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Sample records for altered sleep homeostasis

  1. Maternal dietary restriction alters offspring's sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Noriyuki; Chikahisa, Sachiko; Nishi, Yuina; Harada, Saki; Iwaki, Yohei; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Séi, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional state in the gestation period influences fetal growth and development. We hypothesized that undernutrition during gestation would affect offspring sleep architecture and/or homeostasis. Pregnant female mice were assigned to either control (fed ad libitum; AD) or 50% dietary restriction (DR) groups from gestation day 12 to parturition. After parturition, dams were fed AD chow. After weaning, the pups were also fed AD into adulthood. At adulthood (aged 8-9 weeks), we carried out sleep recordings. Although offspring mice displayed a significantly reduced body weight at birth, their weights recovered three days after birth. Enhancement of electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was observed in the DR mice over a 24-hour period without changing the diurnal pattern or amounts of wake, NREM, or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In addition, DR mice also displayed an enhancement of EEG-SWA rebound after a 6-hour sleep deprivation and a higher threshold for waking in the face of external stimuli. DR adult offspring mice exhibited small but significant increases in the expression of hypothalamic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα) and brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (Cpt1c) mRNA, two genes involved in lipid metabolism. Undernutrition during pregnancy may influence sleep homeostasis, with offspring exhibiting greater sleep pressure.

  2. Chronic social stress leads to altered sleep homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Olini, Nadja; Rothfuchs, Iru; Azzinnari, Damiano; Pryce, Christopher R; Kurth, Salome; Huber, Reto

    2017-03-15

    Disturbed sleep and altered sleep homeostasis are core features of many psychiatric disorders such as depression. Chronic uncontrollable stress is considered an important factor in the development of depression, but little is known on how chronic stress affects sleep regulation and sleep homeostasis. We therefore examined the effects of chronic social stress (CSS) on sleep regulation in mice. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were implanted for electrocortical recordings (ECoG) and underwent either a 10-day CSS protocol or control handling (CON). Subsequently, ECoG was assessed across a 24-h post-stress baseline, followed by a 4-h sleep deprivation, and then a 20-h recovery period. After sleep deprivation, CSS mice showed a blunted increase in sleep pressure compared to CON mice, as measured using slow wave activity (SWA, electroencephalographic power between 1 - 4Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Vigilance states did not differ between CSS and CON mice during post-stress baseline, sleep deprivation or recovery, with the exception of CSS mice exhibiting increased REM sleep during recovery sleep. Behavior during sleep deprivation was not affected by CSS. Our data provide evidence that CSS alters the homeostatic regulation of sleep SWA in mice. In contrast to acute social stress, which results in a faster SWA build-up, CSS decelerates the homeostatic build up. These findings are discussed in relation to the causal contribution of stress-induced sleep disturbance to depression.

  3. Aging induced endoplasmic reticulum stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Chan, May T; Zimmerman, John E; Pack, Allan I; Jackson, Nicholas E; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity, and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response. The effectiveness of the adaptive unfolded protein response is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α, in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged or sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep or sleep debt discharge.

  4. Aging induced ER stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Marishka K.; Chan, May T.; Zimmerman, John E.; Pack, Allan I.; Jackson, Nicholas E.; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). The effectiveness of the adaptive UPR is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α (p-eIF2α), in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged/sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep/ sleep debt discharge. PMID:24444805

  5. Altered Sleep Homeostasis in Rev-erbα Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Mang, Géraldine M; La Spada, Francesco; Emmenegger, Yann; Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs; Franken, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα is a potent, constitutive transcriptional repressor critical for the regulation of key circadian and metabolic genes. Recently, REV-ERBα's involvement in learning, neurogenesis, mood, and dopamine turnover was demonstrated suggesting a specific role in central nervous system functioning. We have previously shown that the brain expression of several core clock genes, including Rev-erbα, is modulated by sleep loss. We here test the consequences of a loss of REV-ERBα on the homeostatic regulation of sleep. EEG/EMG signals were recorded in Rev-erbα knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Cortical gene expression measurements after sleep deprivation were contrasted to baseline. Although baseline sleep/wake duration was remarkably similar, KO mice showed an advance of the sleep/wake distribution relative to the light-dark cycle. After sleep onset in baseline and after sleep deprivation, both EEG delta power (1-4 Hz) and sleep consolidation were reduced in KO mice indicating a slower increase of homeostatic sleep need during wakefulness. This slower increase might relate to the smaller increase in theta and gamma power observed in the waking EEG prior to sleep onset under both conditions. Indeed, the increased theta activity during wakefulness predicted delta power in subsequent NREM sleep. Lack of Rev-erbα increased Bmal1, Npas2, Clock, and Fabp7 expression, confirming the direct regulation of these genes by REV-ERBα also in the brain. Our results add further proof to the notion that clock genes are involved in sleep homeostasis. Because accumulating evidence directly links REV-ERBα to dopamine signaling the altered homeostatic regulation of sleep reported here are discussed in that context. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  6. Altered Sleep Homeostasis in Rev-erbα Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Géraldine M.; La Spada, Francesco; Emmenegger, Yann; Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Albrecht, Urs; Franken, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα is a potent, constitutive transcriptional repressor critical for the regulation of key circadian and metabolic genes. Recently, REV-ERBα's involvement in learning, neurogenesis, mood, and dopamine turnover was demonstrated suggesting a specific role in central nervous system functioning. We have previously shown that the brain expression of several core clock genes, including Rev-erbα, is modulated by sleep loss. We here test the consequences of a loss of REV-ERBα on the homeostatic regulation of sleep. Methods: EEG/EMG signals were recorded in Rev-erbα knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Cortical gene expression measurements after sleep deprivation were contrasted to baseline. Results: Although baseline sleep/wake duration was remarkably similar, KO mice showed an advance of the sleep/wake distribution relative to the light-dark cycle. After sleep onset in baseline and after sleep deprivation, both EEG delta power (1–4 Hz) and sleep consolidation were reduced in KO mice indicating a slower increase of homeostatic sleep need during wakefulness. This slower increase might relate to the smaller increase in theta and gamma power observed in the waking EEG prior to sleep onset under both conditions. Indeed, the increased theta activity during wakefulness predicted delta power in subsequent NREM sleep. Lack of Rev-erbα increased Bmal1, Npas2, Clock, and Fabp7 expression, confirming the direct regulation of these genes by REV-ERBα also in the brain. Conclusions: Our results add further proof to the notion that clock genes are involved in sleep homeostasis. Because accumulating evidence directly links REV-ERBα to dopamine signaling the altered homeostatic regulation of sleep reported here are discussed in that context. Citation: Mang GM, La Spada F, Emmenegger Y, Chappuis S, Ripperger JA, Albrecht U, Franken P. Altered sleep homeostasis in Rev

  7. Maternal Dietary Restriction Alters Offspring’s Sleep Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Noriyuki; Chikahisa, Sachiko; Nishi, Yuina; Harada, Saki; Iwaki, Yohei; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Séi, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional state in the gestation period influences fetal growth and development. We hypothesized that undernutrition during gestation would affect offspring sleep architecture and/or homeostasis. Pregnant female mice were assigned to either control (fed ad libitum; AD) or 50% dietary restriction (DR) groups from gestation day 12 to parturition. After parturition, dams were fed AD chow. After weaning, the pups were also fed AD into adulthood. At adulthood (aged 8–9 weeks), we carried out sleep recordings. Although offspring mice displayed a significantly reduced body weight at birth, their weights recovered three days after birth. Enhancement of electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was observed in the DR mice over a 24-hour period without changing the diurnal pattern or amounts of wake, NREM, or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In addition, DR mice also displayed an enhancement of EEG-SWA rebound after a 6-hour sleep deprivation and a higher threshold for waking in the face of external stimuli. DR adult offspring mice exhibited small but significant increases in the expression of hypothalamic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα) and brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (Cpt1c) mRNA, two genes involved in lipid metabolism. Undernutrition during pregnancy may influence sleep homeostasis, with offspring exhibiting greater sleep pressure. PMID:23741310

  8. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  9. Occurrence of Epilepsy at Different Zeitgeber Times Alters Sleep Homeostasis Differently in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Pei-Lu; Chen, Ying-Ju; Lin, Chung-Tien; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2012-01-01

    . Shifts of sleep circadian rhythm and PER1 oscillation induced by ZT6-kindling were blocked by administration of hypocretin receptor antagonist SB334867 into the SCN, indicating the involvement of hypocretin. Conclusion: These observations suggest that the occurrence of epilepsy at different ZTs alters sleep processes differently. Citation: Yi PL; Chen YJ; Lin CT; Chang FC. Occurrence of epilepsy at different zeitgeber times alters sleep homeostasis differently in rats. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1651–1665. PMID:23204608

  10. Altered sleep homeostasis correlates with cognitive impairment in patients with focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Boly, Melanie; Jones, Benjamin; Findlay, Graham; Plumley, Erin; Mensen, Armand; Hermann, Bruce; Tononi, Guilio; Maganti, Rama

    2017-04-01

    In animal studies, both seizures and interictal spikes induce synaptic potentiation. Recent evidence suggests that electroencephalogram slow wave activity during sleep reflects synaptic potentiation during wake, and that its homeostatic decrease during the night is associated with synaptic renormalization and its beneficial effects. Here we asked whether epileptic activity induces plastic changes that can be revealed by high-density electroencephalography recordings during sleep in 15 patients with focal epilepsy and 15 control subjects. Compared to controls, patients with epilepsy displayed increased slow wave activity power during non-rapid eye movement sleep over widespread, bilateral scalp regions. This global increase in slow wave activity power was positively correlated with the frequency of secondarily generalized seizures in the 3-5 days preceding the recordings. Individual patients also showed local increases in sleep slow wave activity power at scalp locations matching their seizure focus. This local increase in slow wave activity power was positively correlated with the frequency of interictal spikes during the last hour of wakefulness preceding sleep. By contrast, frequent interictal spikes during non-rapid eye movement sleep predicted a reduced homeostatic decrease in the slope of sleep slow waves during the night, which in turn predicted reduced daytime learning. Patients also showed an increase in sleep spindle power, which was negatively correlated with intelligence quotient. Altogether, these findings suggest that both seizures and interictal spikes may induce long-lasting changes in the human brain that can be sensitively detected by electroencephalographic markers of sleep homeostasis. Furthermore, abnormalities in sleep markers are correlated with cognitive impairment, suggesting that not only seizures, but also interictal spikes can have negative consequences. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  11. Sustained Sleep Fragmentation Induces Sleep Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Maxime O.; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Petit, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep fragmentation (SF) is an integral feature of sleep apnea and other prevalent sleep disorders. Although the effect of repetitive arousals on cognitive performance is well documented, the effects of long-term SF on electroencephalography (EEG) and molecular markers of sleep homeostasis remain poorly investigated. To address this question, we developed a mouse model of chronic SF and characterized its effect on EEG spectral frequencies and the expression of genes previously linked to sleep homeostasis including clock genes, heat shock proteins, and plasticity-related genes. Design: N/A. Setting: Animal sleep research laboratory. Participants : Sixty-six C57BL6/J adult mice. Interventions: Instrumental sleep disruption at a rate of 60/h during 14 days Measurements and Results: Locomotor activity and EEG were recorded during 14 days of SF followed by recovery for 2 days. Despite a dramatic number of arousals and decreased sleep bout duration, SF minimally reduced total quantity of sleep and did not significantly alter its circadian distribution. Spectral analysis during SF revealed a homeostatic drive for slow wave activity (SWA; 1–4 Hz) and other frequencies as well (4–40 Hz). Recordings during recovery revealed slow wave sleep consolidation and a transient rebound in SWA, and paradoxical sleep duration. The expression of selected genes was not induced following chronic SF. Conclusions: Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) increased sleep pressure confirming that altered quality with preserved quantity triggers core sleep homeostasis mechanisms. However, it did not induce the expression of genes induced by sleep loss, suggesting that these molecular pathways are not sustainably activated in chronic diseases involving SF. Citation: Baud MO, Magistretti PJ, Petit JM. Sustained sleep fragmentation induces sleep homeostasis in mice. SLEEP 2015;38(4):567–579. PMID:25325477

  12. Sleep deprivation alters energy homeostasis through non-compensatory alterations in hypothalamic insulin receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Danilo Alves; Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-11-01

    Studies have shown a gradual reduction of sleep time in the general population, accompanied by increased food intake, representing a risk for developing obesity, type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Rats subjected to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) exhibit feeding and metabolic alterations, both of which are regulated by the communication between peripheral signals and the hypothalamus. This study aimed to investigate the daily change of 96 h of PSD-induced food intake, body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin and leptin concentrations and the expression of their receptors in the hypothalamus of Wistar rats. Food intake was assessed during the light and dark phases and was progressively increased in sleep-deprived animals, during the light phase. PSD produced body weight loss, particularly on the first day, and decreased plasma insulin and leptin levels, without change in blood glucose levels. Reduced leptin levels were compensated by increased expression of leptin receptors in the hypothalamus, whereas no compensations occurred in insulin receptors. The present results on body weight loss and increased food intake replicate previous studies from our group. The fact that reduced insulin levels did not lead to compensatory changes in hypothalamic insulin receptors, suggests that this hormone may be, at least in part, responsible for PSD-induced dysregulation in energy metabolism.

  13. Sleep architecture and glucose and insulin homeostasis in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Koren, Dorit; Levitt Katz, Lorraine E; Brar, Preneet C; Gallagher, Paul R; Berkowitz, Robert I; Brooks, Lee J

    2011-11-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with increased risk of adult type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It is uncertain whether sleep deprivation and/or altered sleep architecture affects glycemic regulation or insulin sensitivity or secretion. We hypothesized that in obese adolescents, sleep disturbances would associate with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. This cross-sectional observational study of 62 obese adolescents took place at the Clinical and Translational Research Center and Sleep Laboratory in a tertiary care children's hospital. Subjects underwent oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), anthropometric measurements, overnight polysomnography, and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT). Hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) and serial insulin and glucose levels were obtained, indices of insulin sensitivity and secretion were calculated, and sleep architecture was assessed. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to assess the association of total sleep and sleep stages with measures of insulin and glucose homeostasis, adjusted for confounding variables. We found significant U-shaped (quadratic) associations between sleep duration and both HbA(1c) and serial glucose levels on OGTT and positive associations between slow-wave sleep (N3) duration and insulin secretory measures, independent of degree of obesity, pubertal stage, sex, and obstructive sleep apnea measures. Insufficient and excessive sleep was associated with short-term and long-term hyperglycemia in our obese adolescents. Decreased N3 was associated with decreased insulin secretion. These effects may be related, with reduced insulin secretory capacity leading to hyperglycemia. We speculate that optimizing sleep may stave off the development of T2DM in obese adolescents.

  14. Sleep homeostasis in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Mark S; Middlemis-Brown, Jessica E; Johnson, Eric D

    2004-12-01

    Homeostatic regulation is a defining characteristic of sleep but has rarely been examined in infants. This study presents an automated method of sleep deprivation in which 5-day-old rats were shocked whenever the nuchal muscle became atonic. The intensity of shock was always set at the minimal level required to maintain arousal. Deprived pups exhibited rapid increases in sleep pressure, as evidenced by increased attempts to enter sleep and subsequent increases in sensory threshold; this increased sensory threshold was not due to sensory adaptation of peripheral receptors. In addition, myoclonic twitching was suppressed during the 30-min deprivation period, leading to rebound twitching during recovery sleep. These results provide the earliest demonstration of the homeostatic regulation of sleep in an altricial mammal.

  15. Sleep and bodily functions: the physiological interplay between body homeostasis and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Amici, R; Bastianini, S; Berteotti, C; Cerri, M; Del Vecchio, F; Lo Martire, V; Luppi, M; Perez, E; Silvani, A; Zamboni, G; Zoccoli, G

    2014-01-01

    Body homeostasis and sleep homeostasis may both rely on the complex integrative activity carried out by the hypothalamus. Thus, the three main wake-sleep (WS) states (i.e. wakefulness, NREM sleep, and REM sleep) may be better understood if the different cardio-respiratory and metabolic parameters, which are under the integrated control of the autonomic and the endocrine systems, are studied during sleep monitoring. According to this view, many physiological events can be considered as an expression of the activity that physiological regulations should perform in order to cope with the need to fulfill body and sleep homeostasis. This review is aimed at making an assessment of data showing the existence of a physiological interplay between body homeostasis and sleep homeostasis, starting from the spontaneous changes observed in the somatic and autonomic activity during sleep, through evidence showing the deep changes occurring in the central integration of bodily functions during the different WS states, to the changes in the WS states observed when body homeostasis is challenged by the external environment and when the return to normal ambient conditions allows sleep homeo- stasis to run without apparent physiological restrictions. The data summarized in this review suggest that an approach to the dichotomy between NREM and REM sleep based on physiological regulations may offer a framework within which observations that a traditional behavioral approach may overlook can be interpreted. The study of the interplay between body and sleep homeostasis appears, therefore, to be a way to understand the function of complex organisms beyond that of the specific regulations.

  16. Transcranial Electrical Stimulation Accelerates Human Sleep Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Reato, Davide; Gasca, Fernando; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom; Marshall, Lisa; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-01-01

    The sleeping brain exhibits characteristic slow-wave activity which decays over the course of the night. This decay is thought to result from homeostatic synaptic downscaling. Transcranial electrical stimulation can entrain slow-wave oscillations (SWO) in the human electro-encephalogram (EEG). A computational model of the underlying mechanism predicts that firing rates are predominantly increased during stimulation. Assuming that synaptic homeostasis is driven by average firing rates, we expected an acceleration of synaptic downscaling during stimulation, which is compensated by a reduced drive after stimulation. We show that 25 minutes of transcranial electrical stimulation, as predicted, reduced the decay of SWO in the remainder of the night. Anatomically accurate simulations of the field intensities on human cortex precisely matched the effect size in different EEG electrodes. Together these results suggest a mechanistic link between electrical stimulation and accelerated synaptic homeostasis in human sleep. PMID:23459152

  17. Transcranial electrical stimulation accelerates human sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Reato, Davide; Gasca, Fernando; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom; Marshall, Lisa; Parra, Lucas C

    2013-01-01

    The sleeping brain exhibits characteristic slow-wave activity which decays over the course of the night. This decay is thought to result from homeostatic synaptic downscaling. Transcranial electrical stimulation can entrain slow-wave oscillations (SWO) in the human electro-encephalogram (EEG). A computational model of the underlying mechanism predicts that firing rates are predominantly increased during stimulation. Assuming that synaptic homeostasis is driven by average firing rates, we expected an acceleration of synaptic downscaling during stimulation, which is compensated by a reduced drive after stimulation. We show that 25 minutes of transcranial electrical stimulation, as predicted, reduced the decay of SWO in the remainder of the night. Anatomically accurate simulations of the field intensities on human cortex precisely matched the effect size in different EEG electrodes. Together these results suggest a mechanistic link between electrical stimulation and accelerated synaptic homeostasis in human sleep.

  18. Update on Energy Homeostasis and Insufficient Sleep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the demands and opportunities of modern life, many people habitually sleep less than 6 h a night. In the sleep clinic, chronic sleep restriction is recognized by the diagnosis of insufficient sleep syndrome (ICSD-9, 307.49-4), which is receiving increased scrutiny as a potential risk to metabolic health. Its relevance for the practicing endocrinologist is highlighted by a stream of epidemiological data that show an association of insufficient sleep with increased incidence of obesity and related morbidities. A central theme of this update is the notion that sleep loss incurs additional metabolic cost, which triggers a set of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and behavioral adaptations aimed at increasing food intake and conserving energy. Although this coordinated response may have evolved to offset the metabolic demands of extended wakefulness in natural habitats with limited food availability, it can be maladaptive in the context of a modern environment that allows many to overeat while maintaining a sedentary lifestyle without sufficient sleep. Importantly, such sleep loss-related metabolic adaptation may undermine the success of behavioral interventions based on reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity to lower metabolic risk in obesity-prone individuals. This emerging perspective is based on data from recently published human interventional studies and requires further experimental support. Nevertheless, it now seems prudent to recommend that overweight and obese individuals attempting to reduce their caloric intake and maintain increased physical activity should obtain adequate sleep and, if needed, seek effective treatment for any coexisting sleep disorders. PMID:22442266

  19. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Wilfredo; Pereira, Catia M; Cota, Vinicius R; Souza, Annie C; Rennó-Costa, César; Santos, Sharlene; Dias, Gabriella; Guerreiro, Ana M G; Tort, Adriano B L; Neto, Adrião D; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-05-01

    Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP) takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα) in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states were interrupted. Control animals not exposed to novel objects during waking (WK) showed stable pCaMKIIα levels across the sleep-wake cycle, but animals exposed to novel objects showed a decrease during subsequent slow-wave sleep (SWS) followed by a rebound during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM). The levels of pCaMKIIα during REM were proportional to cortical spindles near SWS/REM transitions. Based on these results, we modeled sleep-dependent LTP on a network of fully connected excitatory neurons fed with spikes recorded from the rat hippocampus across WK, SWS and REM. Sleep without LTP orderly rescaled synaptic weights to a narrow range of intermediate values. In contrast, LTP triggered near the SWS/REM transition led to marked swaps in synaptic weight ranking. To better understand the interaction between rescaling and restructuring during sleep, we implemented synaptic homeostasis and embossing in a detailed hippocampal-cortical model with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Synaptic homeostasis was implemented by weakening potentiation and strengthening depression, while synaptic embossing was simulated by evoking LTP on selected synapses. We observed that synaptic homeostasis facilitates controlled synaptic restructuring. The results imply a mechanism for a cognitive synergy between SWS and REM, and suggest that LTP at the SWS/REM transition critically influences the effect of sleep: Its lack determines synaptic homeostasis, its presence causes synaptic

  20. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Rennó-Costa, César; Santos, Sharlene; Dias, Gabriella; Guerreiro, Ana M. G.; Tort, Adriano B. L.; Neto, Adrião D.; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP) takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα) in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states were interrupted. Control animals not exposed to novel objects during waking (WK) showed stable pCaMKIIα levels across the sleep-wake cycle, but animals exposed to novel objects showed a decrease during subsequent slow-wave sleep (SWS) followed by a rebound during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM). The levels of pCaMKIIα during REM were proportional to cortical spindles near SWS/REM transitions. Based on these results, we modeled sleep-dependent LTP on a network of fully connected excitatory neurons fed with spikes recorded from the rat hippocampus across WK, SWS and REM. Sleep without LTP orderly rescaled synaptic weights to a narrow range of intermediate values. In contrast, LTP triggered near the SWS/REM transition led to marked swaps in synaptic weight ranking. To better understand the interaction between rescaling and restructuring during sleep, we implemented synaptic homeostasis and embossing in a detailed hippocampal-cortical model with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Synaptic homeostasis was implemented by weakening potentiation and strengthening depression, while synaptic embossing was simulated by evoking LTP on selected synapses. We observed that synaptic homeostasis facilitates controlled synaptic restructuring. The results imply a mechanism for a cognitive synergy between SWS and REM, and suggest that LTP at the SWS/REM transition critically influences the effect of sleep: Its lack determines synaptic homeostasis, its presence causes synaptic

  1. Cortical neuronal mechanisms of sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V

    2013-01-01

    The longer we are awake, the deeper is our subsequent sleep. On the other hand, the shorter and more fragmented is our sleep, the more difficult it is for us to maintain wakefulness and stable cognitive performance the next day. This relationship between wakefulness and subsequent sleep becomes especially apparent after sleep deprivation or during chronic sleep restriction, which is experienced by millions of people in our society, as well as in multiple neurological, respiratory and other chronic diseases. Invariably, poor sleep leads to fatigue, sleepiness, marked cognitive deficits and impaired mood. The crucial question is what happens to the brain after a period of being awake or asleep, and where in the brain and why do these changes occur. This review summarizes information about neurophysiological substrates of sleep homeostatic processes at the cellular and network levels. It is suggested that sensory, behavioral and cognitive deficits after sleep deprivation resulting from the imbalance between local and global neuronal interactions can be reversed only by physiological sleep.

  2. Cortical neuronal activity does not regulate sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, M-H; Chen, M C; Lu, J

    2015-06-25

    The neural substrate of sleep homeostasis is unclear, but both cortical and subcortical structures are thought to be involved in sleep regulation. To test whether prior neuronal activity in the cortex or in subcortical regions drives sleep rebound, we systemically administered atropine (100mg/kg) to rats, producing a dissociated state with slow-wave cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) but waking behavior (e.g. locomotion). Atropine injections during the light period produced 6h of slow-wave cortical EEG but also subcortical arousal. Afterward, rats showed a significant increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, compared to the same period on a baseline day. Consistent with the behavioral and cortical EEG state produced by systemic atropine, c-Fos expression was low in the cortex but high in multiple subcortical arousal systems. These data suggest that subcortical arousal and behavior are sufficient to drive sleep homeostasis, while a sleep-like pattern of cortical activity is not sufficient to satisfy sleep homeostasis.

  3. Maternal Ube3a Loss Disrupts Sleep Homeostasis But Leaves Circadian Rhythmicity Largely Intact

    PubMed Central

    Ehlen, J. Christopher; Jones, Kelly A.; Pinckney, Lennisha; Gray, Cloe L.; Burette, Susan; Weinberg, Richard J.; Evans, Jennifer A.; Brager, Allison J.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with Angelman syndrome (AS) suffer sleep disturbances that severely impair quality of life. Whether these disturbances arise from sleep or circadian clock dysfunction is currently unknown. Here, we explored the mechanistic basis for these sleep disorders in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome (Ube3am−/p+ mice). Genetic deletion of the maternal Ube3a allele practically eliminates UBE3A protein from the brain of Ube3am−/p+ mice, because the paternal allele is epigenetically silenced in most neurons. However, we found that UBE3A protein was present in many neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus—the site of the mammalian circadian clock—indicating that Ube3a can be expressed from both parental alleles in this brain region in adult mice. We found that while Ube3am−/p+ mice maintained relatively normal circadian rhythms of behavior and light-resetting, these mice exhibited consolidated locomotor activity and skipped the timed rest period (siesta) present in wild-type (Ube3am+/p+) mice. Electroencephalographic analysis revealed that alterations in sleep regulation were responsible for these overt changes in activity. Specifically, Ube3am−/p+ mice have a markedly reduced capacity to accumulate sleep pressure, both during their active period and in response to forced sleep deprivation. Thus, our data indicate that the siesta is governed by sleep pressure, and that Ube3a is an important regulator of sleep homeostasis. These preclinical findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that target mechanisms of sleep homeostasis may improve sleep quality in individuals with AS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of the UBE3A gene. Individuals with AS have severe sleep dysfunction that affects their cognition and presents challenges to their caregivers. Unfortunately, current treatment strategies have limited efficacy due to a poor understanding of the

  4. Repeated Sleep Restriction in Adolescent Rats Altered Sleep Patterns and Impaired Spatial Learning/Memory Ability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Su-Rong; Sun, Hui; Huang, Zhi-Li; Yao, Ming-Hui; Qu, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate possible differences in the effect of repeated sleep restriction (RSR) during adolescence and adulthood on sleep homeostasis and spatial learning and memory ability. Design: The authors examined electroencephalograms of rats as they were subjected to 4-h daily sleep deprivation that continued for 7 consecutive days and assessed the spatial learning and memory by Morris water maze test (WMT). Participants: Adolescent and adult rats. Measurements and Results: Adolescent rats exhibited a similar amount of rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep with higher slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4 Hz) and fewer episodes and conversions with prolonged durations, indicating they have better sleep quality than adult rats. After RSR, adult rats showed strong rebound of REM sleep by 31% on sleep deprivation day 1; this value was 37% on sleep deprivation day 7 in adolescents compared with 20-h baseline level. On sleep deprivation day 7, SWA in adult and adolescent rats increased by 47% and 33%, and such elevation lasted for 5 h and 7 h, respectively. Furthermore, the authors investigated the effects of 4-h daily sleep deprivation immediately after the water maze training sessions on spatial cognitive performance. Adolescent rats sleep-restricted for 7 days traveled a longer distance to find the hidden platform during the acquisition training and had fewer numbers of platform crossings in the probe trial than those in the control group, something that did not occur in the sleep-deprived adult rats. Conclusions: Repeated sleep restriction (RSR) altered sleep profiles and mildly impaired spatial learning and memory capability in adolescent rats. Citation: Yang SR; Sun H; Huang ZL; Yao MH; Qu WM. Repeated sleep restriction in adolescent rats altered sleep patterns and impaired spatial learning/memory ability. SLEEP 2012;35(6):849-859. PMID:22654204

  5. Notch signaling modulates sleep homeostasis and learning after sleep deprivation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Seugnet, Laurent; Suzuki, Yasuko; Merlin, Gabriel; Gottschalk, Laura; Duntley, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The role of the trans-membrane receptor Notch in the adult brain is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that bunched, a negative regulator of Notch is involved in sleep homeostasis. Genetic evidence indicates that interfering with bunched activity in the mushroom bodies (MBs) abolishes sleep homeostasis. Combining bunched and Delta loss-of-function mutations rescued normal homeostasis, suggesting that Notch signaling may be involved in regulating sensitivity to sleep loss. Preventing the down regulation of Delta by over-expressing a wild-type transgene in MBs reduces sleep homeostasis and, importantly, prevents learning impairments induced by sleep deprivation. Similar resistance to sleep loss is observed with the Notchspl-1 gain-of-function mutants. Immunohistochemistry reveals that the Notch receptor is expressed in glia, whereas Delta is localized in neurons. Importantly the expression of the intracellular domain of Notch, a dominant activated form of the receptor, in glia is sufficient to prevent learning deficits after sleep deprivation. Together these results identify a novel neuronal-glia signalling pathway dependent on Notch and regulated by bunched. These data highlight the emerging role of neuron-glia interactions in regulating both sleep and learning impairments associated with sleep loss. PMID:21549599

  6. Ketone body metabolism and sleep homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Séi, Hiroyoshi

    2014-04-01

    A link has been established between energy metabolism and sleep homeostasis. The ketone bodies acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, generated from the breakdown of fatty acids, are major metabolic fuels for the brain under conditions of low glucose availability. Ketogenesis is modulated by the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and treatment with a PPAR activator has been shown to induce a marked increase in plasma acetoacetate and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate in mice, accompanied by increased slow-wave activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The present study investigated the role of ketone bodies in sleep regulation. Six-hour sleep deprivation increased plasma ketone bodies and their ratio (acetoacetate/β-hydroxybutyrate) in 10-week-old male mice. Moreover, sleep deprivation increased mRNA expression of ketogenic genes such as PPARα and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarate-CoA synthase 2 in the brain and decreased ketolytic enzymes such as succinyl-CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase. In addition, central injection of acetoacetate, but not β-hydroxybutyrate, markedly increased slow-wave activity during NREM sleep and suppressed glutamate release. Central metabolism of ketone bodies, especially acetoacetate, appears to play a role in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  7. Synaptic plasticity in sleep: learning, homeostasis, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gordon; Grone, Brian; Colas, Damien; Appelbaum, Lior; Mourrain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is a fundamental and evolutionarily conserved aspect of animal life. Recent studies have shed light on the role of sleep in synaptic plasticity. Demonstrations of memory replay and synapse homeostasis suggest that one essential role of sleep is in the consolidation and optimization of synaptic circuits to retain salient memory traces despite the noise of daily experience. Here, we review this recent evidence, and suggest that sleep creates a heightened state of plasticity, which may be essential for this optimization. Furthermore, we discuss how sleep deficits seen in diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorders might not just reflect underlying circuit malfunction, but could also play a direct role in the progression of those disorders. PMID:21840068

  8. Role of Orexin in Respiratory and Sleep Homeostasis during Upper Airway Obstruction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tarasiuk, Ariel; Levi, Avishag; Berdugo-Boura, Nilly; Yahalom, Ari; Segev, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chronic upper airway obstruction (UAO) elicits a cascade of complex endocrine derangements that affect growth, sleep, and energy metabolism. We hypothesized that elevated hypothalamic orexin has a role in maintaining ventilation during UAO, while at the same time altering sleep-wake activity and energy metabolism. Here, we sought to explore the UAO-induced changes in hypothalamic orexin and their role in sleep-wake balance, respiratory activity, and energy metabolism. Interventions: The tracheae of 22-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were surgically narrowed; UAO and sham-operated control animals were monitored for 7 weeks. We measured food intake, body weight, temperature, locomotion, and sleep-wake activity. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify subcutaneous and visceral fat tissue volumes. In week 7, the rats were sacrificed and levels of hypothalamic orexin, serum leptin, and corticosterone were determined. The effect of dual orexin receptor antagonist (almorexant 300 mg/kg) on sleep and respiration was also explored. Measurements and Results: UAO increased hypothalamic orexin mRNA and protein content by 64% and 65%, respectively. UAO led to 30% chronic sleep loss, excessive active phase sleepiness, decreased body temperature, increased food intake, reduction of abdominal and subcutaneous fat tissue volume, and growth retardation. Administration of almorexant normalized sleep but induced severe breathing difficulties in UAO rats, while it had no effect on sleep or on breathing of control animals. Conclusions: In upper airway obstruction animals, enhanced orexin secretion, while crucially important for respiratory homeostasis maintenance, is also responsible for chronic partial sleep loss, as well as considerable impairment of energy metabolism and growth. Citation: Tarasiuk A, Levi A, Berdugo-Boura N, Yahalom A, Segev Y. Role of orexin in respiratory and sleep homeostasis during upper airway obstruction in rats. SLEEP 2014

  9. Local sleep homeostasis in the avian brain: convergence of sleep function in mammals and birds?

    PubMed Central

    Lesku, John A.; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Wilzeck, Christiane; Rattenborg, Niels C.

    2011-01-01

    The function of the brain activity that defines slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in mammals is unknown. During SWS, the level of electroencephalogram slow wave activity (SWA or 0.5–4.5 Hz power density) increases and decreases as a function of prior time spent awake and asleep, respectively. Such dynamics occur in response to waking brain use, as SWA increases locally in brain regions used more extensively during prior wakefulness. Thus, SWA is thought to reflect homeostatically regulated processes potentially tied to maintaining optimal brain functioning. Interestingly, birds also engage in SWS and REM sleep, a similarity that arose via convergent evolution, as sleeping reptiles and amphibians do not show similar brain activity. Although birds deprived of sleep show global increases in SWA during subsequent sleep, it is unclear whether avian sleep is likewise regulated locally. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first electrophysiological evidence for local sleep homeostasis in the avian brain. After staying awake watching David Attenborough's The Life of Birds with only one eye, SWA and the slope of slow waves (a purported marker of synaptic strength) increased only in the hyperpallium—a primary visual processing region—neurologically connected to the stimulated eye. Asymmetries were specific to the hyperpallium, as the non-visual mesopallium showed a symmetric increase in SWA and wave slope. Thus, hypotheses for the function of mammalian SWS that rely on local sleep homeostasis may apply also to birds. PMID:21208955

  10. Local sleep homeostasis in the avian brain: convergence of sleep function in mammals and birds?

    PubMed

    Lesku, John A; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Wilzeck, Christiane; Rattenborg, Niels C

    2011-08-22

    The function of the brain activity that defines slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in mammals is unknown. During SWS, the level of electroencephalogram slow wave activity (SWA or 0.5-4.5 Hz power density) increases and decreases as a function of prior time spent awake and asleep, respectively. Such dynamics occur in response to waking brain use, as SWA increases locally in brain regions used more extensively during prior wakefulness. Thus, SWA is thought to reflect homeostatically regulated processes potentially tied to maintaining optimal brain functioning. Interestingly, birds also engage in SWS and REM sleep, a similarity that arose via convergent evolution, as sleeping reptiles and amphibians do not show similar brain activity. Although birds deprived of sleep show global increases in SWA during subsequent sleep, it is unclear whether avian sleep is likewise regulated locally. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first electrophysiological evidence for local sleep homeostasis in the avian brain. After staying awake watching David Attenborough's The Life of Birds with only one eye, SWA and the slope of slow waves (a purported marker of synaptic strength) increased only in the hyperpallium--a primary visual processing region--neurologically connected to the stimulated eye. Asymmetries were specific to the hyperpallium, as the non-visual mesopallium showed a symmetric increase in SWA and wave slope. Thus, hypotheses for the function of mammalian SWS that rely on local sleep homeostasis may apply also to birds.

  11. Effects of chronic sleep deprivation on glucose homeostasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaowen; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Yan; Su, Tianjiao; Chen, Liying; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weifeng; Xie, Yuanyuan; Wang, Tiantian; Yang, Fan; He, Li; Wang, Wenjiao; Fu, Xuemei; Hao, Hongxia; Ma, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that chronic sleep disturbances resulted in metabolic disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between chronic sleep deprivation (CSD) and the glucose homeostasis in rats. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into CSD group and control (CON) group. The CSD rats were intervened by a modified multiple platform method (MMPM) to establish an animal model of chronic sleep disturbances. After 3-month intervention, all rats were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and an insulin tolerance test (ITT), and the body weight, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine, lipid profile group, and homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) were measured. Both the CSD and CON groups had an attenuation of weight gain after 3-month intervention. The plasma glucose level of CSD group was higher than that of the CON group during the IPGTT (P < 0.01). The CSD rats showed a marked increase in HOMA-IR and ITT compared with the CON group (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences of AST, ALT, creatinine, and most lipid parameters between the CSD and CON groups (P > 0.05). The CSD has a marked effect on glucose homeostasis, comprising glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

  12. Repeated sleep restriction in adolescent rats altered sleep patterns and impaired spatial learning/memory ability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Rong; Sun, Hui; Huang, Zhi-Li; Yao, Ming-Hui; Qu, Wei-Min

    2012-06-01

    To investigate possible differences in the effect of repeated sleep restriction (RSR) during adolescence and adulthood on sleep homeostasis and spatial learning and memory ability. The authors examined electroencephalograms of rats as they were subjected to 4-h daily sleep deprivation that continued for 7 consecutive days and assessed the spatial learning and memory by Morris water maze test (WMT). Adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent rats exhibited a similar amount of rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep with higher slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4 Hz) and fewer episodes and conversions with prolonged durations, indicating they have better sleep quality than adult rats. After RSR, adult rats showed strong rebound of REM sleep by 31% on sleep deprivation day 1; this value was 37% on sleep deprivation day 7 in adolescents compared with 20-h baseline level. On sleep deprivation day 7, SWA in adult and adolescent rats increased by 47% and 33%, and such elevation lasted for 5 h and 7 h, respectively. Furthermore, the authors investigated the effects of 4-h daily sleep deprivation immediately after the water maze training sessions on spatial cognitive performance. Adolescent rats sleep-restricted for 7 days traveled a longer distance to find the hidden platform during the acquisition training and had fewer numbers of platform crossings in the probe trial than those in the control group, something that did not occur in the sleep-deprived adult rats. Repeated sleep restriction (RSR) altered sleep profiles and mildly impaired spatial learning and memory capability in adolescent rats.

  13. DAF-16/FOXO regulates homeostasis of essential sleep-like behavior during larval transitions in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Driver, Robert J; Lamb, Annesia L; Wyner, Abraham J; Raizen, David M

    2013-03-18

    Sleep homeostasis, which refers to the maintenance of sleep amount or depth following sleep deprivation, indicates that sleep and sleep-like states serve fundamental functions that cannot be bypassed [1]. Homeostasis of sleep-like behavior is observed during C. elegans lethargus, a 2-3 hr behavioral quiescent period that occurs during larval state transitions [2]. Here, we report a role for DAF-16/FOXO, a transcription factor that is active under conditions of stress [3], in the response to deprivation of lethargus quiescence. Forced locomotion during lethargus results in nuclear translocation of DAF-16. The formation of dauer larvae, a developmental state promoted by daf-16, is increased in response to quiescence deprivation. daf-16 mutants show an impaired homeostatic response to deprivation of lethargus quiescence and are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of forced locomotion during lethargus. DAF-16 expression in muscle cells, but not in neurons, is sufficient to restore a homeostatic response to deprivation of quiescence, pointing to a role for muscle in sleep homeostasis. These findings are relevant to clinical observations of altered metabolic signaling in response to sleep deprivation and suggest that these signaling pathways may act in nonneuronal tissue to regulate sleep behaviors.

  14. DAF-16/FOXO regulates homeostasis of essential sleep-like behavior during larval transitions in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Robert J.; Lamb, Annesia L.; Wyner, Abraham J.; Raizen, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep homeostasis, which refers to the maintenance of sleep amount or depth following sleep deprivation, indicates that sleep and sleep-like states serve fundamental functions that cannot be bypassed [1]. Homeostasis of sleep-like behavior is observed during C. elegans lethargus, a 2-3 hour behavioral quiescent period that occurs during larval state transitions [2]. Here, we report a role for DAF-16/FOXO, a transcription factor that is active under conditions of stress [3], in the response to deprivation of lethargus quiescence. Forced locomotion during lethargus results in nuclear translocation of DAF-16. The formation of dauer larvae, a developmental state promoted by daf-16, is increased in response to quiescence deprivation. daf-16 mutants show an impaired homeostatic response to deprivation of lethargus quiescence, and are hypersensitive to the lethal effects of forced locomotion during lethargus. DAF-16 expression in muscle cells but not in neurons is sufficient to restore a homeostatic response to deprivation of quiescence, pointing to a role for muscle in sleep homeostasis. These findings are relevant to clinical observations of altered metabolic signaling in response to sleep deprivation and suggest that these signaling pathways may act in non-neuronal tissue to regulate sleep behaviors. PMID:23477722

  15. REM sleep homeostasis in the absence of REM sleep: Effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrew; Wafford, Keith; Shanks, Elaine; Ligocki, Marcin; Edgar, Dale M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Most antidepressants suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is thought to be important to brain function, yet the resulting REM sleep restriction is well tolerated. This study investigated the impact of antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), on the regulation of REM sleep in rats. REM sleep was first demonstrated to be homeostatically regulated using 5, 8 and 10 h of REM-sleep specific restriction through EEG-triggered arousals, with an average of 91 ± 10% of lost REM sleep recovered following a 26-29 -hour recovery period. Acute treatment with the antidepressants paroxetine, citalopram and imipramine inhibited REM sleep by 84 ± 8, 84 ± 8 and 69 ± 9% respectively relative to vehicle control. The pharmacologically-induced REM sleep deficits by paroxetine and citalopram were not fully recovered, whereas, after imipramine the REM sleep deficit was fully compensated. Given the marked difference between REM sleep recovery following the administration of paroxetine, citalopram, imipramine and REM sleep restriction, the homeostatic response was further examined by pairing REM sleep specific restriction with the three antidepressants. Surprisingly, the physiologically-induced REM sleep deficits incurred prior to suppression of REM sleep by all antidepressants was consistently recovered. The data indicate that REM sleep homeostasis remains operative following subsequent treatment with antidepressants and is unaffected by additional pharmacological inhibition of REM sleep. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiple Sleep Alterations in Mice Lacking Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bastianini, Stefano; Lo Martire, Viviana; Mazza, Roberta; Pagotto, Uberto; Quarta, Carmelo; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors are highly expressed in the brain and play a role in behavior control. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling is modulated by high-fat diet (HFD). We investigated the consequences of congenital lack of CB1 receptors on sleep in mice fed standard diet (SD) and HFD. CB1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed SD or HFD for 4 months (n = 9–10 per group). Mice were instrumented with electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic electrodes. Recordings were performed during baseline (48 hours), sleep deprivation (gentle handling, 6 hours), sleep recovery (18 hours), and after cage switch (insomnia model paradigm, 6 hours). We found multiple significant effects of genotype on sleep. In particular, KO spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) than WT during the dark (active) period but not during the light (rest) period, enhancing the day-night variation of wake-sleep amounts. KO had slower EEG theta rhythm during REMS. REMS homeostasis after sleep deprivation was less effective in KO than in WT. Finally, KO habituated more rapidly to the arousing effect of the cage-switch test than WT. We did not find any significant effects of diet or of diet x genotype interaction on sleep. The occurrence of multiple sleep alterations in KO indicates important roles of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in limiting arousal during the active period of the day, in sleep regulation, and in sleep EEG in mice. PMID:24586776

  17. Multiple sleep alterations in mice lacking cannabinoid type 1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Bastianini, Stefano; Lo Martire, Viviana; Mazza, Roberta; Pagotto, Uberto; Quarta, Carmelo; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors are highly expressed in the brain and play a role in behavior control. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling is modulated by high-fat diet (HFD). We investigated the consequences of congenital lack of CB1 receptors on sleep in mice fed standard diet (SD) and HFD. CB1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed SD or HFD for 4 months (n = 9-10 per group). Mice were instrumented with electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic electrodes. Recordings were performed during baseline (48 hours), sleep deprivation (gentle handling, 6 hours), sleep recovery (18 hours), and after cage switch (insomnia model paradigm, 6 hours). We found multiple significant effects of genotype on sleep. In particular, KO spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) than WT during the dark (active) period but not during the light (rest) period, enhancing the day-night variation of wake-sleep amounts. KO had slower EEG theta rhythm during REMS. REMS homeostasis after sleep deprivation was less effective in KO than in WT. Finally, KO habituated more rapidly to the arousing effect of the cage-switch test than WT. We did not find any significant effects of diet or of diet x genotype interaction on sleep. The occurrence of multiple sleep alterations in KO indicates important roles of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in limiting arousal during the active period of the day, in sleep regulation, and in sleep EEG in mice.

  18. Sleep homeostasis in the female rat during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Schwierin, B; Borbély, A A; Tobler, I

    1998-11-16

    To investigate whether sleep homeostasis in the female rat is modulated by the estrous cycle, the vigilance states, EEG power spectra and cortical temperature (TCRT) were assessed on the basis of 4-day continuous recordings. A regulatory response was elicited by 6-h sleep deprivation (SD) during the proestrous (PRO) and the estrous (EST) day and compared to the baseline recordings. The vigilance states varied across the estrous cycle. In the PRO dark period the amount of sleep was reduced. The decrease in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep was already evident towards the end of the preceding light period, and an increased fragmentation of sleep was present throughout PRO. Compared to the other days of the estrous cycle, slow-wave activity (SWA; EEG power density 0.75-4.75 Hz) in nonREM (NREM) sleep was lower in PRO at the end of the light period and in the beginning of the dark period. High-frequency activity (HFA; EEG power density 10.25-25.0 Hz) was increased in the dark period of PRO. The SD performed during the first 6 h of the light period of PRO and EST enhanced SWA in NREM sleep and reduced sleep fragmentation during the subsequent 6 h. The extent and time course of the response to SD did not differ between the two phases of the estrous cycle. It is concluded that despite the marked baseline variations of the vigilance states and the EEG, homeostatic regulation is little affected by the estrous cycle. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Effects of a 3-Hour Sleep Delay on Sleep Homeostasis in Alcohol Dependent Adults

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Roseanne; Hoffmann, Robert; Conroy, Deirdre A.; Arnedt, J. Todd; Brower, Kirk J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated slow wave activity homeostatic response to a mild sleep challenge in alcohol-dependent adults compared to healthy controls. Design: Participants maintained a 23:00-06:00 schedule for 5 days verified by actigraphy and diary, followed by 3 nights in the lab: adaptation, baseline, and a sleep delay night with an 02:00-09:00 schedule. Setting: Sleep ' Chronophysiology laboratory. Participants: 48 alcohol-dependent adults (39 men, 9 women) who were abstinent for at least 3 weeks and 16 healthy control adults (13 men, 3 women), 21-55 years of age participated in study. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Slow wave EEG activity (SWA) in consecutive NREM periods was compared between baseline and sleep delay nights and between AD and HC groups, using age and sex as statistical covariates. The AD group showed a blunted SWA response to sleep delay with significantly lower SWA power than the HC group. Exponential regression analyses confirmed lower asymptotic SWA with a slower decay rate over NREM sleep time in the AD group. Results were similar for raw SWA and %SWA on the delay night expressed relative to baseline SWA. Conclusions: Alcohol dependence is associated with impaired SWA regulation and a blunted response to a mild homeostatic sleep challenge. Citation: Armitage R; Hoffmann R; Conroy DA; Arnedt JT; Brower KJ. Effects of a 3-hour sleep delay on sleep homeostasis in alcohol dependent adults. SLEEP 2012;35(2):273-278. PMID:22294818

  20. Behavioral Sleep-Wake Homeostasis and EEG Delta Power Are Decoupled By Chronic Sleep Restriction in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Richard; Caron, Aimee M.; Famina, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) is prevalent in society and is linked to adverse consequences that might be ameliorated by acclimation of homeostatic drive. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the sleep-wake homeostat will acclimatize to CSR. DESIGN: A four-parameter model of proportional control was used to quantify sleep homeostasis with and without recourse to a sleep intensity function. Setting: Animal laboratory, rodent walking-wheel apparatus. Subjects: Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions: Acute total sleep deprivation (TSD, 1 day × 18 or 24 h, N = 12), CSR (10 days × 18 h TSD, N = 6, or 5 days × 20 h TSD, N = 5). Measurements and Results: Behavioral rebounds were consistent with model predictions for proportional control of cumulative times in wake, nonrapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM). Delta (Δ) energy homeostasis was secondary to behavioral homeostasis; a biphasic NREM Δ power rebound contributed to the dynamics (rapid response) but not to the magnitude of the rebound in Δ energy. REM behavioral homeostasis was little affected by CSR. NREM behavioral homeostasis was attenuated in proportion to cumulative NREM deficit, whereas the biphasic NREM Δ power rebound was only slightly suppressed, indicating decoupled regulatory mechanisms following CSR. Conclusions: We conclude that sleep homeostasis is achieved through behavioral regulation, that the nonrapid eye movement sleep behavioral homeostat is susceptible to attenuation during chronic sleep restriction and that the concept of sleep intensity is not essential in a model of sleep-wake regulation. Citation: Stephenson R, Caron AM, Famina S. Behavioral sleep-wake homeostasis and EEG delta power are decoupled by chronic sleep restriction in the rat. SLEEP 2015;38(5):685–697. PMID:25669184

  1. Role of orexin in respiratory and sleep homeostasis during upper airway obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, Ariel; Levi, Avishag; Berdugo-Boura, Nilly; Yahalom, Ari; Segev, Yael

    2014-05-01

    Chronic upper airway obstruction (UAO) elicits a cascade of complex endocrine derangements that affect growth, sleep, and energy metabolism. We hypothesized that elevated hypothalamic orexin has a role in maintaining ventilation during UAO, while at the same time altering sleep-wake activity and energy metabolism. Here, we sought to explore the UAO-induced changes in hypothalamic orexin and their role in sleep-wake balance, respiratory activity, and energy metabolism. The tracheae of 22-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were surgically narrowed; UAO and sham-operated control animals were monitored for 7 weeks. We measured food intake, body weight, temperature, locomotion, and sleep-wake activity. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify subcutaneous and visceral fat tissue volumes. In week 7, the rats were sacrificed and levels of hypothalamic orexin, serum leptin, and corticosterone were determined. The effect of dual orexin receptor antagonist (almorexant 300 mg/kg) on sleep and respiration was also explored. UAO increased hypothalamic orexin mRNA and protein content by 64% and 65%, respectively. UAO led to 30% chronic sleep loss, excessive active phase sleepiness, decreased body temperature, increased food intake, reduction of abdominal and subcutaneous fat tissue volume, and growth retardation. Administration of almorexant normalized sleep but induced severe breathing difficulties in UAO rats, while it had no effect on sleep or on breathing of control animals. In upper airway obstruction animals, enhanced orexin secretion, while crucially important for respiratory homeostasis maintenance, is also responsible for chronic partial sleep loss, as well as considerable impairment of energy metabolism and growth.

  2. Short-term sleep deprivation leads to decreased systemic redox metabolites and altered epigenetic status.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav S; Holger, Dana; Bui, Anh Tuyet; Craddock, Travis J A; Tartar, Jaime L

    2017-01-01

    Sleep is critical for repair as well as the rejuvenation processes in the body and many of these functions are regulated via underlying cellular metabolic homeostasis. Changes in sleep pattern are reported to alter such metabolic function resulting in altered disease susceptibility or behavior. Here, we measured the extent to which overnight total sleep deprivation (SD) in young adult humans can influence systemic (plasma-derived) redox-metabolism including the major antioxidant, glutathione as well as DNA methylation levels. Nineteen participants (n = 19, μ age = 21, SD = 3.09) underwent morning testing before and after overnight total SD. Biochemical measures before and after SD revealed that glutathione, ATP, cysteine, and homocysteine levels were significantly reduced following one night of sleep deprivation (all p's < 0.01). Parallel to the well-recognized fact that sleep deprivation (maintaining wakefulness) uses up metabolic reserves, we observed that morning cortisol levels were blunted after sleep deprivation. There were no significant correlations between self-reported or actigraphy-measured sleep and the biochemical measurements, strongly indicating that prior sleep behavior did not have any direct influence on the biochemical measures taken at baseline or after sleep deprivation. Results from the current investigation supports the previous literature implicating the induction of oxidative stress and ATP depletion with sleep deprivation. Furthermore, such altered antioxidant status can also induce downstream epigenetic changes. Although we did not measure the specific genes that were altered under the influence of such sleep deprivation, such epigenetic changes could potentially contribute towards disease predisposition.

  3. Avian sleep homeostasis: convergent evolution of complex brains, cognition and sleep functions in mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Rattenborg, Niels C; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Lesku, John A

    2009-03-01

    Birds are the only taxonomic group other than mammals that exhibit high-amplitude slow-waves in the electroencephalogram (EEG) during sleep. This defining feature of slow-wave sleep (SWS) apparently evolved independently in mammals and birds, as reptiles do not exhibit similar EEG activity during sleep. In mammals, the level of slow-wave activity (SWA) (low-frequency spectral power density) during SWS increases and decreases as a function of prior time spent awake and asleep, respectively, and therefore reflects homeostatically regulated sleep processes potentially tied to the function of SWS. Although birds also exhibit SWS, previous sleep deprivation studies in birds did not detect a compensatory increase in SWS-related SWA during recovery, as observed in similarly sleep-deprived mammals. This suggested that, unlike mammalian SWS, avian SWS is not homeostatically regulated, and therefore might serve a different function. However, we recently demonstrated that SWA during SWS increases in pigeons following short-term sleep deprivation. Herein we summarize research on avian sleep homeostasis, and cast our evidence for this phenomenon within the context of theories for the function of SWS in mammals. We propose that the convergent evolution of homeostatically regulated SWS in mammals and birds was directly linked to the convergent evolution of large, heavily interconnected brains capable of performing complex cognitive processes in each group. Specifically, as has been proposed for mammals, the interconnectivity that forms the basis of complex cognition in birds may also instantiate slow, synchronous network oscillations during SWS that in turn maintain interconnectivity and cognition at an optimal level.

  4. CD40 activation induces NREM sleep and modulates genes associated with sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gast, Heidemarie; Müller, Andreas; Lopez, Martin; Meier, Daniel; Huber, Reto; Dechent, Frieder; Prinz, Marco; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul; Birchler, Thomas; Fontana, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    The T-cell derived cytokine CD40 ligand is overexpressed in patients with autoimmune diseases. Through activation of its receptor, CD40 ligand leads to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1) dependent impairment of locomotor activity in mice. Here we report that this effect is explained through a promotion of sleep, which was specific to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep while REM sleep was suppressed. The increase in NREM sleep was accompanied by a decrease in EEG delta power during NREM sleep and by a decrease in the expression of transcripts in the cerebral cortex known to be associated with homeostatic sleep drive, such as Homer1a, Early growth response 2, Neuronal pentraxin 2, and Fos-like antigen 2. The effect of CD40 activation was mimicked by peripheral TNF injection and prevented by the TNF blocker etanercept. Our study indicates that sleep-wake dysregulation in autoimmune diseases may result from CD40 induced TNF:TNFR1 mediated alterations of molecular pathways, which regulate sleep-wake behavior.

  5. Relationship among nocturnal sleep deficit, excess weight and metabolic alterations in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Nelina; Rangel, Airam; Rodríguez, Carla; Rodríguez, Lisette; Rodríguez, Valeria

    2014-12-01

    Sleep modulates neuroendocrine function and metabolism; therefore, changes in sleep duration may lead to developing obesity during adolescence. To assess the possible association among nocturnal sleep duration, the presence of overweight and metabolic alterations in a group of adolescents. Cross-sectional, analytical study conducted at a school in Valencia, Venezuela, during the 2012-2013 school year. Participants were 12 to 17 year-old adolescents. A survey on nocturnal sleep duration was administered; weight, height and waist circumference were recorded; and glycemia, lipid profile and insulinemia levels were measured. Body mass index and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were calculated. Ninety adolescents were included. Compared to the group with normal weight, adolescents with excessive weight had, in average, fewer sleep hours Sundays through Thursdays (p < 0.05) and a higher rate of sleep deficit and sleep debt (p < 0.05). Low HDL cholesterol and insulin resistance was significantly associated with sleep debt (p < 0.05). Among adolescents with sleep debt, the risk of having excess weight was 2.70 times higher (95% CI= 1.09-6.72; p= 0.032) regardless of age, gender, sexual maturity, sleep deficit Sundays through Thursdays, and history of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in first-degree relatives. Nocturnal sleep deficit and sleep debt were significantly associated with excess weight and metabolic alterations related to a high cardiometabolic risk.

  6. Telemetric Study of Sleep Architecture and Sleep Homeostasis in the Day-Active Tree Shrew Tupaia belangeri

    PubMed Central

    Coolen, Alex; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Barf, R. Paulien; Fuchs, Eberhard; Meerlo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: In this study the authors characterized sleep architecture and sleep homeostasis in the tree shrew, Tupaia belangeri, a small, omnivorous, day-active mammal that is closely related to primates. Design: Adult tree shrews were individually housed under a 12-hr light/12-hr dark cycle in large cages containing tree branches and a nest box. The animals were equipped with radio transmitters to allow continuous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram (EMG), and body temperature without restricting their movements. Recordings were performed under baseline conditions and after sleep deprivation (SD) for 6 hr or 12 hr during the dark phase. Measurements and Results: Under baseline conditions, the tree shrews spent a total of 62.4 ± 1.4% of the 24-hr cycle asleep, with 91.2 ± 0.7% of sleep during the dark phase and 33.7 ± 2.8% sleep during the light phase. During the dark phase, all sleep occurred in the nest box; 79.6% of it was non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and 20.4% was rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In contrast, during the light phase, sleep occurred almost exclusively on the top branches of the cage and only consisted of NREM sleep. SD was followed by an immediate increase in NREM sleep time and an increase in NREM sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA), indicating increased sleep intensity. The cumulative increase in NREM sleep time and intensity almost made up for the NREM sleep that had been lost during 6-hr SD, but did not fully make up for the NREM sleep lost during 12-hr SD. Also, only a small fraction of the REM sleep that was lost was recovered, which mainly occurred on the second recovery night. Conclusions: The day-active tree shrew shares most of the characteristics of sleep structure and sleep homeostasis that have been reported for other mammalian species, with some peculiarities. Because the tree shrew is an established laboratory animal in neurobiological research, it may be a valuable model species for studies of

  7. Behavioral sleep-wake homeostasis and EEG delta power are decoupled by chronic sleep restriction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Richard; Caron, Aimee M; Famina, Svetlana

    2015-05-01

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) is prevalent in society and is linked to adverse consequences that might be ameliorated by acclimation of homeostatic drive. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the sleep-wake homeostat will acclimatize to CSR. A four-parameter model of proportional control was used to quantify sleep homeostasis with and without recourse to a sleep intensity function. Animal laboratory, rodent walking-wheel apparatus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Acute total sleep deprivation (TSD, 1 day × 18 or 24 h, N = 12), CSR (10 days × 18 h TSD, N = 5, or 5 days × 20 h TSD, N = 6). Behavioral rebounds were consistent with model predictions for proportional control of cumulative times in wake, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM). Delta (D) energy homeostasis was secondary to behavioral homeostasis; a biphasic NREM D power rebound contributed to the dynamics (rapid response) but not to the magnitude of the rebound in D energy. REM behavioral homeostasis was little affected by CSR. NREM behavioral homeostasis was attenuated in proportion to cumulative NREM deficit, whereas the biphasic NREM D power rebound was only slightly suppressed, indicating decoupled regulatory mechanisms following CSR. We conclude that sleep homeostasis is achieved through behavioral regulation, that the NREM behavioral homeostat is susceptible to attenuation during CSR and that the concept of sleep intensity is not essential in a model of sleep-wake regulation. Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) is prevalent in society and is linked to adverse consequences that might be ameliorated by acclimation of homeostatic drive. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the sleep-wake homeostat will acclimatize to CSR. A four-parameter model of proportional control was used to quantify sleep homeostasis with and without recourse to a sleep intensity function. Animal laboratory, rodent walking-wheel apparatus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Acute total sleep

  8. Cold Exposure and Sleep in the Rat: REM Sleep Homeostasis and Body Size

    PubMed Central

    Amici, Roberto; Cerri, Matteo; Ocampo-Garcés, Adrian; Baracchi, Francesca; Dentico, Daniela; Jones, Christine Ann; Luppi, Marco; Perez, Emanuele; Parmeggiani, Pier Luigi; Zamboni, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Exposure to low ambient temperature (Ta) depresses REM sleep (REMS) occurrence. In this study, both short and long-term homeostatic aspects of REMS regulation were analyzed during cold exposure and during subsequent recovery at Ta 24°C. Design: EEG activity, hypothalamic temperature, and motor activity were studied during a 24-h exposure to Tas ranging from 10°C to −10°C and for 4 days during recovery. Setting: Laboratory of Physiological Regulation during the Wake-Sleep Cycle, Department of Human and General Physiology, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna. Subjects: 24 male albino rats. Interventions: Animals were implanted with electrodes for EEG recording and a thermistor to measure hypothalamic temperature. Measurements and Results: REMS occurrence decreased proportionally with cold exposure, but a fast compensatory REMS rebound occurred during the first day of recovery when the previous loss went beyond a “fast rebound” threshold corresponding to 22% of the daily REMS need. A slow REMS rebound apparently allowed the animals to fully restore the previous REMS loss during the following 3 days of recovery. Conclusion: Comparing the present data on rats with data from earlier studies on cats and humans, it appears that small mammals have less tolerance for REMS loss than large ones. In small mammals, this low tolerance may be responsible on a short-term basis for the shorter wake-sleep cycle, and on long-term basis, for the higher percentage of REMS that is quickly recovered following REMS deprivation. Citation: Amici R; Cerri M; Ocampo-Garcés A; Baracchi F; Dentico D; Jones CA; Luppi M; Perez E; Parmeggiani PL; Zamboni G. Cold exposure and sleep in the rat: REM sleep homeostasis and body size. SLEEP 2008;31(5):708–715. PMID:18517040

  9. The Perilipin Homologue, Lipid Storage Droplet 2, Regulates Sleep Homeostasis and Prevents Learning Impairments Following Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Thimgan, Matthew S.; Suzuki, Yasuko; Seugnet, Laurent; Gottschalk, Laura; Shaw, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Extended periods of waking result in physiological impairments in humans, rats, and flies. Sleep homeostasis, the increase in sleep observed following sleep loss, is believed to counter the negative effects of prolonged waking by restoring vital biological processes that are degraded during sleep deprivation. Sleep homeostasis, as with other behaviors, is influenced by both genes and environment. We report here that during periods of starvation, flies remain spontaneously awake but, in contrast to sleep deprivation, do not accrue any of the negative consequences of prolonged waking. Specifically, the homeostatic response and learning impairments that are a characteristic of sleep loss are not observed following prolonged waking induced by starvation. Recently, two genes, brummer (bmm) and Lipid storage droplet 2 (Lsd2), have been shown to modulate the response to starvation. bmm mutants have excess fat and are resistant to starvation, whereas Lsd2 mutants are lean and sensitive to starvation. Thus, we hypothesized that bmm and Lsd2 may play a role in sleep regulation. Indeed, bmm mutant flies display a large homeostatic response following sleep deprivation. In contrast, Lsd2 mutant flies, which phenocopy aspects of starvation as measured by low triglyceride stores, do not exhibit a homeostatic response following sleep loss. Importantly, Lsd2 mutant flies are not learning impaired after sleep deprivation. These results provide the first genetic evidence, to our knowledge, that lipid metabolism plays an important role in regulating the homeostatic response and can protect against neuronal impairments induced by prolonged waking. PMID:20824166

  10. The alteration of copper homeostasis in inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Han, Ming; Lin, Zhexuan; Zhang, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Significant changes of copper homeostasis were triggered by lipopolysaccharides, which result in systemic inflammatory response and contribute to hepatic injury. Administration of lipopolysaccharides resulted in the increase of plasma "free" copper and total copper concentrations, whereas, the decrease of "free" copper and total copper contents in liver tissue. Copper-associated proteins were detected and showed a down-regulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and up-regulation of copper metabolism domain containing 1 and copper transporter 1. The alteration of these proteins would lower the apoptotic threshold. Meanwhile, the increasing of circulation copper might cause oxidative injury through Fenton reaction and contribute to tissue injury. Our findings underscored the possibility that these changes in systemic copper homeostasis might provide a novel insight of the characteristic of the acute phase of inflammatory response and the underlying influence on tissue injury.

  11. Time to be SHY? Some comments on sleep and synaptic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Sleep must serve an essential, universal function, one that offsets the risk of being disconnected from the environment. The synaptic homeostasis hypothesis (SHY) is an attempt to identify this essential function. Its core claim is that sleep is needed to reestablish synaptic homeostasis, which is challenged by the remarkable plasticity of the brain. In other words, sleep is "the price we pay for plasticity." In this issue, M. G. Frank reviewed several aspects of the hypothesis and raised several issues. The comments below provide a brief summary of the motivations underlying SHY and clarify that SHY is a hypothesis not about specific mechanisms, but about a universal, essential function of sleep. This function is the preservation of synaptic homeostasis in the face of a systematic bias toward a net increase in synaptic strength--a challenge that is posed by learning during adult wake, and by massive synaptogenesis during development.

  12. Sleep and the Price of Plasticity: From Synaptic and Cellular Homeostasis to Memory Consolidation and Integration

    PubMed Central

    Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep is universal, tightly regulated, and its loss impairs cognition. But why does the brain need to disconnect from the environment for hours every day? The synaptic homeostasis hypothesis (SHY) proposes that sleep is the price the brain pays for plasticity. During a waking episode, learning statistical regularities about the current environment requires strengthening connections throughout the brain. This increases cellular needs for energy and supplies, decreases signal-to-noise ratios, and saturates learning. During sleep, spontaneous activity renormalizes net synaptic strength and restores cellular homeostasis. Activity-dependent down-selection of synapses can also explain the benefits of sleep on memory acquisition, consolidation, and integration. This happens through the off-line, comprehensive sampling of statistical regularities incorporated in neuronal circuits over a lifetime. This review considers the rationale and evidence for SHY and points to open issues related to sleep and plasticity. PMID:24411729

  13. Low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin (Orexin) and altered energy homeostasis in human narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Nishino, S; Ripley, B; Overeem, S; Nevsimalova, S; Lammers, G J; Vankova, J; Okun, M; Rogers, W; Brooks, S; Mignot, E

    2001-09-01

    Hypocretins (orexins) are hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in sleep and energy homeostasis. Hypocretin mutations produce narcolepsy in animal models. In humans, narcolepsy is rarely due to hypocretin mutations, but this system is deficient in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain of a small number of patients. A recent study also indicates increased body mass index (BMI) in narcolepsy. The sensitivity of low CSF hypocretin was examined in 38 successive narcolepsy-cataplexy cases [36 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQB1*0602-positive] and 34 matched controls (15 controls and 19 neurological patients). BMI and CSF leptin levels were also measured. Hypocretin-1 was measurable (169 to 376 pg/ml) in all controls. Levels were unaffected by freezing/thawing or prolonged storage and did not display any concentration gradient. Hypocretin-1 was dramatically decreased (<100 pg/ml) in 32 of 38 patients (all HLA-positive). Four patients had normal levels (2 HLA-negative). Two HLA-positive patients had high levels (609 and 637 pg/ml). CSF leptin and adjusted BMI were significantly higher in patients versus controls. We conclude that the hypocretin ligand is deficient in most cases of human narcolepsy, providing possible diagnostic applications. Increased BMI and leptin indicate altered energy homeostasis. Sleep and energy metabolism are likely to be functionally connected through the hypocretin system.

  14. Altered iron homeostasis involvement in arsenite-mediated cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Eckard, Jonathan; Chen, Haobin; Costa, Max; Frenkel, Krystyna; Huang, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposure to low doses of arsenite causes transformation of human osteogenic sarcoma (HOS) cells. Although oxidative stress is considered important in arsenite-induced cell transformation, the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which arsenite transforms human cells are still unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether altered iron homeostasis, known to affect cellular oxidative stress, can contribute to the arsenite-mediated cell transformation. Using arsenite-induced HOS cell transformation as a model, it was found that total iron levels are significantly higher in transformed HOS cells in comparison to parental control HOS cells. Under normal iron metabolism conditions, iron homeostasis is tightly controlled by inverse regulation of ferritin and transferrin receptor (TfR) through iron regulatory proteins (IRP). Increased iron levels in arsenite transformed cells should theoretically lead to higher ferritin and lower TfR in these cells than in controls. However, the results showed that both ferritin and TfR are decreased, apparently through two different mechanisms. A lower ferritin level in cytoplasm was due to the decreased mRNA in the arsenite-transformed HOS cells, while the decline in TfR was due to a lowered IRP-binding activity. By challenging cells with iron, it was further established that arsenite-transformed HOS cells are less responsive to iron treatment than control HOS cells, which allows accumulation of iron in the transformed cells, as exemplified by significantly lower ferritin induction. On the other hand, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an antioxidant previously shown to suppress As-mediated cell transformation, prevents As-mediated ferritin depletion. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered iron homeostasis contributes to arsenite-induced oxidative stress and, thus, may be involved in arsenite-mediated cell transformation. PMID:16443159

  15. Two features of sleep slow waves: homeostatic and reactive aspects--from long term to instant sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Halász, Péter; Bódizs, Róbert; Parrino, Liborio; Terzano, Mario

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we reviewed results of sleep research that have changed the views about sleep slow wave homeostasis, which involve use-dependent and experience-dependent local aspects to understand more of the physiology of plastic changes during sleep. Apart from the traditional homeostatic slow-wave economy, we also overviewed research on the existence and role of reactive aspects of sleep slow waves. Based on the results from spontaneous and artificially evoked slow waves, we offer a new hypothesis on instant slow wave homeostatic regulation. This regulation compensates for any potentially sleep-disturbing events by providing instant "delta injections" to maintain the nightly delta level, thus protecting cognitive functions located in the frontal lobe. We suggest that this double (long-term /instant) homeostasis provides double security for the frontal lobes in order to protect cognitive functions. The incorporation of reactive slow wave activity (SWA) makes sleep regulation more dynamic and provides more room for the internalization of external influences during sleep.

  16. The brain functional connectome is robustly altered by lack of sleep.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Alnæs, Dag; Zak, Nathalia; Pedersen, Per Ø; Norbom, Linn B; Quraishi, Sophia H; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Laufs, Helmut; Bjørnerud, Atle; Malt, Ulrik F; Andreassen, Ole A; Roussos, Evangelos; Duff, Eugene P; Smith, Stephen M; Groote, Inge R; Westlye, Lars T

    2016-02-15

    Sleep is a universal phenomenon necessary for maintaining homeostasis and function across a range of organs. Lack of sleep has severe health-related consequences affecting whole-body functioning, yet no other organ is as severely affected as the brain. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying these deficits are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the dynamic changes in brain connectivity profiles inflicted by sleep deprivation and how they deviate from regular daily variability. To this end, we obtained functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 60 young, adult male participants, scanned in the morning and evening of the same day and again the following morning. 41 participants underwent total sleep deprivation before the third scan, whereas the remainder had another night of regular sleep. Sleep deprivation strongly altered the connectivity of several resting-state networks, including dorsal attention, default mode, and hippocampal networks. Multivariate classification based on connectivity profiles predicted deprivation state with high accuracy, corroborating the robustness of the findings on an individual level. Finally, correlation analysis suggested that morning-to-evening connectivity changes were reverted by sleep (control group)-a pattern which did not occur after deprivation. We conclude that both, a day of waking and a night of sleep deprivation dynamically alter the brain functional connectome.

  17. Separating the Contribution of Glucocorticoids and Wakefulness to the Molecular and Electrophysiological Correlates of Sleep Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mongrain, Valérie; Hernandez, Susana A.; Pradervand, Sylvain; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Curie, Thomas; Hagiwara, Grace; Gip, Phung; Heller, H. Craig; Franken, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The sleep-deprivation–induced changes in delta power, an electroencephalographical correlate of sleep need, and brain transcriptome profiles have importantly contributed to current hypotheses on sleep function. Because sleep deprivation also induces stress, we here determined the contribution of the corticosterone component of the stress response to the electrophysiological and molecular markers of sleep need in mice. Design: N/A Settings: Mouse sleep facility. Participants: C57BL/6J, AKR/J, DBA/2J mice. Interventions: Sleep deprivation, adrenalectomy (ADX). Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation elevated corticosterone levels in 3 inbred strains, but this increase was larger in DBA/2J mice; i.e., the strain for which the rebound in delta power after sleep deprivation failed to reach significance. Elimination of the sleep-deprivation–associated corticosterone surge through ADX in DBA/2J mice did not, however, rescue the delta power rebound but did greatly reduce the number of transcripts affected by sleep deprivation. Genes no longer affected by sleep deprivation cover pathways previously implicated in sleep homeostasis, such as lipid, cholesterol (e.g., Ldlr, Hmgcs1, Dhcr7, −24, Fkbp5), energy and carbohydrate metabolism (e.g., Eno3, G6pc3, Mpdu1, Ugdh, Man1b1), protein biosynthesis (e.g., Sgk1, Alad, Fads3, Eif2c2, −3, Mat2a), and some circadian genes (Per1, −3), whereas others, such as Homer1a, remained unchanged. Moreover, several microRNAs were affected both by sleep deprivation and ADX. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that corticosterone contributes to the sleep-deprivation–induced changes in brain transcriptome that have been attributed to wakefulness per se. The study identified 78 transcripts that respond to sleep loss independent of corticosterone and time of day, among which genes involved in neuroprotection prominently feature, pointing to a molecular pathway directly relevant for sleep function. Citation: Mongrain

  18. Osteopontin Deficiency Alters Biliary Homeostasis and Protects against Gallstone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Shao, Wei-qing; Chen, Zong-you; Zhu, Wen-wei; Lu, Lu; Cai, Duan; Qin, Lun-xiu; Jia, Hu-liang; Lu, Ming; Chen, Jin-hong

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation of excess biliary cholesterol as solid crystals is a prerequisite for cholesterol gallstone formation, which occurs due to disturbed biliary homeostasis. Biliary homeostasis is regulated by an elaborate network of genes in hepatocytes. If unmanaged, the cholesterol crystals will aggregate, fuse and form gallstones. We have previously observed that the levels of osteopontin (OPN) in bile and gallbladder were reduced in gallstone patients. However, the role and mechanism for hepatic OPN in cholesterol gallstone formation is undetermined. In this study, we found that the expression of hepatic OPN was increased in gallstone patients compared with gallstone-free counterparts. Then, we observed that OPN-deficient mice were less vulnerable to cholesterol gallstone formation than wild type mice. Further mechanistic studies revealed that this protective effect was associated with alterations of bile composition and was caused by the increased hepatic CYP7A1 expression and the reduced expression of hepatic SHP, ATP8B1, SR-B1 and SREBP-2. Finally, the correlations between the expression of hepatic OPN and the expression of these hepatic genes were validated in gallstone patients. Taken together, our findings reveal that hepatic OPN contributes to cholesterol gallstone formation by regulating biliary metabolism and might be developed as a therapeutic target for gallstone treatments. PMID:27484115

  19. Altered sleep composition after traumatic brain injury does not affect declarative sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Mantua, Janna; Mahan, Keenan M; Henry, Owen S; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often report sleep disturbances, which may be caused by changes in sleep architecture or reduced sleep quality (greater time awake after sleep onset, poorer sleep efficiency, and sleep stage proportion alterations). Sleep is beneficial for memory formation, and herein we examine whether altered sleep physiology following TBI has deleterious effects on sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Participants learned a list of word pairs in the morning or evening, and recall was assessed 12-h later, following an interval awake or with overnight sleep. Young adult participants (18-22 years) were assigned to one of four experimental groups: TBI Sleep (n = 14), TBI Wake (n = 12), non-TBI Sleep (n = 15), non-TBI Wake (n = 15). Each TBI participant was >1 year post-injury. Sleep physiology was measured with polysomnography. Memory consolidation was assessed by comparing change in word-pair recall over 12-h intersession intervals. The TBI group spent a significantly greater proportion of the night in SWS than the non-TBI group at the expense of NREM1. The TBI group also had marginally lower EEG delta power during SWS in the central region. Intersession changes in recall were greater for intervals with sleep than without sleep in both groups. However, despite abnormal sleep stage proportions for individuals with a TBI history, there was no difference in the intersession change in recall following sleep for the TBI and non-TBI groups. In both Sleep groups combined, there was a positive correlation between Intersession Change and the proportion of the night in NREM2 + SWS. Overall, sleep composition is altered following TBI but such deficits do not yield insufficiencies in sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

  20. The alteration of human sleep and circadian rhythms during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Gundel, A; Polyakov, V V; Zulley, J

    1997-03-01

    Numerous anecdotes in the past suggest the concept that sleep disturbances in astronauts occur more frequently during spaceflight than on ground. Such disturbances may be caused in part by exogenous factors, but also an altered physiological state under microgravity may add to reducing sleep quality in a spacecraft. The present investigation aims at a better understanding of possible sleep disturbances under microgravity. For the first time, experiments were conducted in which sleep and circadian regulation could be simultaneously assessed in space. Four astronauts took part in this study aboard the Russian MIR station. Sleep was recorded polygraphically on tape together with body temperature. For a comparison, the same parameters were measured during baseline periods preceding the flights. The circadian phase of body temperature was found to be delayed by about 2 h in space compared with baseline data. A free-run was not observed during the first 30 d in space. Sleep was shorter and more disturbed than on earth. In addition, the structure of sleep was significantly altered. In space, the latency to the first REM episode was shorter, and slow-wave sleep was redistributed from the first to the second sleep cycle. Several mechanisms may be responsible for these alterations in sleep regulation and circadian phase. Most likely, altered circadian zeitgebers on MIR and a deficiency in the process S of Borbély's sleep model cause the observed findings. The change in process S may be related to changes in physical activity as a result of weightlessness.

  1. Update of sleep alterations in depression

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Andrés Barrera; Lechuga, DeboraYoaly Arana; Escandón, Oscar Sánchez; Moctezuma, Javier Velázquez

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances in depression are up to 70%. Patients frequently have difficulty in falling asleep, frequent awakenings during the night and non-restorative sleep. Sleep abnormalities in depression are mainly characterized by increased rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and reduced slow wave sleep. Among the mechanisms of sleep disturbances in depression are hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, CLOCK gene polymorphism and primary sleep disorders. The habenula is a structure regulating the activities of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. The hyperactivation of the habenula has also been implicated, together with sleep disturbances, in depression. The presence of depression in primary sleep disorders is common. Sleep disturbances treatment include pharmacotherapy or Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. PMID:26483922

  2. Role of N-Arachidonoyl-Serotonin (AA-5-HT) in Sleep-Wake Cycle Architecture, Sleep Homeostasis, and Neurotransmitters Regulation.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Machado, Sergio; Rocha, Nuno B; Veras, André B; Neto, Geraldo A M; Budde, Henning; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises several molecular entities such as endogenous ligands [anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)], receptors (CB1 and CB2), enzymes such as [fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAHH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL)], as well as the anandamide membrane transporter. Although the role of this complex neurobiological system in the sleep-wake cycle modulation has been studied, the contribution of the blocker of FAAH/transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT) in sleep has not been investigated. Thus, in the present study, varying doses of AA-5-HT (5, 10, or 20 mg/Kg, i.p.) injected at the beginning of the lights-on period of rats, caused no statistical changes in sleep patterns. However, similar pharmacological treatment given to animals at the beginning of the dark period decreased wakefulness (W) and increased slow wave sleep (SWS) as well as rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Power spectra analysis of states of vigilance showed that injection of AA-5-HT during the lights-off period diminished alpha spectrum across alertness in a dose-dependent fashion. In opposition, delta power spectra was enhanced as well as theta spectrum, during SWS and REMS, respectively. Moreover, the highest dose of AA-5-HT decreased wake-related contents of neurotransmitters such as dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), serotonin (5-HT) whereas the levels of adenosine (AD) were enhanced. In addition, the sleep-inducing properties of AA-5-HT were confirmed since this compound blocked the increase in W caused by stimulants such as cannabidiol (CBD) or modafinil (MOD) during the lights-on period. Additionally, administration of AA-5-HT also prevented the enhancement in contents of DA, NE, EP, 5-HT and AD after CBD of MOD injection. Lastly, the role of AA-5-HT in sleep homeostasis was tested in animals that received either CBD or MOD after total sleep deprivation (TSD). The

  3. The temporal structure of behaviour and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V; Tobler, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The amount and architecture of vigilance states are governed by two distinct processes, which occur at different time scales. The first, a slow one, is related to a wake/sleep dependent homeostatic Process S, which occurs on a time scale of hours, and is reflected in the dynamics of NREM sleep EEG slow-wave activity. The second, a fast one, is manifested in a regular alternation of two sleep states--NREM and REM sleep, which occur, in rodents, on a time scale of ~5-10 minutes. Neither the mechanisms underlying the time constants of these two processes--the slow one and the fast one, nor their functional significance are understood. Notably, both processes are primarily apparent during sleep, while their potential manifestation during wakefulness is obscured by ongoing behaviour. Here, we find, in mice provided with running wheels, that the two sleep processes become clearly apparent also during waking at the level of behavior and brain activity. Specifically, the slow process was manifested in the total duration of waking periods starting from dark onset, while the fast process was apparent in a regular occurrence of running bouts during the waking periods. The dynamics of both processes were stable within individual animals, but showed large interindividual variability. Importantly, the two processes were not independent: the periodic structure of waking behaviour (fast process) appeared to be a strong predictor of the capacity to sustain continuous wakefulness (slow process). The data indicate that the temporal organization of vigilance states on both the fast and the slow time scales may arise from a common neurophysiologic mechanism.

  4. Sleep-Dependent Potentiation in the Visual System Is at Odds with the Synaptic Homeostasis Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Jaclyn; Aton, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    Two commentaries recently published in SLEEP came to very different conclusions regarding how data from a mouse model of sleep-dependent neural plasticity (orientation-specific response potentiation; OSRP) fit with the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis (SHY). To assess whether SHY offers an explanatory mechanism for OSRP, we present new data on how cortical neuron firing rates are modulated as a function of novel sensory experience and subsequent sleep in this model system. We carried out longitudinal extracellular recordings of single-neuron activity in the primary visual cortex across a period of novel visual experience and subsequent sleep or sleep deprivation. Spontaneous neuronal firing rates and visual responses were recorded from the same population of visual cortex neurons before control (blank screen) or novel (oriented grating) stimulus presentation, immediately after stimulus presentation, and after a period of subsequent ad lib sleep or sleep deprivation. Firing rate responses to visual stimuli were unchanged across waking experience, regardless of whether a blank screen or an oriented grating stimulus was presented. Firing rate responses to stimuli of the presented stimulus orientation were selectively enhanced across post-stimulus sleep, but these changes were blocked by sleep deprivation. Neuronal firing increased significantly across bouts of post-stimulus rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and slow wave sleep (SWS), but not across bouts of wake. The current data suggest that following novel visual experience, potentiation of a subset of V1 synapses occurs across periods of sleep. This finding cannot be explained parsimoniously by SHY. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. Altered sleep-wake cycles and physical performance in athletes.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Thomas; Edwards, Ben

    2007-02-28

    Sleep-waking cycles are fundamental in human circadian rhythms and their disruption can have consequences for behaviour and performance. Such disturbances occur due to domestic or occupational schedules that do not permit normal sleep quotas, rapid travel across multiple meridians and extreme athletic and recreational endeavours where sleep is restricted or totally deprived. There are methodological issues in quantifying the physiological and performance consequences of alterations in the sleep-wake cycle if the effects on circadian rhythms are to be separated from the fatigue process. Individual requirements for sleep show large variations but chronic reduction in sleep can lead to immuno-suppression. There are still unanswered questions about the sleep needs of athletes, the role of 'power naps' and the potential for exercise in improving the quality of sleep.

  6. Role of N-Arachidonoyl-Serotonin (AA-5-HT) in Sleep-Wake Cycle Architecture, Sleep Homeostasis, and Neurotransmitters Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Machado, Sergio; Rocha, Nuno B.; Veras, André B.; Neto, Geraldo A. M.; Budde, Henning; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises several molecular entities such as endogenous ligands [anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)], receptors (CB1 and CB2), enzymes such as [fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAHH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL)], as well as the anandamide membrane transporter. Although the role of this complex neurobiological system in the sleep–wake cycle modulation has been studied, the contribution of the blocker of FAAH/transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT) in sleep has not been investigated. Thus, in the present study, varying doses of AA-5-HT (5, 10, or 20 mg/Kg, i.p.) injected at the beginning of the lights-on period of rats, caused no statistical changes in sleep patterns. However, similar pharmacological treatment given to animals at the beginning of the dark period decreased wakefulness (W) and increased slow wave sleep (SWS) as well as rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Power spectra analysis of states of vigilance showed that injection of AA-5-HT during the lights-off period diminished alpha spectrum across alertness in a dose-dependent fashion. In opposition, delta power spectra was enhanced as well as theta spectrum, during SWS and REMS, respectively. Moreover, the highest dose of AA-5-HT decreased wake-related contents of neurotransmitters such as dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), serotonin (5-HT) whereas the levels of adenosine (AD) were enhanced. In addition, the sleep-inducing properties of AA-5-HT were confirmed since this compound blocked the increase in W caused by stimulants such as cannabidiol (CBD) or modafinil (MOD) during the lights-on period. Additionally, administration of AA-5-HT also prevented the enhancement in contents of DA, NE, EP, 5-HT and AD after CBD of MOD injection. Lastly, the role of AA-5-HT in sleep homeostasis was tested in animals that received either CBD or MOD after total sleep deprivation (TSD). The

  7. Sleep and Sleep Homeostasis in Mice Lacking the 5-HT2c Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marcos G.; Stryker, Michael P.; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    Studies in humans and rats indicate that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors are involved in mammalian sleep expression. We investigated the contribution of the 5-HT2c receptor to sleep expression by examining sleep patterns in mice bearing a targeted null mutation of this receptor. 5-HT2c receptor knock-out mice had more wakefulness, several abnormalities in rapid eye movement sleep expression and an enhanced response to sleep deprivation compared with wild-type control mice. These findings suggest that 5HT2c receptors may mediate several effects on sleep that have been ascribed to serotonin. PMID:12431861

  8. Subjective sleep quality alterations at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Robert K; Sitek, Emilia J; Sławek, Jarosław W; Basiński, Andrzej; Siemiński, Mariusz; Wieczorek, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Sleep pattern at high altitude has been studied, mainly with the use of polysomnography. This study aimed to analyze subjective sleep quality at high altitude using the following standardized scales: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-8). Thirty-two members of 2 expeditions--28 males and 4 females (mean age 31 years)--participated in this study conducted in Nepal, Himalayas (Lobuche East, 6119 m above sea level [masl]), Kyrgyzstan, Pamirs (Lenin Peak, 7134 masl), and Poland (sea level). The scales were administered twice, at high altitude (mean altitude 4524 masl) and at sea level. Both measures showed a decrease in sleep quality at high altitude (statistical significance, P < .001). Sleep problems affected general sleep quality and sleep induction. Sleep disturbances due to awakenings during the night, temperature-related discomfort, and breathing difficulties were reported. High altitude had no statistically significant effect on sleep duration or daytime dysfunction as measured by PSQI. The overall results of PSQI and AIS-8 confirm the data based on the climbers' subjective accounts and polysomnographic results reported in previous studies. The introduction of standardized methods of subjective sleep quality assessment might resolve the problem of being able to perform precise evaluations and research in the field of sleep disturbances at high altitude.

  9. Bright morning light advances the human circadian system without affecting NREM sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dijk, D J; Beersma, D G; Daan, S; Lewy, A J

    1989-01-01

    Eight male subjects were exposed to either bright light or dim light between 0600 and 0900 h for 3 consecutive days each. Relative to the dim light condition, the bright light treatment advanced the evening rise in plasma melatonin and the time of sleep termination (sleep onset was held constant) for an average approximately 1 h. The magnitude of the advance of the plasma melatonin rise was dependent on its phase in dim light. The reduction in sleep duration was at the expense of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. Spectral analysis of the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that the advance of the circadian pacemaker did not affect EEG power densities between 0.25 and 15.0 Hz during either non-REM or REM sleep. The data show that shifting the human circadian pacemaker by 1 h does not affect non-REM sleep homeostasis. These findings are in accordance with the predictions of the two-process model of sleep regulation.

  10. Altered Sleep Stage Transitions of REM Sleep: A Novel and Stable Biomarker of Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Venny; Ho, Crover Kwok Wah; Zhou, Junying; Li, Shirley Xin; Lam, Siu Ping; Yu, Mandy Wai Man; Tang, Xiangdong; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2015-08-15

    To determine the diagnostic values, longitudinal stability, and HLA association of the sleep stage transitions in narcolepsy. To compare the baseline differences in the sleep stage transition to REM sleep among 35 patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 39 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 26 unaffected relatives, and 159 non-narcoleptic sleep patient controls, followed by a reassessment at a mean duration of 37.4 months. The highest prevalence of altered transition from stage non-N2/N3 to stage R in multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) was found in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (92.0% and 57.1%), followed by patients with type 2 narcolepsy (69.4% and 12.8%), unaffected relatives (46.2% and 0%), and controls (39.3% and 1.3%). Individual sleep variables had varied sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing narcolepsy. By incorporating a combination of sleep variables, the decision tree analysis improved the sensitivity to 94.3% and 82.1% and enhanced specificity to 82.4% and 83% for the diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy, respectively. There was a significant association of DBQ1*0602 with the altered sleep stage transition (OR = 16.0, 95% CI: 1.7-149.8, p = 0.015). The persistence of the altered sleep stage transition in both MSLT and NPSG was high for both type 1 (90.5% and 64.7%) and type 2 narcolepsy (92.3% and 100%), respectively. Altered sleep stage transition is a significant and stable marker of narcolepsy, which suggests a vulnerable wake-sleep dysregulation trait in narcolepsy. Altered sleep stage transition has a significant diagnostic value in the differential diagnosis of hypersomnias, especially when combined with other diagnostic sleep variables in decision tree analysis. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  11. Astrocytic modulation of sleep homeostasis and cognitive consequences of sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Halassa, Michael M.; Florian, Cedrick; Fellin, Tommaso; Munoz, James R.; Lee, So-Young; Abel, Ted; Haydon, Philip G.; Frank, Marcos G.

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytes modulate neuronal activity by releasing chemical transmitters via a process termed gliotransmission. The role of this process in the control of behavior is unknown. Since one outcome of SNARE-dependent gliotransmission is the regulation of extracellular adenosine and because adenosine promotes sleep, we genetically inhibited the release of gliotransmitters and asked if astrocytes play an unsuspected role in sleep regulation. Inhibiting gliotransmission attenuated the accumulation of sleep pressure, assessed by measuring the slow wave activity of the EEG during NREM sleep and prevented cognitive deficits associated with sleep loss. Since the sleep-suppressing effects of the A1 receptor antagonist CPT were prevented following inhibition of gliotransmission and because intracerebroventricular delivery of CPT to wildtype mice mimicked the transgenic phenotype we conclude that astrocytes modulate the accumulation of sleep pressure and its cognitive consequences through a pathway involving A1 receptors. PMID:19186164

  12. Female Reproductive Hormones Alter Sleep Architecture in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deurveilher, Samüel; Rusak, Benjamin; Semba, Kazue

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Treating ovariectomized rats with physiological levels of estradiol and/or progesterone affects aspects of both baseline (24 h) sleep and recovery (18 h) sleep after 6 h of sleep deprivation. We have extended the analysis of these effects by examining several additional parameters of sleep architecture using the same data set as in our previous study (Deurveilher et al. SLEEP 2009;32(7):865-877). Design: Sleep in ovariectomized rats implanted with oil, 17 β-estradiol and/or progesterone capsules was recorded using EEG and EMG before, during, and after 6 h of sleep deprivation during the light phase of a 12/12 h light/dark cycle. Measurements and Results: During the baseline dark, but not light, phase, treatments with estradiol alone or combined with progesterone decreased the mean duration of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) episodes and the number of REMS episodes, while also increasing brief awakenings, consistent with the previously reported lower baseline NREMS and REMS amounts. Following sleep deprivation, the hormonal treatments caused a larger percentage increase from baseline in the mean durations of NREMS and REMS episodes, and a larger percentage decrease in brief awakenings, consistent with the previously reported larger increase in recovery REMS amount. There were no hormonal effects on NREMS and REMS EEG power values, other than on recovery NREMS delta power, as previously reported. Conclusions: Physiological levels of estradiol and/or progesterone in female rats modulate sleep architecture differently at baseline and after acute sleep loss, fragmenting baseline sleep while consolidating recovery sleep. These hormones also play a role in the diurnal pattern of NREMS maintenance. Citation: Deurveilher S; Rusak B; Semba K. Female reproductive hormones alter sleep architecture in ovariectomized rats. SLEEP 2011;34(4):519-530. PMID:21461331

  13. Hallucinations, sleep fragmentation, and altered dream phenomena in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pappert, E J; Goetz, C G; Niederman, F G; Raman, R; Leurgans, S

    1999-01-01

    In a series of consecutively randomized outpatients who had Parkinson's disease (PD), we examined the association of three behaviors: sleep fragmentation, altered dream phenomena, and hallucinations/illusions. Using a log-linear model methodology, we tested the independence of each behavior. Sixty-two percent of the subjects had sleep fragmentation, 48% had altered dream phenomena, and 26% had hallucinations/illusions. Eighty-two percent of the patients with hallucinations/illusions experienced some form of sleep disorder. The three phenomena were not independent. The interaction between sleep fragmentation and altered dream phenomena was strongly statistically significant. Likewise, a significant interaction existed between altered dream phenomena and hallucinations/illusions. No interaction occurred between sleep fragmentation and hallucinations/illusions. Sleep fragmentation, altered dream phenomena, and hallucinations/illusions in PD should be considered distinct but often overlapping behaviors. The close association between altered dream phenomena and hallucinations suggests that therapeutic interventions aimed at diminishing dream-related activities may have a specific positive impact on hallucinatory behavior.

  14. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Patricio D.; Algarín, Cecilia R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent years after correction of anemia with iron treatment in the absence of subsequent IDA. We suggest that altered sleep patterns may represent an underlying mechanism that interferes with optimal brain functioning during sleep and wakefulness in former IDA children. PMID:20620103

  15. Relevance of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR5) in the regulation of NREM-REM sleep cycle and homeostasis: evidence from mGluR5 (-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; Raeymaekers, L; Steckler, T; Drinkenbrug, W H I M

    2015-04-01

    Sleep is a homeostatically regulated behavior and sleep loss evokes a proportional increase in sleep time and delta slow wave activity. Glutamate and pharmacological modulation of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) signaling have been implicated in the organization of vigilance states. Here, the role of the mGluR5 on homeostatic regulation of sleep-wake cycle and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was examined in mGluR5 (-/-) mice. We first characterized the sleep-wake EEG phenotype in mGluR5 (-/-) and wild-type (WT) littermates mice by continuous recording for 72h of EEG, body temperature (BT) and locomotor activity (LMA). Next, we investigated the influence of sleep deprivation on the recovery sleep and EEG slow wave activity (1-4Hz) during NREM sleep to assess whether mGluR5 deletion affects the sleep homeostasis process. Like the control animals, mGluR5 (-/-) mice exhibited a clear-cut circadian sleep-wake architecture, however they showed reduced REM sleep time during the light phase with shorter REM sleep bouts and reduced state transitions in the NREM sleep-REM sleep cycle during the first and last 24h of the spontaneous 72h recording period. In addition, mGluR5 (-/-) mice had decreased slow EEG delta power during NREM sleep and enhanced LMA associated with elevated BT during the dark phase. Moreover, mGluR5 (-/-) mice exhibited reduced slow wave activity and sleep drive after sleep deprivation, indicating altered sleep homeostatic processes. The findings strongly indicate that mGluR5 is involved in shaping the stability of NREM sleep-REM sleep state transitions, NREM slow wave activity and homeostatic response to sleep loss.

  16. Cul3 and the BTB Adaptor Insomniac Are Key Regulators of Sleep Homeostasis and a Dopamine Arousal Pathway in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffenberger, Cory; Allada, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is homeostatically regulated, such that sleep drive reflects the duration of prior wakefulness. However, despite the discovery of genes important for sleep, a coherent molecular model for sleep homeostasis has yet to emerge. To better understand the function and regulation of sleep, we employed a reverse-genetics approach in Drosophila. An insertion in the BTB domain protein CG32810/insomniac (inc) exhibited one of the strongest baseline sleep phenotypes thus far observed, a ∼10 h sleep reduction. Importantly, this is coupled to a reduced homeostatic response to sleep deprivation, consistent with a disrupted sleep homeostat. Knockdown of the INC-interacting protein, the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cul3, results in reduced sleep duration, consolidation, and homeostasis, suggesting an important role for protein turnover in mediating INC effects. Interestingly, inc and Cul3 expression in post-mitotic neurons during development contributes to their adult sleep functions. Similar to flies with increased dopaminergic signaling, loss of inc and Cul3 result in hyper-arousability to a mechanical stimulus in adult flies. Furthermore, the inc sleep duration phenotype can be rescued by pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. Taken together, these results establish inc and Cul3 as important new players in setting the sleep homeostat and a dopaminergic arousal pathway in Drosophila. PMID:23055946

  17. Altered Sleep Stage Transitions of REM Sleep: A Novel and Stable Biomarker of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaping; Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Venny; Ho, Crover Kwok Wah; Zhou, Junying; Li, Shirley Xin; Lam, Siu Ping; Yu, Mandy Wai Man; Tang, Xiangdong; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the diagnostic values, longitudinal stability, and HLA association of the sleep stage transitions in narcolepsy. Methods: To compare the baseline differences in the sleep stage transition to REM sleep among 35 patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 39 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 26 unaffected relatives, and 159 non-narcoleptic sleep patient controls, followed by a reassessment at a mean duration of 37.4 months. Results: The highest prevalence of altered transition from stage non-N2/N3 to stage R in multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) was found in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (92.0% and 57.1%), followed by patients with type 2 narcolepsy (69.4% and 12.8%), unaffected relatives (46.2% and 0%), and controls (39.3% and 1.3%). Individual sleep variables had varied sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing narcolepsy. By incorporating a combination of sleep variables, the decision tree analysis improved the sensitivity to 94.3% and 82.1% and enhanced specificity to 82.4% and 83% for the diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy, respectively. There was a significant association of DBQ1*0602 with the altered sleep stage transition (OR = 16.0, 95% CI: 1.7–149.8, p = 0.015). The persistence of the altered sleep stage transition in both MSLT and NPSG was high for both type 1 (90.5% and 64.7%) and type 2 narcolepsy (92.3% and 100%), respectively. Conclusions: Altered sleep stage transition is a significant and stable marker of narcolepsy, which suggests a vulnerable wake-sleep dysregulation trait in narcolepsy. Altered sleep stage transition has a significant diagnostic value in the differential diagnosis of hypersomnias, especially when combined with other diagnostic sleep variables in decision tree analysis. Citation: Liu Y, Zhang J, Lam V, Ho CK, Zhou J, Li SX, Lam SP, Yu MW, Tang X, Wing YK. Altered sleep stage transitions of REM sleep: a novel and stable biomarker of narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015

  18. Sleep as spatiotemporal integration of biological processes that evolved to periodically reinforce neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis: The 2m3d paradigm of sleep.

    PubMed

    Mader, Edward Claro; Mader, Annie Cielo Llave

    2016-08-15

    Sleep continues to perplex scientists and researchers. Despite decades of sleep research, we still lack a clear understanding of the biological functions and evolution of sleep. In this review, we will examine sleep from a functional and phylogenetic perspective and describe some important conceptual gaps in understanding sleep. Classical theories of the biology and evolution of sleep emphasize sensory activation, energy balance, and metabolic homeostasis. Advances in electrophysiology, functional neuroimaging, and neuroplasticity allow us to view sleep within the framework of neural dynamics. With this paradigm shift, we have come to realize the importance of neurodynamic homeostasis in shaping the biology of sleep. Evidently, animals sleep to achieve neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis. We are not aware of any framework for understanding sleep where neurodynamic, metabolic, homeostatic, chronophasic, and afferent variables are all taken into account. This motivated us to propose the two-mode three-drive (2m3d) paradigm of sleep. In the 2m3d paradigm, local neurodynamic/metabolic (N/M) processes switch between two modes-m0 and m1-in response to three drives-afferent, chronophasic, and homeostatic. The spatiotemporal integration of local m0/m1 operations gives rise to the global states of sleep and wakefulness. As a framework of evolution, the 2m3d paradigm allows us to view sleep as a robust adaptive strategy that evolved so animals can periodically reinforce neurodynamic and metabolic homeostasis while remaining sensitive to their internal and external environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Musculoskeletal Sensitization and Sleep: Chronic Muscle Pain Fragments Sleep of Mice without Altering Its Duration

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Musculoskeletal pain in humans is often associated with poor sleep quality. We used a model in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced by injection of acidified saline into muscle to study the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of mice. Design: A one month pre-clinical study was designed to determine the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of C57BL/6J mice. Methods: We instrumented mice with telemeters to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature. We used an established model of musculoskeletal sensitization in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0). The injections were given into the gastrocnemius muscle and spaced five days apart. EEG and body temperature recordings started prior to injections (baseline) and continued for three weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization was induced by the second injection. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed using von Frey filaments at baseline (before any injections) and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the second injection. Results: Mice injected with acidified saline developed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity at the hind paws as measured by von Frey testing and as compared to control mice and baseline data. Sleep during the light period was fragmented in experimental mice injected with acidified saline, and EEG spectra altered. Musculoskeletal sensitization did not alter the duration of time spent in wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal sensitization in this model results in a distinct sleep phenotype in which sleep is fragmented during the light period, but the overall duration of sleep is not changed. This study suggests the consequences of musculoskeletal pain include sleep disruption, an observation that has been made in the clinical literature but has yet to be studied using preclinical models. Citation: Sutton BC

  20. Microgravity alters respiratory abdominal and rib cage motion during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The abdominal and rib cage contributions to tidal breathing differ between rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-NREM sleep. We hypothesized that abdominal relative contribution during NREM and REM sleep would be altered in different directions when comparing sleep on Earth with sleep in sustained microgravity (μG), due to conformational changes and differences in coupling between the rib cage and the abdominal compartment induced by weightlessness. We studied respiration during sleep in five astronauts before, during, and after two Space Shuttle missions. A total of 77 full-night (8 h) polysomnographic studies were performed; abdominal and rib cage respiratory movements were recorded using respiratory inductive plethysmography. Breath-by-breath analysis of respiration was performed for each class: awake, light sleep, deep sleep, and REM sleep. Abdominal contribution to tidal breathing increased in μG, with the first measure in space being significantly higher than preflight values, followed by a return toward preflight values. This was observed for all classes. Preflight, rib cage, and abdominal movements were found to be in phase for all but REM sleep, for which an abdominal lead was observed. The abdominal leading role during REM sleep increased while deep sleep showed the opposite behavior, the rib cage taking a leading role in-flight. In μG, the percentage of inspiratory time in the overall breath, the duty cycle (TI/TTot), decreased for all classes considered when compared with preflight, while normalized inspiratory flow, taking the awake values as reference, increased in-flight for light sleep, deep sleep, and REM. Changes in abdominal-rib cage displacements probably result from a less efficient operating point for the diaphragm and a less efficient coupling between the abdomen and the apposed portion of the rib cage in μG. However, the preservation of total ventilation suggests that short-term adaptive mechanisms of ventilatory control compensate for these

  1. Effects of light on cognitive brain responses depend on circadian phase and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vandewalle, Gilles; Archer, Simon N; Wuillaume, Catherine; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Light is a powerful modulator of cognition through its long-term effects on circadian rhythmicity and direct effects on brain function as identified by neuroimaging. How the direct impact of light on brain function varies with wavelength of light, circadian phase, and sleep homeostasis, and how this differs between individuals, is a largely unexplored area. Using functional MRI, we compared the effects of 1 minute of low-intensity blue (473 nm) and green light (527 nm) exposures on brain responses to an auditory working memory task while varying circadian phase and status of the sleep homeostat. Data were collected in 27 subjects genotyped for the PER3 VNTR (12 PER3(5/5) and 15 PER3(4/4) ) in whom it was previously shown that the brain responses to this task, when conducted in darkness, depend on circadian phase, sleep homeostasis, and genotype. In the morning after sleep, blue light, relative to green light, increased brain responses primarily in the ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and in the intraparietal sulcus, but only in PER3(4/4) individuals. By contrast, in the morning after sleep loss, blue light increased brain responses in a left thalamofrontoparietal circuit to a larger extent than green light, and only so in PER3(5/5) individuals. In the evening wake maintenance zone following a normal waking day, no differential effect of 1 minute of blue versus green light was observed in either genotype. Comparison of the current results with the findings observed in darkness indicates that light acts as an activating agent particularly under those circumstances in which and in those individuals in whom brain function is jeopardized by an adverse circadian phase and high homeostatic sleep pressure.

  2. Sleep homeostasis and cortical synchronization: I. Modeling the effects of synaptic strength on sleep slow waves.

    PubMed

    Esser, Steve K; Hill, Sean L; Tononi, Giulio

    2007-12-01

    Sleep slow-wave activity (SWA, electroencephalogram [EEG] power between 0.5 and 4.0 Hz) is homeostatically regulated, increasing with wakefulness and declining with sleep. Sleep SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, but the mechanisms of its homeostatic regulation remain unknown. Based on a recent hypothesis, we sought to determine whether a decrease in cortical synaptic strength can account for changes in sleep SWA. A large-scale computer model of the sleeping thalamocortical system was used to reproduce in detail the cortical slow oscillations underlying EEG slow waves. N/A. N/A. Simulated reductions in the strength of corticocortical synapses. Decreased synaptic strength led to (1) decreased single cell membrane potential oscillations and reduced network synchronization, (2) decreased rate of neural recruitment and decruitment, and (3) emergence of local clusters of synchronized activity. These changes were reflected in the local EEG as (1) decreased incidence of high-amplitude slow waves, (2) decreased wave slope, and (3) increased number of multipeak waves. Spectral analysis confirmed that these changes were associated with a decrease in SWA. A decrease in cortical synaptic strength is sufficient to account for changes in sleep SWA and is accompanied by characteristic changes in slow-wave parameters. Experimental results from rat cortical depth recordings and human high-density EEG show similar changes in slow-wave parameters with decreasing SWA, suggesting that the underlying mechanism may indeed be a net decrease in synaptic strength.

  3. Sleep homeostasis modulates hypocretin-mediated sleep-to-wake transitions.

    PubMed

    Carter, Matthew E; Adamantidis, Antoine; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Deisseroth, Karl; de Lecea, Luis

    2009-09-02

    The hypocretins (Hcrts) (also called orexins) are two neuropeptides expressed in the lateral hypothalamus that play a crucial role in the stability of wakefulness. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that in vivo photostimulation of Hcrt neurons genetically targeted with ChR2, a light-activated cation channel, was sufficient to increase the probability of an awakening event during both slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. In the current study, we ask whether Hcrt-mediated sleep-to-wake transitions are affected by light/dark period and sleep pressure. We found that stimulation of Hcrt neurons increased the probability of an awakening event throughout the entire light/dark period but that this effect was diminished with sleep pressure induced by 2 or 4 h of sleep deprivation. Interestingly, photostimulation of Hcrt neurons was still sufficient to increase activity assessed by c-Fos expression in Hcrt neurons after sleep deprivation, although this stimulation did not cause an increase in transitions to wakefulness. In addition, we found that photostimulation of Hcrt neurons increases neural activity assessed by c-Fos expression in the downstream arousal-promoting locus ceruleus and tuberomammilary nucleus but not after 2 h of sleep deprivation. Finally, stimulation of Hcrt neurons was still sufficient to increase the probability of an awakening event in histidine decarboxylase-deficient knock-out animals. Collectively, these results suggest that the Hcrt system promotes wakefulness throughout the light/dark period by activating multiple downstream targets, which themselves are inhibited with increased sleep pressure.

  4. Impact of sleep and sleep loss on glucose homeostasis and appetite regulation

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Kristen L

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Over the past 30 years there has been an increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, both of which can have serious consequences for longevity and quality of life. Sleep durations may have also decreased over this time period. This chapter reviews laboratory and epidemiologic evidence for an association between sleep loss and impairments in glucose metabolism and appetite regulation, which could increase the risk of diabetes or weight gain. PMID:18516218

  5. Pannexins Are Potential New Players in the Regulation of Cerebral Homeostasis during Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    PubMed

    Shestopalov, Valery I; Panchin, Yuri; Tarasova, Olga S; Gaynullina, Dina; Kovalzon, Vladimir M

    2017-01-01

    During brain homeostasis, both neurons and astroglia release ATP that is rapidly converted to adenosine in the extracellular space. Pannexin-1 (Panx1) hemichannels represent a major conduit of non-vesicular ATP release from brain cells. Previous studies have shown that Panx1(-/-) mice possess severe disruption of the sleep-wake cycle. Here, we review experimental data supporting the involvement of pannexins (Panx) in the coordination of fundamental sleep-associated brain processes, such as neuronal activity and regulation of cerebrovascular tone. Panx1 hemichannels are likely implicated in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle via an indirect effect of released ATP on adenosine receptors and through interaction with other somnogens, such as IL-1β, TNFα and prostaglandin D2. In addition to the recently established role of Panx1 in the regulation of endothelium-dependent arterial dilation, similar signaling pathways are the major cellular component of neurovascular coupling. The new discovered role of Panx in sleep regulation may have broad implications in coordinating neuronal activity and homeostatic housekeeping processes during the sleep-wake cycle.

  6. Disturbed dreaming and sleep quality: altered sleep architecture in subjects with frequent nightmares.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára; Gombos, Ferenc; Takács, Krisztina P; Bódizs, Róbert

    2012-12-01

    Nightmares are intense, emotionally negative mental experiences that usually occur during late-night sleep and result in abrupt awakenings. Questionnaire-based studies have shown that nightmares are related to impaired sleep quality; however, the polysomnographic profile of nightmare subjects has been only scarcely investigated. We investigated the sleep architecture of 17 individuals with frequent nightmares and 23 control subjects based on polysomnographic recordings of a second night spent in the laboratory after an adaptation night. Nightmare subjects in comparison with control subjects were characterized by impaired sleep architecture, as reflected by reduced sleep efficiency, increased wakefulness, a reduced amount of slow wave sleep, and increased nocturnal awakenings, especially from Stage 2 sleep. While these differences were independent of the effects of waking psychopathology, nightmare subjects also exhibited longer durations of REM sleep that was mediated by heightened negative affect. Our results support that nightmares are related to altered sleep architecture, showing impaired sleep continuity and emotion-related increase in REM propensity.

  7. Evaluation of depressive symptoms and sleep alterations in college students.

    PubMed

    Moo-Estrella, Jesús; Pérez-Benítez, Hugo; Solís-Rodríguez, Francisco; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that sleep alterations could favor subsequent depression development. In order to identify the simultaneous occurrence of these parameters in young people, in this work we evaluated the prevalence of depressive symptoms, sleep habits, and possible sleep disturbances in college students. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and a Sleep Habits Questionnaire were applied to students registered at the Autonomous University of Yucatan, Merida (mean age 20.2 +/- 2.6 years). The final sample was composed of 340 (53%) women and 298 (47%) men. Reliability of the BDI and ESS was assessed by Cronbach's alpha method. Taking 10 as ESS cut-off point, it was found that 31.6% of the students had a high level of sleepiness. Students with depressive symptoms had a greater number of days with somnolence during class (p <0.05) and perceived that this affected their academic performance at a higher level (p <0.001) than the students without symptoms. In comparison to subjects without depressive symptoms, students with those symptoms rated their sleep quality as poor (p <0.001), perceived a greater latency to initiate sleep after going to bed (p <0.03), and experienced a greater number of awakenings (p <0.04). We found diverse sleep alterations in a large proportion of the studied subjects, which were more severe in those who showed depressive symptoms. Educating students for appropriate sleep hygiene and encouraging them to seek professional advice to treat sleep disturbances may be useful to prevent depression.

  8. Hypocretin/Orexin neuropeptides: participation in the control of sleep-wakefulness cycle and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, A; Rodrigo-Angulo, M L; Andrés, I De; Garzón, M

    2009-03-01

    Hypocretins or orexins (Hcrt/Orx) are hypothalamic neuropeptides that are synthesized by neurons located mainly in the perifornical area of the posterolateral hypothalamus. These hypothalamic neurons are the origin of an extensive and divergent projection system innervating numerous structures of the central nervous system. In recent years it has become clear that these neuropeptides are involved in the regulation of many organic functions, such as feeding, thermoregulation and neuroendocrine and cardiovascular control, as well as in the control of the sleep-wakefulness cycle. In this respect, Hcrt/Orx activate two subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors (Hcrt/Orx1R and Hcrt/Orx2R) that show a partly segregated and prominent distribution in neural structures involved in sleep-wakefulness regulation. Wakefulness-enhancing and/or sleep-suppressing actions of Hcrt/Orx have been reported in specific areas of the brainstem. Moreover, presently there are animal models of human narcolepsy consisting in modifications of Hcrt/Orx receptors or absence of these peptides. This strongly suggests that narcolepsy is the direct consequence of a hypofunction of the Hcrt/Orx system, which is most likely due to Hcrt/Orx neurons degeneration.The main focus of this review is to update and illustrate the available data on the actions of Hcrt/Orx neuropeptides with special interest in their participation in the control of the sleep-wakefulness cycle and the regulation of energy homeostasis. Current pharmacological treatment of narcolepsy is also discussed.

  9. Musculoskeletal sensitization and sleep: chronic muscle pain fragments sleep of mice without altering its duration.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Blair C; Opp, Mark R

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in humans is often associated with poor sleep quality. We used a model in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced by injection of acidified saline into muscle to study the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of mice. A one month pre-clinical study was designed to determine the impact of musculoskeletal sensitization on sleep of C57BL/6J mice. We instrumented mice with telemeters to record the electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature. We used an established model of musculoskeletal sensitization in which mechanical hypersensitivity was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0). The injections were given into the gastrocnemius muscle and spaced five days apart. EEG and body temperature recordings started prior to injections (baseline) and continued for three weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization was induced by the second injection. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed using von Frey filaments at baseline (before any injections) and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the second injection. Mice injected with acidified saline developed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity at the hind paws as measured by von Frey testing and as compared to control mice and baseline data. Sleep during the light period was fragmented in experimental mice injected with acidified saline, and EEG spectra altered. Musculoskeletal sensitization did not alter the duration of time spent in wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep, or rapid eye movement sleep. Musculoskeletal sensitization in this model results in a distinct sleep phenotype in which sleep is fragmented during the light period, but the overall duration of sleep is not changed. This study suggests the consequences of musculoskeletal pain include sleep disruption, an observation that has been made in the clinical literature but has yet to be studied using preclinical models.

  10. Increased Automaticity and Altered Temporal Preparation Following Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Danyang; Asplund, Christopher L.; Ling, Aiqing; Chee, Michael W.L.

    2015-01-01

    participants also rely more on automatic processes. Citation: Kong D, Asplund CL, Ling A, Chee MWL. Increased automaticity and altered temporal preparation following sleep deprivation. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1219–1227. PMID:25845689

  11. Homeostasis in C. elegans sleep is characterized by two behaviorally and genetically distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Stanislav; Tramm, Nora; Sanders, Jarred; Iwanir, Shachar; Shirley, Ian A; Levine, Erel; Biron, David

    2014-01-01

    Biological homeostasis invokes modulatory responses aimed at stabilizing internal conditions. Using tunable photo- and mechano-stimulation, we identified two distinct categories of homeostatic responses during the sleep-like state of Caenorhabditis elegans (lethargus). In the presence of weak or no stimuli, extended motion caused a subsequent extension of quiescence. The neuropeptide Y receptor homolog, NPR-1, and an inhibitory neuropeptide known to activate it, FLP-18, were required for this process. In the presence of strong stimuli, the correlations between motion and quiescence were disrupted for several minutes but homeostasis manifested as an overall elevation of the time spent in quiescence. This response to strong stimuli required the function of the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor in neurons, but not that of NPR-1. Conversely, response to weak stimuli did not require the function of DAF-16/FOXO. These findings suggest that routine homeostatic stabilization of sleep may be distinct from homeostatic compensation following a strong disturbance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04380.001 PMID:25474127

  12. Regulatory Alterations of Energy Homeostasis in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR).

    PubMed

    Furedi, Nora; Miko, Alexandra; Aubrecht, Bianka; Gaszner, Balazs; Feller, Diana; Rostas, Ildiko; Tenk, Judit; Soos, Szilvia; Balasko, Marta; Balogh, Andras; Pap, Marianna; Petervari, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have high sympathetic tone and progressive hypertension. Chronic calorie-restriction prevents hypertension. Their food intake (FI) and body weight are lower than in normotensive (NT) controls, even on a high-fat diet, suggesting a dysregulation of energy homeostasis. We assumed enhanced activity of hypothalamic anorexigenic melanocortins and diminished tone of orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the background. FI of male SHR and NT Wistar rats was recorded in a FeedScale system upon intracerebroventricular injection of NPY, melanocortin ligands alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) or during a 7-day intracerebroventricular infusion of melanocortin antagonist HS024. Alpha-MSH, NPY, and AgRP immunoreactivities were semi-quantified in the arcuate (ARC) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei of the hypothalamus in NT vs. SHR. Proopiomelanocortin gene expression was also assessed by quantitative RT-PCR in the ARC. Melanocortin-induced anorexia was stronger, FI induced by NPY or HS024 was smaller and delayed in SHR. Cellular alpha-MSH-specific signal density was higher in the ARC of SHR as evaluated by immunofluerescence, which was supported by PCR data. In the PVN, no differences in alpha-MSH-, NPY-, or AgRP-immunosignal were observed. Our results suggest that a higher melanocortin production/responsiveness and lower NPY responsiveness may contribute to the body weight dysregulation of SHR.

  13. Sleep deprivation alters thyroid hormone economy in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Nayana Coutinho; da Cruz, Natália Santos; de Paula Nascimento, Cristine; da Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues; da Silva, Alba Cenélia Matos; Olivares, Emerson Lopes; Marassi, Michelle Porto

    2015-02-01

    sleep-deprived and sleep-restricted rats; rebound restored this parameter in only the PSD24R group. The serum TSH and T4 concentrations decreased, whereas T3 increased in both the PSD24 and PSD96 groups compared with control animals (P < 0.05). Only PSD24R and PSD96R normalized T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations, respectively, independently of the higher circulating T3 concentrations (∼20-30%) noted in all groups compared with control animals (P < 0.05). Brown adipose tissue D2 activity increased in the PSD 24 and 96 h groups (∼10 times), and PSD24R was more effective than PSD96R at restoring basal brown adipose tissue D2 activity. Our data suggest that thyroid hormone metabolism adapts to sleep deprivation-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid alterations and increases T4 to T3 activation peripherally, thereby increasing circulating T3 in rats. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  14. Sleep deprivation alters choice strategy without altering uncertainty or loss aversion preferences

    PubMed Central

    Mullette-Gillman, O'Dhaniel A.; Kurnianingsih, Yoanna A.; Liu, Jean C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation alters decision making; however, it is unclear what specific cognitive processes are modified to drive altered choices. In this manuscript, we examined how one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) alters economic decision making. We specifically examined changes in uncertainty preferences dissociably from changes in the strategy with which participants engage with presented choice information. With high test-retest reliability, we show that TSD does not alter uncertainty preferences or loss aversion. Rather, TSD alters the information the participants rely upon to make their choices. Utilizing a choice strategy metric which contrasts the influence of maximizing and satisficing information on choice behavior, we find that TSD alters the relative reliance on maximizing information and satisficing information, in the gains domain. This alteration is the result of participants both decreasing their reliance on cognitively-complex maximizing information and a concomitant increase in the use of readily-available satisficing information. TSD did not result in a decrease in overall information use in either domain. These results show that sleep deprivation alters decision making by altering the informational strategies that participants employ, without altering their preferences. PMID:26500479

  15. Influence of serial electrical stimulations of perifornical and posterior hypothalamic orexin-containing neurons on regulation of sleep homeostasis and sleep-wakefulness cycle recovery from experimental comatose state and anesthesia-induced deep sleep.

    PubMed

    Chijavadze, E; Chkhartishvili, E; Babilodze, M; Maglakelidze, N; Nachkebia, N

    2013-11-01

    The work was aimed for the ascertainment of following question - whether Orexin-containing neurons of dorsal and lateral hypothalamic, and brain Orexinergic system in general, are those cellular targets which can speed up recovery of disturbed sleep homeostasis and accelerate restoration of sleep-wakefulness cycle phases during some pathological conditions - experimental comatose state and/or deep anesthesia-induced sleep. Study was carried out on white rats. Modeling of experimental comatose state was made by midbrain cytotoxic lesions at intra-collicular level.Animals were under artificial respiration and special care. Different doses of Sodium Ethaminal were used for deep anesthesia. 30 min after comatose state and/or deep anesthesia induced sleep serial electrical stimulations of posterior and/or perifornical hypothalamus were started. Stimulation period lasted for 1 hour with the 5 min intervals between subsequent stimulations applied by turn to the left and right side hypothalamic parts.EEG registration of cortical and hippocampal electrical activity was started immediately after experimental comatose state and deep anesthesia induced sleep and continued continuously during 72 hour. According to obtained new evidences, serial electrical stimulations of posterior and perifornical hypothalamic Orexin-containing neurons significantly accelerate recovery of sleep homeostasis, disturbed because of comatose state and/or deep anesthesia induced sleep. Speed up recovery of sleep homeostasis was manifested in acceleration of coming out from comatose state and deep anesthesia induced sleep and significant early restoration of sleep-wakefulness cycle behavioral states.

  16. Sleep Fragmentation Exacerbates Mechanical Hypersensitivity and Alters Subsequent Sleep-Wake Behavior in a Mouse Model of Musculoskeletal Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation, or sleep disruption, enhances pain in human subjects. Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent in our society, and constitutes a tremendous public health burden. Although preclinical models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain demonstrate effects on sleep, few studies focus on musculoskeletal pain. We reported elsewhere in this issue of SLEEP that musculoskeletal sensitization alters sleep of mice. In this study we hypothesize that sleep fragmentation during the development of musculoskeletal sensitization will exacerbate subsequent pain responses and alter sleep-wake behavior of mice. Design: This is a preclinical study using C57BL/6J mice to determine the effect on behavioral outcomes of sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization. Methods: Musculoskeletal sensitization, a model of chronic muscle pain, was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0) into the gastrocnemius muscle, spaced 5 days apart. Musculoskeletal sensitization manifests as mechanical hypersensitivity determined by von Frey filament testing at the hindpaws. Sleep fragmentation took place during the consecutive 12-h light periods of the 5 days between intramuscular injections. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature were recorded from some mice at baseline and for 3 weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization. Mechanical hypersensitivity was determined at preinjection baseline and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after sensitization. Two additional experiments were conducted to determine the independent effects of sleep fragmentation or musculoskeletal sensitization on mechanical hypersensitivity. Results: Five days of sleep fragmentation alone did not induce mechanical hypersensitivity, whereas sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization resulted in prolonged and exacerbated mechanical hypersensitivity. Sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization had an effect on

  17. Maternal obesity alters endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in offspring pancreas.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Jumpei; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Carter, Rebeca; Kapur, Sabrina R; Pombo, Joaquim; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude A

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) is increasing in parallel with obesity rates. Stress-related alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), are associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate ER imbalance in the pancreas of a mice model of adult and perinatal diet-induced obesity. Twenty female C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control (Con) or obesogenic (Ob) diets prior to and during pregnancy and lactation. Their offspring were weaned onto Con or Ob diets up to 6 months post-partum. Then, after sacrifice, plasma biochemical analyses, gene expression, and protein concentrations were measured in pancreata. Offspring of Ob-fed mice had significantly increased body weight (p < 0.001) and plasma leptin (p < 0.001) and decreased insulin (p < 0.01) levels. Maternal obesogenic diet decreased the total and phosphorylated Eif2α and increased spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Pancreatic gene expression of downstream regulators of UPR (EDEM, homocysteine-responsive endoplasmic reticulum-resident (HERP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)) and autophagy-related proteins (LC3BI/LC3BII) were differently disrupted by obesogenic feeding in both mothers and offspring (from p < 0.1 to p < 0.001). Maternal obesity and Ob feeding in their offspring alter UPR in NAFPD, with involvement of proapoptotic and autophagy-related markers. Upstream and downstream regulators of PERK, IRE1α, and ATF6 pathways were affected differently following the obesogenic insults.

  18. Alterations in sleep architecture in response to experimental sleep curtailment are associated with signs of positive energy balance.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Ari; O'Keeffe, Majella; Roberts, Amy L; Zammit, Gary K; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Sleep reduction is associated with increased energy intake and weight gain, though few studies have explored the relationship between sleep architecture and energy balance measures in the context of experimental sleep restriction. Fourteen males and 13 females (body mass index: 22-26 kg/m(2)) participated in a crossover sleep curtailment study. Participants were studied under two sleep conditions: short (4 h/night; 0100-0500 h) and habitual (9 h/night; 2200-0700 h), for 5 nights each. Sleep was polysomnographically recorded nightly. Outcome measures included resting metabolic rate (RMR), feelings of appetite-satiety, and ad libitum food intake. Short sleep resulted in reductions in stage 2 sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep duration (P < 0.001), as well as decreased percentage of stage 2 sleep and REM sleep and increased slow wave sleep (SWS) percentage (P < 0.05). Linear mixed model analysis demonstrated a positive association between stage 2 sleep duration and RMR (P = 0.051). Inverse associations were observed between REM sleep duration and hunger (P = 0.031) and between stage 2 sleep duration and appetite for sweet (P = 0.015) and salty (P = 0.046) foods. Stage 2 sleep percentage was inversely related to energy consumed (P = 0.024). Stage 2 sleep (P = 0.005), SWS (P = 0.008), and REM sleep (P = 0.048) percentages were inversely related to fat intake, and SWS (P = 0.040) and REM sleep (P = 0.050) were inversely related to carbohydrate intake. This study demonstrates that changes in sleep architecture are associated with markers of positive energy balance and indicate a means by which exposure to short sleep duration and/or an altered sleep architecture profile may lead to excess weight gain over time.

  19. Lipooligosaccharide-independent alteration of cellular homeostasis in Neisseria meningitidis-infected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bonnah, Robert A; Hoelter, Jenny; Steeghs, Liana; Enns, Caroline A; So, Magdalene; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2005-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (MC) is an important cause of meningitis and septic shock. Primary loose attachment of MC to host epithelial cells is mediated by type IV pili. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS), opacity (Opa) proteins and glycolipid adhesins facilitate subsequent tight attachment. MC infection causes numerous changes in host epithelial cell homeostasis. These include cortical plaque formation, increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and alterations in host iron homeostasis. Using both biochemical and genetic approaches, we examined the role of LOS in mediating these events. We first examined specific cellular iron homeostasis changes that occur following addition of purified MC LOS to epithelial cells. Using an MC mutant that completely lacks LOS (MC lps tbp), we examined pili-mediated attachment and cortical plaque formation in human endocervical epithelial cells (A431). We also tested whether the lack of LOS alters cellular homeostasis, including changes in the levels of host stress response factors and proinflammatory cytokines. MC lps tbp elicited the formation of cortical plaques in A431 cells. However, the plaques were less pronounced than those formed by the MC parent. Surprisingly, the proinflammatory cytokine TNF(alpha) was upregulated during infection in MC lps tbp-infected cells. Furthermore, alterations in iron homeostasis, including lower transferrin receptor 1 (TfR-1) levels, altered TfR-1 trafficking, an 'iron-starvation' gene expression profile and low iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity are independent of LOS. Our results demonstrate that LOS is partially involved in both the attachment to host cells and formation of cortical plaques. However, TNFalpha induction and changes in iron homeostasis observed in MC-infected epithelial cells are independent of LOS.

  20. ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Stoker, Tammy E.1; Laws, Susan C.1; Ferrell, Janet M.1; Cooper, Ralph L.1.

    Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, 27711.

    The...

  1. ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Stoker, Tammy E.1; Laws, Susan C.1; Ferrell, Janet M.1; Cooper, Ralph L.1.

    Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, 27711.

    The...

  2. Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver D.B. Johnson, 1 W.O. Ward, 2 V.L. Bass, 2 M.C.J. Schladweiler, 2A.D. Ledbetter, 2 D. Andrews, and U.P. Kodavanti 2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, Cha...

  3. TRICLOSAN AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION: EVIDENCE FOR ALTERATIONS IN THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact Statement: Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) is a chlorinated phenolic antibacterial compound found as an active ingredient in many personal care and household products. Recent studies suggest that triclosan may alter thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis via ...

  4. Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver D.B. Johnson, 1 W.O. Ward, 2 V.L. Bass, 2 M.C.J. Schladweiler, 2A.D. Ledbetter, 2 D. Andrews, and U.P. Kodavanti 2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, Cha...

  5. TRICLOSAN AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION: EVIDENCE FOR ALTERATIONS IN THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact Statement: Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) is a chlorinated phenolic antibacterial compound found as an active ingredient in many personal care and household products. Recent studies suggest that triclosan may alter thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis via ...

  6. Neuroendocrine alterations in the exercising human: implications for energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fuqua, John S; Rogol, Alan D

    2013-07-01

    Complex mechanisms exist in the human to defend against adverse effects of negative energy balance. These include alterations of hormone secretion affecting the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor system, the adrenal axis, and the reproductive system, particularly in females. Energy deficits are least partially offset by neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating appetite and satiety. The complex feedback mechanisms reporting peripheral fat and energy stores to the central nervous system involve secretion of the peptide hormones leptin and ghrelin, which act centrally on neurons in the arcuate nucleus and anteroventral periventricular area. In addition to appetite regulation, these hormones exert influences on spatially and functionally-related mechanisms regulating reproductive function, such as the kisspeptin-gonadotropin releasing hormone system. Negative energy balance often occurs partially as a result of strenuous and repetitive physical exercise. Exercise stress leads to increased cortisol secretion, but this action is mediated through the induced negative energy balance. In healthy adults with energy deficits, this exercise-induced stress appears to be more important than pure psychological stress in impairing reproductive function. Estrogen deficiency resulting from negative energy balance has important adverse effects on bone density as well as bone microarchitecture, and it may also adversely affect markers of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Altered Lipid Homeostasis in Sertoli Cells Stressed by Mild Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Vallés, Ana S.; Aveldaño, Marta I.; Furland, Natalia E.

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is known to be vulnerable to temperature. Exposures of rat testis to moderate hyperthermia result in loss of germ cells with survival of Sertoli cells (SC). Because SC provide structural and metabolic support to germ cells, our aim was to test the hypothesis that these exposures affect SC functions, thus contributing to germ cell damage. In vivo, regularly repeated exposures (one of 15 min per day, once a day during 5 days) of rat testes to 43°C led to accumulation of neutral lipids. This SC-specific lipid function took 1–2 weeks after the last of these exposures to be maximal. In cultured SC, similar daily exposures for 15 min to 43°C resulted in significant increase in triacylglycerol levels and accumulation of lipid droplets. After incubations with [3H]arachidonate, the labeling of cardiolipin decreased more than that of other lipid classes. Another specifically mitochondrial lipid metabolic function, fatty acid oxidation, also declined. These lipid changes suggested that temperature affects SC mitochondrial physiology, which was confirmed by significantly increased degrees of membrane depolarization and ROS production. This concurred with reduced expression of two SC-specific proteins, transferrin, and Wilms' Tumor 1 protein, markers of SC secretion and differentiation functions, respectively, and with an intense SC cytoskeletal perturbation, evident by loss of microtubule network (α-tubulin) and microfilament (f-actin) organization. Albeit temporary and potentially reversible, hyperthermia-induced SC structural and metabolic alterations may be long-lasting and/or extensive enough to respond for the decreased survival of the germ cells they normally foster. PMID:24690895

  8. Particulate matter in cigarette smoke alters iron homeostasis to produce a biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline G; Dailey, Lisa A; Carter, Jacqueline D; Richards, Judy H; Crissman, Kay M; Foronjy, Robert F; Uyeminami, Dale L; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2008-12-01

    Lung injury after cigarette smoking is related to particle retention. Iron accumulates with the deposition of these particles. We tested the postulate that (1) injury after smoking correlates with exposure to the particulate fraction of cigarette smoke, (2) these particles alter iron homeostasis, triggering metal accumulation, and (3) this alteration in iron homeostasis affects oxidative stress and inflammation. Rats and human respiratory epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke, filtered cigarette smoke, and cigarette smoke condensate (the particulate fraction of smoke), and indices of iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and inflammatory injury were determined. Comparable measures were also evaluated in nonsmokers and smokers. After exposure of rats to cigarette smoke, increased lavage concentrations of iron and ferritin, serum ferritin levels, and nonheme iron concentrations in the lung and liver tissue all increased. Lavage ascorbate concentrations were decreased, supporting an oxidative stress. After filtering of the cigarette smoke to remove particles, most of these changes were reversed. Exposure of cultured respiratory epithelial cells to cigarette smoke condensate caused a similar accumulation of iron, metal-dependent oxidative stress, and increased IL-8 release. Lavage samples in healthy smokers and smoking patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease revealed elevated concentrations of both iron and ferritin relative to healthy nonsmokers. Lavage ascorbate decreased with cigarette smoking. Serum iron and ferritin levels among smokers were increased, supporting systemic accumulation of this metal after cigarette smoke exposure. We conclude that cigarette smoke particles alter iron homeostasis, both in the lung and systemically.

  9. Subchronic arsenic exposure through drinking water alters vascular redox homeostasis and affects physical health in rats.

    PubMed

    Waghe, Prashantkumar; Sarath, Thengumpallil Sasindran; Gupta, Priyanka; Kutty, Harikumar Sankaran; Kandasamy, Kannan; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated whether arsenic can alter vascular redox homeostasis and modulate antioxidant status, taking rat thoracic aorta as a model vascular tissue. In addition, we evaluated whether the altered vascular biochemical homeostasis could be associated with alterations in the physical indicators of toxicity development. Rats were exposed to arsenic as 25, 50, and 100 ppm of sodium arsenite through drinking water for 90 consecutive days. Body weight, food intake, and water consumption were recorded weekly. On the 91st day, rats were sacrificed; vital organs and thoracic aorta were collected. Lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation, and antioxidants were assessed in the thoracic aorta. Arsenic increased aortic lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide generation while decreased reduced glutathione content in a dose-dependent manner. The activities of the enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were decreased. Further, arsenic at 100 ppm decreased feed intake, water consumption, and body weight from the 11th week onward. At this concentration, arsenic increased the relative weights of the liver and kidney. The results suggest that arsenic causes dose-dependent oxidative stress, reduction in antioxidative defense systems, and body weight loss with alteration in hepato-renal organosomatic indices. Overall, subchronic arsenic exposure through drinking water causes alteration in vascular redox homeostasis and at high concentration affects physical health.

  10. Sleep fragmentation exacerbates mechanical hypersensitivity and alters subsequent sleep-wake behavior in a mouse model of musculoskeletal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Blair C; Opp, Mark R

    2014-03-01

    Sleep deprivation, or sleep disruption, enhances pain in human subjects. Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent in our society, and constitutes a tremendous public health burden. Although preclinical models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain demonstrate effects on sleep, few studies focus on musculoskeletal pain. We reported elsewhere in this issue of SLEEP that musculoskeletal sensitization alters sleep of mice. In this study we hypothesize that sleep fragmentation during the development of musculoskeletal sensitization will exacerbate subsequent pain responses and alter sleep-wake behavior of mice. This is a preclinical study using C57BL/6J mice to determine the effect on behavioral outcomes of sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization. Musculoskeletal sensitization, a model of chronic muscle pain, was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0) into the gastrocnemius muscle, spaced 5 days apart. Musculoskeletal sensitization manifests as mechanical hypersensitivity determined by von Frey filament testing at the hindpaws. Sleep fragmentation took place during the consecutive 12-h light periods of the 5 days between intramuscular injections. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature were recorded from some mice at baseline and for 3 weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization. Mechanical hypersensitivity was determined at preinjection baseline and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after sensitization. Two additional experiments were conducted to determine the independent effects of sleep fragmentation or musculoskeletal sensitization on mechanical hypersensitivity. Five days of sleep fragmentation alone did not induce mechanical hypersensitivity, whereas sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization resulted in prolonged and exacerbated mechanical hypersensitivity. Sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization had an effect on subsequent sleep of mice as demonstrated by increased

  11. Alterations in adipocytokines and cGMP homeostasis in morbid obesity patients reverse after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; García-Torres, Maria L; El Mlili, Nisrin; del Olmo, Juan A; Civera, Miguel; Ortega, Joaquin; Ferrandez, Antonio; Martínez-Valls, Jose; Cassinello, Norberto; Montoliu, Carmina

    2013-02-01

    Obesity-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), covering from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Aberrant production of adipocytokines seems to play a main role in most obesity-associated disorders. Changes in adipocytokines in obesity could be mediated by alterations in cyclic GMP (cGMP) homeostasis. The aims of this work were: (1) to study the role of altered cGMP homeostasis in altered adipocytokines in morbid obesity, (2) to assess whether these alterations are different in simple steatosis or NASH, and (3) to assess whether these changes reverse in obese patients after bariatric surgery. In 47 patients with morbid obesity and 45 control subjects, the levels in blood of adipocytokines, cGMP, nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were studied. Whether weight loss after a bariatric surgery reverses the changes in these parameters was evaluated. NO metabolites and leptin increase (and adiponectin decreases) similarly in patients with steatosis or NASH, suggesting that these changes are due to morbid obesity and not to liver disease. Inflammation and cGMP homeostasis are affected both by morbid obesity and by liver disease. The increases in interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 18 (IL-18), plasma cGMP, ANP, and the decrease in cGMP in lymphocytes are stronger in patients with NASH than with steatosis. All these changes reverse completely after bariatric surgery and weight loss, except IL-18. Altered cGMP homeostasis seems to contribute more than inflammation to changes in leptin and adiponectin in morbid obesity. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  12. Genetic findings in schizophrenia patients related to alterations in the intracellular Ca-homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Giegling, Ina; Genius, Just; Benninghoff, Jens; Rujescu, Dan

    2010-12-01

    There is a relatively high genetic heritability of schizophrenia as shown by family, twin and adoption studies. A large number of hypotheses on the causes of schizophrenia occurred over time. In this review we focus on genetic findings related to potential alterations of intracellular Ca-homeostasis in association with schizophrenia. First, we provide evidence for the NMDA/glutamatergic theory of schizophrenia including calcium processes. We mainly focus on genes including: DAO (D-amino acid oxidase), DAOA (D-amino acid oxidase activator), DTNBP1 (Dysbindin 1, dystrobrevin-binding protein 1), NRG1 (Neuregulin 1), ERBB4 (v-erb-a erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 4, avian), NOS1 (nitric oxide synthase 1, neuronal) and NRGN (Neurogranin). Furthermore, a gene coding for a calcium channel subunit (CACNA1C: calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit) is discussed in the light of schizophrenia whereas genetic findings related to alterations in the intracellular Ca-homeostasis associated specifically with dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia are not herein closer reviewed. Taken together there is converging evidence for the contribution of genes potentially related to alterations in intracellular Ca-homeostasis to the risk of schizophrenia. Replications and functional studies will hopefully provide further insight into these genetic variants and the underlying processes.

  13. Evidence that activation of nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) modulates sleep homeostasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Guzmán, Khalil; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria; Salas-Crisóstomo, Mireille; Jiménez-Moreno, Ramsés; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that has been suggested as a modulator of several physiological functions. The PPARα recognizes as an endogenous ligand the anorexic lipid mediator oleoylethanolamide (OEA) which displays wake-inducing properties. Despite that recent evidence indicates that activation of PPARα by synthetic agonists such as Wy14643 enhances waking as well as the extracellular contents of wake-related neurotransmitters, the role of PPARα in sleep recovery after prolonged waking has not been fully described. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize if PPARα regulates sleep rebound after total sleep deprivation (TSD). We report that after 6h of TSD activation of PPARα by pharmacological systemic administration of OEA (10, 20 or 30mg/Kg, i.p.) promoted alertness by blocking the sleep rebound after TSD. Besides, wake-linked compounds such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, or adenosine collected from nucleus accumbens were enhanced after TSD in OEA-treated animals. These sleep and neurochemical results were mimicked after injection of PPARα agonist Wy14643 (10, 20, 30mg/Kg, i.p.). However, similar findings from the sham of vehicle groups were observed if PPARα antagonist MK-886 was administered to rats (10, 20, 30mg/Kg, i.p.). Our results strengthened the hypothesis that PPARα might modulate sleep and neurochemical homeostasis after sleep deprivation.

  14. Revealing the role of the endocannabinoid system modulators, SR141716A, URB597 and VDM-11, in sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Machado, Sergio; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Budde, Henning; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2016-12-17

    The endocannabinoid system comprises receptors (CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors), enzymes (Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase [FAAH], which synthesizes the endocannabinoid anandamide), as well as the anandamide membrane transporter (AMT). Importantly, previous experiments have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system modulates multiple neurobiological functions, including sleep. For instance, SR141716A (the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist) as well as URB597 (the FAAH inhibitor) increase waking in rats whereas VDM-11 (the blocker of the AMT) enhances sleep in rodents. However, no further evidence is available regarding the neurobiological role of the endocannabinoid system in the homeostatic control of sleep. Therefore, the aim of the current experiment was to test if SR141716A, URB597 or VDM-11 would modulate the sleep rebound after sleep deprivation. Thus, these compounds were systemically injected (5, 10, 20mg/kg; ip; separately each one) into rats after prolonged waking. We found that SR141716A and URB597 blocked in dose-dependent fashion the sleep rebound whereas animals treated with VDM-11 displayed sleep rebound during the recovery period. Complementary, injection after sleep deprivation of either SR141716A or URB597 enhanced dose-dependently the extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), serotonin (5-HT), as well as adenosine (AD) while VDM-11 caused a decline in contents of these molecules. These findings suggest that SR141716A or URB597 behave as a potent stimulants since they suppressed the sleep recovery period after prolonged waking. It can be concluded that elements of the endocannabinoid system, such as the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, FAAH and AMT, modulate the sleep homeostasis after prolonged waking.

  15. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly

    PubMed Central

    Sawamura, Naoya; Ando, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Yasushi; Fujimuro, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Hiroaki; Honjo, Ken; Shimoda, Masami; Toda, Hirofumi; Sawamura-Yamamoto, Takako; Makuch, Lauren A; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishizuka, Koko; Cascella, Nicola G.; Kamiya, Atsushi; Ishida, Norio; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Hai, Tsonwin; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo; Sawa, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that co-localizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a co-repressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription. PMID:18762802

  16. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, N; Ando, T; Maruyama, Y; Fujimuro, M; Mochizuki, H; Honjo, K; Shimoda, M; Toda, H; Sawamura-Yamamoto, T; Makuch, L A; Hayashi, A; Ishizuka, K; Cascella, N G; Kamiya, A; Ishida, N; Tomoda, T; Hai, T; Furukubo-Tokunaga, K; Sawa, A

    2008-12-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that colocalizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a corepressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription.

  17. Sleep Deprivation Alters Valuation Signals in the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Libedinsky, Camilo; Smith, David V.; Teng, Chieh Schen; Namburi, Praneeth; Chen, Vanessa W.; Huettel, Scott A.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Even a single night of total sleep deprivation (SD) can have dramatic effects on economic decision making. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that SD influences economic decisions by altering the valuation process. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we identified value signals related to the anticipation and the experience of monetary and social rewards (attractive female faces). We then derived decision value signals that were predictive of each participant’s willingness to exchange money for brief views of attractive faces in an independent market task. Strikingly, SD altered decision value signals in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) in proportion to the corresponding change in economic preferences. These changes in preference were independent of the effects of SD on attention and vigilance. Our results provide novel evidence that signals in VMPFC track the current state of the individual, and thus reflect not static but constructed preferences. PMID:22028686

  18. Impaired K+ Homeostasis and Altered Electrophysiological Properties of Post-Traumatic Hippocampal Glia

    PubMed Central

    D'Ambrosio, Raimondo; Maris, Donald O.; Grady, M. Sean; Winn, H. Richard; Janigro, Damir

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be associated with memory impairment, cognitive deficits, or seizures, all of which can reflect altered hippocampal function. Whereas previous studies have focused on the involvement of neuronal loss in post-traumatic hippocampus, there has been relatively little understanding of changes in ionic homeostasis, failure of which can result in neuronal hyperexcitability and abnormal synchronization. Because glia play a crucial role in the homeostasis of the brain microenvironment, we investigated the effects of TBI on rat hippocampal glia. Using a fluid percussion injury (FPI) model and patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal slices, we have found impaired glial physiology 2 d after FPI. Electrophysiologically, we observed reduction in transient outward and inward K+ currents. To assess the functional consequences of these glial changes, field potentials and extracellular K+ activity were recorded in area CA3 during antidromic stimulation. An abnormal extracellular K+ accumulation was observed in the post-traumatic hippocampal slices, accompanied by the appearance of CA3 afterdischarges. After pharmacological blockade of excitatory synapses and of K+ inward currents, uninjured slices showed the same altered K+ accumulation in the absence of abnormal neuronal activity. We suggest that TBI causes loss of K+ conductance in hippocampal glia that results in the failure of glial K+ homeostasis, which in turn promotes abnormal neuronal function. These findings provide a new potential mechanistic link between traumatic brain injury and subsequent development of disorders such as memory loss, cognitive decline, seizures, and epilepsy. PMID:10479715

  19. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Wang, Dawei; Qin, Wen; Li, Qiong; Chen, Baoyuan; Zhang, Yunting; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Structural and functional brain changes may contribute to neural dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the effect of OSA on resting-state brain activity has not been established. The objective of this study was to investigate alterations in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the common brain networks in patients with OSA and their relationships with changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the corresponding brain regions. Designs: Resting-state functional and structural MRI data were acquired from patients with OSA and healthy controls. Seven brain networks were identified by independent component analysis. The rsFC in each network was compared between groups and the GMV of brain regions with significant differences in rsFC was also compared. Setting: University hospital. Patients and Participants: Twenty-four male patients with untreated OSA and 21 matched healthy controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: OSA specifically affected the cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks but not the visual and auditory networks. The medial prefrontal cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed decreased rsFC and GMV in patients with OSA, suggesting structural and functional deficits. The right DLPFC and left precentral gyrus showed decreased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting a functional deficit. The right posterior cingulate cortex demonstrated increased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting functional compensation. In patients with OSA, the rsFC of the right DLPFC was negatively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: OSA specifically affects resting-state functional connectivity in cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks, which may be related to the impaired cognitive and motor functions in these patients. Citation: Zhang Q; Wang D; Qin W; Li Q; Chen B; Zhang Y; Yu C. Altered resting-state brain activity in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2013

  20. Neural Alterations and Depressive Symptoms in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Rebecca L.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Doering, Lynn V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Yan-Go, Frisca L.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Depressive symptoms are common in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, and brain injury occurs with both OSA and depression independently. The objective was to determine whether brain alterations in OSA bear relationships to depressive symptoms. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based medical center. Participants: 40 treatment-naive OSA subjects and 61 control subjects without diagnosed psychopathology. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Whole-brain maps of T2 relaxation time, a measure sensitive to injury, were calculated from magnetic resonance images, transformed to common space, and smoothed. Control and OSA groups were classified by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II scores (≥12 symptomatic, <10 asymptomatic for depressive symptoms). The OSA group separated into 13 symptomatic (mean ± SD: BDI-II 21 ± 8; age 47.6 ± 11; apnea hypopnea index [AHI] 28.3 ± 17), and 27 asymptomatic (4 ± 3; 47.5 ± 8; 31.5 ± 16) subjects. The control group included 56 asymptomatic (BDI-II 2.5 ± 2.6; age 47.3 ± 9) subjects. Asymptomatic OSA subjects exhibited higher AHI. T2 maps were compared between groups (ANCOVA), with age and gender as covariates. Injury appeared in symptomatic vs asymptomatic OSA subjects in the mid- and anterior cingulate, anterior insular, medial pre-frontal, parietal, and left ventrolateral temporal cortices, left caudate nucleus, and internal capsule. Relative to asymptomatic controls, symptomatic OSA patients showed damage in the bilateral hippocampus and caudate nuclei, anterior corpus callosum, right anterior thalamus, and medial pons. Conclusions: Neural injury differed between OSA patients with and without depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms may exacerbate injury accompanying OSA, or introduce additional damage in affective, cognitive, respiratory, and autonomic control regions. Citation: Cross RL; Kumar R; Macey PM; Doering LV; Alger JR; Yan-Go FL; Harper RM. Neural alterations and

  1. Effects of sleep deprivation on sleep homeostasis and restoration during methadone-maintenance: a [31] P MRS brain imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Trksak, George H.; Jensen, J. Eric; Plante, David T.; Penetar, David M.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Maywalt, Melissa A.; Brendel, Michael; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Insomnia afflicts many individuals, but particularly those in chronic methadone treatment. Studies examining sleep deprivation (SD) have begun to identify sleep restoration processes involving brain bioenergetics. The technique [31]P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can measure brain changes in the high-energy phosphates: alpha-, beta-, and gamma-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP). In the present study, 21 methadone-maintained (MM) and 16 control participants underwent baseline (BL), SD (40 wakeful hrs), recovery1 (RE1), and recovery2 (RE2) study nights. Polysomnographic sleep was recorded each night and [31]P MRS brain scanning conducted each morning using a 4T MR scanner (dual-tuned proton/phosphorus headcoil). Interestingly, increases in total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficiency index (SEI) commonly associated with RE sleep were not apparent in MM participants. Analysis of methadone treatment duration revealed that the lack of RE sleep increases in TST and SEI were primarily exhibited by short-term MM participants (methadone<12 months), while RE sleep in long-term MM (methadone>12 months) participants was more comparable to control participants. Slow wave sleep increased during RE1, but there was no difference between MM and control participants. Spectral power analysis revealed that compared to control participants; MM participants had greater delta, theta, and alpha spectral power during BL and RE sleep. [31]P MRS revealed that elevations in brain beta-NTP (a direct measure of ATP) following RE sleep were greater in MM compared to control participants. Results suggest that differences in sleep and brain chemistry during RE in MM participants may be reflective of a disruption in homeostatic sleep function. PMID:19775835

  2. Exaggerated Nighttime Sleep and Defective Sleep Homeostasis in a Drosophila Knock-In Model of Human Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Petruccelli, Emily; Lansdon, Patrick; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite an established link between epilepsy and sleep behavior, it remains unclear how specific epileptogenic mutations affect sleep and subsequently influence seizure susceptibility. Recently, Sun et al. (2012) created a fly knock-in model of human generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), a wide-spectrum disorder characterized by fever-associated seizing in childhood and lifelong affliction. GEFS+ flies carry a disease-causing mutation in their voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene and display semidominant heat-induced seizing, likely due to reduced GABAergic inhibitory activity at high temperature. Here, we show that at room temperature the GEFS+ mutation dominantly modifies sleep, with mutants exhibiting rapid sleep onset at dusk and increased nighttime sleep as compared to controls. These characteristics of GEFS+ sleep were observed regardless of sex, mating status, and genetic background. GEFS+ mutant sleep phenotypes were more resistant to pharmacologic reduction of GABA transmission by carbamazepine (CBZ) than controls, and were mitigated by reducing GABAA receptor expression specifically in wake-promoting pigment dispersing factor (PDF) neurons. These findings are consistent with increased GABAergic transmission to PDF neurons being mainly responsible for the enhanced nighttime sleep of GEFS+ mutants. Additionally, analyses under other light conditions suggested that the GEFS+ mutation led to reduced buffering of behavioral responses to light on and off stimuli, which contributed to characteristic GEFS+ sleep phenotypes. We further found that GEFS+ mutants had normal circadian rhythms in free-running dark conditions. Interestingly, the mutants lacked a homeostatic rebound following mechanical sleep deprivation, and whereas deprivation treatment increased heat-induced seizure susceptibility in control flies, it unexpectedly reduced seizure activity in GEFS+ mutants. Our study has revealed the sleep architecture of a Drosophila VGSC mutant

  3. Exaggerated Nighttime Sleep and Defective Sleep Homeostasis in a Drosophila Knock-In Model of Human Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Petruccelli, Emily; Lansdon, Patrick; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite an established link between epilepsy and sleep behavior, it remains unclear how specific epileptogenic mutations affect sleep and subsequently influence seizure susceptibility. Recently, Sun et al. (2012) created a fly knock-in model of human generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), a wide-spectrum disorder characterized by fever-associated seizing in childhood and lifelong affliction. GEFS+ flies carry a disease-causing mutation in their voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene and display semidominant heat-induced seizing, likely due to reduced GABAergic inhibitory activity at high temperature. Here, we show that at room temperature the GEFS+ mutation dominantly modifies sleep, with mutants exhibiting rapid sleep onset at dusk and increased nighttime sleep as compared to controls. These characteristics of GEFS+ sleep were observed regardless of sex, mating status, and genetic background. GEFS+ mutant sleep phenotypes were more resistant to pharmacologic reduction of GABA transmission by carbamazepine (CBZ) than controls, and were mitigated by reducing GABAA receptor expression specifically in wake-promoting pigment dispersing factor (PDF) neurons. These findings are consistent with increased GABAergic transmission to PDF neurons being mainly responsible for the enhanced nighttime sleep of GEFS+ mutants. Additionally, analyses under other light conditions suggested that the GEFS+ mutation led to reduced buffering of behavioral responses to light on and off stimuli, which contributed to characteristic GEFS+ sleep phenotypes. We further found that GEFS+ mutants had normal circadian rhythms in free-running dark conditions. Interestingly, the mutants lacked a homeostatic rebound following mechanical sleep deprivation, and whereas deprivation treatment increased heat-induced seizure susceptibility in control flies, it unexpectedly reduced seizure activity in GEFS+ mutants. Our study has revealed the sleep architecture of a Drosophila VGSC mutant

  4. Heparanase Overexpression Reduces Hepcidin Expression, Affects Iron Homeostasis and Alters the Response to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Asperti, Michela; Stuemler, Tanja; Poli, Maura; Gryzik, Magdalena; Lifshitz, Lena; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G.; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is the key regulator of systemic iron availability that acts by controlling the degradation of the iron exporter ferroportin. It is expressed mainly in the liver and regulated by iron, inflammation, erythropoiesis and hypoxia. The various agents that control its expression act mainly via the BMP6/SMAD signaling pathway. Among them are exogenous heparins, which are strong hepcidin repressors with a mechanism of action not fully understood but that may involve the competition with the structurally similar endogenous Heparan Sulfates (HS). To verify this hypothesis, we analyzed how the overexpression of heparanase, the HS degrading enzyme, modified hepcidin expression and iron homeostasis in hepatic cell lines and in transgenic mice. The results showed that transient and stable overexpression of heparanase in HepG2 cells caused a reduction of hepcidin expression and of SMAD5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, the clones showed also altered level of TfR1 and ferritin, indices of a modified iron homeostasis. The heparanase transgenic mice showed a low level of liver hepcidin, an increase of serum and liver iron with a decrease in spleen iron content. The hepcidin expression remained surprisingly low even after treatment with the inflammatory LPS. The finding that modification of HS structure mediated by heparanase overexpression affects hepcidin expression and iron homeostasis supports the hypothesis that HS participate in the mechanisms controlling hepcidin expression. PMID:27711215

  5. Altered microglial copper homeostasis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhiqiang; White, Carine; Lee, Jaekwon; Peterson, Troy S; Bush, Ashley I; Sun, Grace Y; Weisman, Gary A; Petris, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration associated with the aggregation and deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ(40) and Aβ(42) ) peptide in senile plaques. Recent studies suggest that copper may play an important role in AD pathology. Copper concentrations are elevated in amyloid plaques and copper binds with high affinity to the Aβ peptide and promotes Aβ oligomerization and neurotoxicity. Despite this connection between copper and AD, it is unknown whether the expression of proteins involved in regulating copper homeostasis is altered in this disorder. In this study, we demonstrate that the copper transporting P-type ATPase, ATP7A, is highly expressed in activated microglial cells that are specifically clustered around amyloid plaques in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD. Using a cultured microglial cell line, ATP7A expression was found to be increased by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma, but not by TNF-α or IL-1β. Interferon-gamma also elicited marked changes in copper homeostasis, including copper-dependent trafficking of ATP7A from the Golgi to cytoplasmic vesicles, increased copper uptake and elevated expression of the CTR1 copper importer. These findings suggest that pro-inflammatory conditions associated with AD cause marked changes in microglial copper trafficking, which may underlie the changes in copper homeostasis in AD. It is concluded that copper sequestration by microglia may provide a neuroprotective mechanism in AD.

  6. Altered Cellular Homeostasis in Murine MPS I Fibroblasts: Evidence of Cell-Specific Physiopathology.

    PubMed

    Viana, Gustavo Monteiro; do Nascimento, Cinthia Castro; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2017-02-21

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), a rare autosomal recessive disease, is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alfa-L-iduronidase. Impaired enzyme activity promotes glycosaminoglycans accumulation in several tissues and organs, leading to complex multisystemic complications. Several studies using animal models indicated different intracellular pathways involving MPS I physiopathology; however, the exact mechanisms underlying this syndrome are still not understood. Previous results from our group showed alterations in ionic homeostasis and cell viability of splenocytes and macrophages in Idua-/- mice. In the present study, we found altered intracellular ionic homeostasis in a different cell type (fibroblasts) from the same murine model. Idua-/- fibroblasts from 3-month-old mice presented higher cytoplasmatic and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) concentration, lower levels of mitochondrial Ca(2+) and mitochondrial membrane potential and higher cytoplasmatic pH when compared to Idua+/+ animals. Also, Idua-/- fibroblasts were more resistant to the apoptotic induction with staurosporine, indicating a possible resistance to apoptotic induction in those cells. In addition, despite the intracellular ionic imbalance, no significant alterations were found in apoptosis and autophagy in Idua-/- fibroblasts, which implies that the ionic alterations did not activate those pathways. The investigation of mechanisms underlying the cellular physiopathology of lysosomal diseases is crucial for a better understanding about the progression of these diseases. Since splenocytes, macrophages, and fibroblasts have different embryonic origins and distinct structural and functional features, potentially altered signaling pathways found in a cell-specific manner in an alfa-L-iduronidase-deficient environment provide additional understanding of the clinical multisystemic presentation of this disease and provide new basis for improved therapeutic approaches.

  7. Altered transition metal homeostasis in Niemann-Pick disease, Type C1

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ya Hui; Faux, Noel G.; Killilea, David W.; Yanjanin, Nicole; Firnkes, Sally; Volitakis, Irene; Ganio, George; Walterfang, Mark; Hastings, Caroline; Porter, Forbes D.; Ory, Daniel S.; Bush, Ashley I.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of NPC1 protein function is the predominant cause of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NP-C1), a systemic and neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late-endosomal/lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids. Limited evidence from post-mortem human tissues, an Npc1−/− mouse model, and cell culture studies also suggest failure of metal homeostasis in NP-C1. To investigate these findings, we performed a comprehensive transition metal analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and tissue samples from human NP-C1 patients and an Npc1−/− mouse model. NPC1 deficiency in the Npc1−/− mouse model resulted in a perturbation of transition metal homeostasis in the plasma and key organs (brain, liver, spleen, heart, lungs, and kidneys). Analysis of human patient CSF, plasma and post-mortem brain tissues also indicated disrupted metal homeostasis. There was a disparity in the direction of metal changes between the human and the Npc1−/− mouse samples, which may reflect species-specific metal metabolism. Nevertheless, common to both species is brain zinc accumulation. Furthermore, treatment with the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor miglustat, the only drug shown in a controlled clinical trial to have some efficacy for NP-C1, did not correct the alterations in CSF and plasma transition metal and ceruloplasmin (CP) metabolism in NP-C1 patients. These findings highlight the importance of NPC1 function in metal homeostasis, and indicate that metal-targeting therapy may be of value as a treatment for NP-C. PMID:24343124

  8. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerlo, P.; Koehl, M.; van der Borght, K.; Turek, F. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine stress systems. However, few attempts have been made to examine how sleep loss affects the HPA axis response to subsequent stressors. Furthermore, most studies applied short-lasting total sleep deprivation and not restriction of sleep over a longer period of time, as often occurs in human society. Using the rat as our model species, we investigated: (i) the HPA axis activity during and after sleep deprivation and (ii) the effect of sleep loss on the subsequent HPA response to a novel stressor. In one experiment, rats were subjected to 48 h of sleep deprivation by placing them in slowly rotating wheels. Control rats were placed in nonrotating wheels. In a second experiment, rats were subjected to an 8-day sleep restriction protocol allowing 4 h of sleep each day. To test the effects of sleep loss on subsequent stress reactivity, rats were subjected to a 30-min restraint stress. Blood samples were taken at several time points and analysed for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone. The results show that ACTH and corticosterone concentrations were elevated during sleep deprivation but returned to baseline within 4 h of recovery. After 1 day of sleep restriction, the ACTH and corticosterone response to restraint stress did not differ between control and sleep deprived rats. However, after 48 h of total sleep deprivation and after 8 days of restricted sleep, the ACTH response to restraint was significantly reduced whereas the corticosterone response was unaffected. These results show that sleep loss not only is a mild activator of the HPA axis itself, but also affects the subsequent response to stress. Alterations in HPA axis regulation may gradually appear under

  9. Sleep variability in adolescence is associated with altered brain development.

    PubMed

    Telzer, Eva H; Goldenberg, Diane; Fuligni, Andrew J; Lieberman, Matthew D; Gálvan, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    Despite the known importance of sleep for brain development, and the sharp increase in poor sleep during adolescence, we know relatively little about how sleep impacts the developing brain. We present the first longitudinal study to examine how sleep during adolescence is associated with white matter integrity. We find that greater variability in sleep duration one year prior to a DTI scan is associated with lower white matter integrity above and beyond the effects of sleep duration, and variability in bedtime, whereas sleep variability a few months prior to the scan is not associated with white matter integrity. Thus, variability in sleep duration during adolescence may have long-term impairments on the developing brain. White matter integrity should be increasing during adolescence, and so sleep variability is directly at odds with normative developmental trends.

  10. Altered sleep in Borderline Personality Disorder in relation to the core dimensions of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to review the literature regarding sleep disturbances in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and to relate the reported sleep alterations to the underlying core dimensions of BPD pathology. We present a qualitative and theoretical review regarding the empirical studies that investigated objective and subjective sleep quality in BPD and in different psychiatric conditions showing high co-morbidity with this disorder. We show that disturbed sleep including sleep fragmentation, alterations in Slow Wave Sleep and REM sleep, and dysphoric dreaming are prevalent symptoms in BPD. We provide a framework relating the specific sleep alterations to the core dimensions of BPD pathology in order to clarify the inconsistencies of the different findings. The specific sleep disturbances in BPD seem to be related to different dimensions of psychopathological functioning and may have detrimental consequences on waking affect and cognition. Investigating disturbed sleep in BPD in relation to waking symptoms and underlying neural functioning would shed more light on the nature of this complex disorder. Moreover, a stronger emphasis on sleep disturbances would enrich the treatment protocols of BPD. © 2013 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2013 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  11. A human sleep homeostasis phenotype in mice expressing a primate-specific PER3 variable-number tandem-repeat coding-region polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Sibah; van der Veen, Daan R.; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; Hogben, Alexandra; Laing, Emma E.; Koentgen, Frank; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Archer, Simon N.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, a primate-specific variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism (4 or 5 repeats 54 nt in length) in the circadian gene PER3 is associated with differences in sleep timing and homeostatic responses to sleep loss. We investigated the effects of this polymorphism on circadian rhythmicity and sleep homeostasis by introducing the polymorphism into mice and assessing circadian and sleep parameters at baseline and during and after 12 h of sleep deprivation (SD). Microarray analysis was used to measure hypothalamic and cortical gene expression. Circadian behavior and sleep were normal at baseline. The response to SD of 2 electrophysiological markers of sleep homeostasis, electroencephalography (EEG) θ power during wakefulness and δ power during sleep, were greater in the Per35/5 mice. During recovery, the Per35/5 mice fully compensated for the SD-induced deficit in δ power, but the Per34/4 and wild-type mice did not. Sleep homeostasis-related transcripts (e.g., Homer1, Ptgs2, and Kcna2) were differentially expressed between the humanized mice, but circadian clock genes were not. These data are in accordance with the hypothesis derived from human data that the PER3 VNTR polymorphism modifies the sleep homeostatic response without significantly influencing circadian parameters.—Hasan, S., van der Veen, D. R., Winsky-Sommerer, R., Hogben, A., Laing, E. E., Koentgen, F., Dijk, D.-J., Archer, S. N. A human sleep homeostasis phenotype in mice expressing a primate-specific PER3 variable-number tandem-repeat coding-region polymorphism. PMID:24577121

  12. Prominent pancreatic endocrinopathy and altered control of food intake disrupt energy homeostasis in prion diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, J.D.; Berardinelli, J.G.; Rocke, T.E.; Bessen, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that can induce endocrinopathies. The basis of altered endocrine function in prion diseases is not well understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between energy homeostasis and prion infection in hamsters inoculated with either the 139H strain of scrapie agent, which induces preclinical weight gain, or the HY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), which induces clinical weight loss. Temporal changes in body weight, feed, and water intake were measured as well as both non-fasted and fasted concentrations of serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, ??-ketones, and leptin. In 139H scrapie-infected hamsters, polydipsia, hyperphagia, non-fasted hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, and fasted hyperleptinemia were found at preclinical stages and are consistent with an anabolic syndrome that has similarities to type II diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome X. In HY TME-infected hamsters, hypodipsia, hypersecretion of glucagon (in both non-fasted and fasted states), increased fasted ??-ketones, fasted hypoglycemia, and suppressed non-fasted leptin concentrations were found while feed intake was normal. These findings suggest a severe catabolic syndrome in HY TME infection mediated by chronic increases in glucagon secretion. In both models, alterations of pancreatic endocrine function were not associated with PrPSc deposition in the pancreas. The results indicate that prominent endocrinopathy underlies alterations in body weight, pancreatic endocrine function, and intake of food. The prion-induced alterations of energy homeostasis in 139H scrapie- or HY TME-infected hamsters could occur within areas of the hypothalamus that control food satiety and/or within autonomic centers that provide neural outflow to the pancreas. ?? 2008 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Sleep influences the immune response and the rejection process alters sleep pattern: Evidence from a skin allograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francieli Silva; Andersen, Monica Levy; Guindalini, Camila; Araujo, Leandro Pires; Lopes, José Daniel; Tufik, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Sleep generally regulates immune functions in a supportive manner and can affect parameters that are directly involved in the rejection process. The first objective was to assess whether sleep deprivation (SD) or sleep restriction (SR) affects the allograft rejection process in mice. The second objective was to investigate whether the rejection process itself modulates the sleep pattern of allografted mice. Adult BALB/c and C57BL/6J male mice were used as the donors and recipients, respectively, except for the syngeneic group (ISOTX), which received skin from mice of the same strain (C57BL/6J). The recipients were randomly assigned to either one of two control groups - TX (allogenic) or ISOTX (syngeneic) - which underwent stereotaxic surgery to enable sleep recording prior to the allograft but were not sleep deprived; one of two paradoxical sleep deprived groups - SDTX and TXSD - which underwent 72h of continuous SD either before or after the allograft respectively, and one of two sleep restricted groups - SRTX and TXSR - which underwent 21h of SD and 3h of sleep for 15days either before or after the allograft respectively. The skin allograft was inspected daily to determine the survival time, expected as 8.0±0.4days in this transplant model under no treatment. The sleep pattern was controlled throughout the rejection process in the SD and SR groups. Draining lymph nodes, spleen, blood and skin grafts were harvested on the 5th day after transplantation for evaluation of the immune parameters related to allograft rejection. In the control groups, we observed a reduction in paradoxical sleep throughout the entire allograft rejection process. Acute and chronic experimental sleep loss in the SD and SR groups produced marked alterations in the immune response. Both SD and SR prolonged allograft survival compared to the non-sleep-deprived group. There were reductions in the following parameters involved in the allograft rejection under sleep loss: CD4(+) and CD8(+) T

  14. Functional data analysis of sleeping energy expenditure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adequate sleep is crucial during childhood for metabolic health, and physical and cognitive development. Inadequate sleep can disrupt metabolic homeostasis and alter sleeping energy expenditure (SEE). Functional data analysis methods were applied to SEE data to elucidate the population structure of ...

  15. Physostigmine alters onset but not duration of REM sleep in man.

    PubMed

    Gillin, J C; Sitaram, N; Mendelson, W B; Wyatt, R J

    1978-06-15

    Physostigmine (1.0mg) or placebo were administered intravenously over 1-h period to seven male normal volunteers beginning 35 min after sleep onset. The results indicate that physostigmine induced the onset of REM sleep but did not significantly alter the duration of individual REM sleep periods. Physostigmine significantly shortened the REM latency and the duration of the second nonREM period. After inducing the onset of the first REM period(s); physostigmine also appeared to advance succeeding REM-nonREM sleep cycles relative to sleep onset even when the duration of each cycle was unaffected.

  16. The effects of partial sleep restriction and altered sleep timing on appetite and food reward.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Jessica; Forest, Geneviève; Hintze, Luzia Jaeger; Brunet, Jean-François; Finlayson, Graham; Blundell, John E; Doucet, Éric

    2017-02-01

    We examined the effects of partial sleep restriction (PSR) with an advanced wake-time or delayed bedtime on measures of appetite, food reward and subsequent energy intake (EI). Twelve men and 6 women (age: 23 ± 4 years, body fat: 18.8 ± 10.1%) participated in 3 randomized crossover sessions: control (habitual bed- and wake-time), 50% PSR with an advanced wake-time and 50% PSR with a delayed bedtime. Outcome variables included sleep architecture (polysomnography), ad libitum EI (validated food menu), appetite sensations (visual analogue scales), satiety quotient (SQ; mm/100 kcal) and food reward (Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire and the relative-reinforcing value (RRV) of preferred food task). Increased fasting and post-standard breakfast appetite ratings were noted following PSR with an advanced wake-time compared to the control and PSR with a delayed bedtime sessions (Fasting hunger ratings: 77 ± 16 vs. 65 ± 18 and 64 ± 16; P = 0.01; Post-meal hunger AUC: 5982 ± 1781 vs. 4508 ± 2136 and 5198 ± 2201; P = 0.03). Increased explicit wanting and liking for high- relative to low-fat foods were also noted during the advanced wake-time vs. control session (Explicit wanting: -3.5 ± 12.5 vs. -9.3 ± 8.9, P = 0.01; Explicit liking: -1.6 ± 8.5 vs. -7.8 ± 9.6, P = 0.002). No differences in the RRV of preferred food, SQ and ad libitum lunch intake were noted between sessions. These findings suggest that appetite sensations and food reward are increased following PSR with an advanced wake-time, rather than delayed bedtime, vs. However, this did not translate into increased EI during a test meal. Given the increasing prevalence of shift workers and incidences of sleep disorders, additional studies are needed to evaluate the prolonged effects of voluntary sleep restriction with altered sleep timing on appetite and EI measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Partial restoration of mutant enzyme homeostasis in three distinct lysosomal storage disease cell lines by altering calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Ting-Wei; Fowler, Douglas M; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2008-02-01

    A lysosomal storage disease (LSD) results from deficient lysosomal enzyme activity, thus the substrate of the mutant enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, leading to pathology. In many but not all LSDs, the clinically most important mutations compromise the cellular folding of the enzyme, subjecting it to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation instead of proper folding and lysosomal trafficking. A small molecule that restores partial mutant enzyme folding, trafficking, and activity would be highly desirable, particularly if one molecule could ameliorate multiple distinct LSDs by virtue of its mechanism of action. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels, using either diltiazem or verapamil-both US Food and Drug Administration-approved hypertension drugs-partially restores N370S and L444P glucocerebrosidase homeostasis in Gaucher patient-derived fibroblasts; the latter mutation is associated with refractory neuropathic disease. Diltiazem structure-activity studies suggest that it is its Ca2+ channel blocker activity that enhances the capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum to fold misfolding-prone proteins, likely by modest up-regulation of a subset of molecular chaperones, including BiP and Hsp40. Importantly, diltiazem and verapamil also partially restore mutant enzyme homeostasis in two other distinct LSDs involving enzymes essential for glycoprotein and heparan sulfate degradation, namely alpha-mannosidosis and type IIIA mucopolysaccharidosis, respectively. Manipulation of calcium homeostasis may represent a general strategy to restore protein homeostasis in multiple LSDs. However, further efforts are required to demonstrate clinical utility and safety.

  18. Increased EEG spectral power density during sleep following short-term sleep deprivation in pigeons (Columba livia): evidence for avian sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Lesku, John A; Rattenborg, Niels C

    2008-06-01

    Birds provide a unique opportunity to evaluate current theories for the function of sleep. Like mammalian sleep, avian sleep is composed of two states, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep that apparently evolved independently in mammals and birds. Despite this resemblance, however, it has been unclear whether avian SWS shows a compensatory response to sleep loss (i.e., homeostatic regulation), a fundamental aspect of mammalian sleep potentially linked to the function of SWS. Here, we prevented pigeons (Columba livia) from taking their normal naps during the last 8 h of the day. Although time spent in SWS did not change significantly following short-term sleep deprivation, electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave activity (SWA; i.e., 0.78-2.34 Hz power density) during SWS increased significantly during the first 3 h of the recovery night when compared with the undisturbed night, and progressively declined thereafter in a manner comparable to that observed in similarly sleep-deprived mammals. SWA was also elevated during REM sleep on the recovery night, a response that might reflect increased SWS pressure and the concomitant 'spill-over' of SWS-related EEG activity into short episodes of REM sleep. As in rodents, power density during SWS also increased in higher frequencies (9-25 Hz) in response to short-term sleep deprivation. Finally, time spent in REM sleep increased following sleep deprivation. The mammalian-like increase in EEG spectral power density across both low and high frequencies, and the increase in time spent in REM sleep following sleep deprivation suggest that some aspects of avian and mammalian sleep are regulated in a similar manner.

  19. Sleep homeostasis and depression: studies with the rat clomipramine model of depression.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, S A; Rantamäki, T; Rytkönen, K-M; Castren, E; Porkka-Heiskanen, T

    2012-06-14

    Neonatal treatment of rat pups with clomipramine (CLI) has been shown to cause long-lasting and persistent depression-related behaviors and changes in sleep architecture and in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in adult animals, producing an animal model of depression. However, the molecular mechanisms which mediate these effects of early-life CLI treatment on adult animals remain largely unknown. In order to characterize these further, we investigated in neonatally CLI-treated rats the sleep architecture as well as the extracellular and cellular levels of sleep regulators (nitric oxide, adenosine) and BDNF, respectively, in the basal forebrain (BF), i.e. the brain area which is implicated in sleep and depression. We found that CLI-treated rats exhibited a disturbed sleep architecture (REM sleep fragmentation was increased and NREM periods preceding REM were shorter) and reduced levels of BDNF and adenosine in the BF, whereas the levels of nitric oxide were elevated. Next, we examined sleep deprivation (SD)-induced homeostatic responses on sleep regulation and brain BDNF levels in CLI-treated rats. Compared to control rats, 3h of SD induced a smaller increase in the amount of NREM sleep during sleep recovery. At the molecular level, the normal homeostatic response was dissociated: the rise in the adenosine level was not accompanied by a rise in the nitric oxide concentration. Moreover, while BF BDNF levels decreased during SD in control rats, such a decline was not observed in CLI rats. Taken together, neonatal CLI treatment produces long-lasting functional changes in the sleep architecture and sleep regulation in adult rats, accompanied by dysregulated BDNF signaling in the BF. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Altered calcium homeostasis in irreversibly injured P388D1 macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Gleva, G. F.; Goodglick, L. A.; Kane, A. B.

    1990-01-01

    Sequestration of calcium by mitochondria is an important mechanism to maintain normal intracellular calcium homeostasis. Anoxic or toxic damage to these organelles has been postulated to disrupt intracellular calcium compartmentalization, leading to cell death. The authors examined the potential relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis, and irreversible injury in a model system of silica-induced toxicity to P388D1 cells. Exposure to toxic silica particles, but not to nontoxic latex heads, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, increased membrane-associated calcium, elevated free cytosolic calcium, and killed 50% to 60% of the cell population after 6 to 8 hours. To test whether disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential was sufficient to cause irreversible injury, P388D1 cells were exposed to either the proton ionophore, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) or to the mitochondrial inhibitor, antimycin A. Over 90% of the treated cells showed depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane as indicated by the fluorescent probe rhodamine 123. Carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylbydrazone also caused an elevation in free cytosolic calcium as monitored by fura-2. However, even after 6 hours of exposure to these proton ionophores or mitochondrial inhibitors, P388D1 cells did not show increased chlorotetracycline (CTC)-induced fluorescence or loss of viability. P388D1 cells exposed to silica have been shown previously to lose 80% of their adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content. The effect of reduced ATP levels on intracellular calcium homeostasis and viability was assessed by exposing P338D1 cells to FCCP in the presence of sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose, which reduced ATP content by more than 90%. Under these conditions, none of the cells were killed, and only 5.5% showed increased CTC-induced fluorescence after 6 hours. These data indicate that disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, even

  1. Sympathetic and Catecholaminergic Alterations in Sleep Apnea with Particular Emphasis on Children

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fahed; Gozal, David; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is involved in the regulation of major organ functions in the human body, and disruption of sleep potentially can elicit organ dysfunction. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most prevalent sleep disorder of breathing in adults and children, and its manifestations reflect the interactions between intermittent hypoxia, intermittent hypercapnia, increased intra-thoracic pressure swings, and sleep fragmentation, as elicited by the episodic changes in upper airway resistance during sleep. The sympathetic nervous system is an important modulator of the cardiovascular, immune, endocrine and metabolic systems, and alterations in autonomic activity may lead to metabolic imbalance and organ dysfunction. Here we review how OSA and its constitutive components can lead to perturbation of the autonomic nervous system in general, and to altered regulation of catecholamines, both of which then playing an important role in some of the mechanisms underlying OSA-induced morbidities. PMID:22319509

  2. Altered potassium homeostasis in cirrhosis of the liver and Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, O.; Bossaller, C.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of patients (pts) with cirrhosis of the liver (Ci) and Crohn's disease (CD) frequently noticed arrhythmias of the heart, weakness and adynamic ileus suggest alterations in the potassium (K) homeostasis. It is the purpose of the study to assess the role of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ pump mechanism in intracellular and extracellular K homeostasis. Relative total body potassium (TBK), serum potassium (K-S), and the number of red blood cell ouabain binding sites (n-ATPase) was studied in 21 pts with Ci, 31 pts with CD and in 31 controls (C), all were not on digitalis. TBK was measured by equilibrium binding of H-3-ouabain. A significant reduction in TBK was accompanied by normal serum potassium levels, whereas the number of Na-K pumps is increased. The results support the suggestion that changes in TBK may regulate the synthesis of Na-K pump molecules. Secondary hyperaldosteronism and diarrhea e.g. may be responsible for chronic potassium depletion. The need for a nutritional support is discussed.

  3. Neuronal redox imbalance results in altered energy homeostasis and early postnatal lethality.

    PubMed

    Maity-Kumar, Gandhari; Thal, Dietmar R; Baumann, Bernd; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Wirth, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Redox imbalance is believed to contribute to the development and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders. Our aim was to develop an animal model that exhibits neuron-specific oxidative stress in the CNS to study the consequences and eventually find clues regarding the pathomechanisms of oxidative insults in neuronal homeostasis. We therefore generated a novel neuron-specific superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)-deficient mouse by deleting exon 3 of the SOD2 gene using CamKIIα promoter-driven Cre expression. These neuron-specific SOD2 knockout (SOD2(nko)) mice, although born at normal frequencies, died at the age of 4 weeks with critical growth retardation, severe energy failure, and several neurologic phenotypes. In addition, SOD2(nko) mice exhibited severe neuronal alterations such as reactive astrogliosis, neuronal cell cycle inhibition, and induction of apoptosis. JNK activation and stabilization of p53, as a result of reactive oxygen species accumulation, are most likely the inducers of neuronal apoptosis in SOD2(nko) mice. It is remarkable that hypothalamic regulation of glucose metabolism was affected, which in turn induced necrotic brain lesions in SOD2(nko) mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that exclusive deficiency of SOD2 in neurons results in an impaired central regulation of energy homeostasis that leads to persistent hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia-related neuropathology, and an early lethality of the mutant mice. © FASEB.

  4. Sleep and mealtime misalignment alters functional connectivity: A pilot resting state study

    PubMed Central

    Yoncheva, Yuliya N.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Pizinger, Theresa; Kovtun, Kyle; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Delayed sleep and meal times promote metabolic dysregulation and obesity. Altered coordination of sleeping and eating times may impact food reward valuation and interoception in the brain, yet the independent and collective contributions of sleep and meal times are unknown. This randomized, inpatient crossover study experimentally manipulates sleep and meal times while preserving sleep duration (7.05±0.44h for 5 nights). Resting-state functional MRI scans (2×5-minute runs) were obtained for 4 participants (3 males; 25.3±4.6 y), each completing all study phases (normal sleep/normal meal; late sleep/normal meal; normal sleep/late meal; late sleep/late meal). Normal mealtimes were 1, 5, 11, and 12.5h after awakening; late mealtimes were 4.5, 8.5, 14.5 and 16h after awakening. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) was computed for a priori regions-of-interest (seeds) and contrasted across conditions. Statistically significant (p<0.05, whole-brain corrected) regionally-specific effects were found for multiple seeds. The strongest effects were linked to the amygdala: increased RSFC for late versus normal mealtimes (equivalent to skipping breakfast). A main effect of sleep and interaction with mealtime were also observed. Preliminary findings support the feasibility of examining the effects of sleep and meal time misalignment, independent of sleep duration, on RSFC in regions relevant to food reward and interoception. PMID:27478925

  5. Age, drugs, or disease: what alters the macrostructure of sleep in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Trautmann, Ellen; Mollenhauer, Brit; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2012-10-01

    To describe the alterations in the macrostructure of sleep in a large cohort of sleep-disturbed patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and investigate influencing factors. A cohort of sleep-disturbed but otherwise unselected PD patients (n=351) was investigated with video-supported polysomnography. We analyzed the influence of age, disease duration, disease severity, and dopaminergic medication on subjective sleep perception, sleep efficiency, the amount of slow wave sleep, awakenings, periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Sleep efficiency and slow wave sleep decreased with age (p=0.003 and p=0.041, respectively). The number of awakenings and the frequency of RBD increased with age (p=0.028 and p=0.006, respectively). Higher Hoehn & Yahr stages were associated with more PLMS (p=0.017). A higher daily dose of levodopa corresponded to more RBD (p<0.001). Neither disease duration nor levodopa dosage had any influence on sleep efficiency, slow wave sleep, awakenings, or PLMS. Dopamine agonists increased awakenings (p<0.001) and lowered PLMS (p<0.001). Subjective sleep perception was not influenced by any of the factors analyzed. The only path model that could be replicated identified disease severity and dopamine agonists as interdependent factors influencing awakenings and PLMS. Age leads to less sleep and a higher risk for RBD, and disease severity increases motor phenomena such as PLMS; dopamine agonists reduce PLMS but increase awakenings. No single factor analyzed influenced subjective sleep perception in this cohort of sleep disturbed PD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered Sleep and Affect in the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Karrie; Winrow, Christopher J.; Gotter, Anthony L.; Millstein, Joshua; Arbuzova, Janna; Brunner, Joseph; Kasarskis, Andrew; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Renger, John J.; Turek, Fred W.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep and mood disorders have long been understood to have strong genetic components, and there is considerable comorbidity of sleep abnormalities and mood disorders, suggesting the involvement of common genetic pathways. Here, we examine a candidate gene implicated in the regulation of both sleep and affective behavior using a knockout mouse model. Design: Previously, we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for REM sleep amount, REM sleep bout number, and wake amount in a genetically segregating population of mice. Here, we show that traits mapping to this QTL correlated with an expression QTL for neurotensin receptor 1 (Ntsr1), a receptor for neurotensin, a ligand known to be involved in several psychiatric disorders. We examined sleep as well as behaviors indicative of anxiety and depression in the NTSR1 knockout mouse. Measurements and Results: NTSR1 knockouts had a lower percentage of sleep time spent in REM sleep in the dark phase and a larger diurnal variation in REM sleep duration than wild types under baseline conditions. Following sleep deprivation, NTSR1 knockouts exhibited more wake and less NREM rebound sleep. NTSR1 knockouts also showed increased anxious and despair behaviors. Conclusions: Here we illustrate a link between expression of the Ntsr1 gene and sleep traits previously associated with a particular QTL. We also demonstrate a relationship between Ntsr1 and anxiety and despair behaviors. Given the considerable evidence that anxiety and depression are closely linked with abnormalities in sleep, the data presented here provide further evidence that neurotensin and Ntsr1 may be a component of a pathway involved in both sleep and mood disorders. Citation: Fitzpatrick K; Winrow CJ; Gotter AL; Millstein J; Arbuzova J; Brunner J; Kasarskis A; Vitaterna MH; Renger JJ; Turek FW. Altered sleep and affect in the neurotensin receptor 1 knockout mouse. SLEEP 2012;35(7):949-956. PMID:22754041

  7. Prefrontal cortex shotgun proteome analysis reveals altered calcium homeostasis and immune system imbalance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Gattaz, Wagner F; Schmitt, Andrea; Rewerts, Christiane; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Turck, Christoph W

    2009-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease, likely to be caused by a combination of serial alterations in a number of genes and environmental factors. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's Area 46) is involved in schizophrenia and executes high-level functions such as working memory, differentiation of conflicting thoughts, determination of right and wrong concepts and attitudes, correct social behavior and personality expression. Global proteomic analysis of post-mortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from schizophrenia patients and non-schizophrenic individuals was performed using stable isotope labeling and shotgun proteomics. The analysis resulted in the identification of 1,261 proteins, 84 of which showed statistically significant differential expression, reinforcing previous data supporting the involvement of the immune system, calcium homeostasis, cytoskeleton assembly, and energy metabolism in schizophrenia. In addition a number of new potential markers were found that may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease.

  8. Altered brain iron homeostasis and dopaminergic function in Restless Legs Syndrome (Willis-Ekbom Disease).

    PubMed

    Earley, Christopher J; Connor, James; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Jenner, Peter; Winkelman, John; Zee, Phyllis C; Allen, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom Disease (WED), is a sensorimotor disorder for which the exact pathophysiology remains unclear. Brain iron insufficiency and altered dopaminergic function appear to play important roles in the etiology of the disorder. This concept is based partly on extensive research studies using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), autopsy material, and brain imaging indicating reduced regional brain iron and on the clinical efficacy of dopamine receptor agonists for alleviating RLS symptoms. Finding causal relations, linking low brain iron to altered dopaminergic function in RLS, has required however the use of animal models. These models have provided insights into how alterations in brain iron homeostasis and dopaminergic system may be involved in RLS. The results of animal models of RLS and biochemical, postmortem, and imaging studies in patients with the disease suggest that disruptions in brain iron trafficking lead to disturbances in striatal dopamine neurotransmission for at least some patients with RLS. This review examines the data supporting an iron deficiency-dopamine metabolic theory of RLS by relating the results from animal model investigations of the influence of brain iron deficiency on dopaminergic systems to data from clinical studies in patients with RLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alterations in calcium homeostasis and bone during actual and simulated space flight.

    PubMed

    Wronski, T J; Morey, E R

    1983-01-01

    The weightlessness experienced in space produces alterations in calcium homeostasis. Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab astronauts exhibited a negative calcium balance due primarily to hypercalciuria. In addition, the bone mineral density of the calcaneus declined by approximately 4% in Skylab crew members after 84 d of orbital flight. The negative calcium balance and loss of calcaneal bone mineral in normal adults subjected to prolonged bed rest was comparable to that observed in space. The pathogenesis of bone loss during space flight and bed rest is not well understood due to the lack of histomorphometric data. It is also uncertain whether osteoporotic changes in astronauts are corrected postflight. The observed bone loss would be reversible and of no long-term consequence if the only abnormality was an increased remodeling rate. However, altered bone cell activity would probably result in irreversible bone loss with the premature development of senile osteoporosis many years after space flight. The main skeletal defect in growing rats placed in orbit aboard Soviet Cosmos biosatellites appears to be diminished bone formation. Bone resorption was not elevated during weightlessness. Although cortical bone returned to normal postflight, the decline in trabecular bone mass was somewhat persistent. These studies established that the modeling of a growing skeleton was altered in a weightless environment, but do not necessarily imply that a remodeling imbalance occurs in adults during space flight. However, various forms of simulated space flight inhibited bone formation during both skeletal modeling and the remodeling of adult bone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Neuromedin U(2) receptor signaling mediates alteration of sleep-wake architecture in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2011-04-01

    Growing evidence indicates that neuromedin U (NmU) neuropeptide system plays an integral role in mediating the stress response through the corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) pathways. Stress is often associated with alteration in sleep-wake architecture both in human and laboratory animals. Here, we investigated whether activation of the NmU₂ receptor, a major high affinity receptor for NmU predominantly expressed in the brain, affects sleep behavior in rats. Effects of single (acute) intracebroventricular (icv) infusion of 2.5 nmol of the full agonists porcine NmU8 and rat NmU23 were assessed on sleep-wake architecture in freely moving rats, which were chronically implanted with EEG and EMG electrodes. In addition, repeated once daily administration of NmU8 at 2.5 nmol during 8 consecutive days (sub-chronic) was studied. Acute icv infusion of NmU23 elicited a robust alteration in sleep-wake architecture, namely enhanced wakefulness and suppressed sleep during the first 4h after administration. Acute infusion NmU8 had no effect on spontaneous sleep-wake architecture. However, sub-chronic icv infusion of NmU8 increased the amount of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and intermediate stage (IS), while decreased light sleep. Additionally, NmU8 increased transitions from sleep states towards wakefulness suggesting a disruption in sleep continuity. The present results show that central-activation of NmU₂ receptor markedly reduced sleep duration and disrupted the mechanisms underlying NREM-REM sleep transitions. Given that sleep-wakefulness cycle is strongly influenced by stress and the role of NmU/NmU₂ receptor signaling in stress response, the disruption in sleep pattern associated with peptides species may support at least some signs of stress.

  11. Sleep Architecture and NREM Alterations in Children and Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Oliviero; Ferri, Raffaele; Vittori, Elena; Novelli, Luana; Vignati, Manuela; Porfirio, Maria C.; Aricò, Debora; Bernabei, Paola; Curatolo, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To analyze sleep in children with Asperger syndrome (AS) by means of standard sleep questionnaires, to evaluate sleep architecture and NREM sleep alterations by means of cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) and to correlate objective sleep parameters with cognitive behavioral measures. Design: Cross-sectional study involving validated sleep questionnaires, neuropsychological scales, and PSG recording. Setting: Sleep medicine center. Participants: Eight children with AS, 10 children with autism, and 12 healthy control children. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Children with AS had a higher prevalence of problems of initiating sleep and daytime sleepiness. Sleep architecture parameters showed minor differences between the 3 groups. CAP parameters showed an increased percentage of A1 and a decreased percentage of A2 subtypes in subjects with AS vs. controls. All A subtype indexes (number per hour of NREM sleep) were decreased, mostly in sleep stage 2 but not in SWS. With respect to children with autism, subjects with AS showed increased CAP rate in SWS and A1 percentage. In subjects with AS, verbal IQ had a significant positive correlation with total CAP rate and CAP rate in SWS and with global and SWS A1 index. The percentage of A2 negatively correlated with full scale IQ, verbal and performance IQ. CBCL total score correlated positively with CAP rate and A1 index while externalizing score correlated negatively with A3%. Conclusions: This study shows peculiar CAP modifications in children with AS and represents an attempt to correlate the quantification of sleep EEG oscillations with the degree of mental ability/disability. Citation: Bruni O; Ferri R; Vittori E; Novelli L; Vignati M; Porfirio MC; Aricò D; Bernabei P; Curatolo P. Sleep architecture and NREM alterations in children and adolescents with asperger syndrome. SLEEP 2007;30(11):1577-1585. PMID:18041490

  12. Sleep Homeostasis and General Anesthesia: Are Fruit Flies Well Rested after Emergence from Propofol?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benjamin; Strus, Ewa; Meng, Qing Cheng; Coradetti, Thomas; Naidoo, Nirinjini N; Kelz, Max B; Williams, Julie A

    2016-02-01

    Shared neurophysiologic features between sleep and anesthetic-induced hypnosis indicate a potential overlap in neuronal circuitry underlying both states. Previous studies in rodents indicate that preexisting sleep debt discharges under propofol anesthesia. The authors explored the hypothesis that propofol anesthesia also dispels sleep pressure in the fruit fly. To the authors' knowledge, this constitutes the first time propofol has been tested in the genetically tractable model, Drosophila melanogaster. Daily sleep was measured in Drosophila by using a standard locomotor activity assay. Propofol was administered by transferring flies onto food containing various doses of propofol or equivalent concentrations of vehicle. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure the tissue concentrations of ingested propofol. To determine whether propofol anesthesia substitutes for natural sleep, the flies were subjected to 10-h sleep deprivation (SD), followed by 6-h propofol exposure, and monitored for subsequent sleep. Oral propofol treatment causes anesthesia in flies as indicated by a dose-dependent reduction in locomotor activity (n = 11 to 41 flies from each group) and increased arousal threshold (n = 79 to 137). Recovery sleep in flies fed propofol after SD was delayed until after flies had emerged from anesthesia (n = 30 to 48). SD was also associated with a significant increase in mortality in propofol-fed flies (n = 44 to 46). Together, these data indicate that fruit flies are effectively anesthetized by ingestion of propofol and suggest that homologous molecular and neuronal targets of propofol are conserved in Drosophila. However, behavioral measurements indicate that propofol anesthesia does not satisfy the homeostatic need for sleep and may compromise the restorative properties of sleep.

  13. Sleep Homeostasis and General Anesthesia: Are Fruit Flies Well-Rested After Emergence From Propofol?

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Benjamin; Strus, Ewa; Meng, Qing Cheng; Coradetti, Thomas; Naidoo, Nirinjini N.; Kelz, Max B.; Williams, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shared neurophysiologic features between sleep and anesthetic-induced hypnosis indicate a potential overlap in neuronal circuitry underlying both states. Previous studies in rodents indicate that pre-existing sleep debt discharges under propofol anesthesia. We explored the hypothesis that propofol anesthesia also dispels sleep pressure in the fruit fly. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first time propofol has been tested in the genetically tractable model, Drosophila melanogaster. Methods Daily sleep was measured in Drosophila using a standard locomotor activity assay. Propofol was administered by transferring flies onto food containing various doses of propofol or equivalent concentrations of vehicle. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used to measure tissue concentrations of ingested propofol. To determine if propofol anesthesia substitutes for natural sleep, we subjected flies to 10 hours (h) sleep deprivation (SD), followed by 6h propofol exposure, and monitored subsequent sleep. Results Oral propofol treatment causes anesthesia in flies as indicated by a dose-dependent reduction in locomotor activity (n=11–41 flies from each group) and increased arousal threshold (n=79–137). Recovery sleep in flies fed propofol after SD was delayed until after flies had emerged from anesthesia (n=30–48). SD was also associated with a significant increase in mortality in propofol-fed flies (n=44–46). Conclusions Together, these data indicate that fruit flies are effectively anesthetized by ingestion of propofol, and suggest that homologous molecular and neuronal targets of propofol are conserved in Drosophila. However, behavioral measurements indicate that propofol anesthesia does not satisfy the homeostatic need for sleep, and may compromise the restorative properties of sleep. PMID:26556728

  14. Alterations in the homeostasis of phospholipids and cholesterol by antitumor alkylphospholipids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    receptor-mediated uptake of cholesterol. Thus, membrane-targeted alkylphospholipids exhibit a common mechanism of action through disruption of cholesterol homeostasis. The accumulation of cholesterol within the cell and the reduction in phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin biosyntheses certainly alter the ratio of choline-bearing phospholipids to cholesterol, which is critical for the integrity and functionality of specific membrane microdomains such as lipid rafts. Alkylphospholipid-induced alterations in lipid homeostasis with probable disturbance of the native membrane structure could well affect signaling processes vital to cell survival and growth. PMID:20338039

  15. Altered lipid homeostasis in Drosophila InsP3 receptor mutants leads to obesity and hyperphagia

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manivannan; Metya, Suman Kumar; Sadaf, Sufia; Kumar, Satish; Schwudke, Dominik; Hasan, Gaiti

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder that often manifests with a strong genetic component in humans. However, the genetic basis for obesity and the accompanying metabolic syndrome is poorly defined. At a metabolic level, obesity arises from an imbalance between the nutritional intake and energy utilization of an organism. Mechanisms that sense the metabolic state of the individual and convey this information to satiety centers help achieve this balance. Mutations in genes that alter or modify such signaling mechanisms are likely to lead to either obese individuals, who in mammals are at high risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or excessively thin individuals with accompanying health problems. Here we show that Drosophila mutants for an intracellular calcium signaling channel, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) store excess triglycerides in their fat bodies and become unnaturally obese on a normal diet. Although excess insulin signaling can rescue obesity in InsP3R mutants to some extent, we show that it is not the only cause of the defect. Through mass spectrometric analysis of lipids we find that homeostasis of storage and membrane lipids are altered in InsP3R mutants. Possibly as a compensatory mechanism, InsP3R mutant adults also feed excessively. Thus, reduced InsP3R function alters lipid metabolism and causes hyperphagia in adults. Together, the metabolic and behavioral changes lead to obesity. Our results implicate altered InsP3 signaling as a previously unknown causative factor for metabolic syndrome in humans. Importantly, our studies also suggest preventive dietary interventions. PMID:23471909

  16. Altered lipid homeostasis in Drosophila InsP3 receptor mutants leads to obesity and hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Manivannan; Metya, Suman Kumar; Sadaf, Sufia; Kumar, Satish; Schwudke, Dominik; Hasan, Gaiti

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder that often manifests with a strong genetic component in humans. However, the genetic basis for obesity and the accompanying metabolic syndrome is poorly defined. At a metabolic level, obesity arises from an imbalance between the nutritional intake and energy utilization of an organism. Mechanisms that sense the metabolic state of the individual and convey this information to satiety centers help achieve this balance. Mutations in genes that alter or modify such signaling mechanisms are likely to lead to either obese individuals, who in mammals are at high risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or excessively thin individuals with accompanying health problems. Here we show that Drosophila mutants for an intracellular calcium signaling channel, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) store excess triglycerides in their fat bodies and become unnaturally obese on a normal diet. Although excess insulin signaling can rescue obesity in InsP3R mutants to some extent, we show that it is not the only cause of the defect. Through mass spectrometric analysis of lipids we find that homeostasis of storage and membrane lipids are altered in InsP3R mutants. Possibly as a compensatory mechanism, InsP3R mutant adults also feed excessively. Thus, reduced InsP3R function alters lipid metabolism and causes hyperphagia in adults. Together, the metabolic and behavioral changes lead to obesity. Our results implicate altered InsP3 signaling as a previously unknown causative factor for metabolic syndrome in humans. Importantly, our studies also suggest preventive dietary interventions.

  17. ALTERATIONS OF FE HOMEOSTASIS IN RAT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MODELS AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO CARDIOPULMONARY TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Fe homeostasis can be disrupted in human cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We addressed how dysregulation of Fe homeostasis affected the pulmonary inflammation/oxidative stress response and disease progression after exposure to Libby amphibole (LA), an asbestifonn mine...

  18. ALTERATIONS OF FE HOMEOSTASIS IN RAT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE MODELS AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO CARDIOPULMONARY TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Fe homeostasis can be disrupted in human cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We addressed how dysregulation of Fe homeostasis affected the pulmonary inflammation/oxidative stress response and disease progression after exposure to Libby amphibole (LA), an asbestifonn mine...

  19. Early and later life stress alter brain activity and sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Mrdalj, Jelena; Pallesen, Ståle; Milde, Anne Marita; Jellestad, Finn Konow; Murison, Robert; Ursin, Reidun; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Grønli, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to early life stress may profoundly influence the developing brain in lasting ways. Neuropsychiatric disorders associated with early life adversity may involve neural changes reflected in EEG power as a measure of brain activity and disturbed sleep. The main aim of the present study was for the first time to characterize possible changes in adult EEG power after postnatal maternal separation in rats. Furthermore, in the same animals, we investigated how EEG power and sleep architecture were affected after exposure to a chronic mild stress protocol. During postnatal day 2-14 male rats were exposed to either long maternal separation (180 min) or brief maternal separation (10 min). Long maternally separated offspring showed a sleep-wake nonspecific reduction in adult EEG power at the frontal EEG derivation compared to the brief maternally separated group. The quality of slow wave sleep differed as the long maternally separated group showed lower delta power in the frontal-frontal EEG and a slower reduction of the sleep pressure. Exposure to chronic mild stress led to a lower EEG power in both groups. Chronic exposure to mild stressors affected sleep differently in the two groups of maternal separation. Long maternally separated offspring showed more total sleep time, more episodes of rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentage of non-rapid eye movement episodes ending in rapid eye movement sleep compared to brief maternal separation. Chronic stress affected similarly other sleep parameters and flattened the sleep homeostasis curves in all offspring. The results confirm that early environmental conditions modulate the brain functioning in a long-lasting way.

  20. Deletion of the major peroxiredoxin Tsa1 alters telomere length homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian; Vallabhaneni, Haritha; Yin, Jinhu; Liu, Yie

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are proposed to play a major role in telomere length alterations during aging. The mechanisms by which ROS disrupt telomeres remain unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, telomere DNA consists of TG(1-3) repeats, which are maintained primarily by telomerase. Telomere length maintenance can be modulated by the expression level of telomerase subunits and telomerase activity. Additionally, telomerase-mediated telomere repeat addition is negatively modulated by the levels of telomere-bound Rap1-Rif1-Rif2 protein complex. Using a yeast strain defective in the major peroxiredoxin Tsa1 that is involved in ROS neutralization, we have investigated the effect of defective ROS detoxification on telomere DNA, telomerase, telomere binding proteins, and telomere length. Surprisingly, the tsa1 mutant does not show significant increase in steady-state levels of oxidative DNA lesions at telomeres. The tsa1 mutant displays abnormal telomere lengthening, and reduction in oxidative exposure alleviates this phenotype. The telomere lengthening in the tsa1 cells was abolished by disruption of Est2, subtelomeric DNA, Rap1 C-terminus, or Rif2, but not by Rif1 deletion. Although telomerase expression and activity are not altered, telomere-bound Est2 is increased, while telomere-bound Rap1 is reduced in the tsa1 mutant. We propose that defective ROS scavenging can interfere with pathways that are critical in controlling telomere length homeostasis. PMID:23590194

  1. High glucose alters tendon homeostasis through downregulation of the AMPK/Egr1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Fu; Wang, Hsing-Kuo; Chang, Hong-Wei; Sun, Jingyu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chao, Yuan-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with higher risk of tendinopathy, which reduces tolerance to exercise and functional activities and affects lifestyle and glycemic control. Expression of tendon-related genes and matrix metabolism in tenocytes are essential for maintaining physiological functions of tendon. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in diabetic tendinopathy remain unclear. We hypothesized that high glucose (HG) alters the characteristics of tenocyte. Using in vitro 2-week culture of tenocytes, we found that expression of tendon-related genes, including Egr1, Mkx, TGF-β1, Col1a2, and Bgn, was significantly decreased in HG culture and that higher glucose consumption occurred. Down-regulation of Egr1 by siRNA decreased Scx, Mkx, TGF-β1, Col1a1, Col1a2, and Bgn expression. Blocking AMPK activation with Compound C reduced the expression of Egr1, Scx, TGF-β1, Col1a1, Col1a2, and Bgn in the low glucose condition. In addition, histological examination of tendons from diabetic mice displayed larger interfibrillar space and uneven glycoprotein deposition. Thus, we concluded that high glucose alters tendon homeostasis through downregulation of the AMPK/Egr1 pathway and the expression of downstream tendon-related genes in tenocytes. The findings render a molecular basis of the mechanism of diabetic tendinopathy and may help develop preventive and therapeutic strategies for the pathology. PMID:28266660

  2. Obesity alters the ovarian glucidic homeostasis disrupting the reproductive outcome of female rats.

    PubMed

    Bazzano, María Victoria; Paz, Dante Agustín; Elia, Evelin Mariel

    2017-04-01

    Obesity constitutes a health problem of increasing worldwide prevalence related to many reproductive problems such as infertility, ovulation dysfunction, preterm delivery, fetal growth disorders, etc. The mechanisms linking obesity to these pathologies are not fully understood. Cafeteria diet (CAF) is the animal model used for the study of obesity that more closely reflects western diet habits. Previously we described that CAF induces obesity associated to hyperglycemia, reduced ovarian reserve, presence of follicular cysts and ovulatory impairments. The aim of the present study was to contribute in the understanding of the physiological mechanisms altered as consequence of obesity. For that purpose, female Wistar rats were fed ad libitum with a standard diet (control group) or CAF (Obese group). We found that CAF fed-rats developed obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Ovaries from obese rats showed decreased glucose uptake and became insulin resistant, showing decreased ovarian expression of glucotransporter type 4 and insulin receptor gene expression respect to controls. These animals showed an increased follicular nitric oxyde synthase expression that may be responsible for the ovulatory disruptions and for inflammation, a common feature in obesity. Obese rats resulted subfertile and their pups were macrosomic. We conclude that obesity alters the systemic and the ovarian glucidic homeostasis impairing the reproductive outcome. Since macrosomia is a risk factor for metabolic and obstetric disorders in adult life, we suggest that obesity is impacting not only on health and reproduction but it is also impacting on health and reproduction of the offspring.

  3. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Zadra, Antonio; Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Petit, Dominique; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD), during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation. Methods Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers. Results During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls. Conclusions Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness. PMID:26241047

  4. Molecular mechanisms of altered bile acid homeostasis in organic solute transporter-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Haywood, Jamie; Rao, Anuradha; Dawson, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2) block intestinal bile acid absorption, resulting in a compensatory increase in hepatic bile acid synthesis. Inactivation of the basolateral membrane bile acid transporter (OSTα-OSTβ) also impairs intestinal bile acid absorption, but hepatic bile acid synthesis was paradoxically repressed. We hypothesized that the altered bile acid homeostasis resulted from ileal trapping of bile acids that act via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) to induce overexpression of FGF15. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether blocking FXR signaling would reverse the bile acid synthesis phenotype in Ostα null mice. The corresponding null mice were crossbred to generate OstαFxr double-null mice. All experiments compared wild-type, Ostα, Fxr and OstαFxr null littermates. Analysis of the in vivo phenotype included measurements of bile acid fecal excretion, pool size and composition. Hepatic and intestinal gene and protein expression were also examined. OstαFxr null mice exhibited increased bile acid fecal excretion and pool size, and decreased bile acid pool hydrophobicity, as compared with Ostα null mice. Inactivation of FXR reversed the increase in ileal total FGF15 expression, which was associated with a significant increase in hepatic Cyp7a1 expression. Inactivation of FXR largely unmasked the bile acid malabsorption phenotype and corrected the bile acid homeostasis defect in Ostα null mice, suggesting that inappropriate activation of the FXR-FGF15-FGFR4 pathway partially underlies this phenotype. Intestinal morphological changes and reduced apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expression were maintained in Ostα(-/-)Fxr(-/-) mice, indicating that FXR is not required for these adaptive responses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Alteration of iron homeostasis following chronic exposure to manganese in rats1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Qiuqu; Slavkovich, Vesna; Aschner, Michael; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that manganese-induced neurodegenerative toxicity may be partly due to its action on aconitase, which participates in cellular iron regulation and mitochondrial energy production. This study was performed to investigate whether chronic manganese exposure in rats influenced the homeostasis of iron in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Groups of 8–10 rats received intraperitoneal injections of MnCl2 at the dose of 6 mg Mn/kg/day or equal volume of saline for 30 days. Concentrations of manganese and iron in plasma and CSF were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Rats exposed to manganese showed a greatly elevated manganese concentration in both plasma and CSF. The magnitude of increase in CSF manganese (11-fold) was equivalent to that of plasma (10-fold). Chronic manganese exposure resulted in a 32% decrease in plasma iron (p < 0.01) and no changes in plasma total iron binding capacity (TIBC). However, it increased CSF iron by 3-fold as compared to the controls (p < 0.01). Northern blot analyses of whole brain homogenates revealed a 34% increase in the expression of glutamine synthetase (p < 0.05) with unchanged metallothionein-I in manganese-intoxicated rats. When the cultured choroidal epithelial cells derived from rat choroid plexus were incubated with MnCl2 (100 µM) for four days, the expression of transferrin receptor mRNA appeared to exceed by 50% that of control (p < 0.002). The results indicate that chronic manganese exposure alters iron homeostasis possibly by expediting unidirectional influx of iron from the systemic circulation to cerebral compartment. The action appears likely to be mediated by manganese-facilitated iron transport at brain barrier systems. PMID:10375687

  6. Familial Alzheimer’s disease–associated presenilin-1 alters cerebellar activity and calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Hagel, Christian; Korwitz, Anne; Vinueza-Veloz, Maria Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Schonewille, Martijn; Zhou, Haibo; Velazquez-Perez, Luis; Rodriguez-Labrada, Roberto; Villegas, Andres; Ferrer, Isidro; Lopera, Francisco; Langer, Thomas; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) is characterized by autosomal dominant heritability and early disease onset. Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin-1 (PS1) are found in approximately 80% of cases of FAD, with some of these patients presenting cerebellar damage with amyloid plaques and ataxia with unclear pathophysiology. A Colombian kindred carrying the PS1-E280A mutation is the largest known cohort of PS1-FAD patients. Here, we investigated PS1-E280A–associated cerebellar dysfunction and found that it occurs early in PS1-E208A carriers, while cerebellar signs are highly prevalent in patients with dementia. Postmortem analysis of cerebella of PS1-E280A carrier revealed greater Purkinje cell (PC) loss and more abnormal mitochondria compared with controls. In PS1-E280A tissue, ER/mitochondria tethering was impaired, Ca2+ channels IP3Rs and CACNA1A were downregulated, and Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial transport proteins MIRO1 and KIF5C were reduced. Accordingly, expression of PS1-E280A in a neuronal cell line altered ER/mitochondria tethering and transport compared with that in cells expressing wild-type PS1. In a murine model of PS1-FAD, animals exhibited mild ataxia and reduced PC simple spike activity prior to cerebellar β-amyloid deposition. Our data suggest that impaired calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction in PS1-FAD PCs reduces their activity and contributes to motor coordination deficits prior to Aβ aggregation and dementia. We propose that PS1-E280A affects both Ca2+ homeostasis and Aβ precursor processing, leading to FAD and neurodegeneration. PMID:24569455

  7. Deficiency of the p53/p63 target Perp alters mammary gland homeostasis and promotes cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Perp is a transcriptional target of both p53 during DNA damage-induced apoptosis and p63 during stratified epithelial development. Perp-/- mice exhibit postnatal lethality associated with dramatic blistering of the epidermis and oral mucosa, reflecting a critical role in desmosome-mediated intercellular adhesion in keratinocytes. However, the role of Perp in tissue homeostasis in other p63-dependent stratified epithelial tissues is poorly understood. Given that p63 is essential for proper mammary gland development and that cell adhesion is fundamental for ensuring the proper architecture and function of the mammary epithelium, here we investigate Perp function in the mammary gland. Methods Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis were performed to characterize Perp expression and localization in the mouse mammary epithelium throughout development. The consequences of Perp deficiency for mammary epithelial development and homeostasis were examined by using in vivo mammary transplant assays. Perp protein levels in a variety of human breast cancer cell lines were compared with those in untransformed cells with Western blot analysis. The role of Perp in mouse mammary tumorigenesis was investigated by aging cohorts of K14-Cre/+;p53fl/fl mice that were wild-type or deficient for Perp. Mammary tumor latency was analyzed, and tumor-free survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results We show that Perp protein is expressed in the mammary epithelium, where it colocalizes with desmosomes. Interestingly, although altering desmosomes through genetic inactivation of Perp does not dramatically impair mammary gland ductal development, Perp loss affects mammary epithelial homeostasis by causing the accumulation of inflammatory cells around mature mammary epithelium. Moreover, we show reduced Perp expression in many human breast cancer cell lines compared with untransformed cells. Importantly, Perp deficiency also promotes the development of mouse mammary

  8. Deficiency of the p53/p63 target Perp alters mammary gland homeostasis and promotes cancer.

    PubMed

    Dusek, Rachel L; Bascom, Jamie L; Vogel, Hannes; Baron, Sylvain; Borowsky, Alexander D; Bissell, Mina J; Attardi, Laura D

    2012-04-20

    Perp is a transcriptional target of both p53 during DNA damage-induced apoptosis and p63 during stratified epithelial development. Perp-/- mice exhibit postnatal lethality associated with dramatic blistering of the epidermis and oral mucosa, reflecting a critical role in desmosome-mediated intercellular adhesion in keratinocytes. However, the role of Perp in tissue homeostasis in other p63-dependent stratified epithelial tissues is poorly understood. Given that p63 is essential for proper mammary gland development and that cell adhesion is fundamental for ensuring the proper architecture and function of the mammary epithelium, here we investigate Perp function in the mammary gland. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis were performed to characterize Perp expression and localization in the mouse mammary epithelium throughout development. The consequences of Perp deficiency for mammary epithelial development and homeostasis were examined by using in vivo mammary transplant assays. Perp protein levels in a variety of human breast cancer cell lines were compared with those in untransformed cells with Western blot analysis. The role of Perp in mouse mammary tumorigenesis was investigated by aging cohorts of K14-Cre/+;p53fl/fl mice that were wild-type or deficient for Perp. Mammary tumor latency was analyzed, and tumor-free survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. We show that Perp protein is expressed in the mammary epithelium, where it colocalizes with desmosomes. Interestingly, although altering desmosomes through genetic inactivation of Perp does not dramatically impair mammary gland ductal development, Perp loss affects mammary epithelial homeostasis by causing the accumulation of inflammatory cells around mature mammary epithelium. Moreover, we show reduced Perp expression in many human breast cancer cell lines compared with untransformed cells. Importantly, Perp deficiency also promotes the development of mouse mammary cancer. Together, these

  9. Sleep alterations in mammals: did aquatic conditions inhibit rapid eye movement sleep?

    PubMed

    Madan, Vibha; Jha, Sushil K

    2012-12-01

    Sleep has been studied widely in mammals and to some extent in other vertebrates. Higher vertebrates such as birds and mammals have evolved an inimitable rapid eye movement (REM) sleep state. During REM sleep, postural muscles become atonic and the temperature regulating machinery remains suspended. Although REM sleep is present in almost all the terrestrial mammals, the aquatic mammals have either radically reduced or completely eliminated REM sleep. Further, we found a significant negative correlation between REM sleep and the adaptation of the organism to live on land or in water. The amount of REM sleep is highest in terrestrial mammals, significantly reduced in semi-aquatic mammals and completely absent or negligible in aquatic mammals. The aquatic mammals are obligate swimmers and have to surface at regular intervals for air. Also, these animals live in thermally challenging environments, where the conductive heat loss is approximately ~90 times greater than air. Therefore, they have to be moving most of the time. As an adaptation, they have evolved unihemispheric sleep, during which they can rove as well as rest. A condition that immobilizes muscle activity and suspends the thermoregulatory machinery, as happens during REM sleep, is not suitable for these animals. It is possible that, in accord with Darwin's theory, aquatic mammals might have abolished REM sleep with time. In this review, we discuss the possibility of the intrinsic role of aquatic conditions in the elimination of REM sleep in the aquatic mammals.

  10. Neural alterations and depressive symptoms in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Cross, Rebecca L; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M; Doering, Lynn V; Alger, Jeffry R; Yan-Go, Frisca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2008-08-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, and brain injury occurs with both OSA and depression independently. The objective was to determine whether brain alterations in OSA bear relationships to depressive symptoms. Cross-sectional study. University-based medical center. 40 treatment-naive OSA subjects and 61 control subjects without diagnosed psychopathology. None. Whole-brain maps of T2 relaxation time, a measure sensitive to injury, were calculated from magnetic resonance images, transformed to common space, and smoothed. Control and OSA groups were classified by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II scores (> or =12 symptomatic, <10 asymptomatic for depressive symptoms). The OSA group separated into 13 symptomatic (mean +/- SD: BDI-II 21 +/- 8; age 47.6 +/- 11; apnea hypopnea index [AHI] 28.3 +/- 17), and 27 asymptomatic (4 +/- 3; 47.5 +/- 8; 31.5 +/- 16) subjects. The control group included 56 asymptomatic (BDI-II 2.5 +/- 2.6; age 47.3 +/- 9) subjects. Asymptomatic OSA subjects exhibited higher AHI. T2 maps were compared between groups (ANCOVA), with age and gender as covariates. Injury appeared in symptomatic vs asymptomatic OSA subjects in the mid- and anterior cingulate, anterior insular, medial pre-frontal, parietal, and left ventrolateral temporal cortices, left caudate nucleus, and internal capsule. Relative to asymptomatic controls, symptomatic OSA patients showed damage in the bilateral hippocampus and caudate nuclei, anterior corpus callosum, right anterior thalamus, and medial pons. Neural injury differed between OSA patients with and without depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms may exacerbate injury accompanying OSA, or introduce additional damage in affective, cognitive, respiratory, and autonomic control regions.

  11. Energy Stores Are Not Altered by Long-Term Partial Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Susan T.; Sehgal, Amita

    2009-01-01

    Recent human studies reveal a widespread association between short sleep and obesity. Two hypotheses, which are not mutually exclusive, might explain this association. First, genetic factors that reduce endogenous sleep times might also impact energy stores, an assertion that we confirmed in a previous study. Second, metabolism may be altered by chronic partial sleep deprivation. Here we address the second assertion by measuring the impact of long-term partial sleep deprivation on energy stores using Drosophila as a model. We subjected flies to long-term partial sleep deprivation via two different methods: a mechanical stimulus and a light stimulus. We then measured whole-body triglycerides and glycogen, two important sources of energy for the fly, and compared them to un-stimulated controls. We also measured changes in energy stores in response to a random circadian clock shift. Sex and line-dependent alterations in glycogen and/or triglyceride levels occurred in response to the circadian clock shift and in flies subjected to a single night of sleep deprivation using light. Thus, consistent with previous studies, our findings suggest that acute sleep loss and changes to the circadian clock can alter metabolism. Significant changes in energy stores were also observed when flies were subjected to chronic sleep loss via the mechanical stimulus, although not the light stimulus. Interestingly, mechanical stimulation resulted in the same change in energy stores even when it was not associated with sleep deprivation, suggesting that the changes are caused by stress rather than sleep loss. These findings emphasize the importance of taking stress into account when evaluating the relationship between sleep loss and metabolism. PMID:19593430

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with altered midbrain chemical concentrations.

    PubMed

    Macey, Paul M; Sarma, Manoj K; Prasad, Janani P; Ogren, Jennifer A; Aysola, Ravi; Harper, Ronald M; Thomas, M Albert

    2017-09-08

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by altered structure and function in cortical, limbic, brainstem, and cerebellar regions. The midbrain is relatively unexamined, but contains many integrative nuclei which mediate physiological functions that are disrupted in OSA. We therefore assessed the chemistry of the midbrain in OSA in this exploratory study. We used a recently developed accelerated 2D magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D-MRS) technique, compressed sensing-based 4D echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging (4D-EP-JRESI), to measure metabolites in the midbrain of 14 OSA (mean age±SD:54.6±10.6years; AHI:35.0±19.4; SAO2 min:83±7%) and 26 healthy control (50.7±8.5years) subjects. High-resolution T1-weighted scans allowed voxel localization. MRS data were processed with custom MATLAB-based software, and metabolite ratios calculated with respect to the creatine peak using a prior knowledge fitting (ProFit) algorithm. The midbrain in OSA showed decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA; OSA:1.24±0.43, Control:1.47±0.41; p=0.03; independent samples t-test), a marker of neuronal viability. Increased levels in OSA over control subjects appeared in glutamate (Glu; OSA:1.23±0.57, Control:0.98±0.33; p=0.03), ascorbate (Asc; OSA:0.56±0.28, Control:0.42±0.20; (50.7±8.5years; p=0.03), and myo-inositol (mI; OSA:0.96±0.48, Control:0.72±0.35; p=0.03). No differences between groups appeared in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or taurine. The midbrain in OSA patients shows decreased NAA, indicating neuronal injury or dysfunction. Higher Glu levels may reflect excitotoxic processes and astrocyte activation, and higher mI is also consistent with glial activation. Higher Asc levels may result from oxidative stress induced by intermittent hypoxia in OSA. Additionally, Asc and Glu are involved with glutamatergic processes, which are likely upregulated in the midbrain nuclei of OSA patients. The altered metabolite levels help explain dysfunction and structural deficits in

  13. Sleep restriction alters plasma endocannabinoids concentrations before but not after exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Fanelli, Flaminia; Fazzini, Alessia; Pagotto, Uberto; Broman, Jan-Erik; Vogel, Heike; Dickson, Suzanne L; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Following binding to cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids regulate a variety of central nervous system processes including appetite and mood. Recent evidence suggests that the systemic release of these lipid metabolites can be altered by acute exercise and that their levels also vary across the 24-h sleep-wake cycle. The present study utilized a within-subject design (involving 16 normal-weight men) to determine whether daytime circulating endocannabinoid concentrations differ following three nights of partial sleep deprivation (4.25-h sleep opportunity, 2:45-7a.m. each night) vs. normal sleep (8.5-h sleep opportunity, 10:30p.m.-7a.m. each night), before and after an acute bout of ergometer cycling in the morning. In addition, subjective hunger and stress were measured. Pre-exercise plasma concentrations of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG) were 80% higher 1.5h after awakening (vs. normal sleep, p<0.05) when participants were sleep-deprived. This coincided with increased hunger ratings (+25% vs. normal sleep, p<0.05). Moreover, plasma 2AG was elevated 15min post-exercise (+44%, p<0.05). Sleep duration did not however modulate this exercise-induced rise. Finally, subjective stress was generally lower on the day after three nights of short sleep vs. normal sleep, especially after exercise (p<0.05). Given that activation of the endocannabinoid system has been previously shown to acutely increase appetite and mood, our results could suggest that behavioral effects of acute sleep loss, such as increased hunger and transiently improved psychological state, may partially result from activation of this signaling pathway. In contrast, more pronounced exercise-induced elevations of endocannabinoids appear to be less affected by short sleep duration. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Resistance training does not alter same-day sleep architecture in institutionalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Jeffrey E; Puri, Shipra; Richards, Kathy C

    2017-08-10

    Sleep disturbance is a common symptom in institutionalized older adults that reduces their quality of life and may contribute to progression of cognitive impairment. While we found that a 7-week combination of resistance training, walking and social activity significantly improved sleep in institutionalized older adults compared with a usual care control group, no one to our knowledge has determined the acute effects of resistance training on same-day sleep in this population. Given the effort required to promote exercise adherence in institutionalized older adults and to obtain a positive training effect, understanding of the acute effects of resistance training on same-day sleep architecture should be elucidated, especially with respect to unintended consequences. This secondary data analysis assessed if resistance training altered the same-day sleep architecture in institutionalized older adults. Forty-three participants (age 81.5 ± 8.1 years, male = 17, female = 26) had two attended overnight polysomnography tests in their rooms for sleep architecture analysis; one polysomnography with same-day resistance training, one without any resistance training. Resistance training consisted of chest and leg press exercises (three sets, eight repetitions, 80% predicted one-repetition maximum). There were no significant changes in sleep architecture between either polysomnography nights; sleep efficiency (P = 0.71), time in non-rapid eye movement stages (P = 0.50), time in rapid eye movement stages (P = 0.14), time awake (P = 0.56), time until sleep onset (P = 0.47), total sleep stage shifts (P = 0.65) or rapid eye movement sleep stage latency (P = 0.57). Our results show no acute same-day effects of resistance training on sleep architecture in institutionalized older adults. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00888706. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  15. Increased Automaticity and Altered Temporal Preparation Following Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Danyang; Asplund, Christopher L; Ling, Aiqing; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-08-01

    Temporal expectation enables us to focus limited processing resources, thereby optimizing perceptual and motor processing for critical upcoming events. We investigated the effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) on temporal expectation by evaluating the foreperiod and sequential effects during a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). We also examined how these two measures were modulated by vulnerability to TSD. Three 10-min visual PVT sessions using uniformly distributed foreperiods were conducted in the wake-maintenance zone the evening before sleep deprivation (ESD) and three more in the morning following approximately 22 h of TSD. TSD vulnerable and nonvulnerable groups were determined by a tertile split of participants based on the change in the number of behavioral lapses recorded during ESD and TSD. A subset of participants performed six additional 10-min modified auditory PVTs with exponentially distributed foreperiods during rested wakefulness (RW) and TSD to test the effect of temporal distribution on foreperiod and sequential effects. Sleep laboratory. There were 172 young healthy participants (90 males) with regular sleep patterns. Nineteen of these participants performed the modified auditory PVT. Despite behavioral lapses and slower response times, sleep deprived participants could still perceive the conditional probability of temporal events and modify their level of preparation accordingly. Both foreperiod and sequential effects were magnified following sleep deprivation in vulnerable individuals. Only the foreperiod effect increased in nonvulnerable individuals. The preservation of foreperiod and sequential effects suggests that implicit time perception and temporal preparedness are intact during total sleep deprivation. Individuals appear to reallocate their depleted preparatory resources to more probable event timings in ongoing trials, whereas vulnerable participants also rely more on automatic processes. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep

  16. Sleep architecture and homeostasis in mice with partial ablation of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Varin, Christophe; Arthaud, Sébastien; Salvert, Denise; Gay, Nadine; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Léger, Lucienne; Fort, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    Recent reports support a key role of tuberal hypothalamic neurons secreting melanin concentrating-hormone (MCH) in the promotion of Paradoxical Sleep (PS). Controversies remain concerning their concomitant involvement in Slow-Wave Sleep (SWS). We studied the effects of their selective loss achieved by an Ataxin 3-mediated ablation strategy to decipher the contribution of MCH neurons to SWS and/or PS. Polysomnographic recordings were performed on male adult transgenic mice expressing Ataxin-3 transgene within MCH neurons (MCH(Atax)) and their wild-type littermates (MCH(WT)) bred on two genetic backgrounds (FVB/N and C57BL/6). Compared to MCH(WT) mice, MCH(Atax) mice were characterized by a significant drop in MCH mRNAs (-70%), a partial loss of MCH-immunoreactive neurons (-30%) and a marked reduction in brain density of MCH-immunoreactive fibers. Under basal condition, such MCH(Atax) mice exhibited higher PS amounts during the light period and a pronounced SWS fragmentation without any modification of SWS quantities. Moreover, SWS and PS rebounds following 4-h total sleep deprivation were quantitatively similar in MCH(Atax)vs. MCH(WT) mice. Additionally, MCH(Atax) mice were unable to consolidate SWS and increase slow-wave activity (SWA) in response to this homeostatic challenge as observed in MCH(WT) littermates. Here, we show that the partial loss of MCH neurons is sufficient to disturb the fine-tuning of sleep. Our data provided new insights into their contribution to subtle process managing SWS quality and its efficiency rather than SWS quantities, as evidenced by the deleterious impact on two powerful markers of sleep depth, i.e., SWS consolidation/fragmentation and SWA intensity under basal condition and under high sleep pressure.

  17. Altered salience network connectivity predicts macronutrient intake after sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M.; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Senhua; Hu, Siyuan; Goel, Namni; Detre, John A.; Dinges, David F.; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    Although insufficient sleep is a well-recognized risk factor for overeating and weight gain, the neural mechanisms underlying increased caloric (particularly fat) intake after sleep deprivation remain unclear. Here we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and examined brain connectivity changes associated with macronutrient intake after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Compared to the day following baseline sleep, healthy adults consumed a greater percentage of calories from fat and a lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates during the day following TSD. Subjects also exhibited increased brain connectivity in the salience network from the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) to bilateral putamen and bilateral anterior insula (aINS) after TSD. Moreover, dACC-putamen and dACC-aINS connectivity correlated with increased fat and decreased carbohydrate intake during the day following TSD, but not during the day following baseline sleep. These findings provide a potential neural mechanism by which sleep loss leads to increased fat intake. PMID:25645575

  18. Altered salience network connectivity predicts macronutrient intake after sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Senhua; Hu, Siyuan; Goel, Namni; Detre, John A; Dinges, David F; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-02-03

    Although insufficient sleep is a well-recognized risk factor for overeating and weight gain, the neural mechanisms underlying increased caloric (particularly fat) intake after sleep deprivation remain unclear. Here we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and examined brain connectivity changes associated with macronutrient intake after one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Compared to the day following baseline sleep, healthy adults consumed a greater percentage of calories from fat and a lower percentage of calories from carbohydrates during the day following TSD. Subjects also exhibited increased brain connectivity in the salience network from the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) to bilateral putamen and bilateral anterior insula (aINS) after TSD. Moreover, dACC-putamen and dACC-aINS connectivity correlated with increased fat and decreased carbohydrate intake during the day following TSD, but not during the day following baseline sleep. These findings provide a potential neural mechanism by which sleep loss leads to increased fat intake.

  19. Sleep Physiology Alterations Precede Plethoric Phenotypic Changes in R6/1 Huntington's Disease Mice.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Fanny; Cayzac, Sebastien; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD), there exists a growing consideration that sleep and circadian dysregulations may be important symptoms. It is not known, however, whether sleep abnormalities contribute to other behavioral deficits in HD patients and mouse models. To determine the precise chronology for sleep physiology alterations and other sensory, motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms of HD, the same R6/1 HD transgenics and their wild-type littermates were recorded monthly for sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) together with a wide range of behavioral tests according to a longitudinal plan. We found an early and progressive deterioration of both sleep architecture and EEG brain rhythms in R6/1 mice, which are correlated timely with their spatial working memory impairments. Sleep fragmentation and memory impairments were accompanied by the loss of delta (1-4 Hz) power in the transgenic mice, the magnitude of which increased with age and disease progression. These precocious sleep and cognitive impairments were followed by deficits in social behavior, sensory and motor abilities. Our data confirm the existence and importance of sleep physiology alterations in the widely used R6/1 mouse line and highlight their precedence over other plethoric phenotypic changes. The brainwave abnormalities, may represent a novel biomarker and point to innovative therapeutic interventions against HD.

  20. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Aepli, Andrina; Kurth, Salome; Tesler, Noemi; Jenni, Oskar G.; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children’s and adolescents’ sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10–16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4) and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1), morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1–4.5 Hz) at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects). Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25–9.75 Hz). These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development. PMID:26501326

  1. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep.

    PubMed

    Aepli, Andrina; Kurth, Salome; Tesler, Noemi; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2015-10-15

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children's and adolescents' sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10-16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4) and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1), morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1-4.5 Hz) at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects). Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25-9.75 Hz). These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development.

  2. DWARF overexpression induces alteration in phytohormone homeostasis, development, architecture and carotenoid accumulation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Xie; Yin, Ling-Ling; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Xu, Chang-Jie; Chen, Kun-Song; Liu, Chao-Chao; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2016-03-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play a critical role in plant growth, development and stress response; however, genetic evidence for the BR-mediated integrated regulation of plant growth still remains elusive in crop species. Here, we clarified the function of DWARF (DWF), the key BR biosynthetic gene in tomato, in the regulation of plant growth and architecture, phytohormone homeostasis and fruit development by comparing wild type, d^(im), a weak allele mutant impaired in DWF, and DWF-overexpressing plants in tomato. Results showed that increases in DWF transcripts and endogenous BR level resulted in improved germination, lateral root development, CO2 assimilation and eventually plant growth as characterized by slender and compact plant architecture. However, an increase in DWF transcript down-regulated the accumulation of gibberellin, which was associated with decreases in leaf size and thickness. BRs positively regulated lateral bud outgrowth, which was associated with decreased transcript of Aux/IAA3, and the ethylene-dependent petiole bending and fruit ripening. Notably, overexpression of DWF did not significantly alter fruit yield per plant; however, increases by 57.4% and 95.3% might be estimated in fruit yield per square metre in two transgenic lines due to their compact architecture. Significantly, BR level was positively related with the carotenoid accumulation in the fruits. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BRs are actively involved in the regulation of multiple developmental processes relating to agronomical important traits.

  3. Altered Chondrocyte Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Homeostasis in a Zebrafish Model for Mucolipidosis II

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Sias, Christina; Steet, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a pediatric disorder caused by defects in the biosynthesis of mannose 6-phosphate, the carbohydrate recognition signal responsible for targeting certain acid hydrolases to lysosomes. The mechanisms underlying the developmental defects of ML-II are largely unknown due in part to the lack of suitable animal models. To overcome these limitations, we developed a model for ML-II in zebrafish by inhibiting the expression of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, the enzyme that initiates mannose 6-phosphate biosynthesis. Morphant embryos manifest craniofacial defects, impaired motility, and abnormal otolith and pectoral fin development. Decreased mannose phosphorylation of several lysosomal glycosidases was observed in morphant lysates, consistent with the reduction in phosphotransferase activity. Investigation of the craniofacial defects in the morphants uncovered striking changes in the timing and localization of both type II collagen and Sox9 expression, suggestive of an accelerated chondrocyte differentiation program. Accumulation of type II collagen was also noted within misshapen cartilage elements at later stages of development. Furthermore, we observed abnormal matrix formation and calcium deposition in morphant otoliths. Collectively, these data provide new insight into the developmental pathology of ML-II and suggest that altered production and/or homeostasis of extracellular matrix proteins are integral to the disease process. These findings highlight the potential of the zebrafish system in studying lysosomal disease pathogenesis. PMID:19834066

  4. Cohesin loss alters adult hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis, leading to myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Mullenders, Jasper; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lhoumaud, Priscillia; Keller, Matthew; Pae, Juhee; Wang, Kun; Kayembe, Clarisse; Rocha, Pedro P.; Raviram, Ramya; Gong, Yixiao; Premsrirut, Prem K.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Bonneau, Richard; Skok, Jane A.; Cimmino, Luisa; Hoehn, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The cohesin complex (consisting of Rad21, Smc1a, Smc3, and Stag2 proteins) is critically important for proper sister chromatid separation during mitosis. Mutations in the cohesin complex were recently identified in a variety of human malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To address the potential tumor-suppressive function of cohesin in vivo, we generated a series of shRNA mouse models in which endogenous cohesin can be silenced inducibly. Notably, silencing of cohesin complex members did not have a deleterious effect on cell viability. Furthermore, knockdown of cohesin led to gain of replating capacity of mouse hematopoietic progenitor cells. However, cohesin silencing in vivo rapidly altered stem cells homeostasis and myelopoiesis. Likewise, we found widespread changes in chromatin accessibility and expression of genes involved in myelomonocytic maturation and differentiation. Finally, aged cohesin knockdown mice developed a clinical picture closely resembling myeloproliferative disorders/neoplasms (MPNs), including varying degrees of extramedullary hematopoiesis (myeloid metaplasia) and splenomegaly. Our results represent the first successful demonstration of a tumor suppressor function for the cohesin complex, while also confirming that cohesin mutations occur as an early event in leukemogenesis, facilitating the potential development of a myeloid malignancy. PMID:26438359

  5. Airway glutathione homeostasis is altered in children with severe asthma: evidence for oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Teague, W Gerald; Holguin, Fernando; Yeh, Mary; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2009-01-01

    Severe asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and increased formation of reactive oxygen species. Glutathione (GSH) is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF). We hypothesized that airway GSH homeostasis was altered in children with severe asthma and was characterized by decreased GSH and increased glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations. Bronchoalveolar lavage was obtained from 65 children with severe asthma, including 35 children with baseline airway obstruction evidenced by FEV(1) <80%. Control data were obtained from 6 children with psychogenic (habit) cough or vocal cord dysfunction undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy and 35 healthy adult controls. GSH, GSSG, and other determinants of airway oxidative stress including glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostane, and H(2)O(2) were measured in the ELF. The ELF redox potential was calculated from GSH and GSSG by using the Nernst equation. Compared with controls, subjects with severe asthma had lower airway GSH with increased GSSG despite no differences in GST, GR, and GPx activities between groups. This was accompanied by increased malondialdehyde, 8-isoprostane, and H(2)O(2) concentrations in the ELF. GSH oxidation was most apparent in subjects with severe asthma with airway obstruction and was supported by an upward shift in the ELF GSH redox potential. Children with severe asthma have increased biomarkers of oxidant stress in the ELF that are associated with increased formation of GSSG and a shift in the GSH redox potential toward the more oxidized state.

  6. The common mouse protozoa Tritrichomonas muris alters mucosal T cell homeostasis and colitis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Nichole K; Lemire, Paul; Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra; Prescott, David; Mortha, Arthur; Streutker, Catherine J; Girardin, Stephen E; Philpott, Dana J; Mallevaey, Thierry

    2016-12-12

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract hosts a diverse community of microbes including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, helminths, and viruses. Through coevolution, mammals and these microbes have developed a symbiosis that is sustained through the host's continuous sensing of microbial factors and the generation of a tolerant or pro-inflammatory response. While analyzing T cell-driven colitis in nonlittermate mouse strains, we serendipitously identified that a nongenetic transmissible factor dramatically increased disease susceptibility. We identified the protozoan Tritrichomonas muris as the disease-exacerbating element. Furthermore, experimental colonization with T. muris induced an elevated Th1 response in the cecum of naive wild-type mice and accelerated colitis in Rag1(-/-) mice after T cell transfer. Overall, we describe a novel cross-kingdom interaction within the murine gut that alters immune cell homeostasis and disease susceptibility. This example of unpredicted microbial priming of the immune response highlights the importance of studying trans-kingdom interactions and serves as a stark reminder of the importance of using littermate controls in all mouse research. © 2016 Escalante et al.

  7. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Cell Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Cigarette Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Marc-André; Morissette, Mathieu C.; Thériault, Marie-Eve; Nikota, Jake K.; Stämpfli, Martin R.; Debigaré, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle dysfunction is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a disease mainly caused by chronic cigarette use. An important proportion of patients with COPD have decreased muscle mass, suggesting that chronic cigarette smoke exposure may interfere with skeletal muscle cellular equilibrium. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the kinetic of the effects that cigarette smoke exposure has on skeletal muscle cell signaling involved in protein homeostasis and to assess the reversibility of these effects. Methods A mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure was used to assess skeletal muscle changes. BALB/c mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or room air for 8 weeks, 24 weeks or 24 weeks followed by 60 days of cessation. The gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were collected and the activation state of key mediators involved in protein synthesis and degradation was assessed. Results Gastrocnemius and soleus were smaller in mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 8 and 24 weeks compared to room air exposed animals. Pro-degradation proteins were induced at the mRNA level after 8 and 24 weeks. Twenty-four weeks of cigarette smoke exposure induced pro-degradation proteins and reduced Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3β quantity. A 60-day smoking cessation period reversed the cell signaling alterations induced by cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusions Repeated cigarette smoke exposure induces reversible muscle signaling alterations that are dependent on the duration of the cigarette smoke exposure. These results highlights a beneficial aspect associated with smoking cessation. PMID:23799102

  8. Early Alterations of Brain Cellular Energy Homeostasis in Huntington Disease Models*

    PubMed Central

    Mochel, Fanny; Durant, Brandon; Meng, Xingli; O'Callaghan, James; Yu, Hua; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Humbert, Sandrine; Schiffmann, Raphael; Durr, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Brain energy deficit has been a suggested cause of Huntington disease (HD), but ATP depletion has not reliably been shown in preclinical models, possibly because of the immediate post-mortem changes in cellular energy metabolism. To examine a potential role of a low energy state in HD, we measured, for the first time in a neurodegenerative model, brain levels of high energy phosphates using microwave fixation, which instantaneously inactivates brain enzymatic activities and preserves in vivo levels of analytes. We studied HD transgenic R6/2 mice at ages 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We found significantly increased creatine and phosphocreatine, present as early as 4 weeks for phosphocreatine, preceding motor system deficits and decreased ATP levels in striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of R6/2 mice. ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations were inversely correlated with the number of CAG repeats. Conversely, in mice injected with 3-nitroproprionic acid, an acute model of brain energy deficit, both ATP and phosphocreatine were significantly reduced. Increased creatine and phosphocreatine in R6/2 mice was associated with decreased guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase and creatine kinase, both at the protein and RNA levels, and increased phosphorylated AMP-dependent protein kinase (pAMPK) over AMPK ratio. In addition, in 4-month-old knock-in HdhQ111/+ mice, the earliest metabolic alterations consisted of increased phosphocreatine in the frontal cortex and increased the pAMPK/AMPK ratio. Altogether, this study provides the first direct evidence of chronic alteration in homeostasis of high energy phosphates in HD models in the earliest stages of the disease, indicating possible reduced utilization of the brain phosphocreatine pool. PMID:22123819

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Disrupts Thymic Homeostasis by Altering Intrathymic and Systemic Stress-Related Endocrine Circuitries

    PubMed Central

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Carvalho, Vinicius Frias; e Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues; Villar, Silvina; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Savino, Wilson; Morrot, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that experimental infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is associated with changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Increased glucocorticoid (GC) levels are believed to be protective against the effects of acute stress during infection but result in depletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by apoptosis, driving to thymic atrophy. However, very few data are available concerning prolactin (PRL), another stress-related hormone, which seems to be decreased during T. cruzi infection. Considering the immunomodulatory role of PRL upon the effects caused by GC, we investigated if intrathymic cross-talk between GC and PRL receptors (GR and PRLR, respectively) might influence T. cruzi-induced thymic atrophy. Using an acute experimental model, we observed changes in GR/PRLR cross-activation related with the survival of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes during infection. These alterations were closely related with systemic changes, characterized by a stress hormone imbalance, with progressive GC augmentation simultaneously to PRL reduction. The intrathymic hormone circuitry exhibited an inverse modulation that seemed to counteract the GC-related systemic deleterious effects. During infection, adrenalectomy protected the thymus from the increase in apoptosis ratio without changing PRL levels, whereas an additional inhibition of circulating PRL accelerated the thymic atrophy and led to an increase in corticosterone systemic levels. These results demonstrate that the PRL impairment during infection is not caused by the increase of corticosterone levels, but the opposite seems to occur. Accordingly, metoclopramide (MET)-induced enhancement of PRL secretion protected thymic atrophy in acutely infected animals as well as the abnormal export of immature and potentially autoreactive CD4+CD8+ thymocytes to the periphery. In conclusion, our findings clearly show that Trypanosoma cruzi subverts mouse thymus homeostasis by altering intrathymic and systemic stress

  10. Protein-energy malnutrition alters thermoregulatory homeostasis and the response to brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shari E; Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Colbourne, Frederick; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2011-02-01

    Co-existing protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), characterized by deficits in both protein and energy status, impairs functional outcome following global ischemia and has been associated with increased reactive gliosis. Since temperature is a key determinant of brain damage following an ischemic insult, the objective was to investigate whether alterations in post-ischemic temperature regulation contribute to PEM-induced reactive gliosis following ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (190-280 g) were assigned to either control diet (18% protein) or PEM induced by feeding a low protein diet (2% protein) for 7 days prior to either global ischemia or sham surgery. There was a rapid disruption in thermoregulatory function in rats fed the low protein diet as assessed by continuous recording of core temperature with bio-electrical sensor transmitters. Both daily temperature fluctuation and mean temperature increased within the first 24 hours, and these remained significantly elevated throughout the 7 day pre-ischemic period (p < 0.027). In the immediate post-surgical period, PEM decreased body temperature to a greater extent than that in well-nourished controls (p = 0.003). The increase in daily temperature fluctuation caused by PEM persisted throughout the 7 day post-surgical period (p < 0.001), and this interacted with the effects of global ischemia on days 8 (p = 0.018) and 11 (p = 0.021). The astrocytic and microglial responses induced at 7 days after global ischemia were not influenced by PEM, but this preliminary analysis needs to be confirmed with a more reliable global ischemia model. In conclusion, exposure to a low protein diet rapidly impairs the ability to maintain thermoregulatory homeostasis, and the resultant PEM also diminishes the ability to thermoregulate in response to a challenge. Since temperature regulation is a key determinant of brain injury following ischemia, these findings suggest that the pathophysiology of brain injury could be altered in stroke

  11. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP(+) cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP(+) cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP(+) cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis.

  12. Altered surfactant homeostasis and alveolar epithelial cell stress in amiodarone-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Henneke, Ingrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Liebisch, Gerhard; Chambers, Rachel C; Ochs, Matthias; Schmitz, Gerd; Vancheri, Carlo; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is a highly efficient antiarrhythmic drug with potentially serious side effects. Severe pulmonary toxicity is reported in patients receiving AD even at low doses and may cause interstitial pneumonia as well as lung fibrosis. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECII) has been suggested to play an important role in this disease. In the current study, we aimed to establish a murine model of AD-induced lung fibrosis and analyze surfactant homeostasis, lysosomal, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this model. AD/vehicle was instilled intratracheally into C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Extent of lung fibrosis development was assessed by trichrome staining and hydroxyproline measurement. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Phospholipids (PLs) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Surfactant proteins (SP) and markers for apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress were studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AECII morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Extensive lung fibrosis and AECII hyperplasia were observed in AD-treated mice already at day 7. Surfactant PL and SP accumulated in AECII over time. In parallel, induction of apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress was encountered in AECII of mice lungs and in MLE12 cells treated with AD. In vitro, siRNA-mediated knockdown of cathepsin D did not alter the AD-induced apoptotic response. Our data suggest that mice exposed to intratracheal AD develop severe pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit extensive surfactant alterations and cellular stress, but AD-induced AECII apoptosis is not mediated primarily via cathepsin D.

  13. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  14. Altered Ca(2+) homeostasis induces Calpain-Cathepsin axis activation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Franc; Thüne, Katrin; Sikorska, Beata; Schmitz, Matthias; Tahir, Waqas; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Cramm, Maria; Gotzmann, Nadine; Carmona, Margarita; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Michel, Uwe; Zafar, Saima; Schuetz, Anna-Lena; Rajput, Ashish; Andréoletti, Olivier; Bonn, Stefan; Fischer, Andre; Liberski, Pawel P; Torres, Juan Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2017-04-27

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is the most prevalent form of human prion disease and it is characterized by the presence of neuronal loss, spongiform degeneration, chronic inflammation and the accumulation of misfolded and pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)). The molecular mechanisms underlying these alterations are largely unknown, but the presence of intracellular neuronal calcium (Ca(2+)) overload, a general feature in models of prion diseases, is suggested to play a key role in prion pathogenesis.Here we describe the presence of massive regulation of Ca(2+) responsive genes in sCJD brain tissue, accompanied by two Ca(2+)-dependent processes: endoplasmic reticulum stress and the activation of the cysteine proteases Calpains 1/2. Pathogenic Calpain proteins activation in sCJD is linked to the cleavage of their cellular substrates, impaired autophagy and lysosomal damage, which is partially reversed by Calpain inhibition in a cellular prion model. Additionally, Calpain 1 treatment enhances seeding activity of PrP(Sc) in a prion conversion assay. Neuronal lysosomal impairment caused by Calpain over activation leads to the release of the lysosomal protease Cathepsin S that in sCJD mainly localises in axons, although massive Cathepsin S overexpression is detected in microglial cells. Alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis and activation of Calpain-Cathepsin axis already occur at pre-clinical stages of the disease as detected in a humanized sCJD mouse model.Altogether our work indicates that unbalanced Calpain-Cathepsin activation is a relevant contributor to the pathogenesis of sCJD at multiple molecular levels and a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/β-Catenin Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A.; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Di Luigi, Luigi; Donini, Lorenzo M.; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/β-catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β-catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis. PMID:24963291

  16. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/ β -Catenin Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wannenes, Francesca; Papa, Vincenza; Greco, Emanuela A; Fornari, Rachele; Marocco, Chiara; Baldari, Carlo; Di Luigi, Luigi; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Guidetti, Laura; Donini, Lorenzo M; Lenzi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD). We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1) affected by obesity with normal BMD (O), (2) affected by obesity with low BMD (OO), (3) affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS), and (4) affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS) as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL). Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/ β -catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β -catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3 β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis.

  17. Protective effect of alprazolam against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anant; Kumar, Anil

    2008-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is considered as a risk factor for various diseases. Sleep deprivation leads to behavioral, hormonal, neurochemical and biochemical alterations in the animals. The present study was designed to explore the possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of alprazolam against 72h sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice. In the present study, sleep deprivation caused anxiety-like behavior, weight loss, impaired ambulatory movements and oxidative damage as indicated by increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite level and depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in sleep-deprived mice brain. Treatment with alprazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved behavioral alterations. Biochemically, alprazolam treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, reversed raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite level. Combination of flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) with lower dose of alprazolam (0.25mg/kg) significantly antagonized protective effect of alprazolam. However, combination of muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) with alprazolam (0.25 mg/kg, ip) potentiated protective effect of alprazolam. On the basis of these results, it might be suggested that alprazolam might produce protective effect by involving GABAergic system against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and related oxidative damage.

  18. The effect of Eleutheroside E on behavioral alterations in murine sleep deprivation stress model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Zhang; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Hong-Fang; Huang, Bao-Kang; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2011-05-11

    Eleutheroside E (EE), a principal component of Eleutherococcus senticosus, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and protective effects in ischemia heart etc. However, whether it can mitigate behavioral alterations induced by sleep deprivation, has not yet been elucidated. Numerous studies have demonstrated that memory deficits induced by sleep deprivation in experimental animals can be used as a model of behavioral alterations. The present study investigated the effect of EE, on cognitive performances and biochemical parameters of sleep-deprived mice. Animals were repeatedly treated with saline, 10 or 50mg/kg EE and sleep-deprived for 72 h by the multiple platform method. Briefly, groups of 5-6 mice were placed in water tanks (45 × 34 × 17 cm), containing 12 platforms (3 cm in diameter) each, surrounded by water up to 1cm beneath the surface or kept in their home cage. After sleep deprivation, mice showed significant behavioral impairment as evident by reduced latency entering into a dark chamber, locomotion and correctly rate in Y maze, and increased monoamines in hippocampus. However, repeated treatment with EE restored these behavioral and biochemical alterations in mice. In conclusion, the beneficial effect of EE may provide an effective and powerful strategy to alleviate behavioral alterations induced by sleep deprivation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sleep and meal-time misalignment alters functional connectivity: a pilot resting-state study.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Y N; Castellanos, F X; Pizinger, T; Kovtun, K; St-Onge, M-P

    2016-11-01

    Delayed sleep and meal times promote metabolic dysregulation and obesity. Altered coordination of sleeping and eating times may impact food-reward valuation and interoception in the brain, yet the independent and collective contributions of sleep and meal times are unknown. This randomized, in-patient crossover study experimentally manipulates sleep and meal times while preserving sleep duration (7.05±0.44 h for 5 nights). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans (2 × 5-minute runs) were obtained for four participants (three males; 25.3±4.6 years), each completing all study phases (normal sleep/normal meal; late sleep/normal meal; normal sleep/late meal; and late sleep/late meal). Normal mealtimes were 1, 5, 11 and 12.5 h after awakening; late mealtimes were 4.5, 8.5, 14.5 and 16 h after awakening. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) was computed for a priori regions-of-interest (seeds) and contrasted across conditions. Statistically significant (P<0.05, whole-brain corrected) regionally specific effects were found for multiple seeds. The strongest effects were linked to the amygdala: increased RSFC for late versus normal mealtimes (equivalent to skipping breakfast). A main effect of sleep and interaction with meal time were also observed. Preliminary findings support the feasibility of examining the effects of sleep and meal-time misalignment, independent of sleep duration, on RSFC in regions relevant to food reward and interoception.

  20. Tuberal hypothalamic neurons secreting the satiety molecule Nesfatin-1 are critically involved in paradoxical (REM) sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jego, Sonia; Salvert, Denise; Renouard, Leslie; Mori, Masatomo; Goutagny, Romain; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered Nesfatin-1 plays a role in appetite regulation as a satiety factor through hypothalamic leptin-independent mechanisms. Nesfatin-1 is co-expressed with Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) in neurons from the tuberal hypothalamic area (THA) which are recruited during sleep states, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). To help decipher the contribution of this contingent of THA neurons to sleep regulatory mechanisms, we thus investigated in rats whether the co-factor Nesfatin-1 is also endowed with sleep-modulating properties. Here, we found that the disruption of the brain Nesfatin-1 signaling achieved by icv administration of Nesfatin-1 antiserum or antisense against the nucleobindin2 (NUCB2) prohormone suppressed PS with little, if any alteration of slow wave sleep (SWS). Further, the infusion of Nesfatin-1 antiserum after a selective PS deprivation, designed for elevating PS needs, severely prevented the ensuing expected PS recovery. Strengthening these pharmacological data, we finally demonstrated by using c-Fos as an index of neuronal activation that the recruitment of Nesfatin-1-immunoreactive neurons within THA is positively correlated to PS but not to SWS amounts experienced by rats prior to sacrifice. In conclusion, this work supports a functional contribution of the Nesfatin-1 signaling, operated by THA neurons, to PS regulatory mechanisms. We propose that these neurons, likely releasing MCH as a synergistic factor, constitute an appropriate lever by which the hypothalamus may integrate endogenous signals to adapt the ultradian rhythm and maintenance of PS in a manner dictated by homeostatic needs. This could be done through the inhibition of downstream targets comprised primarily of the local hypothalamic wake-active orexin- and histamine-containing neurons.

  1. Tuberal Hypothalamic Neurons Secreting the Satiety Molecule Nesfatin-1 Are Critically Involved in Paradoxical (REM) Sleep Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jego, Sonia; Salvert, Denise; Renouard, Leslie; Mori, Masatomo; Goutagny, Romain; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered Nesfatin-1 plays a role in appetite regulation as a satiety factor through hypothalamic leptin-independent mechanisms. Nesfatin-1 is co-expressed with Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) in neurons from the tuberal hypothalamic area (THA) which are recruited during sleep states, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). To help decipher the contribution of this contingent of THA neurons to sleep regulatory mechanisms, we thus investigated in rats whether the co-factor Nesfatin-1 is also endowed with sleep-modulating properties. Here, we found that the disruption of the brain Nesfatin-1 signaling achieved by icv administration of Nesfatin-1 antiserum or antisense against the nucleobindin2 (NUCB2) prohormone suppressed PS with little, if any alteration of slow wave sleep (SWS). Further, the infusion of Nesfatin-1 antiserum after a selective PS deprivation, designed for elevating PS needs, severely prevented the ensuing expected PS recovery. Strengthening these pharmacological data, we finally demonstrated by using c-Fos as an index of neuronal activation that the recruitment of Nesfatin-1-immunoreactive neurons within THA is positively correlated to PS but not to SWS amounts experienced by rats prior to sacrifice. In conclusion, this work supports a functional contribution of the Nesfatin-1 signaling, operated by THA neurons, to PS regulatory mechanisms. We propose that these neurons, likely releasing MCH as a synergistic factor, constitute an appropriate lever by which the hypothalamus may integrate endogenous signals to adapt the ultradian rhythm and maintenance of PS in a manner dictated by homeostatic needs. This could be done through the inhibition of downstream targets comprised primarily of the local hypothalamic wake-active orexin- and histamine-containing neurons. PMID:23300698

  2. Modeling sleep alterations in Parkinson's disease: How close are we to valid translational animal models?

    PubMed

    Fifel, Karim; Piggins, Hugh; Deboer, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the neurodegenerative diseases that benefited the most from the use of non-human models. Consequently, significant advances have been made in the symptomatic treatments of the motor aspects of the disease. Unfortunately, this translational success has been tempered by the recognition of the debilitating aspect of multiple non-motor symptoms of the illness. Alterations of the sleep/wakefulness behavior experienced as insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep/wake cycle fragmentation and REM sleep behavior disorder are among the non-motor symptoms that predate motor alterations and inevitably worsen over disease progression. The absence of adequate humanized animal models with the perfect phenocopy of these sleep alterations contribute undoubtedly to the lack of efficient therapies for these non-motor complications. In the context of developing efficient translational therapies, we provide an overview of the strengths and limitations of the various currently available models to replicate sleep alterations of Parkinson's disease. Our investigation reveals that although these models replicate dopaminergic deficiency and related parkinsonism, they rarely display a combination of sleep fragmentation and excessive daytime sleepiness and never REM sleep behavior disorder. In this light, we critically discuss the construct, face and predictive validities of both rodent and non-human primate animals to model the main sleep abnormalities experienced by patients with PD. We conclude by highlighting the need of integrating a network-based perspective in our modeling approach of such complex syndrome in order to celebrate valid translational models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  4. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed.

  5. Iron overload alters glucose homeostasis, causes liver steatosis, and increases serum triacylglycerols in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maísa; Silva, Marcelo E; de Paula, Heberth; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of iron overload with a hyperlipidemic diet on the histologic feature of hepatic tissue, the lipid and glycemic serum profiles, and the markers of oxidative damage and stress in a rat model. Twenty-four male Fischer rats, purchased from Experimental Nutrition Laboratory, Federal University of Ouro Preto, were assigned to 4 equal groups, 2 were fed a standard cholesterol-free diet (group C or control and CI or control with iron) containing 8.0% soybean oil and 2 were fed a hyperlipidemic diet (group H or hyperlipidemic and HI or hyperlipidemic with iron) containing 1.0% cholesterol and 25.0% soybean oil. A total of 50 mg of iron was administered to rats in groups CI and HI in 5 equal doses (1 every 3 weeks for a 16-week period) by intraperitoneal injections of 0.1 mL of iron dextran solution (100 g Fe(2+)/L; Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The other rats in groups C and H were treated in a similar manner but with sterile saline (0.1 mL). Irrespective of the diet, iron excess enhanced serum triacylglycerols (P < .05) and reduced serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels (P < .05) but did not affect serum cholesterol concentration. Histologic analysis showed steatosis in groups H and to a lesser extent in HI. No significant differences (P > .05) were observed in paraoxonase activities or in serum levels of free or total sulfhydryl radicals, malondialdehyde, or total antioxidants. The findings suggest that iron excess in the rat probably modifies lipid metabolism and, as a consequence, alters glucose homeostasis and increases the level of serum triacylglycerols but not of cholesterol.

  6. Tissue-specific alterations in thyroid hormone homeostasis in combined Mct10 and Mct8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Müller, Julia; Mayerl, Steffen; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Boelen, Anita; Frappart, Lucien; Mariotta, Luca; Verrey, Francois; Heuer, Heike

    2014-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter Mct10 (Slc16a10; T-type amino acid transporter) facilitates the cellular transport of thyroid hormone (TH) and shows an overlapping expression with the well-established TH transporter Mct8. Because Mct8 deficiency is associated with distinct tissue-specific alterations in TH transport and metabolism, we speculated that Mct10 inactivation may compromise the tissue-specific TH homeostasis as well. However, analysis of Mct10 knockout (ko) mice revealed normal serum TH levels and tissue TH content in contrast to Mct8 ko mice that are characterized by high serum T3, low serum T4, decreased brain TH content, and increased tissue TH concentrations in the liver, kidneys, and thyroid gland. Surprisingly, mice deficient in both TH transporters (Mct10/Mct8 double knockout [dko] mice) showed normal serum T4 levels in the presence of elevated serum T3, indicating that the additional inactivation of Mct10 partially rescues the phenotype of Mct8 ko mice. As a consequence of the normal serum T4, brain T4 content and hypothalamic TRH expression were found to be normalized in the Mct10/Mct8 dko mice. In contrast, the hyperthyroid situation in liver, kidneys, and thyroid gland of Mct8 ko mice was even more severe in Mct10/Mct8 dko animals, suggesting that in these organs, both transporters contribute to the TH efflux. In summary, our data indicate that Mct10 indeed participates in tissue-specific TH transport and also contributes to the generation of the unusual serum TH profile characteristic for Mct8 deficiency.

  7. Tactile stimulation during sleep alters slow oscillation and spindle densities but not motor skill.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sofia Isabel Ribeiro; Beijamini, Felipe; Weber, Frederik D; Vincenzi, Roberta Almeida; da Silva, Felipe Augusto Cini; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli

    2017-02-01

    Studies using targeted memory reactivation have shown that presentation of auditory or olfactory contextual cues during sleep can bias hippocampal reactivations towards the preferential replay of the cue-associated material, thereby resulting in enhanced consolidation of that information. If the same cortical ensembles are indeed used for encoding and storage of a given piece of information, forcing the sleeping brain to re-engage in task-intrinsic information processing should disturb the natural ongoing consolidation processes and therefore impair possible sleep benefits. Here we aimed at recreating an integral part of the sensory experience of a motor skill in a daytime nap, by means of a tactile stimulation. We hypothesized that tampering with the tactile component of a motor skill during sleep would result in hindered performance at retest, due to interference between the highly congruent incoming stimuli and the core skill trace. Contrary to our predictions, the tactile stimulation did not influence neither speed nor accuracy, when compared to natural sleep. However, an exploratory sleep EEG analysis revealed stimulation-induced alterations in the abundance and cortical topography of slow oscillations and spindles. These findings suggest that despite the lack of a significant effect on motor behavior, tactile stimulation induced changes in EEG features suggestive of a possible uncoupling between the sleep oscillations thought to underlie consolidation processes, i.e. slow oscillations and sleep spindles.

  8. Alterations in energy homeostasis to favour adipose tissue gain: A longitudinal study in healthy pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Abeysekera, Minoli V; Morris, Jack A; Davis, Gregory K; O'Sullivan, Anthony J

    2016-02-01

    Pregnancy is associated with an increase in body fat; however, excessive gestational weight gain predisposes to significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. It remains unclear whether alterations in energy homeostasis have a major influence on fat storage. To evaluate longitudinal changes in body composition and energy metabolism in healthy pregnant women. Body composition, energy expenditure and energy intake were measured longitudinally in 26 women with singleton pregnancies at 12-14 weeks, 24-26 weeks and 34-36 weeks of gestation. Fat mass (FM) and lean body mass (LBM) were measured using bio-impedance analysis, total energy expenditure (TEE) using the Sensewear Armband and energy intake through a 3-day food recall diary. Throughout pregnancy, all women remained healthy. Body weight increased by 10.8 ± 3.9 kg, from 67.3 ± 14.1 kg to 78.1 ± 13.8 kg from the first to the third trimester (P < 0.001). Body fat percentage increased by 4.5 ± 4.2% (P < 0.001). LBM also increased throughout pregnancy, by 3.9 ± 2.4 kg (P < 0.001). TEE increased significantly from the first to the third trimesters (9514 kJ/day to 10 263 kJ/day; P < 0.05). In contrast, energy expenditure due to physical activity, energy intake and macronutrient intake did not change significantly throughout pregnancy. Healthy women increase FM during pregnancy despite slight increases in TEE and no change in energy intake. This suggests that energy storage efficiency improves during pregnancy, which may be related to alterations in gut microbiota and activation of anabolic pathways during pregnancy. Clarifying factors leading to this more efficient fat and energy storing state, and the role of the pregnancy-related changes in gut microbiota, may be important for managing gestational weight gain. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  9. Disturbed Dreaming and the Instability of Sleep: Altered Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep Microstructure in Individuals with Frequent Nightmares as Revealed by the Cyclic Alternating Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Simor, Péter; Bódizs, Róbert; Horváth, Klára; Ferri, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Nightmares are disturbing mental experiences during sleep that usually result in abrupt awakenings. Frequent nightmares are associated with poor subjective sleep quality, and recent polysomnographic data suggest that nightmare sufferers exhibit impaired sleep continuity during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Because disrupted sleep might be related to abnormal arousal processes, the goal of this study was to examine polysomnographic arousal-related activities in a group of nightmare sufferers and a healthy control group. Design: Sleep microstructure analysis was carried out by scoring the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) in NREM sleep and the arousal index in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep on the second night of the polysomnographic examination. Setting: Hospital-based sleep research laboratory. Participants: There were 17 in the nightmare (NMs) group and 23 in the healthy control (CTLs) group. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The NMs group exhibited reduced amounts of CAP A1 subtype and increased CAP A2 and A3 subtypes, as well as longer duration of CAP A phases in comparison with CTLs. Moreover, these differences remained significant after controlling for the confounding factors of anxious and depressive symptoms. The absolute number and frequency of REM arousals did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that NREM sleep microstructure is altered during nonsymptomatic nights of nightmares. Disrupted sleep in the NMs group seems to be related to abnormal arousal processes, specifically an imbalance in sleep-promoting and arousing mechanisms during sleep. Citation: Simor P; Bódizs R; Horváth K; Ferri R. Disturbed dreaming and the instability of sleep: altered nonrapid eye movement sleep microstructure in individuals with frequent nightmares as revealed by the cyclic alternating pattern. SLEEP 2013;36(3):413-419. PMID:23449753

  10. Sleep Alterations Following Exposure to Stress Predict Fear-Associated Memory Impairments in a Rodent Model of PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, William M.; George, Sophie A.; Urpa, Lea; Kehoe, Michaela; Liberzon, Israel; Poe, Gina R.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep abnormalities such as insomnia, nightmares, hyper-arousal, and difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, are diagnostic criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The vivid dream state, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, has been implicated in processing emotional memories. We have hypothesized that REM sleep is maladaptive in those suffering from PTSD. However, the precise neurobiological mechanisms regulating these sleep disturbances following trauma exposure are poorly understood. Using single prolonged stress (SPS), a well-validated rodent model of PTSD, we measured sleep alterations in response to stress exposure and over a subsequent 7-day isolation period during which the PTSD-like phenotype develops in rats. SPS resulted in acutely increased REM sleep, transition to REM sleep, and decreased waking in addition to alterations in sleep architecture. The severity of the PTSD-like phenotype was later assessed by measuring freezing levels on a fear-associated memory test. Interestingly, the change in REM sleep following SPS was significantly correlated with freezing behavior during extinction recall assessed more than a week later. We also report reductions in theta (4–10 Hz) and sigma (10–15 Hz) band power during transition to REM sleep which also correlated with impaired fear-associated memory processing. These data reveal that changes in REM sleep, transition to REM sleep, waking, and theta and sigma power may serve as sleep biomarkers to identify individuals with increased susceptibility to PTSD following trauma exposure. PMID:26019008

  11. CHOLINERGIC NEURONS OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN MEDIATE BIOCHEMICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING SLEEP HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Kalinchuk, Anna V.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; McCarley, Robert W.; Basheer, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    The tight coordination of biochemical and electrophysiological mechanisms underlies the homeostatic sleep pressure (HSP) produced by sleep deprivation (SD). We have reported that during SD the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular nitric oxide (NO), adenosine [AD]ex, lactate [Lac]ex and pyruvate [Pyr]ex increase in the basal forebrain (BF). However, it is not clear whether all of them contribute to HSP leading to increased electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) recovery sleep (RS) following SD. Previously, we showed that NREM delta increase evident during RS depends on the presence of BF cholinergic (ChBF) neurons. Here, we investigated the role of ChBF cells in coordination of biochemical and EEG changes seen during SD and RS in the rat. Increases in low theta power (5–7Hz), but not high theta (7–9Hz), during SD correlated with the increase in NREM delta power during RS, and with the changes in nitrate/nitrite [NOx]ex and [AD]ex. Lesions of ChBF cells using IgG 192-saporin prevented increases in [NOx]ex, [AD]ex and low theta activity, during SD, but did not prevent increases in [Lac]ex and [Pyr]ex. Infusion of NO donor DETA NONOate into the saporin-treated BF failed to increase NREM RS and delta power, suggesting ChBF cells are important for mediating NO homeostatic effects. Finally, SD-induced iNOS was mostly expressed in ChBF cells, and the intensity of iNOS induction correlated with the increase in low theta activity. Together, our data indicate ChBF cells are important in regulating the biochemical and EEG mechanisms that contribute to HSP. PMID:25369989

  12. Dietary selenomethionine exposure alters swimming performance, metabolic capacity and energy homeostasis in juvenile fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    McPhee, D Landon; Janz, David M

    2014-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is known to cause chronic toxicity in aquatic species. In particular, dietary exposure of fish to selenomethionine (SeMet), the primary form of Se in the diet, is of concern. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure to elevated dietary SeMet alters energy and endocrine homeostasis in adult fish. However, little is known about the direct effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fish. The objective of the present study was to investigate sublethal physiological effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Twenty days-post-hatch fathead minnow were exposed for 60 days to different measured concentrations (2.8, 5.4, 9.9, 26.5 μg Se/g dry mass [dm]) of Se in food in the form of SeMet. After exposure, samples were collected for Se analysis and fish were subjected to a swimming performance challenge to assess critical swim speed (Ucrit), tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude, oxygen consumption (MO2), cost of transport (COT), standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate (AMR), and factorial aerobic scope (F-AS). Ucrit was decreased in the 26.5 μg Se/g dm exposure group compared to the control group. Tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude were significantly reduced in fish fed 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g. An increase in MO2 and COT was observed in the 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups compared to the control group. While the AMR of the high dose group was increased relative to control, there were no significant differences in SMR and F-AS. Energy storage capacity was measured via whole body triglyceride and glycogen concentrations. Triglyceride concentrations in non-swam fish were elevated in the 5.4 μg Se/g group relative to controls. Fatigued (swam) fish had significantly lower whole body triglycerides than non-swam fish. All non-swam SeMet exposure groups had significantly decreased whole body glycogen concentrations compared to controls, while the 5.4 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups had

  13. Artificial Outdoor Nighttime Lights Associate with Altered Sleep Behavior in the American General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Milesi, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Our study aims to explore the associations between outdoor nighttime lights (ONL) and sleep patterns in the human population. Methods: Cross-sectional telephone study of a representative sample of the general US population age 18 y or older. 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals (participation rate: 83.2%) were interviewed by telephone. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; sleep, mental and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition; International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition). Individuals were geolocated by longitude and latitude. Outdoor nighttime light measurements were obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), with nighttime passes taking place between 19:30 and 22:30 local time. Light data were correlated precisely to the geolocation of each participant of the general population sample. Results: Living in areas with greater ONL was associated with delayed bedtime (P < 0.0001) and wake up time (P < 0.0001), shorter sleep duration (P < 0.01), and increased daytime sleepiness (P < 0.0001). Living in areas with greater ONL also increased the dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and quality (P < 0.0001) and the likelihood of having a diagnostic profile congruent with a circadian rhythm disorder (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although they improve the overall safety of people and traffic, nighttime lights in our streets and cities are clearly linked with modifications in human sleep behaviors and also impinge on the daytime functioning of individuals living in areas with greater ONL. Citation: Ohayon MM, Milesi C. Artificial outdoor nighttime lights associate with altered sleep behavior in the american general population. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1311–1320. PMID:27091523

  14. Social partnering alters sleep in fear-conditioned Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Jamie K; Husain, Eram; Lei, Yanlin; Mann, Graziella L; Morrison, Adrian R; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz

    2017-01-01

    Social support, when provided following a traumatic experience, is associated with a lower incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders. Our hypothesis was that providing a social interaction period with a naive conspecific would improve sleep architecture in response to cued fear conditioning in Wistar rats. Rats were randomly assigned to either the socially isolated or socially partnered groups. Rats assigned to the socially isolated group were individually housed following electrode implantation and fear conditioning. Rats assigned to the socially partnered group were initially paired-housed, and then one rat from each pair was randomly chosen for sleep electrode implantation and fear conditioning. Rats from both groups were habituated to a recording chamber, and baseline sleep was recorded over 22 hours. One day later (Training Day), they were fear-conditioned to 10 presentations of a tone (800 Hz, 90 dB, 5 sec) co-terminating with a mild electric foot shock (1.0 mA, 0.5 sec), at 30-sec intervals. While rats in the socially isolated group were left undisturbed in their home cage for 30-min, socially partnered rats interacted for 30 minutes with their non-stressed rat partner immediately after fear conditioning and while the auditory tones were presented on Days 1 and 14. The results indicated that social interaction increased sleep efficiency in partnered rats compared to isolated rats following the fear conditioning procedure. This was due to an increase in the amount of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) during the light phase. Evaluation of REMS microarchitecture revealed that the increase in REMS was due to an increase in the number of single REMS episodes (siREMS), which represented a more consolidated REMS pattern. A surprising finding was that partnered rats had a greater number of sequential REMS episodes (seqREMS) at Baseline, on the Training Day and on Day 1 when compared to isolated rats. The greater number of seqREMS episodes in partnered rats may

  15. Alteration of calcium homeostasis in primary preeclamptic syncytiotrophoblasts: effect on calcium exchange in placenta

    PubMed Central

    Haché, S; Takser, L; LeBellego, F; Weiler, H; Leduc, L; Forest, J C; Giguère, Y; Masse, A; Barbeau, B; Lafond, J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized by maternal hypertension, proteinuria, oedema and, in 30% of cases, by intrauterine growth retardation. Causes are still unknown; however, epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested alterations in maternal calcium metabolism. We suggested that in PE, calcium transport by the syncytiotrophoblast (ST) is disturbed. From total placental tissues, we studied the expression of: calcium channels (TRPV5, TRPV6 [transient receptor potential vanilloid]), calcium binding proteins (CaBP-9K, CaBP-28K), plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA)1,2,3,4 pumps, ATP synthase, genes implicated in Ca2+ release [inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R)1,2,3; Ryanodine receptor (RyR)1,2,3] and replenishment (SERCA1,2,3 [sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases]) from endoplasmic reticulum, channels implicated in mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation (VDAC1,2,3 [voltage-dependent anion channels]) and a marker of oxidative stress (hOGG1 [Human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1]), as well as the influence of these variations on calcium transport in primary ST cultures. The mRNA and protein levels were thereby examined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively, in two different groups of pregnant women with similar gestational age: a normal group (n= 16) and a PE group (n= 8), diagnosed by a clinician. Our study showed a significant decrease in calcium transport by the ST cultured from preeclamptic placentas. We found a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in mRNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, CaBP-9K, CaBP-28K, PMCA1, PMCA4, ATP synthase, IP3R1, IP3R2, RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3 in PE group compared to normal one. We also noted a significant decrease in protein levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, CaBP-9K, CaBP-28K and PMCA1/4 in PE group. In contrast, SERCA1, SERCA2, SERCA3, VDAC3 and hOGG1 mRNA expressions were significantly increased in PE placentas. Calcium homeostasis and transport through placenta is compromised in preeclamptic pregnancies and it appears to

  16. Sleep microstructure is not altered in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Příhodová, I; Paclt, I; Kemlink, D; Nevšímalová, S

    2012-01-01

    The high rate of occurrence of sleep disturbances in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) prompted the idea that structural and neurotransmitter changes might give rise to specific sleep pattern abnormalities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructure of sleep in children with ADHD who had no polysomnographically diagnosed sleep disorder, had never been treated for ADHD, and were free from any psychiatric comorbidity. Participants were 14 patients with ADHD (12 boys and 2 girls aged 7-12 years, mean age 9.6+/-1.6). ADHD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders). Psychiatric comorbidities were ruled out by detailed psychiatric examination. The patients underwent two consecutive overnight video-polysomnographic (PSG) recordings, with the sleep microstructure (cyclic alternating pattern - CAP) scoring during the second night. The data were compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Sleep microstructure analysis using CAP revealed no significant differences between the ADHD group and the controls in any of the parameters under study. In conclusions, no ADHD-specific alterations were found in the sleep microstructure.

  17. Environmental disruption of the circadian clock leads to altered sleep and immune responses in mouse.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Derrick J; Savenkova, Marina I; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2015-07-01

    In mammals, one of the most salient outputs of the circadian (daily) clock is the timing of the sleep-wake cycle. Modern industrialized society has led to a fundamental breakdown in the relationship between our endogenous timekeeping systems and the solar day, disrupting normal circadian rhythms. We have argued that disrupted circadian rhythms could lead to changes in allostatic load, and the capacity of organisms to respond to other environmental challenges. In this set of studies, we apply a model of circadian disruption characterized in our lab in which mice are housed in a 20h long day, with 10h of light and 10h of darkness. We explored the effects of this environmental disruption on sleep patterns, to establish if this model results in marked sleep deprivation. Given the interaction between circadian, sleep, and immune systems, we further probed if our model of circadian disruption also alters the innate immune response to peripheral bacterial endotoxin challenge. Our results demonstrate that this model of circadian disruption does not lead to marked sleep deprivation, but instead affects the timing and quality of sleep. We also show that while circadian disruption does not lead to basal changes in the immune markers we explored, the immune response is affected, both in the brain and the periphery. Together, our findings further strengthen the important role of the circadian timing system in sleep regulation and immune responses, and provide evidence that disrupting the circadian clock increases vulnerability to further environmental stressors, including immunological challenges.

  18. [Night sleep structural alteration as a function of individual strategy of adapting to 520-isolation].

    PubMed

    Zavalko, I M; Boritko, Ya S; Kovrov, G V; Vinokhodova, A G; Chekalina, A I; Smoleevsky, A E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to establish a relationship between trends in sleep alteration and individual adaptation to the stress-factors in the 520-day isolation study. Psychological evaluations using a battery of motivation tests and L. Sobchik's modification of the Luscher personality test, and Mirror coordinograph enabled to differentiate groups reacting to the stress on the pattern of "control" (G-1) or "search" (G-2) manifested in individual styles of behavior and operator's activity. The 2 groups showed different dynamics of the night sleep structure. Difficulties with falling asleep in G-1 arose on the eve of "landing onto Mars" and end of the experiment, whereas in G-2 they were evident prior to the end only. Besides, the micro- and segmental sleep structures were more stable in G-1 suggesting the integrity of somnogenic mechanisms despite difficult sleep initiation.

  19. Alteration of ROS homeostasis and decreased lifespan in S. cerevisiae elicited by deletion of the mitochondrial translocator FLX1.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Dipalo, Emilia; Miccolis, Angelica; Boles, Eckhard; Caselle, Michele; Barile, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the control exerted by the mitochondrial translocator FLX1, which catalyzes the movement of the redox cofactor FAD across the mitochondrial membrane, on the efficiency of ATP production, ROS homeostasis, and lifespan of S. cerevisiae. The deletion of the FLX1 gene resulted in respiration-deficient and small-colony phenotype accompanied by a significant ATP shortage and ROS unbalance in glycerol-grown cells. Moreover, the flx1Δ strain showed H2O2 hypersensitivity and decreased lifespan. The impaired biochemical phenotype found in the flx1Δ strain might be justified by an altered expression of the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in bioenergetics and cell regulation. A search for possible cis-acting consensus motifs in the regulatory region upstream SDH1-ORF revealed a dozen of upstream motifs that might respond to induced metabolic changes by altering the expression of Flx1p. Among these motifs, two are present in the regulatory region of genes encoding proteins involved in flavin homeostasis. This is the first evidence that the mitochondrial flavin cofactor status is involved in controlling the lifespan of yeasts, maybe by changing the cellular succinate level. This is not the only case in which the homeostasis of redox cofactors underlies complex phenotypical behaviours, as lifespan in yeasts.

  20. Dietary Capsaicin Improves Glucose Homeostasis and Alters the Gut Microbiota in Obese Diabetic ob/ob Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-Xian; Ren, Hui; Gao, Yuan-Feng; Lee, Chong-You; Li, Su-Fang; Zhang, Feng; Li, Long; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background: The effects of capsaicin on obesity and glucose homeostasis are still controversial and the mechanisms underlying these effects remain largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between the regulation of obesity and glucose homeostasis by dietary capsaicin and the alterations of gut microbiota in obese diabetic ob/ob mice. Methods: The ob/ob mice were subjected to a normal, low-capsaicin (0.01%), or high-capsaicin (0.02%) diet for 6 weeks, respectively. Obesity phenotypes, glucose homeostasis, the gut microbiota structure and composition, short-chain fatty acids, gastrointestinal hormones, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured. Results: Both the low- and high-capsaicin diets failed to prevent the increase in body weight, adiposity index, and Lee's obesity index. However, dietary capsaicin at both the low and high doses significantly inhibited the increase of fasting blood glucose and insulin levels. These inhibitory effects were comparable between the two groups. Similarly, dietary capsaicin resulted in remarkable improvement in glucose and insulin tolerance. In addition, neither the low- nor high-capsaicin diet could alter the α-diversity and β-diversity of the gut microbiota. Taxonomy-based analysis showed that both the low- and high-capsaicin diets, acting in similar ways, significantly increased the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio at the phylum level as well as increased the Roseburia abundance and decreased the Bacteroides and Parabacteroides abundances at the genus level. Spearman's correlation analysis revealed that the Roseburia abundance was negatively while the Bacteroides and Parabacteroides abundances were positively correlated to the fasting blood glucose level and area under the curve by the oral glucose tolerance test. Finally, the low- and high-capsaicin diets significantly increased the fecal butyrate and plasma total GLP-1 levels, but decreased plasma total ghrelin, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6

  1. Mars 520-d mission simulation reveals protracted crew hypokinesis and alterations of sleep duration and timing.

    PubMed

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Mollicone, Daniel; Ecker, Adrian; Jones, Christopher W; Hyder, Eric C; Di Antonio, Adrian; Savelev, Igor; Kan, Kevin; Goel, Namni; Morukov, Boris V; Sutton, Jeffrey P

    2013-02-12

    The success of interplanetary human spaceflight will depend on many factors, including the behavioral activity levels, sleep, and circadian timing of crews exposed to prolonged microgravity and confinement. To address the effects of the latter, we used a high-fidelity ground simulation of a Mars mission to objectively track sleep-wake dynamics in a multinational crew of six during 520 d of confined isolation. Measurements included continuous recordings of wrist actigraphy and light exposure (4.396 million min) and weekly computer-based neurobehavioral assessments (n = 888) to identify changes in the crew's activity levels, sleep quantity and quality, sleep-wake periodicity, vigilance performance, and workload throughout the record-long 17 mo of mission confinement. Actigraphy revealed that crew sedentariness increased across the mission as evident in decreased waking movement (i.e., hypokinesis) and increased sleep and rest times. Light exposure decreased during the mission. The majority of crewmembers also experienced one or more disturbances of sleep quality, vigilance deficits, or altered sleep-wake periodicity and timing, suggesting inadequate circadian entrainment. The results point to the need to identify markers of differential vulnerability to hypokinesis and sleep-wake changes during the prolonged isolation of exploration spaceflight and the need to ensure maintenance of circadian entrainment, sleep quantity and quality, and optimal activity levels during exploration missions. Therefore, successful adaptation to such missions will require crew to transit in spacecraft and live in surface habitats that instantiate aspects of Earth's geophysical signals (appropriately timed light exposure, food intake, exercise) required for temporal organization and maintenance of human behavior.

  2. Copper and ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis transport protein COPT1 alter iron homeostasis in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Andrés-Bordería, Amparo; Andrés, Fernando; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Perea-García, Ana; Domingo, Concha; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2017-06-19

    Copper deficiency and excess differentially affect iron homeostasis in rice and overexpression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity copper transporter COPT1 slightly increases endogenous iron concentration in rice grains. Higher plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to efficiently acquire and use micronutrients such as copper and iron. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between both metals remain poorly understood. In the present work, we study the effects produced on iron homeostasis by a wide range of copper concentrations in the growth media and by altered copper transport in Oryza sativa plants. Gene expression profiles in rice seedlings grown under copper excess show an altered expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis compared to standard control conditions. Thus, ferritin OsFER2 and ferredoxin OsFd1 mRNAs are down-regulated whereas the transcriptional iron regulator OsIRO2 and the nicotianamine synthase OsNAS2 mRNAs rise under copper excess. As expected, the expression of OsCOPT1, which encodes a high-affinity copper transport protein, as well as other copper-deficiency markers are down-regulated by copper. Furthermore, we show that Arabidopsis COPT1 overexpression (C1 (OE) ) in rice causes root shortening in high copper conditions and under iron deficiency. C1 (OE) rice plants modify the expression of the putative iron-sensing factors OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and enhance the expression of OsIRO2 under copper excess, which suggests a role of copper transport in iron signaling. Importantly, the C1 (OE) rice plants grown on soil contain higher endogenous iron concentration than wild-type plants in both brown and white grains. Collectively, these results highlight the effects of rice copper status on iron homeostasis, which should be considered to obtain crops with optimized nutrient concentrations in edible parts.

  3. Alterations of locomotor activity rhythm and sleep parameters in patients with advanced glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Lanzani, María Florencia; de Zavalía, Nuria; Fontana, Héctor; Sarmiento, María Ines Keller; Golombek, Diego; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of advanced glaucoma on locomotor activity rhythms and related sleep parameters. Nine normal subjects and nine age-matched patients with bilateral advanced primary open-angle glaucoma, >10 yrs since diagnosis, were included in this observational, prospective, case-control study. Patients were required to record the timing and duration of their sleep and daily activities, and wore an actigraph on the wrist of the nondominant arm for 20 d. Activity rhythm period, MESOR (24-h time-series mean), amplitude (one-half peak-to-trough variation), and acrophase (peak time), plus long sleep episodes during the wake state, sleep duration, efficiency, and latency, as well as mean activity score, wake minutes, and mean wake episodes during the sleep interval were assessed in controls and glaucomatous patients. Glaucomatous patients exhibited significant decrease in nighttime sleep efficiency, and significant increase in the mean activity score, wake minutes, and mean wake episode during the night. These results suggest that alterations of circadian physiology could be a risk to the quality of life of patients with glaucoma.

  4. Interaction between Sleep and Metabolism in Drosophila with Altered Octopamine Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Renske; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Crocker, Amanda; Sehgal, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Sleep length and metabolic dysfunction are correlated, but the causal relationship between these processes is unclear. Octopamine promotes wakefulness in the fly by acting through the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the fly brain. To determine if insulin signaling mediates the effects of octopamine on sleep:wake behavior, we assayed flies in which insulin signaling activity was genetically altered. We found that increasing insulin signaling does not promote wake, nor does insulin appear to mediate the wake-promoting effects of octopamine. Octopamine also affects metabolism in invertebrate species, including, as we show here, Drosophila melanogaster. Triglycerides are decreased in mutants with compromised octopamine signaling and elevated in flies with increased activity of octopaminergic neurons. Interestingly, this effect is mediated at least partially by insulin, suggesting that effects of octopamine on metabolism are independent of its effects on sleep. We further investigated the relative contribution of metabolic and sleep phenotypes to the starvation response of flies with altered octopamine signaling. Hyperactivity (indicative of foraging) induced by starvation was elevated in octopamine receptor mutants, despite their high propensity for sleep, indicating that their metabolic state dictates their behavioral response under these conditions. Moreover, flies with increased octopamine signaling do not suppress sleep in response to starvation, even though they are normally hyper-aroused, most likely because of their high triglyceride levels. Together, these data suggest that observed correlations between sleep and metabolic phenotypes can result from shared molecular pathways rather than causality, and environmental conditions can lead to the dominance of one phenotype over the other. PMID:22829591

  5. Autonomic and Renal Alterations in the Offspring of Sleep-Restricted Mothers During Late Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Raimundo, Joyce R S; Bergamaschi, Cassia T; Campos, Ruy R; Palma, Beatriz D; Tufik, Sergio; Gomes, Guiomar N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Considering that changes in the maternal environment may result in changes in progeny, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sleep restriction during the last week of pregnancy on renal function and autonomic responses in male descendants at an adult age. METHODS: After confirmation of pregnancy, female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to either a control or a sleep restriction group. The sleep-restricted rats were subjected to sleep restriction using the multiple platforms method for over 20 hours per day between the 14th and 20th day of pregnancy. After delivery, the litters were limited to 6 offspring that were designated as offspring from control and offspring from sleep-restricted mothers. Indirect measurements of systolic blood pressure (BPi), renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, glomerular area and number of glomeruli per field were evaluated at three months of age. Direct measurements of cardiovascular function (heart rate and mean arterial pressure), cardiac sympathetic tone, cardiac parasympathetic tone, and baroreflex sensitivity were evaluated at four months of age. RESULTS: The sleep-restricted offspring presented increases in BPi, glomerular filtration rate and glomerular area compared with the control offspring. The sleep-restricted offspring also showed higher basal heart rate, increased mean arterial pressure, increased sympathetic cardiac tone, decreased parasympathetic cardiac tone and reduced baroreflex sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that reductions in sleep during the last week of pregnancy lead to alterations in cardiovascular autonomic regulation and renal morpho-functional changes in offspring, triggering increases in blood pressure. PMID:27652834

  6. Sleep Deprivation Alters Effort Discounting but not Delay Discounting of Monetary Rewards

    PubMed Central

    Libedinsky, Camilo; Massar, Stijn A. A.; Ling, Aiqing; Chee, Weiyan; Huettel, Scott A.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether sleep deprivation would affect the discounting of delayed rewards, of rewards entailing the expense of effort, or both. Design: We measured rates of two types of reward discounting under conditions of rested wakefulness (RW) and sleep deprivation (SD). Delay discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller monetary rewards sooner rather than larger monetary rewards later. Effort discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller rewards that require less effort to obtain (e.g., typing a small number of letter strings backward) over larger but more effortful rewards (e.g., typing more letter strings to receive the reward). The first two experiments used a crossover design in which one session was conducted after a normal night of sleep (RW), and the other after a night without sleep (SD). The first experiment evaluated only temporal discounting whereas the second evaluated temporal and effort discounting. In the second experiment, the discounting tasks were repeatedly administered prior to the state comparisons to minimize the effects of order and/or repeated testing. In a third experiment, participants were studied only once in a between-subject evaluation of discounting across states. Setting: The study took place in a research laboratory. Participants: Seventy-seven healthy young adult participants: 20 in Experiment 1, 27 in Experiment 2, and 30 in Experiment 3. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation elicited increased effort discounting but did not affect delay discounting. Conclusions: The dissociable effects of sleep deprivation on two forms of discounting behavior suggest that they may have differing underlying neural mechanisms. Citation: Libedinsky C; Massar SAA; Ling A; Chee W; Huettel SA; Chee MWL. Sleep deprivation alters effort discounting but not delay discounting of monetary rewards. SLEEP 2013;36(6):899-904. PMID:23729933

  7. A dopamine receptor d2-type agonist attenuates the ability of stress to alter sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, F; Ehlen, J C; Williams, N S; Montemarano, J J; Paul, K N

    2014-11-01

    Although sleep disruptions that accompany stress reduce quality of life and deteriorate health, the mechanisms through which stress alters sleep remain obscure. Psychological stress can alter sleep in a variety of ways, but it has been shown to be particularly influential on rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Prolactin (PRL), a sexually dimorphic, stress-sensitive hormone whose basal levels are higher in females, has somnogenic effects on REM sleep. In the current study, we examined the relationship between PRL secretion and REM sleep after restraint stress to determine whether: 1) the ability of stress to increase REM sleep is PRL-dependent, and 2) fluctuating PRL levels underlie sex differences in sleep responses to stress. Because dopamine D2 receptors in the pituitary gland are the primary regulator of PRL secretion, D2 receptor agonist, 1-[(6-allylergolin-8β-yl)-carbonyl]-1-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl]-3-ethylurea (cabergoline), was used to attenuate PRL levels in mice before 1 hour of restraint stress. Mice were implanted with electroencephalographic/electromyographic recording electrodes and received an ip injection of either 0.3-mg/kg cabergoline or vehicle before a control procedure of 1 hour of sleep deprivation by gentle handling during the light phase. Six days after the control procedure, mice received cabergoline or vehicle 15 minutes before 1 hour of restraint stress. Cabergoline blocked the ability of restraint stress to increase REM sleep amount in males but did not alter REM sleep amount after stress in females even though it reduced basal REM sleep amount in female controls. These data provide evidence that the ability for restraint stress to increase REM sleep is dependent on PRL and that sex differences in REM sleep amount may be driven by PRL.

  8. A new theoretical approach to the functional meaning of sleep and dreaming in humans based on the maintenance of 'predictive psychic homeostasis'.

    PubMed

    Agnati, Luigi F; Barlow, Peter W; Baluška, František; Tonin, Paolo; Guescini, Michele; Leo, Giuseppina; Fuxe, Kjell

    2011-11-01

    Different theories have been put forward during the last decade to explain the functional meaning of sleep and dreaming in humans. In the present paper, a new theory is presented which, while taking advantage of these earlier theories, introduces the following new and original aspects:   • Circadian rhythms relevant to various organs of the body affect the reciprocal interactions which operate to maintain constancy of the internal milieu and thereby also affect the sleep/wakefulness cycle. Particular attention is given to the constancy of natraemia and osmolarity and to the permissive role that the evolution of renal function has had for the evolution of the central nervous system and its integrative actions. • The resetting of neuro-endocrine controls at the onset of wakefulness leads to the acquisition of new information and its integration within previously stored memories. This point is dealt with in relation to Moore-Ede's proposal for the existence of a 'predictive homeostasis'. • The concept of 'psychic homeostasis' is introduced and is considered as one of the most important states since it is aimed at the well-being, or eudemonia, of the human psyche. Sleep and dreaming in humans are discussed as important functions for the maintenance of a newly proposed composite state: that of 'predictive psychic homeostasis'. On the basis of these assumptions, and in accordance with the available neurobiological data, the present paper puts forward the novel hypothesis that sleep and dreaming play important functions in humans by compensating for psychic allostatic overloads. Hence, both consolatory dreams and disturbing nightmares can be part of the vis medicatrix naturae, the natural healing power, in this case, the state of eudemonia.

  9. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Michael W.; Griffith, Leslie C.; Vecsey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis. PMID:25116571

  10. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies.

    PubMed

    Chi, Michael W; Griffith, Leslie C; Vecsey, Christopher G

    2014-08-11

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis.

  11. The median preoptic nucleus: front and centre for the regulation of body fluid, sodium, temperature, sleep and cardiovascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    McKinley, M J; Yao, S T; Uschakov, A; McAllen, R M; Rundgren, M; Martelli, D

    2015-05-01

    Located in the midline anterior wall of the third cerebral ventricle (i.e. the lamina terminalis), the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) receives a unique set of afferent neural inputs from fore-, mid- and hindbrain. These afferent connections enable it to receive neural signals related to several important aspects of homeostasis. Included in these afferent projections are (i) neural inputs from two adjacent circumventricular organs, the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis, that respond to hypertonicity, circulating angiotensin II or other humoural factors, (ii) signals from cutaneous warm and cold receptors that are relayed to MnPO, respectively, via different subnuclei in the lateral parabrachial nucleus and (iii) input from the medulla associated with baroreceptor and vagal afferents. These afferent signals reach appropriate neurones within the MnPO that enable relevant neural outputs, both excitatory and inhibitory, to be activated or inhibited. The efferent neural pathways that proceed from the MnPO terminate on (i) neuroendocrine cells in the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei to regulate vasopressin release, while polysynaptic pathways from MnPO to cortical sites may drive thirst and water intake, (ii) thermoregulatory pathways to the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and medullary raphé to regulate shivering, brown adipose tissue and skin vasoconstriction, (iii) parvocellular neurones in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus that drive autonomic pathways influencing cardiovascular function. As well, (iv) other efferent pathways from the MnPO to sites in the ventrolateral pre-optic nucleus, perifornical region of the lateral hypothalamic area and midbrain influence sleep mechanisms.

  12. Role of homocysteine and folic acid on the altered calcium homeostasis of platelets from rats with biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Romecín, Paola; Atucha, Noemí M; Navarro, Esther G; Clara Ortiz, M; Iyú, David; Rosado, Juan Antonio; García-Estañ, Joaquín

    2017-02-02

    Previously, we have found that intracellular calcium homeostasis is altered in platelets from an experimental model of liver cirrhosis, the bile-duct ligated (BDL) rat; these alterations are compatible with the existence of a hypercoagulable state. Different studies indicate that cholestatic diseases are associated with hyperhomocysteinemia; thus, we hypothetized that it could contribute to those platelet alterations. In the present study, we have investigated the role of homocysteine (HCY) in platelet aggregation and calcium signaling in the BDL model. The effect of chronic folic acid treatment was also analyzed. Acute treatment with HCY increased the aggregation response to ADP and calcium responses to thrombin in platelets of control and BDL rats. Capacitative calcium entry was not altered by HCY. Chronic treatment with folic acid decreased platelet aggregation in control and BDL rats, but this decrease was greater in BDL rats. In folic acid-treated rats, thrombin-induced calcium entry and release were decreased in platelet of control rats but unaltered in BDL rats; however, capacitative calcium entry was decreased in platelets of control and BDL rats treated with folic acid. Reactive oxygen species were produced at higher levels by BDL platelets after stimulation with HCY or thrombin and folic acid normalized these responses. HCY plays a role in the enhanced platelet aggregation response of BDL rats, probably through an enhanced formation of ROS. Folic acid pretreatment normalizes many of the platelet alterations shown by BDL rats.

  13. Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) Modulates Fear-Induced Alterations in Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linghui; Tang, Xiangdong; Wellman, Laurie L.; Liu, Xianling; Sanford, Larry D.

    2009-01-01

    Contextual fear significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REM) during post-exposure sleep in mice and rats. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) plays a major role in CNS responses to stressors. We examined the influence of CRF and astressin (AST), a non-specific CRF antagonist, on sleep after contextual fear in BALB/c mice. Male mice were implanted with transmitters for recording sleep via telemetry and with a guide cannula aimed into the lateral ventricle. Recordings for vehicle and handling control were obtained after ICV microinjection of saline (SAL) followed by exposure to a novel chamber. Afterwards, the mice were subjected to shock training (20 trials, 0.5 mA, 0.5 s duration) for 2 sessions. After training, separate groups of mice received ICV microinjections of SAL (0.2 microl, n=9), CRF (0.4 microg, n=8), or AST (1.0 microg, n=8) prior to exposure to the shock context alone. Sleep was then recorded for 20 hours (8-hour light and 12-hour dark period). Compared to handling control, contextual fear significantly decreased REM during the 8-h light period in mice receiving SAL and in mice receiving CRF, but not in the mice receiving AST. Mice receiving CRF exhibited reductions in REM during the 12-h dark period after contextual fear, whereas mice receiving SAL or AST did not. CRF also reduced non-REM (NREM) delta (slow wave) amplitude in the EEG. Only mice receiving SAL prior to contextual fear exhibited significant reductions in NREM and total sleep. These findings demonstrate a role for the central CRF system in regulating alterations in sleep induced by contextual fear. PMID:19376095

  14. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) modulates fear-induced alterations in sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linghui; Tang, Xiangdong; Wellman, Laurie L; Liu, Xianling; Sanford, Larry D

    2009-06-18

    Contextual fear significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REM) during post-exposure sleep in mice and rats. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) plays a major role in CNS responses to stressors. We examined the influence of CRF and astressin (AST), a non-specific CRF antagonist, on sleep after contextual fear in BALB/c mice. Male mice were implanted with transmitters for recording sleep via telemetry and with a guide cannula aimed into the lateral ventricle. Recordings for vehicle and handling control were obtained after ICV microinjection of saline (SAL) followed by exposure to a novel chamber. Afterwards, the mice were subjected to shock training (20 trials, 0.5 mA, 0.5 s duration) for 2 sessions. After training, separate groups of mice received ICV microinjections of SAL (0.2 microl, n=9), CRF (0.4 microg, n=8), or AST (1.0 microg, n=8) prior to exposure to the shock context alone. Sleep was then recorded for 20 h (8-hour light and 12-hour dark period). Compared to handling control, contextual fear significantly decreased REM during the 8-h light period in mice receiving SAL and in mice receiving CRF, but not in the mice receiving AST. Mice receiving CRF exhibited reductions in REM during the 12-h dark period after contextual fear, whereas mice receiving SAL or AST did not. CRF also reduced non-REM (NREM) delta (slow wave) amplitude in the EEG. Only mice receiving SAL prior to contextual fear exhibited significant reductions in NREM and total sleep. These findings demonstrate a role for the central CRF system in regulating alterations in sleep induced by contextual fear.

  15. Energy content of the evening meal alters nocturnal body temperature but not sleep.

    PubMed

    Driver, H S; Shulman, I; Baker, F C; Buffenstein, R

    Meals of varying energy content and episodes of sleep influence body temperature. We compared the effect of an evening meal, varying from high-energy (11.91 +/- 0.86 MJ) to average (5.74 +/- 0.88 MJ) and a 10-h fast (no evening meal), on nocturnal body temperature and sleep. Seven healthy men (20-24 years, mean body mass index of 23.4 +/- 2.6 kg/m2) reported to the laboratory for an evening meal at 2000 h having consumed similar amounts of food before 1300 h. After completing the meal, subjective hunger ratings were assessed, and a venous blood sample taken. The subjects spent 4 nonconsecutive nights (an adaptation night, followed by either of the two meal conditions or the fast in random order) in the sleep laboratory when polysomnographic recordings were made from 2300 to 0700 h. Meal energy content and serum concentrations of insulin, triglyceride, and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) varied significantly. Lower rectal temperatures were measured during the fast than following the meals. Over the 8-h recording period, thermal response indices (TRI) varied with higher body temperatures following the higher energy meal. Similar rectal temperatures were attained by the end of the sleep periods. There were no significant differences in any of the subjective or objective sleep measures. The physiological responses associated with the transient dietary changes of an evening meal or a 10-h fast altered nocturnal body temperature but did not significantly affect sleep of good sleepers when sleep was initiated 2 to 3 h after finishing the meal.

  16. Lowering dialysate temperature improves sleep and alters nocturnal skin temperature in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kathy P; Bailey, James L; Rye, David B; Bliwise, Donald L; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2007-03-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) induces physiological changes that may affect the ability to dissipate heat and adversely affect sleep. We studied the effects of altering dialysate temperature on polysomnographic measures of nocturnal sleep and the time course of proximal skin temperature. The sample included seven stable HD patients. The three-phase randomized trial was conducted in a research facility. After one acclimatization night, subjects were readmitted in the evening on two additional occasions for 42 h and received HD the next morning in the warm condition (dialysate 37 degrees C) and cool condition (dialysate 35 degrees C) in random order. Continuous proximal skin temperature (axillary, T(ax)) and polysomnographic measures of sleep were recorded the nights before and after HD was administered. Highly significant findings included that the time course of T(ax) was markedly affected by dialysis temperature. There was a greater drop of T(ax) in the early morning following the warm condition than during the baseline nights or in the cool condition. Logistic regression indicated that the odds for the occurrence of sleep and its deeper stages were strongly and positively associated with T(ax). Time of sleep onset was earlier in the cool condition (P = 0.03) with trends toward longer total sleep times (P = 0.09) and shorter rapid-eye-movement latencies (P = 0.09). These observations suggest that the use of cool dialysate during HD may improve nocturnal sleep by decreasing sympathetic activation and sustaining the normally elevated nocturnal skin temperature until later into the morning hours.

  17. Chronic sleep deprivation alters the myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruihua; Huang, Fei; Wang, Peihuan; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Lei; Wu, Gaoyi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms of rat masseter muscle fibres caused by chronic sleep deprivation and a possible link with the pathogenesis of disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 180 male rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=60 in each): cage controls, large platform controls, and chronic sleep deprivation group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups with different observation periods (7, 14, and 21 days). We investigated he expression of MyHC isoforms in masseter muscle fibres by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. In rats with chronic sleep deprivation there was increased MyHC-I expression in layers of both shallow and deep muscles at 7 and 21 days compared with the control groups, whereas sleep deprivation was associated with significantly decreased MyHC-II expression. At 21 days, there were no differences in MyHC-I or MyHC-II expression between the groups and there were no differences between the two control groups at any time point. These findings suggest that chronic sleep deprivation alters the expression of MyHC isoforms, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of disorders of the TMJ.

  18. Disrupted Sleep is Associated with Altered Pain Processing by Sex and Ethnicity in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Megan E.; Goodin, Burel R.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; King, Chris; Glover, Toni L.; Bulls, Hailey W.; Herbert, Matthew; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Bartley, Emily J.; Fessler, Barri J.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Staud, Roland; Redden, David; Fillingim, Roger B.; Bradley, Laurence A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies indicate that improving sleep decreases reported pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), but it is unclear if this association extends to experimentally-induced pain responses. A community-based sample of 88 African-American and 52 non-Hispanic white adults (45-76y) with knee OA completed the Insomnia Severity Index and the arousal subscale of the Sleep Hygiene and Practices Scale. Participants underwent quantitative sensory testing including measures of pain sensitivity and facilitation at the knee, and pain inhibition. Outcomes were analyzed with multiple Tobit, hierarchical regression models, with adjustment for relevant covariates. Ethnicity and sex by sleep interactions were also entered into the models. After covariate adjustment, main associations were not observed. However, sex interacted with insomnia severity to predict greater temporal summation of heat and punctate pressure pain among women and lower heat temporal summation among men. Men and women who engaged in frequent arousal-associated sleep behaviors demonstrated higher and lower heat temporal summation, respectively. Non-Hispanic whites with greater insomnia severity displayed lower pressure pain thresholds and pain inhibition. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that disrupted sleep is associated with altered pain processing differentially by sex and ethnicity/race among people with knee OA. PMID:25725172

  19. Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Salimi, Ali; Dadar, Mahsa; Jones, Barbara E.; Collins, D. Louis; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by dream-enactment motor manifestations arising from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently encountered in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Yet the specific neurostructural changes associated with RBD in PD patients remain to be revealed by neuroimaging. Here we identified such neurostructural alterations by comparing large samples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 69 PD patients with probable RBD, 240 patients without RBD and 138 healthy controls, using deformation-based morphometry (p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). All data were extracted from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative. PD patients with probable RBD showed smaller volumes than patients without RBD and than healthy controls in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, medullary reticular formation, hypothalamus, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. These results demonstrate that RBD is associated with a prominent loss of volume in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, where cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are located and implicated in the promotion of REM sleep and muscle atonia. It is additionally associated with more widespread atrophy in other subcortical and cortical regions whose loss also likely contributes to the altered regulation of sleep-wake states and motor activity underlying RBD in PD patients. PMID:27245317

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 21 is induced upon cardiac stress and alters cardiac lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Brahma, Manoja K.; Adam, Rene C.; Pollak, Nina M.; Jaeger, Doris; Zierler, Kathrin A.; Pöcher, Nadja; Schreiber, Renate; Romauch, Matthias; Moustafa, Tarek; Eder, Sandra; Ruelicke, Thomas; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a PPARα-regulated gene elucidated in the liver of PPARα-deficient mice or PPARα agonist-treated mice. Mice globally lacking adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) exhibit a marked defect in TG catabolism associated with impaired PPARα-activated gene expression in the heart and liver, including a drastic reduction in hepatic FGF21 mRNA expression. Here we show that FGF21 mRNA expression is markedly increased in the heart of ATGL-deficient mice accompanied by elevated expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, which can be reversed by reconstitution of ATGL expression in cardiac muscle. In line with this assumption, the induction of ER stress increases FGF21 mRNA expression in H9C2 cardiomyotubes. Cardiac FGF21 expression was also induced upon fasting of healthy mice, implicating a role of FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. To address this question, we generated and characterized mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of FGF21 (CM-Fgf21). FGF21 was efficiently secreted from cardiomyocytes of CM-Fgf21 mice, which moderately affected cardiac TG homeostasis, indicating a role for FGF21 in cardiac energy metabolism. Together, our results show that FGF21 expression is activated upon cardiac ER stress linked to defective lipolysis and that a persistent increase in circulating FGF21 levels interferes with cardiac and whole body energy homeostasis. PMID:25176985

  1. Caffeine alters oxidative homeostasis in the body of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, M

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is a metabolite from coffee genus and some other plants. It has disparate molecular targets in the body. Beside the major action based on antagonism on adenosine receptor, it is involved in other neurotransmission pathways as well. The complete mechanism of caffeine action remains unrevealed including link to oxidative homeostasis. For the reason, the current paper solves how caffeine influences oxidative homeostasis in BALB/c mouse model. Caffeine was given intramuscularly in doses 1-64 mg/kg and the animals were sacrificed in time intervals from 4 hours up to 3 days. In the experiment, a significant increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in the kidney and decrease in the brain indicated up and down regulation of oxidative burden. Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) level in the kidney appoint at release of low molecular weight antioxidants in the organ. The remaining organs including heart, muscles and liver were intact. In the same way, caspase 3 level was steady and no apoptotic processes were proved (Fig. 3, Ref. 48).

  2. Assessment of altered lipid homeostasis by HILIC-ion mobility-mass spectrometry-based lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Hines, Kelly M; Herron, Josi; Xu, Libin

    2017-04-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be a highly informative technique for the characterization of lipids from cells and tissues. We report the combination of hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with traveling-wave IM-MS (TWIM-MS) for comprehensive lipidomics analysis. Main lipid categories such as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, and glycerophospholipids are separated on the basis of their lipid backbones in the IM dimension, whereas subclasses of each category are mostly separated on the basis of their headgroups in the HILIC dimension, demonstrating the orthogonality of HILIC and IM separations. Using our previously established lipid calibrants for collision cross-section (CCS) measurements in TWIM, we measured over 250 CCS values covering 12 lipid classes in positive and negative modes. The coverage of the HILIC-IM-MS method is demonstrated in the analysis of Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells exposed to benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) with C10 or C16 alkyl chains, which we have previously shown to affect gene expression related to cholesterol and lipid homeostasis. We found that BAC exposure resulted in significant changes to several lipid classes, including glycerides, sphingomyelins, phosphatidylcholines, and phosphatidylethanolamines. Our results indicate that BAC exposure modifies lipid homeostasis in a manner that is dependent upon the length of the BAC alkyl chain. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Sleep: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is sleep? Sleep is a period of unconsciousness during which ...

  4. Multimodal neuroimaging investigations of alterations to consciousness: the relationship between absence epilepsy and sleep.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Andrew P; Rollings, David T; Khalsa, Sakh; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The link between epilepsy and sleep is well established on many levels. The focus of the current review is on recent neuroimaging investigations into the alterations of consciousness that are observed during absence seizures and the descent into sleep. Functional neuroimaging provides simultaneous cortical and subcortical recording of activity throughout the brain, allowing a detailed definition and characterization of large-scale brain networks and the interactions between them. This has led to the identification of a set of regions which collectively form the consciousness system, which includes contributions from the default mode network (DMN), ascending arousal systems, and the thalamus. Electrophysiological and neuroimaging investigations have also clearly demonstrated the importance of thalamocortical and corticothalamic networks in the evolution of sleep and absence epilepsy, two phenomena in which the subject experiences an alteration to the conscious state and a disconnection from external input. However, the precise relationship between the consciousness system, thalamocortical networks, and consciousness itself remains to be clarified. One of the fundamental challenges is to understand how distributed brain networks coordinate their activity in order to maintain and implement complex behaviors such as consciousness and how modifications to this network activity lead to alterations in consciousness. By taking into account not only the level of activation of individual brain regions but also their connectivity within specific networks and the activity and connectivity of other relevant networks, a more specific quantification of brain states can be achieved. This, in turn, may provide a more fundamental understanding of the alterations to consciousness experienced in sleep and epilepsy. © 2013.

  5. Developmental care does not alter sleep and development of premature infants.

    PubMed

    Ariagno, R L; Thoman, E B; Boeddiker, M A; Kugener, B; Constantinou, J C; Mirmiran, M; Baldwin, R B

    1997-12-01

    The Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care Program (NIDCAP) for very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants has been suggested by Als et al to improve several medical outcome variables such as time on ventilator, time to nipple feed, the duration of hospital stay, better behavioral performance on Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior (APIB), and improved neurodevelopmental outcomes. We have tested the hypothesis of whether the infants who had received NIDCAP would show advanced sleep-wake pattern, behavioral, and neurodevelopmental outcome. Thirty-five VLBW infants were randomly assigned to receive NIDCAP or routine infant care. The goals for NIDCAP intervention were to enhance comfort and stability and to reduce stress and agitation for the preterm infants by: a) altering the environment by decreasing excess light and noise in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and by using covers over the incubators and cribs; b) use of positioning aids such as boundary supports, nests, and buntings to promote a balance of flexion and extension postures; c) modification of direct hands-on caregiving to maximize preparation of infants for, tolerance of, and facilitation of recovery from interventions; d) promotion of self-regulatory behaviors such as holding on, grasping, and sucking; e) attention to the readiness for and the ability to take oral feedings; and f) involving parents in the care of their infants as much as possible. The infants' sleep was recorded at 36 weeks postconceptional age (PCA) and at 3 months corrected age (CA) using the Motility Monitoring System (MMS), an automated, nonintrusive procedure for determining sleep state from movement and respiration patterns. Behavioral and developmental outcome was assessed by the Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant (NAPI) at 36 weeks PCA, the APIB at 42 weeks PCA, and by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) at 4, 12, and 24 months CA. Sleep developmental measures at 3 months CA showed a

  6. Bile Acids Do Not Contribute to the Altered Calcium Homeostasis of Platelets from Rats with Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Romecín, Paola; Navarro, Esther G.; Ortiz, M. Clara; Iyú, David; García-Estañ, Joaquín; Atucha, Noemí M.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we have found that intracellular calcium homeostasis is altered in platelets from an experimental model of liver cirrhosis, the bile-duct ligated (BDL) rat; these alterations are compatible with the existence of a hypercoagulable state and related to an enhanced intracellular calcium release evoked by thrombin and an increased amount of calcium stored in the intracellular organelles. In the present study we have investigated the role of bile acids in those alterations of the BDL cirrhotic model. Cholic acid (CA) or deoxycholic acid (DCA) did not change P-selectin expression or platelet aggregation in any group but elevated baseline platelet calcium levels. Incubation with both bile acids reduced calcium release after stimulation with thrombin in the absence of extracellular calcium. Pretreatment with CA but not with DCA reduced significantly thrombin-induced calcium entry in all three experimental groups. The capacitative calcium entry was also significantly lower in platelets pretreated with both bile acids. The simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and ionomycin to estimate the total amount of calcium in platelet internal stores was decreased by pretreatment with both CA and DCA, although these changes were significantly different in the control rats only with CA and in the BDL platelets with DCA. These results indicate that CA and DCA reduce calcium movements in platelets of control and BDL animals, thus suggesting that bile acids do not participate in the alterations observed in the BDL cirrotic model. PMID:28638347

  7. Postnatal exposure to trichloroethylene alters glutathione redox homeostasis, methylation potential, and neurotrophin expression in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Melnyk, Stepan; Cooney, Craig A.; Gilbert, Kathleen M.; James, S. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that continuous exposure throughout gestation until the juvenile period to environmentally-relevant doses of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice promoted adverse behavior associated with glutathione depletion in the cerebellum indicating increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to extend our findings and further characterize the impact of TCE exposure on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus, a brain region prone to oxidative stress. Instead of a continuous exposure, the mice were exposed to water only or two environmentally relevant doses of TCE in the drinking water postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age. Biomarkers of plasma metabolites in the transsulfuration pathway and the transmethylation pathway of the methionine cycle were also examined. Gene expression of neurotrophins was examined to investigate a possible relationship between oxidative stress, redox imbalance and neurotrophic factor expression with TCE exposure. Our results show that hippocampi isolated from male mice exposed to TCE showed altered glutathione redox homeostasis indicating a more oxidized state. Also observed was a significant, dose dependent increase in glutathione precursors. Plasma from the TCE treated mice showed alterations in metabolites in the transsulfuration and transmethylation pathways indicating redox imbalance and altered methylation capacity. 3-Nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of protein oxidative stress, was also significantly higher in plasma and hippocampus of TCE-exposed mice compared to controls. In contrast, expression of key neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus (BDNF, NGF, and NT-3) was significantly reduced compared to controls. Our results demonstrate that low-level postnatal and early life TCE exposure modulates neurotrophin gene expression in the mouse hippocampus and may provide a mechanism for TCE-mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:22421312

  8. Haematopoietic focal adhesion kinase deficiency alters haematopoietic homeostasis to drive tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Silvia; Maniati, Eleni; Reynolds, Louise E; Tavora, Bernardo; Lees, Delphine M; Fernandez, Isabelle; Elia, George; Casanovas, Oriol; Lo Celso, Cristina; Hagemann, Thorsten; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2014-10-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related death and thus understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this process is critical. Here, our data demonstrate, contrary to established dogma, that loss of haematopoietic-derived focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is sufficient to enhance tumour metastasis. Using both experimental and spontaneous metastasis models, we show that genetic ablation of haematopoietic FAK does not affect primary tumour growth but enhances the incidence of metastasis significantly. At a molecular level, haematopoietic FAK deletion results in an increase in PU-1 levels and decrease in GATA-1 levels causing a shift of hematopoietic homeostasis towards a myeloid commitment. The subsequent increase in circulating granulocyte number, with an increase in serum CXCL12 and granulocyte CXCR4 levels, was required for augmented metastasis in mice lacking haematopoietic FAK. Overall our findings provide a mechanism by which haematopoietic FAK controls cancer metastasis.

  9. Persistent replicative stress alters Polycomb phenotypes and tissue homeostasis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Landais, Severine; D'Alterio, Cecilia; Jones, D. Leanne

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins establish and maintain genetic programs that regulate cell fate decisions. Drosophila multi sex combs (mxc) was categorized as a PcG gene based on a classical Polycomb phenotype and genetic interactions; however, a mechanistic connection between Polycomb and Mxc has not been elucidated. Hypomorphic alleles of mxc are characterized by male and female sterility and ectopic sex combs. Mxc is an important regulator of histone synthesis, and we find that increased levels of the core histone H3 in mxc mutants result in replicative stress and a persistent DNA damage response (DDR). Germline loss, ectopic sex combs and the DDR are suppressed by reducing H3 in mxc mutants. Conversely, mxc phenotypes are enhanced when the DDR is abrogated. Importantly, replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment recapitulated mxc germline phenotypes. These data reveal how persistent replicative stress affects gene expression, tissue homeostasis, and maintenance of cellular identity in vivo. PMID:24746823

  10. GPR17 gene disruption does not alter food intake or glucose homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mastaitis, Jason; Min, Soo; Elvert, Ralf; Kannt, Aimo; Xin, Yurong; Ochoa, Francisca; Gale, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, David M.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 17 (GPR17) was recently reported to be a Foxo1 target in agouti-related peptide (AGRP) neurons. Intracerebroventricular injection of GPR17 agonists induced food intake, whereas administration of an antagonist to the receptor reduced feeding. These data lead to the conclusion that pharmacological modulation of GPR17 has therapeutic potential to treat obesity. Here we report that mice deficient in Gpr17 (Gpr17−/−) have similar food intake and body weight compared with their wild-type littermates. Gpr17−/− mice have normal hypothalamic Agrp mRNA expression, AGRP plasma levels, and metabolic rate. GPR17 deficiency in mice did not affect glucose homeostasis or prevent fat-induced insulin resistance. These data do not support a role for GPR17 in the control of food intake, body weight, or glycemic control. PMID:25624481

  11. Starter Feeding Supplementation Alters Colonic Mucosal Bacterial Communities and Modulates Mucosal Immune Homeostasis in Newborn Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junhua; Bian, Gaorui; Sun, Daming; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of starter feeding supplementation on colonic mucosal bacterial communities and on mucosal immune homeostasis in pre-weaned lambs. We selected eight pairs of 10-day-old lamb twins. One twin was fed breast milk (M, n = 8), while the other was fed breast milk plus starter (M+S, n = 8). The lambs were sacrificed at 56 days age. Colonic content was collected to determine the pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactate. The colonic mucosa was harvested to characterize the bacterial communities using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and to determine mRNA expression levels of cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that starter feeding decreased luminal pH and increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total VFA, and lactate in the colon. The principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and analysis of molecular variance show that starter feeding supplementation significantly affected the colonic mucosal bacterial communities with a higher relative abundance of the dominant taxa unclassified S24-7, Oscillibacter, Prevotella, Parabacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminobacter, and Succinivibrio, and a lower proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, RC9_gut_group, Blautia, Phocaeicola, Phascolarctobacterium, unclassified BS11_gut_group, unclassified family_XIII, and Campylobacter in lambs. Meanwhile, starter feeding decreased mRNA expression of TLR4 and cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in colonic tissue. Furthermore, the changes in the colonic mucosal mRNA expression of TLR and cytokines were associated with changes in mucosal bacterial composition. These findings may provide new insights into colonic mucosal bacteria and immune homeostasis in developing lambs. PMID:28382025

  12. Electrocardiogram-Based Sleep Spectrogram Measures of Sleep Stability and Glucose Disposal in Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Pogach, Melanie S.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Thomas, Neil; Thomas, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is independently associated with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Experimental sleep fragmentation has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity. Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG)-based sleep-quality measures have been inconsistently associated with indices of glucose metabolism. This analysis explored associations between glucose metabolism and an EEG-independent measure of sleep quality, the sleep spectrogram, which maps coupled oscillations of heart-rate variability and electrocardiogram (ECG)-derived respiration. The method allows improved characterization of the quality of stage 2 non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: N/A. Participants: Nondiabetic subjects with and without SDB (n = 118) underwent the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) and a full-montage polysomnogram. The sleep spectrogram was generated from ECG collected during polysomnography. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Standard polysomnographic stages (stages 1, 2, 3+4, and rapid eye movement [REM]) were not associated with the disposition index (DI) derived from the FSIVGTT. In contrast, spectrographic high-frequency coupling (a marker of stable or “effective” sleep) duration was associated with increased, and very-low-frequency coupling (a marker of wake/REM/transitions) associated with reduced DI. This relationship was noted after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, slow wave sleep, total sleep time, stage 1, the arousal index, and the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: ECG-derived sleep-spectrogram measures of sleep quality are associated with alterations in glucose-insulin homeostasis. This alternate mode of estimating sleep quality could improve our understanding of sleep and sleep-breathing effects on glucose metabolism. Citation: Pogach MS; Punjabi NM; Thomas N; Thomas RJ. Electrocardiogram-based sleep

  13. Exposure to TBT increases accumulation of lipids and alters fatty acid homeostasis in the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis.

    PubMed

    Janer, Gemma; Navarro, Juan Carlos; Porte, Cinta

    2007-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that organotin compounds affect lipid homeostasis in vertebrates, probably through interaction with RXR and/or PPARgamma receptors. Molluscs are sensitive species to the toxic effects of tributyltin (TBT), particularly to masculinization, and TBT has been recently shown to bind to molluscs RXR. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure to TBT could affect lipid homeostasis in the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis. For comparative purposes, the synthetic androgen methyl-testosterone (MT) was included in the study due to its masculinization effects, but its lack of binding to the RXR receptor. M. cornuarietis was exposed to different concentrations of TBT (30, 125, 500 ng/L as Sn) and MT (30, 300 ng/L) for 100 days. Females exposed to 500 ng/L TBT showed increased percentage of lipids and increased levels of fatty acids in the digestive gland/gonad complex (2- to 3-fold). In addition, fatty acid profiles were altered in both males and females exposed to 125 and 500 ng/L TBT. These effects were not observed in females exposed to MT. Overall, this work suggest that TBT acts as a potent inducer of lipid and fatty acid accumulation in M. cornuarietis as shown in vertebrate studies earlier, and that sex differences in sensitivity do exist.

  14. Altered surfactant homeostasis and recurrent respiratory failure secondary to TTF-1 nuclear targeting defect.

    PubMed

    Peca, Donatella; Petrini, Stefania; Tzialla, Chryssoula; Boldrini, Renata; Morini, Francesco; Stronati, Mauro; Carnielli, Virgilio P; Cogo, Paola E; Danhaive, Olivier

    2011-08-25

    Mutations of genes affecting surfactant homeostasis, such as SFTPB, SFTPC and ABCA3, lead to diffuse lung disease in neonates and children. Haploinsufficiency of NKX2.1, the gene encoding the thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)--critical for lung, thyroid and central nervous system morphogenesis and function--causes a rare form of progressive respiratory failure designated brain-lung-thyroid syndrome. Molecular mechanisms involved in this syndrome are heterogeneous and poorly explored. We report a novel TTF-1 molecular defect causing recurrent respiratory failure episodes in an infant. The subject was an infant with severe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome followed by recurrent respiratory failure episodes, hypopituitarism and neurological abnormalities. Lung histology and ultrastructure were assessed by surgical biopsy. Surfactant-related genes were studied by direct genomic DNA sequencing and array chromatine genomic hybridization (aCGH). Surfactant protein expression in lung tissue was analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. For kinetics studies, surfactant protein B and disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates after intravenous administration of stable isotope-labeled (2)H(2)O and (13)C-leucine; fractional synthetic rate was derived from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (2)H and (13)C enrichment curves. Six intubated infants with no primary lung disease were used as controls. Lung biopsy showed desquamative interstitial pneumonitis and lamellar body abnormalities suggestive of genetic surfactant deficiency. Genetic studies identified a heterozygous ABCA3 mutation, L941P, previously unreported. No SFTPB, SFTPC or NKX2.1 mutations or deletions were found. However, immunofluorescence studies showed TTF-1 prevalently expressed in type II cell cytoplasm instead of nucleus, indicating defective nuclear targeting. This pattern has not been reported in human and was not found in two healthy controls and

  15. Altered telomere homeostasis and resistance to skin carcinogenesis in Suv39h1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Petti, Eleonora; Jordi, Fabian; Buemi, Valentina; Dinami, Roberto; Benetti, Roberta; Blasco, Maria A; Schoeftner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 H3K9 histone methyltransferases (HMTs) have a conserved role in the formation of constitutive heterochromatin and gene silencing. Using a transgenic mouse model system we demonstrate that elevated expression of Suv39h1 increases global H3K9me3 levels in vivo. More specifically, Suv39h1 overexpression enhances the imposition of H3K9me3 levels at constitutive heterochromatin at telomeric and major satellite repeats in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Chromatin compaction is paralleled by telomere shortening, indicating that telomere length is controlled by H3K9me3 density at telomeres. We further show that increased Suv39h1 levels result in an impaired clonogenic potential of transgenic epidermal stem cells and Ras/E1A transduced transgenic primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Importantly, Suv39h1 overexpression in mice confers resistance to a DMBA/TPA induced skin carcinogenesis protocol that is characterized by the accumulation of activating H-ras mutations. Our results provide genetic evidence that Suv39h1 controls telomere homeostasis and mediates resistance to oncogenic stress in vivo. This identifies Suv39h1 as an interesting target to improve oncogene induced senescence in premalignant lesions. PMID:25789788

  16. UV-A emission from fluorescent energy-saving light bulbs alters local retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Heuser, Isabella; Regen, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide bans on incandescent light bulbs (ILBs) drive the use of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs, which emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Potential health issues of these light sources have already been discussed, including speculation about the putative biological effects on light exposed tissues, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized photoisomerization of all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA), a highly light sensitive morphogen, into biologically less active isomers, as a mechanism mediating biological effects of CFLs. Local at-RA is anti-carcinogenic, entrains molecular rhythms and is crucial for skin homeostasis. Therefore, we quantified the impact of CFL irradiation on extra- and intracellular levels of RA isomers using an epidermal cell culture model. Moreover, a biologically relevant impact of CFL irradiation was assessed using highly at-RA-sensitive human neuroblastoma cells. Dose-dependent conversion of extra- and intracellular at-RA into the biologically less active 13-cis-isomer was significantly higher in CFL vs. ILB exposure and completely preventable by employing a UV-filter. Moreover, pre-irradiation of culture media by CFL attenuated at-RA-specific effects on cell viability in human at-RA-sensitive cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings point towards a biological relevance of CFL-induced at-RA decomposition, providing a mechanism for CFL-mediated effects on environmental health.

  17. Altered Glucose Homeostasis and Hepatic Function in Obese Mice Deficient for Both Kinin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Carlos C.; Haro, Anderson; Russo, Fernanda J. V. P.; Schadock, Ines; Almeida, Sandro S.; Ribeiro, Rosane A.; Vanzela, Emerielle C.; Lanzoni, Valeria P.; Barros, Flavio C.; Moraes, Milton R.; Mori, Marcelo A.; Bacurau, Reury F. P.; Wurtele, Martin; Boschero, Antônio C.; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Bader, Michael; Pesquero, Joao B.; Araujo, Ronaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    The Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) has been implicated in several aspects of metabolism, including the regulation of glucose homeostasis and adiposity. Kinins and des-Arg-kinins are the major effectors of this system and promote their effects by binding to two different receptors, the kinin B2 and B1 receptors, respectively. To understand the influence of the KKS on the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we generated an animal model deficient for both kinin receptor genes and leptin (obB1B2KO). Six-month-old obB1B2KO mice showed increased blood glucose levels. Isolated islets of the transgenic animals were more responsive to glucose stimulation releasing greater amounts of insulin, mainly in 3-month-old mice, which was corroborated by elevated serum C-peptide concentrations. Furthermore, they presented hepatomegaly, pronounced steatosis, and increased levels of circulating transaminases. This mouse also demonstrated exacerbated gluconeogenesis during the pyruvate challenge test. The hepatic abnormalities were accompanied by changes in the gene expression of factors linked to glucose and lipid metabolisms in the liver. Thus, we conclude that kinin receptors are important for modulation of insulin secretion and for the preservation of normal glucose levels and hepatic functions in obese mice, suggesting a protective role of the KKS regarding complications associated with obesity and T2DM. PMID:22829877

  18. Keynote lecture: The genetics and epigenetics of altered proliferative homeostasis in ageing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, George M.

    2007-01-01

    Ageing mammals are subject to an amazing array of aberrations in proliferative homeostasis. These are of two basic types: the post-maturational failure to adequately replace effete somatic cells (atrophies) and excessive proliferations of somatic cells (hyperplasias). To a surprising degree, these occur side by side within the same tissues and are features of numerous mammalian geriatric disorders. Atrophy is the likely usual initial event, the proliferative response perhaps developing as a secondary, compensatory, initially adaptive reaction. We have little understanding of why this putative compensatory reaction so often fails to be appropriately regulated in ageing mammals, leading to such pathologies as chronic inflammation, fibrosis, metaplasia and neoplasia. Advances in formal genetic analysis, mutagenesis, stem cell biology and epigenetics are likely to provide major new understanding. Stochastic epigenetic shifts in gene expression are of growing interest, particularly in explaining intra-specific variations on rates and patterns of ageing. Nature may well have evolved such random fluctuations in gene expression as a type of group-selectionist adaptive strategy to cope with diverse stochastic environmental challenges. Alternatively, such background “noise” in transcription and translation may simply reflect a type of informational entropy. PMID:17116316

  19. Dietary fish protein alters blood lipid concentrations and hepatic genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anjali; Bettzieche, Anja; Hirche, Frank; Brandsch, Corinna; Stangl, Gabriele I; Eder, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    It is known that various dietary plant proteins are capable of influencing the lipid metabolism of human subjects and animals when compared with casein. Less, however, is known about the effects of fish protein on the cholesterol and triacylglycerol metabolism. Therefore, two experiments were conducted in which rats were fed diets containing 200 g of either fish protein, prepared from Alaska pollack fillets, or casein, which served as control, per kilogram, over 20 and 22 d, respectively. As parameters of lipid metabolism, the concentrations of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in the plasma and liver, the faecal excretion of bile acids and the hepatic expression of genes encoding proteins involved in lipid homeostasis were determined. In both experiments, rats fed fish protein had higher concentrations of cholesteryl esters in the liver, a lower concentration of cholesterol in the HDL fraction (rho > 1.063 kg/l) and lower plasma triacylglycerol concentrations than rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The gene expression analysis performed in experiment 2 showed that rats fed fish protein had higher relative mRNA concentrations of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, LDL receptor, apo AI, scavenger receptor B1 and lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase in their liver than did rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The faecal excretion of bile acids and the mRNA concentrations of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, SREBP-1c and corresponding target genes were not altered. These findings show that fish protein had multiple effects on plasma and liver lipids that were at least in part caused by an altered expression of the hepatic genes involved in lipid homeostasis.

  20. Modulation of polyamine metabolic flux in adipose tissue alters the accumulation of body fat by affecting glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunli; Perez-Leal, Oscar; Barrero, Carlos; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher; Porter, Carl; Merali, Salim

    2014-03-01

    The continued rise in obesity despite public education, awareness and policies indicates the need for mechanism-based therapeutic approaches to help control the disease. Our data, in conjunction with other studies, suggest an unexpected role for the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) in fat homeostasis. Our previous studies showed that deletion of SSAT greatly exaggerates weight gain and that the transgenic overexpression suppresses weight gain in mice on a high-fat diet. This discovery is substantial but the underlying molecular linkages are only vaguely understood. Here, we used a comprehensive systems biology approach, on white adipose tissue (WAT), to discover that the partition of acetyl-CoA towards polyamine catabolism alters glucose homeostasis and hence, fat accumulation. Comparative proteomics and antibody-based expression studies of WAT in SSAT knockout, wild type and transgenic mice identified nine proteins with an increasing gradient across the genotypes, all of which correlate with acetyl-CoA consumption in polyamine acetylation. Adipose-specific SSAT knockout mice and global SSAT knockout mice on a high-fat diet exhibited similar growth curves and proteomic patterns in their WAT, confirming that attenuated consumption of acetyl-CoA in acetylation of polyamines in adipose tissue drives the obese phenotype of these mice. Analysis of protein expression indicated that the identified changes in the levels of proteins regulating acetyl-CoA consumption occur via the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Together, our data suggest that differential expression of SSAT markedly alters acetyl-CoA levels, which in turn trigger a global shift in glucose metabolism in adipose tissue, thus affecting the accumulation of body fat.

  1. Modulation of polyamine metabolic flux in adipose tissue alters the accumulation of body fat by affecting glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunli; Perez-Leal, Oscar; Barrero, Carlos; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher; Porter, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The continued rise in obesity despite public education, awareness and policies indicates the need for mechanism-based therapeutic approaches to help control the disease. Our data, in conjunction with other studies, suggest an unexpected role for the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) in fat homeostasis. Our previous studies showed that deletion of SSAT greatly exaggerates weight gain and that the transgenic overexpression suppresses weight gain in mice on a high-fat diet. This discovery is substantial but the underlying molecular linkages are only vaguely understood. Here, we used a comprehensive systems biology approach, on white adipose tissue (WAT), to discover that the partition of acetyl-CoA towards polyamine catabolism alters glucose homeostasis and hence, fat accumulation. Comparative proteomics and antibody-based expression studies of WAT in SSAT knockout, wild type and transgenic mice identified nine proteins with an increasing gradient across the genotypes, all of which correlate with acetyl-CoA consumption in polyamine acetylation. Adipose-specific SSAT knockout mice and global SSAT knockout mice on a high-fat diet exhibited similar growth curves and proteomic patterns in their WAT, confirming that attenuated consumption of acetyl-CoA in acetylation of polyamines in adipose tissue drives the obese phenotype of these mice. Analysis of protein expression indicated that the identified changes in the levels of proteins regulating acetyl-CoA consumption occur via the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Together, our data suggest that differential expression of SSAT markedly alters acetyl-CoA levels, which in turn trigger a global shift in glucose metabolism in adipose tissue, thus affecting the accumulation of body fat. PMID:23881108

  2. Nutrients drive transcriptional changes that maintain metabolic homeostasis but alter genome architecture in Microcystis

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Morgan M; Dearth, Stephen P; Dill, Brian D; Li, Zhou; Larsen, Kristen M; Campagna, Shawn R; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a globally distributed bloom-forming organism that degrades freshwater systems around the world. Factors that drive its dispersion, diversification and success remain, however, poorly understood. To develop insight into cellular-level responses to nutrient drivers of eutrophication, RNA sequencing was coupled to a comprehensive metabolomics survey of M. aeruginosa sp. NIES 843 grown in various nutrient-reduced conditions. Transcriptomes were generated for cultures grown in nutrient-replete (with nitrate as the nitrogen (N) source), nitrogen-reduced (with nitrate, urea or ammonium acting as the N sources) and phosphate-reduced conditions. Extensive expression differences (up to 696 genes for urea-grown cells) relative to the control treatment were observed, demonstrating that the chemical variant of nitrogen available to cells affected transcriptional activity. Of particular note, a high number of transposase genes (up to 81) were significantly and reproducibly up-regulated relative to the control when grown on urea. Conversely, phosphorus (P) reduction resulted in a significant cessation in transcription of transposase genes, indicating that variation in nutrient chemistry may influence transcription of transposases and may impact the highly mosaic genomic architecture of M. aeruginosa. Corresponding metabolomes showed comparably few differences between treatments, suggesting broad changes to gene transcription are required to maintain metabolic homeostasis under nutrient reduction. The combined observations provide novel and extensive insight into the complex cellular interactions that take place in this important bloom-forming organism during variable nutrient conditions and highlight a potential unknown molecular mechanism that may drive Microcystis blooms and evolution. PMID:24858783

  3. A brain MRI study of chronic fatigue syndrome: evidence of brainstem dysfunction and altered homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barnden, Leighton R; Crouch, Benjamin; Kwiatek, Richard; Burnet, Richard; Mernone, Anacleto; Chryssidis, Steve; Scroop, Garry; Del Fante, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To explore brain involvement in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), the statistical parametric mapping of brain MR images has been extended to voxel-based regressions against clinical scores. Using SPM5 we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and analysed T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo MR signal levels in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Clinical scores included CFS fatigue duration, a score based on the 10 most common CFS symptoms, the Bell score, the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) anxiety and depression, and hemodynamic parameters from 24-h blood pressure monitoring. We also performed group × hemodynamic score interaction regressions to detect locations where MR regressions were opposite for CFS and NC, thereby indicating abnormality in the CFS group. In the midbrain, white matter volume was observed to decrease with increasing fatigue duration. For T1-weighted MR and white matter volume, group × hemodynamic score interactions were detected in the brainstem [strongest in midbrain grey matter (GM)], deep prefrontal white matter (WM), the caudal basal pons and hypothalamus. A strong correlation in CFS between brainstem GM volume and pulse pressure suggested impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation. It can be argued that at least some of these changes could arise from astrocyte dysfunction. These results are consistent with an insult to the midbrain at fatigue onset that affects multiple feedback control loops to suppress cerebral motor and cognitive activity and disrupt local CNS homeostasis, including resetting of some elements of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). © 2011 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21560176

  4. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fraysse, Bodvaël; Guicheney, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2), a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ) KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atrophy, impairment of contractile properties, histopathological abnormalities, and elevated cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, we aim at better characterizing the calcium homeostasis impairment in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from adult HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice. We demonstrate abnormal contractile properties and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL but not soleus muscles showing that calcium impairment is correlated with muscle weakness and might be a determinant factor of the spatial muscle involvement. In addition, the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL muscles is associated with an increased sarcolemmal permeability to Ca2+ and releasable Ca2+ content from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, amplitude and kinetics characteristics of the calcium transient appear unchanged. This suggests that calcium defect is probably not a primary cause of decreased force generation by compromised sarcomere shortening but may be involved in long-term deleterious consequences on muscle physiology. Our results highlight the first pathomechanism which may explain the spatial muscle involvement occurring in DNM2-related CNM and open the way toward development of a therapeutic approach to normalize calcium content. PMID:27870637

  5. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fraysse, Bodvaël; Guicheney, Pascale; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-11-15

    Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2), a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2(R465W) model. Heterozygous (HTZ) KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atrophy, impairment of contractile properties, histopathological abnormalities, and elevated cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, we aim at better characterizing the calcium homeostasis impairment in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from adult HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice. We demonstrate abnormal contractile properties and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in EDL but not soleus muscles showing that calcium impairment is correlated with muscle weakness and might be a determinant factor of the spatial muscle involvement. In addition, the elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in EDL muscles is associated with an increased sarcolemmal permeability to Ca(2+) and releasable Ca(2+) content from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, amplitude and kinetics characteristics of the calcium transient appear unchanged. This suggests that calcium defect is probably not a primary cause of decreased force generation by compromised sarcomere shortening but may be involved in long-term deleterious consequences on muscle physiology. Our results highlight the first pathomechanism which may explain the spatial muscle involvement occurring in DNM2-related CNM and open the way toward development of a therapeutic approach to normalize calcium content. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Altered carnitine homeostasis is associated with decreased mitochondrial function and altered nitric oxide signaling in lambs with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sud, Neetu; Wiseman, Dean A.; Carter, A. Lee; Kumar, Sanjiv; Hou, Yali; Rau, Thomas; Wilham, Jason; Harmon, Cynthia; Oishi, Peter; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing aortopulmonary vascular graft placement in the fetal lamb, we have developed a model (shunt) of pulmonary hypertension that mimics congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our previous studies have identified a progressive development of endothelial dysfunction in shunt lambs that is dependent, at least in part, on decreased nitric oxide (NO) signaling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible role of a disruption in carnitine metabolism in shunt lambs and to determine the effect on NO signaling. Our data indicate that at 2 wk of age, shunt lambs have significantly reduced expression (P < 0.05) of the key enzymes in carnitine metabolism: carnitine palmitoyltransferases 1 and 2 as well as carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT). In addition, we found that CrAT activity was inhibited due to increased nitration. Furthermore, free carnitine levels were significantly decreased whereas acylcarnitine levels were significantly higher in shunt lambs (P < 0.05). We also found that alterations in carnitine metabolism resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, since shunt lambs had significantly decreased pyruvate, increased lactate, and a reduced pyruvate/lactate ratio. In pulmonary arterial endothelial cells cultured from juvenile lambs, we found that mild uncoupling of the mitochondria led to a decrease in cellular ATP levels and a reduction in both endothelial NO synthase-heat shock protein 90 (eNOS-HSP90) interactions and NO signaling. Similarly, in shunt lambs we found a loss of eNOS-HSP90 interactions that correlated with a progressive decrease in NO signaling. Our data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:18024721

  7. Total sleep deprivation alters cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors in humans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Durocher, John J; Larson, Robert A; Dellavalla, Joseph P; Carter, Jason R

    2012-09-01

    Exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress (MS) and cold pressor test (CPT) has been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent epidemiological studies identify sleep deprivation as an important risk factor for hypertension, yet the relations between sleep deprivation and cardiovascular reactivity remain equivocal. We hypothesized that 24-h total sleep deprivation (TSD) would augment cardiovascular reactivity to MS and CPT and blunt the MS-induced forearm vasodilation. Because the associations between TSD and hypertension appear to be stronger in women, a secondary aim was to probe for sex differences. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded during MS and CPT in 28 young, healthy subjects (14 men and 14 women) after normal sleep (NS) and 24-h TSD (randomized, crossover design). Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was recorded during MS. MAP, FVC, and MSNA (n = 10) responses to MS were not different between NS and TSD (condition × time, P > 0.05). Likewise, MAP and MSNA (n = 6) responses to CPT were not different between NS and TSD (condition × time, P > 0.05). In contrast, increases in HR during both MS and CPT were augmented after TSD (condition × time, P ≤ 0.05), and these augmented HR responses persisted during both recoveries. When analyzed for sex differences, cardiovascular reactivity to MS and CPT was not different between sexes (condition × time × sex, P > 0.05). We conclude that TSD does not significantly alter MAP, MSNA, or forearm vascular responses to MS and CPT. The augmented tachycardia responses during and after both acute stressors provide new insight regarding the emerging links among sleep deprivation, stress, and cardiovascular risk.

  8. Sleep deprivation alters functioning within the neural network underlying the covert orienting of attention.

    PubMed

    Mander, Bryce A; Reid, Kathryn J; Davuluri, Vijay K; Small, Dana M; Parrish, Todd B; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Zee, Phyllis C; Gitelman, Darren R

    2008-06-27

    One function of spatial attention is to enable goal-directed interactions with the environment through the allocation of neural resources to motivationally relevant parts of space. Studies have shown that responses are enhanced when spatial attention is predictively biased towards locations where significant events are expected to occur. Previous studies suggest that the ability to bias attention predictively is related to posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) activation [Small, D.M., et al., 2003. The posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex mediate the anticipatory allocation of spatial attention. Neuroimage 18, 633-41]. Sleep deprivation (SD) impairs selective attention and reduces PCC activity [Thomas, M., et al., 2000. Neural basis of alertness and cognitive performance impairments during sleepiness. I. Effects of 24 h of sleep deprivation on waking human regional brain activity. J. Sleep Res. 9, 335-352]. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that SD would affect PCC function and alter the ability to predictively allocate spatial attention. Seven healthy, young adults underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following normal rest and 34-36 h of SD while performing a task in which attention was shifted in response to peripheral targets preceded by spatially informative (valid), misleading (invalid), or uninformative (neutral) cues. When rested, but not when sleep-deprived, subjects responded more quickly to targets that followed valid cues than those after neutral or invalid cues. Brain activity during validly cued trials with a reaction time benefit was compared to activity in trials with no benefit. PCC activation was greater during trials with a reaction time benefit following normal rest. In contrast, following SD, reaction time benefits were associated with activation in the left intraparietal sulcus, a region associated with receptivity to stimuli at unexpected locations. These changes may render sleep-deprived individuals less able

  9. Mars 520-d mission simulation reveals protracted crew hypokinesis and alterations of sleep duration and timing

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F.; Mollicone, Daniel; Ecker, Adrian; Jones, Christopher W.; Hyder, Eric C.; Di Antonio, Adrian; Savelev, Igor; Kan, Kevin; Goel, Namni; Morukov, Boris V.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    The success of interplanetary human spaceflight will depend on many factors, including the behavioral activity levels, sleep, and circadian timing of crews exposed to prolonged microgravity and confinement. To address the effects of the latter, we used a high-fidelity ground simulation of a Mars mission to objectively track sleep–wake dynamics in a multinational crew of six during 520 d of confined isolation. Measurements included continuous recordings of wrist actigraphy and light exposure (4.396 million min) and weekly computer-based neurobehavioral assessments (n = 888) to identify changes in the crew's activity levels, sleep quantity and quality, sleep–wake periodicity, vigilance performance, and workload throughout the record-long 17 mo of mission confinement. Actigraphy revealed that crew sedentariness increased across the mission as evident in decreased waking movement (i.e., hypokinesis) and increased sleep and rest times. Light exposure decreased during the mission. The majority of crewmembers also experienced one or more disturbances of sleep quality, vigilance deficits, or altered sleep–wake periodicity and timing, suggesting inadequate circadian entrainment. The results point to the need to identify markers of differential vulnerability to hypokinesis and sleep–wake changes during the prolonged isolation of exploration spaceflight and the need to ensure maintenance of circadian entrainment, sleep quantity and quality, and optimal activity levels during exploration missions. Therefore, successful adaptation to such missions will require crew to transit in spacecraft and live in surface habitats that instantiate aspects of Earth's geophysical signals (appropriately timed light exposure, food intake, exercise) required for temporal organization and maintenance of human behavior. PMID:23297197

  10. Deregulation of the pRb-E2F4 axis alters epidermal homeostasis and favors tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Clotilde; Santos, Mirentxu; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Lorz, Corina; Lázaro, Sara; Paramio, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    E2F/RB activity is altered in most human tumors. The retinoblastoma family of proteins plays a key role in regulating the progression of the cell cycle from the G1 to S phases. This is achieved through negative regulation of E2F transcription factors, important positive regulators of cell cycle entry. E2F family members are divided into two groups: activators (E2F1-E2F3a) and repressors (E2F3b-E2F8). E2F4 accounts for a large part of the E2F activity and is a main E2F repressor member in vivo. Perturbations in the balance from quiescence towards proliferation contribute to increased mitotic gene expression levels frequently observed in cancer. We have previously reported that combined Rb1-Rbl1 or Rb1-E2f1 ablation in epidermis produces important alterations in epidermal proliferation and differentiation, leading to tumor development. However, the possible roles of E2F4 in this context are still to be determined. Here, we show the absence of any discernible phenotype in the skin of mice lacking of E2f4. In contrast, the inducible loss of Rb1 in the epidermis of E2F4-null mice produced multiple skin abnormalities including altered differentiation and proliferation, spontaneous wounds, carcinoma in situ development and stem cell perturbations. All these phenotypic alterations are associated with extensive gene expression changes, the induction of c-myc and the Akt activation. Moreover the whole transcriptome analyses in comparison with previous models generated also revealed extensive changes in multiple repressive complexes and in transcription factor activity. These results point to E2F4 as a master regulator in multiple steps of epidermal homeostasis in Rb1 absence. PMID:27708231

  11. Alterations in calcium homeostasis and bone during actual and simulated space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Skeletal alteration in experimental animals induced by actual and simulated spaceflight are discussed, noting that the main factor contributing to bone loss in growing rats placed in orbit aboard Soviet Cosmos biosatellites appears to be diminished bone formation. Mechanical unloading is seen as the most obvious cause of bone loss in a state of weightlessness. Reference is made to a study by Roberts et al. (1981), which showed that osteoblast differentiation in the periodontal ligament of the maxilla was suppressed in rats flown in space. Since the maxilla lacks a weight-bearing function, this finding indicates that the skeletal alterations associated with orbital flight may be systemic rather than confined to weight-bearing bones. In addition, the skeletal response to simulated weightlessness may also be systemic (wronski and Morey, 1982). In suspended rats, the hindlimbs lost all weight-bearing functions, while the forelimbs maintained contact with the floor of the hypokinetic model. On this basis, it was to be expected that there would be different responses at the two skeletal sites if the observed abnormalities were due to mechanical unloading alone. The changes induced by simulated weightlessness in the proximal tibia and humerus, however, were generally comparable. This evidence for systemic skeletal responses has drawn attention to endocrine factors.

  12. Long-term mTOR inhibitors administration evokes altered calcium homeostasis and platelet dysfunction in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    López, Esther; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Bermejo, Nuria; Brull, José María; Martinez, Rocío; Garcia Pino, Guadalupe; Alvarado, Raul; Salido, Ginés María; Rosado, Juan Antonio; Cubero, Juan José; Redondo, Pedro Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The use of the mammal target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors has been consolidated as the therapy of election for preventing graft rejection in kidney transplant patients, despite their immunosuppressive activity is less strong than anti-calcineurin agents like tacrolimus and cyclosporine A. Furthermore, as mTOR is widely expressed, rapamycin (a macrolide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus) is recommended in patients presenting neoplasia due to its antiproliferative actions. Hence, we have investigated whether rapamycin presents side effects in the physiology of other cell types different from leucocytes, such as platelets. Blood samples were drawn from healthy volunteers and kidney transplant patients long-term medicated with rapamycin: sirolimus and everolimus. Platelets were either loaded with fura-2 or directly stimulated, and immunoassayed or fixed with Laemmli's buffer to perform the subsequent analysis of platelet physiology. Our results indicate that rapamycin evokes a biphasic time-dependent alteration in calcium homeostasis and function in platelets from kidney transplant patients under rapamycin regime, as demonstrated by the reduction in granule secretion observed and subsequent impairment of platelet aggregation in these patients compared with healthy volunteers. Platelet count was also reduced in these patients, thus 41% of patients presented thrombocytopenia. All together our results show that long-term administration of rapamycin to kidney transplant patients evokes alteration in platelet function. PMID:23577651

  13. Altered Metabolic Homeostasis in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Mechanisms of Energy Imbalance and Contribution to Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Zara A; Ngo, Shyuan T; Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A; Steyn, Frederik J

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurones, which leads to paralysis and death in an average of 3 years following diagnosis. The cause of ALS is unknown, but there is substantial evidence that metabolic factors, including nutritional state and body weight, affect disease progression and survival. This review provides an overview of the characteristics of metabolic dysregulation in ALS focusing on mechanisms that lead to disrupted energy supply (at a whole-body and cellular level) and altered energy expenditure. We discuss how a decrease in energy supply occurs in parallel with an increase in energy demand and leads to a state of chronic energy deficit which has a negative impact on disease outcome in ALS. We conclude by presenting potential and tested strategies to compensate for, or correct this energy imbalance, and speculate on promising areas for further research. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Altered intracellular calcium homeostasis and endoplasmic reticulum redox state in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking Grx6 glutaredoxin.

    PubMed

    Puigpinós, Judit; Casas, Celia; Herrero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 6 (Grx6) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an integral thiol oxidoreductase protein of the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi vesicles. Its absence alters the redox equilibrium of the reticulum lumen toward a more oxidized state, thus compensating the defects in protein folding/secretion and cell growth caused by low levels of the oxidase Ero1. In addition, null mutants in GRX6 display a more intense unfolded protein response than wild-type cells upon treatment with inducers of this pathway. These observations support a role of Grx6 in regulating the glutathionylation of thiols of endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi target proteins and consequently the equilibrium between reduced and oxidized glutathione in the lumen of these compartments. A specific function influenced by Grx6 activity is the homeostasis of intracellular calcium. Grx6-deficient mutants have reduced levels of calcium in the ER lumen, whereas accumulation occurs at the cytosol from extracellular sources. This results in permanent activation of the calcineurin-dependent pathway in these cells. Some but not all the phenotypes of the mutant are coincident with those of mutants deficient in intracellular calcium transporters, such as the Golgi Pmr1 protein. The results presented in this study provide evidence for redox regulation of calcium homeostasis in yeast cells. © 2015 Puigpinós et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Sleep Deprivation Alters Rat Ventral Prostate Morphology, Leading to Glandular Atrophy: A Microscopic Study Contrasted with the Hormonal Assays

    PubMed Central

    Venâncio, Daniel P.; Andersen, Monica L.; Vilamaior, Patricia S. L.; Santos, Fernanda C.; Zager, Adriano; Tufik, Sérgio; Taboga, Sebastião R.; De Mello, Marco T.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 96 h paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and 21-day sleep restriction (SR) on prostate morphology using stereological assays in male rats. After euthanasia, the rat ventral prostate was removed, weighed, and prepared for conventional light microscopy. Microscopic analysis of the prostate reveals that morphology of this gland was altered after 96 h of PSD and 21 days of SR, with the most important alterations occurring in the epithelium and stroma in the course of both procedures compared with the control group. Both 96 h PSD and 21-day SR rats showed lower serum testosterone and higher corticosterone levels than control rats. The significance of our result referring to the sleep deprivation was responsible for deep morphological alterations in ventral prostate tissue, like to castration microscopic modifications. This result is due to the marked alterations in hormonal status caused by PSD and SR. PMID:22927719

  16. Sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jonathan C; Chopra, Swati; Schwartz, Alan R

    2016-03-01

    Sleep apnoea is a disorder characterised by repetitive pauses in breathing during sleep caused by airway occlusion (obstructive sleep apnoea) or altered control of breathing (central sleep apnoea). In this Clinical Year in Review, we summarise high-impact research from the past year pertaining to management, diagnosis and cardio-metabolic consequences of sleep apnoea.

  17. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways.

  18. Maternal creatine homeostasis is altered during gestation in the spiny mouse: is this a metabolic adaptation to pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Ellery, Stacey J; LaRosa, Domenic A; Kett, Michelle M; Della Gatta, Paul A; Snow, Rod J; Walker, David W; Dickinson, Hayley

    2015-04-14

    Pregnancy induces adaptations in maternal metabolism to meet the increased need for nutrients by the placenta and fetus. Creatine is an important intracellular metabolite obtained from the diet and also synthesised endogenously. Experimental evidence suggests that the fetus relies on a maternal supply of creatine for much of gestation. However, the impact of pregnancy on maternal creatine homeostasis is unclear. We hypothesise that alteration of maternal creatine homeostasis occurs during pregnancy to ensure adequate levels of this essential substrate are available for maternal tissues, the placenta and fetus. This study aimed to describe maternal creatine homeostasis from mid to late gestation in the precocial spiny mouse. Plasma creatine concentration and urinary excretion were measured from mid to late gestation in pregnant (n = 8) and age-matched virgin female spiny mice (n = 6). At term, body composition and organ weights were assessed and tissue total creatine content determined. mRNA expression of the creatine synthesising enzymes arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) and guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT), and the creatine transporter (CrT1) were assessed by RT-qPCR. Protein expression of AGAT and GAMT was also assessed by western blot analysis. Plasma creatine and renal creatine excretion decreased significantly from mid to late gestation (P < 0.001, P < 0.05, respectively). Pregnancy resulted in increased lean tissue (P < 0.01), kidney (P < 0.01), liver (P < 0.01) and heart (P < 0.05) mass at term. CrT1 expression was increased in the heart (P < 0.05) and skeletal muscle (P < 0.05) at term compared to non-pregnant tissues, and creatine content of the heart (P < 0.05) and kidney (P < 0.001) were also increased at this time. CrT1 mRNA expression was down-regulated in the liver (<0.01) and brain (<0.01) of pregnant spiny mice at term. Renal AGAT mRNA (P < 0.01) and protein (P < 0.05) expression were both significantly up-regulated at term, with

  19. Partial sleep deprivation does not alter processes involved in semantic word priming: event-related potential evidence.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Paniz; Muller-Gass, Alexandra; Campbell, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Sleep deprivation has generally been observed to have a detrimental effect on tasks that require sustained attention for successful performance. It might however be possible to counter these effects by altering cognitive strategies. A recent semantic word priming study indicated that subjects used an effortful predictive-expectancy search of semantic memory following normal sleep, but changed to an automatic, effortless strategy following total sleep deprivation. Partial sleep deprivation occurs much more frequently than total sleep deprivation. The present study therefore employed a similar priming task following either 4h of sleep or following normal sleep. The purpose of the study was to determine whether partial sleep deprivation would also lead to a shift in cognitive strategy to compensate for an inability to sustain attention and effortful processing necessary for using the predicative expectancy strategy. Sixteen subjects were presented with word pairs, a prime and a target that were either strongly semantically associated (cat...dog), weakly associated (cow...barn) or not associated (apple...road). The subject's task was to determine if the target word was semantically associated to the prime. A strong priming effect was observed in both conditions. RTs were slower, accuracy lower, and N400 larger to unassociated targets, independent of the amount of sleep. The overall N400 did not differ as a function of sleep. The scalp distribution of the N400 was also similar following both normal sleep and sleep loss. There was thus little evidence of a difference in the processing of the target stimulus as a function of the amount sleep. Similarly, ERPs in the period between the onset of the prime and the subsequent target also did not differ between the normal sleep and sleep loss conditions. In contrast to total sleep deprivation, subjects therefore appeared to use a common predictive expectancy strategy in both conditions. This strategy does however require an

  20. Crz1p regulates pH homeostasis in Candida glabrata by altering membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongni; Lin, Xiaobao; Qi, Yanli; Liu, Hui; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2016-09-23

    The asexual facultative aerobic haploid yeast Candida glabrata is widely used in the industrial production of various organic acids. To elucidate the physiological function of the transcription factor CgCrz1p and its role in tolerance to acid stress we deleted or overexpressed the corresponding gene CgCRZ1 Deletion of CgCRZ1 resulted in a 60% decrease in dry cell weight (DCW) and a 50% drop in cell viability compared to the wild type at pH 2.0. Expression of lipid metabolism-associated genes was also significantly down-regulated. Consequently, the proportion of C18:1 fatty acids, ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, and ergosterol content decreased by 30%, 46%, and 30%, respectively. Additionally, membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity were reduced by 45%, 9%, and 50%, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of CgCrz1p increased C18:1 and ergosterol content by 16% and 40%, respectively. Overexpression also enhanced membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity by 31%, 6%, and 20%, respectively. Moreover, in the absence of pH buffering, DCW and pyruvate titer increased by 48% and 60%, respectively, compared to the wild type. Together, these results suggest that CgCrz1p regulates tolerance to acidic conditions by altering membrane lipid composition in C. glabrata IMPORTANCE: The present study provides an insight into the metabolism of Candida glabrata under acidic conditions, such as those encountered during industrial production of organic acids. We found that overexpression of the transcription factor CgCrz1p improved viability, biomass, and pyruvate yields at low pH. Analysis of plasma membrane lipid composition indicated that CgCrz1p might play an important role in its integrity and fluidity, and enhanced the pumping of protons in acidic environments. We propose that altering the structure of the cell membrane may provide a successful strategy for increasing C glabrata productivity at low pH.

  1. The 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride is not associated with alterations in sleep spindles in men referred for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Michael R.; Cook, Jesse D.; Plante, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous neurosteroids that potentiate the GABAA receptor are thought to enhance the generation of sleep spindles. This study tested the hypothesis that the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, an agent associated with reductions in neurosteroids, would be associated with reduced sleep spindles in men referred for polysomnography. Methods Spectral analysis and spindle waveform detection were performed on electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep data in the 11–16Hz sigma band, as well as several subranges, from 27 men taking finasteride and 27 matched comparison patients (ages 18 to 81 years). Results No significant differences between groups were observed for spectral power or sleep spindle morphology measures, including spindle density, amplitude, duration, and integrated spindle activity. Conclusions Contrary to our hypothesis, these findings demonstrate that finasteride is not associated with alterations in sleep spindle range activity or spindle morphology parameters. PMID:26494125

  2. The 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride is not associated with alterations in sleep spindles in men referred for polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Michael R; Cook, Jesse D; Plante, David T

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neurosteroids that potentiate the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA ) receptor are thought to enhance the generation of sleep spindles. This study tested the hypothesis that the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, an agent associated with reductions in neurosteroids, would be associated with reduced sleep spindles in men referred for polysomnography. Spectral analysis and spindle waveform detection were performed on electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep data in the 11-16 Hz sigma band, as well as several subranges, from 27 men taking finasteride and 27 matched comparison patients (ages 18 to 81 years). No significant differences between groups were observed for spectral power or sleep spindle morphology measures, including spindle density, amplitude, duration, and integrated spindle activity. Contrary to our hypothesis, these findings demonstrate that finasteride is not associated with alterations in sleep spindle range activity or spindle morphology parameters. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Bmp6 Regulates Retinal Iron Homeostasis and Has Altered Expression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Song, Ying; Wolkow, Natalie; Iacovelli, Jared; Kautz, Leon; Roth, Marie-Paule; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2011-01-01

    Iron-induced oxidative stress causes hereditary macular degeneration in patients with aceruloplasminemia. Similarly, retinal iron accumulation in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may exacerbate the disease. The cause of retinal iron accumulation in AMD is poorly understood. Given that bone morphogenetic protein 6 (Bmp6) is a major regulator of systemic iron, we examined the role of Bmp6 in retinal iron regulation and in AMD pathogenesis. Bmp6 was detected in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a major site of pathology in AMD. In cultured RPE cells, Bmp6 was down-regulated by oxidative stress and up-regulated by iron. Intraocular Bmp6 protein injection in mice up-regulated retinal hepcidin, an iron regulatory hormone, and altered retinal labile iron levels. Bmp6−/− mice had age-dependent retinal iron accumulation and degeneration. Postmortem RPE from patients with early AMD exhibited decreased Bmp6 levels. Because oxidative stress is associated with AMD pathogenesis and down-regulates Bmp6 in cultured RPE cells, the diminished Bmp6 levels observed in RPE cells in early AMD may contribute to iron build-up in AMD. This may in turn propagate a vicious cycle of oxidative stress and iron accumulation, exacerbating AMD and other diseases with hereditary or acquired iron excess. PMID:21703414

  4. Altered systemic bile acid homeostasis contributes to liver disease in pediatric patients with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Tao; Cao, Yi; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Lu, Li-Na; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD), as a major complication, contributes to significant morbidity in pediatric IF patients. However, the pathogenesis of IFALD is still uncertain. We here investigate the roles of bile acid (BA) dysmetabolism in the unclear pathogenesis of IFALD. It found that the histological evidence of pediatric IF patients exhibited liver injury, which was characterized by liver bile duct proliferation, inflammatory infiltration, hepatocyte apoptosis and different stages of fibrosis. The BA compositions were altered in serum and liver of pediatric IF patients, as reflected by a primary BA dominant composition. In IF patients, the serum FGF19 levels decreased significantly, and were conversely correlated with ileal inflammation grades (r = −0.50, p < 0.05). In ileum, the inflammation grades were inversely associated with farnesoid X receptor (FXR) expression (r = −0.55, p < 0.05). In liver, the expression of induction of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile salt synthesis, cytochrome P450 7a1 (CYP7A1) increased evidently. In conclusion, ileum inflammation decreases FXR expression corresponding to reduce serum FGF19 concentration, along with increased hepatic bile acid synthesis, leading to liver damages in IF patients. PMID:27976737

  5. Prenatal androgen treatment alters body composition and glucose homeostasis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Milos; Aird, Fraser; Levine, Jon E; Dunaif, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Prenatal androgen produces many reproductive and metabolic features of polycystic ovary syndrome in female rodents, sheep, and monkeys. We investigated the impact of such prenatal treatment in adult male rats. Pregnant dams received free testosterone (T; aromatizable androgen), dihydrotestosterone (D; nonaromatizable androgen), or vehicle control (C) on embryonic days 16-19. Neither of the prenatal androgen treatments resulted in increased body weight from weaning to age 65 days in males. However, at 65 days, there were significant increases in retroperitoneal (P < 0.001 T versus C; P < 0.05 D versus C), epididymal (P < 0.05 T versus C), and subcutaneous (P < 0.01 T versus C) fat pads in prenatally androgenized males. While both androgens altered body composition, subcutaneous fat depots increased only in T males. T males had elevated glucose levels (P < 0.01) compared to C males. There were no differences among the three groups in insulin sensitivity, circulating lipid and leptin levels, or hepatic triglyceride content. Real-time PCR analysis of insulin signaling pathway genes in retroperitoneal fat revealed a transcriptional downregulation of adipsin and insulin receptor substrate-1 in T and α-1D adrenergic receptor in D compared to C males. We conclude that transient exposure to androgen excess in utero increases body fat in adult male rats. Only T males exhibit increased circulating glucose levels and subcutaneous fat suggesting that these changes may be mediated by aromatization of androgen to estrogen rather than by direct androgenic actions.

  6. Altered functional Connectivity in Lesional Peduncular Hallucinosis with REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Maiya R.; Tie, Yanmei; Gabrieli, John D. E.; McGinnis, Scott M.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem lesions causing peduncular hallucinosis (PH) produce vivid visual hallucinations occasionally accompanied by sleep disorders. Overlapping brainstem regions modulate visual pathways and REM sleep functions via gating of thalamocortical networks. A 66-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation developed abrupt-onset complex visual hallucinations with preserved insight and violent dream enactment behavior. Brain MRI showed restricted diffusion in the left rostrodorsal pons suggestive of an acute ischemic infarct. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was diagnosed on polysomnography. We investigated the integrity of ponto-geniculate-occipital circuits with seed-based resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) in this patient compared to 46 controls. Rs-fcMRI revealed significantly reduced functional connectivity between the lesion and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN), and between LGN and visual association cortex compared to controls. Conversely, functional connectivity between brainstem and visual association cortex, and between visual association cortex and PFC was significantly increased in the patient. Focal damage to the left rostrodorsal pons is sufficient to cause RBD and PH in humans, suggesting an overlapping mechanism in both syndromes. This lesion produced a pattern of altered functional connectivity consistent with disrupted visual cortex connectivity via de-afferentation of thalamocortical pathways. PMID:26656284

  7. Clock Genes and Altered Sleep-Wake Rhythms: Their Role in the Development of Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Annaëlle; Olliac, Bertrand; Roubertoux, Pierre; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2017-04-29

    In mammals, the circadian clocks network (central and peripheral oscillators) controls circadian rhythms and orchestrates the expression of a range of downstream genes, allowing the organism to anticipate and adapt to environmental changes. Beyond their role in circadian rhythms, several studies have highlighted that circadian clock genes may have a more widespread physiological effect on cognition, mood, and reward-related behaviors. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms in core circadian clock genes have been associated with psychiatric disorders (such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). However, the underlying mechanisms of these associations remain to be ascertained and the cause-effect relationships are not clearly established. The objective of this article is to clarify the role of clock genes and altered sleep-wake rhythms in the development of psychiatric disorders (sleep problems are often observed at early onset of psychiatric disorders). First, the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms are described. Then, the relationships between disrupted circadian rhythms, including sleep-wake rhythms, and psychiatric disorders are discussed. Further research may open interesting perspectives with promising avenues for early detection and therapeutic intervention in psychiatric disorders.

  8. The endocrine disruptor cadmium alters human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells homeostasis in vitro by alteration of Wnt/β-catenin pathway and activation of caspases.

    PubMed

    Papa, V; Bimonte, V M; Wannenes, F; D'Abusco, A S; Fittipaldi, S; Scandurra, R; Politi, L; Crescioli, C; Lenzi, A; Di Luigi, L; Migliaccio, S

    2015-12-01

    The pollutant Cadmium (Cd) is widespread in the environment and causes alterations of human health by acting as an endocrine disruptor. Bone tissue seems to be a crucial target of Cd contamination. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that this endocrine disruptor induces osteoblast apoptosis and necrosis. Thus, aim of this study was to further evaluate the effect of Cd on osteoblasts homeostasis, investigating potential modification of the Wnt/β-catenin intracellular pathway, the intracellular process involved in programmed cellular death and the cytoskeletal alterations. To this purpose, human osteoblastic Saos-2 cells, a human osteosarcoma osteoblast-like cell line, were cultured and treated with Cd. Osteoblastic cells were treated for 6 h with 10μM Cd, which induced nuclear translocation of β-catenin and increased expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Longer exposure to the same Cd concentration induced osteoblastic cell apoptosis. To better characterize the intracellular events involved in these Cd-induced alterations, we evaluated the effect of Cd exposure on actin filaments and proteins associated to cytoskeletal actin, characterized by the presence of LIM domains. Long (15, 24 h) exposure of osteoblasts to Cd reduced LIM proteins expression and induced actin filaments destruction and a significant caspase-3 activation after 24 h. In addition, to prove that Cd induces osteoblastic cells apoptosis after long exposure, we performed TUNEL assay which demonstrated increase of cell apoptosis after 24 h. In conclusion, our study shows that osteoblasts exposed to Cd for short intervals of time demonstrated an increase in cell proliferation through a Wnt/β-catenin dependent mechanism, likely as a compensatory mechanism in response to cell injury. Longer exposure to the same Cd concentration induced cells apoptosis through cytoskeleton disruption-mediated mechanisms and caspase activation.

  9. Twenty-four hours, or five days, of continuous sleep deprivation or experimental sleep fragmentation do not alter thirst or motivation for water reward in rats.

    PubMed

    Christie, Michael A; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E

    2010-12-25

    effect on breakpoint in the progressive ratio task indicating that 5 days of SD or SF did not alter motivation for water reward. As previously reported, food consumption increased and body weight decreased during the 5 days of SD. in experiment 2. The findings indicate that although sleep disruption increases food consumption and decreases body weight, it does not alter thirst or motivation for water reward. Thus, water restriction is well suited for experiments examining the effect of sleep disruption on reward motivated behavioral tests in rats. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Whole transcriptome analysis of transgenic barley with altered cytokinin homeostasis and increased tolerance to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Petr; Kokáš, Filip; Husičková, Alexandra; Grúz, Jiří; Bergougnoux, Veronique; Marchetti, Cintia F; Jiskrová, Eva; Ježilová, Eliška; Mik, Václav; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Galuszka, Petr

    2016-09-25

    Cytokinin plant hormones have been shown to play an important role in plant response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we expand upon the findings of Pospíšilová et al. [30] regarding preparation of novel transgenic barley lines overexpressing cytokinin dehydrogenase 1 gene from Arabidopsis under the control of mild root-specific promotor of maize β-glycosidase. These lines showed drought-tolerant phenotype mainly due to alteration of root architecture and stronger lignification of root tissue. A detailed transcriptomic analysis of roots of transgenic plants subjected to revitalization after drought stress revealed attenuated response through the HvHK3 cytokinin receptor and up-regulation of two transcription factors implicated in stress responses and abscisic acid sensitivity. Increased expression of several genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway as well as of genes encoding arogenate dehydratase/lyase participating in phenylalanine synthesis was found in roots during revitalization. Although more precursors of lignin synthesis were present in roots after drought stress, final lignin accumulation did not change compared to that in plants grown under optimal conditions. Changes in transcriptome indicated a higher auxin turnover in transgenic roots. The same analysis in leaves revealed that genes encoding putative enzymes responsible for production of jasmonates and other volatile compounds were up-regulated. Although transgenic barley leaves showed lower chlorophyll content and down-regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis than did wild-type plants when cultivated under optimal conditions, they did show a tendency to return to initial photochemical activities faster than did wild-type leaves when re-watered after severe drought stress. In contrast to optimal conditions, comparative transcriptomic analysis of revitalized leaves displayed up-regulation of genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in photosynthesis, and especially

  11. Epidemiological analysis of structural alterations of the nasal cavity associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA).

    PubMed

    Mekhitarian Neto, Levon; Fava, Antonio Sérgio; Lopes, Hugo Canhete; Stamm, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that structural alterations of the nasal cavity, e.g. septal deviation and conchal hypertrophy have high incidence in patients with sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome and must be addressed with associated specific procedures of the syndrome. Clinical retrospective. A retrospective study of 200 patients was performed, with 196 male and 4 female, attended at the otorhinolaryngology ambulatory of Hospital Prof. Edmundo Vasconcelos and Unidade Paulista de Otorrinolaringologia, all of them subjected to polysomnography, otorhinolaryngological physical exam, endoscopy exam, and surgical treatment with nasal and pharyngeal procedures. All of them were subjected to pharyngeal procedure: uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or uvulopalatoplasty and nose procedure: 176 septoplasty with partial turbinectomy (88%) and 24 isolated turbinectomy, with satisfactory results. We can see that structural alterations of the nasal cavity have high incidence in patients with OSA.

  12. Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Alters Cancer-associated Transcriptional Signatures in Circulating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Seiger, Ashley N.; Hayes, Amanda L.; Mehra, Reena; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with a number of chronic disorders that may improve with effective therapy. However, the molecular pathways affected by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment are largely unknown. We sought to assess the system-wide consequences of CPAP therapy by transcriptionally profiling peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Methods: Subjects in whom severe OSA was diagnosed were treated with CPAP, and whole-genome expression measurement of PBLs was performed at baseline and following therapy. We used gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to identify pathways that were differentially enriched. Network analysis was then applied to highlight key drivers of processes influenced by CPAP. Results: Eighteen subjects with significant OSA underwent CPAP therapy and microarray analysis of their PBLs. Treatment with CPAP improved apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), daytime sleepiness, and blood pressure, but did not affect anthropometric measures. GSEA revealed a number of enriched gene sets, many of which were involved in neoplastic processes and displayed downregulated expression patterns in response to CPAP. Network analysis identified several densely connected genes that are important modulators of cancer and tumor growth. Conclusions: Effective therapy of OSA with CPAP is associated with alterations in circulating leukocyte gene expression. Functional enrichment and network analyses highlighted transcriptional suppression in cancer-related pathways, suggesting potentially novel mechanisms linking OSA with neoplastic signatures. Citation: Gharib SA; Seiger AN; Hayes AL; Mehra R; Patel SR. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea alters cancer-associated transcriptional signatures in circulating leukocytes. SLEEP 2014;37(4):709-714. PMID:24688164

  13. A detailed assessment of alterations in bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, and bone density in normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Black, A J; Topping, J; Durham, B; Farquharson, R G; Fraser, W D

    2000-03-01

    The effects of pregnancy on bone turnover and the potential risk of developing an osteoporotic fracture in pregnancy are controversial. Utilizing biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), bone turnover before, during, and after pregnancy was studied in detail. Ten women (mean age 30 years; range 23-40) were recruited. Prepregnancy data were obtained and then a review was performed at 2-week intervals , once pregnancy was confirmed, until 14 weeks of gestation and thereafter monthly until term. Bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated by DEXA scanning of hip, spine, and forearm preconception and postpartum. In addition, BMD of the forearm at 14 weeks and 28 weeks gestation was obtained. All pregnancies had a successful outcome. Urinary free pyridinium cross-links, free pyridinoline (fPyr) and free deoxypyridinoline (fDPyr), were normal prepregnancy (mean [+/-SD]) 14.6 nmol/mmol (1.8) and 5.0 nmol/mmol (1.0) creat, respectively. By 14 weeks, they had increased to 20.8 nmol/mmol (4.3) and 6.1 nmol mmol (1.4) (both p < 0.02) and by 28 weeks to 26.3 nmol/mmol (5.6) and 7.4 nmol/mmol (1.6) (both p < 0.01). The ratio of fPyr to fDPyr remained constant. A similar significant increase was observed in N-telopeptide (NTx). Bone formation was assessed by measurement of carboxyterminal propeptide of type 1 collagen (P1CP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP). Neither were altered significantly before 28 weeks, but subsequently mean P1CP increased from 110 microg/liter (23) to 235 microg/liter (84) at 38 weeks and mean BSAP increased from 11.1 U/liter (5.0) to 28.6 U/liter (11.1) (p < 0.01 for both variables). Lumbar spine (L1-L4) BMD decreased from a prepregnancy mean of 1.075 g/cm (0.115) to 1.054 g/cm2 (0.150) postpartum (p < 0.05). Total hip BMD decreased from a prepregnancy mean of 0.976 g/cm2 (0.089) to 0.941 g/cm2 (0.097) (p < 0.05). Forearm BMD at midradius, one-third distal and ultradistal decreased but

  14. Effects of Optogenetic inhibition of BLA on Sleep Brief Optogenetic Inhibition of the Basolateral Amygdala in Mice Alters Effects of Stressful Experiences on Rapid Eye Movement Sleep.

    PubMed

    Machida, Mayumi; Wellman, Laurie L; Fitzpatrick Bs, Mairen E; Hallum Bs, Olga; Sutton Bs, Amy M; Lonart, György; Sanford, Larry D

    2017-04-01

    Stressful events can directly produce significant alterations in subsequent sleep, in particular rapid eye movement sleep (REM); however, the neural mechanisms underlying the process are not fully known. Here, we investigated the role of the basolateral nuclei of the amygdala (BLA) in regulating the effects of stressful experience on sleep. We used optogenetics to briefly inhibit glutamatergic cells in BLA during the presentation of inescapable footshock (IS) and assessed effects on sleep, the acute stress response, and fear memory. c-Fos expression was also assessed in the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), both regions involved in coping with stress, and in brain stem regions implicated in the regulation of REM. Compared to control mice, peri-shock inhibition of BLA attenuated an immediate reduction in REM after IS and produced a significant overall increase in REM. Moreover, upon exposure to the shock context alone, mice receiving peri-shock inhibition of BLA during training showed increased REM without altered freezing (an index of fear memory) or stress-induced hyperthermia (an index of acute stress response). Inhibition of BLA during REM under freely sleeping conditions enhanced REM only when body temperature was high, suggesting the effect was influenced by stress. Peri-shock inhibition of BLA also led to elevated c-Fos expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala and mPFC and differentially altered c-Fos activity in the selected brain stem regions. Glutamatergic cells in BLA can modulate the effects of stress on REM and can mediate effects of fear memory on sleep that can be independent of behavioral fear.

  15. Chronic alcohol exposure alters transcription broadly in a key integrative brain nucleus for homeostasis: the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Maria Yolanda; Khan, Rishi L; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Hoek, Jan B; Schwaber, James S

    2005-12-14

    Chronic exposure to alcohol modifies physiological processes in the brain, and the severe symptoms resulting from sudden removal of alcohol from the diet indicate that these modifications are functionally important. We investigated the gene expression patterns in response to chronic alcohol exposure (21-28 wk) in the rat nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), a brain nucleus with a key integrative role in homeostasis and cardiorespiratory function. Using methods and an experimental design optimized for detecting transcriptional changes less than twofold, we found 575 differentially expressed genes. We tested these genes for significant associations with physiological functions and signaling pathways using Gene Ontology terms and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database, respectively. Chronic alcohol exposure resulted in significant NTS gene regulation related to the general processes of synaptic transmission, intracellular signaling, and cation transport as well as specific neuronal functions including plasticity and seizure behavior that could be related to alcohol withdrawal symptoms. The differentially expressed genes were also significantly enriched for enzymes of lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, MAP kinase signaling, and calcium signaling pathways from KEGG. Intriguingly, many of the genes we found to be differentially expressed in the NTS are known to be involved in alcohol-induced oxidative stress and/or cell death. The study provides evidence of very extensive alterations of physiological gene expression in the NTS in the adapted state to chronic alcohol exposure.

  16. Altered glucose and lipid homeostasis in liver and adipose tissue pre-dispose inducible NOS knockout mice to insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kanuri, Babu Nageswararao; Kanshana, Jitendra S.; Rebello, Sanjay C.; Pathak, Priya; Gupta, Anand P.; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Dikshit, Madhu

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of diet induced obesity and KO mice models, nitric oxide is implied to play an important role in the initiation of dyslipidemia induced insulin resistance. However, outcomes using iNOS KO mice have so far remained inconclusive. The present study aimed to assess IR in iNOS KO mice after 5 weeks of LFD feeding by monitoring body composition, energy homeostasis, insulin sensitivity/signaling, nitrite content and gene expressions changes in the tissues. We found that body weight and fat content in KO mice were significantly higher while the respiratory exchange ratio (RER), volume of carbon dioxide (VCO2), and heat production were lower as compared to WT mice. Furthermore, altered systemic glucose tolerance, tissue insulin signaling, hepatic gluconeogenesis, augmented hepatic lipids, adiposity, as well as gene expression regulating lipid synthesis, catabolism and efflux were evident in iNOS KO mice. Significant reduction in eNOS and nNOS gene expression, hepatic and adipose tissue nitrite content, circulatory nitrite was also observed. Oxygen consumption rate of mitochondrial respiration has remained unaltered in KO mice as measured using extracellular flux analyzer. Our findings establish a link between the NO status with systemic and tissue specific IR in iNOS KO mice at 5 weeks. PMID:28106120

  17. Conditional deletion of Abca3 in alveolar type II cells alters surfactant homeostasis in newborn and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Valérie; Matsuzaki, Yohei; Clark, Jean; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E.; Ikegami, Machiko; Stahlman, Mildred T.; Weaver, Timothy E.; Hunt, Alan N.; Postle, Anthony D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lipid transport protein required for synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. Abca3 was conditionally deleted in respiratory epithelial cells (Abca3Δ/Δ) in vivo. The majority of mice in which Abca3 was deleted in alveolar type II cells died shortly after birth from respiratory distress related to surfactant deficiency. Approximately 30% of the Abca3Δ/Δ mice survived after birth. Surviving Abca3Δ/Δ mice developed emphysema in the absence of significant pulmonary inflammation. Staining of lung tissue and mRNA isolated from alveolar type II cells demonstrated that ∼50% of alveolar type II cells lacked ABCA3. Phospholipid content and composition were altered in lung tissue, lamellar bodies, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice. In adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice, cells lacking ABCA3 had decreased expression of mRNAs associated with lipid synthesis and transport. FOXA2 and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein-α, transcription factors known to regulate genes regulating lung lipid metabolism, were markedly decreased in cells lacking ABCA3. Deletion of Abca3 disrupted surfactant lipid synthesis in a cell-autonomous manner. Compensatory surfactant synthesis was initiated in ABCA3-sufficient type II cells, indicating that surfactant homeostasis is a highly regulated process that includes sensing and coregulation among alveolar type II cells. PMID:20190032

  18. Deletion of the Snord116/SNORD116 Alters Sleep in Mice and Patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Glenda; Priano, Lorenzo; Maggi, Silvia; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Balzani, Edoardo; El-Assawy, Nadia; Pagani, Marco; Tinarelli, Federico; Giardino, Daniela; Mauro, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Gozzi, Alessandro; Grugni, Graziano; Tucci, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep-wake disturbances are often reported in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a rare neurodevelopmental syndrome that is associated with paternally-expressed genomic imprinting defects within the human chromosome region 15q11-13. One of the candidate genes, prevalently expressed in the brain, is the small nucleolar ribonucleic acid-116 (SNORD116). Here we conducted a translational study into the sleep abnormalities of PWS, testing the hypothesis that SNORD116 is responsible for sleep defects that characterize the syndrome. Methods: We studied sleep in mutant mice that carry a deletion of Snord116 at the orthologous locus (mouse chromosome 7) of the human PWS critical region (PWScr). In particular, we assessed EEG and temperature profiles, across 24-h, in PWScr m+/p− heterozygous mutants compared to wild-type littermates. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to explore morphoanatomical differences according to the genotype. Moreover, we complemented the mouse work by presenting two patients with a diagnosis of PWS and characterized by atypical small deletions of SNORD116. We compared the individual EEG parameters of patients with healthy subjects and with a cohort of obese subjects. Results: By studying the mouse mutant line PWScrm+/p−, we observed specific rapid eye movement (REM) sleep alterations including abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG) theta waves. Remarkably, we observed identical sleep/EEG defects in the two PWS cases. We report brain morphological abnormalities that are associated with the EEG alterations. In particular, mouse mutants have a bilateral reduction of the gray matter volume in the ventral hippocampus and in the septum areas, which are pivotal structures for maintaining theta rhythms throughout the brain. In PWScrm+/p− mice we also observed increased body temperature that is coherent with REM sleep alterations in mice and human patients. Conclusions: Our study indicates that paternally expressed

  19. Increased Disease Activity is Associated with Altered Sleep Architecture in an Experimental Model of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Beatriz Duarte; Tufik, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep patterns during the course of the disease in (NZB/NZW)F1 mice, an experimental model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Design: Female mice were implanted with electrodes for chronic recording of sleep-wake cycles during the entire experimental phase (9, 19, and 29 weeks of age). The disease course was also assessed. At each time-point, blood samples were collected from the orbital plexus to evaluate serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which are important serologic parameters of disease evolution. Pain perception was also evaluated. Measurements and Results: During the dark phase, (NZB/NZW)F1 mice aged 19 weeks spent more time in sleep, and, as a consequence, the total waking time was lower when compared with earlier periods. An augmented number of sleep-stage transitions and microarousals were observed at the 29th week of life in both light and dark phases. At this same time-point, the mice showed lower pain thresholds than they had at 9 weeks of life. The disease status was confirmed; the entire group of mice at 29 weeks of life showed positive ANA with high titer levels. Conclusions: The sleep-recording data showed that, during the progress and severe phases of the disease (19 and 29 wks of age, respectively), sleep architecture is altered. According to these results, increased sleep fragmentation, disease activity, and pain sensitivity are features observed in these mice, similar to symptoms of SLE. Citation: Palma BD; Tufik S. Increased disease activity is associated with altered sleep architecture in an experimental model of systemic lupus erythematosus. SLEEP 2010;33(9):1244-1248. PMID:20857872

  20. Alterations of orexinergic and melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in experimental sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Palomba, M; Seke-Etet, P F; Laperchia, C; Tiberio, L; Xu, Y-Z; Colavito, V; Grassi-Zucconi, G; Bentivoglio, M

    2015-04-02

    neurons in the pathogenesis of sleep/wake alterations in the disease and to their vulnerability to inflammatory signaling.

  1. Alteration of local adipose tissue trace element homeostasis as a possible mechanism of obesity-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Sinitskii, Anton I; Popova, Elizaveta V; Nemereshina, Olga N; Gatiatulina, Evgenia R; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of association between obesity and the related metabolic disturbances in general and insulin resistance in particular are extensively studied. Taking into account a key role of adipose tissue insulin resistance in the development of systemic obesity-related insulin resistance, the estimation of mechanisms linking increased adiposity and impaired insulin signaling in adipocytes will allow to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to treatment of these states. A number of trace elements like chromium, zinc, and vanadium have been shown to take part in insulin signaling via various mechanisms. Taking into account a key role of adipocyte in systemic carbohydrate homeostasis it can be asked if trace element homeostasis in adipose tissue may influence regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism. We hypothesize that caloric excess through currently unknown mechanisms results in decreased chromium, vanadium, and zinc content in adipocytes. Decreased content of trace elements in the adipose tissue causes impairment of intra-adipocyte insulin signaling subsequently leading to adipose tissue insulin resistance. The latter significantly contributes to systemic insulin resistance and further metabolic disruption in obesity. It is also possible that decreased adipose tissue trace element content is associated with dysregulation of insulin-sensitizing and proinflammatory adipokines also leading to insulin resistance. We hypothesize that insulin resistance and adipokine dysbalance increase the severity of obesity subsequently aggravating alteration of adipose tissue trace element balance. Single indications of high relative adipose tissue trace element content, decreased Cr, V, and Zn content in obese adipose tissue, and tight association between fat tissue chromium, vanadium, and zinc levels and metabolic parameters in obesity may be useful for hypothesis validation. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by later studies, adipose tissue chromium

  2. Deficiency of FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 51 alters sleep architecture and recovery sleep responses to stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Albu, Stefana; Romanowski, Christoph P N; Letizia Curzi, M; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Gassen, Nils C; Hartmann, Jakob; Schmidt, Mathias V; Schmidt, Ulrike; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Hausch, Felix; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Kimura, Mayumi

    2014-04-01

    FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is a co-chaperone of the glucocorticoid receptor, functionally linked to its activity via an ultra-short negative feedback loop. Thus, FKBP51 plays an important regulatory role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis necessary for stress adaptation and recovery. Previous investigations illustrated that HPA functionality is influenced by polymorphisms in the gene encoding FKBP51, which are associated with both increased protein levels and depressive episodes. Because FKBP51 is a key molecule in stress responses, we hypothesized that its deletion impacts sleep. To study FKBP51-involved changes in sleep, polysomnograms of FKBP51 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were compared at baseline and in the recovery phase after 6-h sleep deprivation (SD) and 1-h restraint stress (RS). Using another set of animals, the 24-h profiles of hippocampal free corticosterone levels were also determined. The most dominant effect of FKBP51 deletion appeared as increased nocturnal wake, where the bout length was significantly extended while non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid eye movement sleep were rather suppressed. After both SD and RS, FKBP51KO mice exhibited less recovery or rebound sleep than WTs, although slow-wave activity during NREMS was higher in KOs, particularly after SD. Sleep compositions of KOs were nearly opposite to sleep profiles observed in human depression. This might result from lower levels of free corticosterone in FKBP51KO mice, confirming reduced HPA reactivity. The results indicate that an FKBP51 deletion yields a pro-resilience sleep phenotype. FKBP51 could therefore be a therapeutic target for stress-induced mood and sleep disorders.

  3. REM sleep deprivation reverses neurochemical and other depressive-like alterations induced by olfactory bulbectomy.

    PubMed

    Maturana, Maira J; Pudell, Cláudia; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Laís S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Fortes, Mariana H; Dos Santos, Patrícia; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete C; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence that sleep deprivation (SD) is an effective strategy in promoting antidepressant effects in humans, whereas few studies were performed in relevant animal models of depression. Acute administration of antidepressants in humans and rats generates a quite similar effect, i.e., suppression of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Then, we decided to investigate the neurochemical alterations generated by a protocol of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMSD) in the notably known animal model of depression induced by the bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). REMSD triggered antidepressant mechanisms such as the increment of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), which were strongly correlated to the swimming time (r = 0.83; P < 0.0001) and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) content (r = 0.66; P = 0.004). Moreover, there was a strong correlation between swimming time and hippocampal 5-HT levels (r = 0.70; P = 0.003), strengthen the notion of an antidepressant effect associated to REMSD in the OBX rats. In addition, REMSD robustly attenuated the hippocampal 5-HT deficiency produced by the OBX procedure. Regarding the rebound (REB) period, we observed the occurrence of a sustained antidepressant effect, indicated mainly by the swimming and climbing times which could be explained by the maintenance of the increased nigral BDNF expression. Hence, hippocampal 5-HT levels remained enhanced in the OBX group after this period. We suggested that the neurochemical complexity inflicted by the OBX model, counteracted by REMSD, is directly correlated to the nigral BDNF expression and hippocampal 5-HT levels. The present findings provide new information regarding the antidepressant mechanisms triggered by REMSD.

  4. Overexpression of the Novel Arabidopsis Gene At5g02890 Alters Inflorescence Stem Wax Composition and Affects Phytohormone Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liping; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Gao, Jie; Hu, Kaining; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2017-01-01

    The cuticle is composed of cutin and cuticular wax. It covers the surfaces of land plants and protects them against environmental damage. At5g02890 encodes a novel protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the current study, protein sequence analysis showed that At5g02890 is highly conserved in the Brassicaceae. Arabidopsis lines overexpressing At5g02890 (OE-At5g02890 lines) and an At5g02890 orthologous gene from Brassica napus (OE-Bn1 lines) exhibited glossy stems. Chemical analysis revealed that overexpression of At5g02890 caused significant reductions in the levels of wax components longer than 28 carbons (C28) in inflorescence stems, whereas the levels of wax molecules of chain length C28 or shorter were significantly increased. Transcriptome analysis indicated that nine of 11 cuticular wax synthesis-related genes with different expression levels in OE-At5g02890 plants are involved in very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) elongation. At5g02890 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is consistent with its function in cuticular wax biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that the overexpression of At5g02890 alters cuticular wax composition by partially blocking VLCFA elongation of C28 and higher. In addition, detailed analysis of differentially expressed genes associated with plant hormones and endogenous phytohormone levels in wild-type and OE-At5g02890 plants indicated that abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) biosynthesis, as well as polar auxin transport, were also affected by overexpression of At5g02890. Taken together, these findings indicate that overexpression of At5g02890 affects both cuticular wax biosynthesis and phytohormone homeostasis in Arabidopsis. PMID:28184233

  5. Gene Expression Profiling of Astrocytes from Hyperammonemic Mice Reveals Altered Pathways for Water and Potassium Homeostasis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    LICHTER-KONECKI, UTA; MANGIN, JEAN MARIE; GORDISH-DRESSMAN, HEATHER; HOFFMAN, ERIC P.; GALLO, VITTORIO

    2014-01-01

    Acute hyperammonemia (HA) causes cerebral edema and brain damage in children with urea cycle disorders (UCDs) and in patients in acute liver failure. Chronic HA is associated with developmental delay and mental retardation in children with UCDs, and with neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with chronic liver failure. Astrocytes are a major cellular target of hyperammonemic encephalopathy, and changes occurring in these cells are thought to be causally related to the brain edema of acute HA. To study the effect of HA on astrocytes in vivo, we crossed the Otcspf mouse, a mouse with the X-linked UCD ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, with the hGFAP-EGFP mouse, a mouse selectively expressing green fluorescent protein in astrocytes. We used FACS to purify astrocytes from the brains of hyperammonemic and healthy Otcspf/GFAP-EGFP mice. RNA isolated from these astrocytes was used in microarray expression analyses and qRT-PCR. When compared with healthy littermates, we observed a significant downregulation of the gap-junction channel connexin 43 (Cx43) the water channel aquaporin 4 (Aqp4) genes, and the astrocytic inward-rectifying potassium channel (Kir) genes Kir4.1 and Kir5.1 in hyperammonemic mice. Aqp4, Cx43, and Kir4.1/ Kir5.1 are co-localized to astrocytic end-feet at the brain vasculature, where they regulate potassium and water transport. Since, NH4+ ions can permeate water and K+-channels, downregulation of these three channels may be a direct effect of elevated blood ammonia levels. Our results suggest that alterations in astrocyte-mediated water and potassium homeostasis in brain may be key to the development of the brain edema. PMID:18186079

  6. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  7. Molecular background and physiological consequences of altered peripheral serotonin homeostasis in adult rats perinatally treated with tranylcypromine.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, S; Erjavec, I; Brizic, M; Vukicevic, S; Hranilovic, D

    2015-08-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a biologically active molecule present in mammals in the brain and peripheral tissues where it exerts many physiological functions. Developmental exposure to 5-HT-enhancing agents has been reported to induce long-lasting changes in the brain, but the long-term effects of perinatal 5-HT enhancement on 5-HT balance and function in the peripheral compartment have not been explored. Perinatal treatment of rats with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor tranylcypromine (TCP), leads to persistent imbalance in central (increased 5-HT degradation and decreased 5-HT concentrations in the brain) and peripheral (increased platelet and decreased plasma 5-HT concentrations) 5-HT homeostasis. In this study, we explored the molecular background of peripheral 5-HT imbalance, and its possible consequences on bone remodeling and hematopoiesis. Jejunum, liver and blood samples were collected from TCP- and saline-treated rats on post-natal day 70. Relative mRNA levels for tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) and MAO A were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR, femoral trabecular bone parameters were measured using microcomputed tomography, while peripheral blood cell number was determined by cell counter. TCP-treated rats displayed significant decrease in expression of Tph1, and significant increase in percentage of bone volume, trabecular number, connectivity density, and leukocyte number. In addition, significant negative correlation was observed between relative concentrations of TPH1 mRNA and trabecular bone parameters. Our results: a) show that perinatal exposure to tranylcypromine leads to long-lasting compensatory decrease in Tph1 expression in the peripheral compartment, accompanied with alterations in bone remodeling and hematopoiesis, b) suggest that peripheral and central 5HT compartment use different strategies to compensate for 5-HT imbalances of the same cause, and c) indicate dominant role of peripheral over central 5-HT in the regulation

  8. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiujun; Liang Ge; Yang Hui; Wang Shouping; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Wei Huafeng

    2011-02-01

    Isoflurane is known to increase {beta}-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdh{sup Q111/Q111}) and wild type (STHdh{sup Q7/Q7}) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdh{sup Q7/Q7} striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP{sub 3} receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} striatal cells.

  9. Neutral buoyancy and sleep-deprived serum factors alter expression of cytokines regulating osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczynski, Reginald M.; Gorczynski, Christopher P.; Gorczynski, Laura Y.; Hu, Jiang; Lu, Jin; Manuel, Justin; Lee, Lydia

    2005-05-01

    We examined expression of genes associated with cytokine production, and genes implicated in regulating bone metabolism, in bone stromal and osteoblast cells incubated under standard ground conditions and under conditions of neutral buoyancy, and in the presence/absence of serum from normal or sleep-deprived mice. We observed a clear interaction between these two conditions (exposure to neutral buoyancy and serum stimulation) in promoting enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Both conditions independently altered expression of a number of cytokines implicated in the regulation of bone metabolism. However, using stromal cells from IL-1 and TNF α cytokine r KO mice, we concluded that the increased bone loss under microgravity conditions was not primarily cytokine mediated.

  10. Deletion of the Snord116/SNORD116 Alters Sleep in Mice and Patients with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lassi, Glenda; Priano, Lorenzo; Maggi, Silvia; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Balzani, Edoardo; El-Assawy, Nadia; Pagani, Marco; Tinarelli, Federico; Giardino, Daniela; Mauro, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Gozzi, Alessandro; Grugni, Graziano; Tucci, Valter

    2016-03-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances are often reported in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a rare neurodevelopmental syndrome that is associated with paternally-expressed genomic imprinting defects within the human chromosome region 15q11-13. One of the candidate genes, prevalently expressed in the brain, is the small nucleolar ribonucleic acid-116 (SNORD116). Here we conducted a translational study into the sleep abnormalities of PWS, testing the hypothesis that SNORD116 is responsible for sleep defects that characterize the syndrome. We studied sleep in mutant mice that carry a deletion of Snord116 at the orthologous locus (mouse chromosome 7) of the human PWS critical region (PWScr). In particular, we assessed EEG and temperature profiles, across 24-h, in PWScr (m+/p-) heterozygous mutants compared to wild-type littermates. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to explore morphoanatomical differences according to the genotype. Moreover, we complemented the mouse work by presenting two patients with a diagnosis of PWS and characterized by atypical small deletions of SNORD116. We compared the individual EEG parameters of patients with healthy subjects and with a cohort of obese subjects. By studying the mouse mutant line PWScr(m+/p-), we observed specific rapid eye movement (REM) sleep alterations including abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG) theta waves. Remarkably, we observed identical sleep/EEG defects in the two PWS cases. We report brain morphological abnormalities that are associated with the EEG alterations. In particular, mouse mutants have a bilateral reduction of the gray matter volume in the ventral hippocampus and in the septum areas, which are pivotal structures for maintaining theta rhythms throughout the brain. In PWScr(m+/p-) mice we also observed increased body temperature that is coherent with REM sleep alterations in mice and human patients. Our study indicates that paternally expressed Snord116 is involved in the 24-h regulation of

  11. Gestational exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin alters retinoid homeostasis in maternal and perinatal tissues of the Holtzman rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kransler, Kevin M. Tonucci, David A. McGarrigle, Barbara P. Napoli, Joseph L. Olson, James R.

    2007-10-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), one of the most widely studied environmental contaminants, causes a variety of adverse health effects including teratogenesis and altered development which may be related to disruptions in retinoid homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that gestational administration of TCDD has on retinoid homeostasis in both pregnant Holtzman rats and developing fetuses and neonates. A single oral dose of TCDD (0, 1.5, 3, or 6 {mu}g/kg) was administered to pregnant rats on gestation day 10, with fetuses analyzed on gestation days 17 and 20, and neonates analyzed on post natal day 7. Exposure to TCDD generally produced decreases in the concentrations of retinyl esters, such as retinyl palmitate, and retinol in maternal and perinatal liver and lung, while increasing levels in the maternal kidney. Additionally, perinatal hepatic retinol binding protein 1-dependent retinyl ester hydrolysis was also decrease by TCDD. Sensitivity of the developing perinates to TCDD appeared to have an age-related component demonstrated by an increased rate of mortality and significant alterations to body weight and length on post natal day 7 relative to that observed at gestation day 20. A unique observation made in this study was a significant decrease in lung weight observed in the perinates exposed to TCDD. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TCDD significantly alters retinoid homeostasis in tissues of the developing fetus and neonate, suggesting that their unique sensitivity to TCDD may at least be in part the result of altered retinoid homeostasis.

  12. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Bradley D.; Huang, Yanhua H.; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8 h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD. PMID:21962531

  13. Sleep loss alters synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Huang, Yanhua H; Dong, Yan; Krueger, James M

    2011-10-28

    Despite sleep-loss-induced cognitive deficits, little is known about the cellular adaptations that occur with sleep loss. We used brain slices obtained from mice that were sleep deprived for 8h to examine the electrophysiological effects of sleep deprivation (SD). We employed a modified pedestal (flowerpot) over water method for SD that eliminated rapid eye movement sleep and greatly reduced non-rapid eye movement sleep. In layer V/VI pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, miniature excitatory post synaptic current amplitude was slightly reduced, miniature inhibitory post synaptic currents were unaffected, and intrinsic membrane excitability was increased after SD.

  14. Mice Lacking the Circadian Modulators SHARP1 and SHARP2 Display Altered Sleep and Mixed State Endophenotypes of Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Ali; Reinecke, Lisa; Kroos, Christina; Wichert, Sven P.; Oster, Henrik; Wehr, Michael C.; Taneja, Reshma; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Rossner, Moritz J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that clock genes may be implicated in a spectrum of psychiatric diseases, including sleep and mood related disorders as well as schizophrenia. The bHLH transcription factors SHARP1/DEC2/BHLHE41 and SHARP2/DEC1/BHLHE40 are modulators of the circadian system and SHARP1/DEC2/BHLHE40 has been shown to regulate homeostatic sleep drive in humans. In this study, we characterized Sharp1 and Sharp2 double mutant mice (S1/2-/-) using online EEG recordings in living animals, behavioral assays and global gene expression profiling. EEG recordings revealed attenuated sleep/wake amplitudes and alterations of theta oscillations. Increased sleep in the dark phase is paralleled by reduced voluntary activity and cortical gene expression signatures reveal associations with psychiatric diseases. S1/2-/- mice display alterations in novelty induced activity, anxiety and curiosity. Moreover, mutant mice exhibit impaired working memory and deficits in prepulse inhibition resembling symptoms of psychiatric diseases. Network modeling indicates a connection between neural plasticity and clock genes, particularly for SHARP1 and PER1. Our findings support the hypothesis that abnormal sleep and certain (endo)phenotypes of psychiatric diseases may be caused by common mechanisms involving components of the molecular clock including SHARP1 and SHARP2. PMID:25340473

  15. Photoperiod alters duration and intensity of non-rapid eye movement sleep following immune challenge in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Ashley, Noah T; Zhang, Ning; Weil, Zachary M; Magalang, Ulysses J; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-07-01

    Sleep is regulated by circadian and homeostatic processes, but can be altered by infectious disease. During infection or exposure to inflammatory stimuli, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the duration and intensity of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), as measured by electoencephalogram (EEG) delta waves (.5-4 Hz), increase. These sleep alterations are hypothesized to conserve or redirect energy for immune system activation. Many vertebrates exhibit seasonal changes in immune function and sleep-wake cycle, and photoperiod (day length) serves as a reliable environmental cue. For example, winter is energetically demanding for most animals, and Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) adapted to short winter day lengths display reduced fever after LPS administration to presumably conserve energy. We hypothesized that short days increase the duration and intensity of NREMS after LPS challenge to create additional energy savings, despite evidence to the contrary that high fever is associated with increased NREMS. Male hamsters were housed under long (16 h light (L):8 h dark (D)) or short (8L:16D) day lengths, and chronically implanted with transmitters that recorded EEG and electromyogram (EMG) biopotentials simultaneously or core body temperature. After >10 wks in photoperiod conditions, hamsters received an i.p. injection of LPS or saline (control), and vigilance states (duration and distribution of NREMS, rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), and wakefulness) and EEG delta power spectra (NREMS intensity) were assessed. As expected, LPS treatment increased the duration and intensity of NREMS compared to controls. Hamsters adapted to short photoperiods exhibited cumulatively larger increases in NREMS duration and EEG delta wave amplitude 0-8 h after LPS injection compared to long-day LPS-treated hamsters despite short-day attenuation of fever. These results suggest a seasonal decoupling of LPS-induced fever with sleep to promote energy conservation during

  16. Osmotic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zeidel, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in water homeostasis can disturb cell size and function. Although most cells can internally regulate cell volume in response to osmolar stress, neurons are particularly at risk given a combination of complex cell function and space restriction within the calvarium. Thus, regulating water balance is fundamental to survival. Through specialized neuronal “osmoreceptors” that sense changes in plasma osmolality, vasopressin release and thirst are titrated in order to achieve water balance. Fine-tuning of water absorption occurs along the collecting duct, and depends on unique structural modifications of renal tubular epithelium that confer a wide range of water permeability. In this article, we review the mechanisms that ensure water homeostasis as well as the fundamentals of disorders of water balance. PMID:25078421

  17. Intermittent hypoxia alters gut microbiota diversity in a mouse model of sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Torres, Marta; Montserrat, Josep M; Sanchez-Alcoholado, Lidia; Cardona, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco J; Gozal, David; Poroyko, Valeryi A; Navajas, Daniel; Queipo-Ortuño, Maria I; Farré, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    We assessed whether intermittent hypoxia, which emulates one of the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), leads to altered faecal microbiome in a murine model. In vivo partial pressure of oxygen was measured in colonic faeces during intermittent hypoxia in four anesthetised mice. 10 mice were subjected to a pattern of chronic intermittent hypoxia (20 s at 5% O2 and 40 s at room air for 6 h·day(-1)) for 6 weeks and 10 mice served as normoxic controls. Faecal samples were obtained and microbiome composition was determined by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and bioinformatic analysis by Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology. Intermittent hypoxia exposures translated into hypoxia/re-oxygenation patterns in the faeces proximal to the bowel epithelium (<200 μm). A significant effect of intermittent hypoxia on global microbial community structure was found. Intermittent hypoxia increased the α-diversity (Shannon index, p<0.05) and induced a change in the gut microbiota (ANOSIM analysis of β-diversity, p<0.05). Specifically, intermittent hypoxia-exposed mice showed a higher abundance of Firmicutes and a smaller abundance of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla than controls. Faecal microbiota composition and diversity are altered as a result of intermittent hypoxia realistically mimicking OSA, suggesting the possibility that physiological interplays between host and gut microbiota could be deregulated in OSA.

  18. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-12-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [{sup 14}C]CD or [{sup 14}C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 {mu}M). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice.

  19. Clinical impact of altered T-cell homeostasis in treated HIV patients enrolled in a large observational cohort.

    PubMed

    Ndumbi, Patricia; Gillis, Jennifer; Raboud, Janet M; Cooper, Curtis; Hogg, Robert S; Montaner, Julio S G; Burchell, Ann N; Loutfy, Mona R; Machouf, Nima; Klein, Marina B; Tsoukas, Chris M

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the probability of transitioning in or out of the CD3⁺ T-cell homeostatic range during antiretroviral therapy, and we assessed the clinical impact of lost T-cell homeostasis (TCH) on AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) or death. Within the Canadian Observational Cohort (CANOC), we studied 4463 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive HIV-positive patients initiating combination ART (cART) between 2000 and 2010. CD3⁺ trajectories were estimated using a four state Markov model. CD3⁺ T-cel percentage states were classified as follows: very low (<50%), low (50-64%), normal (65-85%), and high (>85%). Covariates associated with transitioning between states were examined. The association between CD3⁺ T-cell percentage states and time to ADI/death from cART initiation was determined using Cox proportional hazards models. A total of 4463 patients were followed for a median of 3 years. Two thousand, five hundred and eight (56%) patients never transitioned from their baseline CD3⁺ T-cell percentage state; 85% of these had normal TCH. In multivariable analysis, individuals with time-updated low CD4⁺ cell count, time-updated detectable viral load, older age, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection were less likely to maintain TCH. In the multivariable proportional hazards model, both very low and high CD3⁺ T-cell percentages were associated with increased risk of ADI/death [adjusted hazard ratio=1.91 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.27-2.89) and hazard ratio=1.49 (95% CI: 1.13-1.96), respectively]. Patients with very low or high CD3⁺ T-cell percentages are at risk for ADIs/death. To our knowledge, this is the first study linking altered TCH and morbidity/mortality in cART-treated HIV-positive patients.

  20. Improved Glucose Homeostasis in Obese Mice Treated With Resveratrol Is Associated With Alterations in the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Sung, Miranda M; Kim, Ty T; Denou, Emmanuel; Soltys, Carrie-Lynn M; Hamza, Shereen M; Byrne, Nikole J; Masson, Grant; Park, Heekuk; Wishart, David S; Madsen, Karen L; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Dyck, Jason R B

    2017-02-01

    Oral administration of resveratrol is able to improve glucose homeostasis in obese individuals. Herein we show that resveratrol ingestion produces taxonomic and predicted functional changes in the gut microbiome of obese mice. In particular, changes in the gut microbiome were characterized by a decreased relative abundance of Turicibacteraceae, Moryella, Lachnospiraceae, and Akkermansia and an increased relative abundance of Bacteroides and Parabacteroides Moreover, fecal transplantation from healthy resveratrol-fed donor mice is sufficient to improve glucose homeostasis in obese mice, suggesting that the resveratrol-mediated changes in the gut microbiome may play an important role in the mechanism of action of resveratrol. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  1. Altered thalamocortical and intra-thalamic functional connectivity during light sleep compared with wake.

    PubMed

    Hale, Joanne R; White, Thomas P; Mayhew, Stephen D; Wilson, Rebecca S; Rollings, David T; Khalsa, Sakhvinder; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Bagshaw, Andrew P

    2016-01-15

    The transition from wakefulness into sleep is accompanied by modified activity in the brain's thalamocortical network. Sleep-related decreases in thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) have previously been reported, but the extent to which these changes differ between thalamocortical pathways, and patterns of intra-thalamic FC during sleep remain untested. To non-invasively investigate thalamocortical and intra-thalamic FC as a function of sleep stage we recorded simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in 13 healthy participants during their descent into light sleep. Visual scoring of EEG data permitted sleep staging. We derived a functional thalamic parcellation during wakefulness by computing seed-based FC, measured between thalamic voxels and a set of pre-defined cortical regions. Sleep differentially affected FC between these distinct thalamic subdivisions and their associated cortical projections, with significant increases in FC during sleep restricted to sensorimotor connections. In contrast, intra-thalamic FC, both within and between functional thalamic subdivisions, showed significant increases with advancement into sleep. This work demonstrates the complexity and state-specific nature of functional thalamic relationships--both with the cortex and internally--over the sleep/wake cycle, and further highlights the importance of a thalamocortical focus in the study of sleep mechanisms.

  2. Homeostasis in Primates in the Hyperdynamic Environment. [circadian timekeeping and effects of lower body positive pressure on sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of chronic centrifugation upon the homestatic regulation of the circadian timekeeping system was examined. The interactions of body temperature regulation and the behavioral state of arousal were studied by evaluating the influence of cephalic fluid shifts induced by lower body positive air pressure (LBPP), upon these systems. The small diurnal squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) was used as the non-human primate model. Results show that the circadian timekeeping system of these primates is functional in the hyperdynamic environment, however, some of its components appear to be regulated at different homeostatic levels. The LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.7 C decrease in DBT (p 0.01). However, although on video some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in state of arousal. Thus, the physiological mechanisms underlying this lowering of body temperature can be independent of the arousal state.

  3. Homeostasis in Primates in the Hyperdynamic Environment. [circadian timekeeping and effects of lower body positive pressure on sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of chronic centrifugation upon the homestatic regulation of the circadian timekeeping system was examined. The interactions of body temperature regulation and the behavioral state of arousal were studied by evaluating the influence of cephalic fluid shifts induced by lower body positive air pressure (LBPP), upon these systems. The small diurnal squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) was used as the non-human primate model. Results show that the circadian timekeeping system of these primates is functional in the hyperdynamic environment, however, some of its components appear to be regulated at different homeostatic levels. The LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.7 C decrease in DBT (p 0.01). However, although on video some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in state of arousal. Thus, the physiological mechanisms underlying this lowering of body temperature can be independent of the arousal state.

  4. Reduced expression of α5GABAA receptors elicits autism-like alterations in EEG patterns and sleep-wake behavior.

    PubMed

    Mesbah-Oskui, Lia; Penna, Antonello; Orser, Beverley A; Horner, Richard L

    2017-05-01

    A reduction in the activity of GABAA receptors, particularly α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors (α5GABAARs), has been implicated in the etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Genetically modified mice that lack α5GABAARs (Gabra5(-/-)) exhibit autism-like behaviors and both enhanced and impaired learning and memory, depending on the behavioral task. The aim of this study was to examine the electroencephalogram (EEG) activity and sleep-wake behaviors in Gabra5(-/-) mice and wild-type mice. In addition, since some individuals with ASD can exhibit elevated innate immune response, mice were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 125mg/kg intraperitoneal injection) or vehicle and EEG and sleep-wake patterns were assessed. The results showed that Gabra5(-/-) mice (n=3) exhibited elevated 0-2Hz EEG activity during all sleep-wake states (all p<0.04), decreased 8-12Hz EEG activity during REM sleep (p=0.04), and decreased sleep spindles under baseline conditions compared to wild-type controls (n=4) (all p≤0.03). Alterations in EEG activity and sleep-wake behavior were identified in Gabra5(-/-) mice following treatment with LPS, however these changes were similar to those in wild-type mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that reduced α5GABAAR activity contributes to an ASD phenotype. The results also suggest that Gabra5(-/-) mice may serve as an animal model for ASD, as assessed through EEG activity and sleep-wake behaviors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea alters cancer-associated transcriptional signatures in circulating leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Sina A; Seiger, Ashley N; Hayes, Amanda L; Mehra, Reena; Patel, Sanjay R

    2014-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with a number of chronic disorders that may improve with effective therapy. However, the molecular pathways affected by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment are largely unknown. We sought to assess the system-wide consequences of CPAP therapy by transcriptionally profiling peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Subjects in whom severe OSA was diagnosed were treated with CPAP, and whole-genome expression measurement of PBLs was performed at baseline and following therapy. We used gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to identify pathways that were differentially enriched. Network analysis was then applied to highlight key drivers of processes influenced by CPAP. Eighteen subjects with significant OSA underwent CPAP therapy and microarray analysis of their PBLs. Treatment with CPAP improved apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), daytime sleepiness, and blood pressure, but did not affect anthropometric measures. GSEA revealed a number of enriched gene sets, many of which were involved in neoplastic processes and displayed downregulated expression patterns in response to CPAP. Network analysis identified several densely connected genes that are important modulators of cancer and tumor growth. Effective therapy of OSA with CPAP is associated with alterations in circulating leukocyte gene expression. Functional enrichment and network analyses highlighted transcriptional suppression in cancer-related pathways, suggesting potentially novel mechanisms linking OSA with neoplastic signatures.

  6. M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonism alters sleep without affecting memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Christoph; Power, Ann E; Nofzinger, Eric A; Feige, Bernd; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Kloepfer, Corinna; Waldheim, Bernhard; Radosa, Marc-Philipp; Berger, Mathias; Riemann, Dieter

    2006-11-01

    Preclinical studies have implicated cholinergic neurotransmission, specifically M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation, in sleep-associated memory consolidation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of administering the direct M1 mAChR agonist RS-86 on pre-post sleep memory consolidation. Twenty healthy human participants were tested in a declarative word-list task and a procedural mirror-tracing task. RS-86 significantly reduced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency and slow wave sleep (SWS) duration in comparison with placebo. Presleep acquisition and postsleep recall rates were within the expected ranges. However, recall rates in both tasks were almost identical for the RS-86 and placebo conditions. These results indicate that selective M1 mAChR activation in healthy humans has no clinically relevant effect on pre-post sleep consolidation of declarative or procedural memories at a dose that reduces REM sleep latency and SWS duration.

  7. Loss of niche-satellite cell interactions in syndecan-3 null mice alters muscle progenitor cell homeostasis improving muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pisconti, Addolorata; Banks, Glen B; Babaeijandaghi, Farshad; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Rossi, Fabio M V; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle stem cell niche provides an environment that maintains quiescent satellite cells, required for skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Syndecan-3, a transmembrane proteoglycan expressed in satellite cells, supports communication with the niche, providing cell interactions and signals to maintain quiescent satellite cells. Syndecan-3 ablation unexpectedly improves regeneration in repeatedly injured muscle and in dystrophic mice, accompanied by the persistence of sublaminar and interstitial, proliferating myoblasts. Additionally, muscle aging is improved in syndecan-3 null mice. Since syndecan-3 null myofiber-associated satellite cells downregulate Pax7 and migrate away from the niche more readily than wild type cells, syxndecan-3 appears to regulate satellite cell homeostasis and satellite cell homing to the niche. Manipulating syndecan-3 provides a promising target for development of therapies to enhance muscle regeneration in muscular dystrophies and in aged muscle.

  8. Loss of Goosecoid-like and DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 in interpeduncular nucleus results in altered regulation of rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Hiromasa; Sato, Makito; Sinton, Christopher M.; Gautron, Laurent; Williams, S. Clay; Skach, Amber; Elmquist, Joel K.; Skoultchi, Arthur I.; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated primarily by inhibitory interactions between the hypothalamus and brainstem. The expression of the states of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep also are correlated with the activity of groups of REM-off and REM-on neurons in the dorsal brainstem. However, the contribution of ventral brainstem nuclei to sleep regulation has been little characterized to date. Here we examined sleep and wakefulness in mice deficient in a homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid-like (Gscl), which is one of the genes deleted in DiGeorge syndrome or 22q11 deletion syndrome. The expression of Gscl is restricted to the interpeduncular nucleus (IP) in the ventral region of the midbrain–hindbrain transition. The IP has reciprocal connections with several cell groups implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. Although Gscl−/− mice have apparently normal anatomy and connections of the IP, they exhibited a reduced total time spent in REM sleep and fewer REM sleep episodes. In addition, Gscl−/− mice showed reduced theta power during REM sleep and increased arousability during REM sleep. Gscl−/− mice also lacked the expression of DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 (Dgcr14) in the IP. These results indicate that the absence of Gscl and Dgcr14 in the IP results in altered regulation of REM sleep. PMID:20921407

  9. Loss of Goosecoid-like and DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 in interpeduncular nucleus results in altered regulation of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Funato, Hiromasa; Sato, Makito; Sinton, Christopher M; Gautron, Laurent; Williams, S Clay; Skach, Amber; Elmquist, Joel K; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2010-10-19

    Sleep and wakefulness are regulated primarily by inhibitory interactions between the hypothalamus and brainstem. The expression of the states of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep also are correlated with the activity of groups of REM-off and REM-on neurons in the dorsal brainstem. However, the contribution of ventral brainstem nuclei to sleep regulation has been little characterized to date. Here we examined sleep and wakefulness in mice deficient in a homeobox transcription factor, Goosecoid-like (Gscl), which is one of the genes deleted in DiGeorge syndrome or 22q11 deletion syndrome. The expression of Gscl is restricted to the interpeduncular nucleus (IP) in the ventral region of the midbrain-hindbrain transition. The IP has reciprocal connections with several cell groups implicated in sleep/wakefulness regulation. Although Gscl(-/-) mice have apparently normal anatomy and connections of the IP, they exhibited a reduced total time spent in REM sleep and fewer REM sleep episodes. In addition, Gscl(-/-) mice showed reduced theta power during REM sleep and increased arousability during REM sleep. Gscl(-/-) mice also lacked the expression of DiGeorge syndrome critical region 14 (Dgcr14) in the IP. These results indicate that the absence of Gscl and Dgcr14 in the IP results in altered regulation of REM sleep.

  10. Global deletion of MGL in mice delays lipid absorption and alters energy homeostasis and diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, John D.; Zhou, Yin Xiu; Wu, Amy; Zadrogra, John A.; Gajda, Angela M.; Lackey, Atreju I.; Lang, Wensheng; Chevalier, Kristen M.; Sutton, Steven W.; Zhang, Sui-Po; Flores, Christopher M.; Connelly, Margery A.; Storch, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of monoacylglycerols (MGs) to yield FFAs and glycerol. MGL contributes to energy homeostasis through the mobilization of fat stores and also via the degradation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. To further examine the role of MG metabolism in energy homeostasis, MGL−/− mice were fed either a 10% (kilocalories) low-fat diet (LFD) or a 45% (kilocalories) high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Profound increases of MG species in the MGL−/− mice compared with WT control mice were found. Weight gain over the 12 weeks was blunted in both diet groups. MGL−/− mice were leaner than WT mice at both baseline and after 12 weeks of LFD feeding. Circulating lipids were decreased in HFD-fed MGL−/− mice, as were the levels of several plasma peptides involved in glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Interestingly, MGL−/− mice had markedly reduced intestinal TG secretion following an oral fat challenge, suggesting delayed lipid absorption. Overall, the results indicate that global MGL deletion leads to systemic changes that produce a leaner phenotype and an improved serum metabolic profile. PMID:25842377

  11. The loss of ATP2C1 impairs the DNA damage response and induces altered skin homeostasis: Consequences for epidermal biology in Hailey-Hailey disease

    PubMed Central

    Cialfi, Samantha; Le Pera, Loredana; De Blasio, Carlo; Mariano, Germano; Palermo, Rocco; Zonfrilli, Azzurra; Uccelletti, Daniela; Palleschi, Claudio; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Barbieri, Luca; Screpanti, Isabella; Talora, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of the Golgi Ca2+-ATPase ATP2C1 is associated with deregulated calcium homeostasis and altered skin function. ATP2C1 mutations have been identified as having a causative role in Hailey-Hailey disease, an autosomal-dominant skin disorder. Here, we identified ATP2C1 as a crucial regulator of epidermal homeostasis through the regulation of oxidative stress. Upon ATP2C1 inactivation, oxidative stress and Notch1 activation were increased in cultured human keratinocytes. Using RNA-seq experiments, we found that the DNA damage response (DDR) was consistently down-regulated in keratinocytes derived from the lesions of patients with Hailey-Hailey disease. Although oxidative stress activates the DDR, ATP2C1 inactivation down-regulates DDR gene expression. We showed that the DDR response was a major target of oxidative stress-induced Notch1 activation. Here, we show that this activation is functionally important because early Notch1 activation in keratinocytes induces keratinocyte differentiation and represses the DDR. These results indicate that an ATP2C1/NOTCH1 axis might be critical for keratinocyte function and cutaneous homeostasis, suggesting a plausible model for the pathological features of Hailey-Hailey disease. PMID:27528123

  12. Interleukin 37 expression in mice alters sleep responses to inflammatory agents and influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher J; Zielinski, Mark R; Dunbrasky, Danielle; Taishi, Ping; Dinarello, Charles A; Krueger, James M

    2017-06-01

    Multiple interactions between the immune system and sleep are known, including the effects of microbial challenge on sleep or the effects of sleep loss on facets of the immune response. Cytokines regulate, in part, sleep and immune responses. Here we examine the role of an anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-37 (IL-37) on sleep in a mouse strain that expresses human IL-37b (IL37tg mice). Constitutive expression of the IL-37 gene in the brains of these mice under resting conditions is low; however, upon an inflammatory stimulus, expression increases dramatically. We measured sleep in three conditions; a) under baseline conditions and after 6 h of sleep loss, b) after bolus intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or IL-1β and c) after intranasal influenza virus challenge. Under baseline conditions, the IL37tg mice had 7% more spontaneous non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) during the light period than wild-type (WT) mice. After sleep deprivation both WT mice and IL37tg mice slept an extra 21% and 12%, respectively, during the first 6 h of recovery. NREMS responses after sleep deprivation did not significantly differ between WT mice and IL37tg mice. However, in response to either IL-1β or LPS, the increases in time spent in NREMS were about four-fold greater in the WT mice than in the IL37tg mice. In contrast, in response to a low dose of mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus, sleep responses developed slowly over the 6 day recording period. By day 6, NREMS increased by 10% and REMS increased by 18% in the IL37tg mice compared to the WT mice. Further, by day 4 IL37tg mice lost less weight, remained more active, and retained their body temperatures closer to baseline values than WT mice. We conclude that conditions that promote IL-37 expression attenuate morbidity to severe inflammatory challenge.

  13. Acute Sleep Loss Induces Tissue-Specific Epigenetic and Transcriptional Alterations to Circadian Clock Genes in Men.

    PubMed

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Osler, Megan E; Voisin, Sarah; Broman, Jan-Erik; Vogel, Heike; Dickson, Suzanne L; Zierath, Juleen R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Shift workers are at increased risk of metabolic morbidities. Clock genes are known to regulate metabolic processes in peripheral tissues, eg, glucose oxidation. This study aimed to investigate how clock genes are affected at the epigenetic and transcriptional level in peripheral human tissues following acute total sleep deprivation (TSD), mimicking shift work with extended wakefulness. In a randomized, two-period, two-condition, crossover clinical study, 15 healthy men underwent two experimental sessions: x sleep (2230-0700 h) and overnight wakefulness. On the subsequent morning, serum cortisol was measured, followed by skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies for DNA methylation and gene expression analyses of core clock genes (BMAL1, CLOCK, CRY1, PER1). Finally, baseline and 2-h post-oral glucose load plasma glucose concentrations were determined. In adipose tissue, acute sleep deprivation vs sleep increased methylation in the promoter of CRY1 (+4%; P = .026) and in two promoter-interacting enhancer regions of PER1 (+15%; P = .036; +9%; P = .026). In skeletal muscle, TSD vs sleep decreased gene expression of BMAL1 (-18%; P = .033) and CRY1 (-22%; P = .047). Concentrations of serum cortisol, which can reset peripheral tissue clocks, were decreased (2449 ± 932 vs 3178 ± 723 nmol/L; P = .039), whereas postprandial plasma glucose concentrations were elevated after TSD (7.77 ± 1.63 vs 6.59 ± 1.32 mmol/L; P = .011). Our findings demonstrate that a single night of wakefulness can alter the epigenetic and transcriptional profile of core circadian clock genes in key metabolic tissues. Tissue-specific clock alterations could explain why shift work may disrupt metabolic integrity as observed herein.

  14. Altering Misperception of Sleep in Insomnia: Behavioral Experiment Versus Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Nicole K. Y.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight individuals with insomnia were asked to wear an actigraph and keep a sleep diary for 2 nights. On the following day, half were shown the discrepancy between the data recorded on the actigraph and their sleep diary via a behavioral experiment, whereas the other half were told of the discrepancy verbally. Participants were then asked to…

  15. Altering Misperception of Sleep in Insomnia: Behavioral Experiment Versus Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Nicole K. Y.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight individuals with insomnia were asked to wear an actigraph and keep a sleep diary for 2 nights. On the following day, half were shown the discrepancy between the data recorded on the actigraph and their sleep diary via a behavioral experiment, whereas the other half were told of the discrepancy verbally. Participants were then asked to…

  16. The unrested resting brain: sleep deprivation alters activity within the default-mode network.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Ninad; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Hu, Peter; Walker, Matthew P

    2010-08-01

    The sleep-deprived brain has principally been characterized by examining dysfunction during cognitive task performance. However, far less attention has been afforded the possibility that sleep deprivation may be as, if not more, accurately characterized on the basis of abnormal resting-state brain activity. Here we report that one night of sleep deprivation significantly disrupts the canonical signature of task-related deactivation, resulting in a double dissociation within anterior as well as posterior midline regions of the default network. Indeed, deactivation within these regions alone discriminated sleep-deprived from sleep-control subjects with a 93% degree of sensitivity and 92% specificity. In addition, the relative balance of deactivation within these default nodes significantly correlated with the amount of prior sleep in the control group (and not extended time awake in the deprivation group). Therefore, the stability and the balance of task-related deactivation in key default-mode regions may be dependent on prior sleep, such that a lack thereof disrupts this signature pattern of brain activity, findings that may offer explanatory insights into conditions associated with sleep loss at both a clinical as well as societal level.

  17. The Bidirectional Relationship between Sleep and Immunity against Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Pantaleón-Martínez, Ana Ma; Velazquéz-Moctezuma, Javier; Prospéro-García, Oscar; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Pavón, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is considered an important modulator of the immune response. Thus, a lack of sleep can weaken immunity, increasing organism susceptibility to infection. For instance, shorter sleep durations are associated with a rise in suffering from the common cold. The function of sleep in altering immune responses must be determined to understand how sleep deprivation increases the susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. There are several explanations for greater susceptibility to infections after reduced sleep, such as impaired mitogenic proliferation of lymphocytes, decreased HLA-DR expression, the upregulation of CD14+, and variations in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, which have been observed during partial sleep deprivation. Also, steroid hormones, in addition to regulating sexual behavior, influence sleep. Thus, we hypothesize that sleep and the immune-endocrine system have a bidirectional relationship in governing various physiological processes, including immunity to infections. This review discusses the evidence on the bidirectional effects of the immune response against viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections on sleep patterns and how the lack of sleep affects the immune response against such agents. Because sleep is essential in the maintenance of homeostasis, these situations must be adapted to elicit changes in sleep patterns and other physiological parameters during the immune response to infections to which the organism is continuously exposed.

  18. The Bidirectional Relationship between Sleep and Immunity against Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G.; Pantaleón-Martínez, Ana Ma.; Velazquéz-Moctezuma, Javier; Prospéro-García, Oscar; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Pavón, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is considered an important modulator of the immune response. Thus, a lack of sleep can weaken immunity, increasing organism susceptibility to infection. For instance, shorter sleep durations are associated with a rise in suffering from the common cold. The function of sleep in altering immune responses must be determined to understand how sleep deprivation increases the susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. There are several explanations for greater susceptibility to infections after reduced sleep, such as impaired mitogenic proliferation of lymphocytes, decreased HLA-DR expression, the upregulation of CD14+, and variations in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, which have been observed during partial sleep deprivation. Also, steroid hormones, in addition to regulating sexual behavior, influence sleep. Thus, we hypothesize that sleep and the immune-endocrine system have a bidirectional relationship in governing various physiological processes, including immunity to infections. This review discusses the evidence on the bidirectional effects of the immune response against viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections on sleep patterns and how the lack of sleep affects the immune response against such agents. Because sleep is essential in the maintenance of homeostasis, these situations must be adapted to elicit changes in sleep patterns and other physiological parameters during the immune response to infections to which the organism is continuously exposed. PMID:26417606

  19. Electroencephalographic studies of sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.; Agnew, H. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Various experimental studies on sleep are described. The following areas are discussed: (1) effect of altered day length on sleep, (2) effect of a partial loss of sleep on subsequent nocturnal sleep; (3) effect of rigid control over sleep-wake-up times; (4) sleep and wakefulness in a time-free environment; (5) distribution of spindles during a full night of sleep; and (6) effect on sleep and performance of swiftly changing shifts of work.

  20. Altered activity-based sleep measures in rhesus monkeys following cocaine self-administration and abstinence.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Jennifer A; Gomez, Gustavo; Ehnerd, Carol; Gurnsey, Kate; Nicolazzo, Jessica; Bradberry, Charles W; Jedema, Hank P

    2016-06-01

    Impairments in sleep and cognitive function have been observed in patients with substance abuse disorders and may be potential factors contributing to drug relapse. In addition, sleep disruption may itself contribute to cognitive deficits. In the present study we examined the impact of prolonged cocaine self-administration and abstinence on actigraphy-based measures of night-time activity in rhesus macaques as an inferential measure of sleep, and determined whether sleep-efficiency correlated with cognitive impairments in the same subjects on drug free days. Actigraphy data was obtained from a group of rhesus macaques intravenously self-administering cocaine (n=6) and a control group (n=5). Periods were evaluated during which the mean cumulative doses of cocaine were 3.0+0.0 and 4.5+0.2mg/kg/day for 4days (Tuesday-Thursday) each week. Actigraphy-based sleep efficiency decreased during days of cocaine self-administration in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with this observation, sleep became more fragmented. Activity-based sleep efficiency normalized during the weekend without cocaine prior to cognitive assessment on Monday. The magnitude of activity-based sleep disruption during self-administration did not correlate with the level of cognitive impairment on drug free days. With continued self-administration, the impact of cocaine on activity-based sleep efficiency declined indicating the development of tolerance. Cocaine self-administration disrupted sleep efficiency in rhesus macaques as measured by actigraphy, but normalized quickly in the absence of cocaine. The cognitive impairment observed on drug free days was unlikely to be related to disruption of the nightly activity patterns on days of cocaine self-administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Misassembly of full-length Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 protein is linked to altered dopamine homeostasis and behavioral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Trossbach, S V; Bader, V; Hecher, L; Pum, M E; Masoud, S T; Prikulis, I; Schäble, S; de Souza Silva, M A; Su, P; Boulat, B; Chwiesko, C; Poschmann, G; Stühler, K; Lohr, K M; Stout, K A; Oskamp, A; Godsave, S F; Müller-Schiffmann, A; Bilzer, T; Steiner, H; Peters, P J; Bauer, A; Sauvage, M; Ramsey, A J; Miller, G W; Liu, F; Seeman, P; Brandon, N J; Huston, J P; Korth, C

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a mental illness gene first identified in a Scottish pedigree. So far, DISC1-dependent phenotypes in animal models have been confined to expressing mutant DISC1. Here we investigated how pathology of full-length DISC1 protein could be a major mechanism in sporadic mental illness. We demonstrate that a novel transgenic rat model, modestly overexpressing the full-length DISC1 transgene, showed phenotypes consistent with a significant role of DISC1 misassembly in mental illness. The tgDISC1 rat displayed mainly perinuclear DISC1 aggregates in neurons. Furthermore, the tgDISC1 rat showed a robust signature of behavioral phenotypes that includes amphetamine supersensitivity, hyperexploratory behavior and rotarod deficits, all pointing to changes in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. To understand the etiology of the behavioral deficits, we undertook a series of molecular studies in the dorsal striatum of tgDISC1 rats. We observed an 80% increase in high-affinity DA D2 receptors, an increased translocation of the dopamine transporter to the plasma membrane and a corresponding increase in DA inflow as observed by cyclic voltammetry. A reciprocal relationship between DISC1 protein assembly and DA homeostasis was corroborated by in vitro studies. Elevated cytosolic dopamine caused an increase in DISC1 multimerization, insolubility and complexing with the dopamine transporter, suggesting a physiological mechanism linking DISC1 assembly and dopamine homeostasis. DISC1 protein pathology and its interaction with dopamine homeostasis is a novel cellular mechanism that is relevant for behavioral control and may have a role in mental illness. PMID:26754951

  2. Longitudinal brain structural alterations and systemic inflammation in obstructive sleep apnea before and after surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Pei-Chin; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Friedman, Michael; Lin, Hsin-Ching; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-05-17

    Systemic inflammation, neurocognitive impairments, and morphologic brain changes are associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Understanding their longitudinal evolution and interactions after surgical treatment provides clues to the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and its reversibility. In the present study, we investigate clinical disease severity, systemic inflammation, cognitive deficits, and corresponding gray matter volume (GMV) changes in OSA, and the modifications following surgery. Twenty-one patients with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI > 5) and 15 healthy volunteers (AHI < 5) underwent serial evaluation, including polysomnography, flow cytometry for leukocyte apoptosis categorization, cognitive function evaluation, and high-resolution brain scan. Disease severity, leukocyte apoptosis, cognitive function, and imaging data were collected to assess therapeutic efficacy 3 months after surgery. Pre-operatively, patients presented with worse cognitive function, worse polysomnography scores, and higher early leukocyte apoptosis associated with increased insular GMV. There was reduced GMV in the anterior cingulate gyrus before and after surgery in the cases compared to that in controls, suggesting an irreversible structural deficit. Post-operatively, there were significant improvements in different cognitive domains, including attention, executive and visuospatial function, and depression, and in early leukocyte apoptosis. There was also a significant decrease in GMVs after treatment, suggesting recovery from vasogenic edema in the precuneus, insula, and cerebellum. Improvement in early leukocyte apoptosis post-surgery predicted better recovery of precuneus GMV. In OSA, increased disease severity and systemic inflammation can alter GMV in vulnerable regions. Surgical treatment may improve disease severity and systemic inflammation, with subsequent recovery in brain structures and functions.

  3. Simultaneous coffee caffeine intake and sleep deprivation alter glucose homeostasis in Iranian men: a randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Rasaei, Behrouz; Talib, Ruzita Abd; Noor, Mohd Ismail; Karandish, Majid; Karim, Norimah A

    2016-12-01

    背景与目的:睡眠剥夺和咖啡中咖啡因的摄入对葡萄糖稳态的影响已分别被证 明,但这两个变量的综合效果尚不知道。方法与研究设计:42 名年龄在20-40 岁之间的伊朗男性在本随机交叉试验中被分配到3 个试验组,试验组间有两周 的洗脱期。研究对象为中度咖啡消费者(<=3 杯/天),并且匹兹堡睡眠质量指 数<=5。每种试验包括3 晚上的睡眠剥夺(在床上4 小时),加3 杯开水(BW 试验,每杯150 毫升)、无咖啡因的咖啡(DC 试验,不加糖,99.9%无咖啡 因)或含咖啡因的咖啡(CC 试验,不加糖,每杯含65 毫克咖啡因)。DC 和 CC 处理采用盲法。每种试验结束后,测量空腹血糖(采用酶法测定)和胰岛 素(采用电化学发光免疫分析法测定),口服葡萄糖耐量试验(OGTT)两个 小时后再次测量血糖和胰岛素。胰岛素抵抗采用稳态模型量化。结果:重复测 量方差分析表明各试验组间的空腹血糖(p=0.248)和胰岛素抵抗(p=0.079) 没有显著差异。然而,方差分析表明各试验组间空腹血清胰岛素、血糖和 OGTT 后的胰岛素有差异。配对比较(研究对象间)表明:与DC 试验组相 比,CC 试验组OGTT 后血糖和胰岛素较高(p<0.001),空腹血清胰岛素 (p=0.001)和胰岛素抵抗(p=0.039)也增加。结论:对睡眠被剥夺的人,含 咖啡因的咖啡比不含咖啡因的咖啡更不利于葡萄糖稳态。.

  4. Deficits in avoidance responding after paradoxical sleep deprivation are not associated with altered [3H]pirenzepine binding to M1 muscarinic receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Karin M; Hipólide, Débora C; Nobrega, José N; Bueno, Orlando F A; Tufik, Sergio; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela M

    2003-07-04

    Previous work had indicated that animals that were sleep-deprived and then trained on a passive avoidance task show poor retention of the task 24 h later after being allowed to sleep freely again. Cholinergic involvement is suggested by the fact that this effect is prevented by treatment with the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine during sleep deprivation. The observation that similar deficits are observed in non-deprived rats after treatment with M1-selective antagonist compounds such as dicyclomine or pirenzepine cause similar impairments, and gave rise to the hypothesis that sleep deprivation might induce significant reductions in M1 binding in brain areas involved in learning and memory processes. Rats were deprived of sleep for 96 h and then either immediately killed, or allowed to recover sleep for 24 h before being killed. [3H]pirenzepine binding to M1 sites was examined by quantitative autoradiography in 39 different brain areas in cage controls, sleep-deprived and sleep-recovered animals (N=8 per group). No significant differences among groups were found in any brain region. A separate group of animals was subjected to the sleep deprivation procedure and then trained in a simple avoidance task. Animals were then allowed to sleep and retested 24 h later. This group showed a significant impairment in the avoidance task compared to cage controls, in agreement with previous observations. These data suggest that proactive learning/memory deficits induced by sleep deprivation cannot be attributed to altered M1 binding either immediately after deprivation (when avoidance training occurs) or after sleep has recovered (when acquisition/retention are tested). The possibility remains that alterations in M1 function occur at post-membrane second messenger systems.

  5. Sleep-wake dynamics under extended light and extended dark conditions in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sigurgeirsson, Benjamín; Thornorsteinsson, Haraldur; Sigmundsdóttir, Sigrún; Lieder, Ramona; Sveinsdóttir, Hildur S; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Halldórsson, Bjarni; Karlsson, Karl

    2013-11-01

    We characterize the effects of sleep deprivation on sleep-wake behavior, neurogenesis and stress in adult zebrafish, and describe light-induced changes in gene expression. Sleep deprivation was performed using two stimuli: mild electroshock and light. Comparisons were made between five groups of fish: naïve; electroshock sleep-deprived and yoked-control; fish exposed to constant light (increasing wakefulness); and fish exposed to constant darkness (increasing sleep). Behavioral parameters assessed were sleep percentage, number of sleep-wake transitions, and sleep and wake bout length. Using microarray technology, light-dark modulation of gene expression was examined. In parallel with gene expression, neurogenesis was measured and stress following sleep deprivation was assessed behaviorally and physiologically. Our results indicate that sleep duration is most effectively altered by varying exposure to ambient light. Further, while the sleep-wake dynamics are comparable to those observed in mammals, zebrafish may exhibit weaker sleep homeostasis and sleep pressure than do mammals; and sleep deprivation does not significantly alter their stress responses. Finally, modulation of gene expression by light and dark was observed. Genes upregulated during the dark period are broadly related to growth, morphogenesis, energy balance, and lipid synthesis. Genes upregulated during light are broadly related to synaptic plasticity and cell proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Does sleep deprivation alter functional EEG networks in children with focal epilepsy?

    PubMed

    van Diessen, Eric; Otte, Willem M; Braun, Kees P J; Stam, Cornelis J; Jansen, Floor E

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings after sleep deprivation increase the diagnostic yield in patients suspected of epilepsy if the routine EEG remains inconclusive. Sleep deprivation is associated with increased interictal EEG abnormalities in patients with epilepsy, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In this feasibility study, we used a network analytical approach to provide novel insights into this clinical observation. The aim was to characterize the effect of sleep deprivation on the interictal functional network organization using a unique dataset of paired routine and sleep deprivation recordings in patients and controls. We included 21 children referred to the first seizure clinic of our center with suspected new onset focal epilepsy in whom a routine interictal and a sleep deprivation EEG (SD-EEG) were performed. Seventeen children, in whom the diagnosis of epilepsy was excluded, served as controls. For both time points weighted functional networks were constructed based on interictal artifact free time-series. Routine and sleep deprivation networks were characterized at different frequency bands using minimum spanning tree (MST) measures (leaf number and diameter) and classical measures of integration (path length) and segregation (clustering coefficient). A significant interaction was found for leaf number and diameter between patients and controls after sleep deprivation: patients showed a shift toward a more path-like MST network whereas controls showed a shift toward a more star-like MST network. This shift in network organization after sleep deprivation in patients is in accordance with previous studies showing a more regular network organization in the ictal state and might relate to the increased epileptiform abnormalities found in patients after sleep deprivation. Larger studies are needed to verify these results. Finally, MST measures were more sensitive in detecting network changes as compared to the classical measures of integration and

  7. Artificial Outdoor Nighttime Lights Associate with Altered Sleep Behavior in the American General Population.

    PubMed

    Ohayon, Maurice M; Milesi, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Our study aims to explore the associations between outdoor nighttime lights (ONL) and sleep patterns in the human population. Cross-sectional telephone study of a representative sample of the general US population age 18 y or older. 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals (participation rate: 83.2%) were interviewed by telephone. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; sleep, mental and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition; International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) Edition). Individuals were geolocated by longitude and latitude. Outdoor nighttime light measurements were obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), with nighttime passes taking place between 19:30 and 22:30 local time. Light data were correlated precisely to the geolocation of each participant of the general population sample. Living in areas with greater ONL was associated with delayed bedtime (P < 0.0001) and wake up time (P < 0.0001), shorter sleep duration (P < 0.01), and increased daytime sleepiness (P < 0.0001). Living in areas with greater ONL also increased the dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and quality (P < 0.0001) and the likelihood of having a diagnostic profile congruent with a circadian rhythm disorder (P < 0.0001). Although they improve the overall safety of people and traffic, nighttime lights in our streets and cities are clearly linked with modifications in human sleep behaviors and also impinge on the daytime functioning of individuals living in areas with greater ONL. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Altered regulatory T cell homeostasis in patients with CD4+ lymphopenia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Ken-ichi; Kim, Haesook T.; McDonough, Sean; Bascug, Gregory; Warshauer, Ben; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs have an indispensable role in the maintenance of tolerance after allogeneic HSC transplantation (HSCT). Patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) have fewer circulating Tregs, but the mechanisms that lead to this deficiency of Tregs after HSCT are not known. Here, we analyzed reconstitution of Tregs and conventional CD4+ T cells (Tcons) in patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT after myeloablative conditioning. Following transplant, thymic generation of naive Tregs was markedly impaired, and reconstituting Tregs had a predominantly activated/memory phenotype. In response to CD4+ lymphopenia after HSCT, Tregs underwent higher levels of proliferation than Tcons, but Tregs undergoing homeostatic proliferation also showed increased susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Prospective monitoring of CD4+ T cell subsets revealed that Tregs rapidly expanded and achieved normal levels by 9 months after HSCT, but Treg levels subsequently declined in patients with prolonged CD4+ lymphopenia. This resulted in a relative deficiency of Tregs, which was associated with a high incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. These studies indicate that CD4+ lymphopenia is a critical factor in Treg homeostasis and that prolonged imbalance of Treg homeostasis after HSCT can result in loss of tolerance and significant clinical disease manifestations. PMID:20389017

  9. Inhibition of diabetic-cataract by vitamin K1 involves modulation of hyperglycemia-induced alterations to lens calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sai Varsha, M K N; Raman, Thiagarajan; Manikandan, Ramar

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the potential of vitamin K1 against streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in Wistar rats. A single, intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg) resulted in hyperglycemia, accumulation of sorbitol and formation of advanced glycation end product (AGE) in eye lens. Hyperglycemia in lens also resulted in superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical generation and less reduced glutathione suggesting oxidative stress in lens. Hyperglycemia also resulted in increase in lens Ca2+ and significant inhibition of lens Ca2+ ATPase activity. These changes were associated with cataract formation in diabetic animals. By contrast treatment of diabetic rats with vitamin K1 (5 mg/kg, sc, twice a week) resulted in animals with partially elevated blood glucose and with transparent lenses having normal levels of sorbitol, AGE, Ca2+ ATPase, Ca2+, and oxidative stress. Vitamin K 1 may function to protect against cataract formation in the STZ induced diabetic rat by affecting the homeostasis of blood glucose and minimizing subsequent oxidative and osmotic stress. Thus, these results show that Vitamin K1 inhibits diabetic-cataract by modulating lens Ca2+ homeostasis and its hypoglycemic effect through its direct action on the pancreas.

  10. Baclofen and gamma-hydroxybutyrate differentially altered behavior, EEG activity and sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Hodor, A; Palchykova, S; Gao, B; Bassetti, C L

    2015-01-22

    Animal and human studies have shown that sleep may have an impact on functional recovery after brain damage. Baclofen (Bac) and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) have been shown to induce physiological sleep in humans, however, their effects in rodents are unclear. The aim of this study is to characterize sleep and electroencelphalogram (EEG) after Bac and GHB administration in rats. We hypothesized that both drugs would induce physiological sleep. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with EEG/electromyogram (EMG) electrodes for sleep recordings. Bac (10 or 20 mg/kg), GHB (150 or 300 mg/kg) or saline were injected 1 h after light and dark onset to evaluate time of day effect of the drugs. Vigilance states and EEG spectra were quantified. Bac and GHB induced a non-physiological state characterized by atypical behavior and an abnormal EEG pattern. After termination of this state, Bac was found to increase the duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (∼90 and 10 min, respectively), reduce sleep fragmentation and affect NREM sleep episode frequency and duration (p<0.05). GHB had no major effect on vigilance states. Bac drastically increased EEG power density in NREM sleep in the frequencies 1.5-6.5 and 9.5-21.5 Hz compared to saline (p<0.05), while GHB enhanced power in the 1-5-Hz frequency band and reduced it in the 7-9-Hz band. Slow-wave activity in NREM sleep was enhanced 1.5-3-fold during the first 1-2 h following termination of the non-physiological state. The magnitude of drug effects was stronger during the dark phase. While both Bac and GHB induced a non-physiological resting state, only Bac facilitated and consolidated sleep, and promoted EEG delta oscillations thereafter. Hence, Bac can be considered a sleep-promoting drug and its effects on functional recovery after stroke can be evaluated both in humans and rats. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute stress alters autonomic modulation during sleep in women approaching menopause.

    PubMed

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Sugarbaker, David; Trinder, John; Colrain, Ian M; Baker, Fiona C

    2016-04-01

    Hot flashes, hormones, and psychosocial factors contribute to insomnia risk in the context of the menopausal transition. Stress is a well-recognized factor implicated in the pathophysiology of insomnia; however the impact of stress on sleep and sleep-related processes in perimenopausal women remains largely unknown. We investigated the effect of an acute experimental stress (impending Trier Social Stress Task in the morning) on pre-sleep measures of cortisol and autonomic arousal in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia that developed in the context of the menopausal transition. In addition, we assessed the macro- and micro-structure of sleep and autonomic functioning during sleep. Following adaptation to the laboratory, twenty two women with (age: 50.4 ± 3.2 years) and eighteen women without (age: 48.5 ± 2.3 years) insomnia had two randomized in-lab overnight recordings: baseline and stress nights. Anticipation of the task resulted in higher pre-sleep salivary cortisol levels and perceived tension, faster heart rate and lower vagal activity, based on heart rate variability measures, in both groups of women. The effect of the stress manipulation on the autonomic nervous system extended into the first 4 h of the night in both groups. However, vagal tone recovered 4-6 h into the stress night in controls but not in the insomnia group. Sleep macrostructure was largely unaltered by the stress, apart from a delayed latency to REM sleep in both groups. Quantitative analysis of non-rapid eye movement sleep microstructure revealed greater electroencephalographic (EEG) power in the beta1 range (15-≤23 Hz), reflecting greater EEG arousal during sleep, on the stress night compared to baseline, in the insomnia group. Hot flash frequency remained similar on both nights for both groups. These results show that pre-sleep stress impacts autonomic nervous system functioning before and during sleep in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia. Findings also indicate

  12. Immune alterations after selective rapid eye movement or total sleep deprivation in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francieli S; Andersen, Monica L; Martins, Raquel C S; Zager, Adriano; Lopes, José D; Tufik, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the impact of two nights of total sleep deprivation (SD) or four nights of rapid eye movement (REM) SD on immunological parameters in healthy men. Thirty-two volunteers were randomly assigned to three protocols (control, total SD or REM SD). Both SD protocols were followed by three nights of sleep recovery. The control and REM SD groups had regular nights of sleep monitored by polysomnography. Circulating white blood cells (WBCs), T- (CD4/CD8) and B-lymphocytes, Ig classes, complement and cytokine levels were assessed daily. Two nights of total SD increased the numbers of leukocytes and neutrophils compared with baseline levels, and these levels returned to baseline after 24 h of sleep recovery. The CD4(+) T-cells increased during the total SD period (one and two nights) and IgA levels decreased during the entire period of REM SD. These levels did not return to baseline after three nights of sleep recovery. Levels of monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ) remained unchanged by both protocols of SD. Our findings suggest that both protocols affected the human immune profile, although in different parameters, and that CD4(+) T-cells and IgA levels were not re-established after sleep recovery.

  13. Oral contraceptives alter sleep and raise body temperature in young women.

    PubMed

    Baker, F C; Mitchell, D; Driver, H S

    2001-08-01

    Female reproductive steroids, oestrogen and progesterone, not only affect reproductive function, but also thermoregulation and sleep. Chronic administration of synthetic steroids, as occurs in women taking oral contraceptives, may affect these regulatory systems differently from endogenous oestrogen and progesterone. We therefore investigated body temperature and sleep in ten young women taking oral contraceptives, in the active and placebo phases of the contraceptive pack, and compared them to a group of nine women with ovulatory cycles, in the mid-follicular and mid-luteal phases. Body temperature was raised throughout 24 h in the women taking oral contraceptives in the active phase, and in the naturally cycling women in the luteal phase, compared to the follicular phase. The women taking oral contraceptives in the placebo phase, however, continued to have raised body temperatures, similar to those in the active phase, indicating a prolonged action of synthetic reproductive steroids on body temperature. Sleep also was influenced by the endogenous and synthetic reproductive steroids, but independently of body temperature. The women taking oral contraceptives had more stage-2 non-rapid eye movement sleep in the active phase, both compared to their placebo phase and the naturally cycling women. The naturally cycling women, however, had more slow wave sleep in the luteal phase compared to the contraceptive group of women. Exogenous reproductive steroids therefore influence body temperature and sleep differently from endogenous progesterone and oestrogen.

  14. Sleep complaints in periodic paralyses: a web survey.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, G; Mostacci, B; Sancisi, E; Cirignotta, F

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal potassium conductance has been shown to influence the sleep-wake cycle and REM sleep homeostasis. The periodic paralyses (PP) are characterized by episodes of muscular weakness associated with changes in serum potassium levels and, therefore, with possible alterations in extracellular neuronal potassium conductance. We submitted a sleep questionnaire to the members of Periodic Paralysis International Listserv, an on-line support and information group for subjects with PP. Three control groups were made up of patients with untreated depression, patients with depression under treatment and healthy subjects. Both subjects with PP and those with untreated depression had a higher frequency of self-reported insufficient sleep quality and a higher number of nocturnal awakenings than patients with depression under treatment and healthy controls. PP subjects had more self-reported daytime sleepiness, sleep-related hallucinations and nightmares/abnormal dreams than the other three groups. Patients affected by PP may have disrupted sleep architecture and homeostasis. In particular, we suggest that the stereotypical abnormal dreams reported by several patients may reflect oneiric elaboration of nocturnal episodes of flaccid paralysis, while the increased frequency of sleep-related hallucinations may be due to enhanced REM sleep expression associated with alterations of neuronal potassium conductance.

  15. Constitutive expression of the ZmZIP7 in Arabidopsis alters metal homeostasis and increases Fe and Zn content.

    PubMed

    Li, Suzhen; Zhou, Xiaojin; Zhao, Yongfeng; Li, Hongbo; Liu, Yuanfeng; Zhu, Liying; Guo, Jinjie; Huang, Yaqun; Yang, Wenzhu; Fan, Yunliu; Chen, Jingtang; Chen, Rumei

    2016-09-01

    Iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) are important micronutrients for plant growth and development. Zinc-regulated transporters and the iron-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) are necessary for the homeostatic regulation of these metal micronutrients. In this study, the physiological function of ZmZIP7 which encodes a ZIP family transporter was characterized. We detected the expression profiles of ZmZIP7 in maize, and found that the accumulation of ZmZIP7 in root, stem, leaf, and seed was relatively higher than tassel and young ear. ZmZIP7 overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis lines were generated and the metal contents in transgenic and wild-type (WT) plants were examined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and Zinpyr-1 staining. Fe and Zn concentrations were elevated in the roots and shoots of ZmZIP7-overexpressing plants, while only Fe content was elevated in the seeds. We also analyzed the expression profiles of endogenous genes associated with metal homeostasis. Both endogenic Fe-deficiency inducible genes and the genes responsible for Zn and Fe transport and storage were stimulated in ZmZIP7 transgenic plants. In conclusion, ZmZIP7 encodes a functional Zn and Fe transporter, and ectopic overexpression of ZmZIP7 in Arabidopsis stimulate endogenous Fe and Zn uptake mechanisms, thereby facilitating both metal uptake and homeostasis. Our results contribute to improved understanding of ZIP family transporter functions and suggest that ZmZIP7 could be used to enhance Fe levels in grains.

  16. Sex-specific alterations in glucose homeostasis and metabolic parameters during ageing of caspase-2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C H; Nikolic, A; Kentish, S J; Shalini, S; Hatzinikolas, G; Page, A J; Dorstyn, L; Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    Gender-specific differences are commonly found in metabolic pathways and in response to nutritional manipulation. Previously, we identified a role for caspase-2 in age-related glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism using male caspase-2-deficient (Casp2−/−) mice. Here we show that the resistance to age-induced glucose tolerance does not occur in female Casp2−/− mice and it appears to be independent of insulin sensitivity in males. Using fasting (18 h) as a means to further investigate the role of caspase-2 in energy and lipid metabolism, we identified sex-specific differences in the fasting response and lipid mobilization. In aged (18–22 months) male Casp2−/− mice, a significant decrease in fasting liver mass, but not total body weight, was observed while in females, total body weight, but not liver mass, was reduced when compared with wild-type (WT) animals. Fasting-induced lipolysis of adipose tissue was enhanced in male Casp2−/− mice as indicated by a significant reduction in white adipocyte cell size, and increased serum-free fatty acids. In females, white adipocyte cell size was significantly smaller in both fed and fasted Casp2−/− mice. No difference in fasting-induced hepatosteatosis was observed in the absence of caspase-2. Further analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) indicated that female Casp2−/− mice may have enhanced fatty acid recycling and metabolism with expression of genes involved in glyceroneogenesis and fatty acid oxidation increased. Loss of Casp2 also increased fasting-induced autophagy in both male and female liver and in female skeletal muscle. Our observations suggest that caspase-2 can regulate glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism in a tissue and sex-specific manner. PMID:27551503

  17. Acute stress alters autonomic modulation during sleep in women approaching menopause

    PubMed Central

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Sugarbaker, David; Trinder, John; Colrain, Ian M.; Baker, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Hot flashes, hormones, and psychosocial factors contribute to insomnia risk in the context of the menopausal transition. Stress is a well-recognized factor implicated in the pathophysiology of insomnia; however the impact of stress on sleep and sleep-related processes in perimenopausal women remains largely unknown. We investigated the effect of an acute experimental stress (impending Trier Social Stress Task in the morning) on presleep measures of cortisol and autonomic arousal in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia that developed in the context of the menopausal transition. In addition, we assessed the macro- and micro-structure of sleep and autonomic functioning during sleep. Following adaptation to the laboratory, twenty two women with (age: 50.4 ± 3.2 y) and eighteen women without (age: 48.5±2.3 y) insomnia had two randomized in-lab overnight recordings: baseline and stress nights. Anticipation of the task resulted in higher pre-sleep salivary cortisol levels and perceived tension, faster heart rate and lower vagal activity, based on heart rate variability measures, in both groups of women. The effect of the stress manipulation on the autonomic nervous system extended into the first four hours of the night in both groups. However, vagal tone recovered four-six hours into the stress night in controls but not in the insomnia group. Sleep macrostructure was largely unaltered by the stress, apart from a delayed latency to REM sleep in both groups. Quantitative analysis of non-rapid eye movement sleep microstructure revealed greater electroencephalographic (EEG) power in the beta1 range (15-≤23Hz), reflecting greater EEG arousal during sleep, on the stress night compared to baseline, in the insomnia group. Hot flash frequency remained similar on both nights for both groups. These results show that presleep stress impacts autonomic nervous system functioning before and during sleep in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia. Findings also

  18. Altered regulation of sleep and feeding contributes to starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Masek, Pavel; Reynolds, Lauren A.; Bollinger, Wesley L.; Moody, Catriona; Mehta, Aradhana; Murakami, Kazuma; Yoshizawa, Masato; Gibbs, Allen G.; Keene, Alex C.

    2014-01-01

    Animals respond to changes in food availability by adjusting sleep and foraging strategies to optimize their fitness. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation resistance that are dependent on geographic location, food availability and evolutionary history. How behaviors that include sleep and feeding vary in Drosophila with increased starvation resistance is unclear. We have generated starvation-resistant flies through experimental evolution to investigate the relationship between foraging behaviors and starvation resistance. Outbred populations of D. melanogaster were selected for starvation resistance over 60 generations. This selection process resulted in flies with a threefold increase in total lipids that survive up to 18 days without food. We tested starvation-selected (S) flies for sleep and feeding behaviors to determine the effect that selection for starvation resistance has had on foraging behavior. Flies from three replicated starvation-selected populations displayed a dramatic reduction in feeding and prolonged sleep duration compared to fed control (F) populations, suggesting that modified sleep and feeding may contribute to starvation resistance. A prolonged larval developmental period contributes to the elevated energy stores present in starvation-selected flies. By preventing S larvae from feeding longer than F larvae, we were able to reduce energy stores in adult S flies to the levels seen in adult F flies, thus allowing us to control for energy storage levels. However, the reduction of energy stores in S flies fails to generate normal sleep and feeding behavior seen in F flies with similar energy stores. These findings suggest that the behavioral changes observed in S flies are due to genetic regulation of behavior rather than elevated lipid levels. Testing S-F hybrid individuals for both feeding and sleep revealed a lack of correlation between food consumption and sleep duration

  19. Altered regulation of sleep and feeding contributes to starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Masek, Pavel; Reynolds, Lauren A; Bollinger, Wesley L; Moody, Catriona; Mehta, Aradhana; Murakami, Kazuma; Yoshizawa, Masato; Gibbs, Allen G; Keene, Alex C

    2014-09-01

    Animals respond to changes in food availability by adjusting sleep and foraging strategies to optimize their fitness. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation resistance that are dependent on geographic location, food availability and evolutionary history. How behaviors that include sleep and feeding vary in Drosophila with increased starvation resistance is unclear. We have generated starvation-resistant flies through experimental evolution to investigate the relationship between foraging behaviors and starvation resistance. Outbred populations of D. melanogaster were selected for starvation resistance over 60 generations. This selection process resulted in flies with a threefold increase in total lipids that survive up to 18 days without food. We tested starvation-selected (S) flies for sleep and feeding behaviors to determine the effect that selection for starvation resistance has had on foraging behavior. Flies from three replicated starvation-selected populations displayed a dramatic reduction in feeding and prolonged sleep duration compared to fed control (F) populations, suggesting that modified sleep and feeding may contribute to starvation resistance. A prolonged larval developmental period contributes to the elevated energy stores present in starvation-selected flies. By preventing S larvae from feeding longer than F larvae, we were able to reduce energy stores in adult S flies to the levels seen in adult F flies, thus allowing us to control for energy storage levels. However, the reduction of energy stores in S flies fails to generate normal sleep and feeding behavior seen in F flies with similar energy stores. These findings suggest that the behavioral changes observed in S flies are due to genetic regulation of behavior rather than elevated lipid levels. Testing S-F hybrid individuals for both feeding and sleep revealed a lack of correlation between food consumption and sleep duration

  20. Regulation of adolescent sleep: implications for behavior.

    PubMed

    Carskadon, Mary A; Acebo, Christine; Jenni, Oskar G

    2004-06-01

    Adolescent development is accompanied by profound changes in the timing and amounts of sleep and wakefulness. Many aspects of these changes result from altered psychosocial and life-style circumstances that accompany adolescence. The maturation of biological processes regulating sleep/wake systems, however, may be strongly related to the sleep timing and amount during adolescence-either as "compelling" or "permissive" factors. The two-process model of sleep regulation posits a fundamental sleep-wake homeostatic process (process S) working in concert with the circadian biological timing system (process C) as the primary intrinsic regulatory factors. How do these systems change during adolescence? We present data from adolescent participants examining EEG markers of sleep homeostasis to evaluate whether process S shows maturational changes permissive of altered sleep patterns across puberty. Our data indicate that certain aspects of the homeostatic system are unchanged from late childhood to young adulthood, while other features change in a manner that is permissive of later bedtimes in older adolescents. We also show alterations of the circadian timing system indicating a possible circadian substrate for later adolescent sleep timing. The circadian parameters we have assessed include phase, period, melatonin secretory pattern, light sensitivity, and phase relationships, all of which show evidence of changes during pubertal development with potential to alter sleep patterns substantially. However the changes are mediated-whether through process S, process C, or by a combination-many adolescents have too little sleep at the wrong circadian phase. This pattern is associated with increased risks for excessive sleepiness, difficulty with mood regulation, impaired academic performance, learning difficulties, school tardiness and absenteeism, and accidents and injuries.

  1. Chronic Sleep Disruption Alters Gut Microbiota, Induces Systemic and Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Poroyko, Valeriy A.; Carreras, Alba; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A.; Leone, Vanessa; Peris, Eduard; Almendros, Isaac; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Hubert, Nathaniel; Farré, Ramon; Chang, Eugene B.; Gozal, David

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) commonly occurs in human populations, and although it does not involve circadian shifts or sleep deprivation, it markedly alters feeding behaviors ultimately promoting obesity and insulin resistance. These symptoms are known to be related to the host gut microbiota. Mice were exposed to SF for 4 weeks and then allowed to recover for 2 weeks. Taxonomic profiles of fecal microbiota were obtained prospectively, and conventionalization experiments were performed in germ-free mice. Adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and inflammation, as well as circulating measures of inflammation, were assayed. Effect of fecal water on colonic epithelial permeability was also examined. Chronic SF-induced increased food intake and reversible gut microbiota changes characterized by the preferential growth of highly fermentative members of Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae and a decrease of Lactobacillaceae families. These lead to systemic and visceral white adipose tissue inflammation in addition to altered insulin sensitivity in mice, most likely via enhanced colonic epithelium barrier disruption. Conventionalization of germ-free mice with SF-derived microbiota confirmed these findings. Thus, SF-induced metabolic alterations may be mediated, in part, by concurrent changes in gut microbiota, thereby opening the way for gut microbiome-targeted therapeutics aimed at reducing the major end-organ morbidities of chronic SF. PMID:27739530

  2. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Expression of Memory and Neurotransmission Associated Genes in the REM Sleep Deprived Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Narwade, Santosh C.; Mallick, Birendra N.; Deobagkar, Deepti D.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disorders are associated with cognitive impairment. Selective rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) deprivation (REMSD) alters several physiological processes and behaviors. By employing NGS platform we carried out transcriptomic analysis in brain samples of control rats and those exposed to REMSD. The expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly, methylation, learning, memory, regulation of synaptic transmission, neuronal plasticity and neurohypophysial hormone synthesis were altered. Increased transcription of BMP4, DBH and ATP1B2 genes after REMSD supports our earlier findings and hypothesis. Alteration in the transcripts encoding histone subtypes and important players in chromatin remodeling was observed. The mRNAs which transcribe neurotransmitters such as OXT, AVP, PMCH and LNPEP and two small non-coding RNAs, namely RMRP and BC1 were down regulated. At least some of these changes are likely to regulate REMS and may participate in the consequences of REMS loss. Thus, the findings of this study have identified key epigenetic regulators and neuronal plasticity genes associated to REMS and its loss. This analysis provides a background and opens up avenues for unraveling their specific roles in the complex behavioral network particularly in relation to sustained REMS-loss associated changes. PMID:28367113

  3. CCR7 expression alters memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis by regulating occupancy in IL-7- and IL-15-dependent niches.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong Woo; Kim, Hyun Gyung; Perry, Curtis J; Kaech, Susan M

    2016-07-19

    C-C receptor 7 (CCR7) is important to allow T cells and dendritic cells to migrate toward CCL19- and CCL21-producing cells in the T-cell zone of the spleen and lymph nodes. The role of this chemokine receptor in regulating the homeostasis of effector and memory T cells during acute viral infection is poorly defined, however. In this study, we show that CCR7 expression alters memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Greater numbers of CCR7-deficient memory T cells were formed and maintained compared with CCR7-sufficient memory T cells, especially in the lung and bone marrow. The CCR7-deficient memory T cells also displayed enhanced rates of homeostatic turnover, which may stem from increased exposure to IL-15 as a consequence of reduced exposure to IL-7, because removal of IL-15, but not of IL-7, normalized the numbers of CCR7-sufficient and CCR7-deficient memory CD8 T cells. This result suggests that IL-15 is the predominant cytokine supporting augmentation of the CCR7(-/-) memory CD8 T-cell pool. Taken together, these data suggest that CCR7 biases memory CD8 T cells toward IL-7-dependent niches over IL-15-dependent niches, which provides insight into the homeostatic regulation of different memory T-cell subsets.

  4. High concentrations of hexavalent chromium in drinking water alter iron homeostasis in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Thompson, Chad M; Kirman, Christopher R; Carakostas, Michael C; Haws, Laurie C; Harris, Mark A; Proctor, Deborah M

    2014-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] induces hematological signs of microcytic anemia in rodents. Considering that Cr(VI) can oxidize ferrous (Fe(2+)) to ferric (Fe(3+)) iron, and that only the former is transported across the duodenum, we hypothesize that, at high concentrations, Cr(VI) oxidizes Fe(2+) in the lumen of the small intestine and perturbs iron absorption. Herein we report that 90-day exposure to Cr(VI) in drinking water resulted in dose-dependent decreases in Fe levels in the duodenum, liver, serum, and bone marrow. Toxicogenomic analyses from the duodenum indicate responses consistent with Fe deficiency, including significant induction of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, Slc11a2) and transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1, Tfr1). In addition, at ⩾20mg Cr(VI)/L in drinking water, Cr RBC:plasma ratios in rats were increased and exceeded unity, indicating saturation of reductive capacity and intracellular absorption of Cr(VI) into red blood cells (RBCs). These effects occurred in both species but were generally more severe in rats. These data suggest that high concentrations of Cr(VI) in drinking limit Fe absorption and alter iron homeostasis. Furthermore, some effects observed at high doses in recent Cr(VI) chronic and subchronic bioassays may be explained, at least in part, by iron deficiency and disruption of homeostasis.

  5. Defective autophagy in vascular smooth muscle cells alters contractility and Ca²⁺ homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Cédéric F; Fransen, Paul; De Munck, Dorien G; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Martinet, Wim

    2015-03-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionary preserved process that prevents the accumulation of unwanted cytosolic material through the formation of autophagosomes. Although autophagy has been extensively studied to understand its function in normal physiology, the role of vascular smooth muscle (SM) cell (VSMC) autophagy in Ca(2+) mobilization and contraction remains poorly understood. Recent evidence shows that autophagy is involved in controlling contractile function and Ca(2+) homeostasis in certain cell types. Therefore, autophagy might also regulate contractile capacity and Ca(2+)-mobilizing pathways in VSMCs. Contractility (organ chambers) and Ca(2+) homeostasis (myograph) were investigated in aortic segments of 3.5-mo-old mice containing a SM cell-specific deletion of autophagy-related 7 (Atg7; Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) mice) and in segments of corresponding control mice (Atg7(+/+) SM22α-Cre(+)). Our results indicate that voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) of Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) VSMCs were more sensitive to depolarization, independent of changes in resting membrane potential. Contractions elicited with K(+) (50 mM) or the VGCC agonist BAY K8644 (100 nM) were significantly higher due to increased VGCC expression and activity. Interestingly, the sarcoplasmic reticulum of Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) VSMCs was enlarged, which, combined with increased sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 expression and higher store-operated Ca(2+) entry, promoted inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated contractions of Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) segments and maximized the Ca(2+) storing capacity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, decreased plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in Atg7(fl/fl) SM22α-Cre(+) VSMCs hampered Ca(2+) extrusion to the extracellular environment. Overall, our study indicates that defective autophagy in VSMCs leads to an imbalance between Ca(2+) release/influx and Ca(2+) reuptake/extrusion, resulting in higher basal Ca(2+) concentrations and

  6. Cyclic glycine-proline regulates IGF-1 homeostasis by altering the binding of IGFBP-3 to IGF-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian; Gluckman, Peter; Yang, Panzao; Krissansen, Geoff; Sun, Xueying; Zhou, Yongzhi; Wen, Jingyuan; Phillips, Gemma; Shorten, Paul R.; McMahon, Chris D.; Wake, Graeme C.; Chan, Wendy H. K.; Thomas, Mark F.; Ren, April; Moon, Steve; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2014-03-01

    The homeostasis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is essential for metabolism, development and survival. Insufficient IGF-1 is associated with poor recovery from wounds whereas excessive IGF-1 contributes to growth of tumours. We have shown that cyclic glycine-proline (cGP), a metabolite of IGF-1, can normalise IGF-1 function by showing its efficacy in improving the recovery from ischemic brain injury in rats and inhibiting the growth of lymphomic tumours in mice. Further investigation in cell culture suggested that cGP promoted the activity of IGF-1 when it was insufficient, but inhibited the activity of IGF-1 when it was excessive. Mathematical modelling revealed that the efficacy of cGP was a modulated IGF-1 effect via changing the binding of IGF-1 to its binding proteins, which dynamically regulates the balance between bioavailable and non-bioavailable IGF-1. Our data reveal a novel mechanism of auto-regulation of IGF-1, which has physiological and pathophysiological consequences and potential pharmacological utility.

  7. Exercise and gut immune function: evidence of alterations in colon immune cell homeostasis and microbiome characteristics with exercise training.

    PubMed

    Cook, Marc D; Allen, Jacob M; Pence, Brandt D; Wallig, Matthew A; Gaskins, H Rex; White, Bryan A; Woods, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    There is robust evidence that habitual physical activity is anti-inflammatory and protective against developing chronic inflammatory disease. Much less is known about the effects of habitual moderate exercise in the gut, the compartment that has the greatest immunological responsibility and interactions with the intestinal microbiota. The link between the two has become evident, as recent studies have linked intestinal dysbiosis, or the disproportionate balance of beneficial to pathogenic microbes, with increased inflammatory disease susceptibility. Limited animal and human research findings imply that exercise may have a beneficial role in preventing and ameliorating such diseases by having an effect on gut immune function and, recently, microbiome characteristics. Emerging data from our laboratory show that different forms of exercise training differentially impact the severity of intestinal inflammation during an inflammatory insult (for example, ulcerative colitis) and may be jointly related to gut immune cell homeostasis and microbiota-immune interactions. The evidence we review and present will provide data in support of rigorous investigations concerning the effects of habitual exercise on gut health and disease.

  8. Leaf Mitochondria Modulate Whole Cell Redox Homeostasis, Set Antioxidant Capacity, and Determine Stress Resistance through Altered Signaling and Diurnal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Garmier, Marie; Noctor, Graham; Mathieu, Chantal; Chétrit, Philippe; Foyer, Christine H.; de Paepe, Rosine

    2003-01-01

    To explore the role of plant mitochondria in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and stress resistance, we exploited a Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial mutant. The cytoplasmic male-sterile mutant (CMSII) is impaired in complex I function and displays enhanced nonphosphorylating rotenone-insensitive [NAD(P)H dehydrogenases] and cyanide-insensitive (alternative oxidase) respiration. Loss of complex I function is not associated with increased oxidative stress, as shown by decreased leaf H2O2 and the maintenance of glutathione and ascorbate content and redox state. However, the expression and activity of several antioxidant enzymes are modified in CMSII. In particular, diurnal patterns of alternative oxidase expression are lost, the relative importance of the different catalase isoforms is modified, and the transcripts, protein, and activity of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase are enhanced markedly. Thus, loss of complex I function reveals effective antioxidant crosstalk and acclimation between the mitochondria and other organelles to maintain whole cell redox balance. This reorchestration of the cellular antioxidative system is associated with higher tolerance to ozone and Tobacco mosaic virus. PMID:12724545

  9. Leaf mitochondria modulate whole cell redox homeostasis, set antioxidant capacity, and determine stress resistance through altered signaling and diurnal regulation.

    PubMed

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Garmier, Marie; Noctor, Graham; Mathieu, Chantal; Chétrit, Philippe; Foyer, Christine H; de Paepe, Rosine

    2003-05-01

    To explore the role of plant mitochondria in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and stress resistance, we exploited a Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial mutant. The cytoplasmic male-sterile mutant (CMSII) is impaired in complex I function and displays enhanced nonphosphorylating rotenone-insensitive [NAD(P)H dehydrogenases] and cyanide-insensitive (alternative oxidase) respiration. Loss of complex I function is not associated with increased oxidative stress, as shown by decreased leaf H(2)O(2) and the maintenance of glutathione and ascorbate content and redox state. However, the expression and activity of several antioxidant enzymes are modified in CMSII. In particular, diurnal patterns of alternative oxidase expression are lost, the relative importance of the different catalase isoforms is modified, and the transcripts, protein, and activity of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase are enhanced markedly. Thus, loss of complex I function reveals effective antioxidant crosstalk and acclimation between the mitochondria and other organelles to maintain whole cell redox balance. This reorchestration of the cellular antioxidative system is associated with higher tolerance to ozone and Tobacco mosaic virus.

  10. Organelle-specific expression of subunit ND5 of human complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) alters cation homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Wojtek; Gemperli, Anja C; Cvetesic, Nevena; Steuber, Julia

    2010-09-01

    The ND5 component of the respiratory complex I is a large, hydrophobic subunit encoded by the mitochondrial genome. Its bacterial homologue, the NDH-1 subunit NuoL, acts as a cation transporter in the absence of other NDH-1 subunits. Mutations in human ND5 are frequently observed in neurodegenerative diseases. Wild type and mutant variants of ND5 fused to GFP or a FLAG peptide were targeted to the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) or the inner mitochondrial membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which lacks an endogenous complex I. The localization of ND5 fusion proteins was confirmed by microscopic analyses of S. cerevisiae cells, followed by cellular fractionation and immunostaining. The impact of the expression of ND5 fusion proteins on the growth of S. cerevisiae in the presence and absence of added salts was studied. ER-resident ND5 conferred Li(+) sensitivity to S. cerevisiae, which was lost when the E145V variant of ND5 was expressed. All variants of ND5 tested led to increased resistance of S. cerevisiae at high external concentrations of Na(+) or K(+). The data seem to indicate that ND5 influences the salt homeostasis of S. cerevisiae independent of other complex I subunits, and paves the way for functional studies of mutations found in mitochondrially encoded complex I genes.

  11. Altered structural and effective connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa in circuits that regulate energy and reward homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Frank, G K W; Shott, M E; Riederer, J; Pryor, T L

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders that share many behaviors. Structural and functional brain circuits could provide biological links that those disorders have in common. We recruited 77 young adult women, 26 healthy controls, 26 women with anorexia and 25 women with bulimia nervosa. Probabilistic tractography was used to map white matter connectivity strength across taste and food intake regulating brain circuits. An independent multisample greedy equivalence search algorithm tested effective connectivity between those regions during sucrose tasting. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa had greater structural connectivity in pathways between insula, orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but lower connectivity from orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala to the hypothalamus (P<0.05, corrected for comorbidity, medication and multiple comparisons). Functionally, in controls the hypothalamus drove ventral striatal activity, but in anorexia and bulimia nervosa effective connectivity was directed from anterior cingulate via ventral striatum to the hypothalamus. Across all groups, sweetness perception was predicted by connectivity strength in pathways connecting to the middle orbitofrontal cortex. This study provides evidence that white matter structural as well as effective connectivity within the energy-homeostasis and food reward-regulating circuitry is fundamentally different in anorexia and bulimia nervosa compared with that in controls. In eating disorders, anterior cingulate cognitive–emotional top down control could affect food reward and eating drive, override hypothalamic inputs to the ventral striatum and enable prolonged food restriction. PMID:27801897

  12. Altered structural and effective connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa in circuits that regulate energy and reward homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Frank, G K W; Shott, M E; Riederer, J; Pryor, T L

    2016-11-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders that share many behaviors. Structural and functional brain circuits could provide biological links that those disorders have in common. We recruited 77 young adult women, 26 healthy controls, 26 women with anorexia and 25 women with bulimia nervosa. Probabilistic tractography was used to map white matter connectivity strength across taste and food intake regulating brain circuits. An independent multisample greedy equivalence search algorithm tested effective connectivity between those regions during sucrose tasting. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa had greater structural connectivity in pathways between insula, orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but lower connectivity from orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala to the hypothalamus (P<0.05, corrected for comorbidity, medication and multiple comparisons). Functionally, in controls the hypothalamus drove ventral striatal activity, but in anorexia and bulimia nervosa effective connectivity was directed from anterior cingulate via ventral striatum to the hypothalamus. Across all groups, sweetness perception was predicted by connectivity strength in pathways connecting to the middle orbitofrontal cortex. This study provides evidence that white matter structural as well as effective connectivity within the energy-homeostasis and food reward-regulating circuitry is fundamentally different in anorexia and bulimia nervosa compared with that in controls. In eating disorders, anterior cingulate cognitive-emotional top down control could affect food reward and eating drive, override hypothalamic inputs to the ventral striatum and enable prolonged food restriction.

  13. Cyclic glycine-proline regulates IGF-1 homeostasis by altering the binding of IGFBP-3 to IGF-1

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Gluckman, Peter; Yang, Panzao; Krissansen, Geoff; Sun, Xueying; Zhou, Yongzhi; Wen, Jingyuan; Phillips, Gemma; Shorten, Paul R.; McMahon, Chris D.; Wake, Graeme C.; Chan, Wendy H. K.; Thomas, Mark F.; Ren, April; Moon, Steve; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2014-01-01

    The homeostasis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is essential for metabolism, development and survival. Insufficient IGF-1 is associated with poor recovery from wounds whereas excessive IGF-1 contributes to growth of tumours. We have shown that cyclic glycine-proline (cGP), a metabolite of IGF-1, can normalise IGF-1 function by showing its efficacy in improving the recovery from ischemic brain injury in rats and inhibiting the growth of lymphomic tumours in mice. Further investigation in cell culture suggested that cGP promoted the activity of IGF-1 when it was insufficient, but inhibited the activity of IGF-1 when it was excessive. Mathematical modelling revealed that the efficacy of cGP was a modulated IGF-1 effect via changing the binding of IGF-1 to its binding proteins, which dynamically regulates the balance between bioavailable and non-bioavailable IGF-1. Our data reveal a novel mechanism of auto-regulation of IGF-1, which has physiological and pathophysiological consequences and potential pharmacological utility. PMID:24633053

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB'WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao-Hong; Wu, Run-Dong; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Tian, Ren-Rong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB'WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study. LPS administration affected the virus/host equilibrium by elevating the levels of viral replication and activating T lymphocytes. LPS induced upregulation of CD8+ naïve T cells and downregulated the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T effector memory cells. The downregulated effector memory cells are associated with a lower frequency of monofunctional and polyfunctional cells, and an upregulated programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) expression on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was observed in monkeys after LPS stimulation. Our data provide new insights into the function of LPS in the immune activation in SHIV/HIV infection. PMID:26713320

  15. Soluble epoxide hydrolase deficiency alters pancreatic islet size and improves glucose homeostasis in a model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Xi, Yannan; Shieh, Guang-Jong; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Inoue, Hiromi; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Imig, John D; Haj, Fawaz G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-05-31

    Visceral obesity has been defined as an important element of the metabolic syndrome and contributes to the development of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Increasing endogenous levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are known for their analgesic, antihypertensive, and antiinflammatory effects. The availability of EETs is limited primarily by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, EPHX2), which metabolizes EETs to their less active diols. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that EETs are involved in glucose regulation and in retarding the development of insulin resistance. To address the role of EETs in regulating glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, we used mice with targeted gene deletion of sEH (Ephx2-null mice) and a subsequent study with a selective sEH inhibitor. When wild-type mice are fed a high fat diet, insulin resistance develops. However, knockout or inhibition of sEH activity resulted in a significant decrease in plasma glucose. These findings are characterized by enhancement of tyrosyl phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1, and their downstream cascade. In addition, pancreatic islets were larger when sEH was disrupted. This effect was associated with an increase in vasculature. These observations were supported by pharmacological inhibition of sEH. These data suggest that an increase in EETs due to sEH-gene knockout leads to an increase in the size of islets and improved insulin signaling and sensitivity.

  16. Long-Lasting Metabolic Imbalance Related to Obesity Alters Olfactory Tissue Homeostasis and Impairs Olfactory-Driven Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Marie-Christine; Caillol, Monique; Durieux, Didier; Monnerie, Régine; Grebert, Denise; Pellerin, Luc; Repond, Cendrine; Tolle, Virginie; Zizzari, Philippe; Baly, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic food intake disorders and binge eating. Food intake relies on the interaction between homeostatic regulation and hedonic signals among which, olfaction is a major sensory determinant. However, its potential modulation at the peripheral level by a chronic energy imbalance associated to obese status remains a matter of debate. We further investigated the olfactory function in a rodent model relevant to the situation encountered in obese humans, where genetic susceptibility is juxtaposed on chronic eating disorders. Using several olfactory-driven tests, we compared the behaviors of obesity-prone Sprague-Dawley rats (OP) fed with a high-fat/high-sugar diet with those of obese-resistant ones fed with normal chow. In OP rats, we reported 1) decreased odor threshold, but 2) poor olfactory performances, associated with learning/memory deficits, 3) decreased influence of fasting, and 4) impaired insulin control on food seeking behavior. Associated with these behavioral modifications, we found a modulation of metabolism-related factors implicated in 1) electrical olfactory signal regulation (insulin receptor), 2) cellular dynamics (glucorticoids receptors, pro- and antiapoptotic factors), and 3) homeostasis of the olfactory mucosa and bulb (monocarboxylate and glucose transporters). Such impairments might participate to the perturbed daily food intake pattern that we observed in obese animals. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Overview of sleep & sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Chokroverty, S

    2010-02-01

    Sleep is defined on the basis of behavioural and physiological criteria dividing it into two states: non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep which is subdivided into three stages (N1, N2, N3); and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep characterized by rapid eye movements, muscle atonia and desynchronized EEG. Circadian rhythm of sleep-wakefulness is controlled by the master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. The neuroanatomical substrates of the NREM sleep are located principally in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus and those of REM sleep are located in pons. A variety of significant physiological changes occur in all body systems and organs during sleep as a result of functional alterations in the autonomic and somatic nervous systems. The international classification of sleep disorders (ICSD, ed 2) lists eight categories of sleep disorders along with appendix A and appendix B. The four major sleep complaints include excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia, abnormal movements or behaviour during sleep and inability to sleep at the desired time. The most important step in assessing a patient with a sleep complaint is obtaining a detailed history including family and previous histories, medical, psychiatric, neurological, drug, alcohol and substance abuse disorders. Some important laboratory tests for investigating sleep disorders consist of an overnight polysomnography, multiple sleep latency and maintenance of wakefulness tests as well as actigraphy. General physicians should have a basic knowledge of the salient clinical features of common sleep disorders, such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, narcolepsy-cataplexy syndrome, circadian rhythm sleep disorders (e.g., jet leg, shift work disorder, etc.) and parasomnias (e.g., partial arousal disorders, REM behaviour disorder, etc.) and these are briefly described in this chapter. The principle of treatment of sleep disorders is first to find cause of the sleep

  18. Arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular calcium homeostasis induces head kidney macrophage apoptosis involving the activation of calpain-2 and ERK in Clarias batrachus

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Goswami, Ramansu; Datta, Soma; Rajagopal, R.; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2011-10-01

    We had earlier shown that exposure to arsenic (0.50 {mu}M) caused caspase-3 mediated head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis involving the p38-JNK pathway in Clarias batrachus. Here we examined the roles of calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) and extra-cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), the other member of MAPK-pathway on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involved increased expression of ERK and calpain-2. Nifedipine, verapamil and EGTA pre-treatment inhibited the activation of calpain-2, ERK and reduced arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis as evidenced from reduced caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining. Pre-incubation with ERK inhibitor U 0126 inhibited the activation of calpain-2 and interfered with arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Additionally, pre-incubation with calpain-2 inhibitor also interfered with the activation of ERK and inhibited arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium chloride also inhibited ERK activation indicating activation of ERK in arsenic-exposed HKM also depends on signals from NADPH oxidase pathway. Our study demonstrates the critical role of Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. We suggest that arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels initiates pro-apoptotic ERK and calpain-2; the two pathways influence each other positively and induce caspase-3 mediated HKM apoptosis. Besides, our study also indicates the role of ROS in the activation of ERK pathway in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis in C. batrachus. - Highlights: > Altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis leads to arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Calpain-2 plays a critical role in the process. > ERK is pro-apoptotic in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involves cross talk between calpain-2 and ERK.

  19. Sleep deprivation alters effort discounting but not delay discounting of monetary rewards.

    PubMed

    Libedinsky, Camilo; Massar, Stijn A A; Ling, Aiqing; Chee, Weiyan; Huettel, Scott A; Chee, Michael W L

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether sleep deprivation would affect the discounting of delayed rewards, of rewards entailing the expense of effort, or both. We measured rates of two types of reward discounting under conditions of rested wakefulness (RW) and sleep deprivation (SD). Delay discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller monetary rewards sooner rather than larger monetary rewards later. Effort discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller rewards that require less effort to obtain (e.g., typing a small number of letter strings backward) over larger but more effortful rewards (e.g., typing more letter strings to receive the reward). The first two experiments used a crossover design in which one session was conducted after a normal night of sleep (RW), and the other after a night without sleep (SD). The first experiment evaluated only temporal discounting whereas the second evaluated temporal and effort discounting. In the second experiment, the discounting tasks were repeatedly administered prior to the state comparisons to minimize the effects of order and/or repeated testing. In a third experiment, participants were studied only once in a between-subject evaluation of discounting across states. The study took place in a research laboratory. Seventy-seven healthy young adult participants: 20 in Experiment 1, 27 in Experiment 2, and 30 in Experiment 3. N/A. Sleep deprivation elicited increased effort discounting but did not affect delay discounting. The dissociable effects of sleep deprivation on two forms of discounting behavior suggest that they may have differing underlying neural mechanisms.

  20. [Natural factors influencing sleep].

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Marek K; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is a universal phenomenon of human and animal lives, although the importance of sleep for homeo-stasis is still unknown. Sleep disturbances influence many behavioral and physiologic processes, leading to health complications including death. On the other hand, sleep improvement can beneficially influence the course of healing of many disorders and can be a prognostic of health recovery. The factors influencing sleep have different biological and chemical origins. They are classical hormones, hypothalamic releasing and inhibitory hormones, neuropeptides, peptides and others as cytokines, prostaglandins, oleamid, adenosine, nitric oxide. These factors regulate most physiologic processes and are likely elements integrating sleep with physiology and physiology with sleep in health and disorders.

  1. Loss of the anion exchanger DRA (Slc26a3), or PAT1 (Slc26a6), alters sulfate transport by the distal ileum and overall sulfate homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Hatch, Marguerite

    2017-09-01

    The ileum is considered the primary site of inorganic sulfate ([Formula: see text]) absorption. In the present study, we explored the contributions of the apical chloride/bicarbonate (Cl(-)/[Formula: see text]) exchangers downregulated in adenoma (DRA; Slc26a3), and putative anion transporter 1 (PAT1; Slc26a6), to the underlying transport mechanism. Transepithelial (35)[Formula: see text] and (36)Cl(-) fluxes were determined across isolated, short-circuited segments of the distal ileum from wild-type (WT), DRA-knockout (KO), and PAT1-KO mice, together with measurements of urine and plasma sulfate. The WT distal ileum supported net sulfate absorption [197.37 ± 13.61 (SE) nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)], but neither DRA nor PAT1 directly contributed to the unidirectional mucosal-to-serosal flux ([Formula: see text]), which was sensitive to serosal (but not mucosal) DIDS, dependent on Cl(-), and regulated by cAMP. However, the absence of DRA significantly enhanced net sulfate absorption by one-third via a simultaneous rise in [Formula: see text] and a 30% reduction to the secretory serosal-to-mucosal flux ([Formula: see text]). We propose that DRA, together with PAT1, contributes to [Formula: see text] by mediating sulfate efflux across the apical membrane. Associated with increased ileal sulfate absorption in vitro, plasma sulfate was 61% greater, and urinary sulfate excretion (USO4) 2.2-fold higher, in DRA-KO mice compared with WT controls, whereas USO4 was increased 1.8-fold in PAT1-KO mice. These alterations to sulfate homeostasis could not be accounted for by any changes to renal sulfate handling suggesting that the source of this additional sulfate was intestinal. In summary, we characterized transepithelial sulfate fluxes across the mouse distal ileum demonstrating that DRA (and to a lesser extent, PAT1) secretes sulfate with significant implications for intestinal sulfate absorption and overall homeostasis.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Sulfate is an essential anion that is

  2. Complexity analysis of sleep and alterations with insomnia based on non-invasive techniques.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Philip M; Angelova, Maia; Lombardo, Sara; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Lee, David; Ellis, Jason

    2014-04-06

    For the first time, fractal analysis techniques are implemented to study the correlations present in sleep actigraphy for individuals suffering from acute insomnia with comparisons made against healthy subjects. Analysis was carried out for 21 healthy individuals with no diagnosed sleep disorders and 26 subjects diagnosed with acute insomnia during night-time hours. Detrended fluctuation analysis was applied in order to look for 1/f-fluctuations indicative of high complexity. The aim is to investigate whether complexity analysis can differentiate between people who sleep normally and people who suffer from acute insomnia. We hypothesize that the complexity will be higher in subjects who suffer from acute insomnia owing to increased night-time arousals. This hypothesis, although contrary to much of the literature surrounding complexity in physiology, was found to be correct-for our study. The complexity results for nearly all of the subjects fell within a 1/f-range, indicating the presence of underlying control mechanisms. The subjects with acute insomnia displayed significantly higher correlations, confirmed by significance testing-possibly a result of too much activity in the underlying regulatory systems. Moreover, we found a linear relationship between complexity and variability, both of which increased with the onset of insomnia. Complexity analysis is very promising and could prove to be a useful non-invasive identifier for people who suffer from sleep disorders such as insomnia.

  3. Complexity analysis of sleep and alterations with insomnia based on non-invasive techniques

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Philip M.; Angelova, Maia; Lombardo, Sara; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Lee, David; Ellis, Jason

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, fractal analysis techniques are implemented to study the correlations present in sleep actigraphy for individuals suffering from acute insomnia with comparisons made against healthy subjects. Analysis was carried out for 21 healthy individuals with no diagnosed sleep disorders and 26 subjects diagnosed with acute insomnia during night-time hours. Detrended fluctuation analysis was applied in order to look for 1/f-fluctuations indicative of high complexity. The aim is to investigate whether complexity analysis can differentiate between people who sleep normally and people who suffer from acute insomnia. We hypothesize that the complexity will be higher in subjects who suffer from acute insomnia owing to increased night-time arousals. This hypothesis, although contrary to much of the literature surrounding complexity in physiology, was found to be correct—for our study. The complexity results for nearly all of the subjects fell within a 1/f-range, indicating the presence of underlying control mechanisms. The subjects with acute insomnia displayed significantly higher correlations, confirmed by significance testing—possibly a result of too much activity in the underlying regulatory systems. Moreover, we found a linear relationship between complexity and variability, both of which increased with the onset of insomnia. Complexity analysis is very promising and could prove to be a useful non-invasive identifier for people who suffer from sleep disorders such as insomnia. PMID:24501273

  4. The Oral Iron Chelator, Deferasirox, Reverses the Age-Dependent Alterations in Iron and Amyloid-β Homeostasis in Rat Brain: Implications in the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Anand, Shruti; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2016-01-01

    The altered metabolism of iron impacts the brain function in multiple deleterious ways during normal aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease. We have shown in this study that chelatable iron accumulates in the aged rat brain along with overexpression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin, accompanied by significant alterations in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide homeostasis in the aging brain, such as an increased production of the amyloid-β protein precursor, a decreased level of neprilysin, and increased accumulation of Aβ42. When aged rats are given daily the iron chelator, deferasirox, over a period of more than 4 months starting from the 18th month, the age-related accumulation of iron and overexpression of TfR1 and ferritin in the brain are significantly prevented. More interestingly, the chelator treatment also considerably reverses the altered Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain implying a significant role of iron in the latter phenomenon. Further, other results indicate that iron accumulation results in oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB in the aged rat brain, which are also reversed by the deferasirox treatment. The analysis of the results together suggests that iron accumulation and oxidative stress interact at multiple levels that include transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to bring about changes in the expression levels of TfR1 and ferritin and also alterations in Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging rat brain. The efficacy of deferasirox in preventing age-related changes in iron and Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain, as shown here, has obvious therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. CLA-enriched diet containing t10,c12-CLA alters bile acid homeostasis and increases the risk of cholelithiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Letona, Amaia Zabala; Niot, Isabelle; Laugerette, Fabienne; Athias, Anne; Monnot, Marie-Claude; Portillo, Maria P; Besnard, Philippe; Poirier, Hélène

    2011-08-01

    Mice fed a mixture of CLA containing t10,c12-CLA lose fat mass and develop hyperinsulinemia and hepatic steatosis due to an accumulation of TG and cholesterol. Because cholesterol is the precursor in bile acid (BA) synthesis, we investigated whether t10,c12-CLA alters BA metabolism. In Expt. 1, female C57Bl/6J mice were fed a standard diet for 28 d supplemented with a CLA mixture (1 g/100 g) or not (controls). In Expt. 2, the feeding period was reduced to 4, 6, and 10 d. In Expt. 3, mice were fed a diet supplemented with linoleic acid, c9,t11-CLA, or t10,c12-CLA (0.4 g/100 g) for 28 d. In Expt. 1, the BA pool size was greater in CLA-fed mice than in controls and the entero-hepatic circulation of BA was altered due to greater BA synthesis and ileal reclamation. This resulted from higher hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and ileal apical sodium BA transporter expressions in CLA-fed mice. Furthermore, hepatic Na(+)/taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) (-52%) and bile salt export pump (BSEP) (-77%) protein levels were lower in CLA-fed mice than in controls, leading to a greater accumulation of BA in the plasma (+500%); also, the cholesterol saturation index and the concentration of hydrophobic BA in the bile were greater in CLA-fed mice, changes associated with the presence of cholesterol crystals. Expt. 2 suggests that CLA-mediated changes were caused by hyperinsulinemia, which occurred after 6 d of the CLA diet before NTCP and BSEP mRNA downregulation (10 d). Expt. 3 demonstrated that only t10,c12-CLA altered NTCP and BSEP mRNA levels. In conclusion, t10,c12-CLA alters BA homeostasis and increases the risk of cholelithiasis in mice.

  6. Melanin-Concentrating Hormone: A New Sleep Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Torterolo, Pablo; Lagos, Patricia; Monti, Jaime M.

    2011-01-01

    Neurons containing the neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are mainly located in the lateral hypothalamus and the incerto-hypothalamic area, and have widespread projections throughout the brain. While the biological functions of this neuropeptide are exerted in humans through two metabotropic receptors, the MCHR1 and MCHR2, only the MCHR1 is present in rodents. Recently, it has been shown that the MCHergic system is involved in the control of sleep. We can summarize the experimental findings as follows: (1) The areas related to the control of sleep and wakefulness have a high density of MCHergic fibers and receptors. (2) MCHergic neurons are active during sleep, especially during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. (3) MCH knockout mice have less REM sleep, notably under conditions of negative energy balance. Animals with genetically inactivated MCHR1 also exhibit altered vigilance state architecture and sleep homeostasis. (4) Systemically administered MCHR1 antagonists reduce sleep. (5) Intraventricular microinjection of MCH increases both slow wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep; however, the increment in REM sleep is more pronounced. (6) Microinjection of MCH into the dorsal raphe nucleus increases REM sleep time. REM seep is inhibited by immunoneutralization of MCH within this nucleus. (7) Microinjection of MCH in the nucleus pontis oralis of the cat enhances REM sleep time and reduces REM sleep latency. All these data strongly suggest that MCH has a potent role in the promotion of sleep. Although both SWS and REM sleep are facilitated by MCH, REM sleep seems to be more sensitive to MCH modulation. PMID:21516258

  7. Involvement of cytokines in slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Krueger, James M; Clinton, James M; Winters, Bradley D; Zielinski, Mark R; Taishi, Ping; Jewett, Kathryn A; Davis, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-1 beta (IL1β) play a role in sleep regulation in health and disease. TNFα or IL1β injection enhances non-rapid eye movement sleep. Inhibition of TNFα or IL1β reduces spontaneous sleep. Mice lacking TNFα or IL1β receptors sleep less. In normal humans and in multiple disease states, plasma levels of TNFα covary with EEG slow wave activity (SWA) and sleep propensity. Many of the symptoms induced by sleep loss, for example, sleepiness, fatigue, poor cognition, enhanced sensitivity to pain, are elicited by injection of exogenous TNFα or IL1β. IL1β or TNFα applied unilaterally to the surface of the cortex induces state-dependent enhancement of EEG SWA ipsilaterally, suggesting greater regional sleep intensity. Interventions such as unilateral somatosensory stimulation enhance localized sleep EEG SWA, blood flow, and somatosensory cortical expression of IL1β and TNFα. State oscillations occur within cortical columns. One such state shares properties with whole animal sleep in that it is dependent on prior cellular activity, shows homeostasis, and is induced by TNFα. Extracellular ATP released during neuro- and gliotransmission enhances cytokine release via purine type 2 receptors. An ATP agonist enhances sleep, while ATP antagonists inhibit sleep. Mice lacking the P2X7 receptor have attenuated sleep rebound responses after sleep loss. TNFα and IL1β alter neuron sensitivity by changing neuromodulator/neurotransmitter receptor expression, allowing the neuron to scale its activity to the presynaptic neurons. TNFα's role in synaptic scaling is well characterized. Because the sensitivity of the postsynaptic neuron is changed, the same input will result in a different network output signal and this is a state change. The top-down paradigm of sleep regulation requires intentional action from sleep/wake regulatory brain circuits to initiate whole-organism sleep. This raises unresolved

  8. Effect of garlic (Allium sativum) on nickel II or chromium VI induced alterations of glucose homeostasis and hepatic antioxidant status under sub-chronic exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Amrita; Dhara, Prakash C; Dhundasi, Salim A; Das, Kusal K

    2009-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has a profound effect in reducing plasma glucose and increasing serum insulin in diabetic rats. We studied the effect of a garlic extract on nickel- or chromium-induced alteration of plasma glucose and hepatic glycogen levels and anti-oxidant status in rats. Adult male albino rats (n=36) divided into six groups of six animals each were treated as follows: Group I, untreated controls; Group II, fresh aqueous homogenate of garlic; Group III, nickel sulfate; Group IV, nickel sulfate + garlic; Group V, potassium dichromate; Group VI, potassium dichromate + garlic. In Groups IV and VI, the simultaneous administration of garlic abrogated a significant nickel- or chromium-induced increase in plasma glucose and decrease in liver glycogen. Nickel and chromium alone also increased lipid peroxide (LPO) and decreased glutathione levels, as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Simultaneous garlic administration significantly reduced the LPO level and remarkably improved SOD activity. Hence, we postulate that the administration of garlic can prevent nickel II- or chromium VI-induced alterations in blood glucose homeostasis while exerting a hepatoprotective effect on glycogen levels and antioxidant status in male albino rats.

  9. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZM, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases.

  10. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  11. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  12. State-dependent alterations in sleep/wake architecture elicited by the M4 PAM VU0467154 - Relation to antipsychotic-like drug effects.

    PubMed

    Gould, Robert W; Nedelcovych, Michael T; Gong, Xuewen; Tsai, Erica; Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Wood, Michael R; Duggan, Mark E; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Wood, Michael W; Ivarsson, Magnus; Noetzel, Meredith J; Daniels, J Scott; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates direct relationships between sleep abnormalities and the severity and prevalence of other symptom clusters in schizophrenia. Assessment of potential state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal relative to antipsychotic-like activity is critical for the development of novel antipsychotic drugs (APDs). Recently, we reported that VU0467154, a selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), exhibits robust APD-like and cognitive enhancing activity in rodents. However, the state-dependent effects of VU0467154 on sleep architecture and arousal have not been examined. Using polysomnography and quantitative electroencephalographic recordings from subcranial electrodes in rats, we evaluated the effects of VU0467154, in comparison with the atypical APD clozapine and the M1/M4-preferring mAChR agonist xanomeline. VU0467154 induced state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal including delayed Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep onset, increased cumulative duration of total and Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep, and increased arousal during waking periods. Clozapine decreased arousal during wake, increased cumulative NREM, and decreased REM sleep. In contrast, xanomeline increased time awake and arousal during wake, but reduced slow wave activity during NREM sleep. Additionally, in combination with the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801, modeling NMDAR hypofunction thought to underlie many symptoms in schizophrenia, both VU0467154 and clozapine attenuated MK-801-induced elevations in high frequency gamma power consistent with an APD-like mechanism of action. These findings suggest that selective M4 PAMs may represent a novel mechanism for treating multiple symptoms of schizophrenia, including disruptions in sleep architecture without a sedative profile.

  13. State-Dependent Alterations in Sleep/wake Architecture Elicited by the M4 PAM VU0467154- Relation to Antipsychotic-like Drug Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Robert W.; Nedelcovych, Michael T.; Gong, Xuewen; Tsai, Erica; Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M.; Wood, Michael R.; Duggan, Mark E.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, John; Wood, Michael W.; Ivarsson, Magnus; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Daniels, J. Scott; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates direct relationships between sleep abnormalities and the severity and prevalence of other symptom clusters in schizophrenia. Assessment of potential state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal relative to antipsychotic-like activity is critical for the development of novel antipsychotic drugs (APDs). Recently, we reported that VU0467154, a selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), exhibits robust APD-like and cognitive enhancing activity in rodents. However, the state-dependent effects of VU0467154 on sleep architecture and arousal have not been examined. Using polysomnography and quantitative electroencephalographic recordings from subcranial electrodes in rats, we evaluated the effects of VU0467154, in comparison with the atypical APD clozapine and the M1/M4-preferring mAChR agonist xanomeline. VU0467154 induced state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal by delaying Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep onset, selectively increased cumulative duration of total and Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep, and increased arousal during waking periods. Clozapine decreased arousal during wake, increased cumulative NREM, and decreased REM sleep. In contrast, xanomeline increased time awake and arousal during wake, but reduced slow wave activity during NREM sleep. Additionally, in combination with the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801, modeling NMDAR hypofunction thought to underlie many symptoms in schizophrenia, both VU0467154 and clozapine attenuated MK-801-induced elevations in high frequency gamma power consistent with an APD-like mechanism of action. These findings suggest that selective M4 PAMs may represent a novel mechanism for treating multiple symptoms of schizophrenia, including disruptions in sleep architecture without a sedative profile. PMID:26617071

  14. Circadian Disruption Leads to Loss of Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Carolina; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Gonzalez-Guerra, Eduardo; Tapia Osorio, Araceli; Angeles-Castellanos, Manuel; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of a synchronized temporal order for adaptation and homeostasis is discussed in this review. We present evidence suggesting that an altered temporal order between the biological clock and external temporal signals leads to disease. Evidence mainly based on a rodent model of “night work” using forced activity during the sleep phase suggests that altered activity and feeding schedules, out of phase from the light/dark cycle, may be the main cause for the loss of circadian synchrony and disease. It is proposed that by avoiding food intake during sleep hours the circadian misalignment and adverse consequences can be prevented. This review does not attempt to present a thorough revision of the literature, but instead it aims to highlight the association between circadian disruption and disease with special emphasis on the contribution of feeding schedules in circadian synchrony. PMID:23471148

  15. Scn1b deletion leads to increased tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current, altered intracellular calcium homeostasis and arrhythmias in murine hearts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xianming; O'Malley, Heather; Chen, Chunling; Auerbach, David; Foster, Monique; Shekhar, Akshay; Zhang, Mingliang; Coetzee, William; Jalife, José; Fishman, Glenn I; Isom, Lori; Delmar, Mario

    2015-03-15

    Na(+) current (INa) results from the integrated function of a molecular aggregate (the voltage-gated Na(+) channel complex) that includes the β subunit family. Mutations or rare variants in Scn1b (encoding the β1 and β1B subunits) have been associated with various inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes, including Brugada syndrome and sudden unexpected death in patients with epilepsy. We used Scn1b null mice to understand better the relation between Scn1b expression, and cardiac electrical function. Loss of Scn1b caused, among other effects, increased amplitude of tetrodotoxin-sensitive INa, delayed after-depolarizations, triggered beats, delayed Ca(2+) transients, frequent spontaneous calcium release events and increased susceptibility to polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. Most alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis were prevented by 100 nM tetrodotoxin. We propose that life-threatening arrhythmias in patients with mutations in Scn1b, a gene classically defined as ancillary to the Na(+) channel α subunit, can be partly consequent to disrupted intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Na(+) current (INa) is determined not only by the properties of the pore-forming voltage-gated Na(+) channel (VGSC) α subunit, but also by the integrated function of a molecular aggregate (the VGSC complex) that includes the VGSC β subunit family. Mutations or rare variants in Scn1b (encoding the β1 and β1B subunits) have been associated with various inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes, including cases of Brugada syndrome and sudden unexpected death in patients with epilepsy. Here, we have used Scn1b null mouse models to understand better the relation between Scn1b expression, and cardiac electrical function. Using a combination of macropatch and scanning ion conductance microscopy we show that loss of Scn1b in juvenile null animals resulted in increased tetrodotoxin-sensitive INa but only in the cell midsection, even before full T-tubule formation; the latter occurred concurrent with

  16. Restraint stress and exogenous corticosterone differentially alter sensitivity to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol in inbred long-sleep and inbred short-sleep mice

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Clarissa Carlin; Ponicsan, Heather; Spencer, Robert Leon; Holmes, Andrew; Johnson, Thomas Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Decreased sensitivity to ethanol is a genetically mediated trait implicated in susceptibility to developing alcoholism. Here, we explore genotype by environment differences in ethanol sensitivity. The relationship between acute- and repeated-restraint stress, corticosterone (CORT) levels, and sensitivity to sedative-hypnotic properties of ethanol was explored using inbred long-sleep (ILS) and inbred short-sleep (ISS) mice. In ILS mice, acute restraint decreased ethanol sensitivity at a 4.1 g/kg dose, as measured by a decrease in the duration of loss of the righting reflex (LORE) and an increase in blood ethanol concentration at regain of the righting response (BECRR). Repeated restraint also decreased LORE duration, but had no effect on BECRR. In the ISS mice, there was no effect of acute restraint on either LORE duration or BECRR. However, repeated restraint increased ethanol sensitivity at a 4.1 g/kg dose; with an increase in LORE duration, but a decrease in BECRR. Differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness to restraint stress (as measured by plasma CORT) were also examined between genotypes. ILS mice displayed habituation to repeated restraint, whereas ISS mice did not. Lastly, the effect of enhanced CORT levels independent of psychological stress was examined for its effects on the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol. There were no effects of CORT pretreatment on LORE duration or BECRR in ILS mice compared to saline- or noninjected littermates. In contrast, ISS mice injected with CORT showed a decreased duration of LORE, but no effects on BECRR. These findings suggest that in addition to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors (e.g., restraint stress, exogenous CORT administration) also influence sensitivity to the sedative effects of ethanol through alteration of central nervous system sensitivity and pharmacokinetic parameters, and do so in a genotype-dependent manner. PMID:18760716

  17. Diurnal variation of lipopolysaccharide-induced alterations in sleep and body temperature of interleukin-6-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Jonathan D; Opp, Mark R

    2005-01-01

    Infectious challenge triggers a broad array of coordinated changes within the host organism, including alterations in sleep-wake behavior and body temperature. Pro-inflammatory cytokines orchestrate many of the behavioral, metabolic, and endocrine responses to immune challenge. Although interleukin (IL)-6 mediates several aspects of sickness behavior, a role for this cytokine as a mediator of alterations in sleep in response to immune challenge has not been established. We evaluated sleep-wake behavior and core body temperature of IL-6-deficient (IL-6 KO; B6.129S6-Il6tm1Kopf) mice and C57BL/6J control mice after intraperitoneal (IP) administration of 10 microg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Because feedback mechanisms that regulate responses to immune challenge exhibit circadian rhythms, we evaluated responses to LPS administered at the beginning of both the light and dark portions of the light:dark cycle. LPS-induced increases in non-rapid eye movements sleep (NREMS) of both mouse strains, but this increase was less pronounced in IL-6 KO mice than in C57BL/6J mice. Strain differences in LPS-induced increases in NREMS were greatest after light-onset administration. During the 12 h light period, NREMS of C57BL/6J mice increased from 53.0+/-1.7% of recording time after vehicle to 65.4+/-1.4% of recording time after LPS. During this same time period, NREMS of IL-6 KO mice increased from 50.5+/-1.8% after vehicle to only 52.4+/-1.8% of recording time after LPS. REMS of both mouse strains was suppressed to the same extent after LPS, irrespective of timing of administration. LPS-induced fever in C57BL/6J mice, with peak magnitude of 1.4+/-0.3 degrees C and 1.8+/-0.2 degrees C after dark onset and light onset administration, respectively. In contrast, this dose of LPS-induced profound hypothermia in IL-6 KO mice, with nadirs of hypothermia reaching 4.9+/-1.0 degrees C after injection at dark onset and 2.2+/-0.5 degrees C after administration at light onset. These results

  18. A mutation in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase causes conditional hypersensitivity to ammonium, resulting in Arabidopsis root growth inhibition, altered ammonium metabolism, and hormone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Carina; Gouzd, Zachary A; Steele, Hilary P; Imperio, Ryan M

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is an antioxidant fulfilling a multitude of cellular functions. Given its pivotal role in maintaining the rate of cell growth and division in the quiescent centre of the root, it was hypothesized that the AA-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants vtc1-1, vtc2-1, vtc3-1, and vtc4-1 have altered root growth. To test this hypothesis, root development was studied in the wild type and vtc mutants grown on Murashige and Skoog medium. It was discovered, however, that only the vtc1-1 mutant has strongly retarded root growth, while the other vtc mutants exhibit a wild-type root phenotype. It is demonstrated that the short-root phenotype in vtc1-1 is independent of AA deficiency and oxidative stress. Instead, vtc1-1 is conditionally hypersensitive to ammonium (NH(4)(+)). To provide new insights into the mechanism of NH(4)(+) sensitivity in vtc1-1, root development, NH(4)(+) content, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, glutamate dehydrogenase activity, and glutamine content were assessed in wild-type and vtc1-1 mutant plants grown in the presence and absence of high NH(4)(+) and the GS inhibitor MSO. Since VTC1 encodes a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme generating GDP-mannose for AA biosynthesis and protein N-glycosylation, it was also tested whether protein N-glycosylation is affected in vtc1-1. Furthermore, since root development requires the action of a variety of hormones, it was investigated whether hormone homeostasis is linked to NH(4)(+) sensitivity in vtc1-1. Our data suggest that NH(4)(+) hypersensitivity in vtc1-1 is caused by disturbed N-glycosylation and that it is associated with auxin and ethylene homeostasis and/or nitric oxide signalling.

  19. A mutation in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase causes conditional hypersensitivity to ammonium, resulting in Arabidopsis root growth inhibition, altered ammonium metabolism, and hormone homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Carina; Gouzd, Zachary A.; Steele, Hilary P.; Imperio, Ryan M.

    2010-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is an antioxidant fulfilling a multitude of cellular functions. Given its pivotal role in maintaining the rate of cell growth and division in the quiescent centre of the root, it was hypothesized that the AA-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants vtc1-1, vtc2-1, vtc3-1, and vtc4-1 have altered root growth. To test this hypothesis, root development was studied in the wild type and vtc mutants grown on Murashige and Skoog medium. It was discovered, however, that only the vtc1-1 mutant has strongly retarded root growth, while the other vtc mutants exhibit a wild-type root phenotype. It is demonstrated that the short-root phenotype in vtc1-1 is independent of AA deficiency and oxidative stress. Instead, vtc1-1 is conditionally hypersensitive to ammonium (NH4+). To provide new insights into the mechanism of NH4+ sensitivity in vtc1-1, root development, NH4+ content, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, glutamate dehydrogenase activity, and glutamine content were assessed in wild-type and vtc1-1 mutant plants grown in the presence and absence of high NH4+ and the GS inhibitor MSO. Since VTC1 encodes a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme generating GDP-mannose for AA biosynthesis and protein N-glycosylation, it was also tested whether protein N-glycosylation is affected in vtc1-1. Furthermore, since root development requires the action of a variety of hormones, it was investigated whether hormone homeostasis is linked to NH4+ sensitivity in vtc1-1. Our data suggest that NH4+ hypersensitivity in vtc1-1 is caused by disturbed N-glycosylation and that it is associated with auxin and ethylene homeostasis and/or nitric oxide signalling. PMID:20007685

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and disturbed calcium homeostasis are involved in copper-induced alteration in hepatic lipid metabolism in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Feng; Luo, Zhi; Zhang, Li-Han; Hogstrand, Christer; Pan, Ya-Xiong

    2016-02-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Cu exposure on ER stress and Ca(2+) homeostasis, and explore the underlying mechanism of the ER stress and disturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. To this end, three experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, P. fulvidraco were exposed to three waterborne Cu concentrations for 56 days. Waterborne Cu exposure evoked ER stress and SREBP-1c activation and resulted in dysregulation of hepatic lipid metabolism in liver of P. fulvidraco in a time-dependent manner. In experiment 2, specific inhibitors 2-APB (IP3 receptor inhibitor) and dantrolene (RyR receptor inhibitor) were used to explore whether Ca(2+) release from ER was involved in the Cu-induced ER stress change. Dantrolene and 2-APB prevented Cu-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, demonstrating that the release of Ca(2+) from the ER, mediated by both RyR and IP3R, contributed to dysregulation of lipid metabolism. In experiment 3, a chemical chaperone (PBA) was used to demonstrate whether Cu-induced alteration in lipid metabolism was suppressed through the attenuation of ER stress. PBA attenuated the Cu-induced elevation of mRNA expression of SREBP-1c, SCAP, ACC, FAS, GRP78/BiP, GRP94, CRT, eIF2α and XBP-1, and alleviated the Cu-induced downregulation of Insig-1. Based on these observations, these results reveal a link between ER stress and the change of lipid metabolism induced by Cu, which will help to understand the Cu-induced toxicity on cellular and molecular level, and provide some novel insights into the regulation of lipid metabolism in fish.

  1. Scn1b deletion leads to increased tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current, altered intracellular calcium homeostasis and arrhythmias in murine hearts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xianming; O'Malley, Heather; Chen, Chunling; Auerbach, David; Foster, Monique; Shekhar, Akshay; Zhang, Mingliang; Coetzee, William; Jalife, José; Fishman, Glenn I; Isom, Lori; Delmar, Mario

    2014-08-15

    Na(+) current (INa) is determined not only by the properties of the pore-forming voltage-gated Na(+) channel (VGSC) α subunit, but also by the integrated function of a molecular aggregate (the VGSC complex) that includes the VGSC β subunit family. Mutations or rare variants in Scn1b (encoding the β1 and β1B subunits) have been associated with various inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes, including cases of Brugada syndrome and sudden unexpected death in patients with epilepsy. Here, we have used Scn1b null mouse models to understand better the relation between Scn1b expression, and cardiac electrical function. Using a combination of macropatch and scanning ion conductance microscopy we show that loss of Scn1b in juvenile null animals resulted in increased tetrodotoxin-sensitive INa but only in the cell midsection, even before full T-tubule formation; the latter occurred concurrent with increased message abundance for the neuronal Scn3a mRNA, suggesting increased abundance of tetrodotoxin-sensitive NaV1.3 protein and yet its exclusion from the region of the intercalated disc. Ventricular myocytes from cardiac-specific adult Scn1b null animals showed increased Scn3a message, prolonged action potential repolarization, presence of delayed after-depolarizations and triggered beats, delayed Ca(2+) transients and frequent spontaneous Ca(2+) release events and at the whole heart level, increased susceptibility to polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. Most alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis were prevented by 100 nm tetrodotoxin. Our results suggest that life-threatening arrhythmias in patients with mutations in Scn1b, a gene classically defined as ancillary to the Na(+) channel α subunit, can be partly consequent to disrupted intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in ventricular myocytes.

  2. Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Mueller, Noel T.; Duncan, Bruce B.; Bisi Molina, Maria del Carmen; Goulart, Alessandra C.; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Observational studies have reported fairly consistent inverse associations between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes, but this association has been little investigated with regard to lesser degrees of hyperglycemia and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Additionally, the association between coffee consumption and diabetes has been rarely investigated in South American populations. We examined the cross-sectional relationships of coffee intake with newly diagnosed diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion, in a large Brazilian cohort of middle-aged and elderly individuals. Methods We used baseline data from 12,586 participants of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes. Analysis of covariance was used to assess coffee intake in relation to two-hour glucose from an oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, fasting and –2-hour postload insulin and measures of insulin sensitivity. Results We found an inverse association between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes, after adjusting for multiple covariates [23% and 26% lower odds of diabetes for those consuming coffee 2–3 and >3 times per day, respectively, compared to those reporting never or almost never consuming coffee, (p = .02)]. An inverse association was also found for 2-hour postload glucose [Never/almost never: 7.57 mmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 7.48 mmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 7.22 mmol/L, >3 times/day: 7.12 mol/L, p<0.0001] but not with fasting glucose concentrations (p = 0.07). Coffee was additionally associated with 2-hour postload insulin [Never/almost never: 287.2 pmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 280.1 pmol/L, 2–3 times/day: 275.3 pmol/L, >3 times/day: 262.2 pmol/L, p = 0.0005) but not with fasting insulin conce