP1, rpS6 phosphorylation was higher in dormant than proliferating AML blasts, and was also higher in the immature CD34+CD38- blast subset. Data from the Cancer Genome Atlas show that rpS6 expression is associated with that of respiratory chain enzymes in AML. We conclude that phenotypic quiescence markers do not necessarily predict metabolic dormancy and that elevated rpS6 ser235/236 phosphorylation is characteristic of AML. PMID:26985829

  18. Regulation of the substrate preference of p190RhoGAP by protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of a phospholipid binding site.

    PubMed

    Lévay, Magdolna; Settleman, Jeffrey; Ligeti, Erzsébet

    2009-09-15

    The Rho family GTPases are stringently regulated through the action of a large family of GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that stimulate their relatively weak intrinsic GTP hydrolyzing activity. The p190RhoGAPs, which include the p190A and p190B proteins, are potent and widely expressed GAPs acting on both Rho and Rac GTPases. We have observed that several acidic phospholipids inhibit the RhoGAP activity and promote the RacGAP activity of p190 proteins. In liposome binding assays we have demonstrated that binding of p190A to phospholipids is controlled by electrostatic interactions. Using mapping techniques, we determined that a small polybasic peptide stretch within p190A is a common site for both the phospholipid binding and PKC phosphorylation. Moreover, PKC-mediated phosphorylation of two amino acids (serine-1221 and threonine-1226) within this region of p190A prevents the binding and substrate specificity regulation by phospholipids. Transfection of COS-7 cells with mutant forms of p190A either unable to bind to phospholipids or unable to become phosphorylated induced distinct morphological changes. Together, these findings reveal a novel GAP regulatory mechanism in which phosphorylation indirectly alters GTPase substrate preference by affecting the interaction with acidic phospholipids. Our observations provide a potential mechanism of Rac/Rho antagonism described in several cellular functions.

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of a 58 kDa protein induced by morphine in SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, K; Osugi, T; Kuo, C H; Higuchi, H; Miki, N

    1994-04-29

    A 58 kDa protein which was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues with morphine was found in human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH cells) by immunoblot with monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. The tyrosine phosphorylation was induced by morphine in 5 min in a dose-dependent manner and the increment was completely inhibited by naloxone. A Delta (d) agonist, [D-Pen2,Pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE), but not a m agonist, [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAGO), stimulated the phosphorylation and treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin inhibited the phosphorylation by morphine. These data suggest that d receptor-stimulation increases tyrosine phosphorylation of the 58 kDa protein through Gi protein in SK-N-SH cells.

  20. Phosphorylation and localization of protein-zero related (PZR) in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Ken-ichi; Thomas, Tamlyn N; Fujiwara, Keigi

    2008-01-01

    Protein-zero related (PZR) is an immunoglobulin V (IgV)-type immunoreceptor with two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). PZR interacts with Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) via its tyrosine-phosphorylated ITIMs, for which c-Src is a putative kinase. Towards elucidating PZR function in endothelial cells (ECs), the authors cloned PZR from bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) and characterized it. Mature bovine PZR had 94.8% and 92.7% sequence identity with canine and human proteins, respectively, and the two ITIM sequences were conserved among higher vertebrates. PZR was expressed in many cell types and was localized to cell contacts and intracellular granules in BAECs and mesothelioma (REN) cells. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that PZR, Grb-2-associated binder-1 (Gab1), and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) were three major SHP-2-binding proteins in BAECs. H(2)O(2) enhanced PZR tyrosine phosphorylation and PZR/SHP-2 interaction in ECs in a dose-and time-dependent manner. To see if tyrosine kinases other than Src are also capable of phosphorylating PZR, the authors cotransfected HEK293 cells with PZR and one of several tyrosine kinases and found that c-Src, c-Fyn, c-Lyn, Csk, and c-Abl, but not c-Fes, phosphorylated PZR and increased PZR/SHP-2 interaction. These results suggest that PZR is a cell adhesion protein that may be involved in SHP-2-dependent signaling at interendothelial cell contacts. PMID:18568953

  1. Protein phosphorylation associated with epipodophyllotoxin-induced apoptosis of lymphoid cells: role of a serine/threonine protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ye, X; Mody, N S; Hingley, S T; Coffman, F D; Cohen, S; Fresa, K L

    1998-11-01

    We have previously shown that apoptosis induced in thymocytes by dexamethasone or teniposide (VM-26) could be inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) and sangivamycin, both relatively specific inhibitors for protein kinase C, but not by N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA1004), a more specific inhibitor for cAMP-dependent protein kinases. Apoptosis in this model system was not blocked by EGTA and no increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was observed during apoptosis induced by either dexamethasone or VM-26, suggesting that this kinase was Ca2+-independent. In the present study, we demonstrate that addition of 10 microM sangivamycin to thymocyte cultures up to 2 h after addition of either inducer resulted in virtually complete inhibition of apoptosis. Addition of 10 microM sangivamycin at 3 or 4 h after addition of inducer resulted in partial inhibition of apoptosis. Computerized image analysis of two-dimensional PAGE analyses of whole-cell lysates demonstrated that treatment of mouse thymocytes with VM-26 resulted in a limited number of de novo phosphorylation events within 1 h of treatment. The most prominent phosphorylation events associated with VM-26-induced apoptosis were that two intracellular protein species (Protein 1: m.w. = 22.9 kDa, pI, 5.11; and Protein 2: m.w. = 22.9 kDa, pI, 4.98). Similar phosphorylation events were seen in cells treated with dexamethasone. Finally, Western blot analysis suggests that de novo protein phosphorylation induced by VM-26 is on serine/threonine residues. These results provide further evidence that the mechanism of VM-26-induced apoptosis of murine thymocytes involves the action of one or more serine/threonine kinases. PMID:9787113

  2. [Effect of sodium nitrite on phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and spatial learning and memory in rats].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Hong; Fan, Ling-Ling; Hu, Yong-Mei

    2015-10-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the effect of sodium nitrite on cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation and spatial learning and memory in rats. Rats were served with drinking water containing sodium nitrite (100 mg/kg) for 60 days, then, the ability of spatial learning and memory of the rats was measured by Morris water maze. Phosphorylation level of tau and neurofilament, and the expression of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit in the hippocampus were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In comparison with the rats served with normal tap water, the rats served with sodium nitrite water showed significantly longer latency to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze (P < 0.05), elevated phosphorylation level of tau and neurofilament, and decreased expression of PP2A catalytic subunit (P < 0.05). These results indicated that administration of sodium nitrite could impair the spatial learning and memory of the rats, and the hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and the down-regulation of PP2A might be underlying mechanisms for the impairment.

  3. Protein kinase D regulates RhoA activity via rhotekin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pusapati, Ganesh V; Eiseler, Tim; Rykx, An; Vandoninck, Sandy; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Van Lint, Johan; von Wichert, Götz; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-03-16

    The members of the protein kinase D (PKD) family of serine/threonine kinases are major targets for tumor-promoting phorbol esters, G protein-coupled receptors, and activated protein kinase C isoforms (PKCs). The expanding list of cellular processes in which PKDs exert their function via phosphorylation of various substrates include proliferation, apoptosis, migration, angiogenesis, and vesicle trafficking. Therefore, identification of novel PKD substrates is necessary to understand the profound role of this kinase family in signal transduction. Here, we show that rhotekin, an effector of RhoA GTPase, is a novel substrate of PKD. We identified Ser-435 in rhotekin as the potential site targeted by PKD in vivo. Expression of a phosphomimetic S435E rhotekin mutant resulted in an increase of endogenous active RhoA GTPase levels. Phosphorylation of rhotekin by PKD2 modulates the anchoring of the RhoA in the plasma membrane. Consequently, the S435E rhotekin mutant displayed enhanced stress fiber formation when expressed in serum-starved fibroblasts. Our data thus identify a novel role of PKD as a regulator of RhoA activity and actin stress fiber formation through phosphorylation of rhotekin. PMID:22228765

  4. Changes in reflectin protein phosphorylation are associated with dynamic iridescence in squid

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Michi; Sweeney, Alison M.; DeMartini, Daniel; Weaver, James C.; Powers, Meghan L.; Tao, Andrea; Silvas, Tania V.; Kramer, Ryan M.; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J.; Mäthger, Lydia M.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Morse, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Many cephalopods exhibit remarkable dermal iridescence, a component of their complex, dynamic camouflage and communication. In the species Euprymna scolopes, the light-organ iridescence is static and is due to reflectin protein-based platelets assembled into lamellar thin-film reflectors called iridosomes, contained within iridescent cells called iridocytes. Squid in the family Loliginidae appear to be unique in which the dermis possesses a dynamic iridescent component with reflective, coloured structures that are assembled and disassembled under the control of the muscarinic cholinergic system and the associated neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). Here we present the sequences and characterization of three new members of the reflectin family associated with the dynamically changeable iridescence in Loligo and not found in static Euprymna iridophores. In addition, we show that application of genistein, a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suppresses ACh- and calcium-induced iridescence in Loligo. We further demonstrate that two of these novel reflectins are extensively phosphorylated in concert with the activation of iridescence by exogenous ACh. This phosphorylation and the correlated iridescence can be blocked with genistein. Our results suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of reflectin proteins is involved in the regulation of dynamic iridescence in Loligo. PMID:19776150

  5. The Clk/Sty protein kinase phosphorylates SR splicing factors and regulates their intranuclear distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Colwill, K; Pawson, T; Andrews, B; Prasad, J; Manley, J L; Bell, J C; Duncan, P I

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian Clk/Sty is the prototype for a family of dual specificity kinases (termed LAMMER kinases) that have been conserved in evolution, but whose physiological substrates are unknown. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, the Clk/Sty kinase specifically interacted with RNA binding proteins, particularly members of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) family of splicing factors. Clk/Sty itself has an serine/arginine-rich non-catalytic N-terminal region which is important for its association with SR splicing factors. In vitro, Clk/Sty efficiently phosphorylated the SR family member ASF/SF2 on serine residues located within its serine/arginine-rich region (the RS domain). Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping demonstrated that the sites on ASF/SF2 phosphorylated in vitro overlap with those phosphorylated in vivo. Immunofluorescence studies showed that a catalytically inactive form of Clk/Sty co-localized with SR proteins in nuclear speckles. Overexpression of the active Clk/Sty kinase caused a redistribution of SR proteins within the nucleus. These results suggest that Clk/Sty kinase directly regulates the activity and compartmentalization of SR splicing factors. Images PMID:8617202

  6. Juvenile hormone prevents 20-hydroxyecdysone-induced metamorphosis by regulating the phosphorylation of a newly identified broad protein.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; Pei, Xu-Yang; Li, Xiang-Ru; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-09-19

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) initiates insect molting and metamorphosis. By contrast, juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis. However, the mechanism by which JH inhibits metamorphosis remains unclear. In this study, we propose that JH induces the phosphorylation of Broad isoform Z7 (BrZ7), a newly identified protein, to inhibit 20E-mediated metamorphosis in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The knockdown of BrZ7 in larvae inhibited metamorphosis by repressing the expression of the 20E response gene. BrZ7 was weakly expressed and phosphorylated during larval growth but highly expressed and non-phosphorylated during metamorphosis. JH regulated the rapid phosphorylation of BrZ7 via a G-protein-coupled receptor-, phospholipase C-, and protein kinase C-triggered pathway. The phosphorylated BrZ7 bound to the 5'-regulatory region of calponin to regulate its expression in the JH pathway. Exogenous JH induced BrZ7 phosphorylation to prevent metamorphosis by suppressing 20E-related gene transcription. JH promoted non-phosphorylated calponin interacting with ultraspiracle protein to activate the JH pathway and antagonize the 20E pathway. This study reveals one of the possible mechanisms by which JH counteracts 20E-regulated metamorphosis by inducing the phosphorylation of BrZ7.

  7. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in c-jun directly targeted in vitro by protein kinase D

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Richard T. . E-mail: rwaldron@mednet.ucla.edu; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2007-05-04

    Protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylates the c-jun amino-terminal in vitro at site(s) distinct from JNK [C. Hurd, R.T. Waldron, E. Rozengurt, Protein kinase D complexes with c-jun N-terminal kinase via activation loop phosphorylation and phosphorylates the c-jun N-terminus, Oncogene 21 (2002) 2154-2160], but the sites have not been identified. Here, metabolic {sup 32}P-labeling of c-jun protein in COS-7 cells indicated that PKD phosphorylates c-jun in vivo at a site(s) between aa 43-93, a region containing important functional elements. On this basis, the PKD-mediated phosphorylation site(s) was further characterized in vitro using GST-c-jun fusion proteins. PKD did not incorporate phosphate into Ser63 and Ser73, the JNK sites in GST-c-jun(1-89). Rather, PKD and JNK could sequentially phosphorylate distinct site(s) simultaneously. By mass spectrometry of tryptic phosphopeptides, Ser58 interposed between the JNK-binding portion of the delta domain and the adjacent TAD1 was identified as a prominent site phosphorylated in vitro by PKD. These data were further supported by kinase reactions using truncations or point-mutations of GST-c-jun. Together, these data suggest that PKD-mediated phosphorylation modulates c-jun at the level of its N-terminal functional domains.

  8. Liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric characterization of protein kinase C phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Michael J; Quinn, John P; Blakney, Greg T; Emmett, Mark R; Mischak, Harold; Gaskell, Simon J; Marshall, Alan G

    2003-01-01

    A vented column, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) microelectrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR (9.4 T)) mass spectrometry (MS) approach to phosphopeptide identification is described. A dual-ESI source capable of rapid (approximately 200 ms) switching between two independently controlled ESI emitters was constructed. The dual-ESI source, combined with external ion accumulation in a linear octopole ion trap, allowed for internal calibration of every mass spectrum during LC. LC ESI FT-ICR positive-ion MS of protein kinase C (PKC) revealed four previously unidentified phosphorylated peptides (one within PKC(alpha), one within PKC(delta), and two within PKC(zeta)). Internal calibration improved the mass accuracy for LC MS spectra from an absolute mean (47 peptide ions) of 11.5 ppm to 1.5 ppm. Five additional (out of eight known) activating sites of PKC phosphorylation, not detected in positive-ion experiments, were observed by subsequent negative-ion direct infusion nanoelectrospray. Extension of the method to enable infrared multiphoton dissociation of all ions in the ICR cell prior to every other mass measurement revealed the diagnostic neutral loss of H3PO4 from phosphorylated peptide ions. The combination of accurate-mass MS and MS/MS offers a powerful new tool for identifying the presence and site(s) of phosphorylation in peptides, without the need for additional wet chemical derivatization.

  9. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  10. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  11. Regulation of protein kinase B/Akt activity and Ser473 phosphorylation by protein kinase Calpha in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Partovian, Chohreh; Simons, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Protein kinase Balpha (PKBalpha/Akt-1) is a key mediator of multiple signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis among others. The unphosphorylated form of Akt-1 is virtually inactive and its full activation requires two phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent phosphorylation events, Thr308 by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and Ser473 by an undefined kinase that has been termed PDK2. Recent studies have suggested that the Ser473 kinase is a plasma membrane raft-associated kinase. In this study we show that protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) translocates to the membrane rafts in response to insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulation. Overexpression of PKCalpha increases Ser473 phosphorylation and Akt-1 activity, while inhibition of its activity or expression decreases IGF-1-dependent activation of Akt-1. Furthermore, in vitro, in the presence of phospholipids and calcium, PKCalpha directly phosphorylates Akt-1 at the Ser473 site. We conclude, therefore, that PKCalpha regulates Akt-1 activity via Ser473 phosphorylation and may function as PDK2 in endothelial cells. PMID:15157674

  12. Short-term low-protein diet during pregnancy alters islet area and protein content of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, Cristiana S B; Reis, Sílvia R L; Pessoa, Ana F M; De Souza, Letícia M I; Stoppiglia, Luiz F; Veloso, Roberto V; Reis, Marise A B; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Colodel, Edson M; Arantes, Vanessa C; Latorraca, Márcia Q

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways mediate β cell growth, proliferation, survival and death. We investigated whether protein restriction during pregnancy alters islet morphometry or the expression and phosphorylation of several proteins involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. As controls, adult pregnant and non-pregnant rats were fed a normal-protein diet (17%). Pregnant and non-pregnant rats in the experimental groups were fed a low-protein diet (6%) for 15 days. Low protein diet during pregnancy increased serum prolactin level, reduced serum corticosterone concentration and the expression of both protein kinase B/AKT1 (AKT1) and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), as well as the islets area, but did not alter the insulin content of pancreatic islets. Pregnancy increased the expression of the Src homology/collagen (SHC) protein and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) independent of diet. ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK1/2) was similar in islets from pregnant and non-pregnant rats fed a low-protein diet, and was higher in islets from pregnant rats than in islets from non-pregnant rats fed a normal-protein diet. Thus, a short-term, low-protein diet during pregnancy was sufficient to reduce the levels of proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and affect islet morphometry. PMID:25860970

  13. Short-term low-protein diet during pregnancy alters islet area and protein content of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, Cristiana S B; Reis, Sílvia R L; Pessoa, Ana F M; De Souza, Letícia M I; Stoppiglia, Luiz F; Veloso, Roberto V; Reis, Marise A B; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Colodel, Edson M; Arantes, Vanessa C; Latorraca, Márcia Q

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways mediate β cell growth, proliferation, survival and death. We investigated whether protein restriction during pregnancy alters islet morphometry or the expression and phosphorylation of several proteins involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. As controls, adult pregnant and non-pregnant rats were fed a normal-protein diet (17%). Pregnant and non-pregnant rats in the experimental groups were fed a low-protein diet (6%) for 15 days. Low protein diet during pregnancy increased serum prolactin level, reduced serum corticosterone concentration and the expression of both protein kinase B/AKT1 (AKT1) and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), as well as the islets area, but did not alter the insulin content of pancreatic islets. Pregnancy increased the expression of the Src homology/collagen (SHC) protein and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) independent of diet. ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK1/2) was similar in islets from pregnant and non-pregnant rats fed a low-protein diet, and was higher in islets from pregnant rats than in islets from non-pregnant rats fed a normal-protein diet. Thus, a short-term, low-protein diet during pregnancy was sufficient to reduce the levels of proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and affect islet morphometry.

  14. Phosphorylation of the fused protein kinase in response to signaling from hedgehog.

    PubMed Central

    Thérond, P P; Knight, J D; Kornberg, T B; Bishop, J M

    1996-01-01

    The hedgehog gene (hh) of Drosophila melanogaster exerts both short- and long-range effects on cell patterning during development. The product of hedgehog is a secreted protein that apparently acts by triggering an intra-cellular signaling pathway, but little is known about the details of that pathway. The Drosophila gene fused (fu) encodes a serine/threonine-protein kinase that genetic experiments have implicated in signaling initiated by hedgehog. Here we report that the fused protein is phosphorylated during the course of Drosophila embryogenesis, as a result of hedgehog activity. In cell culture, phosphorylation of fused protein occurs in response to the biologically active form of hedgehog and cannot be blocked by activation of protein kinase A, which is thought to be an antagonist of signaling from hedgehog. These results suggest that fused and protein kinase A function downstream of hedgehog but in parallel pathways that eventually converge distal to fused. The reconstruction of signaling from hedgehog in cell culture should provide further access to the mechanisms by which hedgehog acts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8633045

  15. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  16. Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Regulation of Cell Cycle and DNA-Related Processes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Transito; Poncet, Sandrine; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    In all living organisms, the phosphorylation of proteins modulates various aspects of their functionalities. In eukaryotes, protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell signaling, gene expression, and differentiation. Protein phosphorylation is also involved in the global control of DNA replication during the cell cycle, as well as in the mechanisms that cope with stress-induced replication blocks. Similar to eukaryotes, bacteria use Hanks-type kinases and phosphatases for signal transduction, and protein phosphorylation is involved in numerous cellular processes. However, it remains unclear whether protein phosphorylation in bacteria can also regulate the activity of proteins involved in DNA-mediated processes such as DNA replication or repair. Accumulating evidence supported by functional and biochemical studies suggests that phospho-regulatory mechanisms also take place during the bacterial cell cycle. Recent phosphoproteomics and interactomics studies identified numerous phosphoproteins involved in various aspect of DNA metabolism strongly supporting the existence of such level of regulation in bacteria. Similar to eukaryotes, bacterial scaffolding-like proteins emerged as platforms for kinase activation and signaling. This review reports the current knowledge on the phosphorylation of proteins involved in the maintenance of genome integrity and the regulation of cell cycle in bacteria that reveals surprising similarities to eukaryotes. PMID:26909079

  17. Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Regulation of Cell Cycle and DNA-Related Processes in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Transito; Poncet, Sandrine; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    In all living organisms, the phosphorylation of proteins modulates various aspects of their functionalities. In eukaryotes, protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell signaling, gene expression, and differentiation. Protein phosphorylation is also involved in the global control of DNA replication during the cell cycle, as well as in the mechanisms that cope with stress-induced replication blocks. Similar to eukaryotes, bacteria use Hanks-type kinases and phosphatases for signal transduction, and protein phosphorylation is involved in numerous cellular processes. However, it remains unclear whether protein phosphorylation in bacteria can also regulate the activity of proteins involved in DNA-mediated processes such as DNA replication or repair. Accumulating evidence supported by functional and biochemical studies suggests that phospho-regulatory mechanisms also take place during the bacterial cell cycle. Recent phosphoproteomics and interactomics studies identified numerous phosphoproteins involved in various aspect of DNA metabolism strongly supporting the existence of such level of regulation in bacteria. Similar to eukaryotes, bacterial scaffolding-like proteins emerged as platforms for kinase activation and signaling. This review reports the current knowledge on the phosphorylation of proteins involved in the maintenance of genome integrity and the regulation of cell cycle in bacteria that reveals surprising similarities to eukaryotes. PMID:26909079

  18. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  19. Cadmium up-regulates transcription of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene through phosphorylated CREB rather than SF-1 in K28 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Yun; Gomes, Cynthia; Oh, Sung-Dug; Soh, Jaemog

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium is a widely used heavy metal in industry and affects the male reproductive system of animals, including humans, as a result of occupational and environmental exposures. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its effect on steroidogenesis in gonads remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that exposure of K28 mouse testicular Leydig tumor cells to cadmium led to a significant increase in the mRNA level, promoter activity and protein level of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), an essential factor for steroid biosynthesis. It has been well documented that StAR gene transcription is regulated by multiple transcription factors, including cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members and SF-1. Cadmium treatment caused an increase in CREB phosphorylation but did not alter the CREB protein level in the nucleus. EMSA studies revealed that cadmium-induced phosphorylated CREB formed specific complexes with the proximal region of the StAR gene promoter. Furthermore, co-transfection with a CREB expression plasmid significantly increased cadmium-induced StAR promoter activity. However, the nuclear level and the affinity of SF-1 protein for the StAR proximal promoter were dramatically decreased upon exposure to cadmium. Taken together, these results suggest that cadmium up-regulates StAR gene expression through phosphorylated CREB rather than through SF-1 in mouse testicular Leydig cells. PMID:25786521

  20. Phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase Modulates the Structural Coupling Between the Transmembrane and Cytosolic Domains of Phospholamban

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinhui; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2003-09-16

    We have used frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the structural linkage between the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of the regulatory protein phospholamban (PLB). Using an engineered PLB having a single cysteine (Cys24) derivatized with the fluorophore N-(1-pyrenyl) maleimide (PMal), we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the average spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between PMal bound to Cys24 in the transmembrane domain and Tyr6 in the cytosolic domain near the amino-terminus of PLB. In these measurements, PMal serves as an FRET donor and Tyr6 serves as a FRET acceptor following its nitration by tetranitromethane. The native structure of PLB is retained following site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification, as indicated by the ability of the derivatized PLB to fully regulate the Ca-ATPase following their co-reconstitution. To assess how phosphorylation modulates the structure of PLB, FRET measurements were made following reconstitution of PLB in membrane vesicles made from lipids extracted from sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles in the absence of the Ca-ATPase. We find that the cytosolic domain of PLB assumes a wide range of structures relative to the transmembrane sequence, consistent with other structural data indicating the presence of a flexible hinge region between the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of PLB. Phosphorylation of Ser16 by PKA results in almost a two-fold decrease in conformational heterogeneity, suggesting a stabilization of the hinge region of PLB possibly through an electrostatic-linkage between phosphoserine16 and Arg13. These results suggest that the stabilization of the structure of PLB following phosphorylation of Ser16 is part of a switching mechanism, which functions to alter binding interactions between PLB and the nucleotide-binding domain of the Ca-ATPase that modulates enzyme inhibition.

  1. Protein kinase C phosphorylates a recently identified membrane skeleton-associated calmodulin-binding protein in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ling, E; Gardner, K; Bennett, V

    1986-10-25

    A membrane skeleton-associated protein with calmodulin-binding activity recently has been purified and characterized from human erythrocytes (Gardner, K. and Bennett, V. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1339-1348). This new protein (CaM-BP103/97) has now been identified as a major substrate for protein kinase C in erythrocytes since phosphorylation of both of its subunits (Mr = 103,000 and 97,000) is elevated 3-15-fold in the presence of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol beta-acetate (TPA), under the following conditions: ghost membranes incubated with protein kinase C purified from rat brain, ghost membranes from erythrocytes pretreated with TPA, and intact erythrocytes metabolically labeled with 32PO4 and stimulated by TPA. The sites of phosphorylation of this protein by exogenous and endogenous protein kinase C are identical since two-dimensional 32P-peptide maps of both subunits labeled by either endogenous or exogenous enzyme are indistinguishable. Each subunit of CaM-BP103/97 accepts up to 3 mol of phosphate/polypeptide chain. In the presence of low calcium concentrations and in the absence of cytosol, the phosphorylation of CaM-BP103/97 is, on a molar basis, equal to or greater than that of proteins 4.1 and 4.9. As a target for both calmodulin and protein kinase C, CaM-BP103/97 is likely to play a key role in the effect of calcium on erythrocyte membrane shape and stability.

  2. Phosphorylation of synaptosomal cytoplasmic proteins: Inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase c) by bay k 8644.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P J; Lovenberg, W

    1988-01-01

    The phosphorylation of specific substrates of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) was examined in striatal synaptosomal cytoplasm. The phosphoprotein substrata were termed group C phosphoprotems and were divided into two subgroups: group C(1) phosphoproteins (P83, P45A, P21 and P18) were found in both cytoplasm and synaptosomal membranes and, although stimulated by phosphatidylserine, only required exogamous calcium for their labeling; group C(2) phosphoproteins (P120, P96, P21.5, P18.5 and P16) were found predominantly in the cytoplasm and were absolutely dependent upon exogenous calcium and phosphatidylserme for their labeling. Several criteria were used to identify these proteins as specific protein kinase C substrates: (a) their phosphorylation was stimulated to a greater extent by Ca(2+) /phosphatidylserine/diolein than by Ca(2+) alone or Cal(2+) /calmodulin (group C(1)) or was completely dependent upon Ca(2+) /phosphatdylserine/diolein (group C(2)); (b) supermaximal concentrations of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor were without effect; (c) their phosphorylation was stimulated by oleic acid, which selectively activates protein kinase C in the absence of Ca(2+); (d) NaCl, which inhibited cAMP- and Ca(2+)/calmodulindependent phosphorylation, slightly increased phosphorylation of group C(1) and slightly decreased phosphorylation of group C(2) phosphoproteins. Maximal phosphorylation of P96 and other group C phosphoproteins occurred within 60 s and was followed by a slow decay rate while substrata of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase were maximally labeled within 20-30 s and rapidly dephosphorylated. The phosphorylation of all group C phosphoproteins was inhibited by the calcium channel agomst BAY K 8644, however, group C(2) phosphoproteins were considerably more sensitive. The IC(50) for inhibition of P96 labeling was 19 ?M. but for P83 was 190 ?M. Group B phosphoproteins were also slightly inhibited, and the

  3. Altered expression of connexin43 and phosphorylation connexin43 in glioma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin-Yun; Jiang, Qiu-Hua; Hong, Tao; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Rui-Jin; Huang, Jin-Qing; Hu, Kun; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to evaluate the connexin (Cx43) and phosphorylation Cx43 (p-Cx43) expression of human glioma tumors and correlate their expression with degrees of malignancy and proliferation, apoptosis, and migration activity of tumors. Cx43 and p-Cx43 expression were examined by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. The U251 cell viability was measured by MTT analysis. The apoptosis and migration were also evaluated by flow cytometric analysis and fluoroblok transwell chambers, respectively. We found that the Cx43 expression were significantly downregulated in in malignant glioma (WHO grade III and IV), compared to the malignant glioma (WHO grade I and II) and the p-Cx43 expression levels of malignant glioma (WHO grade III and IV) were significantly increased (P<0.05), compared to the malignant glioma (WHO grade I and II) at immunohistochemical analysis. After treatment of cells with a specific inhibitor of PKC, MAPK, and PTK inhibitors, the cell viability and migration were significantly decreased, while the apoptosis was slightly induced. In conclusion, the Cx43 expression level is inversely correlated with the tumor grade and proliferation and migration activity of tumor. Higher p-Cx43 expression level in high tumor grade suggests that a complex mechanism is involved in the suppression of tumor growth by connexins. PMID:26191122

  4. Pellino Proteins Contain a Cryptic FHA Domain that Mediates Interaction with Phosphorylated IRAK1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chun-Chi; Huoh, Yu-San; Schmitz, Karl R.; Jensen, Liselotte E.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2009-03-23

    Pellino proteins are RING E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in signaling events downstream of the Toll and interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptors, key initiators of innate immune and inflammatory responses. Pellino proteins associate with and ubiquitinate proteins in these pathways, including the interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase-1 (IRAK1). We determined the X-ray crystal structure of a Pellino2 fragment lacking only the RING domain. This structure reveals that the IRAK1-binding region of Pellino proteins consists largely of a previously unidentified forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. FHA domains are well-characterized phosphothreonine-binding modules, and this cryptic example in Pellino2 can drive interaction of this protein with phosphorylated IRAK1. The Pellino FHA domain is decorated with an unusual appendage or wing composed of two long inserts that lie within the FHA homology region. Delineating how this E3 ligase associates with substrates, and how these interactions are regulated by phosphorylation, is crucial for a complete understanding of Toll/IL-1 receptor signaling.

  5. (S)-Lacosamide Binding to Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 (CRMP2) Regulates CaV2.2 Activity by Subverting Its Phosphorylation by Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Moutal, Aubin; François-Moutal, Liberty; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Cottier, Karissa; Chew, Lindsey Anne; Yeon, Seul Ki; Dai, Jixun; Park, Ki Duk; Khanna, May; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-04-01

    The neuronal circuit remodels during development as well as in human neuropathologies such as epilepsy. Neurite outgrowth is an obligatory step in these events. We recently reported that alterations in the phosphorylation state of an axon specification/guidance protein, the collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), play a major role in the activity-dependent regulation of neurite outgrowth. We also identified (S)-LCM, an inactive stereoisomer of the clinically used antiepileptic drug (R)-LCM (Vimpat®), as a novel tool for preferentially targeting CRMP2-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which (S)-LCM affects CRMP2 phosphorylation by two key kinases, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). (S)-LCM application to embryonic cortical neurons resulted in reduced levels of Cdk5- and GSK-3β-phosphorylated CRMP2. Mechanistically, (S)-LCM increased CRMP2 binding to both Cdk5- and GSK-3β without affecting binding of CRMP2 to its canonical partner tubulin. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) experiments demonstrated direct binding of (S)-LCM to CRMP2. Using an in vitro luminescent kinase assay, we observed that (S)-LCM specifically inhibited Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of CRMP2. Cross-linking experiments and analytical ultracentrifugation showed no effect of (S)-LCM on the oligomerization state of CRMP2. The increased association between Cdk5-phosphorylated CRMP2 and CaV2.2 was reduced by (S)-LCM in vitro and in vivo. This reduction translated into a decrease of calcium influx via CaV2.2 in (S)-LCM-treated neurons compared to controls. (S)-LCM, to our knowledge, is the first molecule described to directly inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation and may be useful for delineating CRMP2-facilitated functions.

  6. Increased phosphorylation of collapsin response mediator protein-2 at Thr514 correlates with β-amyloid burden and synaptic deficits in Lewy body dementias.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huayang; Lim, Yun-An; Chong, Joyce R; Lee, Jasinda H; Aarsland, Dag; Ballard, Clive G; Francis, Paul T; Chen, Christopher P; Lai, Mitchell K P

    2016-01-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) regulates axonal growth cone extension, and increased CRMP2 phosphorylation may lead to axonal degeneration. Axonal and synaptic pathology is an important feature of Lewy body dementias (LBD), but the state of CRMP2 phosphorylation (pCRMP2) as well as its correlations with markers of neurodegeneration have not been studied in these dementias. Hence, we measured CRMP2 phosphorylation at Thr509, Thr514 and Ser522, as well as markers of β-amyloid (Aβ), tau-phosphorylation, α-synuclein and synaptic function in the postmortem neocortex of a longitudinally assessed cohort of LBD patients characterized by low (Parkinson's disease dementia, PDD) and high (dementia with Lewy bodies, DLB) burden of Alzheimer type pathology. We found specific increases of pCRMP2 at Thr514 in DLB, but not PDD. The increased CRMP2 phosphorylation correlated with fibrillogenic Aβ as well as with losses of markers for axon regeneration (β-III-tubulin) and synaptic integrity (synaptophysin) in LBD. In contrast, pCRMP2 alterations did not correlate with tau-phosphorylation or α-synuclein, and also appear unrelated to immunoreactivities of putative upstream kinases glycogen synthase kinase 3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5, as well as to protein phosphatase 2A. In conclusion, increased pCRMP2 may underlie the axonal pathology of DLB, and may be a novel therapeutic target. However, antecedent signaling events as well as the nature of pCRMP2 association with Aβ and other neuropathologic markers require further study. PMID:27609071

  7. Alterations in cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (CDK5) protein levels, activity and immunocytochemistry in canine motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Green, S L; Vulliet, P R; Pinter, M J; Cork, L C

    1998-11-01

    Hereditary canine spinal muscular atrophy (HCSMA) is a dominantly inherited motor neuron disease in Brittany spaniels that is clinically characterized by progressive muscle weakness leading to paralysis. Histopathologically, degeneration is confined to motor neurons with accumulation of phosphorylated neurofilaments in axonal internodes. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a kinase related to the cell cycle kinase cdc2, phosphorylates neurofilaments and regulates neurofilament dynamics. We examined CDK5 activity, protein levels, and cellular immunoreactivity in nervous tissue from dogs with HCSMA, from closely age-matched controls and from dogs with other neurological diseases. On immunoblot analysis, CDK5 protein levels were increased in the HCSMA dogs (by approximately 1.5-fold in both the cytosolic and the particulate fractions). CDK5 activity was significantly increased (by approximately 3-fold) in the particulate fractions in the HCSMA dogs compared to all controls. The finding that CDK5 activity was increased in the young HCSMA homozygotes with the accelerated form of the disease, who do not show axonal swellings histologically, suggests that alterations in CDK5 occurs early in the pathogenesis, prior to the development of significant neurofilament pathology. Immunocytochemically, there was strong CDK5 staining of the nuclei, cytoplasm and axonal processes of the motor neurons in both control dogs and dogs with HCSMA. Further immunocytochemical studies demonstrated CDK5 staining where neurofilaments accumulated, in axonal swellings in the dogs with HCSMA. Our observations suggest phosphorylation-dependent events mediated by CDK5 occur in canine motor neuron disease.

  8. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  9. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  10. In Vivo and In Vitro Protein Phosphorylation Studies on Ochromonas danica, an Alga with a Chlorophyll a/c/Fucoxanthin Binding Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Pamela B.; Biggins, John

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of thylakoid membranes in the Chromophyte alga Ochromonas danica was studied in whole cells and in vitro. Protein kinase activity was observed in the thylakoid fraction, and several membrane-bound polypeptides were found to be phosphorylated. The thylakoid protein kinase demonstrated several unusual regulatory properties. Both the polypeptides that were phosphorylated and the rate of protein phosphorylation were independent of illumination. Protein kinase activity was also unaffected by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, diuron. The kinase activity was inhibited under strong reducing conditions. Whole cells labeled with 32PO43− were converted to light states I and II by pre-illumination favoring photosystem I or photosystem II, respectively. Analysis of the phosphoproteins from cells in state I and state II showed that no changes in phosphorylation accompanied the change in energy redistribution. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668397

  11. Destabilization of Heterologous Proteins Mediated by the GSK3β Phosphorylation Domain of the β-Catenin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Xian; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Wu, Ningning; He, Yunfeng; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hongmei; Wen, Sheng; Deng, Fang; Liao, Zhan; Wu, Di; Zhang, Junhui; Qin, Xinyue; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; He, Tong-Chuan; Zhou, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in development and cellular processes. The hallmark of canonical Wnt signaling activation is the stabilization of β-catenin protein in cytoplasm and/or nucleus. The stability of β-catenin is the key to its biological functions and is controlled by the phosphorylation of its amino-terminal degradation domain. Aberrant activation of β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of human cancers. It has been recently suggested that GSK3β may play an essential role in regulating global protein turnover. Here, we investigate if the GSK3β phosphorylation site-containing degradation domain of β-catenin is sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins. Methods and Results We engineer chimeric proteins by fusing β-catenin degradation domain at the N- and/or C-termini of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In both transient and stable expression experiments, the chimeric GFP proteins exhibit a significantly decreased stability, which can be effectively antagonized by lithium and Wnt1. An activating mutation in the destruction domain significantly stabilizes the fusion protein. Furthermore, GSK3 inhibitor SB-216763 effectively increases the GFP signal of the fusion protein. Conversely, the inhibition of Wnt signaling with tankyrase inhibitor XAV939 results in a decrease in GFP signal of the fusion proteins, while these small molecules have no significant effects on the mutant destruction domain-GFP fusion protein. Conclusion Our findings strongly suggest that the β-catenin degradation domain may be sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins in Wnt signaling-dependent manner. It is conceivable that the chimeric GFP proteins may be used as a functional reporter to measure the dynamic status of β-catenin signaling, and to identify potential anticancer drugs that target β-catenin signaling. PMID:24335169

  12. Changes in phosphoinositide turnover, Ca sup 2+ mobilization, and protein phosphorylation in platelets from NIDDM patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H.; Umeda, F.; Hashimoto, T.; Nawata, H. )

    1990-12-01

    Enhanced platelet functions have been demonstrated in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). This study evaluated abnormalities in platelet signal transduction in diabetic patients, including turnover of phosphoinositides, mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, and phosphorylation of 20,000- and 47,000-Mr proteins (P20 and P47). Washed platelets were obtained from 6 patients with NIDDM whose platelet aggregation rates were abnormally elevated (DM-A group), 11 NIDDM patients with normal platelet aggregation rates (DM-B group), and 8 age-matched healthy control subjects. The mass and specific radioactivity of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidic acid (PA) in 32P-labeled platelets were not different among the three groups. Hydrolysis of PIP2, PIP, and PI; accumulation of PA; and phosphorylation of P20 in platelets stimulated by 0.05 U/ml thrombin were significantly increased in the DM-A group compared with the control or DM-B group. There was no difference in P47 phosphorylation among the three groups. On the contrary, P20 and P47 phosphorylation induced by 50 nM of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, an activator of protein kinase C, was significantly decreased in the DM-A group. Additionally, the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (( Ca2+)i) was measured with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura 2. Although the basal (Ca2+)i value was similar in the three groups, the rise in (Ca2+)i induced by 0.05 U/ml thrombin in the presence and the absence of extracellular Ca2+ was significantly higher in the DM-A group than the other groups.

  13. Alterations of rat liver mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and calcium uptake by benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Inés; Pavani, Mario; Aranda, Waldo; Maya, Juan Diego; Morello, Antonio; Ferreira, Jorge

    2004-07-01

    We report that oxidative phosphorylation and Ca2+ uptake processes are enhanced in liver mitochondria isolated from benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-treated rats. The carcinogen did not affect either the respiratory control index or the Ca2+ control ratio. B[a]P treatment increased the oxidation rate of several substrates that donate electrons at the level of all three coupling sites, either the ADP- or Ca2+-stimulated rates or those observed after ADP or Ca2+ exhaustion. However, the efficiency of energy coupling was maintained because both ADP/O and Ca2+/site ratios remained unchanged. The electron flow through NADH-oxidase, NADH-duroquinone reductase, NADH-juglone reductase, NADH-cytochrome c reductase, succinate-cytochrome c reductase, and cytochrome c oxidase was enhanced by B[a]P; however, succinate dehydrogenase activity was not affected. All these effects depended on the time post B[a]P administration, with a greater increase close to 48 h after administration of the carcinogen. The contents of cytochromes b, c1, and a + a3 from liver mitochondria, especially those isolated 48 h after B[a]P, were also significantly increased, although cytochrome c levels was just lightly increased 24 h after B[a]P treatment. These results suggest that B[a]P treatment stimulates mitochondrial respiration by increasing the level of several components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This may reflect mitochondrial adaptation to the cellular energy requirements of cell division in the neoplastic transformation process.

  14. The mitosis-regulating and protein-protein interaction activities of astrin are controlled by aurora-A-induced phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Chen, Jo-Mei Maureen; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Cheng, Tai-Shan; Wang, Ya-Hui Candice; Ku, Chia-Feng; Lian, Chiao-Hsuan; Liu, Chun-Chih Jared; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Yu, Chang-Tze Ricky

    2014-09-01

    Cells display dramatic morphological changes in mitosis, where numerous factors form regulatory networks to orchestrate the complicated process, resulting in extreme fidelity of the segregation of duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Astrin regulates several aspects of mitosis, such as maintaining the cohesion of sister chromatids by inactivating Separase and stabilizing spindle, aligning and segregating chromosomes, and silencing spindle assembly checkpoint by interacting with Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein (SKAP) and cytoplasmic linker-associated protein-1α (CLASP-1α). To understand how Astrin is regulated in mitosis, we report here that Astrin acts as a mitotic phosphoprotein, and Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin at Ser(115). The phosphorylation-deficient mutant Astrin S115A abnormally activates spindle assembly checkpoint and delays mitosis progression, decreases spindle stability, and induces chromosome misalignment. Mechanistic analyses reveal that Astrin phosphorylation mimicking mutant S115D, instead of S115A, binds and induces ubiquitination and degradation of securin, which sequentially activates Separase, an enzyme required for the separation of sister chromatids. Moreover, S115A fails to bind mitosis regulators, including SKAP and CLASP-1α, which results in the mitotic defects observed in Astrin S115A-transfected cells. In conclusion, Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin and guides the binding of Astrin to its cellular partners, which ensures proper progression of mitosis.

  15. Protracted cocaine withdrawal produces circadian rhythmic alterations of phosphorylated GSK-3β in reward-related brain areas in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi-ming; Li, Su-xia; Shi, Hai-shui; Ding, Zeng-bo; Luo, Yi-xiao; Xue, Yan-xue; Lu, Lin; Yu, Chang-xi

    2011-03-17

    Protracted cocaine withdrawal can extend for months and contribute to cocaine seeking and relapse. However, no previous studies have reported the manifestation of protracted withdrawal from chronic cocaine in rats. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) can phosphorylate PER2, CRY2, Rev-erbα, and BMAL1 in mammals. The circadian rhythmic expression of GSK-3β in reward-related brain areas is unclear. We examined rodent behaviors and circadian disturbances of GSK-3β expression during 30 days of protracted cocaine withdrawal. The behavioral tests included open field, elevated plus maze, weight gain, and sucrose preference tests performed 3, 10, and 30 days after stopping cocaine. At these three assessment points, we collected brain samples every 4h for 24h to examine the circadian rhythmic expression of GSK-3β. Decreased locomotor activity, weight loss, decreased sucrose consumption on day 3, and increased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze on day 10 after cocaine administration were found. Blunted circadian rhythms of phosphorylated GFK-3β (pGSK-3β) persisted for at least 30 days in all examined brain areas, with the exception of 10 days in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). The expression of pGSK-3β decreased in the SCN and increased in the NAc and ventral tegmental area persisted for at least 30 days, whereas in the prefrontal cortex decreased during withdrawal for 10 days but then reversed to abnormally high levels with protracted withdrawal. These long-lasting changes disrupted circadian rhythms and produced abnormal levels of phosphorylated GSK-3β protein in reward-related brain circuits, which may play a role in protracted cocaine withdrawal and contribute to relapse.

  16. Environmental Enrichment Alters Nicotine-Mediated Locomotor Sensitization and Phosphorylation of DARPP-32 and CREB in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Adrian M.; Midde, Narasimha M.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Zhu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Exposure within an environmental enrichment paradigm results in neurobiological adaptations and decreases the baseline of locomotor activity. The current study determined activation of DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein-32) and CREB (cAMP response element binding protein), and locomotor activity in rats raised in enriched (EC), impoverished (IC), and standard (SC) conditions following repeated administration of nicotine or saline. In the saline-control group, the basal phosphorylation state of DARPP-32 at Threonine-34 site (pDARPP-32 Thr34) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was lower in EC compared to IC and SC rats, which was positively correlated with their respective baseline activities. While nicotine (0.35 mg/kg, freebase) produced locomotor sensitization across all housing conditions when the nicotine-mediated locomotor activity was expressed as a percent change from their respective saline control, EC rats displayed greater sensitization to nicotine than IC and SC rats. Consistent with the behavioral findings, repeated nicotine injection increased pDARPP-32 Thr34 in PFC of EC and IC rats and in nucleus accumbens of EC rats; however, the magnitude of change from saline control in nicotine-induced enhancement of pDARPP-32 Thr34 in PFC was strikingly increased in EC rats relative to IC rats. Moreover, EC rats had lower basal phosphorylation levels of CREB at serine 133 in PFC and nucleus accumbens compared to IC and SC rats, whereas the nicotine-induced increase in phosphorylated CREB-Ser133 was more pronounced in PFC of EC rats relative to IC and SC rats. Collectively, these findings suggest innovative insights into advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of enrichment-induced changes in the motivational effects of nicotine, and aiding in the identification of new therapeutic strategies for tobacco smokers. PMID:22952905

  17. Phosphoproteome analysis of capacitated human sperm. Evidence of tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-anchoring protein 3 and valosin-containing protein/p97 during capacitation.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott; Chertihin, Olga; Westbrook, V Anne; White, Forest; Jayes, Friederike; Kalab, Petr; Marto, Jarrod A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Herr, John C; Hunt, Donald F; Visconti, Pablo E

    2003-03-28

    Before fertilization can occur, mammalian sperm must undergo capacitation, a process that requires a cyclic AMP-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. To identify proteins phosphorylated during capacitation, two-dimensional gel analysis coupled to anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblots and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was performed. Among the protein targets, valosin-containing protein (VCP), a homolog of the SNARE-interacting protein NSF, and two members of the A kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) family were found to be tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. In addition, immobilized metal affinity chromatography was used to investigate phosphorylation sites in whole protein digests from capacitated human sperm. To increase this chromatographic selectivity for phosphopeptides, acidic residues in peptide digests were converted to their respective methyl esters before affinity chromatography. More than 60 phosphorylated sequences were then mapped by MS/MS, including precise sites of tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of the sperm tail proteins AKAP-3 and AKAP-4. Moreover, differential isotopic labeling was developed to quantify phosphorylation changes occurring during capacitation. The phosphopeptide enrichment and quantification methodology coupled to MS/MS, described here for the first time, can be employed to map and compare phosphorylation sites involved in multiple cellular processes. Although we were unable to determine the exact site of phosphorylation of VCP, we did confirm, using a cross-immunoprecipitation approach, that this protein is tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. Immunolocalization of VCP showed fluorescent staining in the neck of noncapacitated sperm. However, after capacitation, staining in the neck decreased, and most of the sperm showed fluorescent staining in the anterior head.

  18. Thrombin mitogenic responses and protein phosphorylation are different in cultured human endothelial cells derived from large and microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, E.; Bikfalvi, A.; Rendu, F.; Toledano, S.L.; Tobelem, G. )

    1989-12-01

    It is well established that thrombin induces various biological responses in endothelial cells derived from large vessels. However, little is known about the effects of thrombin on the microvasculature. Protein phosphorylation may be one of the mechanisms by which an extracellular stimulus initiates cellular events like proliferation. Therefore, we have compared the effects of either human alpha-thrombin or phorbol esters (TPA) on the proliferation or protein phosphorylation in endothelial cells derived from large vessels (umbilical vein, HUVEC) or microvessels (omental tissue, HOMEC). In HOMEC, thrombin did not stimulate cell proliferation and protein phosphorylation while TPA slightly reduced the cell proliferation and induced the phosphorylation of a 27-kDa protein. In contrast, in HUVEC, thrombin or TPA markedly enhanced the cell proliferation and stimulated the phosphorylation of a 59-kDa protein. These data indicate that endothelial cells from large and small vessels respond differently to thrombin and there is a complex and as yet unclear relationship between the proliferation and the protein phosphorylation induced by thrombin.

  19. A role for tumor protein TPD52 phosphorylation in endo-membrane trafficking during cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Diana D.H.; Frey, Christina L.; Messenger, Scott W.; August, Benjamin K.; Groblewski, Guy E.

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} D52 localizes to vesicles at the mid-line in multinucleated cells. {yields} Expression of a D52 serine136/alanine mutant induced multinucleation of cells. {yields} D52 localizes to VAMP 8 positive endosomes necessary for cytokinesis. {yields} The Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of D52 regulates cytokinesis. -- Abstract: Tumor protein D52 is expressed at high levels in exocrine cells containing large secretory granules where it regulates Ca{sup 2+}-dependent protein secretion; however, D52 expression is also highly induced in multiple cancers. The present study investigated a role for the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of D52 at the single major phospho-acceptor site serine 136 on cell division. Ectopic expression of wild type D52 (D52wt) and the phosphomutants serine 136/alanine (S136A) or serine 136/glutamate (S136/E) resulted in significant multinucleation of cells. D52wt and S136/E each resulted in a greater than 2-fold increase in multinucleated cells compared to plasmid-transfected controls whereas the S136/A phospho-null mutant caused a 9-fold increase in multinucleation at 48 h post-transfection. Electron microscopy revealed D52 expression induced a marked accumulation of vesicles along the mid-line between nuclei where the final stages of cell abscission normally occurs. Supporting this, D52wt strongly colocalized on vesicular structures containing the endosomal regulatory protein vesicle associated membrane protein 8 (VAMP 8) and this colocalization significantly increased with elevations in cellular Ca{sup 2+}. As VAMP 8 is known to be necessary for the endo-membrane fusion reactions that mediate the final stages of cytokinesis, these data indicate that D52 expression and phosphorylation at serine 136 play an important role in supporting the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent membrane trafficking events necessary for cytokinesis in rapidly proliferating cancer cells.

  20. Phosphorylation Regulating the Ratio of Intracellular CRY1 Protein Determines the Circadian Period

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhang, Eric Erquan

    2016-01-01

    The core circadian oscillator in mammals is composed of transcription/translation feedback loop, in which cryptochrome (CRY) proteins play critical roles as repressors of their own gene expression. Although post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation of CRY1, are crucial for circadian rhythm, little is known about how phosphorylated CRY1 contributes to the molecular clockwork. To address this, we created a series of CRY1 mutants with single amino acid substitutions at potential phosphorylation sites and performed a cell-based, phenotype-rescuing screen to identify mutants with aberrant rhythmicity in CRY-deficient cells. We report 10 mutants with an abnormal circadian period length, including long period (S280D and S588D), short period (S158D, S247D, T249D, Y266D, Y273D, and Y432D), and arrhythmicity (S71D and S404D). When expressing mutated CRY1 in HEK293 cells, we show that most of the mutants (S71D, S247D, T249D, Y266D, Y273D, and Y432D) exhibited reduction in repression activity compared with wild-type (WT) CRY1, whereas other mutants had no obvious change. Correspondingly, these mutants also showed differences in protein stability and cellular localization. We show that most of mutants are more stable than WT, except S158D, T249D, and S280D. Although the characteristics of the 10 mutants are various, they all impair the ratio balance of intracellular CRY1 protein. Thus, we conclude that the mutations caused distinct phenotypes most likely through the ratio of functional CRY1 protein in cells. PMID:27721804

  1. Changes in diacylglycerol labeling, cell shape, and protein phosphorylation distinguish triggering from activation of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Reibman, J.; Korchak, H.M.; Vosshall, L.B.; Haines, K.A.; Rich, A.M.; Weissmann, G.

    1988-05-05

    Upon activation neutrophils release reactive oxygen intermediates such as superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) which are potent mediators of inflammation. Various agents elicit different responses. In contrast, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 1.6 ..mu..M) acting directly via protein kinase C is a potent stimulus for O/sub 2//sup -/. The authors compared the kinetics of appearance of various second messengers with the capacity of these ligands to elicit O/sub 2//sup -/ generation. Kinetic analysis showed a two-phase response to membrane ligands; both an early (greater than or equal to 15 s) and a late (>15 s) increase in (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)diacylglycerol (DG) was noted in response to fMLP. In contrast, LTB/sub 4/ elicited only a rapid early increase in DG. The rise in DG evoked by PMA was late. Moreover, comparison of increases in (/sup 3/H)DG versus those of (/sup 14/C)DG at early and late time points suggested that DG was not formed exclusively from the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides. Kinetic analysis of protein phosphorylation was compared to the early and late increments of DG labeling. A 47,000 M/sub r/ protein was phosphorylated with kinetics consistent with the production of O/sub 2//sup -/ and DG in response to fMLP and PMA. The temporal pattern of the formation of diacylglycerol and the phosphorylation of proteins describe a dual signal. The data suggest that neutrophils require not only triggering (the rapid generation of a signal) but also activation (the maintenance of a signal) to sustain responses.

  2. Protein kinase C substrate phosphorylation in relation to neural growth and synaptic plasticity: a common molecular mechanism underlying multiple neural functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    In these studies, we addressed the issues of: (1) whether neural protein kinase C (PKC) substrates might be altered in phosphorylation following induction of long-term potentiation (LTP); (2) whether PKC substrate phosphorylation might be specifically related to a model of neural plasticity other than LTP; and (3) whether the PKC substrates implicated in adult synaptic plasticity might be present in axonal growth cones given reports that high concentrations of PKC are found in these structures. Using quantitative analysis of multiple two-dimensional gels, we found that the two major substrates of exogenous purified PKC in adult hippocampal homogenate are both directly correlated to persistence of LTP. In rhesus monkey cerebral cortex, the proteins corresponding to protein F1 and 80k displayed topographical gradients in /sup 32/P-incorporation along the occipitotemporal visual processing pathway. The phosphorylation of both proteins was 11- and 14-fold higher, respectively, in temporal regions of this pathway implicated in the storage of visual representations, than in occipital regions, which do not appear to directly participate in visual memory functions.

  3. 15-Deoxyspergualin inhibits eukaryotic protein synthesis through eIF2α phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, T. N. C.; Surolia, Namita; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2006-01-01

    DSG (15-deoxyspergualin), an immunosuppressant with tumoricidal properties, binds potently to the regulatory C-terminal ‘EEVD’ motif of Hsps (heat-shock proteins). In the present study we demonstrate that DSG inhibits eukaryotic protein synthesis by sequestering Hsp70 which is required for maintaining HRI (haem-regulated inhibitor), a kinase of the eIF2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α), inactive. DSG stalled initiation of protein synthesis through phosphorylation of HRI and eIF2α. Addition of a recombinant eIF2α (S51A) protein, which lacks the phosphorylation site, lowered the inhibitory potential of DSG in reticulocyte lysate. The inhibitory effect of DSG was also attenuated in HRI knockdown cells. Moreover, exogenous addition of Hsp70 or the peptide ‘EEVD’ reversed the inhibitory effect of DSG. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of DSG in different mammalian cancer cells was found to negatively correlate with the amount of Hsp70 expressed in the cells, emphasizing the link with Hsp70 in DSG inhibition of eukaryotic translation. PMID:16952278

  4. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  5. ALTERED PHOSPHORYLATION OF MAP KINASE AFTER ACUTE EXPOSURE TO PCB153.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a model of synaptic plasticity believed to encompass the physiological substrate of memory. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) signalling cascade contributes to synaptic plasticity and to long-term memory formation. Learning and LTP st...

  6. In vivo and in vitro specificity of protein tyrosine kinases for immunoglobulin G receptor (FcgammaRII) phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Bewarder, N; Weinrich, V; Budde, P; Hartmann, D; Flaswinkel, H; Reth, M; Frey, J

    1996-01-01

    Human B cells express four immunoglobulin G receptors, FcgammaRIIa, FcgammaRIIb1, FcgammaRIIb2, and FcgammaRIIc. Coligation of either FcgammaRII isoform with the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the abrogation of B-cell activation, but only the FcgammaRIIa/c and FcgammaIIb1 isoforms become phosphorylated. To identify the FcgammaRII-phosphorylating protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), we used the combination of an in vitro and an in vivo approach. In an in vitro assay using recombinant cytoplasmic tails of the different FcgammaRII isoforms as well as tyrosine exchange mutants, we show that each of the BCR-associated PTKs (Lyn, Blk, Fyn, and Syk) shows different phosphorylation patterns with regard to the different FcgammaR isoforms and point mutants. While each PTK phosphorylated FcgammaRIIa/c, FcgammaRIIb1 was phosphorylated by Lyn and Blk whereas FcgammaRIIb2 became phosphorylated only by Blk. Mutants lacking both tyrosine residues of the immune receptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) of FcgammaRIIa/c were not phosphorylated by Blk and Fyn, while Lyn-mediated phosphorylation was dependent on the presence of the C-terminal tyrosine of the ITAM. Results obtained in assays using an FcgammaR- B-cell line transfected with wild-type or mutated FcgammaRIIa demonstrated that exchange of the C-terminal tyrosine of the ITAM of FcgammaRIIa/c was sufficient to abolish FcgammaRIIa/c phosphorylation in B cells. Additionally, we could show that Lyn and Fyn bind to FcgammaRIIa/c, with the ITAM being necessary for association. Comparison of the phosphorylation pattern of each PTK observed in vitro with the phosphorylation pattern observed in vivo suggests that Lyn is the most likely candidate for FcgammaRIIa/c and FcgammaRIIb1 phosphorylation in vivo. PMID:8756631

  7. Alpha1-antichymotrypsin, an inflammatory protein overexpressed in Alzheimer's disease brain, induces tau phosphorylation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Jaya; Levy, Monique; Dickson, Dennis W; Potter, Huntington

    2006-11-01

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are key pathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease pathology is also characterized by neuroinflammation and neuronal degeneration, with the proteins associated with inflammatory responses being found in tight association with the plaques. One such protein is the serine protease inhibitor alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT). ACT has been shown to promote Abeta polymerization in vitro and in vivo, and levels of ACT protein in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from Alzheimer's patients have been found to correlate with progression of dementia. Here we investigated the possible involvement of ACT in tau phosphorylation and tangle formation. As was previously found for Alzheimer's disease, brains from patients with non-Alzheimer's tauopathies exhibited an enhanced expression of ACT, which correlated with the level of tau hyperphosphorylation. Transgenic mice expressing human ACT alone or ACT along with mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) showed a significant increase in tau phosphorylation, suggesting that this inflammatory protein can induce tau hyperphosphorylation. The increase in phosphorylation was observed at PHF-1 (P-Ser396/P-Thr404), P-Ser202 and P-Thr231 sites on tau, the P-tau epitopes that are associated with tangles in the patients. This result was further confirmed by the finding that addition of purified ACT induced the same Alzheimer's disease-related tau hyperphosphorylation in cortical neurons cultured in vitro. This correlated with an increase in extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 activation, indicating their involvement in ACT-induced tau phosphorylation. The ACT-treated neurons showed neurite loss and subsequently underwent apoptosis. Approximately 40-50% of neurons were TUNEL positive by 6 and at 24 h >70% of the neurons showed staining suggesting that ACT was inducing apoptosis in these neurons. These findings indicate that inappropriate

  8. The Down syndrome-related protein kinase DYRK1A phosphorylates p27Kip1 and Cyclin D1 and induces cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Soppa, Ulf; Schumacher, Julian; Florencio Ortiz, Victoria; Pasqualon, Tobias; Tejedor, Francisco J; Becker, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in neurobiology is how the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuronal precursors is maintained to ensure that the proper number of brain neurons is generated. Substantial evidence implicates DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) as a candidate gene responsible for altered neuronal development and brain abnormalities in Down syndrome. Recent findings support the hypothesis that DYRK1A is involved in cell cycle control. Nonetheless, how DYRK1A contributes to neuronal cell cycle regulation and thereby affects neurogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study we have investigated the mechanisms by which DYRK1A affects cell cycle regulation and neuronal differentiation in a human cell model, mouse neurons, and mouse brain. Dependent on its kinase activity and correlated with the dosage of overexpression, DYRK1A blocked proliferation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells within 24 h and arrested the cells in G1 phase. Sustained overexpression of DYRK1A induced G0 cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DYRK1A modulated protein stability of cell cycle-regulatory proteins. DYRK1A reduced cellular Cyclin D1 levels by phosphorylation on Thr286, which is known to induce proteasomal degradation. In addition, DYRK1A phosphorylated p27Kip1 on Ser10, resulting in protein stabilization. Inhibition of DYRK1A kinase activity reduced p27Kip1 Ser10 phosphorylation in cultured hippocampal neurons and in embryonic mouse brain. In aggregate, these results suggest a novel mechanism by which overexpression of DYRK1A may promote premature neuronal differentiation and contribute to altered brain development in Down syndrome. PMID:24806449

  9. The Down syndrome-related protein kinase DYRK1A phosphorylates p27(Kip1) and Cyclin D1 and induces cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Ulf; Schumacher, Julian; Florencio Ortiz, Victoria; Pasqualon, Tobias; Tejedor, Francisco J; Becker, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in neurobiology is how the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuronal precursors is maintained to ensure that the proper number of brain neurons is generated. Substantial evidence implicates DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) as a candidate gene responsible for altered neuronal development and brain abnormalities in Down syndrome. Recent findings support the hypothesis that DYRK1A is involved in cell cycle control. Nonetheless, how DYRK1A contributes to neuronal cell cycle regulation and thereby affects neurogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study we have investigated the mechanisms by which DYRK1A affects cell cycle regulation and neuronal differentiation in a human cell model, mouse neurons, and mouse brain. Dependent on its kinase activity and correlated with the dosage of overexpression, DYRK1A blocked proliferation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells within 24 h and arrested the cells in G₁ phase. Sustained overexpression of DYRK1A induced G₀ cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DYRK1A modulated protein stability of cell cycle-regulatory proteins. DYRK1A reduced cellular Cyclin D1 levels by phosphorylation on Thr286, which is known to induce proteasomal degradation. In addition, DYRK1A phosphorylated p27(Kip1) on Ser10, resulting in protein stabilization. Inhibition of DYRK1A kinase activity reduced p27(Kip1) Ser10 phosphorylation in cultured hippocampal neurons and in embryonic mouse brain. In aggregate, these results suggest a novel mechanism by which overexpression of DYRK1A may promote premature neuronal differentiation and contribute to altered brain development in Down syndrome.

  10. The Down syndrome-related protein kinase DYRK1A phosphorylates p27(Kip1) and Cyclin D1 and induces cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Ulf; Schumacher, Julian; Florencio Ortiz, Victoria; Pasqualon, Tobias; Tejedor, Francisco J; Becker, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in neurobiology is how the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuronal precursors is maintained to ensure that the proper number of brain neurons is generated. Substantial evidence implicates DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) as a candidate gene responsible for altered neuronal development and brain abnormalities in Down syndrome. Recent findings support the hypothesis that DYRK1A is involved in cell cycle control. Nonetheless, how DYRK1A contributes to neuronal cell cycle regulation and thereby affects neurogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study we have investigated the mechanisms by which DYRK1A affects cell cycle regulation and neuronal differentiation in a human cell model, mouse neurons, and mouse brain. Dependent on its kinase activity and correlated with the dosage of overexpression, DYRK1A blocked proliferation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells within 24 h and arrested the cells in G₁ phase. Sustained overexpression of DYRK1A induced G₀ cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DYRK1A modulated protein stability of cell cycle-regulatory proteins. DYRK1A reduced cellular Cyclin D1 levels by phosphorylation on Thr286, which is known to induce proteasomal degradation. In addition, DYRK1A phosphorylated p27(Kip1) on Ser10, resulting in protein stabilization. Inhibition of DYRK1A kinase activity reduced p27(Kip1) Ser10 phosphorylation in cultured hippocampal neurons and in embryonic mouse brain. In aggregate, these results suggest a novel mechanism by which overexpression of DYRK1A may promote premature neuronal differentiation and contribute to altered brain development in Down syndrome. PMID:24806449

  11. Domains of tau protein, differential phosphorylation, and dynamic instability of microtubules.

    PubMed

    Trinczek, B; Biernat, J; Baumann, K; Mandelkow, E M; Mandelkow, E

    1995-12-01

    The dynamic instability of microtubules is thought to be regulated by MAPs and phosphorylation. Here we describe the effect of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein tau by observing the dynamics of single microtubules by video microscopy. We used recombinant tau isoforms and tau mutants, and we phosphorylated tau by the neuronal kinases MARK (affecting the KXGS motifs within tau's repeat domain) and cdk5 (phosphorylating Ser-Pro motifs in the regions flanking the repeats). The variants of tau can be broadly classified into three categories, depending on their potency to affect microtubule dynamics. "Strong" tau variants have four repeats and both flanking regions. "Medium" variants have one to three repeats and both flanking regions. "Weak" variants lack one or both of the flanking regions, or have no repeats; with such constructs, microtubule dynamics is not significantly different from that of pure tubulin. N- or C-terminal tails of tau have no influence on dynamic instability. The two ends of microtubules (plus and minus) showed different activities but analogous behavior. These results are consistent with the "jaws" model of tau where the flanking regions are considered as targeting domains whereas the addition of repeats makes them catalytically active in terms of microtubule stabilization. The dominant changes in the parameters of dynamic instability induced by tau are those in the dissociation rate and in the catastrophe rate (up to 30-fold). Other rates change only moderately or not at all (association rate increased up to twofold, rates of rescue or rapid shrinkage decreased up to approximately twofold). The order of repeats has little influence on microtubule dynamics (i.e., repeats can be re-arranged or interchanged), arguing in favor of the "distributed weak binding" model proposed by Butner and Kirschner (1991); however, we confirmed the presence of a "hotspot" of binding potential involving Lys274 and Lys281 observed by Goode and Feinstein, 1994

  12. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  13. Protein kinase Cα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizong; Wang, Nan; Li, Man; Gong, Huiqin; Liao, Xinghua; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Tongcun

    2015-09-01

    Myocardin plays a key role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the upstream signals that control the stability and transactivity of myocardin remain to be fully understood. The expression of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) also induces cardiac hypertrophy. An essential downstream molecule of PKCα, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, was reported to negatively regulate the activities of myocardin. But, the effect of cooperation between PKCα and myocardin and the potential molecular mechanism by which PKCα regulates myocardin-mediated cardiac hypertrophy are unclear. In this study, a luciferase assay was performed using H9C2 cells transfected with expression plasmids for PKCα and myocardin. Surprisingly, the results showed that PKCα inhibited the transcriptional activity of myocardin. PKCα inhibited myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, demonstrated by the decrease in cell surface area and fetal gene expression, in cardiomyocyte cells overexpressing PKCα and myocardin. The potential mechanism underlying the inhibition effect of PKCα on the function of myocardin is further explored. PKCα directly promoted the basal phosphorylation of endogenous myocardin at serine and threonine residues. In myocardin-overexpressing cardiomyocyte cells, PKCα induced the excessive phosphorylation of myocardin, resulting in the degradation of myocardin and a transcriptional suppression of hypertrophic genes. These results demonstrated that PKCα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation. PMID:26206583

  14. ERK2 phosphorylates Krüppel-like factor 8 protein at serine 48 to maintain its stability

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Satadru K; Lu, Heng; Mukherjee, Debarati; Yu, Lin; Zhao, Jihe

    2016-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) plays important roles in cancer and is strictly regulated by various post-translational modifications such as sumoylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation and PARylation. Here we report a novel phosphorylation of KLF8 by ERK2 responsible and critical for the stability of KLF8 protein. The full-length KLF8 protein displays a doublet in SDS-PAGE gel. The upper band of the doublet, however, disappeared when the N-terminal 50 amino acids were deleted. In its full-length the upper band disappeared upon phosphatase treatment or mutation of the serine 48 (S48) to alanine whereas the lower band was lost when the S48 was mutated to aspartic acid that mimics phosphorylated S48. These results suggest that S48 phosphorylation is responsible for the motility up-shift of KLF8 protein. Pharmacological and genetic manipulations of various potential kinases identified ERK2 as the likely one that phosphorylates KLF8 at S48. Functional studies indicated that this phosphorylation is crucial for protecting KLF8 protein from degradation in the nucleus and promoting cell migration. Taken together, this study identifies a novel mechanism of phosphorylation critical for KLF8 protein stabilization and function. PMID:27293988

  15. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I

    2015-08-14

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses. PMID:25987564

  16. Protein phosphorylation and membrane association of sucrose synthase in developing tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Anguenot, Raphaël; Nguyen-Quoc, Binh; Yelle, Serge; Michaud, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) activities were detected both in the soluble and the membrane fraction of various tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) organs, using a synthetic peptide mimicking the serine 11 phosphorylation site of a tomato sucrose synthase (SS, EC 2.4.1.13) isoform as substrate. The levels of membrane and soluble Ser-CDPK activities were differentially regulated during fruit development. The membrane Ser-CDPK activity was maximal in young fruit but decreased as the fruit developed, suggesting a specific role during fruit growth. Using an in gel assay with purified tomato SS as substrate, we showed that partially purified soluble and membrane Ser-CDPK preparations both contained a SS-kinase polypeptide of 55 kDa. The membrane and soluble Ser-CDPK activities were largely inactivated in the absence of calcium or when MgCl(2) was replaced by MnCl(2). Both soluble and membrane Ser-CDPK activities were very sensitive to staurosporine. Using Fe(III)-immobilized metal chromatography to determine the apparent phosphorylation status of the enzyme in vivo, we showed that soluble SS was largely dephosphorylated in fruits fed EGTA or staurosporine, compared to fruits fed water or sucrose. Moreover, the level of SS increased by about two-fold in the membrane fraction of fruits fed the Ser-CDPK inhibitors, compared to the control. The level of SS protein in the membrane and soluble fractions of tomato fruit was developmentally regulated, the membrane form being specifically detected in actively growing fruits. Together, our results suggest that a mechanism involving protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and/or calcium would in part control the association of SS isoforms with membranes in developing tomat