Science.gov

Sample records for altering mrna stability

  1. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  2. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Müller, Maren; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Gommlich, Jessie; Balagopal, Vidya; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC) reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization. PMID:27543059

  3. Amphotericin B severely affects expression and activity of the endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase involving altered mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Suschek, Christoph Viktor; Bonmann, Eckhard; Kleinert, Hartmut; Wenzel, Michael; Mahotka, Csaba; Kolb, Hubert; Förstermann, Ulrich; Gerharz, Claus-Dieter; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    The therapeutic use of the antifungal drug amphotericin B (AmB) is limited due to severe side effects like glomerular vasoconstriction and risk of renal failure during AmB administration. As nitric oxide (NO) has substantial functions in renal autoregulation, we have determined the effects of AmB on endothelial constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) expression and activity in human and rat endothelial cell cultures.AmB used at concentrations of 0.6 to 1.25 μg ml−1 led to increases in ecNOS mRNA and protein expression as well as NO production. This was the result of an increased ecNOS mRNA half-life. In contrast, incubation of cells with higher albeit subtoxic concentrations of AmB (2.5–5.0 μg ml−1) resulted in a decrease or respectively in completely abolished ecNOS mRNA and protein expression with a strongly reduced or inhibited ecNOS activity, due to a decrease of ecNOS mRNA half-life. None of the AmB concentrations affected promoter activity as found with a reporter gene construct stably transfected into ECV304 cells.Thus, our experiments show a concentration-dependent biphasic effect of AmB on expression and activity of ecNOS, an effect best explained by AmB influencing ecNOS mRNA stability. In view of the known renal accumulation of this drug the results reported here could help to elucidate its renal toxicity. PMID:11015297

  4. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  5. Conditional regulation of Puf1p, Puf4p, and Puf5p activity alters YHB1 mRNA stability for a rapid response to toxic nitric oxide stress in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Olivas, Wendy M.

    2015-01-01

    Puf proteins regulate mRNA degradation and translation through interactions with 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Such regulation provides an efficient method to rapidly alter protein production during cellular stress. YHB1 encodes the only protein to detoxify nitric oxide in yeast. Here we show that YHB1 mRNA is destabilized by Puf1p, Puf4p, and Puf5p through two overlapping Puf recognition elements (PREs) in the YHB1 3′ UTR. Overexpression of any of the three Pufs is sufficient to fully rescue wild-type decay in the absence of other Pufs, and overexpression of Puf4p or Puf5p can enhance the rate of wild-type decay. YHB1 mRNA decay stimulation by Puf proteins is also responsive to cellular stress. YHB1 mRNA is stabilized in galactose and high culture density, indicating inactivation of the Puf proteins. This condition-specific inactivation of Pufs is overcome by Puf overexpression, and Puf4p/Puf5p overexpression during nitric oxide exposure reduces the steady-state level of endogenous YHB1 mRNA, resulting in slow growth. Puf inactivation is not a result of altered expression or localization. Puf1p and Puf4p can bind target mRNA in inactivating conditions; however, Puf5p binding is reduced. This work demonstrates how multiple Puf proteins coordinately regulate YHB1 mRNA to protect cells from nitric oxide stress. PMID:25631823

  6. A noncoding RNA produced by arthropod-borne flaviviruses inhibits the cellular exoribonuclease XRN1 and alters host mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Stephanie L.; Anderson, John R.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Wilusz, Carol J.; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    All arthropod-borne flaviviruses generate a short noncoding RNA (sfRNA) from the viral 3′ untranslated region during infection due to stalling of the cellular 5′-to-3′ exonuclease XRN1. We show here that formation of sfRNA also inhibits XRN1 activity. Cells infected with Dengue or Kunjin viruses accumulate uncapped mRNAs, decay intermediates normally targeted by XRN1. XRN1 repression also resulted in the increased overall stability of cellular mRNAs in flavivirus-infected cells. Importantly, a mutant Kunjin virus that cannot form sfRNA but replicates to normal levels failed to affect host mRNA stability or XRN1 activity. Expression of sfRNA in the absence of viral infection demonstrated that sfRNA formation was directly responsible for the stabilization of cellular mRNAs. Finally, numerous cellular mRNAs were differentially expressed in an sfRNA-dependent fashion in a Kunjin virus infection. We conclude that flaviviruses incapacitate XRN1 during infection and dysregulate host mRNA stability as a result of sfRNA formation. PMID:23006624

  7. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm-2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  8. p190RhoGEF Binds to a destabilizing element in the 3' untranslated region of light neurofilament subunit mRNA and alters the stability of the transcript.

    PubMed

    Cañete-Soler, R; Wu, J; Zhai, J; Shamim, M; Schlaepfer, W W

    2001-08-24

    Stabilization of neurofilament (NF) mRNAs plays a major role in regulating levels of NF expression and in establishing axonal size and rate of axonal conduction. Previous studies have identified a 68-nucleotide destabilizing element at the junction of the coding region and 3' untranslated region of the light NF subunit (NF-L) mRNA. The present study has used the destabilizing element (probe A) to screen a rat brain cDNA library for interactive proteins. A cDNA clone encoding 1068 nucleotides in the C-terminal domain of p190RhoGEF (clone 39) was found to bind strongly and specifically to the RNA probe. The interaction was confirmed using a glutathione S-transferase/clone 39 fusion protein in Northwestern, gel-shift, and cross-linkage studies. The glutathione S-transferase/clone 39 fusion protein also enhanced the cross-linkage of a major 43-kDa protein in brain extract to the destabilizing element. Functional studies on stably transfected neuronal cells showed that p190RhoGEF expression increased the half-life of a wild-type NF-L mRNA but did not alter the half-life of a mutant NF-L mRNA lacking the destabilizing element. The findings reveal a novel interactive feature of p190RhoGEF that links the exchange factor with NF mRNA stability and regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton.

  9. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 7 Controls mRNA Synthesis by Affecting Stability of Preinitiation Complexes, Leading to Altered Gene Expression, Cell Cycle Progression, and Survival of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Timothy W. R.; Baumgart, Karen; Eickhoff, Jan; Albert, Thomas; Antrecht, Claudia; Lemcke, Sarah; Klebl, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) activates cell cycle CDKs and is a member of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Although there is substantial evidence for an active role of CDK7 in mRNA synthesis and associated processes, the degree of its influence on global and gene-specific transcription in mammalian species is unclear. In the current study, we utilize two novel inhibitors with high specificity for CDK7 to demonstrate a restricted but robust impact of CDK7 on gene transcription in vivo and in in vitro-reconstituted reactions. We distinguish between relative low- and high-dose responses and relate them to distinct molecular mechanisms and altered physiological responses. Low inhibitor doses cause rapid clearance of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules and sufficed to cause genome-wide alterations in gene expression, delays in cell cycle progression at both the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and diminished survival of human tumor cells. Higher doses and prolonged inhibition led to strong reductions in RNAPII carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation, eventual activation of the p53 program, and increased cell death. Together, our data reason for a quantitative contribution of CDK7 to mRNA synthesis, which is critical for cellular homeostasis. PMID:25047832

  10. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  11. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  12. Effect of ribosome shielding on mRNA stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the experimental evidence that translating ribosomes stabilize the mRNAs, we introduce and study a theoretical model for the dynamic shielding of mRNA by ribosomes. We present an improved fitting of published decay assay data in E. coli and show that only one third of the decay patterns are exponential. Our new transcriptome-wide estimate of the average lifetimes and mRNA half-lives shows that these timescales are considerably shorter than previous estimates. We also explain why there is a negative correlation between mRNA length and average lifetime when the mRNAs are subdivided in classes sharing the same degradation parameters. As a by-product, our model indicates that co-transcriptional translation in E. coli may be less common than previously believed.

  13. Expression and stability of c-sis mRNA in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Press, R.D.; Samols, D.; Goldthwait, D.A.

    1988-07-26

    The production of platelet-derived growth factor like (PDGF-like) material by glioblastomas may be involved in the conversion of normal cells to tumor cells. In an investigation of this problem, the authors have examined some of the properties of the platelet-derived growth factor B-chain mRNA (c-sis mRNA) by a sensitive and quantitative RNA-RNA solution hybridization method. In 5 out of 8 human glioblastoma cell lines, c-sis mRNA was present, and in the line with the highest level, there were approximately 4-10 molecules per cell. The half-lives of the c-sis mRNA in two glioblastoma cell lines were 2.6 and 3.4 h, while in human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) and bladder carcinoma (T24) cells they were 1.6 and 2.5 h, respectively. Inhibiting protein synthesis produced no significant alteration of the c-sis mRNA half-lives in the glioblastoma or HUVE cells. The A-U-rich sequence at the 3' end of the c-sis mRNA therefore does not appear to affect the mRNA stability in the presence of cycloheximide as it does in other transcripts. The similarity of the c-sis mRNA half-lives in normal and tumor cells suggests that regulation of stability of c-sis mRNA is not a major factor in tumorigenesis in the glioblastoma cell lines examined.

  14. Stabilization of a specific nuclear mRNA precursor by thyroid hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Towle, H C

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of a thyroid hormone-responsive gene in rats, designated spot 14, was explored. The expression of this gene in liver is rapidly (less than 10 min) and markedly (greater than 10-fold) altered by the administration of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) to hypothyroid rats (P. Narayan, C. W. Liaw, and H. C. Towle, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81:4687-4691, 1984). To investigate the cellular site at which T3 acts to induce this hepatic mRNA, we made parallel measurements of the relative levels of spot 14 mRNA and nuclear precursor RNA and of the rate of gene transcription after treatments designed to alter the thyroid status of rats. The relative levels of both the mRNA and nuclear precursor were elevated roughly 5- to 6-fold in euthyroid animals and 9- to 12-fold in hyperthyroid animals over those in hypothyroid controls. However, only a small difference of approximately 1.5-fold was detected in the rate of spot 14 gene transcription. After a single injection of T3 into hypothyroid animals, a small and transient rise in the transcription rate was detected at 30 min. However, the levels of spot 14 mRNA and nuclear precursor RNA increased much more dramatically throughout the first 4 h of treatment. In both cases, changes in the rate of gene transcription were not capable of accounting for the alterations observed in mRNA levels. Thus, the major site of spot 14 gene regulation by T3 is at a posttranscriptional level. The proportional changes observed in the nuclear precursor and mRNA levels suggest that the site of control is at the level of stability of the nuclear precursor RNA for spot 14 mRNA. PMID:3837180

  15. Hypoxia and Hypoglycemia Synergistically Regulate mRNA Stability.

    PubMed

    Carraway, Kristen R; Johnson, Ellen M; Kauffmann, Travis C; Fry, Nate J; Mansfield, Kyle D

    2017-03-31

    Ischemic events, common in many diseases, result from decreased blood flow and impaired delivery of oxygen and glucose to tissues of the body. While much is known about the cellular transcriptional response to ischemia, much less is known about the posttranscriptional response to oxygen and glucose deprivation. The goal of this project was to investigate one such posttranscriptional response, the regulation of mRNA stability. To that end, we have identified a number of novel ischemia-related mRNAs that are synergistically stabilized by oxygen and glucose deprivation including VEGF, MYC, MDM2, and CYR61. This increase in mRNA half-life requires the synergistic effects of both low oxygen (1%) as well as low glucose (≤1 g/L) conditions. Oxygen or glucose deprivation alone fails to initiate the response, as exposure to either high glucose (4 g/L) or normoxic conditions inhibits the response. Furthermore, in response to hypoxia/hypoglycemia, the identified mRNAs are released from the RNA binding protein KHSRP which likely contributes to their stabilization.

  16. A MYLK variant regulates asthmatic inflammation via alterations in mRNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Saadat, Laleh; Garcia, Joe GN

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light-chain kinase (MYLK) is a gene known to be significantly associated with severe asthma in African Americans. Here we further examine the molecular function of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), located in the non-muscle myosin light-chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK), in asthma susceptibility and pathobiology. We identified nmMLCK variant (reference SNP: rs9840993, NM_053025: 721C>T, c.439C>T) with a distinct mRNA secondary structure from the other variants. The nmMLCK variant (721C) secondary structure exhibits increased stability with an elongated half-life in the human endothelial cell, and greater efficiency in protein translation initiation owing to an increased accessibility to translation start site. Finally, nmMLCK expression of 721C- and 721T-containing MYLK transgenes were compared in nmMLCK−/− mice and confirmed deleterious effects of nmMLCK expression on asthmatic indices and implicated the augmented influence of MYLK 721C>T (c.439C>T) SNP on asthma severity. The confirmation of the novel mechanism of the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by a MYLK advances knowledge of the genetic basis for asthma disparities, and further suggests the potential of nmMLCK as a therapeutic target. Our study suggests that in addition to altering protein structure and function, non-synonymous SNPs may also lead to phenotypic disparity by altering protein expression. PMID:25271083

  17. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  18. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  19. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-06-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability.

  20. Fragile X mental retardation protein control of neuronal mRNA metabolism: Insights into mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Silvia; Bagni, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA binding protein that has an essential role in neurons. From the soma to the synapse, FMRP is associated with a specific subset of messenger RNAs and controls their posttranscriptional fates, i.e., dendritic localization and local translation. Because FMRP target mRNAs encode important neuronal proteins, the deregulation of their expression in the absence of FMRP leads to a strong impairment of synaptic function. Here, we review emerging evidence indicating a critical role for FMRP in the control of mRNA stability. To date, two mRNAs have been identified as being regulated in this manner: PSD-95 mRNA, encoding a scaffolding protein, and Nxf1 mRNA, encoding a general export factor. Moreover, expression studies suggest that the turnover of other neuronal mRNAs, including those encoding for the GABA(A) receptors subunits, could be affected by the loss of FMRP. According to the specific target and/or cellular context, FMRP could influence mRNA stability in the brain.

  1. Gravitational loading of a simulated launch alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1996-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1a) were centrifuged under a regime designed to simulate a space shuttle launch (maximum of 3g). Messenger RNA levels for eight genes involved in bone growth and maintenance were determined using RT-PCR. Following 30 min of centrifugation, mRNA level for early response gene c-fos was significantly increased 89% (P < 0.05). The c-fos induction was transient and returned to control levels after 3 h. The mRNA level for the mineralization marker gene osteocalcin was significantly decreased to 44% of control level (P < 0.005) 3 h after centrifugation. No changes in mRNA levels were detected for c-myc, TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, cyclophilin A, or actin. No basal mRNA level for TGFbeta3 was detected. In addition, no change in the steady-state synthesis of prostaglandin E2 was detected, possibly due to lack of lipid substrates in serum-deprived cells, suggesting that the increase in c-fos mRNA in response to gravitational loading is a result of mechanical stimulation. These results indicate that a small magnitude mechanical loading, such as that experienced during a shuttle launch, can alter mRNA levels in quiescent osteoblastic cells.

  2. Impairment of FOS mRNA stabilization following translation arrest in granulocytes from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomin; Shikama, Yayoi; Shichishima, Tsutomu; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Kimura, Hideo; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Although quantitative and qualitative granulocyte defects have been described in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the underlying molecular basis of granulocyte dysfunction in MDS is largely unknown. We recently found that FOS mRNA elevation under translation-inhibiting stimuli was significantly smaller in granulocytes from MDS patients than in healthy individuals. The aim of this study is to clarify the cause of the impaired FOS induction in MDS. We first examined the mechanisms of FOS mRNA elevation using granulocytes from healthy donors cultured with the translation inhibitor emetine. Emetine increased both transcription and mRNA stability of FOS. p38 MAPK inhibition abolished the emetine-induced increase of FOS transcription but did not affect FOS mRNA stabilization. The binding of an AU-rich element (ARE)-binding protein HuR to FOS mRNA containing an ARE in 3'UTR was increased by emetine, and the knockdown of HuR reduced the FOS mRNA stabilizing effect of emetine. We next compared the emetine-induced transcription and mRNA stabilization of FOS between MDS patients and healthy controls. Increased rates of FOS transcription by emetine were similar in MDS and controls. In the absence of emetine, FOS mRNA decayed to nearly 17% of initial levels in 45 min in both groups. In the presence of emetine, however, 76.7±19.8% of FOS mRNA remained after 45 min in healthy controls, versus 37.9±25.5% in MDS (P<0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating attenuation of stress-induced FOS mRNA stabilization in MDS granulocytes.

  3. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications.

  4. qPCR based mRNA quality score show intact mRNA after heat stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Segerström, Lova; Sjöback, Robert; Nylander, Ingrid; Borén, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of multiple analytes from biological samples can be challenging as different analytes require different preservation measures. Heat induced enzymatic inactivation is an efficient way to preserve proteins and their modifications in biological samples but RNA quality, as measured by RIN value, has been a concern in such samples. Here, we investigate the effect of heat stabilization compared with standard snap freezing on RNA quality using two RNA extraction protocols, QiaZol with and without urea pre-solubilization, and two RNA quality measurements: RIN value, as defined by the Agilent Bioanalyzer, and an alternative qPCR based method. DNA extraction from heat stabilized brain samples was also examined. The snap frozen samples had RIN values about 1 unit higher than heat stabilized samples for the direct QiaZol extraction but equal with stabilized samples using urea pre-solubilization. qPCR based RNA quality measurement showed no difference in quality between snap frozen and heat inactivated samples. The probable explanation for this discrepancy is that the RIN value is an indirect measure based on rRNA, while the qPCR score is based on actual measurement of mRNA quality. The DNA yield from heat stabilized brain tissue samples was significantly increased, compared to the snap frozen tissue, without any effects on purity or quality. Hence, heat stabilization of tissues opens up the possibility for a two step preservation protocol, where proteins and their modifications can be preserved in the first heat based step, while in a second step, using standard RNA preservation strategies, mRNA be preserved. This collection strategy will enable biobanking of samples where the ultimate analysis is not determined without loss of sample quality. PMID:27077049

  5. HDAC3 regulates stability of estrogen receptor α mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Oie, Shohei; Matsuzaki, Kazuya; Yokoyama, Wataru; Murayama, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► HDAC inhibitors decrease the stability of ERα mRNA in MCF-7 cells. ► HDAC3 is involved in maintaining ERα mRNA stability in MCF-7 cells. ► ERα mRNA instability by knockdown of HDAC3 reduces the estrogen-dependent proliferation of ERα-positive MCF-7 cells. ► HDAC3 specific inhibitor will be one of new drugs for ERα-positive breast cancers. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) expression is a risk factor for breast cancer. HDAC inhibitors have been demonstrated to down-regulate ERα expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cell lines, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we showed that HDAC inhibitors decrease the stability of ERα mRNA, and that knockdown of HDAC3 decreases the stability of ERα mRNA and suppresses estrogen-dependent proliferation of ERα-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In the Oncomine database, expression levels of HDAC3 in ERα-positive tumors are higher than those in ERα-negative tumors, thus suggesting that HDAC3 is necessary for ERα mRNA stability, and is involved in the estrogen-dependent proliferation of ERα-positive tumors.

  6. Effect of copy number and mRNA processing and stabilization on transcript and protein levels from an engineered dual-gene operon.

    PubMed

    Smolke, Christina D; Keasling, Jay D

    2002-05-20

    To study the effect of mRNA stability and DNA copy number on protein production from a dual-gene operon, a synthetic operon containing the reporter genes gfp and lacZ under the control of the araBAD promoter was placed in pMB1-based (approximately 100 copies/cell) and F plasmid-based (approximately 1 copy/cell) vectors. DNA cassettes encoding secondary structures were placed at the 5' and 3' ends of the genes and a putative RNase E site was placed between the two genes. Although the copy number of the pMB1-based vectors was approximately 100-fold greater than the copy number of the F plasmid-based vectors, transcript and protein levels from the pMB1-based vector were not 100-fold greater than from the F plasmid-based vectors. In identical plasmid backbones, different combinations of mRNA control elements were used to alter steady-state levels of transcripts. Control elements that amplified the stability of one coding region relative to another amplified the ratio of protein produced from those transcripts. The effects of mRNA stability control elements were greater at low inducer concentrations, where mRNA levels limit protein production, than at high inducer concentrations. Although we can alter mRNA and protein levels through copy number, induction level, and mRNA stability control elements, some aspect of gene expression remains dependent on inherent characteristics of the coding region.

  7. An mRNA decapping mutant deficient in P body assembly limits mRNA stabilization in response to osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Nissan, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Yeast is exposed to changing environmental conditions and must adapt its genetic program to provide a homeostatic intracellular environment. An important stress for yeast in the wild is high osmolarity. A key response to this stress is increased mRNA stability primarily by the inhibition of deadenylation. We previously demonstrated that mutations in decapping activators (edc3∆ lsm4∆C), which result in defects in P body assembly, can destabilize mRNA under unstressed conditions. We wished to examine whether mRNA would be destabilized in the edc3∆ lsm4∆C mutant as compared to the wild-type in response to osmotic stress, when P bodies are intense and numerous. Our results show that the edc3∆ lsm4∆C mutant limits the mRNA stability in response to osmotic stress, while the magnitude of stabilization was similar as compared to the wild-type. The reduced mRNA stability in the edc3∆ lsm4∆C mutant was correlated with a shorter PGK1 poly(A) tail. Similarly, the MFA2 mRNA was more rapidly deadenylated as well as significantly stabilized in the ccr4∆ deadenylation mutant in the edc3∆ lsm4∆C background. These results suggest a role for these decapping factors in stabilizing mRNA and may implicate P bodies as sites of reduced mRNA degradation. PMID:28290514

  8. The RNA-binding protein HuR regulates DNA methylation through stabilization of DNMT3b mRNA.

    PubMed

    López de Silanes, Isabel; Gorospe, Myriam; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Srikantan, Subramanya; Alaminos, Miguel; Berdasco, María; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Fraga, Mario F; Jacinto, Filipe V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-05-01

    The molecular basis underlying the aberrant DNA-methylation patterns in human cancer is largely unknown. Altered DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity is believed to contribute, as DNMT expression levels increase during tumorigenesis. Here, we present evidence that the expression of DNMT3b is post-transcriptionally regulated by HuR, an RNA-binding protein that stabilizes and/or modulates the translation of target mRNAs. The presence of a putative HuR-recognition motif in the DNMT3b 3'UTR prompted studies to investigate if this transcript associated with HuR. The interaction between HuR and DNMT3b mRNA was studied by immunoprecipitation of endogenous HuR ribonucleoprotein complexes followed by RT-qPCR detection of DNMT3b mRNA, and by in vitro pulldown of biotinylated DNMT3b RNAs followed by western blotting detection of HuR. These studies revealed that binding of HuR stabilized the DNMT3b mRNA and increased DNMT3b expression. Unexpectedly, cisplatin treatment triggered the dissociation of the [HuR-DNMT3b mRNA] complex, in turn promoting DNMT3b mRNA decay, decreasing DNMT3b abundance, and lowering the methylation of repeated sequences and global DNA methylation. In summary, our data identify DNMT3b mRNA as a novel HuR target, present evidence that HuR affects DNMT3b expression levels post-transcriptionally, and reveal the functional consequences of the HuR-regulated DNMT3b upon DNA methylation patterns.

  9. Poly(rC) binding proteins mediate poliovirus mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, K E; Roberts, A W; Barton, D J

    2001-01-01

    The 5'-terminal 88 nt of poliovirus RNA fold into a cloverleaf RNA structure and form ribonucleoprotein complexes with poly(rC) binding proteins (PCBPs; AV Gamarnik, R Andino, RNA, 1997, 3:882-892; TB Parsley, JS Towner, LB Blyn, E Ehrenfeld, BL Semler, RNA, 1997, 3:1124-1134). To determine the functional role of these ribonucleoprotein complexes in poliovirus replication, HeLa S10 translation-replication reactions were used to quantitatively assay poliovirus mRNA stability, poliovirus mRNA translation, and poliovirus negative-strand RNA synthesis. Ribohomopoly(C) RNA competitor rendered wild-type poliovirus mRNA unstable in these reactions. A 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine cap prevented the degradation of wild-type poliovirus mRNA in the presence of ribohomopoly(C) competitor. Ribohomopoly(A), -(G), and -(U) did not adversely affect poliovirus mRNA stability. Ribohomopoly(C) competitor RNA inhibited the translation of poliovirus mRNA but did not inhibit poliovirus negative-strand RNA synthesis when poliovirus replication proteins were provided in trans using a chimeric helper mRNA possessing the hepatitis C virus IRES. A C24A mutation prevented UV crosslinking of PCBPs to 5' cloverleaf RNA and rendered poliovirus mRNA unstable. A 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine cap blocked the degradation of C24A mutant poliovirus mRNA. The C24A mutation did not inhibit the translation of poliovirus mRNA nor diminish viral negative-strand RNA synthesis relative to wild-type RNA. These data support the conclusion that poly(rC) binding protein(s) mediate the stability of poliovirus mRNA by binding to the 5'-terminal cloverleaf structure of poliovirus mRNA. Because of the general conservation of 5' cloverleaf RNA sequences among picornaviruses, including C24 in loop b of the cloverleaf, we suggest that viral mRNA stability of polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and rhinoviruses is mediated by interactions between PCBPs and 5' cloverleaf RNA. PMID:11497431

  10. Control of mRNA stability during development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G

    1989-01-01

    A large group of mRNA species (which are mainly pre-spore specific) accumulate only after the formation of multicellular aggregates. They are transcribed at a constant rate from the beginning of development and their accumulation is controlled by a 10-20-fold increase in their stability. This mRNA stabilization is dependent upon multicellularity. When aggregates are dispersed, the mRNAs are destabilized; if cells are allowed to reaggregate, the destabilization is reversed. Destabilization is not due to a selective exclusion of mRNA from polyribosomes, but is a primary control event. It does not require synthesis of new RNA or protein, but it may require an interaction between ribosome and the 5'-end of mRNA molecules.

  11. Sustained stabilization of Interleukin-8 mRNA in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Linah; Al-Enezi, Fatma; Al-Saif, Maher; Warsy, Arjumand; Khabar, Khalid SA; Hitti, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    The mRNAs of most inflammatory mediators are short-lived due to AU-rich elements (AREs) in their 3′-untranslated regions. AREs ensure a low basal level of expression during homeostasis and a transient nature of expression during the inflammatory response. Here, we report that the mRNA of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8, which contains an archetypal ARE, is unexpectedly constitutively abundant and highly stable in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Using the pre-monocyte-like THP-1 cell line that can differentiate into macrophage-like cells, we show that a low level of unstable IL-8 mRNA in undifferentiated cells (half-life < 30 min) becomes constitutively elevated and the mRNA is dramatically stabilized in differentiated THP-1 cells with a half-life of more than 15 h similar to primary monocytes and macrophages. In contrast, the level and stability of TNF-α mRNA also containing an ARE is only slightly affected by differentiation; it remains low and unstable in primary macrophages and differentiated THP-1 cells with an estimated half-life of less than 20 min. This differentiation-dependent stabilization of IL-8 mRNA is p38 MAPK-independent and is probably coupled with reduced protein translation. Reporter assays in THP-1 cells suggest that the ARE alone is not sufficient for the constitutive stabilization in macrophage-like cells and imply an effect of the natural biogenesis of the transcript on the stabilization of the mature form. We present a novel, cell type-dependent sustained stabilization of an ARE-containing mRNA with similarities to situations found in disease. PMID:24525793

  12. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Kyren A.; Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C.; To, Sarah Q.; Chand, Ashwini L.; Clyne, Colin D.

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer.

  13. Oestradiol reduces liver receptor homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Kyren A; Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C; To, Sarah Q; Chand, Ashwini L; Clyne, Colin D

    2013-08-30

    The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E2), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER- cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER- cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER- breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER- compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E2, showed increased mRNA stability in ER- versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E2 treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER- cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER- cells as well as ER- tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER- tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER- and ER+ breast cancer.

  14. Metabolic labeling and recovery of nascent RNA to accurately quantify mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Russo, Joseph; Heck, Adam M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Wilusz, Carol J

    2017-02-20

    Changes in the rate of mRNA decay are closely coordinated with transcriptional changes and together these events have profound effects on gene expression during development and disease. Traditional approaches to assess mRNA decay have relied on inhibition of transcription, which can alter mRNA decay rates and confound interpretation. More recently, metabolic labeling combined with chemical modification and fractionation of labeled RNAs has allowed the isolation of nascent transcripts and the subsequent calculation of mRNA decay rates. This approach has been widely adopted for measuring mRNA half-lives on a global scale, but has proven challenging to use for analysis of single genes. We present a series of normalization and quality assurance steps to be used in combination with 4-thiouridine pulse labeling of cultured eukaryotic cells. Importantly, we demonstrate how the relative amount of 4sU-labeled nascent RNA influences accurate quantification. The approach described facilitates reproducible measurement of individual mRNA half-lives using 4-thiouridine and could be adapted for use with other nucleoside analogs.

  15. Controlling mRNA stability and translation with the CRISPR endoribonuclease Csy4

    PubMed Central

    Borchardt, Erin K.; Vandoros, Leonidas A.; Huang, Michael; Lackey, Patrick E.; Marzluff, William F.; Asokan, Aravind

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial CRISPR endoribonuclease Csy4 has recently been described as a potential RNA processing tool. Csy4 recognizes substrate RNA through a specific 28-nt hairpin sequence and cleaves at the 3′ end of the stem. To further explore applicability in mammalian cells, we introduced this hairpin at various locations in mRNAs derived from reporter transgenes and systematically evaluated the effects of Csy4-mediated processing on transgene expression. Placing the hairpin in the 5′ UTR or immediately after the start codon resulted in efficient degradation of target mRNA by Csy4 and knockdown of transgene expression by 20- to 40-fold. When the hairpin was incorporated in the 3′ UTR prior to the poly(A) signal, the mRNA was cleaved, but only a modest decrease in transgene expression (∼2.5-fold) was observed. In the absence of a poly(A) tail, Csy4 rescued the target mRNA substrate from degradation, resulting in protein expression, which suggests that the cleaved mRNA was successfully translated. In contrast, neither catalytically inactive (H29A) nor binding-deficient (R115A/R119A) Csy4 mutants were able to exert any of the effects described above. Generation of a similar 3′ end by RNase P-mediated cleavage was unable to rescue transgene expression independent of Csy4. These results support the idea that the selective generation of the Csy4/hairpin complex resulting from cleavage of target mRNA might serve as a functional poly(A)/poly(A) binding protein (PABP) surrogate, stabilizing the mRNA and supporting translation. Although the exact mechanism(s) remain to be determined, our studies expand the potential utility of CRISPR nucleases as tools for controlling mRNA stability and translation. PMID:26354771

  16. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Jin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons. PMID:28197547

  17. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to MAG mRNA profoundly alter BP and PLP mRNA expression in differentiating oligodendrocytes: a caution.

    PubMed

    Laszkiewicz, I; Wiggins, R C; Konat, G W

    1999-09-01

    The applicability of antisense technology to suppress the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in cultured oligodendrocytes was evaluated. Differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells obtained by the shake-off method were exposed to nine unmodified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) targeted to the first seven exons of MAG mRNA. After four days, steady-state levels of MAG, proteolipid protein (PLP) and basic protein (BP) mRNAs were determined by Northern blot analysis. Only ODN annealing to 599-618 nt of the MAG mRNA (the junction of exon 5 and 6) resulted in a significant, 75% decrease in the MAG mRNA level. Unexpectedly, six other anti-MAG ODNs which had no significant effect on the MAG message, greatly increased the level of BP mRNA. The highest upregulation of approximately 12 fold was observed with ODN annealing to 139-168 nt (junction of exon 3 and 4). On the other hand, the 997-1016 ODN decreased the levels of BP and PLP messages by 70-80%. The 599-618 ODN also decreased the PLP mRNA by 85%. The results demonstrate that antisense ODNs targeted to one gene may profoundly alter the expression of other genes, and hence, complicate functional analysis of the targeted protein.

  18. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D.; Lai, Wi S.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Hill, Georgette D.; Flake, Gordon P.; Mannie, Mark D.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements (AREs) in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3′UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  19. NOX4 Regulates CCR2 and CCL2 mRNA Stability in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yu; Dehnad, Ali; Fish, Sarah; Sato, Ai; Jiang, Joy; Tian, Jijing; Schröder, Kathrin; Brandes, Ralf; Török, Natalie J.

    2017-01-01

    Recruitment of inflammatory cells is a major feature of alcoholic liver injury however; the signals and cellular sources regulating this are not well defined. C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) is expressed by active hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and is a key monocyte recruitment signal. Activated HSC are also important sources of hydrogen peroxide resulting from the activation of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4). As the role of this NOX in early alcoholic liver injury has not been addressed, we studied NOX4-mediated regulation of CCR2/CCL2 mRNA stability. NOX4 mRNA was significantly induced in patients with alcoholic liver injury, and was co-localized with αSMA-expressing activated HSC. We generated HSC-specific NOX4 KO mice and these were pair-fed on alcohol diet. Lipid peroxidation have not changed significantly however, the expression of CCR2, CCL2, Ly6C, TNFα, and IL-6 was significantly reduced in NOX4HSCKO compared to fl/fl mice. NOX4 promoter was induced in HSC by acetaldehyde treatment, and NOX4 has significantly increased mRNA half-life of CCR2 and CCL2 in conjunction with Ser221 phosphorylation and cytoplasmic shuttling of HuR. In conclusion, NOX4 is induced in early alcoholic liver injury and regulates CCR2/CCL2 mRNA stability thereby promoting recruitment of inflammatory cells and production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:28383062

  20. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of coumarin 7-hydroxylase (P450coh) induction by xenobiotics in mouse liver: mRNA stabilization by pyrazole

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, K.; Negishi, M. )

    1991-03-15

    The induction mechanism by pyrazole or phenobarbital of coumarin 7-hydroxylase was investigated in DBA/2J male mice. The P450coh mRNA in the pyrazole-induced mice was increased gradually to a 20-fold higher level within 48 hr, yet transcription of the P450coh gene was not affected. The half-life of P450coh mRNA, on the other hand, was at least 4-fold longer in the pyrazole-induced DBA2J than in control DBA/2J male mice. The stabilization of P450coh mRNA, therefore, is the primary mechanism for the induction by pyrazole of coumarin 7-hydroxylase. Phenobarbital, on the other hand, regulates the induction translationally or post-translationally. This drug affected neither the P450coh mRNA nor the P450coh gene's transcription levels in the DBA/2J male mice, although Western blots showed a 2- to 3-fold increase of the P450coh protein in the liver microsomes of the drug-treated mice. The results indicate, therefore, that both phenobarbital and pyrazole regulate the P450coh induction post-transcriptional efficiency of P450coh mRNA or alters the degradation rate of P450coh protein, while the latter stabilizes P450coh mRNA.

  2. Stability of mRNA in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Bini, Elisabetta; Dikshit, Vidula; Dirksen, Kristi; Drozda, Melissa; Blum, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Archaea-like bacteria are prokaryotes but, in contrast, use eukaryotic-like systems for key aspects of DNA, RNA, and protein metabolism. mRNA is typically unstable in bacteria and stable in eukaryotes, but little information is available about mRNA half-lives in archaea. Because archaea are generally insensitive to antibiotics, examination of mRNA stability in the hyperthermophile, Sulfolobus solfataricus, required the identification of transcription inhibitors for half-life determinations. An improved lacS promoter-dependent in vitro transcription system was used to assess inhibitor action. Efficient inhibitors were distinguished as blocking both lacSp transcription in vitro and the incorporation of 3H-uracil into bulk RNA in vivo. Actinomycin D was the most stable and potent compound identified. A survey of transcript chemical half-lives normalized to levels of the signal recognition particle 7S RNA ranged from at least 2 h for tfb1, a transcription factor TFIIB paralog, to a minimum of 6.3 min for gln1, one of three glutamine synthetase paralogs. Transcript half-lives for other mRNAs were: 2 h, superoxide dismutase (sod); 37.5 min, glucose dehydrogenase (dhg1); 25 min, alpha-glucosidase (malA); and 13.5 min, transcription factor TFIIB-2 (tfb2) resulting in a minimum average half-life of 54 min. These are the first mRNA half-lives reported for a hyperthermophile or member of the crenarchaea. The unexpected stability of several transcripts has important implications for gene expression and mRNA degradation in this organism. PMID:12358432

  3. Cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of the urokinase mRNA binding protein regulates message stability.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sreerama

    2002-08-01

    Treatment of small airway epithelial (SAEC) cells or lung epithelial (Beas2B) cells with TNF-alpha or PMA induces urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression. Treatment of these cells with TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide but not TGF-beta increased steady-state expression of uPAmRNA. TNF-alpha, PMA or cycloheximide caused 8-10 fold extensions of the uPAmRNA half-life in SAEC or Beas2B cells treated with DRB, a transcriptional inhibitor. These findings suggest that uPA gene expression involves a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism. Using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking assays, we identified a 30 kDa uPA mRNA binding protein (uPA mRNABp) that selectively binds to a 66 nt protein binding fragment of uPA mRNA containing regulatory information for message stabilization. Binding of cytoplasmic uPA mRNABp to uPA mRNA was abolished after treatment with TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta. In addition, we found the accumulation of 30 kDa uPAmRNABp in the nuclear extracts of TNF-alpha but not TGF-beta treated cells. The uPA mRNABp starts moving to the nucleus from the cytoplasmic compartment as early as three hours after TNF-alpha treatment. Complete translocation is achieved between 12-24 h, which coincides with the maximal expression of uPA protein effected by cytokine stimulation. Treatment of Beas2B cells with NaF inhibited TNF-alpha-mediated translocation of uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and concomitant inhibition of uPA expression. TNF-alpha stabilizes uPA mRNA by translocating the uPA mRNABp from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism governing uPA mRNA stability through shuttling of uPA mRNABp between the nucleus and cytoplasm. This newly identified pathway may have evolved to regulate uPA-mediated functions of the lung epithelium in inflamation or neoplasia.

  4. Tristetraprolin regulation of interleukin 23 mRNA stability prevents a spontaneous inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Molle, Céline; Zhang, Tong; Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Gueydan, Cyril; Andrianne, Mathieu; Sherer, Félicie; Van Simaeys, Gaetan; Blackshear, Perry J.; Leo, Oberdan

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL) 12 and IL23 are two related heterodimeric cytokines produced by antigen-presenting cells. The balance between these two cytokines plays a crucial role in the control of Th1/Th17 responses and autoimmune inflammation. Most studies focused on their transcriptional regulation. Herein, we explored the role of the adenine and uridine–rich element (ARE)–binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) in influencing mRNA stability of IL12p35, IL12/23p40, and IL23p19 subunits. LPS-stimulated bone marrow–derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from TTP−/− mice produced normal levels of IL12/23p40. Production of IL12p70 was modestly increased in these conditions. In contrast, we observed a strong impact of TTP on IL23 production and IL23p19 mRNA stability through several AREs in the 3′ untranslated region. TTP−/− mice spontaneously develop an inflammatory syndrome characterized by cachexia, myeloid hyperplasia, dermatitis, and erosive arthritis. We observed IL23p19 expression within skin lesions associated with exacerbated IL17A and IL22 production by infiltrating γδ T cells and draining lymph node CD4 T cells. We demonstrate that the clinical and immunological parameters associated with TTP deficiency were completely dependent on the IL23–IL17A axis. We conclude that tight control of IL23 mRNA stability by TTP is critical to avoid severe inflammation. PMID:23940256

  5. Altered EphA5 mRNA expression in rat brain with a single methamphetamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Numachi, Yohtaro; Yoshida, Sumiko; Yamashita, Motoyasu; Fujiyama, Ko; Toda, Shigenobu; Matsuoka, Hiroo; Kajii, Yasushi; Nishikawa, Toru

    2007-09-07

    Methamphetamine is a potent and indirect dopaminergic agonist which can cause chronic brain dysfunctions including drug abuse, drug dependence and drug-induced psychosis. Methamphetamine is known to trigger molecular mechanisms involved in associative learning and memory, and thereby alter patterns of synaptic connectivity. The persistent risk of relapse in methamphetamine abuse, dependence and psychosis may be caused by such alterations in synaptic connectivity. EphA5 receptors constitute large families of tyrosine kinase receptor and are expressed almost exclusively in the nervous system, especially in the limbic structures. Recent studies suggest EphA5 to be important in the topographic projection, development, and plasticity of limbic structures, and to be involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission. We used in situ hybridization to examine whether methamphetamine alters EphA5 mRNA expression in the brains of adult male Wister rats. EphA5 mRNA was widely distributed in the medial frontal cortex, cingulate cortex, piriform cortex, hippocampus, habenular nucleus and amygdala. Compared to baseline expression at 0h, EphA5 mRNA was significantly decreased (by 20%) in the medial frontal cortex at 24h, significantly increased (by 30%) in the amygdala at 9 and 24h, significantly but transiently decreased (by 30%) in the habenular nucleus at 1h after a single injection of methamphetamine. Methamphetamine did not change EphA5 mRNA expression in the cingulate cortex, piriform cortex or hippocampus. Our results that methamphetamine altered EphA5 mRNA expression in rat brain suggest methamphetamine could affect patterns of synaptic connectivity, which might be responsible for methamphetamine-induced chronic brain dysfunctions.

  6. Iron chelation down-regulates dopamine transporter expression by decreasing mRNA stability and increasing endocytosis in N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Narasimha V; Jensen, Gordon L; Unger, Erica L

    2011-02-15

    Cell surface expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT) is determined by the relative rates of its internalization and recycling. Changes in the cellular labile iron pool (LIP) affect many cellular mechanisms including those that regulate DAT trafficking. In this study, we analyzed DAT expression and posttranslational modifications in response to changes in cellular iron in transfected neuroblastoma cells (N2a). Iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) altered DAT protein levels by decreasing the stability of DAT mRNA. Increased phosphorylation and ubiquitination of this transporter protein following DFO treatment were also observed. Cellular iron depletion elevated protein levels of the early endosomal marker Rab5. Moreover, confocal microscopy studies showed increased localization of DAT into the endosomal compartment in DFO-treated cells compared to control. Together, these findings suggest that cellular iron depletion regulates DAT expression through reducing mRNA stability as well as an increasing in endocytosis.

  7. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test.

  8. Role of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology: focus on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Feigerlová, Eva; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-Fang

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents an important public health problem. Its progression to end-stage renal disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The determinants of renal function decline are not fully understood. Recent progress in the understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability has helped the identification of both the trans- and cis-acting elements of mRNA as potential markers and therapeutic targets for difficult-to-diagnose and -treat diseases, including CKDs such as diabetic nephropathy. Human antigen R (HuR), a trans-acting element of mRNA, is an RNA binding factor (RBF) best known for its ability to stabilize AU-rich-element-containing mRNAs. Deregulated HuR subcellular localization or expression occurs in a wide range of renal diseases, such as metabolic acidosis, ischemia, and fibrosis. Besides RBFs, recent evidence revealed that noncoding RNA, such as microRNA and long noncoding RNA, participates in regulating mRNA stability and that aberrant noncoding RNA expression accounts for many pathologic renal conditions. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of our current understanding of the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology and to offer perspectives for this class of diseases. We use examples of diverse renal diseases to illustrate different mRNA stability pathways in specific cellular compartments and discuss the roles and impacts of both the cis- and trans-activating factors on the regulation of mRNA stability in these diseases.-Feigerlová, E., Battaglia-Hsu, S.-F. Role of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology: focus on chronic kidney disease.

  9. Apigenin prevents UVB-induced cyclooxygenase 2 expression: coupled mRNA stabilization and translational inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Van Dross, Rukiyah T; Abu-Yousif, Adnan; Morrison, Aubrey R; Pelling, Jill C

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) is a key enzyme in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, and COX-2 overexpression plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Exposure to UVB strongly increased COX-2 protein expression in mouse 308 keratinocytes, and this induction was inhibited by apigenin, a nonmutagenic bioflavonoid that has been shown to prevent mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by both chemical carcinogens and UV exposure. Our previous study suggested that one pathway by which apigenin inhibits UV-induced and basal COX-2 expression is through modulation of USF transcriptional activity in the 5' upstream region of the COX-2 gene. Here, we found that apigenin treatment also increased COX-2 mRNA stability, and the inhibitory effect of apigenin on UVB-induced luciferase reporter gene activity was dependent on the AU-rich element of the COX-2 3'-untranslated region. Furthermore, we identified two RNA-binding proteins, HuR and the T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1-related protein (TIAR), which were associated with endogenous COX-2 mRNA in 308 keratinocytes, and apigenin treatment increased their localization to cell cytoplasm. More importantly, reduction of HuR levels by small interfering RNA inhibited apigenin-mediated stabilization of COX-2 mRNA. Cells expressing reduced TIAR showed marked resistance to apigenin's ability to inhibit UVB-induced COX-2 expression. Taken together, these results indicate that in addition to transcriptional regulation, another mechanism by which apigenin prevents COX-2 expression is through mediating TIAR suppression of translation.

  10. Induction of human spermine oxidase SMO(PAOh1) is regulated at the levels of new mRNA synthesis, mRNA stabilization and newly synthesized protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlin; Hacker, Amy; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Fleischer, Jennifer G; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2005-03-15

    The oxidation of polyamines induced by antitumour polyamine analogues has been associated with tumour response to specific agents. The human spermine oxidase, SMO(PAOh1), is one enzyme that may play a direct role in the cellular response to the antitumour polyamine analogues. In the present study, the induction of SMO(PAOh1) enzyme activity by CPENSpm [N1-ethyl-N11-(cyclopropyl)methyl-4,8,diazaundecane] is demonstrated to be a result of newly synthesized mRNA and protein. Inhibition of new RNA synthesis by actinomycin D inhibits both the appearance of SMO(PAOh1) mRNA and enzyme activity. Similarly, inhibition of newly synthesized protein with cycloheximide prevents analogue-induced enzyme activity. Half-life determinations indicate that stabilization of SMO(PAOh1) protein does not play a significant role in analogue-induced activity. However, half-life experiments using actinomycin D indicate that CPENSpm treatment not only increases mRNA expression, but also leads to a significant increase in mRNA half-life (17.1 and 8.8 h for CPENSpm-treated cells and control respectively). Using reporter constructs encompassing the SMO(PAOh1) promoter region, a 30-90% increase in transcription is observed after exposure to CPENSpm. The present results are consistent with the hypothesis that analogue-induced expression of SMO(PAOh1) is a result of increased transcription and stabilization of SMO(PAOh1) mRNA, leading to increased protein production and enzyme activity. These data indicate that the major level of control of SMO(PAOh1) expression in response to polyamine analogues exposure is at the level of mRNA.

  11. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  12. Stage structure alters how complexity affects stability of ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolf, V.H.W.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving how complexity affects stability of natural communities is of key importance for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. Central to previous stability analysis has been the assumption that the resources of a consumer are substitutable. However, during their development, most species change diets; for instance, adults often use different resources than larvae or juveniles. Here, we show that such ontogenetic niche shifts are common in real ecological networks and that consideration of these shifts can alter which species are predicted to be at risk of extinction. Furthermore, niche shifts reduce and can even reverse the otherwise stabilizing effect of complexity. This pattern arises because species with several specialized life stages appear to be generalists at the species level but act as sequential specialists that are hypersensitive to resource loss. These results suggest that natural communities are more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than indicated by previous analyses.

  13. The Expression of Antibiotic Resistance Methyltransferase Correlates with mRNA Stability Independently of Ribosome Stalling

    PubMed Central

    Dzyubak, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Erm methyltransferase family modify 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome and render cross-resistance to macrolides and multiple distantly related antibiotics. Previous studies have shown that the expression of erm is activated when a macrolide-bound ribosome stalls the translation of the leader peptide preceding the cotranscribed erm. Ribosome stalling is thought to destabilize the inhibitory stem-loop mRNA structure and exposes the erm Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence for translational initiation. Paradoxically, mutations that abolish ribosome stalling are routinely found in hyper-resistant clinical isolates; however, the significance of the stalling-dead leader sequence is largely unknown. Here, we show that nonsense mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus ErmB leader peptide (ErmBL) lead to high basal and induced expression of downstream ErmB in the absence or presence of macrolide concomitantly with elevated ribosome methylation and resistance. The overexpression of ErmB is associated with the reduced turnover of the ermBL-ermB transcript, and the macrolide appears to mitigate mRNA cleavage at a site immediately downstream of the ermBL SD sequence. The stabilizing effect of antibiotics on mRNA is not limited to ermBL-ermB; cationic antibiotics representing a ribosome-stalling inducer and a noninducer increase the half-life of specific transcripts. These data unveil a new layer of ermB regulation and imply that ErmBL translation or ribosome stalling serves as a “tuner” to suppress aberrant production of ErmB because methylated ribosome may impose a fitness cost on the bacterium as a result of misregulated translation. PMID:27645242

  14. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  15. Expression of trkB mRNA is altered in rat hippocampus after experimental brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R R; Zhang, L; Dhillon, H S; Prasad, M R; Seroogy, K B

    1998-08-31

    Recent investigations have shown that expression of mRNAs for the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is differentially altered in the hippocampus following traumatic brain injury. In the present study, modulation of neurotrophin receptor expression was examined in the hippocampus in a rat model of traumatic brain injury using in situ hybridization. Messenger RNA for trkB, the high-affinity receptor for BDNF and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4), was increased between 3 and 6 h bilaterally in the dentate gyrus following a lateral fluid-percussion brain injury of moderate severity (2.0-2.1 atm). No time-dependent alterations were observed for trkB mRNA in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3. Levels of mRNA for trkC, the high-affinity receptor for NT-3, did not change in any region of the hippocampus. These data demonstrate that lateral fluid-percussion injury modulates expression of trkB mRNA in the hippocampus and support a role for BDNF/trkB signalling mechanisms in secondary events associated with traumatic brain injury.

  16. Importance of cis determinants and nitrogenase activity in regulated stability of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase structural gene mRNA.

    PubMed

    Simon, H M; Gosink, M M; Roberts, G P

    1999-06-01

    The Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogen fixation (nif) mRNAs are unusually stable, with half-lives of 20 to 30 min under conditions favorable to nitrogen fixation (limiting nitrogen, anaerobiosis, temperatures of 30 degrees C). Addition of O2 or fixed nitrogen or temperature increases to 37 degrees C or more result in the dramatic destabilization of the nif mRNAs, decreasing the half-lives by a factor of 3 to 5. A plasmid expression system, independent of nif transcriptional regulation, was used to define cis determinants required for the regulated stability of the 5.2-kb nifHDKTY mRNA and to test the model suggested by earlier work that NifA is required in trans to stabilize nif mRNA under nif-derepressing conditions. O2 regulation of nifHDKTY mRNA stability is impaired in a plasmid containing a deletion of a 499-bp region of nifH, indicating that a site(s) required for the O2-regulated stability of the mRNA is located within this region. The simple model suggested from earlier work that NifA is required for stabilizing nif mRNA under conditions favorable for nitrogen fixation was disproved, and in its place, a more complicated model involving the sensing of nitrogenase activity as a component of the system regulating mRNA stability is proposed. Analysis of nifY mutants and overexpression suggests a possible involvement of the protein in this sensing process.

  17. Changes in the stability of a human H3 histone mRNA during the HeLa cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, T D; Weber, L A; Hickey, E; Stein, G S; Stein, J L

    1991-01-01

    A major component of the regulation of histone protein synthesis during the cell cycle is the modulation of the half-life of histone mRNA. We have uncoupled transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation by using a Drosophila hsp70-human H3 histone fusion gene that produces a marked human H3 histone mRNA upon heat induction. Transcription of this gene can be switched on and off by raising and lowering cell culture temperatures, respectively. HeLa cell lines containing stably integrated copies of the fusion gene were synchronized by double thymidine block. Distinct populations of H3 histone mRNA were produced by heat induction in early S-phase, late S-phase, or G2-phase cells, and the stability of the induced H3 histone mRNA was measured. The H3 histone mRNA induced during early S phase decayed with a half-life of 110 min, whereas the same transcript induced during late S phase had a half-life of 10 to 15 min. The H3 histone mRNA induced in non-S-phase cells is more stable than that induced in late S phase, with a half-life of 40 min. Thus, the stability of histone mRNA is actively regulated throughout the cell cycle. Our results are consistent with an autoregulatory model in which the stability of histone mRNA is determined by the level of free histone protein in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:1986245

  18. p73 expression is regulated by ribosomal protein RPL26 through mRNA translation and protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wensheng; Chen, Xinbin

    2016-01-01

    p73, a p53 family tumor suppressor, is regulated by multiple mechanisms, including transcription and mRNA and protein stability. However, whether p73 expression is regulated via mRNA translation has not been explored. To test this, we examined whether ribosomal protein 26 (RPL26) plays a role in p73 expression. Here, we showed that p73 expression is controlled by RPL26 via protein stability and mRNA translation. To examine whether MDM2 mediates RPL26 to regulate p73 protein stability, we generated multiple MDM2-knockout cell lines by CRISPR-cas9. We found that in the absence of MDM2, the half-life of p73 protein is markedly increased. Interestingly, we also found that RPL26 is still capable of regulating p73 expression, albeit to a lesser extent, in MDM2-KO cells compared to that in isogenic control cells, suggesting that RPL26 regulates p73 expression via multiple mechanisms. Indeed, we found that RPL26 is necessary for efficient assembly of polysomes on p73 mRNA and de novo synthesis of p73 protein. Consistently, we found that RPL26 directly binds to p73 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) and that RPL26 is necessary for efficient expression of an eGFP reporter that carries p73 3′UTR. We also found that RPL26 interacts with cap-binding protein eIF4E and enhances the association of eIF4E with p73 mRNA, leading to increased p73 mRNA translation. Finally, we showed that knockdown of RPL26 promotes, whereas ectopic expression of RPL26 inhibits, cell growth in a TAp73-dependent manner. Together, our data indicate that RPL26 regulates p73 expression via two distinct mechanisms: protein stability and mRNA translation. PMID:27825141

  19. Determinants of mRNA stability in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae: differences in poly(A) tail length, ribosome loading, and mRNA size cannot account for the heterogeneity of mRNA decay rates.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, R A; Herrick, D; Manrow, R E; Blinder, D; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    As an approach to understanding the structures and mechanisms which determine mRNA decay rates, we have cloned and begun to characterize cDNAs which encode mRNAs representative of the stability extremes in the poly(A)+ RNA population of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. The cDNA clones were identified in a screening procedure which was based on the occurrence of poly(A) shortening during mRNA aging. mRNA half-lives were determined by hybridization of poly(A)+ RNA, isolated from cells labeled in a 32PO4 pulse-chase, to dots of excess cloned DNA. Individual mRNAs decayed with unique first-order decay rates ranging from 0.9 to 9.6 h, indicating that the complex decay kinetics of total poly(A)+ RNA in D. discoideum amoebae reflect the sum of the decay rates of individual mRNAs. Using specific probes derived from these cDNA clones, we have compared the sizes, extents of ribosome loading, and poly(A) tail lengths of stable, moderately stable, and unstable mRNAs. We found (i) no correlation between mRNA size and decay rate; (ii) no significant difference in the number of ribosomes per unit length of stable versus unstable mRNAs, and (iii) a general inverse relationship between mRNA decay rates and poly(A) tail lengths. Collectively, these observations indicate that mRNA decay in D. discoideum amoebae cannot be explained in terms of random nucleolytic events. The possibility that specific 3'-structural determinants can confer mRNA instability is suggested by a comparison of the labeling and turnover kinetics of different actin mRNAs. A correlation was observed between the steady-state percentage of a given mRNA found in polysomes and its degree of instability; i.e., unstable mRNAs were more efficiently recruited into polysomes than stable mRNAs. Since stable mRNAs are, on average, "older" than unstable mRNAs, this correlation may reflect a translational role for mRNA modifications that change in a time-dependent manner. Our previous studies have demonstrated both a time

  20. Isoeugenol destabilizes IL-8 mRNA expression in THP-1 cells through induction of the negative regulator of mRNA stability tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Carne, Alice; Mitjans, Montserrat; Galli, Corrado Lodovico; Marinovich, Marina; Corsini, Emanuela

    2012-02-01

    We previously demonstrated in the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1 that all allergens tested, with the exception of the prohapten isoeugenol, induced a dose-related release of interleukin-8 (IL-8). In the present study, we investigated whether this abnormal behavior was regulated by the AU-rich element-binding proteins HuR and tristetraprolin (TTP) or by the downstream molecule suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3. The contact allergens isoeugenol, diethylmaleate (DEM), and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and the irritant salicylic acid were used as reference compounds. Chemicals were used at concentrations that induced a 20% decrease in cell viability as assessed by propidium iodide staining, namely 100 μg/ml (0.61 mM) for isoeugenol, 100 μg/ml (0.58 mM) for DEM, 3 μg/ml (14.8 μM) for DNCB, and 250 μg/ml (1.81 mM) for salicylic acid. Time course experiments of IL-8 mRNA expression and assessment of IL-8 mRNA half-life, indicated a decreased IL-8 mRNA stability in isoeugenol-treated cells. We could demonstrate that a combination and regulation of HuR and TTP following exposure to contact allergens resulted in a different modulation of IL-8 mRNA half-life and release. The increased expression of TTP in THP-1 cells treated with isoeugenol results in destabilization of the IL-8 mRNA, which can account for the lack of IL-8 release. In contrast, the strong allergen DNCB failing to up-regulate TTP, while inducing HuR, resulted in longer IL-8 mRNA half-life and protein release. SOCS-3 was induced only in isoeugenol-treated cells; however, its modulation did not rescue the lack of IL-8 release, indicating that it is unlikely to be involved in the lack of IL-8 production. Finally, the destabilization effect of isoeugenol on IL-8 mRNA expression together with SOCS-3 expression resulted in an anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by the ability of isoeugenol to modulate LPS or ionomycin-induced cytokine release.

  1. AUF1 and HuR: possible implications of mRNA stability in thyroid function and disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract RNA-binding proteins may regulate every aspect of RNA metabolism, including pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA trafficking, stability and translation of many genes. The dynamic association of these proteins with RNA defines the lifetime, cellular localization, processing and the rate at which a specific mRNA is translated. One of the pathways involved in regulating of mRNA stability is mediated by adenylate uridylate-rich element (ARE) binding proteins. These proteins are involved in processes of apoptosis, tumorigenesis and development. Out of many ARE-binding proteins, two of them AUF1 and HuR were studied most extensively and reported to regulate the mRNA stability in vivo. Our previously published data demonstrate that both proteins are involved in thyroid carcinogenesis. Several other reports postulate that mRNA binding proteins may participate in thyroid hormone actions. However, until now, exacts mechanisms and the possible role of post-transcriptional regulation and especially the role of AUF1 and HuR in those processes remain not fully understood. In this study we shortly review the possible function of both proteins in relation to development and various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including thyroid function and disorders. PMID:21835052

  2. Altered mRNA Splicing in SMN-Depleted Motor Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todd, A. Gary; Astroski, Jacob W.; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable neurodegenerative disease afflicting 1 in 6–10,000 live births. One of the key functions of the SMN protein is regulation of spliceosome assembly. Reduced levels of the SMN protein that are observed in SMA have been shown to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. SMN-dependent mis-spliced transcripts in motor neurons may cause stresses that are particularly harmful and may serve as potential targets for the treatment of motor neuron disease or as biomarkers in the SMA patient population. We performed deep RNA sequencing using motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells to screen for SMN-dependent mRNA processing changes that occur following acute depletion of SMN. We identified SMN-dependent splicing changes, including an intron retention event that results in the production of a truncated Rit1 transcript. This intron-retained transcript is stable and is mis-spliced in spinal cord from symptomatic SMA mice. Constitutively active Rit1 ameliorated the neurite outgrowth defect in SMN depleted NSC-34 cells, while expression of the truncated protein product of the mis-spliced Rit1 transcript inhibited neurite extension. These results reveal new insights into the biological consequence of SMN-dependent splicing in motor neuron-like cells. PMID:27736905

  3. Respiratory Deficiency Mediates the Regulation of CHO1-encoded Phosphatidylserine Synthase by mRNA Stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    The CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase (CDP-diacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) is one of the most highly regulated phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CHO1 expression is regulated by nutrient availability through a regulatory circuit involving a UASINO cis-acting element in the CHO1 promoter, the positive transcription factors Ino2p and Ino4p, and the transcriptional repressor Opi1p. In this work, we examined the posttranscriptional regulation of CHO1 by mRNA stability. CHO1 mRNA was stabilized in mutants defective in deadenylation (ccr4Δ), mRNA decapping (dcp1), and the 5’-3’ exonuclease (xrn1) indicating that the CHO1 transcript is primarily degraded through the general 5’-3’ mRNA decay pathway. In respiratory sufficient cells, the CHO1 transcript was moderately stable with a half-life of 12 min. However, the CHO1 transcript was stabilized to a half-life of greater than 45 min in respiratory deficient (rho− and rho°) cells, the cox4Δ mutant defective in the cytochrome c oxidase, and wild type cells treated with KCN (a cytochorome c oxidase inhibitor). The increased CHO1 mRNA stability in response to respiratory deficiency caused increases in CHO1 mRNA abundance, phosphatidylserine synthase protein and activity, and the synthesis of phosphatidylserine in vivo. Respiratory deficiency also caused increases in the activities of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase, phosphatidylserine decarboxylase, and the phospholipid methyltransferases. Phosphatidylinositol synthase and choline kinase activities were not affected by respiratory deficiency. This work advances our understanding of phosphatidylserine synthase regulation and underscores the importance of mitochondrial respiration to the regulation of phospholipid synthesis in S. cerevisiae. PMID:17761681

  4. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenbolone (TREN) was performed to evaluate the response of juvenile coho salmon to EDC exposure. Second, juvenile coho salmon were exposed to 0, 20 or 100% effluent from eight WWTPs from the Puget Sound, WA region for 72h. Juvenile coho salmon exposed to 2 and 10ng EE2L(-1) had 17-fold and 215-fold higher lhb mRNA levels relative to control fish. Hepatic vtg mRNA levels were dramatically increased 6670-fold, but only in response to 10ng EE2L(-1) and Fsh beta-subunit (fshb) mRNA levels were not altered by any of the treatments. In the WWTP effluent exposures, lhb mRNA levels were significantly elevated in fish exposed to five of the WWTP effluents. In contrast, transcript levels of vtg were not affected by any of the WWTP effluent exposures. Mean levels of natural and synthetic estrogens in fish bile were consistent with pituitary lhb expression, suggesting that the observed lhb induction may be due to

  5. Alterations in the estrogen receptor alpha mRNA in the breast tumors of African American women.

    PubMed

    Koduri, S; Fuqua, S A; Poola, I

    2000-05-01

    Several recent reports have shown that the mortality rate with breast cancer is about three times higher in African American women than in other populations. In addition, the available data also indicate that the tumors are very aggressive and poorly differentiated with a very low frequency of hormone receptors. To gain an insight into the factors that may be responsible for their aggressive tumors, we investigated the transcript profiles of the estrogen receptor (ER), the most important prognostic factor in breast cancer, in the tumors derived from African American women. We analyzed 24 immunohistochemically ER+ and 6 ER- malignant tumors for ER mRNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using a number of primer pairs. For comparative purposes, 20 ER- malignant tumor issues derived from Caucasian patients were also included. Our results showed that only 15 of the ER+ tumors from African American women patients had full-length wild-type receptor transcripts and the others exhibited alterations/truncations in exon 8. We also found that the majority of tumors that had alterations/truncations in exon 8 did not express the naturally occurring, more abundant exon 7 deletion transcript. Most of the tumors expressed exon 2, exons 2-3, and exon 5 deletion variant transcripts. Unexpectedly, 2 of the 6 immunohistochemically ER- tumors showed full-length wild-type receptor mRNA but none of the variant transcripts.

  6. Effect of the increased stability of the penicillin amidase mRNA on the protein expression levels.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Sandra C; Schmidt, Dorothea; Kasche, Volker; Arraiano, Cecília M; Ignatova, Zoya

    2005-09-12

    Several factors at transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational level determine the fate of a target protein and can severely restrict its yield. Here, we focus on the post-transcriptional regulation of the biosynthesis of the periplasmic protein, penicillin amidase (PA). The PA mRNA stability was determined under depleted RNase conditions in strains carrying single or multiple RNase deletions. Single deletion of the endonuclease RNase E yielded, as the highest, a fourfold stabilization of the PA mRNA. This effect, however, was reduced twice at post-translational level. The RNase II, generating secondary exonucleolytic cleavages in the mRNA, although not significantly influencing the PA mRNA decay, led also to an increase of the amount of mature PA. The non-proportional correlation between increased mRNA longevity and amount of active enzyme propose that the rational strategies for yield improvement must be based on a simultaneous tuning of more than one yield restricting factor.

  7. Occlusion of the Ribosome Binding Site Connects the Translational Initiation Frequency, mRNA Stability and Premature Transcription Termination

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Mette; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen; Mitarai, Namiko

    2017-01-01

    Protein production is controlled by ribosome binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA), quantified in part by the binding affinity between the ribosome and the ribosome binding sequence on the mRNA. Using the E. coli lac operon as model, Ringquist et al. (1992) found a more than 1,000-fold difference in protein yield when varying the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and its distance to the translation start site. Their proposed model accounted for this large variation by only a variation in the binding affinity and the subsequent initiation rate. Here we demonstrate that the decrease in protein yield with weaker ribosome binding sites in addition is caused by a decreased mRNA stability, and by an increased rate of premature transcription termination. Using different ribosome binding site sequences of the E. coli lacZ gene, we found that an approximately 100-fold span in protein expression could be subdivided into three mechanisms that each affected expression 3- to 6-fold. Our experiments is consistent with a two-step ribosome initiation model, in which occlusion of the initial part of the mRNA by a ribosome simultaneously protects the mRNA from both premature transcription termination and degradation: The premature termination we suggest is coupled to the absence of occlusion that allows binding of transcription termination factor, possibly Rho. The mRNA stability is explained by occlusion that prevents binding of the degrading enzymes. In our proposed scenario, a mRNA with lower translation initiation rate would at the same time be “hit” by an increased premature termination and a shorter life-time. Our model further suggests that the transcription from most if not all natural promoters is substantially influenced by premature termination. PMID:28382022

  8. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  9. Manganese exposure alters extracellular GABA, GABA receptor and transporter protein and mRNA levels in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Fordahl, Steve C; Cooney, Paula T; Weaver, Tara L; Colyer, Christa L; Erikson, Keith M

    2008-11-01

    Unlike other essential trace elements (e.g., zinc and iron) it is the toxicity of manganese (Mn) that is more common in human populations than its deficiency. Data suggest alterations in dopamine biology may drive the effects associated with Mn neurotoxicity, though recently gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been implicated. In addition, iron deficiency (ID), a common nutritional problem, may cause disturbances in neurochemistry by facilitating accumulation of Mn in the brain. Previous data from our lab have shown decreased brain tissue levels of GABA as well as decreased (3)H-GABA uptake in synaptosomes as a result of Mn exposure and ID. These results indicate a possible increase in the concentration of extracellular GABA due to alterations in expression of GABA transport and receptor proteins. In this study weanling-male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly placed into one of four dietary treatment groups: control (CN; 35mg Fe/kg diet), iron-deficient (ID; 6mg Fe/kg diet), CN with Mn supplementation (via the drinking water; 1g Mn/l) (CNMn), and ID with Mn supplementation (IDMn). Using in vivo microdialysis, an increase in extracellular GABA concentrations in the striatum was observed in response to Mn exposure and ID although correlational analysis reveals that extracellular GABA is related more to extracellular iron levels and not Mn. A diverse effect of Mn exposure and ID was observed in the regions examined via Western blot and RT-PCR analysis, with effects on mRNA and protein expression of GAT-1, GABA(A), and GABA(B) differing between and within the regions examined. For example, Mn exposure reduced GAT-1 protein expression by approximately 50% in the substantia nigra, while increasing mRNA expression approximately four-fold, while in the caudate putamen mRNA expression was decreased with no effect on protein expression. These data suggest that Mn exposure results in an increase in extracellular GABA concentrations via altered expression of transport and

  10. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  11. Ultra-fast alterations in mRNA levels uncover multiple players in light stress acclimation in plants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Devireddy, Amith R; Inupakutika, Madhuri A; Baxter, Aaron; Miller, Gad; Song, Luhua; Shulaev, Elena; Azad, Rajeev K; Shulaev, Vladimir; Mittler, Ron

    2015-11-01

    The acclimation of plants to changes in light intensity requires rapid responses at several different levels. These include biochemical and biophysical responses as well as alterations in the steady-state level of different transcripts and proteins. Recent studies utilizing promoter::reporter constructs suggested that transcriptional responses to changes in light intensity could occur within seconds, rates for which changes in mRNA expression are not routinely measured or functionally studied. To identify and characterize rapid changes in the steady-state level of different transcripts in response to light stress we performed RNA sequencing analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants subjected to light stress. Here we report that mRNA accumulation of 731 transcripts occurs as early as 20-60 sec following light stress application, and that at least five of these early response transcripts play an important biological role in the acclimation of plants to light stress. More than 20% of transcripts accumulating in plants within 20-60 sec of initiation of light stress are H2 O2 - and ABA-response transcripts, and the accumulation of several of these transcripts is inhibited by transcriptional inhibitors. In accordance with the association of rapid response transcripts with H2 O2 and ABA signaling, a mutant impaired in ABA sensing (abi-1) was found to be more tolerant to light stress, and the response of several of the rapid response transcripts was altered in mutants impaired in reactive oxygen metabolism. Our findings reveal that transcriptome reprogramming in plants could occur within seconds of initiation of abiotic stress and that this response could invoke known as well as unknown proteins and pathways.

  12. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  13. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  14. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Stephanie E; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Ramirez, Claire A; Malpas, Janae M; Propper, Catherine R

    2015-07-15

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring of endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10(-9)M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10(-9)M, 10(-8)M, and 10(-7)M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10(-7)M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10(-9) and 10(-8)M OP, but not 10(-7)M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed within

  15. The DLK-1 kinase promotes mRNA stability and local translation in C. elegans synapses and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dong; Wu, Zilu; Chisholm, Andrew D.; Jin, Yishi

    2009-01-01

    Growth cone guidance and synaptic plasticity involve dynamic local changes in proteins at axons and dendrites. The Dual Leucine zipper MAPKKK (DLK) has been previously implicated in synaptogenesis and axon outgrowth in C. elegans and other animals. Here we show that in C. elegans DLK-1 regulates not only proper synapse formation and axon morphology, but also axon regeneration, by influencing mRNA stability. DLK-1 kinase signals via a MAPKAP kinase, MAK-2, to stabilize the mRNA encoding CEBP-1, a bZip protein related to CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins, via its 3′ UTR. Inappropriate upregulation of cebp-1 in adult neurons disrupts synapses and axon morphology. CEBP-1 and the DLK-1 pathway are essential for axon regeneration after laser axotomy in adult neurons, and that axotomy induces translation of CEBP-1 in axons. Our findings identify the DLK-1 pathway as a regulator of mRNA stability in synapse formation and maintenance and also in adult axon regeneration. PMID:19737525

  16. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  17. Posttranscriptional regulation of GAP-43 gene expression in PC12 cells through protein kinase C-dependent stabilization of the mRNA

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have previously shown that nerve growth factor (NGF) selectively stabilizes the GAP-43 mRNA in PC12 cells. To study the cellular mechanisms for this post-transcriptional control and to determine the contribution of mRNA stability to GAP-43 gene expression, we examined the effects of several agents that affect PC12 cell differentiation on the level of induction and rate of degradation of the GAP-43 mRNA. The NGF-mediated increase in GAP-43 mRNA levels and neurite outgrowth was mimicked by the phorbol ester TPA, but not by dibutyryl cAMP or the calcium ionophore A12783. Downregulation of protein kinase C (PKC) by high doses of phorbol esters or selective PKC inhibitors prevented the induction of this mRNA by NGF, suggesting that NGF and TPA act through a common PKC-dependent pathway. In mRNA decay studies, phorbol esters caused a selective 6-fold increase in the half-life of the GAP-43 mRNA, which accounts for most of the induction of this mRNA by TPA. The phorbol ester-induced stabilization of GAP-43 mRNA was blocked by the protein kinase inhibitor polymyxin B and was partially inhibited by dexamethasone, an agent that blocks GAP-43 expression and neuronal differentiation in PC12 cells. In contrast, the rates of degradation and the levels of the GAP-43 mRNA in control and TPA-treated cells were not affected by cycloheximide treatment. Thus, changes in GAP-43 mRNA turnover do not appear to require continuous protein synthesis. In conclusion, these data suggest that PKC activity regulates the levels of the GAP-43 mRNA in PC12 cells through a novel, translation- independent mRNA stabilization mechanism. PMID:8436593

  18. Plakophilins 1 and 3 Bind to FXR1 and Thereby Influence the mRNA Stability of Desmosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Kešo, Regina; Breuninger, Sonja; Hofmann, Sarah; Henn, Manuela; Röhrig, Theresa; Ströbel, Philipp; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilins 1 and 3 (PKP1/3) are members of the arm repeat family of catenin proteins and serve as structural components of desmosomes, which are important for cell-cell-adhesion. In addition, PKP1/3 occur as soluble proteins outside desmosomes, yet their role in the cytoplasm is not known. We found that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 coprecipitated with the RNA-binding proteins FXR1, G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1, and these PKP1/3 complexes also comprised desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNAs. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of PKP1/3 with G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1 but not with FXR1 was RNase sensitive. To address the cytoplasmic function of PKP1/3, we performed gain-and-loss-of-function studies. Both PKP1 and PKP3 knockdown cell lines showed reduced protein and mRNA levels for desmoplakin and PKP2. Whereas global rates of translation were unaffected, desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNA were destabilized. Furthermore, binding of PKP1/3 to FXR1 was RNA independent, and both PKP3 and FXR1 stabilized PKP2 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 are components of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. PMID:25225333

  19. The Circadian Deadenylase Nocturnin Is Necessary for Stabilization of the iNOS mRNA in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Garbarino-Pico, Eduardo; Kojima, Shihoko; Gilbert, Misty; Green, Carla B.

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnin is a member of the CCR4 deadenylase family, and its expression is under circadian control with peak levels at night. Because it can remove poly(A) tails from mRNAs, it is presumed to play a role in post-transcriptional control of circadian gene expression, but its target mRNAs are not known. Here we demonstrate that Nocturnin expression is acutely induced by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Nocturnin exhibit normal patterns of acute induction of TNFα and iNOS mRNAs during the first three hours following LPS treatment, but by 24 hours, while TNFα mRNA levels are indistinguishable from WT cells, iNOS message is significantly reduced 20-fold. Accordingly, analysis of the stability of the mRNAs showed that loss of Nocturnin causes a significant decrease in the half-life of the iNOS mRNA (t1/2 = 3.3 hours in Nocturnin knockout MEFs vs. 12.4 hours in wild type MEFs), while having no effect on the TNFα message. Furthermore, mice lacking Nocturnin lose the normal nighttime peak of hepatic iNOS mRNA, and have improved survival following LPS injection. These data suggest that Nocturnin has a novel stabilizing activity that plays an important role in the circadian response to inflammatory signals. PMID:22073225

  20. The Drosophila RNA-binding protein HOW controls the stability of dgrasp mRNA in the follicular epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Giuliano; Giuliani, Fabrizio; Volk, Talila; Rabouille, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of RNA stability and localization underlies a wide array of developmental processes, such as axon guidance and epithelial morphogenesis. In Drosophila, ectopic expression of the classically Golgi peripheral protein dGRASP at the plasma membrane is achieved through its mRNA targeting at key developmental time-points, in a process critical to follicular epithelium integrity. However, the trans-acting factors that tightly regulate the spatio-temporal dynamics of dgrasp are unknown. Using an in silico approach, we identified two putative HOW Response Elements (HRE1 and HRE2) within the dgrasp open reading frame for binding to Held Out Wings (HOW), a member of the Signal Transduction and Activation of RNA family of RNA-binding proteins. Using RNA immunoprecipitations, we confirmed this by showing that the short cytoplasmic isoform of HOW binds directly to dgrasp HRE1. Furthermore, HOW loss of function in vivo leads to a significant decrease in dgrasp mRNA levels. We demonstrate that HRE1 protects dgrasp mRNA from cytoplasmic degradation, but does not mediate its targeting. We propose that this binding event promotes the formation of ribonucleoprotein particles that ensure dgrasp stability during transport to the basal plasma membrane, thus enabling the local translation of dgrasp for its roles at non-Golgi locations. PMID:24217913

  1. Regional and Duration of Illness Differences in the Alteration of NCAM-180 mRNA Expression within the Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A. S.; Thomas, E. A.; Dean, B

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been proposed to have a neurodevelopmental aetiology. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (NCAM1) is involved in several neurodevelopmental processes and abnormal expression of this gene has been associated in the pathology of schizophrenia and, thus, altered NCAM1 expression may be characteristic of the early stages of the illness. Alternative splicing of the NCAM1 transcript produces 3 major isoforms. Using qPCR we analysed mRNA expression of one of these isoforms; the 180 kDa isoform of NCAM1 (NCAM-180), in Brodmann Area (BA) 46, BA10 and BA17, postmortem, from 15 subjects with a short duration of illness of schizophrenia (<7 years) and 15 control subjects. NCAM-180 mRNA expression was increased in BA46 from subjects with schizophrenia compared to controls (P=0.013). By contrast, there were no significant differences in the expression of NCAM-180 mRNA in BA10 (P=0.575) or BA17 (P=0.772). We then analysed NCAM-180 mRNA expression in BA46 from 15 subjects with a longer duration of illness of schizophrenia (>22 years) and 15 controls. There was no significant difference in NCAM-180 mRNA expression in this second cohort. This data suggests NCAM-180 mRNA expression is altered in a regionally-specific manner in schizophrenia and these changes are associated with the early period following diagnosis. PMID:19411161

  2. Determinants that contribute to cytoplasmic stability of human c-fos and. beta. -globin mRNAs are located at several sites in each mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kabnick, K.S.; Housman, D.E.

    1988-08-01

    The authors have analyzed the contributions to cytoplasmic stability in an mRNA species with a very short half-life (human c-fos) and an mRNA species with a very long half-life (human ..beta..-globin). When the human c-fos promoter was used to drive the expression of human c-fos, ..beta..-globin, and chimeric DNAs between c-fos and ..beta..-globin in transfected cells, a pulse of mRNA synthesis was obtained following induction of transcription by refeeding quiescent cells with medium containing 15% calf serum. The mRNA half-life was determined by using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of mRNAs prepared at various times following the pulse of transcription. Under these conditions human c-fos mRNA exhibited a half-life of 6.6 min and human ..beta..-globin mRNA exhibited a half-life of 17.5 h. Replacement of the 3' end of the c-fos mRNA with the 3' end of the ..beta..-globin mRNA increased the half-life of the resultant RNA from 6.6 to 34 min. The reciprocal chimera had a half-life of 34.6 min compared with the 17.5-half-life of ..beta..-globin mRNA. These results suggest that sequences which make a major contribution to mRNA stability reside in the 3' end of either or both molecules. A chimera in which the 5' untranslated region of globin was replaced by part of the 5' untranslated region of fos led to destabilization of the encoded mRNA. This construct produced an mRNA with a half-life of 6.8 h instead of the 17.5-h half-life of globin. This result suggests that additional determinants of stability reside in the 5' end of these mRNA molecules. Substitution of part of the 5' untranslated region of fox by the 5' untranslated region of ..beta..-globin yielded an mRNA with stability similar to fos mRNA. These results suggest that interactions among sequences within each mRNA contribute to the stability of the respective molecules.

  3. Alkaline decontamination of sputum specimens adversely affects stability of mycobacterial mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Desjardin, L E; Perkins, M D; Teixeira, L; Cave, M D; Eisenach, K D

    1996-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) is an important tool for Mycobacterium tuberculosis research and diagnostics. A standard procedure using N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC) and NaOH has been widely adopted for digestion and decontamination of sputum specimens for mycobacterial culture. The objective of this study was to determine the compatibility of this method with the recovery of RNA for RT-PCR assays. Nineteen sputum specimens were collected from smear-positive, pretreatment tuberculosis patients. After homogenization with NALC and glass beads, specimens were further processed by the addition of either NaOH, as per the standard decontamination protocol, or phosphate buffer. RNA was prepared by using a modified guanidine-phenol extraction method developed specifically for sputum sediments. DNA was isolated from the same specimens. Reverse transcriptions of alpha antigen (85B protein) mRNA and 16S rRNA were performed together, and aliquots were removed for separate PCRs. In all specimens, the 85B mRNA target was greatly diminished by treatment with NaOH; however, the 16S rRNA target remained unaffected. Storing sputum specimens for 48 h at 4 degrees C before processing did not seem to affect the integrity or yield of RNA; however, some degradation occurred by 72 h. Data suggest that the NaOH-NALC method for processing sputum samples is not suitable for detecting mRNA targets in RT-PCR assays. PMID:8880495

  4. RNAIII of the Staphylococcus aureus agr system activates global regulator MgrA by stabilizing mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi Kr.; Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia Y.

    2015-01-01

    RNAIII, the effector of the agr quorum-sensing system, plays a key role in virulence gene regulation in Staphylococcus aureus, but how RNAIII transcriptionally regulates its downstream genes is not completely understood. Here, we show that RNAIII stabilizes mgrA mRNA, thereby increasing the production of MgrA, a global transcriptional regulator that affects the expression of many genes. The mgrA gene is transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, to produce two mRNA transcripts with long 5′ UTR. Two adjacent regions of the mgrA mRNA UTR transcribed from the upstream P2 promoter, but not the P1 promoter, form a stable complex with two regions of RNAIII near the 5′ and 3′ ends. We further demonstrate that the interaction has several biological effects. We propose that MgrA can serve as an intermediary regulator through which agr exerts its regulatory function. PMID:26504242

  5. Imbalanced Expression of Vcan mRNA Splice Form Proteins Alters Heart Morphology and Cellular Protein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Tara A.; Dours-Zimmermann, Maria T.; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Krug, Edward L.; Comte-Walters, Susana; Reyes, Leticia; Davis, Monica A.; Schey, Kevin L.; Schwacke, John H.; Kern, Christine B.; Mjaatvedt, Corey H.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental importance of the proteoglycan versican to early heart formation was clearly demonstrated by the Vcan null mouse called heart defect (hdf). Total absence of the Vcan gene halts heart development at a stage prior to the heart’s pulmonary/aortic outlet segment growth. This creates a problem for determining the significance of versican’s expression in the forming valve precursors and vascular wall of the pulmonary and aortic roots. This study presents data from a mouse model, Vcan(tm1Zim), of heart defects that results from deletion of exon 7 in the Vcan gene. Loss of exon 7 prevents expression of two of the four alternative splice forms of the Vcan gene. Mice homozygous for the exon 7 deletion survive into adulthood, however, the inability to express the V2 or V0 forms of versican results in ventricular septal defects, smaller cushions/valve leaflets with diminished myocardialization and altered pulmonary and aortic outflow tracts. We correlate these phenotypic findings with a large-scale differential protein expression profiling to identify compensatory alterations in cardiac protein expression at E13.5 post coitus that result from the absence of Vcan exon 7. The Vcan(tm1Zim) hearts show significant changes in the relative abundance of several cytoskeletal and muscle contraction proteins including some previously associated with heart disease. These alterations define a protein fingerprint that provides insight to the observed deficiencies in pre-valvular/septal cushion mesenchyme and the stability of the myocardial phenotype required for alignment of the outflow tract with the heart ventricles. PMID:24586547

  6. Interaction of CCR4–NOT with EBF1 regulates gene-specific transcription and mRNA stability in B lymphopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng-Yuan; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Boller, Sören; Rosenbaum, Marc; Rodriguez Gil, Alfonso; Mittler, Gerhard; Imai, Yumiko; Kuba, Keiji; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor EBF1 (early B-cell factor 1) regulates early B-cell differentiation by poising or activating lineage-specific genes and repressing genes associated with alternative cell fates. To identify proteins that regulate the diverse functions of EBF1, we used SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based mass spectrometry of proteins associated with endogenous EBF1 in pro-B cells. This analysis identified most components of the multifunctional CCR4–NOT complex, which regulates transcription and mRNA degradation. CNOT3 interacts with EBF1, and we identified histidine 240 in EBF1 as a critical residue for this interaction. Complementation of Ebf1−/− progenitors with EBF1H240A revealed a partial block of pro-B-cell differentiation and altered expression of specific EBF1 target genes that show either reduced transcription or increased mRNA stability. Most deregulated EBF1 target genes show normal occupancy by EBF1H240A, but we also detected genes with altered occupancy, suggesting that the CCR4–NOT complex affects multiple activities of EBF1. Mice with conditional Cnot3 inactivation recapitulate the block of early B-cell differentiation, which we found to be associated with an impaired autoregulation of Ebf1 and reduced expression of pre-B-cell receptor components. Thus, the interaction of the CCR4–NOT complex with EBF1 diversifies the function of EBF1 in a context-dependent manner and may coordinate transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation. PMID:27807034

  7. Interaction of CCR4-NOT with EBF1 regulates gene-specific transcription and mRNA stability in B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Yuan; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Boller, Sören; Rosenbaum, Marc; Rodriguez Gil, Alfonso; Mittler, Gerhard; Imai, Yumiko; Kuba, Keiji; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2016-10-15

    Transcription factor EBF1 (early B-cell factor 1) regulates early B-cell differentiation by poising or activating lineage-specific genes and repressing genes associated with alternative cell fates. To identify proteins that regulate the diverse functions of EBF1, we used SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based mass spectrometry of proteins associated with endogenous EBF1 in pro-B cells. This analysis identified most components of the multifunctional CCR4-NOT complex, which regulates transcription and mRNA degradation. CNOT3 interacts with EBF1, and we identified histidine 240 in EBF1 as a critical residue for this interaction. Complementation of Ebf1(-/-) progenitors with EBF1H240A revealed a partial block of pro-B-cell differentiation and altered expression of specific EBF1 target genes that show either reduced transcription or increased mRNA stability. Most deregulated EBF1 target genes show normal occupancy by EBF1H240A, but we also detected genes with altered occupancy, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex affects multiple activities of EBF1. Mice with conditional Cnot3 inactivation recapitulate the block of early B-cell differentiation, which we found to be associated with an impaired autoregulation of Ebf1 and reduced expression of pre-B-cell receptor components. Thus, the interaction of the CCR4-NOT complex with EBF1 diversifies the function of EBF1 in a context-dependent manner and may coordinate transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  8. Rice Stripe Virus Infection Alters mRNA Levels of Sphingolipid-Metabolizing Enzymes and Sphingolipids Content in Laodelphax striatellus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei-Qiang; Bai, Yue-Liang; Shi, Xiao-Xiao; Zhu, Mu-Fei; Zhang, Min-Jing; Mao, Cun-Gui; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids and their metabolites have been implicated in viral infection and replication in mammal cells but how their metabolizing enzymes in the host are regulated by viruses remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of 12 sphingolipid genes and their regulation by Rice stripe virus in the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén), a serious pest of rice throughout eastern Asia. According to protein sequence similarity, we identified 12 sphingolipid enzyme genes in L. striatellus. By comparing their mRNA levels in viruliferous versus nonviruliferous L. striatellus at different life stages by qPCR, we found that RSV infection upregulated six genes (LsCGT1, LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, LsSMPD4, LsSMS, and LsSPT) in most stages of L. striatellus. Especially, four genes (LsCGT1, LsSMPD2, LsNAGA1, and LsSMS) and another three genes (LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, and LsSMS) were significantly upregulated in viruliferous third-instar and fourth-instar nymphs, respectively. HPLC-MS/MS results showed that RSV infection increased the levels of various ceramides, such as Cer18:0, Cer20:0, and Cer22:0 species, in third and fourth instar L. striatellus nymphs. Together, these results demonstrate that RSV infection alters the transcript levels of various sphingolipid enzymes and the contents of sphingolipids in L. striatellus, indicating that sphingolipids may be important for RSV infection or replication in L. striatellus. PMID:28130458

  9. Translational stability of native and deadenylylated rabbit globin mRNA injected into HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Huez, G; Bruck, C; Cleuter, Y

    1981-01-01

    HeLa human cells were injected with a natural mixture of rabbit alpha and beta globin mRNA. They were incubated for 6 hr with [35S]methionine either immediately after injection or 20 hr later. The labeled proteins in the injected cells were analyzed by fluorography of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. By using this procedure, it was possible to show that, during the first few hours after injection, both alpha and beta globin molecules are synthesized with an alpha to beta ratio approximately equal to 0.6. The rate of synthesis of alpha globin decreased significantly faster than that of beta globin over a 26-hr period after injection of the two mRNAs. It thus seems that two messenger RNAs coding for closely related polypeptides possess a markedly different translational stability. When deadenylylated rabbit globin mRNAs were injected into HeLa cells, no globin synthesis could be detected by the techniques used. We conclude that the translational half-life of mRNAs lacking poly(A) is very short in these cells. It is thus clear that the poly(A) segment is required to ensure stability to globin mRNA in somatic cells as in Xenopus oocytes. Images PMID:6940155

  10. mRNA stabilization controls the expression of a class of developmentally regulated genes in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio; Giorda, Roberto; Ceccarelli, Adriano; Perlo, Carla

    1985-01-01

    During the development of Dictyostelium discoideum, several thousand new mRNA species appear in the cytoplasm after the cells have formed stable aggregates. Here we show that six of these late mRNAs, corresponding to six clones randomly chosen from a genomic library, are synthesized from the very beginning of development at a rate comparable to that observed late in development but that transcripts do not accumulate until after aggregation. The early- and late-synthesized mRNAs are identical in size and compete with each other for hybridization to the genomic clones. The early-synthesized mRNAs do not accumulate in the cytoplasm in the preaggregation stage because they are very unstable. Their stability, estimated from the kinetics of incorporation during continuous labeling with 32P, increases by perhaps an order of magnitude in the postaggregation stage. We conclude that mRNA stabilization is the major controlling factor of the expression of these genes. Images PMID:16593597

  11. Nickel Ions Selectively Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Interleukin-6 Production by Decreasing Its mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Sanki; Kishimoto, Yu; Takano, Takayuki; Okita, Kiyuki; Takakuwa, Shiho; Sato, Taiki; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2015-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) ions easily elute from many alloys and elicit inflammation and allergies. Previous studies have shown that infections due to the implantation of medical devices cause inflammation and enhance the elution of Ni ions (Ni2+). However, cross-talk between infection- and Ni2+-induced signaling pathways has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ni2+ on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of cytokines in a LPS-induced air pouch-type inflammation model in BALB/c mice and the murine macrophage cell line RAW264. We demonstrated that Ni2+ inhibited the LPS-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6, but not that of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α both in vivo and in vitro. This inhibitory effect was also observed with cobalt ion (Co2+), but not with chloride ion (Cl-), zinc ion (Zn2+), or palladium ion (Pd2+), and was highly selective to the production of IL-6. Ni2+ did not inhibit the activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or JNK. Although Ni2+ decreased IL-6 mRNA levels, it failed to inhibit the LPS-induced activation of the IL-6 promoter. An experiment using actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor, revealed that Ni2+ decreased the stability of IL-6 mRNA. Moreover, Ni2+ inhibited the LPS-induced expression of Arid5a, but not regnase-1. These results demonstrated that Ni2+ may have selectively inhibited the LPS-induced production of IL-6 by decreasing the Arid5a-dependent stabilization of IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25742007

  12. Quantification of mRNA stability of stress-responsive yeast genes following conditional excision of open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Talarek, Nicolas; Bontron, Séverine; De Virgilio, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells rapidly adjust the levels of mRNAs in response to environmental stress primarily by controlling transcription and mRNA turnover. How different stress conditions influence the fate of stress-responsive mRNAs, however, is relatively poorly understood. This is largely due to the fact that mRNA half-life assays are traditionally based on interventions (e.g., temperature-shifts using temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II alleles or treatment with general transcription inhibitory drugs), which, rather than blocking, specifically induce transcription of stress-responsive genes. To study the half-lives of the latter suite of mRNAs, we developed and describe here a minimally perturbing alternative method, coined CEO, which is based on discontinuance of transcription following the conditional excision of open reading frames. Using CEO, we confirm that the target of rapamycin complex I (TORC1), a nutrient-activated, central stimulator of eukaryotic cell growth, favors the decay of mRNAs that depend on the stress- and/or nutrient-regulated transcription factors Msn2/4 and Gis1 for their transcription. We further demonstrate that TORC1 controls the stability of these mRNAs via the Rim15-Igo1/2-PP2A(Cdc55) effector branch, which reportedly also controls Gis1 promoter recruitment. These data pinpoint PP2A(Cdc55) as a central node in homo-directional coordination of transcription and post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization of a specific array of nutrient-regulated genes.

  13. Stabilization of Oncostatin-M mRNA by Binding of Nucleolin to a GC-Rich Element in Its 3'UTR.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sucharita; Chakraborty, Alina; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita Sengupta

    2016-04-01

    Oncostatin-M (OSM) is a patho-physiologically important pleiotropic, multifunctional cytokine. OSM mRNA sequence analysis revealed that its 3'UTR contains three highly conserved GC-rich cis-elements (GCREs) whose role in mRNA stability is unidentified. In the present study, the functional role of the proximal GC-rich region of osm 3'-UTR (GCRE-1) in post-transcriptional regulation of osm expression in U937 cells was assessed by transfecting construct containing GCRE-1 at 3'-end of a fairly stable reporter gene followed by analysis of the expression of the reporter. GCRE-1 showed mRNA destabilizing activity; however, upon PMA treatment the reporter message containing GCRE-1 was stabilized. This stabilization is owing to a time-dependent progressive binding of trans-factors (at least five proteins) to GCRE-1 post-PMA treatment. Nucleolin was identified as one of the proteins in the RNP complex of GCRE-1 with PMA-treated U937 cytosolic extracts by oligo-dT affinity chromatography of poly-adenylated GCRE-1. Immuno-blot revealed time-dependent enhancement of nucleolin in the cytoplasm which in turn directly binds GCRE-1. RNA co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the GCRE-1-nucleolin interaction in vivo. To elucidate the functional role of nucleolin in stabilization of osm mRNA, nucleolin was overexpressed in U937 cells and found to stabilize the intrinsic osm mRNA, where co-transfection with the reporter containing GCRE-1 confirms the role of GCRE-1 in stabilization of the reporter mRNA. Thus, in conclusion, the results asserted that PMA treatment in U937 cells leads to cytoplasmic translocation of nucleolin that directly binds GCRE-1, one of the major GC-rich instability elements, thereby stabilizing the osm mRNA.

  14. miR-346 Controls Release of TNF-α Protein and Stability of Its mRNA in Rheumatoid Arthritis via Tristetraprolin Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleh, Ghada; Suffert, Guillaume; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Sibilia, Jean; Pfeffer, Sebastien; Wachsmann, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    TNF-α is a major cytokine implicated in rheumatoid arthritis. Its expression is regulated both at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and recent data demonstrated that miRNAs are implicated in TNF-α response in macrophages. LPS-activated FLS isolated from RA patients express TNF-α mRNA but not the mature protein. This prompted us to look for miRNAs which could be implicated in this anti-inflammatory effect. Using a microarray, we found two miRNAs, miR-125b and miR-939 predicted to target the 3′-UTR of TNF-α mRNA, to be up-regulated in RA FLS in response to LPS, but their repression did not restore mature TNF-α expression in FLS. We showed previously that miR-346, which is upregulated in LPS-activated FLS, inhibited Btk expression that stabilized TNF-α mRNA. Blocking miR-346 reestablished TNF-α expression in activated FLS. Interestingly, transfection of miR-346 in LPS-activated THP-1 cells inhibited TNF-α secretion. We also demonstrated that TTP, a RNA binding protein which inhibited TNF-α synthesis, is overexpressed in activated FLS and that inhibition of miR-346 decreases its expression. Conversely, transfection of miR-346 in LPS-activated THP-1 cells increased TTP mRNA expression and inhibited TNF-α release. These results indicate that miR-346 controls TNF-α synthesis by regulating TTP expression. PMID:21611196

  15. Altered expression of hyaluronan synthase and hyaluronidase mRNA may affect hyaluronic acid distribution in keloid disease compared with normal skin.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, Gary P; Iqbal, Syed A; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-05-01

    Keloid disease (KD) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterised partly by an altered extracellular matrix (ECM) profile. In fetal scarring, hyaluronic acid (HA) expression is increased, but is reduced in KD tissue compared with normal skin (NS). The expression of Hyaluronan Synthase (HAS) and hyaluronidase (HYAL) in KD and NS tissue were investigated for the first time using a range of techniques. Hyaluronan synthase and HYAL mRNA expression were significantly increased in NS tissue compared with KD tissue (P < 0.05). Immunohistological analysis of tissue indicated an accumulation of HAS and HYAL protein expression in KD compared with NS due to the thicker epidermis. No differences were observed in mRNA or protein expression in KD and NS fibroblasts. Reduced expression of HAS and HYAL may alter HA synthesis, degradation and accumulation in KD. Better understanding of the role of HA in KD may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to address the resulting ECM imbalance.

  16. Human eosinophil activin A synthesis and mRNA stabilization are induced by the combination of IL-3 plus TNF

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Esnault, Stephane; Johnson, Sean H.; Liu, Lin Ying; Malter, James S.; Burnham, Mandy E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils contribute to immune regulation and wound healing/fibrosis in various diseases including asthma. Growing appreciation for the role of activin A in such processes led us to hypothesize that eosinophils are a source of this TGF-β superfamily member. TNFα (TNF) induces activin A by other cell types and is often present at the site of allergic inflammation along with the eosinophil activating common β (βc) chain-signaling cytokines (IL-5, IL-3, GM-CSF). Previously, we established that the combination of TNF plus a βc chain-signaling cytokine synergistically induces eosinophil synthesis of the remodeling enzyme MMP-9. Therefore, eosinophils were stimulated ex vivo by these cytokines and in vivo through an allergen-induced airway inflammatory response. In contrast to IL-5+TNF or GM-CSF+TNF, the combination of IL-3+TNF synergistically induced activin A synthesis and release by human blood eosinophils. IL-3+TNF enhanced activin A mRNA stability, which required sustained signaling of pathways downstream of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. In vivo, following segmental airway allergen challenge of subjects with mild allergic asthma, activin A mRNA was upregulated in airway eosinophils compared to circulating eosinophils, and ex vivo, circulating eosinophils tended to release activin A in response to IL-3+TNF. These data provide evidence that eosinophils release activin A and that this function is enhanced when eosinophils are present in an allergen-induced inflammatory environment. Moreover, these data provide the first evidence for post-transcriptional control of activin A mRNA. We propose that, an environment rich in IL-3+TNF will lead to eosinophil–derived activin A, which plays an important role in regulating inflammation and/or fibrosis. PMID:27001469

  17. Transition State Charge Stabilization and Acid-Base Catalysis of mRNA Cleavage by the Endoribonuclease RelE.

    PubMed

    Dunican, Brian F; Hiller, David A; Strobel, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial toxin RelE is a ribosome-dependent endoribonuclease. It is part of a type II toxin-antitoxin system that contributes to antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. During amino acid starvation, RelE cleaves mRNA in the ribosomal A-site, globally inhibiting protein translation. RelE is structurally similar to microbial RNases that employ general acid-base catalysis to facilitate RNA cleavage. The RelE active site is atypical for acid-base catalysis, in that it is enriched with positively charged residues and lacks the prototypical histidine-glutamate catalytic pair, making the mechanism of mRNA cleavage unclear. In this study, we use a single-turnover kinetic analysis to measure the effect of pH and phosphorothioate substitution on the rate constant for cleavage of mRNA by wild-type RelE and seven active-site mutants. Mutation and thio effects indicate a major role for stabilization of increased negative change in the transition state by arginine 61. The wild-type RelE cleavage rate constant is pH-independent, but the reaction catalyzed by many of the mutants is strongly dependent on pH, suggestive of general acid-base catalysis. pH-rate curves indicate that wild-type RelE operates with the pK(a) of at least one catalytic residue significantly downshifted by the local environment. Mutation of any single active-site residue is sufficient to disrupt this microenvironment and revert the shifted pK(a) back above neutrality. pH-rate curves are consistent with K54 functioning as a general base and R81 as a general acid. The capacity of RelE to effect a large pK(a) shift and facilitate a common catalytic mechanism by uncommon means furthers our understanding of other atypical enzymatic active sites.

  18. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinization in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinization in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilize the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilize it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model.

  19. Cross Talk between β1 and αV Integrins: β1 Affects β3 mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Retta, Saverio Francesco; Cassarà, Georgia; D'Amato, Monica; Alessandro, Riccardo; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Degani, Simona; De Leo, Giacomo; Silengo, Lorenzo; Tarone, Guido

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a fine-tuned integrin cross talk can generate a high degree of specificity in cell adhesion, suggesting that spatially and temporally coordinated expression and activation of integrins are more important for regulated cell adhesive functions than the intrinsic specificity of individual receptors. However, little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms of integrin cross talk. With the use of β1-null GD25 cells ectopically expressing the β1A integrin subunit, we provide evidence for the existence of a cross talk between β1 and αV integrins that affects the ratio of αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrin cell surface levels. In particular, we demonstrate that a down-regulation of αVβ3 and an up-regulation of αVβ5 occur as a consequence of β1A expression. Moreover, with the use of GD25 cells expressing the integrin isoforms β1B and β1D, as well as two β1 cytoplasmic domain deletion mutants lacking either the entire cytoplasmic domain (β1TR) or only its “variable” region (β1COM), we show that the effects of β1 over αV integrins take place irrespective of the type of β1 isoform, but require the presence of the “common” region of the β1 cytoplasmic domain. In an attempt to establish the regulatory mechanism(s) whereby β1 integrins exert their trans-acting functions, we have found that the down-regulation of αVβ3 is due to a decreased β3 subunit mRNA stability, whereas the up-regulation of αVβ5 is mainly due to translational or posttranslational events. These findings provide the first evidence for an integrin cross talk based on the regulation of mRNA stability. PMID:11598197

  20. Host factor I, Hfq, binds to Escherichia coli ompA mRNA in a growth rate-dependent fashion and regulates its stability.

    PubMed

    Vytvytska, O; Jakobsen, J S; Balcunaite, G; Andersen, J S; Baccarini, M; von Gabain, A

    1998-11-24

    The stability of the ompA mRNA depends on the bacterial growth rate. The 5' untranslated region is the stability determinant of this transcript and the target of the endoribonuclease, RNase E, the key player of mRNA degradation. An RNA-binding protein with affinity for the 5' untranslated region ompA was purified and identified as Hfq, a host factor initially recognized for its function in phage Qbeta replication. The ompA RNA-binding activity parallels the amount of Hfq, which is elevated in bacteria cultured at slow growth rate, a condition leading to facilitated degradation of the ompA mRNA. In hfq mutant cells with a deficient Hfq gene product, the RNA-binding activity is missing, and analysis of the ompA mRNA showed that the growth-rate dependence of degradation is lost. Furthermore, the half-life of the ompA mRNA is prolonged in the mutant cells, irrespective of growth rate. Hfq has no affinity for the lpp transcript whose degradation, like that of bulk mRNA, is not affected by bacterial growth rate. Compatible with our results, we found that the intracellular concentration of RNase E and its associated degradosome components is independent of bacterial growth rate. Thus our results suggest a regulatory role for Hfq that specifically facilitates the ompA mRNA degradation in a growth rate-dependent manner.

  1. Stability of maternal mRNA in Xenopus embryos: role of transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    Duval, C; Bouvet, P; Omilli, F; Roghi, C; Dorel, C; LeGuellec, R; Paris, J; Osborne, H B

    1990-08-01

    The first 12 cell divisions of Xenopus laevis embryos do not require gene transcription. This means that the regulation of gene expression during this period is controlled at post transcriptional levels and makes Xenopus early development a potentially interesting biological system with which to study the mechanisms involved. We describe here the stability characteristics of several maternal Xenopus mRNAs which are deadenylated soon after fertilisation (J. Paris and M. Philippe, Dev. Biol., in press). We show that these mRNAs were only degraded in the embryo after the midblastula transition (MBT), when gene transcription was initiated. The kinetics with which the deadenylated maternal mRNAs decreased in the post-MBT embryos showed sequence specificity. The degradation of these mRNAs after the MBT was inhibited by cycloheximide but was not affected by dactinomycin. Therefore, the destabilization of these mRNAs does not appear to be initiated by new embryonic gene transcripts. Sequence comparisons of the 3' untranslated region of these mRNAs identified several motifs which may be involved in the posttranscriptional control of these gene products.

  2. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  3. Dysregulation of the Axonal Trafficking of Nuclear-encoded Mitochondrial mRNA alters Neuronal Mitochondrial Activity and Mouse Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Amar N.; Sun, Ching-Yu; Reichard, Kathryn; Gervasi, Noreen M.; Pickel, James; Nakazawa, Kazu; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    Local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is essential for mitochondrial activity, yet there is little insight into the role that axonal trafficking of these transcripts play in neuronal function and behavior. Previously, we identified a 38 nucleotide stem-loop structure (zipcode) in the 3′ untranslated region of the Cytochrome C oxidase IV (COXIV) mRNA that directs the transport of a reporter mRNA to the axon of superior cervical ganglion neurons (SCG). Over-expression of a chimeric reporter mRNA with the COXIV zipcode competed with the axonal trafficking of endogenous COXIV mRNA, and led to attenuated axon growth in SCG neurons. Here, we show that exogenous expression of the COXIV zipcode in cultured SCG neurons also results in the reduction of local ATP levels and increases levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the axon. We took advantage of this “competition” phenotype to investigate the in vivo significance of axonal transport of COXIV mRNA. Towards this end, we generated transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent reporter fused to COXIV zipcode under a forebrain-specific promoter. Immunohistological analyses and RT-PCR analyses of RNA from the transgenic mouse brain showed expression of the reporter in the deep layer neurons in the pre-frontal and frontal cortex. Consistent with the in vitro studies, we observed increased ROS levels in neurons of these transgenic animals. A battery of behavioral tests on transgenic mice expressing the COXIV zipcode revealed an “anxiety-like” behavioral phenotype, suggesting an important role for axonal trafficking of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs in neuronal physiology and animal behavior. PMID:24151253

  4. Acute heat stress up-regulates neuropeptide Y precursor mRNA expression and alters brain and plasma concentrations of free amino acids in chicks.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Bahry, Mohammad A; Hui, Yang; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S

    2015-09-01

    Heat stress causes an increase in body temperature and reduced food intake in chickens. Several neuropeptides and amino acids play a vital role in the regulation of food intake. However, the responses of neuropeptides and amino acids to heat-stress-induced food-intake regulation are poorly understood. In the current study, the hypothalamic mRNA expression of some neuropeptides related to food intake and the content of free amino acids in the brain and plasma was examined in 14-day-old chicks exposed to a high ambient temperature (HT; 40±1 °C for 2 or 5 h) or to a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30±1 °C). HT significantly increased rectal temperature and plasma corticosterone level and suppressed food intake. HT also increased the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) precursor mRNA, while no change was observed in pro-opiomelanocortin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, or corticotropin-releasing hormone precursor mRNA. It was further found that the diencephalic content of free amino acids - namely, tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, valine and serine - was significantly higher in HT chicks with some alterations in their plasma amino acids in comparison with CT chicks. The induction of NPY and ASIP expression and the alteration of some free amino acids during HT suggest that these changes can be the results or causes the suppression of food intake.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor 1B and 1C mRNA transcript alterations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and their possible regulation by GR gene variants.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Duncan; Fullerton, Janice M; Webster, Maree J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal patterns of HPA axis activation, under basal conditions and in response to stress, are found in individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA and protein expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in psychiatric illness have also been reported, but the cause of these abnormalities is not known. We quantified expression of GR mRNA transcript variants which employ different 5' promoters, in 35 schizophrenia cases, 31 bipolar disorder cases and 34 controls. We also explored whether sequence variation within the NR3C1 (GR) gene is related to GR mRNA variant expression. Total GR mRNA was decreased in the DLPFC in schizophrenia cases relative to controls (15.1%, p<0.0005) and also relative to bipolar disorder cases (8.9%, p<0.05). GR-1B mRNA was decreased in schizophrenia cases relative to controls (20.2%, p<0.05), while GR-1C mRNA was decreased in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder cases relative to controls (16.1% and 17.2% respectively, both p<0.005). A dose-dependent effect of rs10052957 genotype on GR-1B mRNA expression was observed, where CC homozygotes displayed 18.4% lower expression than TC heterozygotes (p<0.05), and 31.8% lower expression than TT homozygotes (p<0.005). Similarly, a relationship between rs6190 (R23K) genotype and GR-1C expression was seen, with 24.8% lower expression in GG homozygotes than GA heterozygotes (p<0.01). We also observed an effect of rs41423247 (Bcl1) SNP on expression of 67 kDa GRα isoform, the most abundant GRα isoform in the DLPFC. These findings suggest possible roles for the GR-1B and GR-1C promoter regions in mediating GR gene expression changes in psychotic illness, and highlight the potential importance of sequence variation within the NR3C1 gene in modulating GR mRNA expression in the DLPFC.

  6. Posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression in human cells: effects of heat shock, inhibition of protein synthesis, and adenovirus infection on translation and mRNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, N G; Morimoto, R I

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 gene expression in two human cell lines, HeLa and 293 cells, which constitutively express high levels of HSP70. HSP70 mRNA translates with high efficiency in both control and heat-shocked cells. Therefore, heat shock is not required for the efficient translation of HSP70 mRNA. Rather, the main effect of heat shock on translation is to suppress the translatability of non-heat shock mRNAs. Heat shock, however, has a marked effect on the stability of HSP70 mRNA; in non-heat-shocked cells the half-life of HSP70 mRNA is approximately 50 min, and its stability increases at least 10-fold upon heat shock. Moreover, HSP70 mRNA is more stable in cells treated with protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that a heat shock-sensitive labile protein regulates its turnover. An additional effect on posttranscriptional regulation of hsp70 expression can be found in adenovirus-infected cells, in which HSP70 mRNA levels decline precipititously late during infection although hsp70 transcription continues unabated. Images PMID:3437893

  7. Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Gene Expression in Theca Cells: Augmented Transcriptional Regulation and mRNA Stability in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-DeGrave, Velen L.; Legro, Richard S.; Strauss, Jerome F.; McAllister, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism is characteristic of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ovarian theca cells isolated from PCOS follicles and maintained in long-term culture produce elevated levels of progestins and androgens compared to normal theca cells. Augmented steroid production in PCOS theca cells is associated with changes in the expression of genes for several steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, which encodes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage. Here, we further examined CYP11A1 gene expression, at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in normal and PCOS theca cells propagated in long-term culture utilizing quantitative RT-PCR, functional promoter analyses, and mRNA degradation studies. The minimal element(s) that conferred increased basal and cAMP-dependent CYP11A1 promoter function were determined. CYP11A1 mRNA half-life in normal and PCOS theca cells was compared. Results of these cumulative studies showed that basal and forskolin stimulated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance and CYP11A1 promoter activity were increased in PCOS theca cells. Deletion analysis of the CYP11A1 promoter demonstrated that augmented promoter function in PCOS theca cells results from increased basal regulation conferred by a minimal sequence between −160 and −90 bp of the transcriptional start site. The transcription factor, nuclear factor 1C2, was observed to regulate basal activity of this minimal CYP11A1 element. Examination of mRNA stability in normal and PCOS theca cells demonstrated that CYP11A1 mRNA half-life increased >2-fold, from approximately 9.22+/−1.62 h in normal cells, to 22.38+/−0.92 h in PCOS cells. Forskolin treatment did not prolong CYP11A1 mRNA stability in either normal or PCOS theca cells. The 5′-UTR of CYP11A1 mRNA confers increased basal mRNA stability in PCOS cells. In conclusion, these studies show that elevated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance in PCOS cells results from increased transactivation of the CYP

  8. Tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate and triethyl phosphate alter embryonic development, hepatic mRNA expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations in chicken embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Egloff, Caroline; Crump, Doug; Porter, Emily; Williams, Kim L.; Letcher, Robert J.; Gauthier, Lewis T.; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2014-09-15

    The organophosphate flame retardants tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP) are used in a wide range of applications to suppress or delay the ignition and spread of fire. Both compounds have been detected in the environment and TBOEP was recently measured in free-living avian species. In this study, TBOEP and TEP were injected into the air cell of chicken embryos at concentrations ranging from 0 to 45,400 ng/g and 0 to 241,500 ng/g egg, respectively. Pipping success, development, hepatic mRNA expression of 9 target genes, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations were determined. Exposure to the highest doses of TBOEP and TEP resulted in negligible detection of the parent compounds in embryonic contents at pipping indicating their complete metabolic degradation. TBOEP exposure had limited effects on chicken embryos, with the exception of hepatic CYP3A37 mRNA induction. TEP exposure decreased pipping success to 68%, altered growth, increased liver somatic index (LSI) and plasma bile acids, and modulated genes associated with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism and the thyroid hormone pathway. Plasma thyroxine levels were decreased at all TEP doses, including an environmentally-relevant concentration (8 ng/g), and gallbladder hypotrophy was evident at ≥ 43,200 ng/g. Tarsus length and circulating thyroxine concentration emerged as potential phenotypic anchors for the modulation of transthyretin mRNA. The increase in plasma bile acids and LSI, gallbladder hypotrophy, and discoloration of liver tissue represented potential phenotypic outcomes associated with modulation of hepatic genes involved with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism. - Highlights: • TBOEP is not embryolethal to chicken embryos. • TEP affected embryonic viability, morphometric endpoints, and thyroid hormone levels. • TEP altered mRNA levels of xenobiotic and lipid metabolism genes. • TEP increased plasma bile acids and caused gallbladder hypotrophy

  9. Integration of mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels in breast cancer to improve grade definition.

    PubMed

    Cava, Claudia; Bertoli, Gloria; Ripamonti, Marilena; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zoppis, Italo; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Defining the aggressiveness and growth rate of a malignant cell population is a key step in the clinical approach to treating tumor disease. The correct grading of breast cancer (BC) is a fundamental part in determining the appropriate treatment. Biological variables can make it difficult to elucidate the mechanisms underlying BC development. To identify potential markers that can be used for BC classification, we analyzed mRNAs expression profiles, gene copy numbers, microRNAs expression and their association with tumor grade in BC microarray-derived datasets. From mRNA expression results, we found that grade 2 BC is most likely a mixture of grade 1 and grade 3 that have been misclassified, being described by the gene signature of either grade 1 or grade 3. We assessed the potential of the new approach of integrating mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels to select a limited number of genomic BC biomarkers. The combination of mRNA profile analysis and copy number data with microRNA expression levels led to the identification of two gene signatures of 42 and 4 altered genes (FOXM1, KPNA4, H2AFV and DDX19A) respectively, the latter obtained through a meta-analytical procedure. The 42-based gene signature identifies 4 classes of up- or down-regulated microRNAs (17 microRNAs) and of their 17 target mRNA, and the 4-based genes signature identified 4 microRNAs (Hsa-miR-320d, Hsa-miR-139-5p, Hsa-miR-567 and Hsa-let-7c). These results are discussed from a biological point of view with respect to pathological features of BC. Our identified mRNAs and microRNAs were validated as prognostic factors of BC disease progression, and could potentially facilitate the implementation of assays for laboratory validation, due to their reduced number.

  10. Altered mRNA transport, docking, and protein translation in neurons lacking fragile X mental retardation protein.

    PubMed

    Kao, Der-I; Aldridge, Georgina M; Weiler, Ivan Jeanne; Greenough, William T

    2010-08-31

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the absence of functional fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA binding protein. The molecular mechanism of aberrant protein synthesis in fmr1 KO mice is closely associated with the role of FMRP in mRNA transport, delivery, and local protein synthesis. We show that GFP-labeled Fmr1 and CaMKIIalpha mRNAs undergo decelerated motion at 0-40 min after group I mGluR stimulation, and later recover at 40-60 min. Then we investigate targeting of mRNAs associated with FMRP after neuronal stimulation. We find that FMRP is synthesized closely adjacent to stimulated mGluR5 receptors. Moreover, in WT neurons, CaMKIIalpha mRNA can be delivered and translated in dendritic spines within 10 min in response to group I mGluR stimulation, whereas KO neurons fail to show this response. These data suggest that FMRP can mediate spatial mRNA delivery for local protein synthesis in response to synaptic stimulation.

  11. Epithelial remodeling and claudin mRNA abundance in the gill and kidney of puffer fish (Tetraodon biocellatus) acclimated to altered environmental ion levels.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Nicole M; Bui, Phuong; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Kelly, Scott P

    2011-02-01

    In water of varying ion content, the gills and kidney of fishes contribute significantly to the maintenance of salt and water balance. However, little is known about the molecular architecture of the tight junction (TJ) complex and the regulation of paracellular permeability characteristics in these tissues. In the current studies, puffer fish (Tetraodon biocellatus) were acclimated to freshwater (FW), seawater (SW) or ion-poor freshwater (IPW) conditions. Following acclimation, alterations in systemic endpoints of hydromineral status were examined in conjunction with changes in gill and kidney epithelia morphology/morphometrics, as well as claudin TJ protein mRNA abundance. T. biocellatus were able to maintain endpoints of hydromineral status within relatively tight limits across the broad range of water ion content examined. Both gill and kidney tissue exhibited substantial alterations in morphology as well as claudin TJ protein mRNA abundance. These responses were particularly pronounced when comparing fish acclimated to SW versus those acclimated to IPW. TEM observations of IPW-acclimated fish gills revealed the presence of cells that exhibited the typical characteristics of gill mitochondria-rich cells (e.g. voluminous, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive, exposed to the external environment at the apical surface), but were not mitochondria-rich. To our knowledge, this type of cell has not previously been described in hyperosmoregulating fish gills. Furthermore, modifications in the morphometrics and claudin mRNA abundance of kidney tissue support the notion that spatial alterations in claudin TJ proteins along the nephron of fishes will likely play an important role in the regulation of salt and water balance in these organisms.

  12. Non-Invasive Analysis of Recombinant mRNA Stability in Escherichia coli by a Combination of Transcriptional Inducer Wash-Out and qRT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kucharova, Veronika; Strand, Trine Aakvik; Almaas, Eivind; Naas, Adrian E.; Brautaset, Trygve; Valla, Svein

    2013-01-01

    mRNA stability is one among many parameters that can potentially affect the level of recombinant gene expression in bacteria. Blocking of the entire prokaryotic transcription machinery by addition of rifampicin is commonly used in protocols for analysis of mRNA stability. Here we show that such treatment can be effectively replaced by a simple, non-invasive method based on removal of the relevant transcriptional inducers and that the mRNA decay can then be followed by qRT-PCR. To establish the methodology we first used the m-toluate-inducible XylS/Pm expression cassette as a model system and analyzed several examples of DNA modifications causing gene expression stimulation in Escherichia coli. The new method allowed us to clearly discriminate whether an improvement in mRNA stability contributes to observed increases in transcript amounts for each individual case. To support the experimental data a simple mathematical fitting model was developed to calculate relative decay rates. We extended the relevance of the method by demonstrating its application also for an IPTG-inducible expression cassette (LacI/Ptac) and by analyzing features of the bacteriophage T7-based expression system. The results suggest that the methodology is useful in elucidating factors controlling mRNA stability as well as other specific features of inducible expression systems. Moreover, as expression systems based on diffusible inducers are almost universally available, the concept can be most likely used to measure mRNA decay for any gene in any cell type that is heavily used in molecular biology research. PMID:23840466

  13. miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Hung; Ekaterina Rodriguez, C.; Donald, Graham W.; Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Jung, Xiaoman S.; Chang, Hui-Hua; Moro, Aune; Reber, Howard A.; Hines, O. Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Pancreatic cancer cells express low miR-143 levels and elevated p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1. •MEK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 increase miR-143 expression. •miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression and PGE{sub 2}. •miR-143 decreases p-p38MAPK, p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1 expression. -- Abstract: Small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNA), inhibit the translation or accelerate the degradation of message RNA (mRNA) by targeting the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) in regulating growth and survival through gene suppression. Deregulated miRNA expression contributes to disease progression in several cancers types, including pancreatic cancers (PaCa). PaCa tissues and cells exhibit decreased miRNA, elevated cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) resulting in increased cancer growth and metastases. Human PaCa cell lines were used to demonstrate that restoration of miRNA-143 (miR-143) regulates COX-2 and inhibits cell proliferation. miR-143 were detected at fold levels of 0.41 ± 0.06 in AsPC-1, 0.20 ± 0.05 in Capan-2 and 0.10 ± 0.02 in MIA PaCa-2. miR-143 was not detected in BxPC-3, HPAF-II and Panc-1 which correlated with elevated mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK) activation. Treatment with 10 μM of MEK inhibitor U0126 or PD98059 increased miR-143, respectively, by 187 ± 18 and 152 ± 26-fold in BxPC-3 and 182 ± 7 and 136 ± 9-fold in HPAF-II. miR-143 transfection diminished COX-2 mRNA stability at 60 min by 2.6 ± 0.3-fold in BxPC-3 and 2.5 ± 0.2-fold in HPAF-II. COX-2 expression and cellular proliferation in BxPC-3 and HPAF-II inversely correlated with increasing miR-143. PGE{sub 2} levels decreased by 39.3 ± 5.0% in BxPC-3 and 48.0 ± 3.0% in HPAF-II transfected with miR-143. Restoration of miR-143 in PaCa cells suppressed of COX-2, PGE{sub 2}, cellular proliferation and MEK/MAPK activation, implicating this pathway in regulating miR-143 expression.

  14. Tumor protein D52 expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by T-cell intercellular antigen (TIA) 1 and TIA-related protein via mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Hiromi; Mukudai, Yoshiki; Ito, Chihiro; Kato, Kosuke; Shimane, Toshikazu; Kondo, Seiji; Shirota, Tatsuo

    2017-03-15

    Although tumor protein D52 (TPD) family proteins were first identified nearly 20 years ago, their molecular regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the post-transcriptional regulation of TPD52 family genes. An RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed the potential binding ability of TPD52 family mRNAs to several RNA-binding proteins, and an RNA degradation assay revealed that TPD52 is subject to more prominent post-transcriptional regulation than TPD53 and 54. We subsequently focused on the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of TPD52 as a cis -acting element in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several deletion mutants of the 3'-UTR of TPD52 mRNA were constructed and ligated to the 3' end of a reporter green fluorescence protein gene. RNA degradation assay revealed that a minimal cis -acting region, located in the 78-280 region of the 5'-proximal region of the 3'-UTR, stabilized the reporter mRNA. Biotin pull-down and RNA immunoprecipitation assays revealed specific binding of the region to T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1) and TIA-1-related protein (TIAR). Knockdown of TIA-1/TIAR decreased not only the expression, but also the stability of TPD52 mRNA; it also decreased the expression and stability of the reporter gene ligated to the 3' end of the 78-280 fragment. Stimulation of TGF-b and EGF decreased the binding ability of these factors, resulted in decreased mRNA stability. These results indicate that the 78-280 fragment and TIA-1/TIAR concordantly contribute to mRNA stability as a cis -acting element and trans -acting factor(s), respectively. Thus, we herein report the specific interactions between these elements in the post-transcriptional regulation of the TPD52 gene.

  15. Impact of hydrothermal alteration on lava dome stability: a numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detienne, Marie; Delmelle, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Lava domes are a common feature of many volcanoes worldwide. They represent a serious volcanic hazard as they are prone to repeated collapses, generating devastating debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows. While it has long been known that hydrothermal alteration degrades rock properties and weakens rock mass cohesion and strength, there is still little quantitative information allowing the description of this effect and its consequences for assessing the stability of a volcanic rock mass such as a lava dome. In this study, we use the finite difference numerical model FLAC 3D to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on the stability of a volcanic dome lying on a flat surface. Different hydrothermal alteration distributions were tested to encompass the variability observed in natural lava domes. Rock shear strength parameters (minimum, maximum and mean cohesion "c" and friction angle "φ" values) representative of various degrees of hydrothermal rock alteration were used in the simulations. The model predicts that reduction of the basement rock's shear strength decreases the factor of safety significantly. A similar result is found by increasing the vertical and horizontal extension of hydrothermal alteration in the basement rocks. In addition, pervasive hydrothermal alteration within the lava dome is predicted to exert a strong negative influence on the factor of safety. Through reduction of rock porosity and permeability, hydrothermal alteration may also affect pore fluid pressure within a lava dome. The results of new FLAC 3D runs which simulate the effect of hydrothermal alteration-induced pore pressure changes on lava dome stability will be presented.

  16. Altered sex hormone concentrations and gonadal mRNA expression levels of activin signaling factors in hatchling alligators from a contaminated Florida lake.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon C; Kohno, Satomi; Cook, Robert W; Alvers, Ashley L; Hamlin, Heather J; Woodruff, Teresa K; Guillette, Louis J

    2010-04-01

    Activins and estrogens participate in regulating the breakdown of ovarian germ cell nests and follicle assembly in mammals. In 1994, our group reported elevated frequencies of abnormal, multioocytic ovarian follicles in 6 month old, environmental contaminant-exposed female alligators after gonadotropin challenge. Here, we investigated if maternal contribution of endocrine disrupting contaminants to the egg subsequently alters estrogen/inhibin/activin signaling in hatchling female offspring, putatively predisposing an increased frequency of multioocytic follicle formation. We quantified basal and exogenous gonadotropin-stimulated concentrations of circulating plasma steroid hormones and ovarian activin signaling factor mRNA abundance in hatchling alligators from the same contaminated (Lake Apopka) and reference (Lake Woodruff) Florida lakes, as examined in 1994. Basal circulating plasma estradiol and testosterone concentrations were greater in alligators from the contaminated environment, whereas activin/inhibin betaA subunit and follistatin mRNA abundances were lower than values measured in ovaries from reference lake animals. Challenged, contaminant-exposed animals showed a more robust increase in plasma estradiol concentration following an acute follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) challenge compared with reference site alligators. Aromatase and follistatin mRNA levels increased in response to an extended FSH challenge in the reference site animals, but not in the contaminant-exposed animals. In hatchling alligators, ovarian follicles have not yet formed; therefore, these endocrine differences are likely to affect subsequent ovarian development, including ovarian follicle assembly.

  17. CIL-102 induces matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 down-regulation via simultaneous suppression of genetic transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Yeh-Long; Chang, Long-Sen

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the CIL-102 suppression mechanism on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expression in human leukemia K562 cells. CIL-102 attenuated K562 cell invasion with decreased MMP-2/MMP-9 protein expression and mRNA levels. Moreover, CIL-102 reduced luciferase activity of MMP-2/MMP-9 promoter constructs and MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA stability. CIL-102 treatment induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation but reduced the phospho-ERK level. Transfection of constitutively active MEK1 restored MMP-2 and MMP-9 promoter activity in CIL-102-treated cells, while suppression of p38 MAPK/JNK activation abolished CIL-102-induced MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay. CIL-102-induced p38 MAPK/JNK activation led to protein phosphatase 2A-mediated tristetraprolin (TTP) down-regulation. The reduction in TTP-KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) complexes formation promoted KSRP-mediated MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay in CIL-102-treated K562 cells. Moreover, CIL-102 reduced invasion and MMP-2/MMP-9 expression in breast and liver cancer cells. Taken together, our data indicate that CIL-102 induces MMP-2/MMP-2 down-regulation via simultaneous suppression of genetic transcription and mRNA stability, and suggest a potential utility for CIL-102 in reducing MMP-2/MMP-9-mediated cancer progression.

  18. A Single Element in the 3′ UTR of the Apical Sodium-Dependent Bile Acid Transporter Controls both Stabilization and Destabilization of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Dellys M.; Ghosh, Ayantika; Chen, Frank; Shneider, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    mRNA stability appears to play a key role in the ontogenic regulation of the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). The RNA binding proteins, Hu antigen R (HuR) and Tristetraprolin (TTP), stabilize and destabilize ASBT mRNA, respectively. Potential HuR binding sites were assessed by sequence analysis in the context of prior in vitro functional analyses of the rat ASBT 3′UTR. Wild type and mutant binding sites were investigated by gel shift analysis using IEC-6 cell extracts. The functional consequences of binding site mutations were assessed using two different hybrid reporter constructs linking the 3′UTR element to a either a luciferase or a β-globin coding mRNA sequence. A specific metastasis associated gene 1 cis-element (MTA1) was identified in the ASBT 3′UTR that became associated with proteins in IEC-6 cell extracts and could be supershifted by HuR or TTP antibodies. Mutation of this cis-element abrogated the gel shift of IEC-6 proteins. Furthermore hybrid constructs containing a mutant MTA1 element had reduced responses to modulation of HuR or TTP. For the first time we have identified a single specific sequence element in the 3′UTR of the rat ASBT mRNA that mediates counter-regulatory changes in mRNA abundance in response to both HuR and TTP. PMID:24946903

  19. Craniofacial abnormalities and altered wnt and mmp mRNA expression in zebrafish embryos exposed to gasoline oxygenates ETBE and TAME

    PubMed Central

    Bonventre, Josephine A.; White, Lori A.; Cooper, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    Gasoline additives ethyl tert butyl ether (ETBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) are used world wide, but the consequence of developmental exposure to these hydrophilic chemicals is unknown for aquatic vertebrates. The effect of ETBE and TAME on zebrafish embryos was determined following OCED 212 guidelines, and their toxicity was compared to structurally related methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which is known to target developing vasculature. LC50s for ETBE and TAME were 14 mM [95% CI = 10 to 20] and 10 mM [CI = 8 to 12.5], respectively. Both chemicals caused dose dependent developmental lesions (0.625 to 10 mM), which included pericardial edema, abnormal vascular development, whole body edema, and craniofacial abnormalities. The lesions were suggestive of a dysregulation of WNT ligands and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) protein families based on their roles in development. Exposure to 5 mM ETBE significantly (p ≤ 0.05) decreased relative mRNA transcript levels of mmp-9 and wnt3a, while 2.5 and 5 mM TAME significantly decreased wnt3a, wnt5a, and wnt8a. TAME also significantly decreased mmp-2 and -9 mRNA levels at 5 mM. ETBE and TAME were less effective in altering the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-a and -c, which were the only genes tested that were significantly decreased by MTBE. This is the first study to characterize the aquatic developmental toxicity following embryonic exposure to ETBE and TAME. Unlike MTBE, which specifically targets angiogenesis, ETBE and TAME disrupt multiple organ systems and significantly alter the mRNA transcript levels of genes required for general development. PMID:22609741

  20. Adaptations in horizontal head stabilization in response to altered vision and gaze during natural walking.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Ronita L; Pidcoe, Peter E; Griffin, Lori A; Sotillo, Tanya; Ganninger, Daniel; Feagin, Montgomery

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine adaptations in head stability resulting from altered gaze control and vision during over-ground walking. Using over-ground walking permitted adaptations in walking velocity and cadence that are otherwise not possible during treadmill walking or walking-in-place. Gaze control and vision were manipulated by having 20 young adult subjects 1) walk naturally, 2) view a distant, earth-fixed target to enhance the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), 3) view a head-fixed target to suppress the VOR, and 4) walk in darkness. Horizontal head and trunk angular velocities in space, walking velocity and cadence were measured. Root-mean-square head and trunk angular velocities were calculated and frequency analyses determined head-trunk movement patterns. Results demonstrated that when given the opportunity, subjects slowed down and decreased cadence in response to challenging tasks. Despite strongly reduced walking velocity and cadence, walking in darkness proved most challenging for head stabilization, indicating the importance of vision during this process. Viewing the earth-fixed target demonstrated the greatest head stability thereby, facilitating gaze stabilization. However, comparisons between the earth-fixed and head-fixed target conditions suggest a reciprocal relationship where gaze stability also facilitates head stability. This contribution of gaze stability to head stability is more important than vision alone as the head stabilization response was diminished during the VOR suppressed condition.

  1. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qipeng; Guo, Xirui; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-03-29

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α-/- cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy.

  2. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-01-01

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α−/− cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26918608

  3. Alterations of calmodulin and its mRNA in rat brain after acute and chronic administration of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Akiyama, K; Kodama, M; Ishihara, T; Hamamura, T; Kuroda, S

    1997-08-15

    The effect of acute and chronic administration of methamphetamine (METH) on the levels of calmodulin (CaM) and its mRNAs has been investigated in rat brain using antisense oligonucleotides to three distinct rat CaM genes (CaM I, CaM II, CaM III). CaM I mRNA was reduced in the striatum and nucleus accumbens within 2 h of acute administration of 4 mg/kg METH, but returned to the control level by 6 h. The CaM content in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions of the striatum was reduced 0.5, 2, and 6 h after acute administration of METH. In the chronic experiments, rats were treated with either 4 mg/kg METH or saline once daily for 14 days. This was followed by a withdrawal period of 28 days, and thereafter, the animals were challenged with either METH (4 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. All the animals were decapitated 6 h after this injection. There were four treatment groups: METH-METH (MM); METH-saline (MS); saline-METH (SM); and saline-saline (SS). There was a significant decrease in the mRNA for CaM I and CaM II in the striatum, and CaM II and CaM III in the nucleus accumbens in the MS group and the MS and MM groups, respectively, when compared to the SS group. The CaM content in the striatal membrane fraction decreased in both the SM and MS groups but not in the MM group. In contrast, the CaM content in the membrane fraction of the mesolimbic area showed a significant increase in the MM group. The CaM content in the cytosolic fraction of these brain areas decreased in both the SM and MM groups. The total CaM decreased significantly in the SM and MM groups of the striatum, but increased significantly in the MM group of the mesolimbic area. The mRNA for CaM I and CaM III decreased significantly in the MM group, and in the SM and MM groups, in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), respectively. The CaM content in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions and total CaM content of the SN/VTA decreased significantly in the SM, MS and MM

  4. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-03-06

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3'UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3(-/-) mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally.

  5. Galectin-3 is a non-classic RNA binding protein that stabilizes the mucin MUC4 mRNA in the cytoplasm of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, Lucie; Vincent, Audrey; Frénois, Frédéric; Duchêne, Belinda; Lahdaoui, Fatima; Stechly, Laurence; Renaud, Florence; Villenet, Céline; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dion, Johann; Grandjean, Cyrille; Poirier, Françoise; Figeac, Martin; Delacour, Delphine; Porchet, Nicole; Pigny, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells express high levels of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 mRNAs that encode membrane-bound mucins. These mRNAs share unusual features such as a long half-life. However, it remains unknown how mucin mRNA stability is regulated. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is an endogenous lectin playing important biological functions in epithelial cells. Gal-3 is encoded by LGALS3 which is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. Despite the absence of a RNA-recognition motif, Gal-3 interacts indirectly with pre-mRNAs in the nucleus and promotes constitutive splicing. However a broader role of Gal-3 in mRNA fate is unexplored. We report herein that Gal-3 increases MUC4 mRNA stability through an intermediate, hnRNP-L which binds to a conserved CA repeat element in the 3′UTR in a Gal-3 dependent manner and also controls Muc4 mRNA levels in epithelial tissues of Gal3−/− mice. Gal-3 interacts with hnRNP-L in the cytoplasm, especially during cell mitosis, but only partly associates with protein markers of P-Bodies or Stress Granules. By RNA-IP plus RNA-seq analysis and imaging, we demonstrate that Gal-3 binds to mature spliced MUC4 mRNA in the perinuclear region, probably in hnRNP-L-containing RNA granules. Our findings highlight a new role for Gal-3 as a non-classic RNA-binding protein that regulates MUC4 mRNA post-transcriptionally. PMID:28262838

  6. AU-rich elements in the mRNA 3'-untranslated region of the rat receptor for advanced glycation end products and their relevance to mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Caballero, José Juan; Girón, María Dolores; Vargas, Alberto Manuel; Sevillano, Natalia; Suárez, María Dolores; Salto, Rafael

    2004-06-18

    Several putative polyadenylation sequences and an adenylate plus timidylate rich element (ARE) are present at the 3' end of the rat advanced glycation end products receptor (RAGE) gene. Two transcripts are generated by the use of alternative polyadenylation sequences, one containing the ARE sequence in its 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). Transfections of CHO-k1 or NRK cells with constructs expressing the 3'-UTRs of the transcripts fused to a green fluorescence protein mRNA show that the ARE sequence has a negative effect on protein expression correlating with a decrease in the amount of mRNA, as shown in CHO-k1 transfected cells. When transfected cells were incubated in the presence of Actinomycin D the amount of fluorescence decreased in cells transfected with the ARE sequence, indicating that this sequence induces lower mRNA stability. Thus, alternative polyadenylation signals and an ARE sequence provide a novel mechanism for the regulation of the rat RAGE gene expression.

  7. Abnormal expression of mRNA, microRNA alteration and aberrant DNA methylation patterns in rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xianglong; Yuan, Xiangfei; Qin, Hai; Zhang, Xipeng

    2017-01-01

    Aim Rectal adenocarcinoma (READ) is a malignancy cancer with the high morbidity and motility worldwide. Our study aimed to explore the potential pathogenesis of READ through integrated analysis of gene expression profiling and DNA methylation data. Methods The miRNA, mRNA expression profiling and corresponding DNA methylation data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Differentially expressed mRNAs/ miRNAs/methylated regions (DEmRNA/DEmiRNAs) were identified in READ. The negatively correlation of DEmiRNA-DEmRNAs and DNA methylation-DEmRNAs were obtained. DEmRNAs expression was validated through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microarray expression profiling analyses. Results 1192 dysregulated DEmRNAs, 27 dysregulated DEmiRNAs and 6403 aberrant methylation CpG sites were screened in READ compared to normal controls. 1987 negative interaction pairs among 27 DEmiRNAs and 668 DEmRNAs were predicted. 446 genes with aberrant methylation were annotated. Eventually, 50 DEmRNAs (39 down- and 11 up-regulated DEmRNAs) with hypermethylation, synchronously negatively targeted by DEmiRNAs, were identified through the correlation analysis among 446 genes with aberrant methylation and 668 DEmRNAs. 50 DEmRNAs were significantly enriched in cAMP signaling pathway, circadian entrainment and glutamatergic synapse. The validation results of expression levels of DEmRNAs through qRT-PCR and microarray analyses were compatible with our study. Conclusion 7 genes of SORCS1, PDZRN4, LONRF2, CNGA3, HAND2, RSPO2 and GNAO1 with hypermethylation and negatively regulation by DEmiRNAs might contribute to the tumorigenesis of READ. Our work might provide valuable foundation for the READ in mechanism elucidation, early diagnosis and therapeutic target identification. PMID:28350845

  8. The Association between Splenocyte Apoptosis and Alterations of Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA Expression, and Oxidative Stress Induced by Dietary Nickel Chloride in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianying; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wu, Bangyuan

    2013-01-01

    Two hundred and forty avian broilers were equally divided into four groups, and raised with a corn-soybean basal diet or the same diet supplemented with 300, 600, 900 mg/kg NiCl2 for 42 days. Numbers or percentages of apoptotic splenocytes by flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL were higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than those in the control group. Results measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that mRNA expression and contents were significantly higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bax and Caspase-3, and were significantly lower (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bcl-2 of the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups. Also, the SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, and the ability to inhibit hydroxyl radical, and GSH contents were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01), and MDA contents were increased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in all groups. In conclusion, dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused apoptosis, altered Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression levels and contents, and induced oxidative stress in the spleen. Also, splenocyte apoptosis was closely related to the alternations of Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression, and oxidative damage. The splenic immunity and blood filtration functions were impaired in broilers. PMID:24351749

  9. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Alessandro; Le Sage, Valerie; Ghanem, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se) induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4EBP1). In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms. PMID:27025252

  10. Genomic Convergence Analysis of Schizophrenia: mRNA Sequencing Reveals Altered Synaptic Vesicular Transport in Post-Mortem Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Mudge, Joann; Miller, Neil A.; Khrebtukova, Irina; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; May, Gregory D.; Huntley, Jim J.; Luo, Shujun; Zhang, Lu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Lewis, Sharon; Beavis, William D.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Virk, Selene M.; Black, C. Forrest; Myers, M. Kathy; Mader, Lar C.; Langley, Ray J.; Utsey, John P.; Kim, Ryan W.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Khalsa, Sat Kirpal; Garcia, Meredith; Ambriz-Griffith, Victoria; Harlan, Richard; Czika, Wendy; Martin, Stanton; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Schroth, Gary P.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ. PMID:18985160

  11. Alterations in urinary bladder M2-muscarinic receptor protein and mRNA in 2-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Y C; Chin, W T; Cheng, J T

    1999-12-31

    The M2 receptor (M2-mAChR) is quantitatively the dominant muscarinic subtype in animal bladders. The alterations in its protein quantity and biosynthesis during diabetic cystopathy were investigated. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (1) 2-week-old diabetics; and (2) normoglycemic control rats. Diabetes was induced by single intravenous injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin. The amount of M2 receptor protein in the rat bladder body tissue was measured by Western immunoblotting using monoclonal antibodies. For determination of M2 muscarinic receptor mRNA in the bladder tissue, the method of Northern blotting was employed. The results of the Western immunoblotting showed that the amount of M2-mAChR protein in the diabetic bladder was significantly increased by 40.0 +/- 6.2% when compared with the control bladder (P < 0.05, n = 8). The Northern blotting demonstrated a 69.3 +/- 8.5% increase of the M2-mAChR mRNA in the diabetic bladder (P < 0.05, n = 8). The findings of the present study demonstrated an up-regulation of M2-mAChR biosynthesis in the diabetic urinary bladder. This phenomenon could lead to increased reactivity to acetylcholine and thus results in detrusor instability.

  12. Effects of Zidovudine Treatment on Heart mRNA Expression and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Associated with Alterations in Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Composition in a Neonatal Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Snowdin, Jacob W; Hsiung, Chia-Heng; Kesterson, Daniel G; Kamath, Vasudeva G; McKee, Edward E

    2015-10-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is a crucial component in HIV therapy. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), primarily 3'-azido-3'-thymidine (AZT [zidovudine]), have been used to treat both mothers and neonates. While AZT is being replaced with less toxic drugs in treating mothers in MTCT prevention, it is still commonly used to treat neonates. Problems related to mitochondrial toxicity and potential mutagenesis associated with AZT treatment have been reported in treated cohorts. Yet little is known concerning the metabolism and potential toxicity of AZT on embryonic and neonatal tissues, especially considering that the enzymes of nucleoside metabolism change dramatically as many tissues convert from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth during this period. AZT is known to inhibit thymidine phosphorylation and potentially alter deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools in adults. This study examines the effects of AZT on dNTP pools, mRNA expression of deoxynucleoside/deoxynucleotide metabolic enzymes, and mitochondrial DNA levels in a neonatal rat model. Results show that AZT treatment dramatically altered dNTP pools in the first 7 days of life after birth, which normalized to age-matched controls in the second and third weeks. Additionally, AZT treatment dramatically increased the mRNA levels of many enzymes involved in deoxynucleotide synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis during the first week of life, which normalized to age-matched controls by the third week. These results were correlated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA noted in the second week. Taken together, results demonstrated that AZT treatment has a powerful effect on the deoxynucleotide synthesis pathways that may be associated with toxicity and mutagenesis.

  13. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent and -Independent Signaling of mRNA Stability of AU-Rich Element-Containing Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Frevel, Mathias A. E.; Bakheet, Tala; Silva, Aristobolo M.; Hissong, John G.; Khabar, Khalid S. A.; Williams, Bryan R. G.

    2003-01-01

    Adenylate/uridylate-rich element (ARE)-mediated mRNA turnover is an important regulatory component of gene expression for innate and specific immunity, in the hematopoietic system, in cellular growth regulation, and for many other cellular processes. This diversity is reflected in the distribution of AREs in the human genome, which we have established as a database of more than 900 ARE-containing genes that may utilize AREs as a means of controlling cellular mRNA levels. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) pathway has been implicated in regulating the stability of nine ARE-containing transcripts. Here we explored the entire spectrum of ARE-containing genes for p38-dependent regulation of ARE-mediated mRNA turnover with a custom cDNA array containing probes for 950 ARE mRNAs. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as a reproducible cellular model system that allowed us to precisely control the conditions of mRNA induction and decay in the absence and presence of the p38 inhibitor SB203580. This approach allowed us to establish an LPS-induced ARE mRNA expression profile in human monocytes and determine the half-lives of 470 AU-rich mRNAs. Most importantly, we identified 42 AU-rich genes, previously unrecognized, that show p38-dependent mRNA stabilization. In addition to a number of cytokines, several interesting novel AU-rich transcripts likely to play a role in macrophage activation by LPS exhibited p38-dependent transcript stabilization, including macrophage-specific colony-stimulating factor 1, carbonic anhydrase 2, Bcl2, Bcl2-like 2, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2. Finally, the identification of the p38-dependent upstream activator MAP kinase kinase 6 as a member of this group identifies a positive feedback loop regulating macrophage signaling via p38 MAP kinase-dependent transcript stabilization. PMID:12509443

  14. Influence of Picual olive ripening on virgin olive oil alteration and stability during potato frying.

    PubMed

    Olivero-David, Raul; Mena, Carmen; Pérez-Jimenez, M Angeles; Sastre, Blanca; Bastida, Sara; Márquez-Ruiz, Gloria; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2014-12-03

    Ripening modifies oil attributes and composition. However, the influence of olive ripening on virgin olive oil (VOO) thermal oxidative stability on food-frying has not been studied yet. Oils from Picual olives of low (VOO1), medium (VOO2), and high (VOO3) ripeness were obtained, and their thermal oxidative stability during 40 potato-fryings was tested. Unused VOO1 showed higher antioxidant content and oxidative stability than VOO2 and VOO3. Polar compounds (PC), oligomers, and altered fatty acid methyl esters (polar-FAME) increased, whereas linoleic acid, polyphenols, and tocopherols decreased in the three VOOs through frying. The alteration was lower in VOO1, followed by VOO2 (0.105, 0.117, and 0.042 g/100 g oil less of PC, oligomers and polar-FAME per frying, respectively, in VOO1 than in VOO3). In conclusion, VOO obtained from low-ripeness Picual olives should be preferred when frying fresh-potatoes due to its higher thermal and oxidative stability, permitting a higher number of potato-frying uses.

  15. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  16. Effects of disruption of the nucleotide pattern in CRID element and Kozak sequence of interferon β on mRNA stability and protein production.

    PubMed

    Kay, Maryam; Hojati, Zohreh; Heidari, Maryam; Bazi, Zahra; Korbekandi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Interferon β (IFNβ) is the most important drug that has been used frequently for multiple sclerosis treatment. This study has tried to improve the IFNβ production by introducing mutations in the coding region of IFNβ, while its amino acid sequence is intact. Two recombinant vectors IFNβ(K) and IFNβ(K+CRID )were designed by site-directed mutagenesis. The IFNβ(K) and IFNβ(K+CRID) have two substitutions in Kozak sequence and four substitutions in CRID sequence, respectively. The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell codon usage optimization was also performed for both of them. They were transiently transfected to CHO-dhfr(-) cell line using Lipofectamine kit (Invitrogen, Grand Island, NY). The amount of mRNA and protein was determined by real time PCR and ELISA. The results of this study indicate that the amount of IFNβ protein produced by CHO cells containing IFNβ(K) has been elevated up to 3.5-fold. On the other hand, enormous amounts of IFNβ mRNA and protein were produced by cells containing IFNβ(K+CRID) construct; more than 4.6-fold and 6-fold, respectively. It could be concluded that disruption of AT pattern in CRID element increase RNA and protein production, improve IFNβ mRNA stability and, may also enhance mRNA half-life. In a similar way, more proteins are produced by modification of Kozak sequence.

  17. Fas-activated Ser/Thr phosphoprotein (FAST) is a eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein that regulates mRNA stability and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ivanov, Pavel; Anderson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of T cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) by Fas-activated Ser/Thr phosphoprotein (FAST) results in prolonged cell survival by inducing the expression of inhibitors of apoptosis. Here we show that the functional effects of FAST are dependent on its interactions with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) which is the major cytosolic cap binding protein in cells. FAST binds to eIF4E via a consensus motif (428YXXXXLL433) that is also found in eIF4G, 4E-BP1/2/3, 4E-T, and cup. A point mutation within this motif at Y428 dampens the ability of FAST to recognize eIF4E. Wild-type (WT) FAST, but not its Y428G mutant, increases the expression of co-transfected cellular inhibitor of apoptosis-1 (cIAP-1) and β-gal mRNA and protein, but inhibits the Fas-induced activation of caspase-3. Increased expression of the co-transfected proteins results, in part, from stabilization of mRNA, suggesting that FAST:eIF4E interactions can inhibit mRNA decay. We propose that eIF4E:FAST:TIA-1 complexes regulate the translation and stability of specific mRNAs that encode proteins important for cell survival. PMID:26824015

  18. Extracellular norepinephrine, norepinephrine receptor and transporter protein and mRNA levels are differentially altered in the developing rat brain due to dietary iron deficiency and manganese exposure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Fordahl, Steven C; Cooney, Paula T; Weaver, Tara L; Colyer, Christa L; Erikson, Keith M

    2009-07-24

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element, but overexposure is characterized by Parkinson's like symptoms in extreme cases. Previous studies have shown that Mn accumulation is exacerbated by dietary iron deficiency (ID) and disturbances in norepinephrine (NE) have been reported. Because behaviors associated with Mn neurotoxicity are complex, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of Mn exposure and ID-associated Mn accumulation on NE uptake in synaptosomes, extracellular NE concentrations, and expression of NE transport and receptor proteins. Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four dietary groups: control (CN; 35 mg Fe/kg diet), iron-deficient (ID; 6 mg Fe/kg diet), CN with Mn exposure (via the drinking water; 1 g Mn/L) (CNMn), and ID with Mn (IDMn). (3)H-NE uptake decreased significantly (R=-0.753, p=0.001) with increased Mn concentration in the locus coeruleus, while decreased Fe was associated with decreased uptake of (3)H-NE in the caudate putamen (R=0.436, p=0.033) and locus coeruleus (R=0.86; p<0.001). Extracellular concentrations of NE in the caudate putamen were significantly decreased in response to Mn exposure and ID (p<0.001). A diverse response of Mn exposure and ID was observed on mRNA and protein expression of NE transporter (NET) and alpha(2) adrenergic receptor. For example, elevated brain Mn and decreased Fe caused an approximate 50% decrease in NET and alpha(2) adrenergic receptor protein expression in several brain regions, with reductions in mRNA expression also observed. These data suggest that Mn exposure results in a decrease in NE uptake and extracellular NE concentrations via altered expression of transport and receptor proteins.

  19. PKCε Promotes HuD-Mediated Neprilysin mRNA Stability and Enhances Neprilysin-Induced Aβ Degradation in Brain Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chol Seung; Alkon, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide accumulation in the brain is a pathological hallmark of all forms of Alzheimer’s disease. An imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from the brain may contribute to accumulation of neurotoxic Aβ and subsequent synaptic loss, which is the strongest correlate of the extent of memory loss in AD. The activity of neprilysin (NEP), a potent Aβ-degrading enzyme, is decreased in the AD brain. Expression of HuD, an mRNA-binding protein important for synaptogenesis and neuronal plasticity, is also decreased in the AD brain. HuD is regulated by protein kinase Cε (PKCε), and we previously demonstrated that PKCε activation decreases Aβ levels. We hypothesized that PKCε acts through HuD to stabilize NEP mRNA, modulate its localization, and support NEP activity. Conversely, loss of PKCε-activated HuD in AD leads to decreased NEP activity and accumulation of Aβ. Here we show that HuD is associated with NEP mRNA in cultures of human SK-N-SH cells. Treatment with bryostatin, a PKCε-selective activator, enhanced NEP association with HuD and increased NEP mRNA stability. Activation of PKCε also increased NEP protein levels, increased NEP phosphorylation, and induced cell surface expression. In addition, specific PKCε activation directly stimulated NEP activity, leading to degradation of a monomeric form of Aβ peptide and decreased Aβ neuronal toxicity, as measured by cell viability. Bryostatin treatment also rescued Aβ-mediated inhibition of HuD-NEP mRNA binding, NEP protein expression, and NEP cell membrane translocation. These results suggest that PKCε activation reduces Aβ by up-regulating, via the mRNA-binding protein HuD, Aβ-degrading enzymes such as NEP. Thus, PKCε activation may have therapeutic efficacy for AD by reducing neurotoxic Aβ accumulation as well as having direct anti-apoptotic and synaptogenic effects. PMID:24848988

  20. Detrimental ELAVL-1/HuR-dependent GSK3β mRNA stabilization impairs resolution in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Olivia; Burns, Nana; Vadász, István; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Edwards, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is accumulation of protein-rich edema in the distal airspaces and its removal is critical for patient survival. Previous studies have shown a detrimental role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK) 3β during ARDS via inhibition of alveolar epithelial protein transport. We hypothesized that post-transcriptional regulation of GSK3β could play a functional role in ARDS resolution. To address this hypothesis, we performed an in silico analysis to identify regulatory genes whose expression correlation to GSK3β messenger RNA utilizing two lung cancer cell line array datasets. Among potential regulatory partners of GSK3β, these studies identified the RNA-binding protein ELAVL-1/HuR (Embryonic Lethal, Abnormal Vision, Drosophila-Like) as a central component in a likely GSK3β signaling network. ELAVL-1/HuR is a RNA-binding protein that selectively binds to AU-rich elements of mRNA and enhances its stability thereby increasing target gene expression. Subsequent studies with siRNA suppression of ELAVL-1/HuR demonstrated deceased GSK3β mRNA and protein expression and improved clearance of FITC-albumin in A549 cells. Conversely, stabilization of ELAVL-1/HuR with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 resulted in induction of GSK3β at mRNA and protein level and attenuated FITC-albumin clearance. Utilizing ventilator-induced lung injury or intra-tracheal installation of hydrochloric acid to induce ARDS in mice, we observed increased mRNA and protein expression of ELAVL-1/HuR and GSK3β. Together, our findings indicate a previously unknown interaction between GSK3β and ELAV-1 during ARDS, and suggest the inhibition of the ELAV-1- GSK3β pathways as a novel ARDS treatment approach. PMID:28196122

  1. Detrimental ELAVL-1/HuR-dependent GSK3β mRNA stabilization impairs resolution in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Olivia; Burns, Nana; Vadász, István; Eltzschig, Holger K; Edwards, Michael G; Vohwinkel, Christine U

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is accumulation of protein-rich edema in the distal airspaces and its removal is critical for patient survival. Previous studies have shown a detrimental role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK) 3β during ARDS via inhibition of alveolar epithelial protein transport. We hypothesized that post-transcriptional regulation of GSK3β could play a functional role in ARDS resolution. To address this hypothesis, we performed an in silico analysis to identify regulatory genes whose expression correlation to GSK3β messenger RNA utilizing two lung cancer cell line array datasets. Among potential regulatory partners of GSK3β, these studies identified the RNA-binding protein ELAVL-1/HuR (Embryonic Lethal, Abnormal Vision, Drosophila-Like) as a central component in a likely GSK3β signaling network. ELAVL-1/HuR is a RNA-binding protein that selectively binds to AU-rich elements of mRNA and enhances its stability thereby increasing target gene expression. Subsequent studies with siRNA suppression of ELAVL-1/HuR demonstrated deceased GSK3β mRNA and protein expression and improved clearance of FITC-albumin in A549 cells. Conversely, stabilization of ELAVL-1/HuR with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 resulted in induction of GSK3β at mRNA and protein level and attenuated FITC-albumin clearance. Utilizing ventilator-induced lung injury or intra-tracheal installation of hydrochloric acid to induce ARDS in mice, we observed increased mRNA and protein expression of ELAVL-1/HuR and GSK3β. Together, our findings indicate a previously unknown interaction between GSK3β and ELAV-1 during ARDS, and suggest the inhibition of the ELAV-1- GSK3β pathways as a novel ARDS treatment approach.

  2. Rainfall and hydrological stability alter the impact of top predators on food web structure and function.

    PubMed

    Marino, Nicholas A C; Srivastava, Diane S; MacDonald, A Andrew M; Leal, Juliana S; Campos, Alice B A; Farjalla, Vinicius F

    2017-02-01

    Climate change will alter the distribution of rainfall, with potential consequences for the hydrological dynamics of aquatic habitats. Hydrological stability can be an important determinant of diversity in temporary aquatic habitats, affecting species persistence and the importance of predation on community dynamics. As such, prey are not only affected by drought-induced mortality but also the risk of predation [a non-consumptive effect (NCE)] and actual consumption by predators [a consumptive effect (CE)]. Climate-induced changes in rainfall may directly, or via altered hydrological stability, affect predator-prey interactions and their cascading effects on the food web, but this has rarely been explored, especially in natural food webs. To address this question, we performed a field experiment using tank bromeliads and their aquatic food web, composed of predatory damselfly larvae, macroinvertebrate prey and bacteria. We manipulated the presence and consumption ability of damselfly larvae under three rainfall scenarios (ambient, few large rainfall events and several small rainfall events), recorded the hydrological dynamics within bromeliads and examined the effects on macroinvertebrate colonization, nutrient cycling and bacterial biomass and turnover. Despite our large perturbations of rainfall, rainfall scenario had no effect on the hydrological dynamics of bromeliads. As a result, macroinvertebrate colonization and nutrient cycling depended on the hydrological stability of bromeliads, with no direct effect of rainfall or predation. In contrast, rainfall scenario determined the direction of the indirect effects of predators on bacteria, driven by both predator CEs and NCEs. These results suggest that rainfall and the hydrological stability of bromeliads had indirect effects on the food web through changes in the CEs and NCEs of predators. We suggest that future studies should consider the importance of the variability in hydrological dynamics among habitats as

  3. Posttranscriptional regulation of ribosomal protein S20 and stability of the S20 mRNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, G A

    1987-01-01

    I have tested whether selective degradation of mRNA for ribosomal protein S20 of Escherichia coli occurs under conditions for which the expression of S20 is regulated posttranscriptionally. Blot hybridization of total RNA extracted from cultures at different times after addition of rifampin has permitted the estimation of relative levels of the two S20 mRNA species and their half-lives. In a strain harboring a plasmid containing the complete gene for S20, including the transcriptional terminator, moderate posttranscriptional repression of S20 synthesis is accompanied by a substantial increase in the half-lives of both S20 mRNAs relative to those in the haploid parental strain. In an otherwise identical strain in which the transcriptional terminator is deleted from the plasmid-borne S20 genes, the half-life of total S20 mRNA declines more than twofold relative to that in the haploid parent. Thus accelerated decay of the mRNAs for ribosomal protein S20 appears to be an artifact of deletion of the transcriptional terminator, rather than a physiologically significant consequence of translational repression. Images PMID:2438268

  4. Identification of cytoplasmic capping targets reveals a role for cap homeostasis in translation and mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Chandrama; Patil, Deepak P.; Kennedy, Brian A.; Bakthavachalu, Baskar; Bundschuh, Ralf; Schoenberg, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The notion that decapping leads irreversibly to mRNA decay changed with the identification of capped transcripts missing portions of their 5′ ends and a cytoplasmic complex that can restore the cap on uncapped mRNAs. The current study used accumulation of uncapped transcripts in cells inhibited for cytoplasmic capping to identify the targets of this pathway. Inhibition of cytoplasmic capping resulted in the destabilization of some transcripts and the redistribution of others from polysomes to non-translating mRNPs, where they accumulate in an uncapped state. Only a portion of the mRNA transcriptome is affected by cytoplasmic capping, and its targets encode proteins involved in nucleotide binding, RNA and protein localization and the mitotic cell cycle. The 3′-UTRs of recapping targets are enriched for AU-rich elements and microRNA binding sites, both of which function in cap-dependent mRNA silencing. These findings identify a cyclical process of decapping and recapping we term cap homeostasis. PMID:22921400

  5. Glucocorticoid-induced changes in glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in the human placenta as a potential factor for altering fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Bivol, Svetlana; Owen, Suzzanne J; Rose'Meyer, Roselyn B

    2016-02-05

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) control essential metabolic processes in virtually every cell in the body and play a vital role in the development of fetal tissues and organ systems. The biological actions of GCs are mediated via glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), the cytoplasmic transcription factors that regulate the transcription of genes involved in placental and fetal growth and development. Several experimental studies have demonstrated that fetal exposure to high maternal GC levels early in gestation is associated with adverse fetal outcomes, including low birthweight, intrauterine growth restriction and anatomical and structural abnormalities that may increase the risk of cardiovascular, metabolic and neuroendocrine disorders in adulthood. The response of the fetus to GCs is dependent on gender, with female fetuses becoming hypersensitive to changes in GC levels whereas male fetuses develop GC resistance in the environment of high maternal GCs. In this paper we review GR function and the physiological and pathological effects of GCs on fetal development. We propose that GC-induced changes in the placental structure and function, including alterations in the expression of GR mRNA and protein levels, may play role in inhibiting in utero fetal growth.

  6. Carrying shopping bags does not alter static postural stability and gait parameters in healthy older females.

    PubMed

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Food shopping is an important aspect of maintaining independence and social interaction in older age. Carriage of shopping bags alters the body's weight distribution which, depending on load distribution, could potentially increase instability during standing and walking. The study examined the effect of carrying UK style shopping bags on static postural stability and gait in healthy older and young females. Nine older (71.0±6.0 years) and 10 young (26.7±5.2 years) females were assessed in five conditions carrying no bags, one 1.5kg bag in each hand, one 3kg bag in each hand, one 1.5kg bag in preferred hand, one 3kg bag in preferred hand. Antero-posterior and medio-lateral displacement, and 95% ellipse area from a 30s quiet standing were used for postural stability assessment. Stride length and its coefficient of variation, total double support time, step asymmetry and gait stability ratio were calculated from 1min treadmill walking at self-selected speed for gait assessment. Carrying shopping bags did not negatively affect postural stability or gait variables, in either group. Further, in older individuals, a decrease in sway velocity was found when holding bags during the postural stability assessment (p<0.05), suggesting that carriage of bags, irrespective of the load distribution, may have a stabilising effect during quiet standing. These results should help to alleviate concerns regarding safety of carrying shopping bags and help encourage shopping, both as a social and as a physical activity.

  7. Altered native stability is the dominant basis for susceptibility of α1-antitrypsin mutants to polymerization.

    PubMed

    Irving, James A; Haq, Imran; Dickens, Jennifer A; Faull, Sarah V; Lomas, David A

    2014-05-15

    Serpins are protease inhibitors whose most stable state is achieved upon transition of a central 5-stranded β-sheet to a 6-stranded form. Mutations, low pH, denaturants and elevated temperatures promote this transition, which can result in a growing polymer chain of inactive molecules. Different types of polymer are possible, but, experimentally only heat has been shown to generate polymers in vitro consistent with ex vivo pathological specimens. Many mutations that alter the rate of heat-induced polymerization have been described, but interpretation is problematic because discrimination is lacking between the effect of global changes in native stability and specific effects on structural mechanism. We show that the temperature midpoint (Tm) of thermal denaturation reflects the transition of α1-antitrypsin to the polymerization intermediate, and determine the relationship with fixed-temperature polymerization half-times (t0.5) in the presence of stabilizing additives [TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide), sucrose and sodium sulfate], point mutations and disulfide bonds. Combined with a retrospective analysis of 31 mutants characterized in the literature, the results of the present study show that global changes to native state stability are the predominant basis for the effects of mutations and osmolytes on heat-induced polymerization, summarized by the equation: ln(t0.5,mutant/t0.5,wild-type)=0.34×ΔTm. It is deviations from this relationship that hold key information about the polymerization process.

  8. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) inhibited cell transformation by inducing G0/G1 phase arrest via increasing MKP-1 mRNA Stability.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangxun; Chen, Liang; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Fang, Yong; Huang, Haishan; Chen, Xiequn; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-05-15

    The cancer chemopreventive property of Chinese herb new isolate isorhapontigenin (ISO) and mechanisms underlying its activity have never been explored. Here we demonstrated that ISO treatment with various concentrations for 3 weeks could dramatically inhibit TPA/EGF-induced cell transformation of Cl41 cells in Soft Agar assay, whereas co-incubation of cells with ISO at the same concentrations could elicit G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest without redundant cytotoxic effects on non-transformed cells. Further studies showed that ISO treatment resulted in cyclin D1 downregulation in dose- and time-dependent manner. Our results indicated that ISO regulated cyclin D1 at transcription level via targeting JNK/C-Jun/AP-1 activation. Moreover, we found that ISO-inhibited JNK/C-Jun/AP-1 activation was mediated by both upregulation of MKP-1 expression through increasing its mRNA stability and deactivating MKK7. Most importantly, MKP-1 knockdown could attenuate ISO-mediated suppression of JNK/C-Jun activation and cyclin D1 expression, as well as G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and cell transformation inhibition, while ectopic expression of FLAG-cyclin D1 T286A mutant also reversed ISO-induced G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest and inhibition of cell transformation. Our results demonstrated that ISO is a promising chemopreventive agent via upregulating mkp-1 mRNA stability, which is distinct from its cancer therapeutic effect with downregulation of XIAP and cyclin D1 expression.

  9. The arabidopsis polyamine transporter LHRI/AtPUT3 modulates heat responsive gene expression by regulating mRNA stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyamines (PA) involve in the gene regulation by interacting with various anionic macromolecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins and modulating their structure and function. Previous studies have showed that changing in polyamine biosynthesis alters plant response to different abiotic stresses. Here,...

  10. GABA-A and NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression is altered in the caudate but not the putamen of the postmortem brains of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Bhandage, Amol K; Jin, Zhe; Bazov, Igor; Kononenko, Olga; Bakalkin, Georgy; Korpi, Esa R; Birnir, Bryndis

    2014-01-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol by humans has been shown to lead to impairment of executive and cognitive functions. Here, we have studied the mRNA expression of ion channel receptors for glutamate and GABA in the dorsal striatum of post-mortem brains from alcoholics (n = 29) and normal controls (n = 29), with the focus on the caudate nucleus that is associated with the frontal cortex executive functions and automatic thinking and on the putamen area that is linked to motor cortices and automatic movements. The results obtained by qPCR assay revealed significant changes in the expression of specific excitatory ionotropic glutamate and inhibitory GABA-A receptor subunit genes in the caudate but not the putamen. Thus, in the caudate we found reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the GluN2A glutamate receptor and the δ, ε, and ρ2 GABA-A receptor subunits, and increased levels of the mRNAs encoding GluD1, GluD2, and GABA-A γ1 subunits in the alcoholics as compared to controls. Interestingly in the controls, 11 glutamate and 5 GABA-A receptor genes were more prominently expressed in the caudate than the putamen (fold-increase varied from 1.24 to 2.91). Differences in gene expression patterns between the striatal regions may underlie differences in associated behavioral outputs. Our results suggest an altered balance between caudate-mediated voluntarily controlled and automatic behaviors in alcoholics, including diminished executive control on goal-directed alcohol-seeking behavior.

  11. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  12. Maternal consumption of organic trace minerals alters calf systemic and neutrophil mRNA and microRNA indicators of inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jacometo, Carolina B; Osorio, Johan S; Socha, Michael; Corrêa, Marcio N; Piccioli-Cappelli, Fiorenzo; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Organic trace mineral (ORG) supplementation to dairy cows in substitution of sulfate (INO) sources has been associated with improvement in immune function during stressful states such as the peripartal period. However, the effect of supplemental ORG during pregnancy on the neonatal calf is unknown. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of ORG supplementation during late pregnancy on the immune system and growth of the neonatal calf. Of specific interest was the evaluation of inflammation-related microRNA (miRNA) and target gene expression in blood neutrophils as indicators of possible nutritional programming. Forty multiparous cows were supplemented for 30d prepartum with 40 mg/kg of Zn, 20 mg/kg of Mn, 5 mg/kg of Cu, and 1mg/kg of Co from either organic (ORG) or sulfate (INO) sources (total diet contained supplemental 75 mg/kg of Zn, 65 mg/kg of Mn, 11 mg/kg of Cu, and 1 mg/kg of Co, and additional Zn, Mn, and Co provided by sulfates), and a subset of calves (n=8/treatment) was used for blood immunometabolic marker and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) gene and miRNA expression analyses. Samples were collected at birth (before colostrum feeding), 1d (24 h after colostrum intake), and 7 and 21d of age. Data were analyzed as a factorial design with the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS. No differences were detected in BW, but maternal ORG tended to increase calf withers height. Calves from INO-fed cows had greater concentrations of blood glucose, GOT, paraoxonase, myeloperoxidase, and reactive oxygen metabolites. Antioxidant capacity also was greater in INO calves. The PMNL expression of toll-like receptor pathway genes indicated a pro-inflammatory state in INO calves, with greater expression of the inflammatory mediators MYD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, NFKB, and NFKBIA. The lower expression of miR-155 and miR-125b in ORG calves indicated the potential for maternal organic trace minerals in regulating the PMNL inflammatory response at least via alterations in mRNA and

  13. Water making hot rocks soft: How hydrothermal alteration affects volcano stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    My research involves using numerical models of groundwater flow and slope stability to determine how long-term hydrothermal alteration in stratovolcanoes can cause increases in pore fluid pressure that lead to edifice collapse. Or in simpler terms: We can use computers to figure out how and why water that moves through hot rocks changes them into softer rocks that want to fall down. It's important to pay attention to the soft rocks even if they look safe because this can happen a long time after the stuff that makes them hot goes away or becomes cool. Wet soft rocks can go very far from high places and run over people in their way. I want show where the soft wet rocks are and how they might fall down so people will be safer.

  14. Let-7b/c enhance the stability of a tissue-specific mRNA during mammalian organogenesis as part of a feedback loop involving KSRP.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Emanuela; Briata, Paola; Kuziner, Nathalie; Harfe, Brian D; McManus, Michael T; Gherzi, Roberto; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Trabucchi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Gene silencing mediated by either microRNAs (miRNAs) or Adenylate/uridylate-rich elements Mediated mRNA Degradation (AMD) is a powerful way to post-transcriptionally modulate gene expression. We and others have reported that the RNA-binding protein KSRP favors the biogenesis of select miRNAs (including let-7 family) and activates AMD promoting the decay of inherently labile mRNAs. Different layers of interplay between miRNA- and AMD-mediated gene silencing have been proposed in cultured cells, but the relationship between the two pathways in living organisms is still elusive. We conditionally deleted Dicer in mouse pituitary from embryonic day (E) 9.5 through Cre-mediated recombination. In situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that Dicer is essential for pituitary morphogenesis and correct expression of hormones. Strikingly, αGSU (alpha glycoprotein subunit, common to three pituitary hormones) was absent in Dicer-deleted pituitaries. αGSU mRNA is unstable and its half-life increases during pituitary development. A transcriptome-wide analysis of microdissected E12.5 pituitaries revealed a significant increment of KSRP expression in conditional Dicer-deleted mice. We found that KSRP directly binds to αGSU mRNA, promoting its rapid decay; and, during pituitary development, αGSU expression displays an inverse temporal relationship to KSRP. Further, let-7b/c downregulated KSRP expression, promoting the degradation of its mRNA by directly binding to the 3'UTR. Therefore, we propose a model in which let-7b/c and KSRP operate within a negative feedback loop. Starting from E12.5, KSRP induces the maturation of let-7b/c that, in turn, post-transcriptionally downregulates the expression of KSRP itself. This event leads to stabilization of αGSU mRNA, which ultimately enhances the steady-state expression levels. We have identified a post-transcriptional regulatory network active during mouse pituitary development in

  15. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms.

  16. Photoelectrochemical Stability and Alteration Products of n-Type Single-Crystal ZnO Photoanodes

    DOE PAGES

    Paulauskas, I. E.; Jellison, G. E.; Boatner, L. A.; ...

    2011-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical stability and surface-alteration characteristics of doped and undoped n-type ZnO single-crystal photoanode electrodes were investigated. The single-crystal ZnO photoanode properties were analyzed using current-voltage measurements plus spectral and time-dependent quantum-yield methods. These measurements revealed a distinct anodic peak and an accompanying cathodic surface degradation process at negative potentials. The features of this peak depended on time and the NaOH concentration in the electrolyte, but were independent of the presence of electrode illumination. Current measurements performed at the peak indicate that charging and discharging effects are apparently taking place at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. This result is consistent with themore » significant reactive degradation that takes place on the ZnO single crystal photoanode surface and that ultimately leads to the reduction of the ZnO surface to Zn metal. The resulting Zn-metal reaction products create unusual, dendrite-like, surface alteration structural features that were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. ZnO doping methods were found to be effective in increasing the n-type character of the crystals. Higher doping levels result in smaller depletion widths and lower quantum yields, since the minority carrier diffusion lengths are very short in these materials.« less

  17. Differential IL-1β secretion by monocyte subsets is regulated by Hsp27 through modulating mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Hadadi, Eva; Zhang, Biyan; Baidžajevas, Kajus; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Puan, Kia Joo; Ong, Siew Min; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Wilson, Heather; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes play a central role in regulating inflammation in response to infection or injury, and during auto-inflammatory diseases. Human blood contains classical, intermediate and non-classical monocyte subsets that each express characteristic patterns of cell surface CD16 and CD14; each subset also has specific functional properties, but the mechanisms underlying many of their distinctive features are undefined. Of particular interest is how monocyte subsets regulate secretion of the apical pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, which is central to the initiation of immune responses but is also implicated in the pathology of various auto-immune/auto-inflammatory conditions. Here we show that primary human non-classical monocytes, exposed to LPS or LPS + BzATP (3’-O-(4-benzoyl)benzyl-ATP, a P2X7R agonist), produce approx. 80% less IL-1β than intermediate or classical monocytes. Despite their low CD14 expression, LPS-sensing, caspase-1 activation and P2X7R activity were comparable in non-classical monocytes to other subsets: their diminished ability to produce IL-1β instead arose from 50% increased IL-1β mRNA decay rates, mediated by Hsp27. These findings identify the Hsp27 pathway as a novel therapeutic target for the management of conditions featuring dysregulated IL-1β production, and represent an advancement in understanding of both physiological inflammatory responses and the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases involving monocyte-derived IL-1β. PMID:27976724

  18. Differential IL-1β secretion by monocyte subsets is regulated by Hsp27 through modulating mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Eva; Zhang, Biyan; Baidžajevas, Kajus; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Puan, Kia Joo; Ong, Siew Min; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Wilson, Heather; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-12-15

    Monocytes play a central role in regulating inflammation in response to infection or injury, and during auto-inflammatory diseases. Human blood contains classical, intermediate and non-classical monocyte subsets that each express characteristic patterns of cell surface CD16 and CD14; each subset also has specific functional properties, but the mechanisms underlying many of their distinctive features are undefined. Of particular interest is how monocyte subsets regulate secretion of the apical pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, which is central to the initiation of immune responses but is also implicated in the pathology of various auto-immune/auto-inflammatory conditions. Here we show that primary human non-classical monocytes, exposed to LPS or LPS + BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzyl-ATP, a P2X7R agonist), produce approx. 80% less IL-1β than intermediate or classical monocytes. Despite their low CD14 expression, LPS-sensing, caspase-1 activation and P2X7R activity were comparable in non-classical monocytes to other subsets: their diminished ability to produce IL-1β instead arose from 50% increased IL-1β mRNA decay rates, mediated by Hsp27. These findings identify the Hsp27 pathway as a novel therapeutic target for the management of conditions featuring dysregulated IL-1β production, and represent an advancement in understanding of both physiological inflammatory responses and the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases involving monocyte-derived IL-1β.

  19. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  20. The phosphorylation of protein S6 modulates the interaction of the 40 S ribosomal subunit with the 5'-untranslated region of a dictyostelium pre-spore-specific mRNA and controls its stability.

    PubMed

    Chiaberge, S; Cassarino, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1998-10-16

    AC914 mRNA, a pre-spore-specific mRNA that accumulates only in the post-aggregation stage of development, is transcribed constitutively as shown by nuclear run-off experiments and by fusing its promoter to the luciferase reporter gene. The same mRNA disappears quickly from disaggregated cells. If the 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of the constitutively expressed Actin 15 mRNA is substituted for the 5'UTR of AC914 mRNA, this can no longer be destabilized and accumulates both in growing and disaggregated cells. If the 5'UTR of AC914 mRNA is substituted for the 5'UTR of Actin 15 mRNA, the latter accumulates only in aggregated cells. Pactamycin, but not other inhibitors of protein synthesis, prevents AC914 mRNA from being destabilized in disaggregated cells, suggesting a role of 40 S subunits in the destabilization. This has been confirmed by using an in vitro system in which the in vivo stability of different mRNAs is reproduced. A protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 determines whether 40 S subunits are capable or not of destabilizing AC914 mRNA in the in vitro system.

  1. RNA-Binding Protein Dnd1 Promotes Breast Cancer Apoptosis by Stabilizing the Bim mRNA in a miR-221 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Feng; Pan, Ying; Lu, Yi-Min; Zhu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and miRNAs are capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. Both of them could determine RNA transcripts fate from synthesis to decay. One such RBP, Dead end (Dnd1), is essential for regulating germ-cell viability and suppresses the germ-cell tumors development, yet how it exerts its functions in breast cancer has remained unresolved. The level of Dnd1 was detected in 21 cancerous tissues paired with neighboring normal tissues by qRT-PCR. We further annotated TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) mRNA expression profiles and found that the expression of Dnd1 and Bim is positively correlated (p = 0.04). Patients with higher Dnd1 expression level had longer overall survival (p = 0.0014) by KM Plotter tool. Dnd1 knockdown in MCF-7 cells decreased Bim expression levels and inhibited apoptosis. While knockdown of Dnd1 promoted the decay of Bim mRNA 3′UTR, the stability of Bim-5′UTR was not affected. In addition, mutation of miR-221-binding site in Bim-3′UTR canceled the effect of Dnd1 on Bim mRNA. Knockdown of Dnd1 in MCF-7 cells confirmed that Dnd1 antagonized miR-221-inhibitory effects on Bim expression. Overall, our findings indicate that Dnd1 facilitates apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bim via its competitive combining with miR-221 in Bim-3′UTR. The new function of Dnd1 may contribute to a vital role in breast cancer development. PMID:28191469

  2. RNA-Binding Protein Dnd1 Promotes Breast Cancer Apoptosis by Stabilizing the Bim mRNA in a miR-221 Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Pan, Ying; Lu, Yi-Min; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Shuzheng

    2017-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and miRNAs are capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. Both of them could determine RNA transcripts fate from synthesis to decay. One such RBP, Dead end (Dnd1), is essential for regulating germ-cell viability and suppresses the germ-cell tumors development, yet how it exerts its functions in breast cancer has remained unresolved. The level of Dnd1 was detected in 21 cancerous tissues paired with neighboring normal tissues by qRT-PCR. We further annotated TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) mRNA expression profiles and found that the expression of Dnd1 and Bim is positively correlated (p = 0.04). Patients with higher Dnd1 expression level had longer overall survival (p = 0.0014) by KM Plotter tool. Dnd1 knockdown in MCF-7 cells decreased Bim expression levels and inhibited apoptosis. While knockdown of Dnd1 promoted the decay of Bim mRNA 3'UTR, the stability of Bim-5'UTR was not affected. In addition, mutation of miR-221-binding site in Bim-3'UTR canceled the effect of Dnd1 on Bim mRNA. Knockdown of Dnd1 in MCF-7 cells confirmed that Dnd1 antagonized miR-221-inhibitory effects on Bim expression. Overall, our findings indicate that Dnd1 facilitates apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bim via its competitive combining with miR-221 in Bim-3'UTR. The new function of Dnd1 may contribute to a vital role in breast cancer development.

  3. Altered mRNA Levels of Glucocorticoid Receptor, Mineralocorticoid Receptor, and Co-Chaperones (FKBP5 and PTGES3) in the Middle Frontal Gyrus of Autism Spectrum Disorder Subjects.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neil; Crider, Amanda; Pandya, Chirayu D; Ahmed, Anthony O; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2016-05-01

    Although stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), it is not known whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels are altered in the brain of subjects with ASD. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of GR isoforms (GRα, GRβ, GRγ, and GRP), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), GR co-chaperones (FKBP5, PTGES3, and BAG1), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) were examined in the postmortem middle frontal gyrus tissues of 13 ASD and 13 age-matched controls by qRT-PCR. The protein levels were examined by Western blotting. We found significant decreases in GRα (64%), GRγ (48%), GRP (20%) and MR (46%) mRNA levels in ASD subjects as compared to controls. However, significant increases in FKBP5 (42%) and PTGES3 (35%) mRNA levels were observed in ASD subjects. There were no differences in the mRNA levels of GRβ and BAG1 in ASD subjects as compared to controls. MR mRNA was found to be negatively correlated with the diagnostic score for abnormality of development. On the protein level, significant reductions in GR and MR, but no change in FKBP5 and PTGES3 were found in ASD subjects as compared to controls. Moreover, we observed significant increases in IL-1β and IFN-γ mRNA levels in ASD subjects, and these cytokines were negatively associated with GR levels. Our data, for the first time, reports dysregulation of GR, MR, FKBP5, and PTGES3 in ASD and suggest a possible role of inflammation in altered GR function in ASD.

  4. The RNA-binding protein HuD is required for GAP-43 mRNA stability, GAP-43 gene expression, and PKC-dependent neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, C D; Anderson, K D; Morin, M; Beckel-Mitchener, A; Rogers, S L; Furneaux, H; King, P; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I

    2000-09-01

    The RNA-binding protein HuD binds to a regulatory element in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the GAP-43 mRNA. To investigate the functional significance of this interaction, we generated PC12 cell lines in which HuD levels were controlled by transfection with either antisense (pDuH) or sense (pcHuD) constructs. pDuH-transfected cells contained reduced amounts of GAP-43 protein and mRNA, and these levels remained low even after nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulation, a treatment that is normally associated with protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent stabilization of the GAP-43 mRNA and neuronal differentiation. Analysis of GAP-43 mRNA stability demonstrated that the mRNA had a shorter half-life in these cells. In agreement with their deficient GAP-43 expression, pDuH cells failed to grow neurites in the presence of NGF or phorbol esters. These cells, however, exhibited normal neurite outgrowth when exposed to dibutyryl-cAMP, an agent that induces outgrowth independently from GAP-43. We observed opposite effects in pcHuD-transfected cells. The GAP-43 mRNA was stabilized in these cells, leading to an increase in the levels of the GAP-43 mRNA and protein. pcHuD cells were also found to grow short spontaneous neurites, a process that required the presence of GAP-43. In conclusion, our results suggest that HuD plays a critical role in PKC-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and that this protein does so primarily by promoting the stabilization of the GAP-43 mRNA.

  5. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  6. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L; Turner, Edgar C

    2011-11-27

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification.

  7. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Robert M.; Didham, Raphael K.; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D.; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L.; Turner, Edgar C.

    2011-01-01

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification. PMID:22006969

  8. Effect of purified diets and phenobarbital withdrawal on the phenotypic stability of altered hepatic foci (AHF)

    SciTech Connect

    Glauert, H.P.; Schwarz, M.; Pitot, H.C.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of the short-term withdrawal of phenobarbital (PB) and of the feeding of purified diets during the long-term withdrawal of PB on the stability of AHF were studied. In both experiments, female CD rats initially received an intragastric dose of diethylnitrosamine (10 mg/kg) 20 hours after being subjected to partial hepatectomy. In the short-term study, rats were fed 0.05% PB in a cereal-based diet for 6 months; at this time, half of the rats were killed whereas the other half were withdrawn from PB for 10 days before sacrifice. Withdrawing PB for 10 days resulted in a decrease in the number and volume of AHF, particularly those which stained positively for gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). In the long-term experiment, rats were fed 0.05% PB in a cereal-based diet containing PB and fed either a low-fat or a high-fat purified diet without PB for 8 months. At this time, the number and volume of AHF were much less than that seen at the time of PB withdrawal, and the distribution of phenotypes was altered: the percentage of foci containing GGT as a marker decreased dramatically. These results indicate that the observable number and total volume of AHF rapidly decrease after the withdrawal of PB from rats fed a cereal-based diet and that the feeding of purified diets after such PB withdrawal does not result in the reappearance of AHF.

  9. 6-Hydroxydopamine-lesioning of the nigrostriatal pathway in rats alters basal ganglia mRNA for copper, zinc- and manganese-superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Kunikowska, G; Jenner, P

    2001-12-13

    The effects of nigrostriatal pathway destruction on the mRNA levels of copper, zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase in basal ganglia of adult rat were investigated using in situ hybridization histochemistry and oligodeoxynucleotide (single-stranded complementary DNA) probes. The 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal pathway resulted in contralateral rotation to apomorphine and a marked loss of specific [(3)H]mazindol binding in the striatum (93%; P<0.05) and of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in substantia nigra pars compacta (SC) (93%; P<0.05) compared with control rats. Levels of Cu,Zn-SOD mRNA were decreased in the striatum, globus pallidus, and SC on the lesioned side of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats compared with sham-lesioned rats (P<0.05). Levels of Mn-SOD mRNA were increased in the nucleus accumbens (P<0.05), but decreased in the SC (P<0.05) on the lesioned side of 6-OHDA-treated rats compared with sham-lesioned rats. Lesioning with 6-OHDA had no effect on glutathione peroxidase mRNA levels in any region of basal ganglia examined. The significant changes in Cu,Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD mRNA indicate that SOD is primarily expressed by dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway, and that the Mn-SOD gene appears to be inducible in rat basal ganglia in response to both physical and chemical damage 5 weeks after 6-OHDA-lesioning. These findings may clarify the status of antioxidant enzymes, particularly Mn-SOD, in patients with Parkinson's disease and their relevance to disease pathogenesis.

  10. Stress and withdrawal from d-amphetamine alter 5-HT2A receptor mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ryan C; Hebbard, John C; Logan, Anna S; Vanchipurakel, Golda A; Gilbert, Yamiece E; Horner, Kristen A

    2014-01-24

    Psychostimulant withdrawal results in emotional, behavioral, and cognitive impairments, which may be exacerbated by stress. However, little is known about the neurochemical changes that occur when these two conditions are experienced concomitantly. 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is diminished following withdrawal from d-amphetamine (AMPH) and may underlie the emotional and cognitive impairments observed in psychostimulant withdrawal, but whether stress affects 5-HT2AR mRNA expression during psychostimulant withdrawal is unknown. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of forced swim test (FST) exposure during AMPH withdrawal on 5-HT2AR mRNA expression in PFC. Animals were treated 3 times a day for 4 days with escalating doses of AMPH (1-10mg/kg) and 24h or 4 days after the final injection, animals were subjected to FST. At 24h of withdrawal, AMPH-treated animals showed greater immobility in FST and at 4 days of withdrawal, AMPH-treated animals did not show immobility. At 24h of withdrawal, animals showed lower 5-HT2AR mRNA expression in the PFC relative to saline-treated animals, and exposure to FST did not further decrease expression in these animals. At 4 days of withdrawal, AMPH-treated animals showed greater 5-HT2AR mRNA expression relative to saline-treated animals in the PFC, an effect that was diminished by exposure to FST. These data indicate that stress and short-term AMPH withdrawal affect prefrontal 5-HT2AR mRNA expression to a similar degree, and stress experienced during long-term AMPH withdrawal can diminish the recovery of 5-HT2AR mRNA expression. Together, these data suggest that exposure to stress during extended AMPH withdrawal could prolong withdrawal-induced, 5-HT2AR mRNA expression which could be related to 5-HT2AR mediated deficits.

  11. Short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition alters intestinal structure, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA and protein, and proglucagon mRNA abundance in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, K A; Drozdowski, L A; Thomson, A B; McBurney, M I

    1998-07-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a complex physiologic process that is not completely understood. Intravenous short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) enhance intestinal adaptation after 80% enterectomy in rats. The purpose of this study was to examine rapid responses to SCFA-supplemented total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in the normal small intestine. After jugular catheterization, 31 Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 258 +/- 3 g) were randomly assigned to receive standard TPN or an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous TPN solution supplemented with SCFAs (TPN+SCFA). Intestinal samples were obtained after 24 or 72 h of nutrient infusion. TPN+SCFA for 24 h increased (P < 0.05) the ileal RNA concentration (microg RNA/mg ileum) whereas TPN+SCFA for 72 h increased (P < 0.05) the ileal DNA concentration (microg DNA/mg ileum) and decreased (P < 0.05) the ileal protein concentration (microg protein/mg ileum). Ileal proglucagon mRNA abundance was elevated (P < 0.05) after 24 h of TPN+SCFA infusion and returned to levels seen with control TPN by 72 h. Glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the TPN+SCFA groups at both time points when compared with control TPN groups. Ileal GLUT2 protein abundance in the 72-h TPN+SCFA group was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of all other groups. Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT-1) mRNA and protein abundance and uptake of D-fructose and D-glucose did not differ between groups. Jejunal uptake of L-glucose and lauric acid was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after 72 h of TPN+SCFA than after 24 h, whereas the 24- and 72-h TPN groups did not differ. In summary, SCFAs led to rapid changes in ileal proglucagon and glucose transporter expression in rats receiving TPN and provide insights into therapeutic management of individuals with short bowel syndrome or intestinal malabsorption syndromes.

  12. Comparison of stress-induced and LPS-induced depressive-like behaviors and the alterations of central proinflammatory cytokines mRNA in rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xi-Ting; Lin, Wen-Juan; Tang, Ming-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Although proinflammatory cytokine changes in depression have been studied widely, few investigations have searched for specific and common changes in cytokines. In the present study, two animal models of depression were compared: a chronic stress model using forced swim stress and an immune activation model using repeated central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 mRNA were examined in the brain regions of the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was found that both chronic swim stress and repeated central LPS infusion induced depressive-like behaviors, including decreased body weight, reduced saccharin preference, and increased immobility time or shortened latency of immobility in the tail suspension test. Central TNF-α mRNA expression was elevated in both models and central IL-6 mRNA expression was unchanged in both models. Central IL-1β mRNA expression was increased only in the chronic immune activation model. The findings from this study suggest that TNF-α may be a common risk factor for inflammation in depressive disorders.

  13. Dietary supplementation of boron differentially alters expression of borate transporter (NaBCl) mRNA by jejunum and kidney of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengfa F; Monegue, James S; Lindemann, Merlin D; Cromwell, Gary L; Matthews, James C

    2011-11-01

    Inorganic boron (B), in the form of various borates, is readily absorbed across gastrointestinal epithelia. Although there is no stated B requirement, dietary B supplementation is thought to positively affect animal growth and metabolism, including promotion of bone strength and cell proliferation. Because of effective homeostatic control of plasma B levels, primarly by renal excretion, B toxicity in animals and humans is rare. The mechanisms responsible for improved animal performance and borate homeostasis are incompletely understood. Although a Na+-coupled borate transporter (NaBC1) has been identified, the effect of dietary B supplementation on expression of NaBCl has not been evaluated. An experiment was conducted with growing pigs to determine if NaBC1 mRNA was expressed by small intestinal epithelia and kidney of growing barrows and whether dietary B (as borate) supplementation would affect expression of NaBC1 mRNA. A concomitant objective was to test the hypothesis that B supplementation of a phosphorus (P)-deficient diet would improve calcium, phosphorus, or nitrogen retention. Twenty-four crossbred growing barrows (body weight=74.0±9.8 kg) were selected and used in a randomized complete block design experiment with a total of eight blocks and three B supplementation treatments (n=8/treatment). A typical corn-soybean meal basal diet (calculated to contain 41 mg intrinsic B/kg) was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient requirements, except for P, and fed to all pigs for 12 days. The basal diet plus 0, 50, or 100 mg/kg of B (prilled sodium borate pentahydrate, Na₂B₄O₇·5H₂O) was then fed for 18 more days. Feces and urine were collected during days 6 to 16 of the B supplementation, and pigs were killed for collection of jejunal and ileal epithelia and kidney tissue. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that NaBC1 mRNA was expressed by these tissues, a novel finding for jejunal and ileal epithelia. Boron supplementation increased

  14. Simultaneous exposure of excess fluoride and calcium deficiency alters VDR, CaR, and calbindin D 9 k mRNA levels in rat duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Gupta, S K; Kumar, K; Trivedi, R; Godbole, M M

    2004-10-01

    Fluoride ingestion reduces intestinal calcium absorption; its molecular basis has not been studied. We studied the mRNA expression of calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), vitamin D receptor (VDR) and calbindin D 9 k (D 9 k) by northern blot analysis in the duodenal mucosa of rats. Weanling pups fed with chow diet containing adequate calcium (0.5% w/w) and drinking water (NaF < 1 ppm) served as controls (Group I) and were studied at 9 and 15 weeks. The pups, born to rats fed with a calcium-deficient diet (0.03%) and excess fluoride water (NaF 50 ppm), were continued on the same diet and water (Group II) until 9 weeks of age. Subsequently, Group II rats were divided into 4 subgroups; 3 subgroups with fluoride free water [II-A adequate calcium, II-B excess calcium (Ca 2%) and II-D calcium deficient], whereas II-C received fluorinated water and adequate calcium diet until 15 weeks. At 9 weeks, as compared to group-I, group-II had decreased VDR (P < 0.001) and D 9 k mRNA (P < 0.001), whereas CaR mRNA levels increased (P < 0.05). At 15 weeks, as compared to group-I, VDR mRNA further reduced in group II-D (P < 0.001) and II-C (P < 0.001), whereas it increased in group II-A. Removal of fluoride ingestion and calcium replenishment increased D 9 k mRNA expression, maximally in adequate calcium group (P < 0.001), while it was further reduced in group II-C (P < 0.001). CaR expression decreased significantly in all the groups. We conclude that excess fluoride reduces the mRNA levels of VDR and D 9 k in the duodenal mucosa of rats, thereby possibly reducing calcium absorption. Calcium supplementation with simultaneous fluoride removal improves their expression.

  15. Tumor suppressor NFκB2 p100 interacts with ERK2 and stabilizes PTEN mRNA via inhibition of miR-494

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yulei; Xu, Jiawei; Gao, Guangxun; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Jin, Honglei; Zhu, Junlan; Che, Xun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has revealed that nfκb2 gene encoding p100 is genetically deleted or mutated in human cancers, implicating NFκB2 as a potential tumor suppressor. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-tumorigenic action of p100 remains poorly understood. Here, we report that p100 inhibits cancer cell anchorage-independent growth, a hallmark of cellular malignancy, by stabilizing the tumor suppressor PTEN mRNA via a mechanism that is independent of p100’s inhibitory role in NFκB activation. We further demonstrate that the regulatory effect of p100 on PTEN expression is mediated by its downregulation of miR-494 as a result of the inactivation of ERK2, in turn leading to inhibition of c-Jun/AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we identify that p100 specifically interacts with non-phosphorylated ERK2 and prevents ERK2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Moreover, the death domain at C-terminal of p100 is identified as being crucial and sufficient for its interaction with ERK2. Taken together, our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the understanding of the tumor suppressive role for NFκB2 p100. PMID:26686085

  16. Several Cis-regulatory Elements Control mRNA Stability, Translation Efficiency, and Expression Pattern of Prrxl1 (Paired Related Homeobox Protein-like 1)*

    PubMed Central

    Regadas, Isabel; Matos, Mariana Raimundo; Monteiro, Filipe Almeida; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Lima, Deolinda; Bessa, José; Casares, Fernando; Reguenga, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Prrxl1/DRG11 has emerged as a crucial molecule in the establishment of the pain circuitry, in particular spinal cord targeting of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) axons and differentiation of nociceptive glutamatergic spinal cord neurons. Despite Prrxl1 importance in the establishment of the DRG-spinal nociceptive circuit, the molecular mechanisms that regulate its expression along development remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Prrxl1 transcription is regulated by three alternative promoters (named P1, P2, and P3), which control the expression of three distinct Prrxl1 5′-UTR variants, named 5′-UTR-A, 5′-UTR-B, and 5′-UTR-C. These 5′-UTR sequences confer distinct mRNA stability and translation efficiency to the Prrxl1 transcript. The most conserved promoter (P3) contains a TATA-box and displays in vivo enhancer activity in a pattern that overlaps with the zebrafish Prrxl1 homologue, drgx. Regulatory modules present in this sequence were identified and characterized, including a binding site for Phox2b. Concomitantly, we demonstrate that zebrafish Phox2b is required for the expression of drgx in the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagal cranial ganglia. PMID:24214975

  17. hnRNP A1 antagonizes cellular senescence and senescence-associated secretory phenotype via regulation of SIRT1 mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Han, Limin; Zhao, Ganye; Shen, Hong; Wang, Pengfeng; Sun, Zhaomeng; Xu, Chenzhong; Su, Yuanyuan; Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun; Chen, Jun

    2016-09-09

    Senescent cells display a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) which contributes to tumor suppression, aging, and cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms for SASP regulation are not fully elucidated. SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase, plays multiple roles in metabolism, inflammatory response, and longevity, etc. However, its posttranscriptional regulation and its roles in cellular senescence and SASP regulation are still elusive. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein hnRNP A1 as a posttranscriptional regulator of SIRT1, as well as cell senescence and SASP regulator. hnRNP A1 directly interacts with the 3' untranslated region of SIRT1 mRNA, promotes its stability, and increases SIRT1 expression. hnRNP A1 delays replicative cellular senescence and prevents from Ras OIS via upregulation of SIRT1 expression to deacetylate NF-κB, thus blunting its transcriptional activity and subsequent IL-6/IL-8 induction. hnRNP A1 overexpression promotes cell transformation and tumorigenesis in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Together, our findings unveil a novel posttranscriptional regulation of SIRT1 by hnRNP A1 and uncover a critical role of hnRNP A1-SIRT1-NF-κB pathway in regulating cellular senescence and SASP expression.

  18. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL regulates mRNA splicing and stability during B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing; Li, Bin; Rao, Anjana

    2015-04-14

    Posttranscriptional regulation is a major mechanism to rewire transcriptomes during differentiation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein LL (hnRNPLL) is specifically induced in terminally differentiated lymphocytes, including effector T cells and plasma cells. To study the molecular functions of hnRNPLL at a genome-wide level, we identified hnRNPLL RNA targets and binding sites in plasma cells through integrated Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Cross-Linking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) and RNA sequencing. hnRNPLL preferentially recognizes CA dinucleotide-containing sequences in introns and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), promotes exon inclusion or exclusion in a context-dependent manner, and stabilizes mRNA when associated with 3' UTRs. During differentiation of primary B cells to plasma cells, hnRNPLL mediates a genome-wide switch of RNA processing, resulting in loss of B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) expression and increased Ig production--both hallmarks of plasma-cell maturation. Our data identify previously unknown functions of hnRNPLL in B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation and demonstrate that the RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL has a critical role in tuning transcriptomes of terminally differentiating B lymphocytes.

  19. Brain region specific alterations in the protein and mRNA levels of protein kinase A subunits in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Mondal, Amal C; Shukla, Pradeep K; Conley, Robert R

    2005-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA), a critical component of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system, phosphorylates crucial proteins and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. The objective of the study was to examine if changes in PKA activity or in the protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of any of its subunits are related to the pathophysiology of teenage suicide. We determined PKA activity and the protein and mRNA expression of different subunits of PKA in cytosol and membrane fractions obtained from the prefrontal cortex, (PFC) hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens (NA) of post-mortem brain from 17 teenage suicide victims and 17 nonpsychiatric control subjects. PKA activity was significantly decreased in the PFC but not the hippocampus of teenage suicide victims as compared with controls. However, the protein and mRNA expression of only two PKA subunits, that is, PKA RIalpha and PKA RIbeta, but not any other subunits were significantly decreased in both membrane and cytosol fractions of the PFC and protein expression of RIalpha and RIbeta in the NA of teenage suicide victims as compared to controls. A decrease in protein and mRNA expression of two specific PKA subunits may be associated with the pathogenesis of teenage suicide, and this decrease may be brain region specific, which may be related to the specific behavioral functions associated with these brain areas. Whether these changes in PKA subunits are related to suicidal behavior or are a result of suicide or are specific to suicide is not clear at this point.

  20. Alterations in trace element levels and mRNA expression of Hsps and inflammatory cytokines in livers of duck exposed to molybdenum or/and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huabin; Gao, Feiyan; Xia, Bing; Zhang, Mengmeng; Liao, Yilin; Yang, Zhi; Hu, Guoliang; Zhang, Caiying

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of dietary Molybdenum (Mo) or/and Cadmium (Cd) on trace elements and the mRNA expression levels of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and inflammatory cytokines in duck livers. 240 healthy 11-day-old ducks were randomly divided into six groups with 40 ducks in each group, which were treated with Mo or/and Cd at different doses on the basal diet for 120 days. On days 30, 60, 90 and 120, 10 birds in each group were randomly selected and euthanized and then the livers were collected to determine the contents of Mo, Cd, copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zine (Zn), Selenium (Se) and the mRNA expression levels of Hsps, inflammatory cytokines. In addition, liver tissues at 120 days were subjected to histopathological analysis with the optical microscope. The results showed that the mRNA expression of Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were significantly (P<0.01) upregulated in combination groups; Contents of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se decreased in combined groups (P<0.05) in the later period of the test while contents of Mo and Cd significantly increased (P<0.01); Furthermore severe hepatocyte diffuse fatty, hepatic cords swelling, hepatic sinusoid disappeared, and inflammatory cells infiltrated around the hepatic central vein were observed in Mo combined with Cd groups. The results indicated that dietary Mo or/and Cd might lead to stress, inflammatory response, tissue damage and disturb homeostasis of trace elements in duck livers. Moreover the two elements showed a possible synergistic relationship. And the high mRNA expression of HSPs and inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the resistance of liver toxicity induced by Mo and Cd.

  1. Prenatal ethanol increases ethanol intake throughout adolescence, alters ethanol-mediated aversive learning, and affects μ but not δ or κ opioid receptor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2015-06-01

    Animal models of prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) have indicated a facilitatory effect of PEE on adolescent ethanol intake, but few studies have assessed the effects of moderate PEE throughout adolescence. The mechanisms underlying this facilitatory effect remain largely unknown. In the present study, we analysed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats with or without PEE (2.0 g/kg, gestational days 17-20) from postnatal days 37 to 62. The results revealed greater ethanol consumption in PEE rats than in controls, which persisted throughout adolescence. By the end of testing, ethanol ingestion in PEE rats was nearly 6.0 g/kg. PEE was associated with insensitivity to ethanol-induced aversion. PEE and control rats were further analysed for levels of μ, δ and κ opioid receptor mRNA in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and ventral tegmental area. Similar levels of mRNA were observed across most areas and opioid receptors, but μ receptor mRNA in the ventral tegmental area was significantly increased by PEE. Unlike previous studies that assessed the effects of PEE on ethanol intake close to birth, or in only a few sessions during adolescence, the present study observed a facilitatory effect of PEE that lasted throughout adolescence. PEE was associated with insensitivity to the aversive effect of ethanol, and increased levels of μ opioid receptor transcripts. PEE is a prominent vulnerability factor that probably favors the engagement of adolescents in risky trajectories of ethanol use.

  2. Early-life infection leads to altered BDNF and IL-1beta mRNA expression in rat hippocampus following learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bilbo, Staci D; Barrientos, Ruth M; Eads, Andrea S; Northcutt, Alexis; Watkins, Linda R; Rudy, Jerry W; Maier, Steven F

    2008-05-01

    Neonatal bacterial infection in rats leads to profound hippocampal-dependent memory impairments following a peripheral immune challenge in adulthood. Here, we determined whether neonatal infection plus an immune challenge in adult rats is associated with impaired induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) within the hippocampus (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus) following fear conditioning. BDNF is well characterized for its critical role in learning and memory. Rats injected on postnatal day 4 with PBS (vehicle) or Escherichia coli received as adults either no conditioning or a single 2min trial of fear conditioning. Half of the rats in the conditioned group then received a peripheral injection of 25mug/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and all were sacrificed 1 or 4h later. Basal (unconditioned) BDNF mRNA did not differ between groups. However, following conditioning, neonatal infection with E. coli led to decreased BDNF mRNA induction in all regions compared to PBS-treated rats. This decrease in E. coli-treated rats was accompanied by a large increase in IL-1beta mRNA in CA1. Taken together, these data indicate that early infection strongly influences the induction of IL-1beta and BDNF within distinct regions of the hippocampus, which likely contribute to observed memory impairments in adulthood.

  3. Syndromic deafness mutations at Asn 14 differentially alter the open stability of Cx26 hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Helmuth A.; Slavi, Nefeli; Srinivas, Miduturu

    2016-01-01

    Connexin 26 (Cx26) is a transmembrane protein that forms hexameric hemichannels that can function when unopposed or dock to form intercellular gap junction channels. Aberrantly functioning unopposed hemichannels are a common feature of syndromic deafness associated with mutations in Cx26. In this study, we examine two different mutations at the same position in the N-terminal domain of Cx26, N14K and N14Y, which have been reported to produce different phenotypes in patients. We find that both N14K and N14Y, when expressed alone or together with wild-type (WT) Cx26, result in functional hemichannels with widely disparate functional properties. N14K currents are robust, whereas N14Y currents are small. The two mutants also exhibit opposite shifts in voltage-dependent loop gating, such that activation of N14K and N14Y is shifted in the hyperpolarizing and depolarizing directions, respectively. Deactivation kinetics suggests that N14K stabilizes and N14Y destabilizes the open state. Single N14K hemichannel recordings in low extracellular Ca2+ show no evidence of stable closing transitions associated with loop gating, and N14K hemichannels are insensitive to pH. Together, these properties cause N14K hemichannels to be particularly refractory to closing. Although we find that the unitary conductance of N14K is indistinguishable from WT Cx26, mutagenesis and substituted cysteine accessibility studies suggest that the N14 residue is exposed to the pore and that the differential properties of N14K and N14Y hemichannels likely result from altered electrostatic interactions between the N terminus and the cytoplasmic extension of TM2 in the adjacent subunit. The combined effects that we observe on loop gating and pH regulation may explain the unusual buccal cutaneous manifestations in patients carrying the N14K mutation. Our work also provides new considerations regarding the underlying molecular mechanism of loop gating, which controls hemichannel opening in the plasma

  4. The human liver fatty acid binding protein T94A variant alters the structure, stability, and interaction with fibrates.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-12-23

    Although the human liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant arises from the most commonly occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism in the entire FABP family, there is a complete lack of understanding regarding the role of this polymorphism in human disease. It has been hypothesized that the T94A substitution results in the complete loss of ligand binding ability and function analogous to that seen with L-FABP gene ablation. This possibility was addressed using the recombinant human wild-type (WT) T94T and T94A variant L-FABP and cultured primary human hepatocytes. Nonconservative replacement of the medium-sized, polar, uncharged T residue with a smaller, nonpolar, aliphatic A residue at position 94 of the human L-FABP significantly increased the L-FABP α-helical structure content at the expense of β-sheet content and concomitantly decreased the thermal stability. T94A did not alter the binding affinities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist ligands (phytanic acid, fenofibrate, and fenofibric acid). While T94A did not alter the impact of phytanic acid and only slightly altered that of fenofibrate on the human L-FABP secondary structure, the active metabolite fenofibric acid altered the T94A secondary structure much more than that of the WT T94T L-FABP. Finally, in cultured primary human hepatocytes, the T94A variant exhibited a significantly reduced extent of fibrate-mediated induction of PPARα-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, FATP5, and PPARα itself. Thus, while the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of the human L-FABP for PPARα agonist ligands, it significantly altered the human L-FABP structure, stability, and conformational and functional response to fibrate.

  5. Aggressive Encounters Alter the Activation of Serotonergic Neurons and the Expression of 5-HT1A mRNA in the Hamster Dorsal Raphe Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Matthew A.; Grober, Matthew S.; Nicholas, Christopher; Huhman, Kim L.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonergic (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) have been implicated in stress-induced changes in behavior. Previous research indicates that stressful stimuli activate 5-HT neurons in select subregions of the DRN. Uncontrollable stress is thought to sensitize 5-HT neurons in the DRN and allow for an exaggerated 5-HT response to future stimuli. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that following aggressive encounters, losing male Syrian hamsters would exhibit increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in 5-HT DRN neurons compared to winners or controls. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that losers would have decreased 5-HT1A mRNA levels in the DRN compared to winners or controls. We found that a single 15-min aggressive encounter increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons in losers compared to winners and controls. The increased c-Fos expression in losers was restricted to ventral regions of the rostral DRN. We also found that four 5-min aggressive encounters reduced total 5-HT1A mRNA levels in the DRN in losers compared to winners and controls, and that differences in mRNA levels were not restricted to specific DRN subregions. These results suggest that social defeat activates neurons in select subregions of the DRN and reduces message for DRN 5-HT1A autoreceptors. Our results support the hypothesis that social stress can activate 5-HT neurons in the DRN, reduce 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated inhibition, and lead to hyperactivity of 5-HT neurons. PMID:19362123

  6. Shared ancestry influences community stability by altering competitive interactions: evidence from a laboratory microcosm experiment using freshwater green algae.

    PubMed

    Venail, Patrick A; Alexandrou, Markos A; Oakley, Todd H; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2013-10-07

    The impact of biodiversity on the stability of ecological communities has been debated among biologists for more than a century. Recently summarized empirical evidence suggests that biodiversity tends to enhance the temporal stability of community-level properties such as biomass; however, the underlying mechanisms driving this relationship remain poorly understood. Here, we report the results of a microcosm study in which we used simplified systems of freshwater microalgae to explore how the phylogenetic relatedness of species influences the temporal stability of community biomass by altering the nature of their competitive interactions. We show that combinations of two species that are more evolutionarily divergent tend to have lower temporal stability of biomass. In part, this is due to negative 'selection effects' in which bicultures composed of distantly related species are more likely to contain strong competitors that achieve low biomass. In addition, bicultures of distantly related species had on average weaker competitive interactions, which reduced compensatory dynamics and decreased the stability of community biomass. Our results demonstrate that evolutionary history plays a key role in controlling the mechanisms, which give rise to diversity-stability relationships. As such, patterns of shared ancestry may help us predict the ecosystem-level consequences of biodiversity loss.

  7. Growth hormone stimulates protein synthesis in bovine skeletal muscle cells without altering insulin-like growth factor-I mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Yu, J; Jiang, H

    2012-04-01

    Growth hormone is a major stimulator of skeletal muscle growth in animals, including cattle. In this study, we determined whether GH stimulates skeletal muscle growth in cattle by direct stimulation of proliferation or fusion of myoblasts, by direct stimulation of protein synthesis, or by direct inhibition of protein degradation in myotubes. We also determined whether these direct effects of GH are mediated by IGF-I produced by myoblasts or myotubes. Satellite cells were isolated from cattle skeletal muscle and were allowed to proliferate as myoblasts or induced to fuse into myotubes in culture. Growth hormone at 10 and 100 ng/mL increased protein synthesis in myotubes (P < 0.05), but had no effect on protein degradation in myotubes or proliferation of myoblasts (P > 0.05). Insulin-like growth factor-I at 50 and 500 ng/mL stimulated protein synthesis (P < 0.01), and this effect of IGF-I was much greater than that of GH (P < 0.05). Besides stimulating protein synthesis, IGF-I at 50 and 500 ng/mL also inhibited protein degradation in myotubes (P < 0.01), and IGF-I at 500 ng/mL stimulated proliferation of myoblasts (P < 0.05). Neither GH nor IGF-I had effects on fusion of myoblasts into myotubes (P > 0.1). These data indicate that GH and IGF-I have largely different direct effects on bovine muscle cells. Growth hormone at 10 and 100 ng/mL had no effect on IGF-I mRNA expression in either myoblasts or myotubes (P > 0.1). This lack of effect was not because the cultured myoblasts or myotubes were not responsive to GH; GH receptor mRNA was detectable in them and the expression of the cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH) gene, a well-established GH target gene, was increased by GH in bovine myoblasts (P < 0.05). Overall, the data suggest that GH stimulates skeletal muscle growth in cattle in part through stimulation of protein synthesis in the muscle and that this stimulation is not mediated through increased IGF-I mRNA expression in the muscle.

  8. Effects of 17 β-estradiol on lipopolysacharride-induced intracellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA expression and Ca2+ homeostasis alteration in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Thor, Der; Zhang, Rui; Anderson, Leigh; Bose, Diptiman; Dubé, Gregory P.; Rahimian, Roshanak

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence showed that 17 β-estradiol (E2) decreased cytokine-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAM). Changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been shown to be associated with CAM expression in endothelial cells. Here, the effects of E2 (1 μM, 24 h) on the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and [Ca2+]i were investigated in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100 ng/mL, 18 h)-stimulated human endothelial cell line, EA.hy926, using real-time PCR and spectrofluorometry, respectively. PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in ICAM-1 expression in calcium ionophore A23187 (1 nM)- or LPS-stimulated cells. Pretreatment of cells with E2 significantly inhibited LPS-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression. [Ca2+]i was monitored in Fura-2 AM-loaded cells in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+ with thapsigargin (TG, 1 μM), a sarco/endoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor or ATP (100 μM). The extent of TG- or ATP-induced [Ca2+]i increase was significantly higher in LPS-stimulated cells than in control cells. Pre-treatment of LPS-stimulated cells with E2 limited the Ca2+ response to the same level as in control cells. Furthermore, ICI 182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, attenuated the inhibitory actions of E2 on ICAM-1 mRNA expression and Ca2+ responses, suggesting that estrogen receptors mediate, at least in part, the effects of estrogen. These data suggest a potential underlying mechanism for the protective effect of E2 against atherosclerosis. PMID:20843480

  9. Phenotype of cerebellar glutamatergic neurons is altered in stargazer mutant mice lacking brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Christine A; Leitch, Beulah

    2005-01-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) influences neuronal survival, differentiation, and maturation. More recently, its role in synapse formation and plasticity has also emerged. In the cerebellum of the spontaneous recessive mutant mouse stargazer (stg) there is a specific and pronounced deficit in BDNF mRNA expression. BDNF protein levels in the cerebellum as a whole are reduced by 70%, while in the granule cells (GCs) there is a selective and near total reduction in BDNF mRNA expression. Recently, we published data demonstrating that inhibitory neurons in the cerebella of stgs have significantly reduced levels (approximately 50%) of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and fewer, smaller inhibitory synapses compared to wildtype (WT) controls. Our current investigations indicate that the stargazer mutation has an even more pronounced effect on the phenotype of glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum. There is a profound decrease in the levels of glutamate-immunoreactivity (up to 77%) in stg compared to WT controls. The distribution profile of presynaptic vesicles is also markedly different: stgs have proportionally fewer docked vesicles and fewer vesicles located adjacent to the active zone ready to dock than WTs. Furthermore, the thickness of the postsynaptic density (PSD) at mossy fiber-granule cell (MF-GC) and parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses is severely reduced (up to 33% less than WT controls). The number and length of excitatory synapses, however, appear to be relatively unchanged. It is possible that at least some of theses changes in phenotype are directly attributable to the lack of BDNF in the cerebellum of the stg mutant.

  10. Regulation of histone mRNA in the unperturbed cell cycle: evidence suggesting control at two posttranscriptional steps.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M E; Böhni, R; Schneiderman, M H; Ramamurthy, L; Schümperli, D; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    The levels of histone mRNA increase 35-fold as selectively detached mitotic CHO cells progress from mitosis through G1 and into S phase. Using an exogenous gene with a histone 3' end which is not sensitive to transcriptional or half-life regulation, we show that 3' processing is regulated as cells progress from G1 to S phase. The half-life of histone mRNA is similar in G1- and S-phase cells, as measured after inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D (dactinomycin) or indirectly after stabilization by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Taken together, these results suggest that the change in histone mRNA levels between G1- and S-phase cells must be due to an increase in the rate of biosynthesis, a combination of changes in transcription rate and processing efficiency. In G2 phase, there is a rapid 35-fold decrease in the histone mRNA concentration which our results suggest is due primarily to an altered stability of histone mRNA. These results are consistent with a model for cell cycle regulation of histone mRNA levels in which the effects on both RNA 3' processing and transcription, rather than alterations in mRNA stability, are the major mechanisms by which low histone mRNA levels are maintained during G1. Images PMID:2017161

  11. Phosphate Stability in Diagenetic Fluids Constrains the Acidic Alteration Model for Lower Mt. Sharp Sedimentary Rocks in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, J. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; VanBommel, S. J.; McAdam, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars rover Curiosity has encountered silica-enriched bedrock (as strata and as veins and associated halos of alteration) in the largely basaltic Murray Fm. of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) investigations of the Murray Fm. revealed decreasing Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Al, and higher S, as silica increased (Fig. 1). A positive correlation between SiO2 and TiO2 (up to 74.4 and 1.7 wt %, respectively) suggests that these two insoluble elements were retained while acidic fluids leached more soluble elements. Other evidence also supports a silica-retaining, acidic alteration model for the Murray Fm., including low trace element abundances consistent with leaching, and the presence of opaline silica and jarosite determined by CheMin. Phosphate stability is a key component of this model because PO4 3- is typically soluble in acidic water and is likely a mobile ion in diagenetic fluids (pH less than 5). However, the Murray rocks are not leached of P; they have variable P2O5 (Fig. 1) ranging from average Mars (0.9 wt%) up to the highest values in Gale Crater (2.5 wt%). Here we evaluate APXS measurements of Murray Fm. bedrock and veins with respect to phosphate stability in acidic fluids as a test of the acidic alteration model for the Lower Mt. Sharp rocks.

  12. Alteration in NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression in vulnerable and resistant regions of in vitro ischemic rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Small, D L; Poulter, M O; Buchan, A M; Morley, P

    1997-08-29

    Brain insults, including cerebral ischemia, can alter glutamate receptor subunit expression in vulnerable neurons. Understanding these post-ischemic changes in glutamate receptors could enhance our ability to identify specific, novel neuroprotective compounds. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification was used to quantify the altered expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) NR2A, NR2B and NR2C subunits relative to one another in rat hippocampal slices in resistant and vulnerable regions following in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation. Ninety minutes after re-oxygenation and return to 10 mM glucose, there was a significant increase in the expression of NR2C relative to NR2B and NR2A in the slice as a whole, as well as in the selectively vulnerable CA1 region and the resistant CA3 and dentate gyrus regions.

  13. Spike width and frequency alter stability of phase-locking in electrically coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J

    2013-06-01

    The stability of phase-locked states of electrically coupled type-1 phase response curve neurons is studied using piecewise linear formulations for their voltage profile and phase response curves. We find that at low frequency and/or small spike width, synchrony is stable, and antisynchrony unstable. At high frequency and/or large spike width, these phase-locked states switch their stability. Increasing the ratio of spike width to spike height causes the antisynchronous state to transition into a stable synchronous state. We compute the interaction function and the boundaries of stability of both these phase-locked states, and present analytical expressions for them. We also study the effect of phase response curve skewness on the boundaries of synchrony and antisynchrony.

  14. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Nevarez, Lisette; Pogue, Robert; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP). Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses. PMID:27622494

  15. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  16. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  17. Perturbation of the Stability of Amyloid Fibrils through Alteration of Electrostatic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Sarah L.; Knowles, Tuomas P.J.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; MacPhee, Cait E.; Welland, Mark E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Devlin, Glyn L.

    2011-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into polymeric amyloid fibrils is a process that has important implications ranging from the understanding of protein misfolding disorders to the discovery of novel nanobiomaterials. In this study, we probe the stability of fibrils prepared at pH 2.0 and composed of the protein insulin by manipulating electrostatic interactions within the fibril architecture. We demonstrate that strong electrostatic repulsion is sufficient to disrupt the hydrogen-bonded, cross-β network that links insulin molecules and ultimately results in fibril dissociation. The extent of this dissociation correlates well with predictions for colloidal models considering the net global charge of the polypeptide chain, although the kinetics of the process is regulated by the charge state of a single amino acid. We found the fibrils to be maximally stable under their formation conditions. Partial disruption of the cross-β network under conditions where the fibrils remain intact leads to a reduction in their stability. Together, these results support the contention that a major determinant of amyloid stability stems from the interactions in the structured core, and show how the control of electrostatic interactions can be used to characterize the factors that modulate fibril stability. PMID:21641324

  18. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  19. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system.

  20. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  1. Xyloglucan Deficiency Disrupts Microtubule Stability and Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, Altering Cell Growth and Morphogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chaowen; Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen

    2016-01-01

    Xyloglucan constitutes most of the hemicellulose in eudicot primary cell walls and functions in cell wall structure and mechanics. Although Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking detectable xyloglucan are viable, they display growth defects that are suggestive of alterations in wall integrity. To probe the mechanisms underlying these defects, we analyzed cellulose arrangement, microtubule patterning and dynamics, microtubule- and wall-integrity-related gene expression, and cellulose biosynthesis in xxt1 xxt2 plants. We found that cellulose is highly aligned in xxt1 xxt2 cell walls, that its three-dimensional distribution is altered, and that microtubule patterning and stability are aberrant in etiolated xxt1 xxt2 hypocotyls. We also found that the expression levels of microtubule-associated genes, such as MAP70-5 and CLASP, and receptor genes, such as HERK1 and WAK1, were changed in xxt1 xxt2 plants and that cellulose synthase motility is reduced in xxt1 xxt2 cells, corresponding with a reduction in cellulose content. Our results indicate that loss of xyloglucan affects both the stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton and the production and patterning of cellulose in primary cell walls. These findings establish, to our knowledge, new links between wall integrity, cytoskeletal dynamics, and wall synthesis in the regulation of plant morphogenesis. PMID:26527657

  2. Depletion of JMJD5 sensitizes tumor cells to microtubule-destabilizing agents by altering microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junyu; He, Zhimin; Wang, Da-Liang; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2016-11-01

    Microtubules play essential roles in mitosis, cell migration, and intracellular trafficking. Drugs that target microtubules have demonstrated great clinical success in cancer treatment due to their capacity to impair microtubule dynamics in both mitotic and interphase stages. In a previous report, we demonstrated that JMJD5 associated with mitotic spindle and was required for proper mitosis. However, it remains elusive whether JMJD5 could regulate the stability of cytoskeletal microtubules and whether it affects the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents. In this study, we find that JMJD5 localizes not only to the nucleus, a fraction of it also localizes to the cytoplasm. JMJD5 depletion decreases the acetylation and detyrosination of α-tubulin, both of which are markers of microtubule stability. In addition, microtubules in JMJD5-depleted cells are more sensitive to nocodazole-induced depolymerization, whereas JMJD5 overexpression increases α-tubulin detyrosination and enhances the resistance of microtubules to nocodazole. Mechanistic studies revealed that JMJD5 regulates MAP1B protein levels and that MAP1B overexpression rescued the microtubule destabilization induced by JMJD5 depletion. Furthermore, JMJD5 depletion significantly promoted apoptosis in cancer cells treated with the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs vinblastine or colchicine. Together, these findings suggest that JMJD5 is required to regulate the stability of cytoskeletal microtubules and that JMJD5 depletion increases the susceptibility of cancer cells to microtubule-destabilizing agents.

  3. TP53 and ATM mRNA expression in skin and skeletal muscle after low-level laser exposure.

    PubMed

    Guedes de Almeida, Luciana; Silva Sergio, Luiz Philippe da; de Paoli, Flavia; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; da Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza

    2017-02-16

    Low-level lasers are widespread in regenerative medicine, but the molecular mechanisms involved in their biological effects are not fully understood, particularly those on DNA stability. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate mRNA expression of genes related to DNA genomic stability in skin and skeletal muscle tissue from Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers. For this, TP53 (Tumor Protein 53) and ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated gene) mRNA expressions were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) technique 24 hours after low-level red and infrared laser exposure. Our data showed that relative TP53 mRNA expression was not significantly altered in both tissues exposed to lasers. For ATM, relative mRNA expression in skin tissue was not significantly altered, but in muscle tissue, laser exposure increased relative ATM mRNA expression. Low-level red and infrared laser radiations alter ATM mRNA expression related to DNA stability in skeletal muscle tissue.

  4. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations alter the stability of the amyloid β-protein monomer folding nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marianne A.; Lazo, Noel D.; Lomakin, Aleksey; Condron, Margaret M.; Arai, Hiromi; Yamin, Ghiam; Rigby, Alan C.; Teplow, David B.

    2007-01-01

    Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers may be the proximate neurotoxins in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, to elucidate the oligomerization pathway, we studied Aβ monomer folding and identified a decapeptide segment of Aβ, 21Ala–22Glu–23Asp–24Val–25Gly–26Ser–27Asn–28Lys–29Gly–30Ala, within which turn formation appears to nucleate monomer folding. The turn is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions between Val-24 and Lys-28 and by long-range electrostatic interactions between Lys-28 and either Glu-22 or Asp-23. We hypothesized that turn destabilization might explain the effects of amino acid substitutions at Glu-22 and Asp-23 that cause familial forms of AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. To test this hypothesis, limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry, and solution-state NMR spectroscopy were used here to determine and compare the structure and stability of the Aβ(21–30) turn within wild-type Aβ and seven clinically relevant homologues. In addition, we determined the relative differences in folding free energies (ΔΔGf) among the mutant peptides. We observed that all of the disease-associated amino acid substitutions at Glu-22 or Asp-23 destabilized the turn and that the magnitude of the destabilization correlated with oligomerization propensity. The Ala21Gly (Flemish) substitution, outside the turn proper (Glu-22–Lys-28), displayed a stability similar to that of the wild-type peptide. The implications of these findings for understanding Aβ monomer folding and disease causation are discussed. PMID:17940047

  5. Deamidation alters the structure and decreases the stability of human lens betaA3-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takumi; Oxford, Julie T; Brandon, Theodore R; Lampi, Kirsten J

    2007-07-31

    According to the World Health Organization, cataracts account for half of the blindness in the world, with the majority occurring in developing countries. A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye due to light scattering of precipitated lens proteins or aberrant cellular debris. The major proteins in the lens are crystallins, and they are extensively deamidated during aging and cataracts. Deamidation has been detected at the domain and monomer interfaces of several crystallins during aging. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two potential deamidation sites at the predicted interface of the betaA3-crystallin dimer on its structure and stability. The glutamine residues at the reported in vivo deamidation sites of Q180 in the C-terminal domain and at the homologous site Q85 in the N-terminal domain were substituted with glutamic acid residues by site-directed mutagenesis. Far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that there were subtle differences in the secondary structure and more notable differences in the tertiary structure of the mutant proteins compared to that of the wild type betaA3-crystallin. The Q85E/Q180E mutant also was more susceptible to enzymatic digestion, suggesting increased solvent accessibility. These structural changes in the deamidated mutants led to decreased stability during unfolding in urea and increased precipitation during heat denaturation. When simulating deamidation at both residues, there was a further decrease in stability and loss of cooperativity. However, multiangle-light scattering and quasi-elastic light scattering experiments showed that dimer formation was not disrupted, nor did higher-order oligomers form. These results suggest that introducing charges at the predicted domain interface in the betaA3 homodimer may contribute to the insolubilization of lens crystallins or favor other, more stable, crystallin subunit interactions.

  6. An alteration in ATG16L1 stability in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Kara G; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2014-10-01

    Individuals who harbor a common coding polymorphism (Thr300Ala) within a structurally unclassified region of ATG16L1 are at increased risk for the development of Crohn disease. Recently, we reported on the generation and characterization of knockin mice carrying the ATG16L1 T300A variant. We demonstrate that multiple cell types from T300A knock-in mice exhibit reduced selective autophagy, and we mechanistically link this phenotype with an increased susceptibility of ATG16L1 T300A to CASP3- and CASP7-mediated cleavage. These findings demonstrate how a single polymorphism can result in cell type- and pathway-specific disruptions of selective autophagy and alterations in the inflammatory milieu that can contribute to disease.

  7. Numerical solution of the chemical master equation uniqueness and stability of the stationary distribution for chemical networks, and mRNA bursting in a gene network with negative feedback regulation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, E S; Santillán, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a couple of algorithms to compute the stationary probability distribution for the chemical master equation (CME) of arbitrary chemical networks. We further find the conditions guaranteeing the algorithms' convergence and the unity and stability of the stationary distribution. Next, we employ these algorithms to study the mRNA and protein probability distributions in a gene regulatory network subject to negative feedback regulation. In particular, we analyze the influence of the promoter activation/deactivation speed on the shape of such distributions. We find that a reduction of the promoter activation/deactivation speed modifies the shape of those distributions in a way consistent with the phenomenon known as mRNA (or transcription) bursting.

  8. Stabilizing Fluid-Fluid Displacements in Porous Media Through Wettability Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojer, Mathias; Szulczewski, Michael L.; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-05-01

    We study experimentally how wettability impacts fluid-fluid-displacement patterns in granular media. We inject a low-viscosity fluid (air) into a thin bed of glass beads initially saturated with a more-viscous fluid (a water-glycerol mixture). Chemical treatment of glass surfaces allows us to control the wetting properties of the medium and modify the contact angle θ from 5° (drainage) to 120° (imbibition). We demonstrate that wettability exerts a powerful influence on the invasion morphology of unfavorable mobility displacements: increasing θ stabilizes fluid invasion into the granular pack at all capillary numbers. In particular, we report the striking observation of a stable radial displacement at low capillary numbers, whose origin lies on the cooperative nature of fluid invasion at the pore scale.

  9. Neonatal paternal deprivation impairs social recognition and alters levels of oxytocin and estrogen receptor α mRNA expression in the MeA and NAcc, and serum oxytocin in mandarin voles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Wu, Ruiyong; Tai, Fadao; Zhang, Xia; Yu, Peng; An, Xiaolei; Qiao, Xufeng; Hao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Paternal care is necessary for the healthy development of social behavior in monogamous rodents and social recognition underpins social behavior in these animals. The effects of paternal care on the development of social recognition and underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms, especially the involvement of oxytocin and estrogen pathways, remain poorly understood. We investigated the effects of paternal deprivation (PD: father was removed from neonatal pups and mother alone raised the offspring) on social recognition in mandarin voles (Microtus mandarinus), a socially monogamous rodent. Paternal deprivation was found to inhibit the development of social recognition in female and male offspring according to a habituation-dishabituation paradigm. Paternal deprivation resulted in increased inactivity and reduced investigation during new encounters with other animals. Paternal deprivation reduced oxytocin receptor (OTR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA expression in the medial amygdala and nucleus accumbens. Paternal deprivation reduced serum oxytocin (OT) concentration in females, but had no effect on males. Our results provide substantial evidence that paternal deprivation inhibits the development of social recognition in female and male mandarin voles and alters social behavior later in life. This is possibly the result of altered expression of central OTR and ERα and serum OT levels caused by paternal deprivation.

  10. Interleukin-1β induced Stress Granules Sequester COX-2 mRNA and Regulates its Stability and Translation in Human OA Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammad Y.; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced and immediate expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA is observed in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes but the synthesis of protein found significantly delayed. Here we investigated the role of stress granules (SGs), ribonucleoprotein complexes that regulate mRNA translation, in the delayed translation of COX-2 mRNAs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Stimulation of human chondrocytes with IL-1β activated the stress response genes and the phosphorylation of eIF2α that triggered the assembly of SGs. Using combined immunofluorescence staining of SGs markers and COX-2 protein, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation, the COX-2 mRNAs were found sequestered in SGs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. No increase in COX-2 protein expression was observed during the persistence of SGs but enhanced expression of COX-2 protein was noted upon clearance of the SGs. Inhibition of SGs clearance blocked COX-2 mRNA translation whereas blocking the assembly of SGs by TIA-1 depletion resulted in rapid and increased production of COX-2 and PGE2. Our findings show for the first time assembly of SGs and sequestration of COX-2 mRNAs in human OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 mRNAs translation by SGs indicates a role in IL-1β-mediated catabolic response that could be therapeutically targeted in OA. PMID:27271770

  11. The Alzheimer's Disease-Associated R47H Variant of TREM2 Has an Altered Glycosylation Pattern and Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Seon; Ji, In Jung; Kim, Dong-Hou; An, Hyun Joo; Yoon, Seung-Yong

    2017-01-01

    The R47H coding variant of the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2) increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) similar to apolipoprotein E4. TREM2 R47H has recently been shown to have impaired binding to damage-associated lipid or apolipoprotein ligands. However, it is not known how this R47H variant affects the biochemical characteristics of TREM2 and alters the pathogenesis of AD. We previously reported that TREM2-R47H has a slightly different glycosylation pattern from wild-type. A more detailed characterization in our present study confirms that TREM2 R47H has an altered glycosylation pattern and reduced stability. TREM2 R47H shows different glycosylation profiles from analysis using monensin or kifunensine treatment which were confirmed by mass spectrometry. The solubility of TREM2 R47H and its cleaved products such as intracellular domain (ICD) is also decreased, increasing its proteasomal and lysosomal degradation. The different biochemical characteristics of TREM2 R47H, including glycosylation, solubility and processing, may offer insights into a future therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:28149270

  12. Alteration/deficiency in activation-3 (Ada3) plays a critical role in maintaining genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Sameer; Katafiasz, Bryan J.; Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Jun; Mohibi, Shakur; Jain, Smrati; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; Pandita, Tej K.; Dave, Bhavana J.; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation and DNA repair following damage are essential for maintaining genome integrity. DNA damage activates checkpoints in order to repair damaged DNA prior to exit to the next phase of cell cycle. Recently, we have shown the role of Ada3, a component of various histone acetyltransferase complexes, in cell cycle regulation, and loss of Ada3 results in mouse embryonic lethality. Here, we used adenovirus-Cre-mediated Ada3 deletion in Ada3fl/fl mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to assess the role of Ada3 in DNA damage response following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). We report that Ada3 depletion was associated with increased levels of phospho-ATM (pATM), γH2AX, phospho-53BP1 (p53BP1) and phospho-RAD51 (pRAD51) in untreated cells; however, radiation response was intact in Ada3−/− cells. Notably, Ada3−/− cells exhibited a significant delay in disappearance of DNA damage foci for several critical proteins involved in the DNA repair process. Significantly, loss of Ada3 led to enhanced chromosomal aberrations, such as chromosome breaks, fragments, deletions and translocations, which further increased upon DNA damage. Notably, the total numbers of aberrations were more clearly observed in S-phase, as compared with G₁ or G₂ phases of cell cycle with IR. Lastly, comparison of DNA damage in Ada3fl/fl and Ada3−/− cells confirmed higher residual DNA damage in Ada3−/− cells, underscoring a critical role of Ada3 in the DNA repair process. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a novel role for Ada3 in maintenance of the DNA repair process and genomic stability. PMID:23095635

  13. Ultraviolet irradiation of diacetylenic liposomes as a strategy to improve size stability and to alter protein binding without cytotoxicity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Temprana, C Facundo; Amor, M Silvia; Femia, A Lis; Gasparri, Julieta; Taira, M Cristina; del Valle Alonso, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Membrane-modification effects, induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in diacetylenic liposomes, were analyzed upon contact with cells, biological membranes, and proteins. Liposomes formulated with mixtures of unsaturated 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and saturated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, in a 1:1 molar ratio, were compared with those that were UV-irradiated and analyzed in several aspects. Membrane polymerization inherence on size stability was studied as well as its impact on mitochondrial and microsomal membrane peroxidation induction, hemolytic activity, and cell viability. Moreover, in order to gain insight about the possible irradiation effect on interfacial membrane properties, interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (Lyso), and apolipoprotein (apoA-I) was studied. Improved size stability was found for polymerized liposomes after a period of 30 days at 4°C. In addition, membrane irradiation had no marked effect on cell viability, hemolysis, or induction of microsomal and mitochondrial membrane peroxidation. Interfacial membrane characteristics were found to be altered after polymerization, since a differential protein binding for polymerized or nonpolymerized membranes was observed for BSA and Lyso, but not for apoA-I. The substantial contribution of this work is the finding that even when maintaining the same lipid composition, changes induced by UV irradiation are sufficient to increase size stability and establish differences in protein binding, in particular, reducing the amount of bound Lyso and BSA, without increasing formulation cytotoxicity. This work aimed at showing that the usage of diacetylenic lipids and UV modification of membrane interfacial properties should be strategies to be taken into consideration when designing new delivery systems.

  14. Altered Kinematics and Time to Stabilization During Drop-Jump Landings in Individuals With or Without Functional Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cynthia J.; Arnold, Brent L.; Ross, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Context It has been proposed that altered dynamic-control strategies during functional activity such as jump landings may partially explain recurrent instability in individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI). Objective To capture jump-landing time to stabilization (TTS) and ankle motion using a multisegment foot model among FAI, coper, and healthy control individuals. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Participants were 23 individuals with a history of at least 1 ankle sprain and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain or instability in their lifetime (controls). Participants were matched for age, height, and weight (age = 23.3 ± 3.8 years, height = 1.71 ± 0.09 m, weight = 69.0 ± 13.7 kg). Intervention(s) Ten single-legged drop jumps were recorded using a 12-camera Vicon MX motion-capture system and a strain-gauge force plate. Main Outcome Measures Mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) TTS in seconds, as well as forefoot and hindfoot sagittal- and frontal-plane angles at jump-landing initial contact and at the point of maximum vertical ground reaction force were calculated. Results For the forefoot and hindfoot in the sagittal plane, group differences were present at initial contact (forefoot: P = .043, hindfoot: P = .004). At the hindfoot, individuals with FAI displayed more dorsiflexion than the control and coper groups. Time to stabilization differed among groups (AP TTS: P < .001; ML TTS: P = .040). Anteroposterior TTS was longer in the coper group than in the FAI or control groups, and ML TTS was longer in the FAI group than in the control group. Conclusions During jump landings, copers showed differences in sagittal-plane control, including less plantar flexion at initial contact and increased AP sway during stabilization

  15. mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells are heterogeneous, and cyclic AMP does not act directly to stabilize cell-type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Manrow, R E; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    We reevaluated the use of 32PO4 pulse-chases for analyzing mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium cells. We found that completely effective PO4 chases could not be obtained in developing cells and that, as a consequence, the decay rates exhibited by some mRNAs were influenced by the rates at which they were transcribed. In developing cells disaggregated in the presence of cyclic AMP, the poly(A)+ mRNA population turned over with an apparent half-life of 4 h, individual mRNA decay rates were heterogeneous, and some prestalk and prespore mRNAs appeared to decay with biphasic kinetics. In cells disaggregated in the absence of cyclic AMP, all prestalk and prespore mRNAs decayed with biphasic kinetics. During the first 1 to 1.5 h after disaggregation in the absence of cyclic AMP, the cell-type-specific mRNAs were selectively degraded, decaying with half-lives of 20 to 30 min; thereafter, the residual prestalk and prespore mRNA molecules decayed at rates that were similar to those measured in the presence of cyclic AMP. This short-term labilization of cell-type-specific mRNAs was observed even for those species not requiring cyclic AMP for their accumulation in developing cells. The observation that cell-type specific mRNAs can decay at similar rates in disaggregated cells with or without cyclic AMP indicates that this compound does not act directly to stabilize prestalk and prespore mRNAs during development and that its primary role in the maintenance of cyclic-AMP-dependent mRNAs is likely to be transcriptional. Images PMID:2847029

  16. DUX4-induced dsRNA and MYC mRNA stabilization activate apoptotic pathways in human cell models of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shadle, Sean C; Zhong, Jun Wen; Campbell, Amy E; Conerly, Melissa L; Jagannathan, Sujatha; Wong, Chao-Jen; Morello, Timothy D; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by the mis-expression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle cells. DUX4 is a transcription factor that activates genes normally associated with stem cell biology and its mis-expression in FSHD cells results in apoptosis. To identify genes and pathways necessary for DUX4-mediated apoptosis, we performed an siRNA screen in an RD rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with an inducible DUX4 transgene. Our screen identified components of the MYC-mediated apoptotic pathway and the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) innate immune response pathway as mediators of DUX4-induced apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that DUX4 expression led to increased MYC mRNA, accumulation of nuclear dsRNA foci, and activation of the dsRNA response pathway in both RD cells and human myoblasts. Nuclear dsRNA foci were associated with aggregation of the exon junction complex component EIF4A3. The elevation of MYC mRNA, dsRNA accumulation, and EIF4A3 nuclear aggregates in FSHD muscle cells suggest that these processes might contribute to FSHD pathophysiology.

  17. Identification of the cis-elements mediating the autogenous control of ribosomal protein L2 mRNA stability in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Presutti, C; Villa, T; Hall, D; Pertica, C; Bozzoni, I

    1995-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L2 (rpL2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates the accumulation of its own mRNA by a feedback mechanism. An RNA sequence is responsible for this control, initially characterized as a 360 nucleotide-long region, localized at the 5' end of the transcript. This region, fused to an unrelated coding sequence, is able to down-regulate the accumulation of the chimeric transcript when increased levels of rpL2 are induced in the cell. The target regulatory region also responds to regulation when inserted inside an intron, demonstrating that the control process can take place inside the nucleus. Deletion analysis from the 5' and 3' borders have restricted the responsive region to approximately 200 nt. The insertion of a poly-G cassette downstream of the regulatory region allowed the identification of truncated 3' cut-off poly(A)+ RNA molecules. The parallel identification of cut-off molecules containing the 5' portion of the transcript allowed us to deduce that the truncated products originate by endonucleolytic cleavage. Altogether, these results are consistent with a mechanism by which the presence of excess amounts of rpL2 in the cell triggers its own mRNA to a degradative pathway; this involves an initial endonucleolytic cleavage that is followed by exonucleolytic trimming. Such a regulatory mechanism shows interesting analogies with the translational regulation of r-proteins in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:7664741

  18. Identification of the cis-elements mediating the autogenous control of ribosomal protein L2 mRNA stability in yeast.

    PubMed

    Presutti, C; Villa, T; Hall, D; Pertica, C; Bozzoni, I

    1995-08-15

    The ribosomal protein L2 (rpL2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates the accumulation of its own mRNA by a feedback mechanism. An RNA sequence is responsible for this control, initially characterized as a 360 nucleotide-long region, localized at the 5' end of the transcript. This region, fused to an unrelated coding sequence, is able to down-regulate the accumulation of the chimeric transcript when increased levels of rpL2 are induced in the cell. The target regulatory region also responds to regulation when inserted inside an intron, demonstrating that the control process can take place inside the nucleus. Deletion analysis from the 5' and 3' borders have restricted the responsive region to approximately 200 nt. The insertion of a poly-G cassette downstream of the regulatory region allowed the identification of truncated 3' cut-off poly(A)+ RNA molecules. The parallel identification of cut-off molecules containing the 5' portion of the transcript allowed us to deduce that the truncated products originate by endonucleolytic cleavage. Altogether, these results are consistent with a mechanism by which the presence of excess amounts of rpL2 in the cell triggers its own mRNA to a degradative pathway; this involves an initial endonucleolytic cleavage that is followed by exonucleolytic trimming. Such a regulatory mechanism shows interesting analogies with the translational regulation of r-proteins in Escherichia coli.

  19. DUX4-induced dsRNA and MYC mRNA stabilization activate apoptotic pathways in human cell models of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shadle, Sean C.; Jagannathan, Sujatha; Wong, Chao-Jen; Morello, Timothy D.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2017-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by the mis-expression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle cells. DUX4 is a transcription factor that activates genes normally associated with stem cell biology and its mis-expression in FSHD cells results in apoptosis. To identify genes and pathways necessary for DUX4-mediated apoptosis, we performed an siRNA screen in an RD rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with an inducible DUX4 transgene. Our screen identified components of the MYC-mediated apoptotic pathway and the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) innate immune response pathway as mediators of DUX4-induced apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that DUX4 expression led to increased MYC mRNA, accumulation of nuclear dsRNA foci, and activation of the dsRNA response pathway in both RD cells and human myoblasts. Nuclear dsRNA foci were associated with aggregation of the exon junction complex component EIF4A3. The elevation of MYC mRNA, dsRNA accumulation, and EIF4A3 nuclear aggregates in FSHD muscle cells suggest that these processes might contribute to FSHD pathophysiology. PMID:28273136

  20. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H.; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  1. Biological soil crust as a bio-mediator alters hydrological processes in stabilized dune system of the Tengger Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinrong

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crust (BSC) is a vital component in the stabilized sand dunes with a living cover up to more than 70% of the total, which has been considered as a bio-mediator that directly influences and regulates the sand dune ecosystem processes. However, its influences on soil hydrological processes have been long neglected in Chinese deserts. In this study, BSCs of different successional stages were chose to test their influence on the hydrological processes of stabilized dune, where the groundwater deep exceeds 30m, further to explore why occur the sand-binding vegetation replacement between shrubs and herbs. Our long-term observation (60 years) shows that cyanobacteria crust has been colonized and developed after 3 years since the sand-binding vegetation has been established and dune fixation using planted xerophytic shrubs and made sand barrier (straw-checkerboard) on shifting dune surface, lichen and moss crust occurred after 20 years, and the cover of moss dominated crust could reach 70 % after 50 years. The colonization and development of BSC altered the initial soil water balance of revegetated areas by influencing rainfall infiltration, soil evaporation and dew water entrapment. The results show that BSC obviously reduced the infiltration that occurred during most rainfall events (80%), when rainfall was greater than 5 mm or less than 20 mm. The presence of BSC reduced evaporation of topsoil after small rainfall (<5 mm) because its high proportion of finer particles slowed the evaporation rate, thus keeping the water in the soil surface longer, and crust facilitated topsoil evaporation when rainfall reached 10 mm. The amount of dew entrapment increases with the succession of BSC. Moreover, the effect of the later successional BSC to dew entrapment, rainfall infiltration and evaporation was more obvious than the early successional BSC on stabilized dunes. In general, BSC reduced the amount of rainfall water that reached deeper soil (0.4-3m), which is

  2. Endoglin regulates PI3-kinase/Akt trafficking and signaling to alter endothelial capillary stability during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam Y.; Golzio, Christelle; Gatza, Catherine E.; Sharma, Arun; Katsanis, Nicholas; Blobe, Gerard C.

    2012-01-01

    Endoglin (CD105) is an endothelial-specific transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) coreceptor essential for angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis. Although endoglin dysfunction contributes to numerous vascular conditions, the mechanism of endoglin action remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel mechanism in which endoglin and Gα-interacting protein C-terminus–interacting protein (GIPC)–mediated trafficking of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) regulates endothelial signaling and function. We demonstrate that endoglin interacts with the PI3K subunits p110α and p85 via GIPC to recruit and activate PI3K and Akt at the cell membrane. Opposing ligand-induced effects are observed in which TGF-β1 attenuates, whereas bone morphogenetic protein-9 enhances, endoglin/GIPC-mediated membrane scaffolding of PI3K and Akt to alter endothelial capillary tube stability in vitro. Moreover, we employ the first transgenic zebrafish model for endoglin to demonstrate that GIPC is a critical component of endoglin function during developmental angiogenesis in vivo. These studies define a novel non-Smad function for endoglin and GIPC in regulating endothelial cell function during angiogenesis. PMID:22593212

  3. Effect of pH on Structural Changes in Perch Hemoglobin that Can Alter Redox Stability and Heme Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mark P.; Aranda, IV, Roman; He, Cai; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-01-07

    pH can be manipulated to alter the oxidative stability of fish-based foods during storage. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the ability of reduced pH to cause structural changes in fish hemoglobins that lead to enhanced oxidative degradation. Decreasing pH from 8.0 to 6.3 and 5.7 created a large channel for solvent entry into the heme crevice of perch hemoglobin beta chains. The proton-induced opening of this channel occurred between site CD3 and the heme-6-propionate. Solvent entry into the heme crevice can enhance metHb formation and hemin loss, processes that accelerate lipid oxidation. Reduced pH also decreased the distance between Ile at E11 in one of the alpha chains and the ligand above the heme iron atom. This sterically displaces O{sub 2} and protonated O{sub 2} which increases metHb formation. These studies demonstrate that pH reduction causes structural changes in perch hemoglobin which increase oxidative degradation of the heme pigment.

  4. TATA boxes in gene transcription and poly (A) tails in mRNA stability: New perspective on the effects of berberine

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lu, Xi; Lei, Fan; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Wang, Yu-Gang; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Feng, Tian-Shi; Wang, Xin-Pei; Yu, Xuan; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound with variable pharmacological effects and a broad panel of target genes. We investigated berberine’s pharmacological activities from the perspective of its nucleotide-binding ability and discovered that BBR directly regulates gene expression by targeting TATA boxes in transcriptional regulatory regions as well as the poly adenine (poly (A)) tail at the mRNA terminus. BBR inhibits gene transcription by binding the TATA boxes in the transcriptional regulatory region, but it promotes higher levels of expression by targeting the poly (A) tails of mRNAs. The present study demonstrates that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are the first and second primary targets by which BBR regulates gene expression. The final outcome of gene regulation by BBR depends on the structure of the individual gene. This is the first study to reveal that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are direct targets for BBR in its regulation of gene expression. Our findings provide a novel explanation for the complex activities of a small molecule compound in a biological system and a novel horizon for small molecule-compound pharmacological studies. PMID:26671652

  5. MicroRNA-322 (miR-322) and its target protein Tob2 modulate Osterix (Osx) mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Carballo, Edgardo; Bartrons, Ramon; Rosa, José Luis; Ventura, Francesc

    2013-05-17

    Osteogenesis depends on a coordinated network of signals and transcription factors such as Runx2 and Osterix. Recent evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) act as important post-transcriptional regulators in a large number of processes, including osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we performed miRNA expression profiling and identified miR-322, a BMP-2-down-regulated miRNA, as a regulator of osteoblast differentiation. We report miR-322 gain- and loss-of-function experiments in C2C12 and MC3T3-E1 cells and primary cultures of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. We demonstrate that overexpression of miR-322 enhances BMP-2 response, increasing the expression of Osx and other osteogenic genes. Furthermore, we identify Tob2 as a target of miR-322, and we characterize the specific Tob2 3'-UTR sequence bound by miR-322 by reporter assays. We demonstrate that Tob2 is a negative regulator of osteogenesis that binds and mediates degradation of Osx mRNA. Our results demonstrate a new molecular mechanism controlling osteogenesis through the specific miR-322/Tob2 regulation of specific target mRNAs. This regulatory circuit provides a clear example of a complex miRNA-transcription factor network for fine-tuning the osteoblast differentiation program.

  6. Maternal supplementation with rumen-protected methionine increases prepartal plasma methionine concentration and alters hepatic mRNA abundance of 1-carbon, methionine, and transsulfuration pathways in neonatal Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Jacometo, C B; Zhou, Z; Luchini, D; Corrêa, M N; Loor, J J

    2017-02-01

    An important mechanism of nutritional "programming" induced by supplementation with methyl donors during pregnancy is the alteration of mRNA abundance in the offspring. We investigated the effects of rumen-protected Met (RPM) on abundance of 17 genes in the 1-carbon, Met, and transsulfuration pathways in calf liver from cows fed the same basal diet without (control, CON) or with RPM at 0.08% of diet dry matter/d (MET) from -21 through +30 d around calving. Biopsies (n = 8 calves per diet) were harvested on d 4, 14, 28, and 50 of age. Cows fed RPM had greater plasma concentration of Met (17.8 vs. 28.2 μM) at -10 d from calving. However, no difference was present in colostrum yield and free AA concentrations. Greater abundance on d 4 and 14 of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 2 (BHMT2), adenosylhomocysteinase (AHCY; also known as SAHH), and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) in MET calves indicated alterations in Met, choline, and homocysteine metabolism. Those data agree with the greater abundance of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) in MET calves. Along with CBS, the greater abundance of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione reductase (GSR) on d 4 in MET calves indicated a short-term postnatal alteration in the use of homocysteine for taurine and glutathione synthesis (both are potent intracellular antioxidants). The striking 7-fold upregulation at d 50 versus 4 of cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD), catalyzing the last step of taurine synthesis, in MET and CON calves underscores an important role of taurine during postnatal calf growth. The unique role of taurine in the young calf is further supported by the upregulation of CBS, GCLC, and GSR at d 50 versus 14 and 28 in MET and CON. Although betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) activity did not differ in MET and CON, it increased ∼50% at d 14 and 28 versus 4. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.79) was present between BHMT abundance and BHMT activity regardless

  7. Control of Cytokine mRNA Expression by RNA-binding Proteins and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, V.; Jakymiw, A.; Van Tubergen, E.A.; D’Silva, N.J.; Kirkwood, K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines are critical mediators of inflammation and host defenses. Regulation of cytokines can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcription, mRNA export, and post- transcriptional and translational levels. Among these modes of regulation, post-transcriptional regulation has been shown to play a vital role in controlling the expression of cytokines by modulating mRNA stability. The stability of cytokine mRNAs, including TNFα, IL-6, and IL-8, has been reported to be altered by the presence of AU-rich elements (AREs) located in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of the mRNAs. Numerous RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs bind to these 3′UTRs to regulate the stability and/or translation of the mRNAs. Thus, this paper describes the cooperative function between RNA-binding proteins and miRNAs and how they regulate AU-rich elements containing cytokine mRNA stability/degradation and translation. These mRNA control mechanisms can potentially influence inflammation as it relates to oral biology, including periodontal diseases and oral pharyngeal cancer progression. PMID:22302144

  8. An AU-Rich Sequence Element (UUUN[A/U]U) Downstream of the Edited C in Apolipoprotein B mRNA Is a High-Affinity Binding Site for Apobec-1: Binding of Apobec-1 to This Motif in the 3′ Untranslated Region of c-myc Increases mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2000-01-01

    Apobec-1, the catalytic subunit of the mammalian apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, is a cytidine deaminase with RNA binding activity for AU-rich sequences. This RNA binding activity is required for Apobec-1 to mediate C-to-U RNA editing. Filter binding assays, using immobilized Apobec-1, demonstrate saturable binding to a 105-nt apoB RNA with a Kd of ∼435 nM. A series of AU-rich templates was used to identify a high-affinity (∼50 nM) binding site of consensus sequence UUUN[A/U]U, with multiple copies of this sequence constituting the high-affinity binding site. In order to determine whether this consensus site could be functionally demonstrated from within an apoB RNA, circular-permutation analysis was performed, revealing one major (UUUGAU) and one minor (UU) site located 3 and 16 nucleotides, respectively, downstream of the edited base. Secondary-structure predictions reveal a stem-loop flanking the edited base with Apobec-1 binding to the consensus site(s) at an open loop. A similar consensus (AUUUA) is present in the 3′ untranslated regions of several mRNAs, including that of c-myc, that are known to undergo rapid degradation. In this context, it is presumed that the consensus motif acts as a destabilizing element. As an independent test of the ability of Apobec-1 to bind to this sequence, F442A cells were transfected with Apobec-1 and the half-life of c-myc mRNA was determined following actinomycin D treatment. These studies demonstrated an increase in the half-life of c-myc mRNA from 90 to 240 min in control versus Apobec-1-expressing cells. Apobec-1 expression mutants, in which RNA binding activity is eliminated, failed to alter c-myc mRNA turnover. Taken together, the data establish a consensus binding site for Apobec-1 embedded in proximity to the edited base in apoB RNA. Binding to this site in other target RNAs raises the possibility that Apobec-1 may be involved in other aspects of RNA metabolism, independent of its role as an apoB RNA

  9. The turnip yellow mosaic virus tRNA-like structure cannot be replaced by generic tRNA-like elements or by heterologous 3' untranslated regions known to enhance mRNA expression and stability.

    PubMed Central

    Skuzeski, J M; Bozarth, C S; Dreher, T W

    1996-01-01

    The tRNA-like structure (TLS) at the 3' end of the turnip yellow mosaic virus genome was replaced with heterologous tRNA-like elements, and with a poly(A) tail, in order to assess its role. Replacement with the valylatable TLSs from two closely related tymoviruses resulted in infectious viruses. In contrast, no systemic symptoms on plants, and only low viral accumulations in protoplasts, were observed for three chimeric genomes with 3' sequences known to enhance mRNA stability and translatability. One of these chimeras had a poly(A) tail, and the others had the TLS with associated upstream pseudoknot tracts from the 3' ends of brome mosaic and tobacco mosaic viruses. The latter two chimeric RNAs were shown to be appropriately folded by demonstrating their aminoacylation in vitro with tyrosine and histidine, respectively. The results show that enhancement of genome stability or gene expression is not the major role of the turnip yellow mosaic virus TLS. The major role is likely to be replicational, dependent on features present in tymoviral TLSs but not in generic tRNA-like structures. PMID:8642631

  10. The use of Molecular Beacons to Directly Measure Bacterial mRNA Abundances and Transcript Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kuechenmeister, Lisa J.; Anderson, Kelsi L.; Morrison, John M.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA turnover is a dynamic means by which bacteria regulate gene expression. Although current methodologies allow characterization of the stability of individual transcripts, procedures designed to measure alterations in transcript abundance/turnover on a high throughput scale are lacking. In the current report, we describe the development of a rapid and simplified molecular beacon-based procedure to directly measure the mRNA abundances and mRNA degradation properties of well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity factors. This method does not require any PCR-based amplification, can monitor the abundances of multiple transcripts within a single RNA sample, and was successfully implemented into a high throughput screen of transposon mutant library members to detect isolates with altered mRNA turnover properties. It is expected that the described methodology will provide great utility in characterizing components of bacterial RNA degradation processes and can be used to directly measure the mRNA levels of virtually any bacterial transcript. PMID:18992285

  11. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  12. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced model of preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease: an influence of chronic pramipexole in rats.

    PubMed

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson's disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively.

  13. Enhanced heat stability and kinetic parameters of maize endosperm ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase by alteration of phylogenetically identified amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Georgelis, Nikolaos; Hannah, L Curtis

    2014-02-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) controls the rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis and is regulated at various levels. Cereal endosperm enzymes, in contrast to other plant AGPases, are particularly heat labile and transgenic studies highlight the importance of temperature for cereal yield. Previously, a phylogenetic approach identified Type II and positively selected amino acid positions in the large subunit of maize endosperm AGPase. Glycogen content, kinetic parameters and heat stability were measured in AGPases having mutations in these sites and interesting differences were observed. This study expands on our earlier evolutionary work by determining how all Type II and positively selected sites affect kinetic constants, heat stability and catalytic rates at increased temperatures. Variants with enhanced properties were identified and combined into one gene, designated Sh2-E. Enhanced properties include: heat stability, enhanced activity at 37 °C, activity at 55 °C, reduced Ka and activity in the absence of activator. The resulting enzyme exhibited all improved properties of the various individual changes. Additionally, Sh2-E was expressed with a small subunit variant with enhanced enzyme properties resulting in an enzyme that has exceptional heat stability, a high catalytic rate at increased temperatures and significantly decreased Km values for both substrates in the absence of the activator.

  14. Regulation of LPS-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines via alteration of NF-κB activity in mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuhu; Huo, Meijun; Li, Guangsheng; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Jundong

    2016-10-01

    F toxicity to immune system, especially to macrophage, has been studied a lot recently. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), as a transcription factor, plays a central role in immune and inflammatory responses via the regulation of downstream gene expression. Recent studies indicated that fluoride effect on inflammatory cytokine secretion, however, the molecular mechanism was less understood. In our study, peritoneal macrophages (PMs) were divided several groups and were administrated sodium fluoride (NaF, 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 μM) and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 30 ng/mg). The mRNA expression of p65, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in macrophages exposed to fluoride was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR respectively. The translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nucleus, which in a way reflects NF-κB activity, was demonstrated by Immunofluorescence and ELISA. Our results showed that fluoride had a dose-dependent effect on NF-κB activity, which coincided with LPS-induced mRNA expression of its downstream genes, iNOS and IL-1β. Fluoride alone causes no effect on gene expression. However, the mRNA expression of TNF-α showed non-NF-κB-dependent manner. Therefore, we come to the conclusion that fluoride can regulate LPS-induced mRNA expression of iNOS and IL-1β via NF-κB pathway in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

  15. The alteration of mRNA expression of SOD and GPX genes, and proteins in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) under stress of NaCl and/or ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alharby, Hesham F; Metwali, Ehab M R; Fuller, Michael P; Aldhebiani, Amal Y

    2016-11-01

    Five cultivars of tomato having different levels of salt stress tolerance were exposed to different treatments of NaCl (0, 3 and 6 g L(-1)) and ZnO-NPs (0, 15 and 30 mg L(-1)). Treatments with NaCl at both 3 and 6 g L(-1) suppressed the mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) genes in all cultivars while plants treated with ZnO-NPs in the presence of NaCl, showed increments in the mRNA expression levels. This indicated that ZnO-NPs had a positive response on plant metabolism under salt stress. Superior expression levels of mRNA were observed in the salt tolerant cultivars, Sandpoint and Edkawy while the lowest level was detected in the salt sensitive cultivar, Anna Aasa. SDS-PAGE showed clear differences in patterns of protein expression among the cultivars. A negative protein marker for salt sensitivity and ZnO-NPs was detected in cv. Anna Aasa at a molecular weight of 19.162 kDa, while the tolerant cultivar Edkawy had two positive markers at molecular weights of 74.991 and 79.735 kDa.

  16. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; ...

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstratedmore » an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.« less

  17. The Intronic GABRG2 Mutation, IVS6+2T→G, Associated with CAE Altered Subunit mRNA Intron Splicing, Activated Nonsense-Mediated Decay and Produced a Stable Truncated γ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mengnan; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The intronic GABRG2 mutation, IVS6+2T→G, was identified in an Australian family with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and febrile seizures (Kananura et al., 2002). The GABRG2 intron 6 splice donor site was found to be mutated from GT to GG. We generated wildtype and mutant γ2S subunit bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) driven by a CMV promoter and expressed them in HEK293T cells and expressed wildtype and mutant γ2S subunit BACs containing the endogenous hGABRG2 promoter in transgenic mice. Wildtype and mutant GABRG2 mRNA splicing patterns were determined in both BAC transfected HEK293T cells and transgenic mouse brain, and in both, the mutation abolished intron 6 splicing at the donor site, activated a cryptic splice site, generated partial intron 6 retention and produced a frame shift in exon 7 that created a premature translation-termination codon (PTC). The resultant mutant mRNA was either degraded partially by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) or translated to a stable, truncated subunit (the γ2-PTC subunit) containing the first 6 GABRG2 exons and a novel frame-shifted 29 aa C terminal tail. The γ2-PTC subunit was homologous to the mollusk acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) but was not secreted from cells. It was retained in the ER and not expressed on the surface membrane, but it did oligomerize with α1 and β2 subunits. These results suggested that the GABRG2 mutation, IVS6+2T→G, reduced surface αβγ2 receptor levels, thus reducing GABAergic inhibition, by reducing GABRG2 transcript level and producing a stable, nonfunctional truncated subunit that had a dominant negative effect on αβγ2 receptor assembly. PMID:22539854

  18. Gallium nitrate regulates rat osteoblast expression of osteocalcin protein and mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Salvatori, R; Bockman, R S

    1993-01-01

    Gallium nitrate, a group IIIa metal salt, has been found to be clinically effective for the treatment of accelerated bone resorption in cancer-related hypercalcemia and Paget's disease. Here we report the effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein levels on the rat osteoblast-like cell line ROS 17/2.8. Gallium nitrate reduced both constitutive and vitamin D3-stimulated osteocalcin protein levels in culture medium by one-half and osteocalcin mRNA levels to one-third to one-tenth of control. Gallium nitrate also inhibited vitamin D3 stimulation of osteocalcin and osteopontin mRNA levels but did not affect constitutive osteopontin mRNA levels. Among several different metals examined, gallium was unique in its ability to reduce osteocalcin mRNA levels without decreasing levels of other mRNAs synthesized by ROS 17/2.8 cells. The effects of gallium nitrate on osteocalcin mRNA and protein synthesis mimic those seen when ROS 17/2.8 cells are exposed to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1); however, TGF-beta 1 was not detected in gallium nitrate-treated ROS 17/2.8 cell media. Use of the RNA polymerase II inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole demonstrated that gallium nitrate did not alter the stability of osteocalcin mRNA. Transient transfection assays using the rat osteocalcin promoter linked to the bacterial reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase indicated that gallium nitrate blocked reporter gene expression stimulated by the osteocalcin promoter. This is the first reported effect of gallium nitrate on isolated osteoblast cells.

  19. Massive bowel resection upregulates the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II and apolipoprotein A-IV and alters the intestinal vitamin A status in rats.

    PubMed

    Hebiguchi, Taku; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Morii, Mayako; Watanabe, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Miura, Mitsutaka; Imai, Katsuyuki; Senoo, Haruki; Yoshino, Hiroaki

    2015-03-01

    Short bowel (SB) syndrome causes the malabsorption of various nutrients. Among these, vitamin A is important for a number of physiological activities. Vitamin A is absorbed by epithelial cells of the small intestine and is discharged into the lymphatic vessels as a component of chylomicrons and is delivered to the liver. In the present study, we used a rat model of SB syndrome in order to assess its effects on the expression of genes associated with the absorption, transport and metabolism of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the intestinal mRNA expression levels of cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II, gene symbol Rbp2) and apolipoprotein A-IV (gene symbol Apoa4) were higher than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by RT-qPCR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that absorptive epithelial cells stained positive for both CRBP II and lecithin retinol acyltransferase, which are both required for the effective esterification of vitamin A. In the rats with SB, the retinol content in the ileum and the retinyl ester content in the jejunum were lower than those in the sham-operated rats, as shown by quantitative analysis of retinol and retinyl esters by high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that the elevated mRNA expression levels of Rbp2 and Apoa4 in the rats with SB contribute to the effective esterification and transport of vitamin A.

  20. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1), Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2), or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and processing bodies (PBs). More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N6-methyladenosine (m6A), allowing the recruitment of YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2), an m6A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries. PMID:27886048

  1. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  2. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  3. A mutation in the promoter of the chicken β,β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 gene alters xanthophyll metabolism through a selective effect on its mRNA abundance in the breast muscle.

    PubMed

    Jlali, M; Graulet, B; Chauveau-Duriot, B; Chabault, M; Godet, E; Leroux, S; Praud, C; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Duclos, M J; Berri, C

    2012-12-01

    A polymorphism in the promoter of the β,β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1) gene recently was identified in an experimental cross between 2 chicken lines divergently selected on growth rate and found to be associated with variations in the yellow color of the breast meat. In this study, the effects of the polymorphism on several aspects of carotenoid metabolism were evaluated in chickens sharing the same genetic background except for their genotype at the BCMO1 locus. We confirmed that BCMO1 mRNA abundance varied (P < 0.001) between the 2 homozygous genotypes (GG < AA) and in the pectoralis major muscle. By contrast, BCMO1 mRNA expression was not affected (P > 0.05) by the polymorphism in the duodenum, liver, or sartorius muscle. The breast meat of GG chickens was more (P < 0.001) yellow and richer in lutein (P < 0.01) and zeaxanthin (P < 0.05) compared to that of AA chickens whereas these variables did not differ (P > 0.05) in the other tissues tested. The GG were also characterized by reduced (P < 0.01) plasma lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations than AA without affecting plasma and tissue content of fat-soluble vitamins A and E. As lutein and zeaxanthin are usually not considered as substrates of the BCMO1 enzyme, the impact of BCMO1 polymorphism on the activity of other genes involved in carotenoid transport (SCARB1 and CD36 encoding the scavenger receptor class B type I and the cluster determinant 36, respectively) and metabolism (BCDO2 encoding β,β-carotene 9',10'-dioxygenase 2) was evaluated. The BCMO1 polymorphism did not affect mRNA abundance of BCDO2, SCARB1, or CD36, regardless of tissue considered. Taken together, these results indicated that a genetic variant of BCMO1 specifically changes lutein and zeaxanthin content in the chicken plasma and breast muscle without impairing vitamin A and E metabolism.

  4. The role of altered proximal femoral geometry in impaired pelvis stability and hip control during CP gait: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Jansen, Karen; Wesseling, Mariska; Molenaers, Guy; Scheys, Lennart; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-02-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often present aberrant hip geometry, more specifically increased femoral anteversion and neck-shaft angle. Furthermore, altered gait patterns are present within this population. This study analyzed the effect of aberrant femoral geometry, as present in subjects with CP, on the ability of muscles to control hip and knee joint kinematics. Given the specific gait deficits observed during crouch gait, increased ability to abduct, externally rotate the hip and extend the knee and hip were denoted as beneficial effects. We ran dynamic simulations of CP and normal gait using two musculoskeletal models, one reflecting normal femoral geometry and one reflecting proximal femoral deformities. The results show that the combination of aberrant bone geometry and CP-specific gait characteristics beneficially increased the ability of gluteus medius and maximus to extend the hip and knee. In contrast, the potentials of the hamstrings to extend the hip decreased whereas the potentials to flex the knee increased. These changes closely followed the observed changes in the muscle moment arm lengths. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the concomitant effect of the presence of proximal femoral deformity and CP gait characteristics on the muscle control of hip and knee joint kinematics during single stance. Not accounting for subject-specific geometry will affect the calculated muscles' potential during gait. Therefore, the use of generic models to assess muscle function in the presence of femoral deformity and CP gait should be treated with caution.

  5. Uremic Serum and Solutes Increase Post–Vascular Interventional Thrombotic Risk Through Altered Stability of Smooth Muscle Cell Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Chitalia, Vipul C.; Shivanna, Sowmya; Martorell, Jordi; Balcells, Mercedes; Bosch, Irene; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Stent thrombosis (ST), a postinterventional complication with a mortality rate of 50%, has an incidence that rises precipitously in patients at risk. Chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease have emerged as particularly strong ST risk factors, yet the mechanism remains elusive. Tissue factor (TF) is a crucial mediator of injury-related thrombosis and has been implicated for ST. We posit that uremia modulates TF in the local vessel wall to induce postinterventional thrombosis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Methods and Results As a model of the de-endothelialized, postinterventional state, we exposed primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) pretreated with uremic serum (obtained from ESRD patients on hemodialysis) to coronary-like blood flow. vSMC TF expression, activity, stability, and posttranslational modification were examined after vSMCs were treated with uremic serum or solutes. We found significantly greater clot formation after uremic serum exposure, which was substantially reduced with the prior treatment with anti-TF neutralizing antibody. Uremic sera induced 2- to 3-fold higher TF expression and activity in vSMCs independent of diabetes mellitus. Relevant concentrations of isolated uremic solutes such as indole-3-acetic acid (3.5 μg/mL), indoxyl sulfate (25 μg/mL), and uric acid (80 μg/mL) recapitulated these effects in cell culture and the flow loop model. We show further that TF undergoes ubiquitination at baseline and that uremic serum, indole-3-acetic acid, and indoxyl sulfate significantly prolong TF half-life by inhibiting its ubiquitination. Conclusions The uremic milieu is profoundly thrombogenic and upregulates vSMC TF levels by increasing TF stability and decreasing its ubiquitination. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time that the posttranslational regulation of TF in uremia may have a causative role in the increased ST risk observed in uremic patients. These data suggest that

  6. Amino-terminal alteration of the HLA-A*0201-restricted human immunodeficiency virus pol peptide increases complex stability and in vitro immunogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pogue, R R; Eron, J; Frelinger, J A; Matsui, M

    1995-01-01

    Initial studies suggested that major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted viral epitopes could be predicted by the presence of particular residues termed anchors. However, recent studies showed that nonanchor positions of the epitopes are also significant for class I binding and recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We investigated if changing nonanchor amino acids could increase class I affinity, complex stability, and T-cell recognition of a natural viral epitope. This concept was tested by using the HLA-A 0201-restricted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 epitope from reverse transcriptase (pol). Position 1 (P1) amino acid substitutions were emphasized because P1 alterations may not alter the T-cell receptor interaction. The peptide with the P1 substitution of tyrosine for isoleucine (I1Y) showed a binding affinity for HLA-A 0201 similar to that of the wild-type pol peptide in a cell lysate assembly assay. Surprisingly, I1Y significantly increased the HLA-A 0201-peptide complex stability at the cell surface. I1Y sensitized HLA-A 0201-expressing target cells for wild-type pol-specific CTL lysis as well as wild-type pol. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from three HLA-A2 HIV-seropositive individuals were stimulated in vitro with I1Y and wild-type pol. I1Y stimulated a higher wild-type pol-specific CTL response than wild-type pol in all three donors. Thus, I1Y may be an "improved" epitope for use as a CTL-based human immunodeficiency virus vaccine component. The design of improved epitopes has important ramifications for prophylaxis and therapeutic vaccine development. PMID:7545295

  7. Switching the centromeres on and off: epigenetic chromatin alterations provide plasticity in centromere activity stabilizing aberrant dicentric chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2013-12-01

    The kinetochore, which forms on a specific chromosomal locus called the centromere, mediates interactions between the chromosome and the spindle during mitosis and meiosis. Abnormal chromosome rearrangements and/or neocentromere formation can cause the presence of multiple centromeres on a single chromosome, which results in chromosome breakage or cell cycle arrest. Analyses of artificial dicentric chromosomes suggested that the activity of the centromere is regulated epigenetically; on some stably maintained dicentric chromosomes, one of the centromeres no longer functions as a platform for kinetochore formation, although the DNA sequence remains intact. Such epigenetic centromere inactivation occurs in cells of various eukaryotes harbouring 'regional centromeres', such as those of maize, fission yeast and humans, suggesting that the position of the active centromere is determined by epigenetic markers on a chromosome rather than the nucleotide sequence. Our recent findings in fission yeast revealed that epigenetic centromere inactivation consists of two steps: disassembly of the kinetochore initiates inactivation and subsequent heterochromatinization prevents revival of the inactivated centromere. Kinetochore disassembly followed by heterochromatinization is also observed in normal senescent human cells. Thus epigenetic centromere inactivation may not only stabilize abnormally generated dicentric chromosomes, but also be part of an intrinsic mechanism regulating cell proliferation.

  8. p130Cas scaffold protein regulates ErbB2 stability by altering breast cancer cell sensitivity to autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Bisaro, Brigitte; Sciortino, Marianna; Colombo, Shana; Leal, Maria Pilar Camacho; Costamagna, Andrea; Castellano, Isabella; Montemurro, Filippo; Rossi, Valentina; Valabrega, Giorgio; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola; Cabodi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the ErbB2/HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase occurs in up to 20% of human breast cancers and correlates with aggressive disease. Several efficacious targeted therapies, including antibodies and kinase inhibitors, have been developed but the occurring of resistance to these agents is often observed. New therapeutic agents targeting the endocytic recycling and intracellular trafficking of membrane in tumor cells overexpressing ErbB2 are actually in clinical development. Nevertheless the mechanisms underlying ErbB2 downregulation are still obscure. We have previously demonstrated that the overexpression of the p130Cas adaptor protein in ErbB2 positive breast cancer, promotes tumor aggressiveness and progression. Here we demonstrate that lowering p130Cas expression in breast cancer cells is sufficient to induce ErbB2 degradation by autophagy. Conversely, p130Cas overexpression protects ErbB2 from degradation by autophagy. Furthermore, this autophagy-dependent preferential degradation of ErbB2 in absence of p130Cas is due to an increased ErbB2 ubiquitination. Indeed, the overexpression of p130Cas impairs ErbB2 ubiquitination by inhibiting the binding of Cbl and CHIP E3 ligases to ErbB2. Finally, our results indicate that p130Cas-dependent ErbB2 protection from degradation by autophagy may alter the sensitivity to the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Consistently, in human ErbB2 positive breast cancers that develop resistance to trastuzumab, p130Cas expression is significantly increased suggesting that elevated levels of p130Cas can be involved in trastuzumab resistance. PMID:26716506

  9. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy.

  10. Administration of flutamide alters sperm ultrastructure, sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability, and sperm mitochondrial oxidative capability in the boar: in vivo and in vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Lydka, M; Piasecka, M; Gaczarzewicz, D; Koziorowski, M; Bilinska, B

    2012-08-01

    Our previous work has shown that an anti-androgen flutamide administered pre- and post-natally induced adverse effects on the epididymal morphology and function of adult boars. The present investigation is aimed to understand the effect of flutamide and its metabolite on changes in sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability, changes in mitochondrial oxidative capability and frequency of abnormal sperm. In vivo effects of flutamide (50 mg/kg b.w.) on sperm ultrastructure were examined by electron microscopic observations. In vitro effects of 5, 50 and 100 μg/ml hydroxyflutamide, administered for 2 and 24 h, on sperm plasma membrane integrity were measured by LIVE/DEAD Sperm Vitality kit, while those on sperm membrane stability and mitochondrial oxidoreductive activity were investigated using Merocyanine 540 and NADH tests, respectively. The incidence of abnormal spermatozoa increased significantly (p < 0.05) in flutamide-treated boars compared with controls. In an in vitro approach, low dose of hydroxyflutamide in 2-h incubations appeared less effective in altering the sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability than two higher doses used (p < 0.05). No further decrease in the membrane integrity was found when the effect of anti-androgen lasted for 24 h. On the other hand, a decrease in sperm membrane destabilization and mitochondrial oxidoreductive activity was strengthened after 24 h of hydroxyflutamide administration (p < 0.05). Characterization of sperm parameters with regard to oxidative capability of mitochondria, plasma membrane changes and sperm ultrastructure provides novel data on the boar sperm sensitivity to anti-androgen action. Results indicate high sensitivity of boar spermatozoa to androgen withdrawal.

  11. Genetic stability of physiological responses to defoliation in a eucalypt and altered chemical defence in regrowth foliage.

    PubMed

    Borzak, Christina L; Potts, Brad M; Barry, Karen M; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M

    2016-11-22

    Defoliation may initiate physiological recovery and chemical defence mechanisms that allow a plant to improve fitness after damage. Such responses may result in changes in plant resource allocation that influence growth and foliar chemistry. In this study, we investigated the nature and stability of the defoliation response of juvenile plants from three divergent populations of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. A partial defoliation treatment that removed all upper crown leaves and the apical buds was applied to plants sourced from eight families from each of three populations representing contrasting chemical resistance to mammalian herbivory. Growth, photosynthetic rate and chlorophyll content were assessed pre-defoliation and periodically up to 12 weeks post-defoliation. The content of key plant primary and secondary metabolites was assessed pre-defoliation, at 12 weeks post-defoliation in the old foliage (positioned below the point of defoliation) and in the new foliage of the control plants and regrowth (from axillary buds) on the defoliated plants. There were clear treatment impacts on physiological responses, growth and foliar chemical traits, but despite significant constitutive differences in physiology, growth and chemistry the three E. globulus populations did not vary in their response to foliage loss. Distinct physiological responses to defoliation were observed with treatment plants showing significant up-regulation of photosynthetic rate and increased chlorophyll content in the old foliage remaining in the lower crown. There was a significant increase in the concentrations of a number of foliar chemical compounds in the regrowth arising from previously dormant axillary buds compared with new growth derived from apical meristems. There were changes in biomass allocation; defoliated plants had increased branching and leaf biomass, with changes in regrowth morphology to increase light capture. This study argues for multiple responses of E. globulus juveniles

  12. Ethanol-induced attenuation of oxidative stress is unable to alter mRNA expression pattern of catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST1A), and superoxide dismutase (SOD3) enzymes in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minghui; Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Haron, Mona H; Wu, Mengmeng; Khan, Ikhlas A; Dasmahapatra, Asok K

    2011-01-01

    Although the mechanism of ethanol toxicity during embryogenesis is unknown, our earlier studies on Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos indicated that the effects might be mediated through oxidative stress. In this study we have determined the oxidative stress and the mRNA content of four antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase) during Japanese rice fish embryogenesis (from 0 day post-fertilization to hatching) and after exposing the embryos to ethanol (100 and 300 mM) for 48 h at three stages (0-2, 1-3 and 4-6 days post-fertilization, dpf) of organogenesis. We observed that oxidative stress was minimal in blastula, gastrula or neurula stages, increased gradually with the advancement of morphogenesis and reached its maximum level in hatchlings. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs were constitutively expressed throughout development; however, the expression pattern was not identical among the enzymes. Catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNAs were minimal in the fertilized eggs, but increased significantly in 1 dpf and then either sharply dropped (SOD) or maintained a steady-state (catalase). Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was very high in fertilized eggs and sharply dropped 1 dpf and then gradually increased thereafter. Glutathione reductase (GR) maintained a steady-state throughout the development. Ethanol was able to attenuate oxidative stress in embryos exposed only to 300 mM 1-3 dpf; no significant difference with controls was observed in other ethanol-treated groups. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs also remained unaltered after ethanol treatment. From these data we conclude that the attenuation of oxidative stress by ethanol is probably due to the inhibition of normal growth of the embryos rather than by inhibiting catalase, GST, GR or SOD-dependent activities.

  13. Phosphorylation of poly(rC) binding protein 1 (PCBP1) contributes to stabilization of mu opioid receptor (MOR) mRNA via interaction with AU-rich element RNA-binding protein 1 (AUF1) and poly A binding protein (PABP)

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Wagley, Yadav; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H.

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level is frequently based on cis- and trans-acting factors on target mRNAs. We found a C-rich element (CRE) in mu-opioid receptor (MOR) 3′-untranslated region (UTR) to which poly (rC) binding protein 1 (PCBP1) binds, resulting in MOR mRNA stabilization. RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA EMSA revealed the formation of PCBP1-RNA complexes at the element. Knockdown of PCBP1 decreased MOR mRNA half-life and protein expression. Stimulation by forskolin increased cytoplasmic localization of PCBP1 and PCBP1/MOR 3′-UTR interactions via increased serine phosphorylation that was blocked by protein kinase A (PKA) or (phosphatidyl inositol-3) PI3-kinase inhibitors. The forskolin treatment also enhanced serine- and tyrosine-phosphorylation of AU-rich element binding protein (AUF1), concurrent with its increased binding to the CRE, and led to an increased interaction of poly A binding protein (PABP) with the CRE and poly(A) sites. AUF1 phosphorylation also led to an increased interaction with PCBP1. These findings suggest that a single co-regulator, PCBP1, plays a crucial role in stabilizing MOR mRNA, and is induced by PKA signaling by conforming to AUF1 and PABP. PMID:27836661

  14. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Interacting Protein (AIP) N-Terminus Gene Mutations Identified in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Alter Protein Stability and Function.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Robert; Vassallo, Josanne

    2017-03-02

    Mutations spanning the entire aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been found in isolated familial cases of pituitary adenomas (PA). Missense mutations located in the N-terminus of the gene have been identified in several patients. However, the functional significance of these mutations remains a matter of controversy. In most studies, the N-terminus of AIP has been shown to regulate protein stability and subcellular localization of the AIP-AHR-HSP90 complex but not to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Other studies found that the N-terminal domain interacts directly with other proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze whether specific N-terminus AIP mutations identified in PA patients would be functionally different from wild-type (WT) AIP. In vitro analyses were used to assess the role of known N-terminus variants, a locally identified mutant, R9Q, and three other commonly genotyped N-terminus mutations R16H, V49M and K103R are found in PA patients. Given the functional effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling alterations caused by N-terminus mutants on this pathway were also analyzed in GH3 cells. Results indicate that N-terminus mutations lead to de-regulation of the effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling and increased cAMP thresholds in GH3 cells resulting in increased growth hormone (GH) secretion. Cycloheximide chase analysis identified a variation in protein degradation patterns between WT and N-terminus variants. Therefore, both functional and structural studies reveal that N-terminus mutations in the AIP gene alter protein behaviour significantly and hence can truly be pathogenic in nature.

  15. A deafness-associated tRNAAsp mutation alters the m1G37 modification, aminoacylation and stability of tRNAAsp and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Peng, Yanyan; Zheng, Jing; Zheng, Binjiao; Jin, Xiaofen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Yong; Tang, Xiaowen; Huang, Taosheng; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we investigated the pathogenic mechanism underlying the deafness-associated mitochondrial(mt) tRNAAsp 7551A > G mutation. The m.7551A > G mutation is localized at a highly conserved nucleotide(A37), adjacent (3′) to the anticodon, which is important for the fidelity of codon recognition and stabilization in functional tRNAs. It was anticipated that the m.7551A > G mutation altered the structure and function of mt-tRNAAsp. The primer extension assay demonstrated that the m.7551A > G mutation created the m1G37 modification of mt-tRNAAsp. Using cybrid cell lines generated by transferring mitochondria from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from a Chinese family into mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)-less (ρo) cells, we demonstrated the significant decreases in the efficiency of aminoacylation and steady-state level of mt-tRNAAsp in mutant cybrids, compared with control cybrids. A failure in metabolism of mt-tRNAAsp caused the variable reductions in mtDNA-encoded polypeptides in mutant cybrids. Impaired mitochondrial translation led to the respiratory phenotype in mutant cybrids. The respiratory deficiency lowed mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate production and increased the production of oxidative reactive species in mutant cybrids. Our data demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunctions caused by the m.7551A > G mutation are associated with deafness. Our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally transmitted deafness that was manifested by altered nucleotide modification of mitochondrial tRNA. PMID:27536005

  16. Alteration of brain and interrenal StAR protein, P450scc, and Cyp11beta mRNA levels in atlantic salmon after nominal waterborne exposure to the synthetic pharmaceutical estrogen ethynylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Lyssimachou, Angeliki; Arukwe, Augustine

    2007-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals are ubiquitous pollutants in the aquatic environment, where their potential effects on nontarget species like fish has only recently become subject of systematic investigations. Recently, it was shown that the documented xenoestrogen nonylphenol produced variations in brain steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, cytochrome P-450-mediated cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and cytochrome P-45011beta hydroxylase (CYP11beta) gene transcripts of exposed juvenile salmon (Arukwe, 2005). In the present study, experiments were undertaken to examine the effect of the synthetic pharmaceutical endocrine disruptor ethynylestradiol (EE2), given in water at 5 or 50 ng/L and sampled at d 0 (control), 3, and 7 after exposure, on these key and rate-limiting brain and interrenal steroidogenic pathways of juvenile salmon using quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Our data, which are based on nominal exposure concentrations, show that brain and head kidney StAR and P450scc expression were modulated by EE2 in a time- and concentration-specific manner. While the StAR protein and P450scc showed EE2 concentration-dependent transcriptional increases in the brain and head kidney at d 3 after exposure, no significant effect was observed at d 7. The EE2 induced effects at d 7 were underscored because the carrier solvent (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) produced significant induction of the StAR protein and P450scc in both the brain and head kidney at d 7 compared to d 3 postexposure. CYP11beta transcript was detected in the brain and head kidney, where the expression patterns were modulated by EE2 in a concentration-and time-specific manner. In the brain, DMSO produced significant changes in the CYP11beta gene expression at d 7 compared to d 3 after exposure. These changes in the levels of StAR, P450scc, and CYP11beta mRNA levels in important steroidogenic organs suggest that the experimental animals are experiencing a time-dependent impaired

  17. Sequences controlling histone H4 mRNA abundance.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, O; Bleecker, G C; Heintz, N

    1987-01-01

    The post-transcriptional regulation of histone mRNA abundance is manifest both by accumulation of histone mRNA during the S phase, and by the rapid degradation of mature histone mRNA following the inhibition of DNA synthesis. We have constructed a comprehensive series of substitution mutants within a human H4 histone gene, introduced them into the mouse L cell genome, and analyzed their effects on the post-transcriptional control of the H4 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that most of the H4 mRNA is dispensable for proper regulation of histone mRNA abundance. However, recognition of the 3' terminus of the mature H4 mRNA is critically important for regulating its cytoplasmic half-life. Thus, this region of the mRNA functions both in the nucleus as a signal for proper processing of the mRNA terminus, and in the cytoplasm as an essential element in the control of mRNA stability. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3608993

  18. pH Shifting alters solubility characteristics and thermal stability of soy protein isolate and its globulin fractions in different pH, salt concentration, and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiang; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie

    2010-07-14

    Soy protein isolate (SPI), beta-conglycinin (7S), and glycinin (11S) were subjected to pH-shifting treatments, that is, unfolding at pH 1.5 or 12.0 followed by refolding at pH 7.0, to induce molten globule structures. Treated samples were analyzed for protein solubility, thermal stability, and aggregation in 0, 0.1, and 0.6 M NaCl solutions at pH 2.0-8.0. The pH(12) shifting resulted in drastic increases (up to 2.5-fold) in SPI solubility in the pH 6.0-7.0 range, especially at 0 M NaCl. The pH(1.5) shifting had a generally lesser effect on solubility. 11S exhibited a solubility pattern similar to that of SPI, but the solubility of 7S was unaffected by pH shifting except at 0.6 M NaCl. The pH shifting, notably at pH 12.0, produced soluble, disulfide-linked polymers from 11S and reduced (P < 0.05) its enthalpy but not its temperature of denaturation. Soy proteins structurally altered by pH shifting had a reduced sensitivity to thermal aggregation.

  19. Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Undernutrition on Cannabinoid Receptor-Related Behaviors: Sex and Tissue-Specific Alterations in the mRNA Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors and Lipid Metabolic Regulators.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, María T; Arco, Rocío; Decara, Juan; Vázquez, Mariam; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Rosario Noemi; Alén, Francisco; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Suárez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition causes long-lasting alterations in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in offspring. It is still unknown whether both, the endocannabinoid (eCB) machinery and the lipid metabolism are implicated in long-term adaptive responses to fetal reprogramming caused by maternal undernutrition. We investigated the long-term effects of maternal exposure to a 20% standard diet restriction during preconceptional and gestational periods on the metabolically-relevant tissues hypothalamus, liver, and perirenal fat (PAT) of male and female offspring at adulthood. The adult male offspring from calorie-restricted dams (RC males) exhibited a differential response to the CB1 antagonist AM251 in a chocolate preference test as well as increased body weight, perirenal adiposity, and plasma levels of triglycerides, LDL, VLDL, bilirubin, and leptin. The gene expression of the cannabinoid receptors Cnr1 and Cnr2 was increased in RC male hypothalamus, but a down-expression of most eCBs-metabolizing enzymes (Faah, Daglα, Daglβ, Mgll) and several key regulators of fatty-acid β-oxidation (Cpt1b, Acox1), mitochondrial respiration (Cox4i1), and lipid flux (Pparγ) was found in their PAT. The female offspring from calorie-restricted dams exhibited higher plasma levels of LDL and glucose as well as a reduction in chocolate and caloric intake at post-weaning periods in the feeding tests. Their liver showed a decreased gene expression of Cnr1, Pparα, Pparγ, the eCBs-degrading enzymes Faah and Mgll, the de novo lipogenic enzymes Acaca and Fasn, and the liver-specific cholesterol biosynthesis regulators Insig1 and Hmgcr. Our results suggest that the long-lasting adaptive responses to maternal caloric restriction affected cannabinoid-regulated mechanisms involved in feeding behavior, adipose β-oxidation, and hepatic lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis in a sex-dependent manner.

  20. Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Undernutrition on Cannabinoid Receptor-Related Behaviors: Sex and Tissue-Specific Alterations in the mRNA Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors and Lipid Metabolic Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-López, María T.; Arco, Rocío; Decara, Juan; Vázquez, Mariam; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Rosario Noemi; Alén, Francisco; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Suárez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition causes long-lasting alterations in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in offspring. It is still unknown whether both, the endocannabinoid (eCB) machinery and the lipid metabolism are implicated in long-term adaptive responses to fetal reprogramming caused by maternal undernutrition. We investigated the long-term effects of maternal exposure to a 20% standard diet restriction during preconceptional and gestational periods on the metabolically-relevant tissues hypothalamus, liver, and perirenal fat (PAT) of male and female offspring at adulthood. The adult male offspring from calorie-restricted dams (RC males) exhibited a differential response to the CB1 antagonist AM251 in a chocolate preference test as well as increased body weight, perirenal adiposity, and plasma levels of triglycerides, LDL, VLDL, bilirubin, and leptin. The gene expression of the cannabinoid receptors Cnr1 and Cnr2 was increased in RC male hypothalamus, but a down-expression of most eCBs-metabolizing enzymes (Faah, Daglα, Daglβ, Mgll) and several key regulators of fatty-acid β-oxidation (Cpt1b, Acox1), mitochondrial respiration (Cox4i1), and lipid flux (Pparγ) was found in their PAT. The female offspring from calorie-restricted dams exhibited higher plasma levels of LDL and glucose as well as a reduction in chocolate and caloric intake at post-weaning periods in the feeding tests. Their liver showed a decreased gene expression of Cnr1, Pparα, Pparγ, the eCBs-degrading enzymes Faah and Mgll, the de novo lipogenic enzymes Acaca and Fasn, and the liver-specific cholesterol biosynthesis regulators Insig1 and Hmgcr. Our results suggest that the long-lasting adaptive responses to maternal caloric restriction affected cannabinoid-regulated mechanisms involved in feeding behavior, adipose β-oxidation, and hepatic lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:28082878

  1. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 plays distinct roles at the mRNA entry and exit channels of the ribosomal preinitiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Beznosková, Petra; Vlčkova, Vladislava; Chiu, Wen-Ling; Zhou, Fujun; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) is a central player in recruitment of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) to mRNA. We probed the effects on mRNA recruitment of a library of S. cerevisiae eIF3 functional variants spanning its 5 essential subunits using an in vitro-reconstituted system. Mutations throughout eIF3 disrupt its interaction with the PIC and diminish its ability to accelerate recruitment to a native yeast mRNA. Alterations to the eIF3a CTD and eIF3b/i/g significantly slow mRNA recruitment, and mutations within eIF3b/i/g destabilize eIF2•GTP•Met-tRNAi binding to the PIC. Using model mRNAs lacking contacts with the 40S entry or exit channels, we uncovered a critical role for eIF3 requiring the eIF3a NTD, in stabilizing mRNA interactions at the exit channel, and an ancillary role at the entry channel requiring residues of the eIF3a CTD. These functions are redundant: defects at each channel can be rescued by filling the other channel with mRNA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20934.001 PMID:27782884

  2. Functional Integration of mRNA Translational Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    MacNicol, Melanie C.; Cragle, Chad E.; Arumugam, Karthik; Fosso, Bruno; Pesole, Graziano; MacNicol, Angus M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated mRNA translation plays a key role in control of cell cycle progression in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in the self-renewal and survival of stem cells and cancer stem cells. While targeting mRNA translation presents an attractive strategy for control of aberrant cell cycle progression, mRNA translation is an underdeveloped therapeutic target. Regulated mRNAs are typically controlled through interaction with multiple RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the mechanisms by which the functions of distinct RBPs bound to a common target mRNA are coordinated are poorly understood. The challenge now is to gain insight into these mechanisms of coordination and to identify the molecular mediators that integrate multiple, often conflicting, inputs. A first step includes the identification of altered mRNA ribonucleoprotein complex components that assemble on mRNAs bound by multiple, distinct RBPs compared to those recruited by individual RBPs. This review builds upon our knowledge of combinatorial control of mRNA translation during the maturation of oocytes from Xenopus laevis, to address molecular strategies that may mediate RBP diplomacy and conflict resolution for coordinated control of mRNA translational output. Continued study of regulated ribonucleoprotein complex dynamics promises valuable new insights into mRNA translational control and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of disease. PMID:26197342

  3. IL-1beta induces stabilization of IL-8 mRNA in malignant breast cancer cells via the 3' untranslated region: Involvement of divergent RNA-binding factors HuR, KSRP and TIAR.

    PubMed

    Suswam, Esther A; Nabors, L Burt; Huang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xiuhua; King, Peter H

    2005-03-01

    IL-8 plays an integral role in promoting the malignant phenotype in breast cancer, and its production is directly influenced by inflammatory cytokines in the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that activation of IL-1beta receptors on malignant HS578t and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells strongly induces IL-8 expression and that RNA stabilization is persistently activated at least 12-24 hr after stimulation. SB 203580 and rapamycin reversed the RNA stabilization effect of IL-1beta in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting involvement of the p38/MAP kinase and mTOR pathways. A luciferase reporter assay indicated that the stabilization effect was dependent on cis elements in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the IL-8 transcript. By UV cross-linking, we identified multiple cellular factors that interact with the IL-8 3'UTR, ranging 34-76 kDa. Immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that HuR, KSRP and TIAR bound to one or more loci in the 3'UTR. While the cross-linking patterns were similar, quantitative immunoprecipitation of native IL-8 RNA from IL-1beta-stimulated cytoplasmic extract revealed a 20-fold greater association of transcript with the stabilizing factor HuR vs. the destabilizing factor KSRP. In conclusion, IL-1beta is a potent cytokine stimulus for IL-8 RNA stabilization in breast cancer cells, possibly by enhanced binding of cytoplasmic HuR to the 3'UTR.

  4. RNA stabilizing proteins as molecular targets in cardiovascular pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Sahana Suresh; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Jeyabal, Prince; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    The stability of mRNA has emerged as a key step in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and function. RNA stabilizing proteins (RSPs) contain several RNA recognition motifs, and selectively bind to Adenylate- and uridylate- Rich Elements in the 3′ untranslated region of several mRNAs leading to altered processing, stability and translation. These post-transcriptional gene regulations play a critical role in cellular homeostasis; therefore act as molecular switch between ‘normal cell’ and ‘disease state’. Many mRNA binding proteins have been discovered to date, which either stabilize (HuR/HuA, HuB, HuC, HuD) or destabilize (AUF1, Tristetraprolin, KSRP) the target transcripts. Although the function of RSPs has been widely studied in cancer biology, its role in cardiovascular pathologies is only beginning to evolve. The current review provides an overall understanding of the potential role of RSP, specifically HuR-mediated mRNA stability in myocardial infarction, hypertension and hypertrophy. Also, the effect of RSPs on various cellular processes including inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, cell-death and proliferation and its relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiological processes is presented. We also discuss the potential clinical implications of RSPs as therapeutic targets in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25801788

  5. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  6. Control of mRNA Translation in ALS Proteinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cestra, Gianluca; Rossi, Simona; Di Salvio, Michela; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Cells robustly reprogram gene expression during stress generated by protein misfolding and aggregation. In this condition, cells assemble the bulk of mRNAs into translationally silent stress granules (SGs), while they sustain the translation of specific mRNAs coding for proteins that are needed to overcome cellular stress. Alterations of this process are deeply associated to neurodegeneration. This is the case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a selective loss of motor neurons. Indeed, impairment of protein homeostasis as well as alterations of RNA metabolism are now recognized as major players in the pathogenesis of ALS. In particular, evidence shows that defective mRNA transport and translation are implicated. Here, we provide a review of what is currently known about altered mRNA translation in ALS and how this impacts on the ability of affected cells to cope with proteotoxic stress. PMID:28386218

  7. GBR 12909 administration as an animal model of bipolar mania: time course of behavioral, brain oxidative alterations and effect of mood stabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Ana Isabelle G; de Araújo, Maíra Moraes; da Silva Araújo, Tatiane; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Jesus Souza Machado, Michel; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms in the human dopamine transporter (DAT) are associated with bipolar endophenotype. Based on this, the acute inhibition of DAT using GBR12909 causes behavioral alterations that are prevented by valproate (VAL), being related to a mania-like model. Herein our first aim was to analyze behavioral and brain oxidative alterations during a 24 h period post-GBR12909 to better characterize this model. Our second aim was to determine the preventive effects of lithium (Li) or VAL 2 h post-GBR12909. For this, adult male mice received GBR12909 or saline being evaluated at 2, 4, 8, 12 or 24 h post-administration. Hyperlocomotion, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation in brain areas were assessed at all these time-points. GBR12909 caused hyperlocomotion at 2 and 24 h. Rearing behavior increased only at 2 h. GSH levels decreased in the hippocampus and striatum at the time points of 2, 4, 8 and 12 h. Increased lipid peroxidation was detected at the time-points of 2 and 12 h in all brain areas studied. At the time-point of 2 h post-GBR12909 Li prevented the hyperlocomotion and rearing alterations, while VAL prevented only rearing alterations. Both drugs prevented pro-oxidative changes. In conclusion, we observed that the main behavioral and oxidative alterations took place at the time-period of 2 h post-GBR12909, what points to this time-period as the best for the assessment of alterations in this model. Furthermore, the present study expands the predictive validity of the model by the determination of the preventive effects of Li.

  8. Model of ribosome translation and mRNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2013-05-01

    A ribosome is an enzyme that catalyzes translation of the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. Besides translation through the single-stranded mRNA, the ribosome is also able to translate through the duplex region of mRNA via unwinding the duplex. Here, based on our proposed ribosome translation model, we study analytically the dynamics of Escherichia coli ribosome translation through the duplex region of mRNA, and compare with the available single molecule experimental data. It is shown that the ribosome uses only one active mechanism (mechanical unwinding), rather than two active mechanisms (open-state stabilization and mechanical unwinding), as proposed before, to unwind the duplex. The reduced rate of translation through the duplex region is due to the occurrence of futile transitions, which are induced by the energy barrier from the duplex unwinding to the forward translocation along the single-stranded mRNA. Moreover, we also present predicted results of the average translation rate versus the external force acting on the ribosome translating through the duplex region and through the single-stranded region of mRNA, which can be easily tested by future experiments.

  9. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.

  10. pH might play a role in regulating the function of paired amphipathic helices domains of human Sin3B by altering structure and thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tauheed; Ali, Mashook; Saluja, Daman; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2015-04-01

    Human Sin3B (hSin3B), a transcription regulator, is a scaffold protein that binds to different transcription factors and regulates transcription. It consists of six conserved domains that include four paired amphipathic helices (PAH 1-4), histone deacetylase interaction domain (HID), and highly conserved region (HCR). Interestingly, the PAH domains of hSin3B are significantly homologous to each other, yet each one interacts with a specific set of unique transcription factors. Though various partners interacting with hSin3B PAH domains have been characterized, there is no structural information available on the individual PAH domains of hSin3B. Here we characterize the structure and stability of different PAH domains of hSin3B at both nuclear and physiological pH values by using different optical probes. We found that the native state structure and stability of different PAH domains are different at nuclear pH where hSin3B performs its biological function. We also found that PAH2 and PAH3 behave differently at both nuclear and physiological pH in terms of native state structure and thermodynamic stability, while the structural identity of PAH1 remains unaltered at both pH values. The study indicates that the structural heterogeneity of different PAH domains might be responsible for having a unique set of interacting transcription factors.

  11. Messenger RNA stability of parathyroid hormone-related protein regulated by transforming growth factor-beta1.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R S; Capen, C C; Rosol, Thomas J

    2002-02-25

    Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with epithelial cancers, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is due to expression and secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1), expressed by many tumors, has been demonstrated in vitro to increase the half-life of PTHrP mRNA. In this study, oral squamous carcinoma cells (SCC2/88) had a two-fold increase in PTHrP mRNA stability (from 45 to 90 min) in response to treatment with TGFbeta1. In order to examine the mechanism of TGFbeta1-mediated PTHrP mRNA stability, a cell-free assay of mRNA degradation was utilized in which the degradation of in vitro-transcribed mRNA incubated with cytoplasmic protein extracts from SCC2/88 treated with vehicle or TGFbeta1 was measured. In this assay, full-length PTHrP mRNA was not significantly stabilized in TGFbeta1-treated samples when compared to vehicle treated samples. However, there was a striking (>5-fold) increase in PTHrP mRNA half-life in TGFbeta1-treated samples when PTHrP mRNA lacked the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). In contrast, the degradation of 3'-UTR-truncated PTHrP mRNA using the cell-free assay was not altered in vehicle-treated samples. UV cross-linking of PTHrP mRNA and cytoplasmic proteins from cells treated with either vehicle or TGFbeta1 revealed numerous mRNA-binding proteins. TGFbeta1 treatment resulting in decreased binding of 33, 31, 27, 20 and 18 kDa binding proteins to the terminal coding region. These studies revealed that TGFbeta1-induced PTHrP mRNA stability might be, in part, the result of cis-acting sequences within the coding region of the PTHrP mRNA.

  12. Human ribosomes from cells with reduced dyskerin levels are intrinsically altered in translation.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Rocchi, Laura; Brugiere, Sabine; Carnicelli, Domenica; Onofrillo, Carmine; Couté, Yohann; Brigotti, Maurizio; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Dyskerin is a pseudouridine (ψ) synthase involved in fundamental cellular processes including uridine modification in rRNA and small nuclear RNA and telomere stabilization. Dyskerin functions are altered in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) and cancer. Dyskerin's role in rRNA pseudouridylation has been suggested to underlie the alterations in mRNA translation described in cells lacking dyskerin function, although relevant direct evidences are currently lacking. Our purpose was to establish definitely whether defective dyskerin function might determine an intrinsic ribosomal defect leading to an altered synthetic activity. Therefore, ribosomes from dyskerin-depleted human cells were purified and 1) added to a controlled reticulocyte cell-free system devoid of ribosomes to study mRNA translation; 2) analyzed for protein contamination and composition by mass spectrometry, 3) analyzed for global pseudouridylation levels. Ribosomes purified from dyskerin-depleted cells showed altered translational fidelity and internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. These ribosomes displayed reduced uridine modification, whereas they were not different in terms of protein contamination or ribosomal protein composition with respect to ribosomes from matched control cells with full dyskerin activity. In conclusion, lack of dyskerin function in human cells induces a defect in rRNA uridine modification, which is sufficient to alter ribosome activity.

  13. Neutralization of acidic residues in helix II stabilizes the folded conformation of acyl carrier protein and variably alters its function with different enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

    2007-02-16

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small protein essential for bacterial growth and pathogenesis, interacts with diverse enzymes during the biosynthesis of fatty acids, phospholipids, and other specialized products such as lipid A. NMR and hydrodynamic studies have previously shown that divalent cations stabilize native helical ACP conformation by binding to conserved acidic residues at two sites (A and B) at either end of the "recognition" helix II. To examine the roles of these amino acids in ACP structure and function, site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace individual site A (Asp-30, Asp-35, Asp-38) and site B (Glu-47, Glu-53, Asp-56) residues in recombinant Vibrio harveyi ACP with the corresponding amides, along with combined mutations at each site (SA, SB) or both sites (SA/SB). Like native V. harveyi ACP, all individual mutants were unfolded at neutral pH but adopted a helical conformation in the presence of millimolar Mg(2+) or upon fatty acylation. Mg(2+) binding to sites A or B independently stabilized native ACP conformation, whereas mutant SA/SB was folded in the absence of Mg(2+), suggesting that charge neutralization is largely responsible for ACP stabilization by divalent cations. Asp-35 in site A was critical for holo-ACP synthase activity, while acyl-ACP synthetase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase (LpxA) activities were more affected by mutations in site B. Both sites were required for fatty acid synthase activity. Overall, our results indicate that divalent cation binding site mutations have predicted effects on ACP conformation but unpredicted and variable consequences on ACP function with different enzymes.

  14. βI-tubulin mutations in the laulimalide/peloruside binding site mediate drug sensitivity by altering drug-tubulin interactions and microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Rowe, Matthew R; Field, Jessica J; Northcote, Peter T; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H; Miller, John H

    2015-09-01

    Peloruside A (PLA) and laulimalide (LAU) are potent microtubule-stabilizing natural products that are effective against a broad spectrum of cancer cells. The interactions of PLA and LAU with tubulin have attracted a great deal of attention, mainly because they bind to β-tubulin at a site that is different from the classical taxoid site. Multiple βI-tubulin amino acid residues have been predicted by computer modelling studies and more recently by protein crystallography to participate in the binding of PLA and LAU to tubulin. The relevance of these residues in determining cellular sensitivity to the compounds, however, remains largely uncertain. To determine the role of four binding site residues, Q291, D295, V333, and N337 on PLA and LAU activity, we introduced single mutations to these sites by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected each mutant tubulin separately into HEK and/or HeLa cells. We found that a Q291M βI-tubulin mutation increased sensitivity of the cells to PLA, but not to LAU, paclitaxel (PTX), or vinblastine (VBL). In contrast, V333W and N337L mutations led to less stable microtubules, with the V333W causing resistance to PLA and PTX, but not LAU, and the N337L causing resistance to PLA, LAU, and PTX. Moreover, cells expressing either W333 or L337 were hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent, VBL. The D295I mutation conferred resistance to both PLA and LAU without affecting microtubule stability or sensitivity to PTX or ixabepilone (IXB). This study identifies the first mammalian βI-tubulin mutation that specifically increases sensitivity to PLA, and reports mutations at PLA and LAU binding site residues that can either reduce microtubule stability or impair drug-tubulin binding, conferring resistance to these microtubule-stabilizing agents. This information provides insights on β-tubulin residues important for maintaining microtubule structural integrity and for sensitivity to microtubule-targeting agents, and suggests novel

  15. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results.

  16. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results. PMID:28120903

  17. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Cross-Linked Intact Multiprotein Complexes: Enhanced Gas-Phase Stabilities and Altered Dissociation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Samulak, Billy M; Niu, Shuai; Andrews, Philip C; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2016-05-17

    Analysis of protein complexes by ion mobility-mass spectrometry is a valuable method for the rapid assessment of complex composition, binding stoichiometries, and structures. However, capturing labile, unknown protein assemblies directly from cells remains a challenge for the technology. Furthermore, ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements of complexes, subcomplexes, and subunits are necessary to build complete models of intact assemblies, and such data can be difficult to acquire in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we present the use of novel mass spectrometry cleavable cross-linkers and tags to stabilize intact protein complexes for ion mobility-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that tags and linkers bearing permanent charges are superior stabilizers relative to neutral cross-linkers, especially in the context of retaining compact forms of the assembly under a wide array of activating conditions. In addition, when cross-linked protein complexes are collisionally activated in the gas phase, a larger proportion of the product ions produced are often more compact and reflect native protein subcomplexes when compared with unmodified complexes activated in the same fashion, greatly enabling applications in structural biology.

  18. Effects of codon usage versus putative 5'-mRNA structure on the expression of Fusarium solani cutinase in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Karl E; Mahmood, Nadir A; Iverson, Brent L; Georgiou, George

    2003-01-01

    Matching the codon usage of recombinant genes to that of the expression host is a common strategy for increasing the expression of heterologous proteins in bacteria. However, while developing a cytoplasmic expression system for Fusarium solani cutinase in Escherichia coli, we found that altering codons to those preferred by E. coli led to significantly lower expression compared to the wild-type fungal gene, despite the presence of several rare E. coli codons in the fungal sequence. On the other hand, expression in the E. coli periplasm using a bacterial PhoA leader sequence resulted in high levels of expression for both the E. coli optimized and wild-type constructs. Sequence swapping experiments as well as calculations of predicted mRNA secondary structure provided support for the hypothesis that differential cytoplasmic expression of the E. coli optimized versus wild-type cutinase genes is due to differences in 5(') mRNA secondary structures. In particular, our results indicate that increased stability of 5(') mRNA secondary structures in the E. coli optimized transcript prevents efficient translation initiation in the absence of the phoA leader sequence. These results underscore the idea that potential 5(') mRNA secondary structures should be considered along with codon usage when designing a synthetic gene for high level expression in E. coli.

  19. A third-generation esterase inoculant alters fermentation pattern and improves aerobic stability of barley silage and the efficiency of body weight gain of growing feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Addah, W; Baah, J; Okine, E K; McAllister, T A

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of a mixed bacterial inoculant possessing ferulic acid esterase (FAE) activity on silage fermentation characteristics, aerobic stability, and growth performance of growing feedlot steers. Whole-crop barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) forage (35% DM) was chopped and ensiled without a silage inoculant (UN) or with a mixed bacterial culture containing 1.0 × 10(11) cfu/g of Lactobacillus buchneri LN4017 that produces FAE, 2.0 × 10(10) cfu/g of Lactobacillus plantarum LP7109, and 1.0 × 10(10) cfu/g of Lactobacillus casei LC3200 at a combined rate of 1.3 × 10(5) cfu/g of fresh forage (IN) in mini and Ag-Bag (Ag-Bag Int. Ltd., Warrenton, OR) silos. Silages from the mini silos were assessed for the effect of inoculation on fermentation characteristics and aerobic stability, whereas silages from Ag-Bags were used to formulate 2 barley silage-based total mixed rations (UN and IN) that were fed to growing feedlot steers for 112 d. The IN silage exhibited a homolactic fermentation during the first 7 d of ensiling as reflected by an increased (P ≤ 0.02) lactic acid concentration and an accelerated rate (P < 0.01) of pH decline. Thereafter, fermentation of IN silage became more heterolactic, resulting in greater concentrations of acetic acid (P < 0.01) and pH (P < 0.01) but less (P < 0.01) lactic acid than UN silage. Inoculation did not affect DM losses (P = 0.52) from mini silos. The IN silage remained stable during 21 d, but temperature and yeasts counts in the UN silage increased after 5 d of aerobic exposure. Growing steers fed the IN silage diet had superior (P = 0.03) feed conversion efficiency compared with those fed UN silage. Inoculation of whole-crop barley silage with a mixed culture of homolactic lactic acid-producing bacteria and FAE-producing L. buchneri at ensiling changed fermentation from a homolactic to a heterolactic form during ensiling and improved aerobic stability of the silage and efficiency of BW gain of growing feedlot

  20. Rift Valley fever virus NSS gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NSS gene, but not the N, GN or NSM genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NSS, confirming that expression of NSS is likely responsible for this phenomenon.

  1. Altered neuronal mitochondrial coenzyme A synthesis in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation caused by abnormal processing, stability, and catalytic activity of mutant pantothenate kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Kotzbauer, Paul T; Truax, Adam C; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2005-01-19

    Mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene have been identified in patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA; formerly Hallervorden-Spatz disease). However, the mechanisms by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration are unclear, especially given the existence of multiple pantothenate kinase genes in humans and multiple PanK2 transcripts with potentially different subcellular localizations. We demonstrate that PanK2 protein is localized to mitochondria of neurons in human brain, distinguishing it from other pantothenate kinases that do not possess mitochondrial-targeting sequences. PanK2 protein translated from the most 5' start site is sequentially cleaved at two sites by the mitochondrial processing peptidase, generating a long-lived 48 kDa mature protein identical to that found in human brain extracts. The mature protein catalyzes the initial step in coenzyme A (CoA) synthesis but displays feedback inhibition in response to species of acyl CoA rather than CoA itself. Some, but not all disease-associated point mutations result in significantly reduced catalytic activity. The most common mutation, G521R, results in marked instability of the intermediate PanK2 isoform and reduced production of the mature isoform. These results suggest that NBIA is caused by altered neuronal mitochondrial lipid metabolism caused by mutations disrupting PanK2 protein levels and catalytic activity.

  2. Diurnal expression of Dnmt3b mRNA in mouse liver is regulated by feeding and hepatic clockwork.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Fumihiko; Shimba, Shigeki; Takumi, Shota; Sano, Tomoharu; Suzuki, Takehiro; Bao, Jinhua; Ohwada, Mika; Ehara, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nohara, Keiko

    2012-09-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) is critically involved in de novo DNA methylation and genomic stability, while the regulatory mechanism in liver is largely unknown. We previously reported that diurnal variation occurs in the mRNA expression of Dnmt3b in adult mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism underlying the diurnal expression pattern. The highest level and the lowest level of Dnmt3b mRNA expression were confirmed to occur at dawn and in the afternoon, respectively, and the expression pattern of Dnmt3b closely coincided with that of Bmal1. Since the diurnal pattern of Dnmt3b mRNA expression developed at weaning and scheduled feeding to separate the feeding cycle from the light/dark cycle led to a phase-shift in the expression, it could be assumed that feeding plays a critical role as an entrainment signal. In liver-specific Bmal1 knockout (L-Bmal1 KO) mice, L-Bmal1 deficiency resulted in significantly higher levels of Dnmt3b at all measured time points, and the time when the expression was the lowest in wild-type mice was shifted to earlier. Investigation of global DNA methylation revealed a temporal decrease of 5-methyl-cytosine percentage in the genome of wild-type mice in late afternoon. By contrast, no such decrease in 5-methyl-cytosine percentage was detected in L-Bmal1 KO mice, suggesting that altered Dnmt3b expression affects the DNA methylation state. Taken together, the results suggest that the feeding and hepatic clockwork generated by the clock genes, including Bmal1, regulate the diurnal variation in Dnmt3b mRNA expression and the consequent dynamic changes in global DNA methylation.

  3. Initiation of translation can occur only in a restricted region of the CYC1 mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Yun, D F; Sherman, F

    1995-01-01

    The steady-state levels and half-lives of CYC1 mRNAs were estimated in a series of mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing (i) TAA nonsense codons, (ii) ATG initiator codons, or (iii) the sequence ATA ATG ACT TAA (denoted ATG-TAA) at various positions along the CYC1 gene, which encodes iso-1-cytochrome c. These mutational alterations were made in backgrounds lacking all internal in-frame and out-of-frame ATG triplets or containing only one ATG initiator codon at the normal position. The results revealed a "sensitive" region encompassing approximately the first half of the CYC1 mRNA, in which nonsense codons caused Upf1-dependent degradation. This result and the stability of CYC1 mRNAs lacking all ATG triplets, as well as other results, suggested that degradation occurs unless elements associated with this sensitive region are covered with 80S ribosomes, 40S ribosomal subunits, or ribonucleoprotein particle proteins. While elongation by 80S ribosomes could be prematurely terminated by TAA codons, the scanning of 40S ribosomal units could not be terminated solely by TAA codons but could be disrupted by the ATG-TAA sequence, which caused the formation and subsequent prompt release of 80S ribosomes. The ATG-TAA sequence caused degradation of the CYC1 mRNA only when it was in the region spanning nucleotide positions -27 to +37 but not in the remaining 3' distal region, suggesting that translation could initiate only in this restricted initiation region. CYC1 mRNA distribution on polyribosomes confirmed that only ATG codons within the initiation region were translated at high efficiency. This initiation region was not entirely dependent on the distance from the 5' cap site and was not obviously dependent on the short-range secondary structure but may simply reflect an open structural requirement for initiation of translation of the CYC1 mRNA. PMID:7823918

  4. Channel widening due to urbanization and a major flood can alter bed particle organization and bed stability in an urban boulder-bed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestegaard, K. L.; Behrns, K.; Blanchet, Z.; Hankin, E.

    2007-12-01

    The Anacostia River is a tributary of the Potomac River north of Washington D.C. that has become progressively more urbanized in the past 50 years. Bankfull discharge and bankfull width in the Anacostia have increased by 3- 4x in the past 50 years. Nearby watersheds of similar size and geology, but without significant urbanization, contain threshold gravel-bed streams. The Anacostia, however, is not a threshold channel; it exhibits break-up of boulder-bed channels in upstream reaches and significant gravel bar formation in downstream reaches. These gravel bars have grown and migrated considerably in the past 10-15 years, contributing significantly to local channel widening that can be twice that of adjacent reaches. The purpose of this study is to determine bedload transport rates and grain size distributions and their relationship to discharge, bed organization and sediment supply. Bed mobility data come from both bedload transport measurements and measurements of channel bed changes. Channel bed changes were obtained from a) repeated channel cross section surveys, b) surface and subsurface size distributions, and c) bed particle organization measurements (measurements of location of particles within reaches). These measurements were made prior to and after the floods of 2006, which equalled the largest floods on record for most parts of the Anacostia River. In some boulder bed reaches, boulders were removed from the center of the channel and deposited along and on the channel banks. The mid-channel boulders were replaced by sheets of gravel and cobbles, significantly altering the bed mobility of the channels.

  5. Target and specificity of a nuclear gene product that participates in mRNA 3'-end formation in Chlamydomonas chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Levy, H; Kindle, K L; Stern, D B

    1999-12-10

    Chloroplast mRNA maturation is catalyzed by nucleus-encoded processing enzymes. We previously described a recessive nuclear mutation (crp3) that affects 3'-end formation of several chloroplast mRNAs in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Levy, H., Kindle, K. L., and Stern, D. B. (1997) Plant Cell 9, 825-836). In the crp3 background, atpB mRNA lacking a 3'-inverted repeat normally required for stability accumulates as a discrete transcript. The mutation also affects the atpA gene cluster; polycistronic mRNAs with psbI or cemA 3'-ends accumulate to a lower level in the crp3 background. Here, we demonstrate that the crp3 mutation also alters 3'-end formation of psbI mRNA and cemA-containing mRNAs. A novel 3'-end is formed in monocistronic psbI transcripts, and this is the only terminus observed when the psbI 3'-untranslated region is fused to an aadA reporter gene. Accumulation of mRNAs with 3'-ends between cemA and atpH, which is immediately downstream, was reduced. However, this sequence was not recognized as a 3'-end formation element in chimeric genes. The crp3 mutation was able to confer stability to three different atpB 3'-stem-loop-disrupting mutations that lack sequence similarity, but are located at a similar distance from the translation termination codon. We propose that the wild-type CRP3 gene product is part of the general 3' --> 5' processing machinery.

  6. Nonsense-mediated decay of human HEXA mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, K S; Neufeld, E F

    2001-08-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), the loss of mRNAs carrying premature stop codons, is a process by which cells recognize and degrade nonsense mRNAs to prevent possibly toxic effects of truncated peptides. Most mammalian nonsense mRNAs are degraded while associated with the nucleus, but a few are degraded in the cytoplasm; at either site, there is a requirement for translation and for an intron downstream of the early stop codon. We have examined the NMD of a mutant HEXA message in lymphoblasts derived from a Tay-Sachs disease patient homozygous for the common frameshift mutation 1278ins4. The mutant mRNA was nearly undetectable in these cells and increased to approximately 40% of normal in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. The stabilized transcript was found in the cytoplasm in association with polysomes. Within 5 h of cycloheximide removal, the polysome-associated nonsense message was completely degraded, while the normal message was stable. The increased lability of the polysome-associated mutant HEXA mRNA shows that NMD of this endogenous mRNA occurred in the cytoplasm. Transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that expression of an intronless HEXA minigene harboring the frameshift mutation or a closely located nonsense codon resulted in half the normal mRNA level. Inclusion of multiple downstream introns decreased the abundance further, to about 20% of normal. Thus, in contrast to other systems, introns are not absolutely required for NMD of HEXA mRNA, although they enhance the low-HEXA-mRNA phenotype.

  7. Aiding and abetting cancer: mRNA export and the nuclear pore.

    PubMed

    Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Borden, Katherine L B

    2013-07-01

    mRNA export is a critical step in gene expression. Export of transcripts can be modulated in response to cellular signaling or stress. Consistently, mRNA export is dysregulated in primary human specimens derived from many different forms of cancer. Aberrant expression of export factors can alter the export of specific transcripts encoding proteins involved in proliferation, survival, and oncogenesis. These specific factors, which are not used for bulk mRNA export, are obvious therapeutic targets. Indeed, given the emerging role of mRNA export in cancer, it is not surprising that efforts to target different aspects of this pathway have reached the clinical trial stage. Thus, like transcription and translation, mRNA export may also play a critical role in cancer genesis and maintenance.

  8. mRNA degradation machines in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Tourrière, Hélène; Chebli, Karim; Tazi, Jamal

    2002-08-01

    The steady-state levels of mRNAs depend upon their combined rates of synthesis and processing, transport from the nucleus to cytoplasm, and decay in the cytoplasm. In eukaryotic cells, the degradation of mRNA is an essential determinant in the regulation of gene expression, and it can be modulated in response to developmental, environmental, and metabolic signals. This level of regulation is particularly important for proteins that are active for a brief period, such as growth factors, transcription factors, and proteins that control cell cycle progression. The mechanisms by which mRNAs are degraded and the sequence elements within the mRNAs that affect their stability are the subject of this review. We will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding cis-acting elements in mRNA and trans-acting factors that contribute to mRNA regulation decay. We will then consider the mechanisms by which specific signaling proteins seem to contribute to a dynamic organization of the mRNA degradation machinery in response to physiological stimuli.

  9. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A.; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay. The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  10. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2016-05-05

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth.

  11. Knockdown of BC200 RNA expression reduces cell migration and invasion by destabilizing mRNA for calcium-binding protein S100A11.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heegwon; Lee, Jungmin; Kim, Youngmi; Jang, Seonghui; Lee, Yunhee; Kim, Semi; Lee, Younghoon

    2017-03-01

    Although BC200 RNA is best known as a neuron-specific non-coding RNA, it is overexpressed in various cancer cells. BC200 RNA was recently shown to contribute to metastasis in several cancer cell lines, but the underlying mechanism was not understood in detail. To examine this mechanism, we knocked down BC200 RNA in cancer cells, which overexpress the RNA, and examined cell motility, profiling of ribosome footprints, and the correlation between cell motility changes and genes exhibiting altered ribosome profiles. We found that BC200 RNA knockdown reduced cell migration and invasion, suggesting that BC200 RNA promotes cell motility. Our ribosome profiling analysis identified 29 genes whose ribosomal occupations were altered more than 2-fold by BC200 RNA knockdown. Many (> 30%) of them were directly or indirectly related to cancer progression. Among them, we focused on S100A11 (which showed a reduced ribosome footprint) because its expression was previously shown to increase cellular motility. S100A11 was decreased at both the mRNA and protein levels following knockdown of BC200 RNA. An actinomycin-chase experiment showed that BC200 RNA knockdown significantly decreased the stability of the S100A11 mRNA without changing its transcription rate, suggesting that the down-regulation of S100A11 was mainly caused by destabilization of its mRNA. Finally, we showed that the BC200 RNA-knockdown-induced decrease in cell motility was mainly mediated by S100A11. Together, our results show that BC200 RNA promotes cell motility by stabilizing S100A11 transcripts.

  12. The pathway of hepatitis C virus mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Hershey, John W B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-04-01

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis begins with mRNA positioning in the ribosomal decoding channel in a process typically controlled by translation-initiation factors. Some viruses use an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in their mRNA to harness ribosomes independently of initiation factors. We show here that a ribosome conformational change that is induced upon hepatitis C viral IRES binding is necessary but not sufficient for correct mRNA positioning. Using directed hydroxyl radical probing to monitor the assembly of IRES-containing translation-initiation complexes, we have defined a crucial step in which mRNA is stabilized upon initiator tRNA binding. Unexpectedly, however, this stabilization occurs independently of the AUG codon, underscoring the importance of initiation factor-mediated interactions that influence the configuration of the decoding channel. These results reveal how an IRES RNA supplants some, but not all, of the functions normally carried out by protein factors during initiation of protein synthesis.

  13. Functional mapping of the translation-dependent instability element of yeast MATalpha1 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hennigan, A N; Jacobson, A

    1996-01-01

    The determinants of mRNA stability include specific cis-acting destabilizing sequences located within mRNA coding and noncoding regions. We have developed an approach for mapping coding-region instability sequences in unstable yeast mRNAs that exploits the link between mRNA translation and turnover and the dependence of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay on the activity of the UPF1 gene product. This approach, which involves the systematic insertion of in-frame translational termination codons into the coding sequence of a gene of interest in a upf1delta strain, differs significantly from conventional methods for mapping cis-acting elements in that it causes minimal perturbations to overall mRNA structure. Using the previously characterized MATalpha1 mRNA as a model, we have accurately localized its 65-nucleotide instability element (IE) within the protein coding region. Termination of translation 5' to this element stabilized the MATalpha1 mRNA two- to threefold relative to wild-type transcripts. Translation through the element was sufficient to restore an unstable decay phenotype, while internal termination resulted in different extents of mRNA stabilization dependent on the precise location of ribosome stalling. Detailed mutagenesis of the element's rare-codon/AU-rich sequence boundary revealed that the destabilizing activity of the MATalpha1 IE is observed when the terminal codon of the element's rare-codon interval is translated. This region of stability transition corresponds precisely to a MATalpha1 IE sequence previously shown to be complementary to 18S rRNA. Deletion of three nucleotides 3' to this sequence shifted the stability boundary one codon 5' to its wild-type location. Conversely, constructs containing an additional three nucleotides at this same location shifted the transition downstream by an equivalent sequence distance. Our results suggest a model in which the triggering of MATalpha1 mRNA destabilization results from establishment of an interaction

  14. Analysis of mRNA decay and rRNA processing in Escherichia coli multiple mutants carrying a deletion in RNase III.

    PubMed

    Babitzke, P; Granger, L; Olszewski, J; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    RNase III is an endonuclease involved in processing both rRNA and certain mRNAs. To help determine whether RNase III (rnc) is required for general mRNA turnover in Escherichia coli, we have created a deletion-insertion mutation (delta rnc-38) in the structural gene. In addition, a series of multiple mutant strains containing deficiencies in RNase II (rnb-500), polynucleotide phosphorylase (pnp-7 or pnp-200), RNase E (rne-1 or rne-3071), and RNase III (delta rnc-38) were constructed. The delta rnc-38 single mutant was viable and led to the accumulation of 30S rRNA precursors, as has been previously observed with the rnc-105 allele (P. Gegenheimer, N. Watson, and D. Apirion, J. Biol. Chem. 252:3064-3073, 1977). In the multiple mutant strains, the presence of the delta rnc-38 allele resulted in the more rapid decay of pulse-labeled RNA but did not suppress conditional lethality, suggesting that the lethality associated with altered mRNA turnover may be due to the stabilization of specific mRNAs. In addition, these results indicate that RNase III is probably not required for general mRNA decay. Of particular interest was the observation that the delta rnc-38 rne-1 double mutant did not accumulate 30S rRNA precursors at 30 degrees C, while the delta rnc-38 rne-3071 double mutant did. Possible explanations of these results are discussed.

  15. Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacts with its mRNA to inhibit muscle formation by attenuating function of miR-34a

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-qiang; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Xiao-Chang; Ma, Mei-ling; Cai, Rui; Gao, Yun; Sun, Yun-mei; Yang, Gong-She; Pang, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate the functions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mediating gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. Our previous study identified a Sirt1 antisense (AS) lncRNA transcribed from the Sirt1 AS strand. However, its role and regulatory mechanism is still unknown in myogenesis. Here, functional analyses showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA overexpression promoted myoblast proliferation, but inhibited differentiation. Mechanistically, Sirt1 AS lncRNA was found to activate its sense gene, Sirt1. The luciferase assay provided evidences that Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacted with Sirt1 3′ UTR and rescued Sirt1 transcriptional suppression by competing with miR-34a. In addition, RNA stability assay showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA prolonged Sirt1 mRNA half-life from 2 to 10 h. Ribonuclease protection assay further indicated that it fully bound to Sirt1 mRNA in the myoblast cytoplasm. Moreover, Sirt1 AS overexpression led to less mouse weight than the control because of less lean mass and greater levels of Sirt1, whereas the fat mass and levels of miR-34a were not altered. Based on the findings, a novel regulatory mechanism was found that Sirt1 AS lncRNA preferably interacted with Sirt1 mRNA forming RNA duplex to promote Sirt1 translation by competing with miR-34a, inhibiting muscle formation. PMID:26902620

  16. Destabilization of TNF-α mRNA by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Woo; Jeon, Ye Ji; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ahn, So Ra; Ha, Shin Won; Bang, So Young; Park, Eun Kyung; Yi, Sang Ah; Lee, Min Gyu; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of mast cells through the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) induces degranulation, lipid mediator release, and cytokine secretion leading to allergic reactions. Although various signaling pathways have been characterized to be involved in the FcεRI-mediated responses, little is known about the precious mechanism for the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in mast cells. Here, we report that rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), reduces the expression of TNF-α in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. IgE or specific antigen stimulation of RBL-2H3 cells increases the expression of TNF-α and activates various signaling molecules including S6K1, Akt and p38 MAPK. Rapamycin specifically inhibits antigen-induced TNF-α mRNA level, while other kinase inhibitors have no effect on TNF-α mRNA level. These data indicate that mTOR signaling pathway is the main regulation mechanism for antigen-induced TNF-α expression. TNF-α mRNA stability analysis using reporter construct containing TNF-α adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs) shows that rapamycin destabilizes TNF-α mRNA via regulating the AU-rich element of TNF-α mRNA. The antigen-induced activation of S6K1 is inhibited by specific kinase inhibitors including mTOR, PI3K, PKC and Ca2+chelator inhibitor, while TNF-α mRNA level is reduced only by rapamycin treatment. These data suggest that the effects of rapamycin on the expression of TNF-α mRNA are not mediated by S6K1 but regulated by mTOR. Taken together, our results reveal that mTOR signaling pathway is a novel regulation mechanism for antigen-induced TNF-α expression in RBL-2H3 cells. PMID:24116273

  17. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  18. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  19. Bioinspired Nanocomplex for Spatiotemporal Imaging of Sequential mRNA Expression in Differentiating Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular activities. The expression dynamics of specific mRNA contains substantial information on the intracellular milieu. Unlike the imaging of stationary mRNAs, real-time intracellular imaging of the dynamics of mRNA expression is of great value for investigating mRNA biology and exploring specific cellular cascades. In addition to advanced imaging methods, timely extracellular stimulation is another key factor in regulating the mRNA expression repertoire. The integration of effective stimulation and imaging into a single robust system would significantly improve stimulation efficiency and imaging accuracy, producing fewer unwanted artifacts. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomplex to enable self-activating and spatiotemporal imaging of the dynamics of mRNA sequential expression during the neural stem cell differentiation process. This nanocomplex showed improved enzymatic stability, fast recognition kinetics, and high specificity. With a mechanism regulated by endogenous cell machinery, this nanocomplex realized the successive stimulating motif release and the dynamic imaging of chronological mRNA expression during neural stem cell differentiation without the use of transgenetic manipulation. The dynamic imaging montage of mRNA expression ultimately facilitated genetic heterogeneity analysis. In vivo lateral ventricle injection of this nanocomplex enabled endogenous neural stem cell activation and labeling at their specific differentiation stages. This nanocomplex is highly amenable as an alternative tool to explore the dynamics of intricate mRNA activities in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25494492

  20. Overexpression of tau downregulated the mRNA levels of Kv channels and improved proliferation in N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiantao; Hu, Ximu; Li, Xiaoqing; Hao, Xuran

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule binding protein tau has a crucial function in promoting the assembly and stabilization of microtubule. Besides tuning the action potentials, voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are important for cell proliferation and appear to play a role in the development of cancer. However, little is known about the possible interaction of tau with Kv channels in various tissues. In the present study, tau plasmids were transiently transfected into mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to explore the possible linkages between tau and Kv channels. This treatment led to a downregulation of mRNA levels of several Kv channels, including Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv4.1, Kv9.2, and KCNH4, but no significant alteration was observed for Kv5.1 and KCNQ4. Furthermore, the macroscopic currents through Kv channels were reduced by 36.5% at +60 mV in tau-transfected N2A cells. The proliferation rates of N2A cells were also improved by the induction of tau expression and the incubation of TEA (tetraethylammonium) for 48 h by 120.9% and 149.3%, respectively. Following the cotransfection with tau in HEK293 cells, the mRNA levels and corresponding currents of Kv2.1 were significantly declined compared with single Kv2.1 transfection. Our data indicated that overexpression of tau declined the mRNA levels of Kv channels and related currents. The effects of tau overexpression on Kv channels provided an alternative explanation for low sensitivity to anti-cancer chemicals in some specific cancer tissues.

  1. Overexpression of Tau Downregulated the mRNA Levels of Kv Channels and Improved Proliferation in N2A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiantao; Hu, Ximu; Li, Xiaoqing; Hao, Xuran

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule binding protein tau has a crucial function in promoting the assembly and stabilization of microtubule. Besides tuning the action potentials, voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are important for cell proliferation and appear to play a role in the development of cancer. However, little is known about the possible interaction of tau with Kv channels in various tissues. In the present study, tau plasmids were transiently transfected into mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to explore the possible linkages between tau and Kv channels. This treatment led to a downregulation of mRNA levels of several Kv channels, including Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv4.1, Kv9.2, and KCNH4, but no significant alteration was observed for Kv5.1 and KCNQ4. Furthermore, the macroscopic currents through Kv channels were reduced by 36.5% at +60 mV in tau-tranfected N2A cells. The proliferation rates of N2A cells were also improved by the induction of tau expression and the incubation of TEA (tetraethylammonium) for 48 h by 120.9% and 149.3%, respectively. Following the cotransfection with tau in HEK293 cells, the mRNA levels and corresponding currents of Kv2.1 were significantly declined compared with single Kv2.1 transfection. Our data indicated that overexpression of tau declined the mRNA levels of Kv channels and related currents. The effects of tau overexpression on Kv channels provided an alternative explanation for low sensitivity to anti-cancer chemicals in some specific cancer tissues. PMID:25590133

  2. Editing of the Sendai virus P/C mRNA by G insertion occurs during mRNA synthesis via a virus-encoded activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, S; Curran, J; Kolakofsky, D

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of the Sendai virus P/C mRNA have been predicted: one an exact copy of the viral genome, and the other with a single G insertion within a run of three G's. We directly cloned the mRNA or portions of it containing the insertion site and screened the resulting colonies with oligonucleotides that could distinguish the presence of three or four G's at this position. We found that 31% of the mRNAs did in fact contain the predicted insertion, whereas the viral genomes contained no heterogeneity at this position. A smaller fraction (7%) of the mRNA contained two to eight G's inserted at this position. The insertions also took place during RNA synthesis in vitro with purified virions but were not detected when the mRNA was expressed in vivo via a vaccinia virus recombinant. When the Sendai virus- and vaccinia virus-derived P/C mRNAs were coexpressed in the same cells under conditions in which each could be distinguished, those from the Sendai genome were altered as before, but those from the vaccinia virus genome remained unaltered. The activity that alters the mRNA is therefore likely to be coded for by the virus and cannot function in trans. Images PMID:1688384

  3. Attenuation of kindling-induced decreases in NT-3 mRNA by thyroid hormone depletion.

    PubMed

    Kim, S Y; Smith, M A; Post, R M; Rosen, J B

    1998-02-01

    The expression of neurotrophins is altered by amygdala kindled seizures. Because thyroid hormone can regulate the transcription of neurotrophins, we asked whether thyroid hormone regulates neurotrophin mRNA expression following amygdala kindling. Rats with electrodes implanted in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala were either depleted of thyroid hormone or given excess thyroid hormone. The rats were then kindled daily until they had one generalized seizure. The brains were removed 4 h after the seizure and processed for in situ hybridization of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNAs. In non-kindled rats, thyroid hormone depletion increased the levels of BDNF mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. NGF and NT-3 mRNA expression was not altered. In addition, thyroid hormone manipulations had no effect on kindling or on kindling-induced BDNF and NGF mRNA. However, the kindling-induced decrease in NT-3 mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer was significantly attenuated by thyroid hormone depletion. These effects were reversed by thyroid hormone replacement. The results indicate that thyroid hormone plays a modulatory role in the seizure-induced changes of NT-3 mRNA expression found in the dentate gyrus.

  4. Exaptive origins of regulated mRNA decay in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is extensively controlled at the level of mRNA stability and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are markedly different from their archaeal and bacterial counterparts. We propose that two such mechanisms, nonsense‐mediated decay (NMD) and motif‐specific transcript destabilization by CCCH‐type zinc finger RNA‐binding proteins, originated as a part of cellular defense against RNA pathogens. These branches of the mRNA turnover pathway might have been used by primeval eukaryotes alongside RNA interference to distinguish their own messages from those of RNA viruses and retrotransposable elements. We further hypothesize that the subsequent advent of “professional” innate and adaptive immunity systems allowed NMD and the motif‐triggered mechanisms to be efficiently repurposed for regulation of endogenous cellular transcripts. This scenario explains the rapid emergence of archetypical mRNA destabilization pathways in eukaryotes and argues that other aspects of post‐transcriptional gene regulation in this lineage might have been derived through a similar exaptation route. PMID:27438915

  5. Cytokine mRNA expression in postischemic/reperfused myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Herskowitz, A.; Choi, S.; Ansari, A. A.; Wesselingh, S.

    1995-01-01

    . These results provide evidence for local expression of cytokine mRNA in postischemic myocardium and suggest that regulation of local cytokine release is altered during the postischemic period. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7856752

  6. A new regulatory pathway of mRNA export by an F-box protein, Mdm30.

    PubMed

    Durairaj, Geetha; Lahudkar, Shweta; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2014-02-01

    Mdm30, an F-box protein in yeast, has been recently shown to promote mRNA export. However, it remains unknown how Mdm30 facilitates mRNA export. Here, we show that Mdm30 targets the Sub2 component of the TREX (Transcription/Export) complex for ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Such a targeted degradation of Sub2 enhances the recruitment of the mRNA export adaptor, Yra1, to the active genes to promote mRNA export. Together, these results elucidate that Mdm30 promotes mRNA export by lowering Sub2's stability and consequently enhancing Yra1 recruitment, thus illuminating new regulatory mechanisms of mRNA export by Mdm30.

  7. Hypoxia may increase rat insulin mRNA levels by promoting binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich insulin mRNA 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Linda; Welsh, Nils

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent reports identify the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA as crucial for control of insulin messenger stability. This region contains a pyrimidine-rich sequence, which is similar to the hypoxia-responsive mRNA-stabilizing element of tyrosine hydroxylase. This study aimed to determine whether hypoxia affects insulin mRNA levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rat islets were incubated at normoxic or hypoxic conditions and with or without hydrogen peroxide and a nitric oxide donor. Insulin mRNA was determined by Northern hybridization. Islet homogenates were used for electrophoretic mobility shift assay with an RNA-oligonucleotide, corresponding to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of rat insulin I mRNA. The expression of reporter gene mRNA, in islets transfected with reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type or mutated insulin mRNA pyrimidine-rich sequences, was measured by semiquantitive RT-PCR. RESULTS: Insulin mRNA was increased in response to hypoxia. This was paralleled by increased binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA, which was counteracted by hydrogen peroxide. The reporter gene mRNA level containing the wild-type binding site was not increased in response to hypoxia, but mutation of the site resulted in a destabilization of the mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: The complete understanding of different diabetic conditions requires the elucidation of mechanisms that control insulin gene expression. Our data show that hypoxia may increase insulin mRNA levels by promoting the binding of PTB to the insulin mRNA 3'-UTR. Hydrogen peroxide abolishes the hypoxic effect indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species and/or the redox potential in the oxygen-signaling pathway. PMID:12359957

  8. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  9. Rift Valley fever virus NS{sub S} gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NS{sub S} gene, but not the N, G{sub N} or NS{sub M} genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NS{sub S}, confirming that expression of NS{sub S} is likely responsible for this phenomenon. - Highlights: • Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection alters the localization of host mRNA. • mRNA accumulates in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. • NS{sub S} is likely responsible for mRNA relocalization to the nucleus.

  10. Altered cell function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    1991-01-01

    The paper overviews published results from investigations of changes in basic biological parameters taking place as a result of spaceflight exposure. These include changes in the rates of the DNA, mRNA, and protein biosyntheses; changes in the growth rate of an organism; and alterations in the cytoskeleton structure, differentiation, hormone accumulation, and collagen matrix secretion. These results, obtained both in complex biological organisms and on cultured cells, suggest that a basic cellular function is influenced and changed by microgravity. Many of the above mentioned changes are also found to take place in aging cells.

  11. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  12. Deregulated expression of VHL mRNA variants in papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Enke; Tuccilli, Chiara; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Chesnel, Frank; Sorrenti, Salvatore; De Vito, Corrado; Catania, Antonio; D'Armiento, Eleonora; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Tartaglia, Francesco; Barollo, Susi; Mian, Caterina; Bononi, Marco; Arceri, Stefano; Mascagni, Domenico; Vergine, Massimo; Pironi, Daniele; Monti, Massimo; Filippini, Angelo; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2017-03-05

    Recent findings demonstrated that a subset of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs) is characterized by reduced expression of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene, and that lowest levels associated with more aggressive PTCs. In the present study, the levels of the two VHL mRNA splicing variants, VHL-213 (V1) and VHL-172 (V2), were measured in a series of 96 PTC and corresponding normal matched tissues by means of quantitative RT-PCR. Variations in the mRNA levels were correlated with patients' clinicopathological parameters and disease-free interval (DFI). The analysis of VHL mRNA in tumor tissues, compared to normal matched tissues, revealed that its expression was either up- or down-regulated in the majority of PTC. In particular, V1 and V2 mRNA levels were altered, respectively, in 78 (81.3%) and 65 (67.7%) out of the 96 PTCs analyzed. A significant positive correlation between the two mRNA variants was observed (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis documented the lack of association between each variant and clinicopathological parameters such as age, tumor size, histology, TNM stage, lymph node metastases, and BRAF mutational status. However, a strong correlation was found between altered V1 or V2 mRNA levels and DFI. Multivariate regression analysis indicated higher V1 mRNA values, along with lymph node metastases at diagnosis, as independent prognostic factors predicting DFI. In conclusion, the data reported demonstrate that VHL gene expression is deregulated in the majority of PTC tissues. Of particular interest is the apparent protective role exerted by VHL transcripts against PTC recurrences.

  13. Regulation of corepressor alternative mRNA splicing by hormonal and metabolic signaling.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Chelsea A; Goodson, Michael L; Schroeder, Amy C; Privalsky, Martin L

    2015-09-15

    Alternative mRNA splicing diversifies the products encoded by the NCoR and SMRT corepressor loci. There is a programmed alteration in NCoR mRNA splicing during adipocyte differentiation from an NCoRω isoform, which contains three nuclear receptor interaction domains, to an NCoRδ isoform that contains two nuclear receptor interaction domains. This alternative mRNA splicing of NCoR has profound effects on adiposity and on diabetes in mouse models. We report here that dexamethasone, a powerful regulator of metabolism and of adipocyte differentiation, confers this change in NCoR mRNA splicing in cultured adipocytes. We also demonstrate that changes in dietary components can consistently, if moderately, modulate the total transcript levels and the mRNA splicing of NCoR and SMRT in both cultured cells and intact mice. This ability of alternative corepressor mRNA splicing to respond to nutritional changes confirms its importance in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism, and its promise as a therapeutic candidate for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes.

  14. The role of mRNA structure in bacterial translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michelle M

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of bacterial messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that influence translation efficiency provide many convenient handles for regulation of gene expression, especially when coupled with the processes of transcription termination and mRNA degradation. An mRNA's structure, especially near the site of initiation, has profound consequences for how readily it is translated. This property allows bacterial gene expression to be altered by changes to mRNA structure induced by temperature, or interactions with a wide variety of cellular components including small molecules, other RNAs (such as sRNAs and tRNAs), and RNA-binding proteins. This review discusses the links between mRNA structure and translation efficiency, and how mRNA structure is manipulated by conditions and signals within the cell to regulate gene expression. The range of RNA regulators discussed follows a continuum from very complex tertiary structures such as riboswitch aptamers and ribosomal protein-binding sites to thermosensors and mRNA:sRNA interactions that involve only base-pairing interactions. Furthermore, the high degrees of diversity observed for both mRNA structures and the mechanisms by which inhibition of translation occur have significant consequences for understanding the evolution of bacterial translational regulation. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1370. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1370 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  15. Regulation of corepressor alternative mRNA splicing by hormonal and metabolic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Chelsea A.; Goodson, Michael L.; Schroeder, Amy C.; Privalsky, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing diversifies the products encoded by the NCoR and SMRT corepressor loci. There is a programmed alteration in NCoR mRNA splicing during adipocyte differentiation from an NCoRδ isoform, which contains three nuclear receptor interaction domains, to an NCoRδ isoform that contains two nuclear receptor interaction domains. This alternative mRNA splicing of NCoR has profound effects on adiposity and on diabetes in mouse models. We report here that dexamethasone, a powerful regulator of metabolism and of adipocyte differentiation, confers this change in NCoR mRNA splicing in cultured adipocytes. We also demonstrate that changes in dietary components can consistently, if moderately, modulate the total transcript levels and the mRNA splicing of NCoR and SMRT in both cultured cells and intact mice. This ability of alternative corepressor mRNA splicing to respond to nutritional changes confirms its importance in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism, and its promise as a therapeutic candidate for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:26166430

  16. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  17. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization.

  18. Targeting a Regulatory Element in Human Thymidylate Synthase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Brunn, Nicholas D.; Sega, Emily Garcia; Kao, Melody B.

    2013-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of thymidine. TS inhibitors, which are used in cancer chemotherapy, suffer from resistance development in tumors through upregulation of TS expression. Autoregulatory translation control has been implicated with TS overexpression. TS binding at its own mRNA, which leads to sequestration of the start codon, is abolished when the enzyme forms an inhibitor complex, thereby relieving translation suppression. We have used the protein binding site from the TS mRNA in the context of a bicistronic expression system to validate targeting the regulatory motif with stabilizing ligands that prevent ribosomal initiation. Stabilization of the RNA by mutations, which were studied as surrogates of ligand binding, suppresses translation of the TS protein. Compounds that stabilize the TS binding RNA motif and thereby inhibit ribosomal initiation might be used in combination with existing TS enzyme-targeting drugs to overcome resistance development during chemotherapy. PMID:23143777

  19. Regulation of mRNA Translation Is a Novel Mechanism for Phthalate Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jun; Lopez-Dee, Zenaida P.; Cottell, Colby; Wolfe, Laura; Nye, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are a group of plasticizers that are widely used in many consumer products and medical devices, thus generating a huge burden to human health. Phthalates have been known to cause a number of developmental and reproductive disorders functioning as endocrine modulators. They are also involved in carcinogenesis with mechanisms less understood. To further understand the molecular mechanisms of phthalate toxicity, in this study we reported a new effect of phthalates on mRNA translation/protein synthesis, a key regulatory step of gene expression. Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) was found to directly inhibit mRNA translation in vitro but showed a complicated pattern of affecting mRNA translation in cells. In human kidney embryonic cell (HEK-293T), BBP increased cap-dependent mRNA translation at lower concentrations but showed inhibitory effect at higher concentrations. Cap-independent translation was not affected. On the other hand, mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) as a major metabolite of another important phthalate di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) inhibited both can-dependent and -independent mRNA translation in vivo. In contrast, BBP and MEHP exhibited an overall promoting effect on mRNA translation in cancer cells. Mechanistic studies identified that the level and phosphorylation of eIF4E-BP (eIF4E binding protein) and the amount of eIF4GI in eIF4F complex were altered in accordance with the effect of BBP on translation. BBP was also identified to directly bind to eIF4E, providing a further mechanism underlying the regulation of mRNA by phthalate. At the cellular level BBP inhibited normal cell growth but slightly promoted cancer cells (HT29) growth. Overall, this study provides the first evidence that phthalates can directly regulate mRNA translation as a novel mechanism to mediate their biological toxicities. PMID:27992464

  20. Regulation of mRNA Translation Is a Novel Mechanism for Phthalate Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Lopez-Dee, Zenaida P; Cottell, Colby; Wolfe, Laura; Nye, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are a group of plasticizers that are widely used in many consumer products and medical devices, thus generating a huge burden to human health. Phthalates have been known to cause a number of developmental and reproductive disorders functioning as endocrine modulators. They are also involved in carcinogenesis with mechanisms less understood. To further understand the molecular mechanisms of phthalate toxicity, in this study we reported a new effect of phthalates on mRNA translation/protein synthesis, a key regulatory step of gene expression. Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) was found to directly inhibit mRNA translation in vitro but showed a complicated pattern of affecting mRNA translation in cells. In human kidney embryonic cell (HEK-293T), BBP increased cap-dependent mRNA translation at lower concentrations but showed inhibitory effect at higher concentrations. Cap-independent translation was not affected. On the other hand, mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) as a major metabolite of another important phthalate di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) inhibited both can-dependent and -independent mRNA translation in vivo. In contrast, BBP and MEHP exhibited an overall promoting effect on mRNA translation in cancer cells. Mechanistic studies identified that the level and phosphorylation of eIF4E-BP (eIF4E binding protein) and the amount of eIF4GI in eIF4F complex were altered in accordance with the effect of BBP on translation. BBP was also identified to directly bind to eIF4E, providing a further mechanism underlying the regulation of mRNA by phthalate. At the cellular level BBP inhibited normal cell growth but slightly promoted cancer cells (HT29) growth. Overall, this study provides the first evidence that phthalates can directly regulate mRNA translation as a novel mechanism to mediate their biological toxicities.

  1. Neuropeptide Y mRNA expression levels following chronic olanzapine, clozapine and haloperidol administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, X-F; Deng, Chao; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2006-06-01

    Using quantitative in situ hybridization, this study examined regional changes in rat brain mRNA levels encoding neuropeptide Y (NPY) following olanzapine, clozapine and haloperidol administration (1.2, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, oral) for 36 days. The NPY mRNA expression levels and patterns were examined after the last drug administration at both time points enabling the measurement of immediate effect at 2h and the effects after 48 h of drug administration. It was found that all these drugs had an immediate effect on NPY mRNA expression, while virtually all these changes normalized 48 h after the drug treatments. A similarity in altered NPY mRNA expression patterns was seen between the olanzapine and clozapine groups; however, haloperidol was very different. Olanzapine and clozapine administration decreased NPY mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and anterior cingulate cortex (from -60% to -77%, p<0.05). Haloperidol decreased NPY mRNA expression in the amygdala and hippocampus (-69%, -64%, p<0.05). In the lateral septal nucleus, NPY mRNA levels significantly decreased in the olanzapine group (-66%, p<0.05), a trend toward a decrease was observed in the clozapine group, and no change was found in the haloperidol treated group. These results suggest that the different effects of atypical and typical antipsychotics on NPY systems may reflect the neural chemical mechanisms responsible for the differences between these drugs in their effects in treating positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The immediate decrease of NPY mRNA levels suggests an immediate reduction of NPY biosynthesis in response to these drugs.

  2. Genetic analysis of glucose regulation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: control of transcription versus mRNA turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Cereghino, G P; Scheffler, I E

    1996-01-01

    A major determinant of the steady-state level of the mRNA encoding the iron protein (Ip) subunit of succinate dehydrogenase of yeast is its rate of turnover. This mRNA is significantly more stable in glycerol than in glucose media. Many other genes, for example, SUC2, that are repressed in the presence of glucose are believed to be controlled at the level of transcription. The present study elucidates differences in the regulatory mechanisms by which glucose controls the transcription and turnover of the SUC2 and Ip mRNAs. The signaling pathway for glucose repression at the transcriptional level has been associated with a number of gene products linking glucose uptake with nuclear events. We have investigated whether the same genes are involved in the control of Ip mRNA stability. Phosphorylation of glucose or fructose is critical in triggering the transcript's degradation, but any hexokinase will do. Of the other known genes examined, most, with the exception of REG1, are not involved in determining the differential stability of the Ip transcript. Finally, our results indicate that differential stability on different carbon sources also plays a role in determining the steady-state level of the SUC2 mRNA. Thus, glucose repression includes both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Images PMID:8617211

  3. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  4. Role of miRNAs and alternative mRNA 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation of their mRNA targets in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Soetanto, R; Hynes, C J; Patel, H R; Humphreys, D T; Evers, M; Duan, G; Parker, B J; Archer, S K; Clancy, J L; Graham, R M; Beilharz, T H; Smith, N J; Preiss, T

    2016-05-01

    miRNAs play critical roles in heart disease. In addition to differential miRNA expression, miRNA-mediated control is also affected by variable miRNA processing or alternative 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) of their mRNA targets. To what extent these phenomena play a role in the heart remains unclear. We sought to explore miRNA processing and mRNA APA in cardiomyocytes, and whether these change during cardiac hypertrophy. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) was performed to induce hypertrophy in C57BL/6J mice. RNA extracted from cardiomyocytes of sham-treated, pre-hypertrophic (2 days post-TAC), and hypertrophic (7 days post-TAC) mice was subjected to small RNA- and poly(A)-test sequencing (PAT-Seq). Differential expression analysis matched expectations; nevertheless we identified ~400 mRNAs and hundreds of noncoding RNA loci as altered with hypertrophy for the first time. Although multiple processing variants were observed for many miRNAs, there was little change in their relative proportions during hypertrophy. PAT-Seq mapped ~48,000 mRNA 3'-ends, identifying novel 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) for over 7000 genes. Importantly, hypertrophy was associated with marked changes in APA with a net shift from distal to more proximal mRNA 3'-ends, which is predicted to decrease overall miRNA repression strength. We independently validated several examples of 3'UTR proportion change and showed that alternative 3'UTRs associate with differences in mRNA translation. Our work suggests that APA contributes to altered gene expression with the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and provides a rich resource for a systems-level understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation in physiological and pathological states of the heart.

  5. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation.

    PubMed

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-08-04

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5' end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies.

  6. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  7. Osteoblast fibronectin mRNA, protein synthesis, and matrix are unchanged after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Gilbertson, V.

    1999-01-01

    The well-defined osteoblast line, MC3T3-E1 was used to examine fibronectin (FN) mRNA levels, protein synthesis, and extracellular FN matrix accumulation after growth activation in spaceflight. These osteoblasts produce FN extracellular matrix (ECM) known to regulate adhesion, differentiation, and function in adherent cells. Changes in bone ECM and osteoblast cell shape occur in spaceflight. To determine whether altered FN matrix is a factor in causing these changes in spaceflight, quiescent osteoblasts were launched into microgravity and were then sera activated with and without a 1-gravity field. Synthesis of FN mRNA, protein, and matrix were measured after activation in microgravity. FN mRNA synthesis is significantly reduced in microgravity (0-G) when compared to ground (GR) osteoblasts flown in a centrifuge simulating earth's gravity (1-G) field 2.5 h after activation. However, 27.5 h after activation there were no significant differences in mRNA synthesis. A small but significant reduction of FN protein was found in the 0-G samples 2.5 h after activation. Total FN protein 27.5 h after activation showed no significant difference between any of the gravity conditions, however, there was a fourfold increase in absolute amount of protein synthesized during the incubation. Using immunofluorescence, we found no significant differences in the amount or in the orientation of the FN matrix after 27.5 h in microgravity. These results demonstrate that FN is made by sera-activated osteoblasts even during exposure to microgravity. These data also suggest that after a total period of 43 h of spaceflight FN transcription, translation, or altered matrix assembly is not responsible for the altered cell shape or altered matrix formation of osteoblasts.

  8. Competitive binding of AUF1 and TIAR to MYC mRNA controls its translation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Baisong; Hu, Yan; Brewer, Gary

    2007-06-01

    (A+U)-rich elements (AREs) within 3' untranslated regions are signals for rapid degradation of messenger RNAs encoding many oncoproteins and cytokines. The ARE-binding protein AUF1 contributes to their degradation. We identified MYC proto-oncogene mRNA as a cellular AUF1 target. Levels of MYC translation and cell proliferation were proportional to AUF1 abundance but inversely proportional to the abundance of the ARE-binding protein TIAR, a MYC translational suppressor. Both AUF1 and TIAR affected MYC translation via the ARE without affecting mRNA abundance. Altering association of one ARE-binding protein with MYC mRNA in vivo reciprocally affected mRNA association with the other protein. Finally, genetic experiments revealed that AUF1 and TIAR control proliferation by a MYC-dependent pathway. Together, these observations suggest a novel regulatory mechanism where tuning the ratios of AUF1 and TIAR bound to MYC mRNA permits dynamic control of MYC translation and cell proliferation.

  9. A Case for Microtubule Vulnerability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Altered Dynamics During Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jayden A.; Yeaman, Elise J.; Blizzard, Catherine A.; Chuckowree, Jyoti A.; Dickson, Tracey C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an aggressive multifactorial disease converging on a common pathology: the degeneration of motor neurons (MNs), their axons and neuromuscular synapses. This vulnerability and dysfunction of MNs highlights the dependency of these large cells on their intracellular machinery. Neuronal microtubules (MTs) are intracellular structures that facilitate a myriad of vital neuronal functions, including activity dependent axonal transport. In ALS, it is becoming increasingly apparent that MTs are likely to be a critical component of this disease. Not only are disruptions in this intracellular machinery present in the vast majority of seemingly sporadic cases, recent research has revealed that mutation to a microtubule protein, the tubulin isoform TUBA4A, is sufficient to cause a familial, albeit rare, form of disease. In both sporadic and familial disease, studies have provided evidence that microtubule mediated deficits in axonal transport are the tipping point for MN survivability. Axonal transport deficits would lead to abnormal mitochondrial recycling, decreased vesicle and mRNA transport and limited signaling of key survival factors from the neurons peripheral synapses, causing the characteristic peripheral “die back”. This disruption to microtubule dependant transport in ALS has been shown to result from alterations in the phenomenon of microtubule dynamic instability: the rapid growth and shrinkage of microtubule polymers. This is accomplished primarily due to aberrant alterations to microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) that regulate microtubule stability. Indeed, the current literature would argue that microtubule stability, particularly alterations in their dynamics, may be the initial driving force behind many familial and sporadic insults in ALS. Pharmacological stabilization of the microtubule network offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in ALS; indeed it has shown promise in many neurological disorders, ALS

  10. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  11. Staufen-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eonyoung; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2013-01-01

    Staufen1 (STAU1)-mediated mRNA decay (SMD) is an mRNA degradation process in mammalian cells that is mediated by the binding of STAU1 to a STAU1-binding site (SBS) within the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of target mRNAs. During SMD, STAU1, a double-stranded (ds) RNA-binding protein, recognizes dsRNA structures formed either by intramolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences or by intermolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences with a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) via partially complementary Alu elements. Recently, STAU2, a paralog of STAU1, has also been reported to mediate SMD. Both STAU1 and STAU2 interact directly with the ATP-dependent RNA helicase UPF1, a key SMD factor, enhancing its helicase activity to promote effective SMD. Moreover, STAU1 and STAU2 form homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions via domain-swapping. Since both SMD and the mechanistically related nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) employ UPF1, SMD and NMD are competitive pathways. Competition contributes to cellular differentiation processes, such as myogenesis and adipogenesis, placing SMD at the heart of various physiologically important mechanisms. PMID:23681777

  12. Tristetraprolin (TTP): Interactions with mRNA and proteins, and current thoughts on mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Seth A.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in mRNA stability and translation are critical control points in the regulation of gene expression, particularly genes encoding growth factors, inflammatory mediators, and proto-oncogenes. Adenosine and uridine (AU)-rich elements (ARE), often located in the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR) of mRNAs, are known to target transcripts for rapid decay. They are also involved in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation in response to extracellular cues. This review focuses on one of the best characterized ARE binding proteins, tristetraprolin (TTP), the founding member of a small family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins. In this survey, we have reviewed the current status of TTP interactions with mRNA and proteins, and discussed current thinking about TTP's mechanism of action to promote mRNA decay. We also review the proposed regulation of TTP's functions by phosphorylation. Finally, we have discussed emerging evidence for TTP operating as a translational regulator. PMID:23428348

  13. Comparing efficiency of micro-RNA and mRNA biomarker liberation with microbubble-enhanced ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Forbrich, Alex; Paproski, Robert; Hitt, Mary; Zemp, Roger

    2014-09-01

    Blood biomarkers are potentially powerful diagnostic tools that are limited clinically by low concentrations, the inability to determine biomarker origin and unknown patient baseline. Recently, ultrasound has been shown to liberate proteins and large mRNA biomarkers, overcoming many of these limitations. We have since demonstrated that adding lipid-stabilized microbubbles elevates mRNA concentration an order of magnitude compared with ultrasound without microbubbles, in vitro. Unfortunately the large size of some mRNA molecules may limit efficiency of release and hinder efficacy as an ultrasound-liberated biomarker. We hypothesize that smaller molecules will be released more efficiently with ultrasound than larger molecules. Although investigation of large libraries of biomarkers should be performed to fully validate this hypothesis, we focus on a small subset of mRNA and micro-RNAs. Specifically, we focus on miR-21 (22 base pairs [bp]), which is upregulated in certain forms of cancer, compared with previously investigated mammaglobin mRNA (502 bp). We also report release of micro-RNA miR-155 (22 bp) and housekeeping rRNA S18 (1869 bp). More than 10 million additional miR-21 copies per 100,000 cells are released with ultrasound-microbubble exposure. The low- molecular-weight miR-21 proved to be liberated 50 times more efficiently than high-molecular-weight mammaglobin mRNA, releasing orders of magnitude more miR-21 than mammaglobin mRNA under comparable conditions.

  14. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  15. Stabilizing mutations and calcium-dependent stability of subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P A; Ruan, B; Strausberg, S L; Bryan, P N

    2001-09-04

    Stability is a property of subtilisin which has proven particularly amenable to enhancement via random mutagenesis and screening, yet the effects of most stabilizing mutations are not understood in structural and energetic detail. This paper seeks to explain the longstanding observation that stabilizing mutations are usually calcium-dependent in their stabilizing effect, irrespective of their proximity to the calcium binding sites. Stabilizing mutations in subtilisin fall into one of three classes. The largest class of mutations stabilize only in the presence of excess calcium. A smaller number of mutations stabilize independently of [calcium], and a few mutations stabilize only in the presence of chelating agents, such as EDTA. This study compares the effects of mutations from each class when introduced into subtilisin BPN' and two calcium-free versions of subtilisin. The calcium-dependent effects of mutations can be explained by considering subtilisin to be in conformational equilibrium between two structurally similar but energetically distinct states: N and N*. The equilibrium from the N* to the N state can be altered either by calcium binding to site A or by mutation. Mutations which stabilize only in the presence of calcium stabilize the N state relative to N*. Mutations which stabilize only in the presence of chelants stabilize the N* state relative to N. As a byproduct of this analysis, we have developed a hyperstable variant of subtilisin whose inactivation at high temperature in the presence of EDTA is 10(5) times slower than wild-type subtilisin.

  16. Quantitative studies of mRNA recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of peptide bond synthesis by ribosomes is conserved between species, but the initiation step differs greatly between the three kingdoms of life. This is illustrated by the evolution of roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factor mass found in humans compared with bacteria. Eukaryotic initiation of translation is comprised of a number of sub-steps: (i) recruitment of an mRNA and initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit; (ii) migration of the 40S subunit along the 5′ UTR to locate the initiation codon; and (iii) recruitment of the 60S subunit to form the 80S initiation complex. Although the mechanism and regulation of initiation has been studied for decades, many aspects of the pathway remain unclear. In this review, I will focus discussion on what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection and its recruitment to the 40S subunit. I will summarize how the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) is formed and stabilized by interactions between its components. I will discuss what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and how the selected mRNA is recruited to the 43S PIC. The regulation of this process by secondary structure located in the 5′ UTR of an mRNA will also be discussed. Finally, I present a possible kinetic model with which to explain the process of mRNA selection and recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome. PMID:25742741

  17. BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus following entorhinal cortex lesions.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, P A; Araujo, D M; Hefti, F

    1993-02-01

    Quantitative in situ hybridization was used to determine whether the prevalence or topographical distribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or tyrosine receptor kinase (trk) B mRNA is altered in the hippocampal formation following lesions of excitatory afferents from the entorhinal cortex which provides an external source of innervation for the hippocampal formation. BDNF mRNA levels were not altered in the hippocampal formation up to 10 days following entorhinal cortex lesions (ECLs). The levels of mRNA coding for all known forms of trkB receptors also remained unchanged. The prevalence of the synaptic plasticity marker SNAP-25 mRNA was increased in the CA2 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers and the dentate gyrus by 6 days following ECLs and remained elevated at 10 days following ECLs. Our findings indicate that hippocampal neuron sprouting which occurs in response to ECLs is not the result of changes in the expression of the BDNF or trkB mRNA.

  18. Final report: FASEB Summer Research Conference on ''Post-transcriptional control of gene expression: Effectors of mRNA decay'' [agenda and attendees list

    SciTech Connect

    Maquat, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this meeting was to provide an interactive forum for scientists working on prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decay. A special seminar presented by a leader in the field of mRNA decay in S. cerevisiae focused on what is known and what needs to be determined, not only for yeast but for other organisms. The large attendance (110 participants) reflects the awareness that mRNA decay is a key player in gene regulation in a way that is affected by the many steps that precede mRNA formation. Sessions were held on the following topics: mRNA transport and mRNP; multicomponent eukaryotic nucleases; nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense-associated altered splicing; Cis-acting sequences/Trans-acting factors of mRNA decay; translational accuracy; multicomponent bacterial nucleases; interplay between mRNA polyadenylation, translation and decay in prokaryotes and prokaryotic organelles; and RNA interference and other RNA mediators of gene expression. In addition to the talks and two poster sessions, there were three round tables: (1) Does translation occur in the nucleus? (2) Differences and similarities in the mechanisms of mRNA decay in different eukaryotes, and (3) RNA surveillance in bacteria?

  19. Moisturizers change the mRNA expression of enzymes synthesizing skin barrier lipids.

    PubMed

    Buraczewska, Izabela; Berne, Berit; Lindberg, Magnus; Lodén, Marie; Törmä, Hans

    2009-09-01

    In a previous study, 7-week treatment of normal human skin with two test moisturizers, Complex cream and Hydrocarbon cream, was shown to affect mRNA expression of certain genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Moreover, the treatment altered transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in opposite directions. In the present study, the mRNA expression of genes important for formation of barrier lipids, i.e., cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides, was examined. Treatment with Hydrocarbon cream, which increased TEWL, also elevated the gene expression of GBA, SPTLC2, SMPD1, ALOX12B, ALOXE3, and HMGCS1. In addition, the expression of PPARG was decreased. On the other hand, Complex cream, which decreased TEWL, induced only the expression of PPARG, although not confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, in the untreated skin, a correlation between the mRNA expression of PPARG and ACACB, and TEWL was found, suggesting that these genes are important for the skin barrier homeostasis. The observed changes further demonstrate that long-term treatment with certain moisturizers may induce dysfunctional skin barrier, and as a consequence several signaling pathways are altered.

  20. Anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate reduces hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Jonas; Kindlundh, Anna M S; Nyberg, Fred; Bergström, Lena; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2003-10-03

    Supratherapeutical doses of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) have dramatic effects on metabolism in humans, and also inhibit feeding and reduce the rate of body weight gain in rats. In order to test the hypothesis that the AAS metabolic syndrome is accompanied by alterations in the central melanocortin system, we evaluated body weight, food intake and hypothalamic agouti-related protein (AgRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels following administration of different doses of the anabolic androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate. In order to distinguish changes induced by the steroid treatment per se from those resulting from the reduced food intake and growth rate, we also compared the effect of nandrolone decanoate on AgRP and POMC mRNA expression with both normally fed, and food restricted control groups. We here report that administration of nandrolone specifically reduces arcuate nucleus POMC mRNA levels while not affecting the expression level of AgRP. The effect on POMC expression was not observed in the food restricted controls, excluding the possibility that the observed effect was a mere response to the reduced food intake and body weight. These results raise the possibility that some of the metabolic and behavioural consequences of AAS abuse may be the result of alterations in the melanocortin system.

  1. Specialized yeast ribosomes: a customized tool for selective mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johann W; Brandl, Clemens; Haubenreisser, Olaf; Wimmer, Bjoern; Weber, Manuela; Karl, Thomas; Klausegger, Alfred; Breitenbach, Michael; Hintner, Helmut; von der Haar, Tobias; Tuite, Mick F; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is now accumulating that sub-populations of ribosomes - so-called specialized ribosomes - can favour the translation of subsets of mRNAs. Here we use a large collection of diploid yeast strains, each deficient in one or other copy of the set of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, to generate eukaryotic cells carrying distinct populations of altered 'specialized' ribosomes. We show by comparative protein synthesis assays that different heterologous mRNA reporters based on luciferase are preferentially translated by distinct populations of specialized ribosomes. These mRNAs include reporters carrying premature termination codons (PTC) thus allowing us to identify specialized ribosomes that alter the efficiency of translation termination leading to enhanced synthesis of the wild-type protein. This finding suggests that these strains can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets in the ribosome. To explore this further we examined the translation of the mRNA encoding the extracellular matrix protein laminin β3 (LAMB3) since a LAMB3-PTC mutant is implicated in the blistering skin disease Epidermolysis bullosa (EB). This screen identified specialized ribosomes with reduced levels of RP L35B as showing enhanced synthesis of full-length LAMB3 in cells expressing the LAMB3-PTC mutant. Importantly, the RP L35B sub-population of specialized ribosomes leave both translation of a reporter luciferase carrying a different PTC and bulk mRNA translation largely unaltered.

  2. PABPN1-Dependent mRNA Processing Induces Muscle Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; van Putten, Maaike; Paniagua-Soriano, Guillem; Krom, Yvonne D.; Florea, Bogdan I.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is a multifunctional regulator of mRNA processing, and its expression levels specifically decline in aging muscles. An expansion mutation in PABPN1 is the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy (OPMD), a late onset and rare myopathy. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 expression correlates with symptom manifestation in OPMD. PABPN1 regulates alternative polyadenylation site (PAS) utilization. However, the impact of PAS utilization on cell and tissue function is poorly understood. We hypothesized that altered PABPN1 expression levels is an underlying cause of muscle wasting. To test this, we stably down-regulated PABPN1 in mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by localized injection of adeno-associated viruses expressing shRNA to PABPN1 (shPab). We found that a mild reduction in PABPN1 levels causes muscle pathology including myofiber atrophy, thickening of extracellular matrix and myofiber-type transition. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 levels caused a consistent decline in distal PAS utilization in the 3’-UTR of a subset of OPMD-dysregulated genes. This alternative PAS utilization led to up-regulation of Atrogin-1, a key muscle atrophy regulator, but down regulation of proteasomal genes. Additionally reduced PABPN1 levels caused a reduction in proteasomal activity, and transition in MyHC isotope expression pattern in myofibers. We suggest that PABPN1-mediated alternative PAS utilization plays a central role in aging-associated muscle wasting. PMID:27152426

  3. Rational Manipulation of mRNA Folding Free Energy Allows Rheostat Control of Pneumolysin Production by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Fábio E.; Parker, Dane; Randis, Tara M.; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Prince, Alice S.; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi M.; Ratner, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of specific factors to bacterial virulence is generally investigated through creation of genetic “knockouts” that are then compared to wild-type strains or complemented mutants. This paradigm is useful to understand the effect of presence vs. absence of a specific gene product but cannot account for concentration-dependent effects, such as may occur with some bacterial toxins. In order to assess threshold and dose-response effects of virulence factors, robust systems for tunable expression are required. Recent evidence suggests that the folding free energy (ΔG) of the 5’ end of mRNA transcripts can have a significant effect on translation efficiency and overall protein abundance. Here we demonstrate that rational alteration of 5’ mRNA folding free energy by introduction of synonymous mutations allows for predictable changes in pneumolysin (PLY) expression by Streptococcus pneumoniae without the need for chemical inducers or heterologous promoters. We created a panel of isogenic S. pneumoniae strains, differing only in synonymous (silent) mutations at the 5’ end of the PLY mRNA that are predicted to alter ΔG. Such manipulation allows rheostat-like control of PLY production and alters the cytotoxicity of whole S. pneumoniae on primary and immortalized human cells. These studies provide proof-of-principle for further investigation of mRNA ΔG manipulation as a tool in studies of bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:25798590

  4. Cap-independent translation of poliovirus mRNA is conferred by sequence elements within the 5' noncoding region

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, J.; Kaplan, G.; Racaniello, V.R.; Sonenberg, N.

    1988-03-01

    Poliovirus polysomal RNA is naturally uncapped, and as such, its translation must bypass any 5' cap-dependent ribosome recognition event. To elucidate the manner by which poliovirus mRNA is translated, the authors determined the translational efficiencies of a series of deletion mutants within the 5' noncoding region of the mRNA. They found striking differences in translatability among the altered mRNAs when assayed in mock-infected and poliovirus-infected HeLa cell extracts. The results identify a functional cis-acting element within the 5' noncoding region of the poliovirus mRNA which enables it to translate in a cap-independent fashion. The major determinant of this element maps between nucleotides 320 and 631 of the 5' end of the poliovirus mRNA. They also show that this region (320 to 631), when fused to a heterologous mRNA, can function in cis to render the mRNA cap independent in translation.

  5. Chronic social subordination stress modulates glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits

    PubMed Central

    Makinson, Ryan; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Seroogy, Kim B.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic social subordination is a well-known precipitant of numerous psychiatric and physiological health concerns. In this study, we examine the effects of chronic social stress in the visible burrow system (VBS) on the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) mRNA in forebrain stress circuitry. Male rats in the VBS system form a dominance hierarchy, whereby subordinate males exhibit neuroendocrine and physiological profiles characteristic of chronic exposure to stress. We found that social subordination decreases GAD67 mRNA in the peri-paraventricular nucleus region of the hypothalamus and the interfascicular nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and increases in GAD67 mRNA in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and dorsal medial hypothalamus. Expression of BDNF mRNA increased in the dorsal region of the BNST, but remained unchanged in all other regions examined. Results from this study indicate that social subordination is associated with several region-specific alterations in GAD67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits, whereas changes in the expression of BDNF mRNA are limited to the BNST. PMID:26066725

  6. Lack of effect of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs on glutamate receptor mRNA levels in rat brains.

    PubMed

    Oretti, R G; Spurlock, G; Buckland, P R; McGuffin, P

    1994-08-15

    By employing multiprobe oligonucleotide solution hybridisation (MOSH) we have measured the levels of mRNA encoding the NMDA receptor subtypes (R1, R2A, R2B and R2C) and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor subtypes (GluR1, 2, 3, and 4) within rat brain following, 1-32 days of antipsychotic or antidepressant drug administration. The results suggest that the drugs studied do not significantly alter rat glutamatergic system mRNA levels when compared to controls.

  7. Global analysis of mRNA decay intermediates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Harigaya, Yuriko; Parker, Roy

    2012-07-17

    The general pathways of eukaryotic mRNA decay occur via deadenylation followed by 3' to 5' degradation or decapping, although some endonuclease sites have been identified in metazoan mRNAs. To determine the role of endonucleases in mRNA degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we mapped 5' monophosphate ends on mRNAs in wild-type and dcp2 xrn1 yeast cells, wherein mRNA endonuclease cleavage products are stabilized. This led to three important observations. First, only few mRNAs that undergo low-level endonucleolytic cleavage were observed, suggesting that endonucleases are not a major contributor to yeast mRNA decay. Second, independent of known decapping enzymes, we observed low levels of 5' monophosphates on some mRNAs, suggesting that an unknown mechanism can generate 5' exposed ends, although for all substrates tested, Dcp2 was the primary decapping enzyme. Finally, we identified debranched lariat intermediates from intron-containing genes, demonstrating a significant discard pathway for mRNAs during the second step of pre-mRNA splicing, which is a potential step to regulate gene expression.

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of satellite cell quiescence by TTP-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Hausburg, Melissa A; Doles, Jason D; Clement, Sandra L; Cadwallader, Adam B; Hall, Monica N; Blackshear, Perry J; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Olwin, Bradley B

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells in their niche are quiescent and upon muscle injury, exit quiescence, proliferate to repair muscle tissue, and self-renew to replenish the satellite cell population. To understand the mechanisms involved in maintaining satellite cell quiescence, we identified gene transcripts that were differentially expressed during satellite cell activation following muscle injury. Transcripts encoding RNA binding proteins were among the most significantly changed and included the mRNA decay factor Tristetraprolin. Tristetraprolin promotes the decay of MyoD mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of myogenic commitment, via binding to the MyoD mRNA 3′ untranslated region. Upon satellite cell activation, p38α/β MAPK phosphorylates MAPKAP2 and inactivates Tristetraprolin, stabilizing MyoD mRNA. Satellite cell specific knockdown of Tristetraprolin precociously activates satellite cells in vivo, enabling MyoD accumulation, differentiation and cell fusion into myofibers. Regulation of mRNAs by Tristetraprolin appears to function as one of several critical post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms controlling satellite cell homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03390.001 PMID:25815583

  9. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA by the Microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsun; Seong, Youngmo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Song, Hoseok

    2014-03-28

    Aurora kinase B regulates the segregation of chromosomes and the spindle checkpoint during mitosis. In this study, we showed that the Microprocessor complex, which is responsible for the processing of the primary transcripts during the generation of microRNAs, destabilizes the mRNA of Aurora kinase B in human cells. The Microprocessor-mediated cleavage kept Aurora kinase B at a low level and prevented premature entrance into mitosis. The cleavage was reduced during mitosis leading to the accumulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA and protein. In addition to Aurora kinase B mRNA, the processing of other primary transcripts of miRNAs were also decreased during mitosis. We found that the cleavage was dependent on an RNA helicase, DDX5, and the association of DDX5 and DDX17 with the Microprocessor was reduced during mitosis. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism by which the Microprocessor complex regulates stability of Aurora kinase B mRNA and cell cycle progression.

  10. Gawky is a component of cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies required for early Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mary D.; Najand, Nima; Chaker, Sana; Pare, Justin M.; Haskins, Julie; Hughes, Sarah C.; Hobman, Tom C.; Locke, John; Simmonds, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the GW182 protein localizes to cytoplasmic bodies implicated in the regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA) stability, translation, and the RNA interference pathway. Many of these functions have also been assigned to analogous yeast cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies. We have characterized the single Drosophila melanogaster homologue of the human GW182 protein family, which we have named Gawky (GW). Drosophila GW localizes to punctate, cytoplasmic foci in an RNA-dependent manner. Drosophila GW bodies (GWBs) appear to function analogously to human GWBs, as human GW182 colocalizes with GW when expressed in Drosophila cells. The RNA-induced silencing complex component Argonaute2 and orthologues of LSm4 and Xrn1 (Pacman) associated with 5′–3′ mRNA degradation localize to some GWBs. Reducing GW activity by mutation or antibody injection during syncytial embryo development leads to abnormal nuclear divisions, demonstrating an early requirement for GWB-mediated cytoplasmic mRNA regulation. This suggests that gw represents a previously unknown member of a small group of genes that need to be expressed zygotically during early embryo development. PMID:16880270

  11. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  12. Effects of simulated microgravity on microRNA and mRNA expression profile of rat soleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongjie; Wu, Feng; Cao, Hongqing; Kan, Guanghan; Zhang, Hongyu; Yeung, Ella W.; Shang, Peng; Dai, Zhongquan; Li, Yinghui

    2015-02-01

    Spaceflight induces muscle atrophy but mechanism is not well understood. Here, we quantified microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNA shifts of rat soleus in response to microgravity. MiRNAs and mRNA microarray of soleus after tail suspension (TS) for 7 and 14 days were performed followed by target gene and function annotation analysis and qRT-PCR. Relative muscle mass lost by 37.0% in TS-7 but less than 10% in the following three weeks. TS altered 23 miRNAs and 1313 mRNAs with at least 2-fold. QRT-PCR confirmed some of these changes. MiR-214, miR-486-5p and miR-221 continuously decreased. MiR-674 and Let-7e decreased only in TS-7, while miR-320b and miR-187 decreased only in TS-14. But there was no alteration of miR-320 and miR-206 in both time point. For mRNA detection, actn3 (5.1-fold and 13.8-fold) and myh4 (38-fold and 51.6-fold) increased abundantly and a3galt2 decreased. Predicted targeted genes (whyz, ywhaz and SFRP2) of altered miRNAs decreased. GO terms and cellular pathway of these alteration showed enrichment in regulation of muscle metabolism. Integration analysis of the miRNA and mRNA expression profiles confirmed that eleven genes were differently regulated by four miRNAs. This is the first study that showed expression pattern and synergistical regulation of miRNA and mRNA in rat soleus of TS for up to 14 days.

  13. Metabolite sensing in eukaryotic mRNA biology

    PubMed Central

    Clingman, Carina C

    2016-01-01

    All living creatures change their gene expression program in response to nutrient availability and metabolic demands. Nutrients and metabolites can directly control transcription and activate second-messenger systems. More recent studies reveal that metabolites also affect post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Here, we review the increasing number of connections between metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic organisms. First, we present evidence that riboswitches, a common mechanism of metabolite sensing in bacteria, also function in eukaryotes. Next, we review an example of a double stranded RNA modifying enzyme that directly interacts with a metabolite, suggesting a link between RNA editing and metabolic state. Finally, we discuss work that shows some metabolic enzymes bind directly to RNA to affect mRNA stability or translation efficiency. These examples were discovered through gene-specific genetic, biochemical, and structural studies. A directed systems level approach will be necessary to determine whether they are anomalies of evolution or pioneer discoveries in what may be a broadly connected network of metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:23653333

  14. Hypotensive but not normotensive haemorrhage increases tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA in caudal midline medulla.

    PubMed

    Brown, Heidi J; Henderson, Luke A; Keay, Kevin A

    2006-05-08

    Severe blood loss triggers shock, a precipitous hypotension and bradycardia. The integrity of (i) neurons in the vasodepressor region of the caudal midline medulla and (ii) central 5-HT neurotransmission are critical for the expression of haemorrhagic shock. This study investigated whether progressive blood loss triggers altered synthesis of 5-HT in the vasodepressor region of the caudal midline medulla by measuring changes in relative expression levels of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TpH 2) mRNA, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of neuronal 5-HT. Hypotensive but not normotensive haemorrhage triggered a significant increase in TpH 2 mRNA in the vasodepressor region of the caudal midline medulla, identifying an important role for 5-HT-containing caudal midline medullary neurons in haemorrhagic shock.

  15. Genome-wide identification of Wig-1 mRNA targets by RIP-Seq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Cinzia; Huss, Mikael; Giacomello, Stefania; Xu, Li-Di; Bianchi, Julie; Eriksson, Sofi; Jerhammar, Fredrik; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Vilborg, Anna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lui, Weng-Onn; Wiman, Klas G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the regulation of gene expression through a variety of post-transcriptional mechanisms. The p53-induced RBP Wig-1 (Zmat3) binds RNA through its zinc finger domains and enhances stability of p53 and N-Myc mRNAs and decreases stability of FAS mRNA. To identify novel Wig-1-bound RNAs, we performed RNA-immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (RIP-Seq) in HCT116 and Saos-2 cells. We identified 286 Wig-1-bound mRNAs common between the two cell lines. Sequence analysis revealed that AU-rich elements (AREs) are highly enriched in the 3′UTR of these Wig-1-bound mRNAs. Network enrichment analysis showed that Wig-1 preferentially binds mRNAs involved in cell cycle regulation. Moreover, we identified a 2D Wig-1 binding motif in HIF1A mRNA. Our findings confirm that Wig-1 is an ARE-BP that regulates cell cycle-related processes and provide a novel view of how Wig-1 may bind mRNA through a putative structural motif. We also significantly extend the repertoire of Wig-1 target mRNAs. Since Wig-1 is a transcriptional target of the tumor suppressor p53, these results have implications for our understanding of p53-dependent stress responses and tumor suppression. PMID:26672765

  16. Induction of VEGFA mRNA translation by CoCl2 mediated by HuR

    PubMed Central

    Osera, Cecilia; Martindale, Jennifer L; Amadio, Marialaura; Kim, Jiyoung; Yang, Xiaoling; Moad, Christopher A; Indig, Fred E; Govoni, Stefano; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam; Pascale, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A is a master regulator of neovascularization and angiogenesis. VEGFA is potently induced by hypoxia and by pathological conditions including diabetic retinopathy and tumorigenesis. Fine-tuning of VEGFA expression by different stimuli is important for maintaining tissue vascularization and organ homeostasis. Here, we tested the effect of the hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on VEGFA expression in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. We found that CoCl2 increased the levels of VEGFA mRNA and VEGFA protein without affecting VEGFA mRNA stability. Biotin pulldown analysis to capture the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bound to VEGFA mRNA followed by mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the RBP HuR [human antigen R, a member of the embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV) family of proteins], interacts with VEGFA mRNA. VEGFA mRNA-tagging experiments showed that exposure to CoCl2 increases the interaction of HuR with VEGFA mRNA and promoted the colocalization of HuR and the distal part of the VEGFA 3′-untranslated region (UTR) in the cytoplasm. We propose that under hypoxia-like conditions, HuR enhances VEGFA mRNA translation. PMID:26325091

  17. Dynein light chain binding to a 3′-untranslated sequence mediates parathyroid hormone mRNA association with microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Eyal; Sela-Brown, Alin; Ringel, Israel; Kilav, Rachel; King, Stephen M.; Benashski, Sharon E.; Yisraeli, Joel K.; Silver, Justin; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2000-01-01

    The 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs binds proteins that determine mRNA stability and localization. The 3′-UTR of parathyroid hormone (PTH) mRNA specifically binds cytoplasmic proteins. We screened an expression library for proteins that bind the PTH mRNA 3′-UTR, and the sequence of 1 clone was identical to that of the dynein light chain LC8, a component of the dynein complexes that translocate cytoplasmic components along microtubules. Recombinant LC8 binds PTH mRNA 3′-UTR, as shown by RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We showed that PTH mRNA colocalizes with microtubules in the parathyroid gland, as well as with a purified microtubule preparation from calf brain, and that this association was mediated by LC8. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a dynein complex protein binding an mRNA. The dynein complex may be the motor that is responsible for transporting mRNAs to specific locations in the cytoplasm and for the consequent is asymmetric distribution of translated proteins in the cell. PMID:10683380

  18. Dietary copper can regulate the level of mRNA for dopamine B-hydroxylase in rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sabban, E.L.; Failla, M.L.; McMahon, A.; Seidel, K.E. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Recent studies have shown that Cu deficiency markedly alters the levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in several peripheral tissues of rodents. Conversion of DA to NE is mediated by dopamine B-hydroxylase (DBM). Here the authors examined the effect of dietary Cu deficiency on the levels of DA, NE and DBM mRNA in rat adrenal gland. Severe Cu deficiency was induced by feeding low Cu diet to dams beginning at 17d gestation and weaning pups to the same diet. At 7 wks of age rats fed {minus}Cu diet were characterized by depressed growth, low tissue Cu, enlarged hearts and moderate anemia. Concentrations of DA were higher in adrenals and hearts of {minus}Cu rats compared to +Cu controls. While cardiac level of NE in {minus}Cu rats were reduced to 17% that of controls, adrenal NE was unchanged by Cu deficiency. To investigate possible mechanisms responsible for the response of adrenal gland to Cu deficiency, RNA was isolated and the levels of DBH mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA were analyzed by Northern blots. Steady state levels of adrenal DBH mRNA was increased 2-3 fold in {minus}Cu rats, whereas TH mRNA were unchanged by dietary Cu status. Upon feeding the {minus}Cu rats the Cu adequate diet overnight, there was a further increase in DBH mRNA and a slight elevation of TH mRNA levels. The results indicate that dietary copper can markedly affect the level of DBH mRNA in rat adrenal gland.

  19. Enhanced translational efficiency of a novel transforming growth factor beta 3 mRNA in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arrick, B A; Grendell, R L; Griffin, L A

    1994-01-01

    The mRNA for transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) includes a long (1.1-kb) 5' noncoding region which exerts a potent inhibitory effect on translational efficiency. We now report that many human breast cancer cell lines (T47-D, SK-BR-3, ZR-75-1, and BT-474) express two mRNA species for TGF-beta 3: the 3.5-kb transcript previously described as the only TGF-beta 3 mRNA species in cells and a novel 2.6-kb transcript which lacks approximately 870 nucleotides from the 5' noncoding region. The 5' end of the shorter transcript was sequenced, establishing it to be a 5' truncation of the full-length TGF-beta 3 transcript. Estradiol decreased mRNA levels of both TGF-beta 3 mRNA transcripts to an equivalent degree in estrogen receptor-positive cells. In contrast, the synthetic progestin gestodene altered the relative abundance of the two transcripts, preferentially diminishing the expression of the 2.6-kb transcript. The potential for enhanced mRNA translation attributable to the shorter 5' noncoding region was evaluated by transfection of cells with chimeric plasmid constructs in which the transcription unit consisted of coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase downstream of the 5' noncoding sequence from TGF-beta 3. The translational efficiency of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-encoding mRNA containing the shorter 5' noncoding region of the 2.6-kb TGF-beta 3 transcript was approximately seven times greater than with the full-length 5' noncoding region of TGF-beta 3. Polysome analysis of TGF-beta 3 mRNA in SK-BR-3 cells supported the hypothesis that the 2.6-kb transcript was more actively engaged in translation. Images PMID:8264630

  20. The influence of eccentric exercise on mRNA expression of skeletal muscle regulators.

    PubMed

    Jensky, Nicole E; Sims, Jennifer K; Rice, Judd C; Dreyer, Hans C; Schroeder, E Todd

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate change in myostatin, follistatin, MyoD and SGT mRNA gene expression using eccentric exercise to study mechanisms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Young (28+/-5 years) and older (68+/-6 years) men participated in a bout of maximal single-leg eccentric knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60 degrees /s: six sets, 12-16 maximal eccentric repetitions. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were obtained from the dominant leg before exercise and 24 h after exercise. Paired t tests were used to compare change (pre versus post-exercise) for normalized gene expression in all variables. Independent t tests were performed to test group differences (young vs. older). A probability level of PmRNA expression in young subjects 24 h after eccentric exercise. Similarly, we did not observe significant change in myostatin (-3.83+/-8.8; P=0.23), follistatin (-2.66+/-5.2; P=0.17), MyoD (-0.13+/-3.1; P=0.90), or SGT (-1.6+/-3.5; P=0.19) mRNA expression in older subjects. Furthermore, the non-significant changes in mRNA expression were not different between young and older subjects, P>0.23 for all variables. Our data suggests that a single bout of maximal eccentric exercise does not alter myostatin, follistatin, MyoD or SGT mRNA gene expression in young or older subjects.

  1. ErbB3 mRNA leukocyte levels as a biomarker for major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, the identification of peripheral biomarkers that are associated with psychiatric diseases, such as Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), has become relevant because these biomarkers may improve the efficiency of the differential diagnosis process and indicate targets for new antidepressant drugs. Two recent candidate genes, ErbB3 and Fgfr1, are growth factors whose mRNA levels have been found to be altered in the leukocytes of patients that are affected by bipolar disorder in a depressive state. On this basis, the aim of the study was to determine if ErbB3 and Fgfr1 mRNA levels could be a biomarkers of MDD. Methods We measured by Real Time PCR ErbB3 and Fgfr1 mRNA expression levels in leukocytes of MDD patients compared with controls. Successively, to assess whether ErbB3 mRNA levels were influenced by previous antidepressant treatment we stratified our patients sample in two cohorts, comparing drug-naive versus drug-free patients. Moreover, we evaluated the levels of the transcript in MDD patients after 12 weeks of antidepressant treatment, and in prefrontal cortex of rats stressed and treated with an antidepressant drug of the same class. Results These results showed that ErbB3 but not Fgfr1 mRNA levels were reduced in leukocytes of MDD patients compared to healthy subjects. Furthermore, ErbB3 levels were not affected by antidepressant treatment in either human or animal models Conclusions Our data suggest that ErbB3 might be considered as a biomarker for MDD and that its deficit may underlie the pathopsysiology of the disease and is not a consequence of treatment. Moreover the study supports the usefulness of leukocytes as a peripheral system for identifying biomarkers in psychiatric diseases. PMID:22989054

  2. Low-level lasers and mRNA levels of reference genes used in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, A. F.; Machado, Y. L. R. C.; Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    Low-level lasers are widely used for the treatment of diseases and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. Reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is widely used to evaluate mRNA levels and output data from a target gene are commonly relative to a reference mRNA that cannot vary according to treatment. In this study, the level of reference genes from Escherichia coli exposed to red or infrared lasers at different fluences was evaluated. E. coli AB1157 cultures were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers, incubated (20 min, 37 °C), the total RNA was extracted, and cDNA synthesis was performed to evaluate mRNA levels from arcA, gyrA and rpoA genes by RT-qPCR. Melting curves and agarose gel electrophoresis were carried out to evaluate specific amplification. Data were analyzed by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. The melting curve and agarose gel electrophoresis showed specific amplification. Although mRNA levels from arcA, gyrA or rpoA genes presented no significant variations trough a traditional statistical analysis, Excel-based tools revealed that these reference genes are not suitable for E. coli cultures exposed to lasers. Our data showed that exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers at different fluences alter the mRNA levels from arcA, gyrA and rpoA in E. coli cells.

  3. Links between mRNA splicing, mRNA quality control, and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Fasken, Milo B.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the impairment of RNA binding proteins that play key roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has been linked to numerous neurological diseases. These RNA binding proteins perform critical mRNA processing steps in the nucleus, including splicing, polyadenylation, and export. In many cases, these RNA binding proteins are ubiquitously expressed raising key questions about why only brain function is impaired. Recently, mutations in the ZC3H14 gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, polyadenosine RNA binding protein, have been linked to a nonsyndromic form of autosomal recessive intellectual disability. Thus far, research on ZC3H14 and its Nab2 orthologs in budding yeast and Drosophila reveals that ZC3H14/Nab2 is important for mRNA processing and neuronal patterning. Two recent studies now provide evidence that ZC3H14/Nab2 may function in the quality control of mRNA splicing and export and could help to explain the molecular defects that cause neuronal dysfunction and lead to an inherited form of intellectual disability. These studies on ZC3H14/Nab2 reveal new clues to the puzzle of why loss of the ubiquitously expressed ZC3H14 protein specifically affects neurons. PMID:27868086

  4. hnRNP-Q1 represses nascent axon growth in cortical neurons by inhibiting Gap-43 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kathryn R.; McAninch, Damian S.; Stefanovic, Snezana; Xing, Lei; Allen, Megan; Li, Wenqi; Feng, Yue; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita; Bassell, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by mRNA-binding proteins is critical for neuronal development and function. hnRNP-Q1 is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA processing events, including translational repression. hnRNP-Q1 is highly expressed in brain tissue, suggesting a function in regulating genes critical for neuronal development. In this study, we have identified Growth-associated protein 43 (Gap-43) mRNA as a novel target of hnRNP-Q1 and have demonstrated that hnRNP-Q1 represses Gap-43 mRNA translation and consequently GAP-43 function. GAP-43 is a neuronal protein that regulates actin dynamics in growth cones and facilitates axonal growth. Previous studies have identified factors that regulate Gap-43 mRNA stability and localization, but it remains unclear whether Gap-43 mRNA translation is also regulated. Our results reveal that hnRNP-Q1 knockdown increased nascent axon length, total neurite length, and neurite number in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and enhanced Neuro2a cell process extension; these phenotypes were rescued by GAP-43 knockdown. Additionally, we have identified a G-quadruplex structure in the 5′ untranslated region of Gap-43 mRNA that directly interacts with hnRNP-Q1 as a means to inhibit Gap-43 mRNA translation. Therefore hnRNP-Q1–mediated repression of Gap-43 mRNA translation provides an additional mechanism for regulating GAP-43 expression and function and may be critical for neuronal development. PMID:26658614

  5. Second-Generation HSP90 Inhibitor Onalespib Blocks mRNA Splicing of Androgen Receptor Variant 7 in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Welti, Jonathan; Powers, Marissa V; Yuan, Wei; Smyth, Tomoko; Seed, George; Riisnaes, Ruth; Hedayat, Somaieh; Wang, Hannah; Crespo, Mateus; Nava Rodrigues, Daniel; Figueiredo, Ines; Miranda, Susana; Carreira, Suzanne; Lyons, John F; Sharp, Swee; Plymate, Stephen R; Attard, Gerhardt; Wallis, Nicola; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to available hormone therapies in prostate cancer has been associated with alternative splicing of androgen receptor (AR) and specifically, the expression of truncated and constitutively active AR variant 7 (AR-V7). The transcriptional activity of steroid receptors, including AR, is dependent on interactions with the HSP90 chaperone machinery, but it is unclear whether HSP90 modulates the activity or expression of AR variants. Here, we investigated the effects of HSP90 inhibition on AR-V7 in prostate cancer cell lines endogenously expressing this variant. We demonstrate that AR-V7 and full-length AR (AR-FL) were depleted upon inhibition of HSP90. However, the mechanisms underlying AR-V7 depletion differed from those for AR-FL. Whereas HSP90 inhibition destabilized AR-FL and induced its proteasomal degradation, AR-V7 protein exhibited higher stability than AR-FL and did not require HSP90 chaperone activity. Instead, HSP90 inhibition resulted in the reduction of AR-V7 mRNA levels but did not affect total AR transcript levels, indicating that HSP90 inhibition disrupted AR-V7 splicing. Bioinformatic analyses of transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing data confirmed that the second-generation HSP90 inhibitor onalespib altered the splicing of at least 557 genes in prostate cancer cells, including AR. These findings indicate that the effects of HSP90 inhibition on mRNA splicing may prove beneficial in prostate cancers expressing AR-V7, supporting further clinical investigation of HSP90 inhibitors in malignancies no longer responsive to androgen deprivation. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2731-42. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Database for mRNA Half-Life of 19 977 Genes Obtained by DNA Microarray Analysis of Pluripotent and Differentiating Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharova, Lioudmila V.; Sharov, Alexei A.; Nedorezov, Timur; Piao, Yulan; Shaik, Nabeebi; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of mRNA is one of the key processes that control the steady-state level of gene expression. However, the rate of mRNA decay for the majority of genes is not known. We successfully obtained the rate of mRNA decay for 19 977 non-redundant genes by microarray analysis of RNA samples obtained from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Median estimated half-life was 7.1 h and only <100 genes, including Prdm1, Myc, Gadd45 g, Foxa2, Hes5 and Trib1, showed half-life less than 1 h. In general, mRNA species with short half-life were enriched among genes with regulatory functions (transcription factors), whereas mRNA species with long half-life were enriched among genes related to metabolism and structure (extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton). The stability of mRNAs correlated more significantly with the structural features of genes than the function of genes: mRNA stability showed the most significant positive correlation with the number of exon junctions per open reading frame length, and negative correlation with the presence of PUF-binding motifs and AU-rich elements in 3′-untranslated region (UTR) and CpG di-nucleotides in the 5′-UTR. The mRNA decay rates presented in this report are the largest data set for mammals and the first for ES cells. PMID:19001483

  7. Regional induction of c-fos and heat shock protein-72 mRNA following fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Raghupathi, R.; Welsh, F.A.; Gennarelli, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the cellular response to traumatic brain injury, the expression of mRNA for c-fos and the 72-kDa heat shock protein (hsp72) was determined using in situ hybridization following lateral fluid-percussion injury (2.2-2.4 atm) in rat brain. At 2 h after injury, induction of c-fos mRNA was restricted to regions of the cortex surrounding the contusion area. An increase in c-fos mRNA, but not hsp72 mRNA, was observed bilaterally in the CA{sub 3} subfield of the hippocampus and the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and in the thalamus ipsilateral to the impact site. By 6 h, increased expression of c-fos mRNA was observed only in the corpus callosum on the impact side; hsp72 mRNA persisted in the deep cortical layers and upper layers of the subcortical white matter below the site of maximal injury. By 24 h, both c-fos and hsp72 mRNA had returned to control levels in all regions of the brain. These results demonstrate that lateral fluid-percussion brain injury triggers regionally and temporally specific expression of c-fos and hsp72 mRNA, which may be suggestive of differential neurochemical alterations in neurons and glia following experimental brain injury. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Differential regulation of amyloid-. beta. -protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-..beta..-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease.

  9. Expression of statherin mRNA and protein in nasal and vaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Koichi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Watanabe, Ken; Fujinami, Yoshihito; Yoshino, Mineo

    2011-11-01

    Nasal secretion has been regarded as one of the most difficult body fluids to identify and is especially difficult to discriminate from vaginal secretions and saliva. At present, few specific markers are known for nasal secretions. The aim of this study is to find a new approach for the identification of nasal secretions. We examined expression levels of statherin and histatin, peptides which are commonly found in saliva, in nasal and vaginal secretions by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Statherin mRNA was highly expressed in all nasal samples (dCt value=-1.49±1.10, n=8) and was detected even in 1-day-old 0.1-μL stains. However, the stability of mRNA in nasal stains was significantly (P<0.01) lower than in saliva. Low levels of statherin mRNA were detected in 4 of the 17 vaginal samples (dCt value=11.65-14.72). Histatin mRNA was not detected in any nasal or vaginal samples, although it was highly expressed in all saliva samples. ELISA assays with anti-statherin goat polyclonal antibody showed that statherin peptide was detected in all nasal and saliva samples even after dilution of more than 1000-fold. The statherin peptide was not detected in any vaginal samples, including samples that expressed low levels of statherin mRNA. The amount of statherin peptide in vaginal samples might be less than the limit of detection of this assay. In the present study, statherin was highly expressed in nasal secretions, but histatin was not. These markers may be useful for discriminating nasal secretions from vaginal secretions and saliva. However, the usefulness of these markers in practical forensic case samples has not yet been examined. Therefore, further research is required to establish the utility of these assays for identification of nasal secretions.

  10. Enhanced levels of scrapie responsive gene mRNA in BSE-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dandoy-Dron, F; Benboudjema, L; Guillo, F; Jaegly, A; Jasmin, C; Dormont, D; Tovey, M G; Dron, M

    2000-03-10

    The expression of the mRNA of nine scrapie responsive genes was analyzed in the brains of FVB/N mice infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The RNA transcripts of eight genes were overexpressed to a comparable extent in both BSE-infected and scrapie-infected mice, indicating a common series of pathogenic events in the two transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In contrast, the serine proteinase inhibitor spi 2, an analogue of the human alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene, was overexpressed to a greater extent in the brains of scrapie-infected animals than in animals infected with BSE, reflecting either an agent specific or a mouse strain specific response. The levels of spi 2 mRNA were increased during the course of scrapie prior to the onset of clinical signs of the disease and the increase reached 11 to 45 fold relative to uninfected controls in terminally ill mice. Spi 2, in common with four of the other scrapie responsive genes studied, is known to be associated with pro-inflammatory processes. These observations underline the importance of cell reactivity in TSE. In addition, scrg2 mRNA the level of which is enhanced in TSE-infected mouse brain, was identified as a previously unrecognized long transcript of the murine aldolase C gene. However, the level of the principal aldolase C mRNA is unaffected in TSE. The increased representation of the longer transcript in the late stage of the disease may reflect changes in mRNA processing and/or stability in reactive astrocytes or in damaged Purkinje cells.

  11. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  12. The effect of hypothermia on the expression of neurotrophin mRNA in the hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Boris-Möller, F; Kamme, F; Wieloch, T

    1998-12-10

    The expression of the mRNAs of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3) and the neurotrophin receptor, TrkB, was studied in the rat hippocampus by in situ hybridization following normothermic (37 degreesC) and protective hypothermic (33 degreesC) transient cerebral ischemia of 15 min duration. In the resistant dentate gyrus, normothermic ischemia transiently induced NGF mRNA at around 8 h of recovery, while the NT3 mRNA levels were depressed over at least a 24-h recovery period. The levels of BDNF and TrkB were transiently and markedly elevated with a maximal expression at 24 h of recovery. Intraischemic hypothermia reduced the induction of NGF mRNA, while the increase of BDNF mRNA expression occurred earlier during recovery, and the post-ischemic NT3 mRNA depression was not affected. Also, the expression of TrkB mRNA was enhanced, and occurred concomitantly with the elevation of BDNF mRNA. In contrast, there were no changes in neurotrophin and TrkB mRNA in the CA3 and CA1 regions. The expression of BDNF mRNA at 24 h after normothermic ischemia, was attenuated by intraischemic hypothermia. We conclude that, the expressions of NGF, BDNF, NT3 or TrkB mRNA in ischemia-sensitive hippocampal subregions are not increased by protective hypothermia. In contrast, hypothermia induces neurotrophin mRNA alterations in the ischemia-resistant dentate gyrus that may convey protection to sensitive regions.

  13. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  14. ACTH Action on Messenger RNA Stability Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Cherradi, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA stability has emerged as a critical control step in dynamic gene expression. This process occurs in response to modifications of the cellular environment, including hormonal variations, and regulates the expression of subsets of proteins whose levels need to be rapidly adjusted. Modulation of messenger RNA stability is usually mediated by stabilizing or destabilizing RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BP) that bind to the 3′-untranslated region regulatory motifs, such as AU-rich elements (AREs). Destabilizing ARE-binding proteins enhance the decay of their target transcripts by recruiting the mRNA decay machineries. Failure of such mechanisms, in particular misexpression of RNA-BP, has been linked to several human diseases. In the adrenal cortex, the expression and activity of mRNA stability regulatory proteins are still understudied. However, ACTH- or cAMP-elicited changes in the expression/phosphorylation status of the major mRNA-destabilizing protein TIS11b/BRF1 or in the subcellular localization of the stabilizing protein Human antigen R have been reported. They suggest that this level of regulation of gene expression is also important in endocrinology. PMID:28163695

  15. Flight crew health stabilization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flight crew health stabilization program was developed to minimize or eliminate the possibility of adverse alterations in the health of flight crews during immediate preflight, flight, and postflight periods. The elements of the program, which include clinical medicine, immunology, exposure prevention, and epidemiological surveillance, are discussed briefly. No crewmember illness was reported for the missions for which the program was in effect.

  16. Frameshift mutations in the v-src gene of avian sarcoma virus act in cis to specifically reduce v-src mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, S B; Stoltzfus, C M

    1994-01-01

    A portion of the avian sarcoma virus (ASV) primary RNA transcripts is alternatively spliced in chicken embryo fibroblast cells to two different messages, the src and env mRNAs. Frameshift mutations of the viral genome causing premature translation termination within the src gene result in a decreased steady-state level of the src mRNA. In marked contrast, frameshift mutations at various positions of the env gene do not decrease the level of the env mRNA. We show that the src gene product is not required in trans for splicing and accumulation of src mRNA. Conversely, the truncated Src proteins do not act negatively in trans to decrease specifically the levels of src mRNA. Taken together, these results indicate that the frameshift mutations act in cis to reduce src mRNA levels. A double mutant with a lesion in the src initiator AUG and a frameshift within the src gene demonstrated wild-type RNA levels, indicating that the src mRNA must be recognized as a translatable mRNA for the effect on src mRNA levels to occur. Our results indicate that the reduced levels do not result from decreased cytoplasmic stability of the mature src mRNA. We also show that the src gene frameshift mutations affect src mRNA levels when expressed from intronless src cDNA clones. We conclude that the reduction of src mRNA levels triggered by the presence of frameshift mutations within the src gene occurs while it is associated with the nucleus. Our data also strongly suggest that this occurs at a step of RNA processing or transport independent of RNA splicing. Images PMID:8114716

  17. Time-course of SKF-81297-induced increase in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons and decrease in GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA levels in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, in adult rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Soghomonian, J-J

    2008-06-26

    Striatal projection neurons use GABA as their neurotransmitter and express the rate-limiting synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the vesicular GABA transporter vGAT. The chronic systemic administration of an agonist of dopamine D1/D5-preferring receptors is known to alter GAD mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons in intact and dopamine-depleted rats. In the present study, the effects of a single or subchronic systemic administration of the dopamine D1/D5-preferring receptor agonist SKF-81297 on GAD65, GAD67, PPD and vGAT mRNA levels in the striatum and GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA levels in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, were measured in rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. After a single injection of SKF-81297, striatal GAD65 mRNA levels were significantly increased at 3 but not 72 h. In contrast, striatal GAD67 mRNA levels were increased and nigral alpha1 mRNA levels were decreased at 72 but not 3 h. Single cell analysis on double-labeled sections indicated that increased GAD or vGAT mRNA levels after acute SKF-81297 occurred in striatonigral neurons identified by their lack of preproenkephalin expression. Subchronic SKF-81297 induced significant increases in striatal GAD67, GAD65, preprodynorphin and vGAT mRNA levels and decreases in nigral alpha1 mRNA levels. In the striatum contralateral to the 6-OHDA lesion, subchronic but not acute SKF-81297 induced a significant increase in GAD65 mRNA levels. The other mRNA levels were not significantly altered. Finally, striatal GAD67 mRNA levels were negatively correlated with nigral alpha1 mRNA levels in the dopamine-depleted but not dopamine-intact side. The results suggest that different signaling pathways are involved in the modulation by dopamine D1/D5 receptors of GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons. They also suggest that the down-regulation of nigral GABA(A) receptors is linked to the increase in striatal GAD67 mRNA levels in the dopamine

  18. A poly(A) binding protein-specific sequence motif: MRTENGKSKGFGFVC binding to mRNA poly(A) and polynucleotides and its role on mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, H N; Halim, M N; Leavis, P C

    1994-06-01

    A consensus sequence (GKSKGFGFV) was recognized in all the sequenced poly(A) binding proteins. We synthesized a 15-amino acid peptide (corresponding to 354-368 in the yeast poly(A) binding protein) which includes the consensus sequence to test its binding affinity to different nucleotides, polynucleotides and mRNA with or without a poly(A) tail. Biochemical and biophysical studies revealed that the 15-amino acid peptide has a strong binding affinity to poly(A) alone or poly(A) attached at the 3' end of mRNA. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that the secondary structure of the 15-mer is consistent with that expected based on the structure of the native RNP domain. Furthermore, among the various mononucleotides performed in the present studies, ATP was preferentially found to bind to the 15-mer. To further examine the biological significance of the binding of the 15-mer to the poly(A) tail of mRNA, in vitro translation of the mRNA poly(A)+ in the presence of the 15-mer drastically increased globin synthesis by almost 2-fold, while translation of the deadenylated mRNA in the presence of the 15-mer almost did not alter the rate of incorporation of radiolabeled leucine into globin.

  19. Lifelong ethanol consumption and brain regional GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Sarviharju, Maija; Hyytiä, Petri; Hervonen, Antti; Jaatinen, Pia; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R

    2006-11-01

    Brain regional gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit mRNA expression was studied in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol) rats after moderate ethanol drinking for up to 2 years of age. In situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes specific for 13 different subunits was used with coronal cryostat sections of the brains. Selective alterations were observed by ethanol exposure and/or aging in signals for several subunits. Most interestingly, the putative highly ethanol-sensitive alpha4 and beta3 subunit mRNAs were significantly decreased in several brain regions. The age-related alterations in alpha4 subunit expression were parallel to those caused by lifelong ethanol drinking, whereas aging had no significant effect on beta3 subunit expression. The results suggest that prolonged ethanol consumption leading to blood concentrations of about 10 mM may downregulate the mRNA expression of selected GABAA receptor subunits and that aging might have partly similar effects.

  20. Arginine methylation of G3BP1 in response to Wnt3a regulates β-catenin mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Bikkavilli, Rama Kamesh; Malbon, Craig C.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for normal mammalian development. Wnt3a activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through stabilization of β-catenin; a process in which the phosphoprotein Dishevelled figures prominently. Protein arginine methylation in signaling complexes containing Dishevelled was investigated. Mass spectrometry of a prominent arginine-methylated, Dishevelled-associated protein identified the Ras GTPase activating protein-binding protein 1 G3BP1. Stimulation of totipotent mouse embryonic F9 cells with Wnt3a provoked increased methylation of G3BP1. We show that G3BP1 is a novel Ctnnb1 mRNA binding protein. Methylation of G3BP1 constitutes a molecular switch that regulates Ctnnb1 mRNA in response to Wnt3a. Thus, the protein arginine methylation that targets G3BP1 acts as a novel regulator of Ctnnb1 mRNA. PMID:21652632

  1. Altered regulation of the Spry2/Dyrk1A/PP2A triad by homocysteine impairs neural progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rabaneda, Luis G; Geribaldi-Doldán, Noelia; Murillo-Carretero, Maribel; Carrasco, Manuel; Martínez-Salas, José M; Verástegui, Cristina; Castro, Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia reduces neurogenesis in the adult mouse brain. Homocysteine (Hcy) inhibits postnatal neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation by specifically impairing the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-Erk1/2-cyclin E signaling pathway. We demonstrate herein that the inhibition of FGFR-dependent NPC proliferation induced by Hcy is mediated by its capacity to alter the cellular methylation potential. Our results show that this alteration modified the expression pattern and activity of Sprouty2 (Spry2), a negative regulator of the above mentioned pathway. Both elevated concentrations of Hcy and methyltransferase activity inhibition induced Spry2 promoter demethylation in NPC cultures leading to a sustained upregulation of the expression of Spry2 mRNA and protein. In addition, protein levels of two kinases responsible for Spry2 activation/deactivation were altered by Hcy: Spry2 kinase Dyrk1A levels diminished while Spry2 phosphatase PP2A increased, leading to changes in the phosphorylation pattern, activity and stability of Spry2. In conclusion, Hcy inhibits NPC proliferation by indirect mechanisms involving alterations in DNA methylation, gene expression, and Spry2 function, causing FGFR signaling impairment.

  2. Probing dimensionality beyond the linear sequence of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-05-01

    mRNA is a nexus entity between DNA and translating ribosomes. Recent developments in deep sequencing technologies coupled with structural probing have revealed new insights beyond the classic role of mRNA and place it more centrally as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation, cellular localization, and mRNA degradation. Here, we highlight emerging approaches to probe mRNA secondary structure on a global transcriptome-wide level and compare their potential and resolution. Combined approaches deliver a richer and more complex picture. While our understanding on the effect of secondary structure for various cellular processes is quite advanced, the next challenge is to unravel more complex mRNA architectures and tertiary interactions.

  3. Dexamethasone increases growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor mRNA levels in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, M; Sato, M; Matsubara, S; Wada, Y; Takahara, J

    1996-06-01

    To examine the effects of glucocorticoid (GC) on growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor gene expression, a highly-sensitive and quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was used in this study. Rat anterior pituitary cells were isolated and cultured for 4 days. The cultured cells were treated with dexamethasone for 2, 6, and 24 h. GRH receptor mRNA levels were determined by competitive RT-PCR using a recombinant RNA as the competitor. Dexamethasone significantly increased GRH receptor mRNA levels at 5 nM after 6- and 24 h-incubations, and the maximal effect was found at 25 nM. The GC receptor-specific antagonist, RU 38486 completely eliminated the dexamethasone-induced enhancement of GRH receptor mRNA levels. Dexamethasone did not alter the mRNA levels of beta-actin and prolactin at 5 nM for 24 h, whereas GH mRNA levels were significantly increased by the same treatment. The GH response to GRH was significantly enhanced by the 24-h incubation with 5 nM dexamethasone. These findings suggest that GC stimulates GRH receptor gene expression through the ligand-activated GC receptors in the rat somatotrophs. The direct effects of GC on the GRH receptor gene could explain the enhancement of GRH-induced GH secretion.

  4. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  5. Targeted mRNA oxidation regulates sunflower seed dormancy alleviation during dry after-ripening.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Jérémie; Langlade, Nicolas; Vincourt, Patrick; Arribat, Sandrine; Balzergue, Sandrine; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Bailly, Christophe

    2011-06-01

    After-ripening is the mechanism by which dormant seeds become nondormant during their dry storage after harvest. The absence of free water in mature seeds does not allow detectable metabolism; thus, the processes associated with dormancy release under these conditions are largely unknown. We show here that sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seed alleviation of dormancy during after-ripening is associated with mRNA oxidation and that this oxidation is prevented when seeds are maintained dormant. In vitro approaches demonstrate that mRNA oxidation results in artifacts in cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphim analysis and alters protein translation. The oxidation of transcripts is not random but selective, and, using microarrays, we identified 24 stored mRNAs that became highly oxidized during after-ripening. Oxidized transcripts mainly correspond to genes involved in responses to stress and in cell signaling. Among them, protein phosphatase 2C PPH1, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1, and phenyl ammonia lyase 1 were identified. We propose that targeted mRNA oxidation during dry after-ripening of dormant seeds could be a process that governs cell signaling toward germination in the early steps of seed imbibition.

  6. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1.

    PubMed

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem-loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3' splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing.

  7. Total RNA-seq to identify pharmacological effects on specific stages of mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Sarah A; Snavely, Andrew; Landry, Heather M; Churchman, L Stirling; Gray, Jesse M; Springer, Michael

    2017-03-06

    Pharmacological perturbation is a powerful tool for understanding mRNA synthesis, but identification of the specific steps of this multi-step process that are targeted by small molecules remains challenging. Here we applied strand-specific total RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify and distinguish specific pharmacological effects on transcription and pre-mRNA processing in human cells. We found unexpectedly that the natural product isoginkgetin, previously described as a splicing inhibitor, inhibits transcription elongation. Compared to well-characterized elongation inhibitors that target CDK9, isoginkgetin caused RNA polymerase accumulation within a broader promoter-proximal band, indicating that elongation inhibition by isoginkgetin occurs after release from promoter-proximal pause. RNA-seq distinguished isoginkgetin and CDK9 inhibitors from topoisomerase I inhibition, which alters elongation across gene bodies. We were able to detect these and other specific defects in mRNA synthesis at low sequencing depth using simple metagene-based metrics. These metrics now enable total-RNA-seq-based screening for high-throughput identification of pharmacological effects on individual stages of mRNA synthesis.

  8. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  9. Stem-loop RNA labeling can affect nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Stephanie; Sidler, Corinne L; Azzalin, Claus M; Weis, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    The binding of sequence-specific RNA-interacting proteins, such as the bacteriophage MS2 or PP7 coat proteins, to their corresponding target sequences has been extremely useful and widely used to visualize single mRNAs in vivo. However, introduction of MS2 stem-loops into yeast mRNAs has recently been shown to lead to the accumulation of RNA fragments, suggesting that the loops impair mRNA decay. This result was questioned, because fragment occurrence was mainly assessed using ensemble methods, and their cellular localization and its implications had not been addressed on a single transcript level. Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of either MS2 stem-loops (MS2SL) or PP7 stem-loops (PP7SL) can affect the processing and subcellular localization of mRNA. We use single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to determine the localization of three independent mRNAs tagged with the stem-loop labeling systems in glucose-rich and glucose starvation conditions. Transcripts containing MS2SL or PP7SL display aberrant localization in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. These defects are most prominent in glucose starvation conditions, with nuclear mRNA processing being altered and stem-loop fragments abnormally enriching in processing bodies (PBs). The mislocalization of SL-containing RNAs is independent of the presence of the MS2 or PP7 coat protein (MCP or PCP).

  10. Cytochalasin releases mRNA from the cytoskeletal framework and inhibits protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ornelles, D A; Fey, E G; Penman, S

    1986-01-01

    Cytochalasin D was shown to be a reversible inhibitor of protein synthesis in HeLa cells. The inhibition was detectable at drug levels typically used to perturb cell structure and increased in a dose-dependent manner. The drug also released mRNA from the cytoskeletal framework in direct proportion to the inhibition of protein synthesis. The released mRNA was unaltered in its translatability as measured in vitro but was no longer translated in the cytochalasin-treated HeLa cells. The residual protein synthesis occurred on polyribosomes that were reduced in amount but displayed a normal sedimentation distribution. The results support the hypothesis that mRNA binding to the cytoskeletal framework is necessary although not sufficient for translation. Analysis of the cytoskeletal framework, which binds the polyribosomes, revealed no alterations in composition or amount of protein as a result of treatment with cytochalasin D. Electron microscopy with embedment-free sections shows the framework in great detail. The micrographs revealed the profound reorganization effected by the drug but did not indicate substantial disaggregation of the cytoskeletal elements. Images PMID:3785175

  11. Icaritin Inhibits Collagen Degradation-Related Factors and Facilitates Collagen Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions: A Potential Action for Plaque Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong-Kang; Li, Jie; Yan, De-Xin; Leung, Wing-Nang; Zhang, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Most acute coronary syndromes result from rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The collagen content of plaques may critically affect plaque stability. This study tested whether Icaritin (ICT), an intestinal metabolite of Epimedium-derived flavonoids, could alter the collagen synthesis/degradation balance in atherosclerotic lesions. Rabbits were fed with an atherogenic diet for four months. Oral administration of ICT (10 mg·kg−1·day−1) was started after two months of an atherogenic diet and lasted for two months. The collagen degradation-related parameters, including macrophages accumulation, content and activity of interstitial collagenase-1 (MMP-1), and the collagen synthesis-related parameters, including amount and distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and collagen mRNA/protein levels, were evaluated in the aorta. ICT reduced plasma lipid levels, inhibited macrophage accumulation, lowered MMP-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed proteolytic activity of pro-MMP-1 and MMP-1 in the aorta. ICT changed the distribution of the SMCs towards the fibrous cap of lesions without increasing the amount of SMCs. Higher collagen protein content in lesions and aorta homogenates was observed with ICT treatment compared with the atherogenic diet only, without altered collagen mRNA level. These results suggest that ICT could inhibit the collagen degradation-related factors and facilitate collagen accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions, indicating a new potential of ICT in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:26828485

  12. Icaritin Inhibits Collagen Degradation-Related Factors and Facilitates Collagen Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions: A Potential Action for Plaque Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-Kang; Li, Jie; Yan, De-Xin; Leung, Wing-Nang; Zhang, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-28

    Most acute coronary syndromes result from rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The collagen content of plaques may critically affect plaque stability. This study tested whether Icaritin (ICT), an intestinal metabolite of Epimedium-derived flavonoids, could alter the collagen synthesis/degradation balance in atherosclerotic lesions. Rabbits were fed with an atherogenic diet for four months. Oral administration of ICT (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was started after two months of an atherogenic diet and lasted for two months. The collagen degradation-related parameters, including macrophages accumulation, content and activity of interstitial collagenase-1 (MMP-1), and the collagen synthesis-related parameters, including amount and distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and collagen mRNA/protein levels, were evaluated in the aorta. ICT reduced plasma lipid levels, inhibited macrophage accumulation, lowered MMP-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed proteolytic activity of pro-MMP-1 and MMP-1 in the aorta. ICT changed the distribution of the SMCs towards the fibrous cap of lesions without increasing the amount of SMCs. Higher collagen protein content in lesions and aorta homogenates was observed with ICT treatment compared with the atherogenic diet only, without altered collagen mRNA level. These results suggest that ICT could inhibit the collagen degradation-related factors and facilitate collagen accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions, indicating a new potential of ICT in atherosclerotic plaques.

  13. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  14. Increased mRNA Levels of TCF7L2 and MYC of the Wnt Pathway in Tg-ArcSwe Mice and Alzheimer's Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Elin S.; Wang, Yijing; Skoglund, Lena; Hansson, Anita C.; Ubaldi, Massimo; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Mielke, Matthew; Hyman, Bradley T.; Heilig, Markus; Lannfelt, Lars; Nilsson, Lars N. G.; Ingelsson, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Several components in the Wnt pathway, including β-catenin and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta, have been implied in AD pathogenesis. Here, mRNA brain levels from five-month-old tg-ArcSwe and nontransgenic mice were compared using Affymetrix microarray analysis. With surprisingly small overall changes, Wnt signaling was the most affected pathway with altered expression of nine genes in tg-ArcSwe mice. When analyzing mRNA levels of these genes in human brain, transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) and v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC), were increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (P < .05). Furthermore, no clear differences in TCF7L2 and MYC mRNA were found in brains with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, suggesting that altered regulation of these Wnt-related genes could be specific to AD. Finally, mRNA levels of three neurogenesis markers were analyzed. Increased mRNA levels of dihydropyrimidinase-like 3 were observed in AD brain, suggesting that altered Wnt pathway regulation may signify synaptic rearrangement or neurogenesis. PMID:21234373

  15. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  16. CDKN2A (p16) mRNA decreased expression is a marker of poor prognosis in malignant high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Sibin, M K; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Narasingarao, K V L; Lavanya, Ch; Chetan, G K

    2015-09-01

    Human high-grade glioma is heterogeneous in nature based on pathological and genetic profiling. Various tumour suppressor gene alterations are considered as prognostic markers in high-grade glioma. Gene expression of CDKN2A (p16) is used in various cancers as a prognostic biomarker along with methylation and deletion status of this gene. Expression levels of p16 mRNA were not studied as a biomarker in gliomas before. In this study, we have performed mRNA quantification analysis on 48 high-grade glioma tissues and checked for a possible prognostic role. The decreased expression of p16 mRNA in majority of the tumour tissues (57.1 %) was observed when compared to control tissues (P = 0.02). mRNA expression level was correlated with clinical variables also. p16 deletion status and BMI1 mRNA expression were also considered for comparison. p16 mRNA was negatively correlated with the BMI1 mRNA (P = <0.0001) but not with p16 deletion. p16 mRNA expression, midline shift in MRI and tumour type were able to predict patient survival in overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). p16 mRNA could independently predict prognosis of OS (P = 0.0146) and PFS (P = 0.0305) in multivariate analysis. We have shown that p16 mRNA expression can act as an independent prognostic biomarker in high-grade glioma.

  17. Heart failure alters matrix metalloproteinase gene expression and activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Dariolli, Rafael; Justulin Junior, Luis Antonio; Sugizaki, Mário Mateus; Politi Okoshi, Marina; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Dal Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2006-12-01

    Heart failure is associated with a skeletal muscle myopathy with cellular and extracellular alterations. The hypothesis of this investigation is that extracellular changes may be associated with enhanced mRNA expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). We examined MMP mRNA expression and MMP activity in Soleus (SOL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and diaphragm (DIA) muscles of young Wistar rat with monocrotaline-induced heart failure. Rats injected with saline served as age-matched controls. MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA contents were determined by RT-PCR and MMP activity by electrophoresis in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels in the presence of SDS under non-reducing conditions. Heart failure increased MMP9 mRNA expression and activity in SOL, EDL and DIA and MMP2 mRNA expression in DIA. These results suggest that MMP changes may contribute to the skeletal muscle myopathy during heart failure.

  18. Reduction of AUF1-mediated follistatin mRNA decay during glucose starvation protects cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangwei; Dong, Haojie; Lin, Chen; Sheng, Jinghao; Zhang, Fan; Su, Jinfeng; Xu, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Follistatin (FST) performs several vital functions in the cells, including protection from apoptosis during stress. The expression of FST is up-regulated in response to glucose deprivation by an unknown mechanism. We herein showed that the induction of FST by glucose deprivation was due to an increase in the half-life of its mRNA. We further identified an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3'UTR of FST mRNA that mediated its decay. The expression of FST was elevated after knocking down AUF1 and reduced when AUF1 was further expressed. In vitro binding assays and RNA pull-down assays revealed that AUF1 interacted with FST mRNA directly via its ARE. During glucose deprivation, a majority of AUF1 shuttled from cytoplasm to nucleus, resulting in dissociation of AUF1 from FST mRNA and thus stabilization of FST mRNA. Finally, knockdown of AUF1 decreased whereas overexpression of AUF1 increased glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis. The apoptosis promoting effect of AUF1 was eliminated in FST expressing cells. Collectively, this study provided evidence that AUF1 is a negative regulator of FST expression and participates in the regulation of cell survival under glucose deprivation.

  19. Strategic Stability Through the Strategic Defense Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-09

    role of the Strategic Defense Initiative research program will play in current and future nuclear stability issues. It addresses the historical ...Defense Initiative,.research program will play in current and future nuclear stability issues. It addresses the historical policies that lead to the...approach to stability, marked a historic moment. The question to consider from his speech is whether technological breakthroughs alter our earlier

  20. Viral and Cellular mRNA Translation in Coronavirus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, K.; Lokugamage, K.G.; Makino, S.

    2017-01-01

    Coronaviruses have large positive-strand RNA genomes that are 5′ capped and 3′ polyadenylated. The 5′-terminal two-thirds of the genome contain two open reading frames (ORFs), 1a and 1b, that together make up the viral replicase gene and encode two large polyproteins that are processed by viral proteases into 15–16 nonstructural proteins, most of them being involved in viral RNA synthesis. ORFs located in the 3′-terminal one-third of the genome encode structural and accessory proteins and are expressed from a set of 5′ leader-containing subgenomic mRNAs that are synthesized by a process called discontinuous transcription. Coronavirus protein synthesis not only involves cap-dependent translation mechanisms but also employs regulatory mechanisms, such as ribosomal frameshifting. Coronavirus replication is known to affect cellular translation, involving activation of stress-induced signaling pathways, and employing viral proteins that affect cellular mRNA translation and RNA stability. This chapter describes our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in coronavirus mRNA translation and changes in host mRNA translation observed in coronavirus-infected cells. PMID:27712623

  1. Viral and Cellular mRNA Translation in Coronavirus-Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, K; Lokugamage, K G; Makino, S

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses have large positive-strand RNA genomes that are 5' capped and 3' polyadenylated. The 5'-terminal two-thirds of the genome contain two open reading frames (ORFs), 1a and 1b, that together make up the viral replicase gene and encode two large polyproteins that are processed by viral proteases into 15-16 nonstructural proteins, most of them being involved in viral RNA synthesis. ORFs located in the 3'-terminal one-third of the genome encode structural and accessory proteins and are expressed from a set of 5' leader-containing subgenomic mRNAs that are synthesized by a process called discontinuous transcription. Coronavirus protein synthesis not only involves cap-dependent translation mechanisms but also employs regulatory mechanisms, such as ribosomal frameshifting. Coronavirus replication is known to affect cellular translation, involving activation of stress-induced signaling pathways, and employing viral proteins that affect cellular mRNA translation and RNA stability. This chapter describes our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in coronavirus mRNA translation and changes in host mRNA translation observed in coronavirus-infected cells.

  2. mRNA changes in nucleus accumbens related to methamphetamine addiction in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li; Li, Jiaqi; Dong, Nan; Guan, Fanglin; Liu, Yufeng; Ma, Dongliang; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Chen, Teng

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that elicits aberrant changes in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the nucleus accumbens of mice, indicating a potential role of METH in post-transcriptional regulations. To decipher the potential consequences of these post-transcriptional regulations in response to METH, we performed strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-Seq) to identify alterations in mRNA expression and their alternative splicing in the nucleus accumbens of mice following exposure to METH. METH-mediated changes in mRNAs were analyzed and correlated with previously reported changes in non-coding RNAs (miRNAs and lncRNAs) to determine the potential functions of these mRNA changes observed here and how non-coding RNAs are involved. A total of 2171 mRNAs were differentially expressed in response to METH with functions involved in synaptic plasticity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and immune response. 309 and 589 of these mRNAs are potential targets of miRNAs and lncRNAs respectively. In addition, METH treatment decreases mRNA alternative splicing, and there are 818 METH-specific events not observed in saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that METH-mediated addiction could be attributed by changes in miRNAs and lncRNAs and consequently, changes in mRNA alternative splicing and expression. In conclusion, our study reported a methamphetamine-modified nucleus accumbens transcriptome and provided non-coding RNA-mRNA interaction networks possibly involved in METH addiction.

  3. Retargeting a Dual-Acting sRNA for Multiple mRNA Transcript Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lahiry, Ashwin; Stimple, Samuel D; Wood, David W; Lease, Richard A

    2017-01-24

    Multitargeting small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) represent a potentially useful tool for metabolic engineering applications. Natural multitargeting sRNAs govern bacterial gene expression by binding to the translation initiation regions of protein-coding mRNAs through base pairing. We designed an Escherichia coli based genetic system to create and assay dual-acting retargeted-sRNA variants. The variants can be assayed for coordinate translational regulation of two alternate mRNA leaders fused to independent reporter genes. Accordingly, we began with the well-characterized E. coli native DsrA sRNA. The merits of using DsrA include its well-characterized separation of function into two independently folded stem-loop domains, wherein alterations at one stem do not necessarily abolish activity at the other stem. Expression of the sRNA and each reporter mRNA was independently controlled by small inducer molecules, allowing precise quantification of the regulatory effects of each sRNA:mRNA interaction in vivo with a microtiter plate assay. Using this system, we semirationally designed DsrA variants screened in E. coli for their ability to regulate key mRNA leader sequences from the Clostridium acetobutylicum n-butanol synthesis pathway. To coordinate intervention at two points in a metabolic pathway, we created bifunctional sRNA prototypes by combining sequences from two singly retargeted DsrA variants. This approach constitutes a platform for designing sRNAs to specifically target arbitrary mRNA transcript sequences, and thus provides a generalizable tool for retargeting and characterizing multitarget sRNAs for metabolic engineering.

  4. mRNA changes in nucleus accumbens related to methamphetamine addiction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Li, Jiaqi; Dong, Nan; Guan, Fanglin; Liu, Yufeng; Ma, Dongliang; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Chen, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that elicits aberrant changes in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the nucleus accumbens of mice, indicating a potential role of METH in post-transcriptional regulations. To decipher the potential consequences of these post-transcriptional regulations in response to METH, we performed strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-Seq) to identify alterations in mRNA expression and their alternative splicing in the nucleus accumbens of mice following exposure to METH. METH-mediated changes in mRNAs were analyzed and correlated with previously reported changes in non-coding RNAs (miRNAs and lncRNAs) to determine the potential functions of these mRNA changes observed here and how non-coding RNAs are involved. A total of 2171 mRNAs were differentially expressed in response to METH with functions involved in synaptic plasticity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and immune response. 309 and 589 of these mRNAs are potential targets of miRNAs and lncRNAs respectively. In addition, METH treatment decreases mRNA alternative splicing, and there are 818 METH-specific events not observed in saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that METH-mediated addiction could be attributed by changes in miRNAs and lncRNAs and consequently, changes in mRNA alternative splicing and expression. In conclusion, our study reported a methamphetamine-modified nucleus accumbens transcriptome and provided non-coding RNA-mRNA interaction networks possibly involved in METH addiction. PMID:27869204

  5. mRNA changes in nucleus accumbens related to methamphetamine addiction in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Li, Jiaqi; Dong, Nan; Guan, Fanglin; Liu, Yufeng; Ma, Dongliang; Goh, Eyleen L K; Chen, Teng

    2016-11-21

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that elicits aberrant changes in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the nucleus accumbens of mice, indicating a potential role of METH in post-transcriptional regulations. To decipher the potential consequences of these post-transcriptional regulations in response to METH, we performed strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-Seq) to identify alterations in mRNA expression and their alternative splicing in the nucleus accumbens of mice following exposure to METH. METH-mediated changes in mRNAs were analyzed and correlated with previously reported changes in non-coding RNAs (miRNAs and lncRNAs) to determine the potential functions of these mRNA changes observed here and how non-coding RNAs are involved. A total of 2171 mRNAs were differentially expressed in response to METH with functions involved in synaptic plasticity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and immune response. 309 and 589 of these mRNAs are potential targets of miRNAs and lncRNAs respectively. In addition, METH treatment decreases mRNA alternative splicing, and there are 818 METH-specific events not observed in saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that METH-mediated addiction could be attributed by changes in miRNAs and lncRNAs and consequently, changes in mRNA alternative splicing and expression. In conclusion, our study reported a methamphetamine-modified nucleus accumbens transcriptome and provided non-coding RNA-mRNA interaction networks possibly involved in METH addiction.

  6. Zinc transporter mRNA expression in the RWPE-1 human prostate epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Amy L; Somji, Seema; Sens, Mary Ann; Sens, Donald A; Garrett, Scott H

    2008-08-01

    The human prostate gland undergoes a prominent alteration in Zn+2 homeostasis during the development of prostate cancer. The goal of the present study was to determine if the immortalized human prostate cell line (RWPE-1) could serve as a model system to study the role of zinc in prostate cancer. The study examined the expression of mRNA for 19 members of the zinc transporter gene family in normal prostate tissue, the prostate RWPE-1 cell line, and the LNCaP, DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. The study demonstrated that the expression of the 19 zinc transporters was similar between the RWPE-1 cell line and the in situ prostate gland. Of the 19 zinc transporters, only 5 had levels that were different between the RWPE-1 cells and the tissue samples; all five being increased (ZnT-6, Zip-1, Zip-3A, Zip-10, and Zip-14). The response of the 19 transporters was also determined when the cell lines were exposed to 75 microM Zn+2 for 24 h. It was shown for the RWPE-1 cells that only 5 transporters responded to Zn+2 with mRNA for ZnT-1 and ZnT-2 being increased while mRNA for ZnT-7, Zip-7 and Zip-10 transporters were decreased. It was shown for the LNCaP, DU-145 and PC-3 cells that Zn+2 had no effect on the mRNA levels of all 19 transporters except for an induction of ZnT-1 in PC-3 cells. Overall, the study suggests that the RWPE-1 cells could be a valuable model for the study of the zinc transporter gene family in the prostate.

  7. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joseph R; Cole, John A; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A

    2015-12-29

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript's half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories.

  8. HLA-A*68020103 shows an eight nucleotides deletion within intron 2 but has normal mRNA splicing and serological recognition.

    PubMed

    Balas, A; Sánchez-García, F; Bustamante, L; García-Sánchez, F; Vicario, J L

    2007-09-01

    A novel A*68020103 allele was completely characterized by sequencing in a Spanish bone marrow donor. A*68020103 has an eight nucleotides deletion at the 5'-end of intron 2, when compared with other A*6802 alleles. This alteration does not affect either its mRNA splicing process or serological detection.

  9. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay modulates immune receptor levels to regulate plant antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Gloggnitzer, Jiradet; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Srinivasan, Arunkumar; Kusenda, Branislav; Riehs, Nina; Stampfl, Hansjörg; Bautor, Jaqueline; Dekrout, Bettina; Jonak, Claudia; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Parker, Jane E; Riha, Karel

    2014-09-10

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved eukaryotic RNA surveillance mechanism that degrades aberrant mRNAs. NMD impairment in Arabidopsis is linked to constitutive immune response activation and enhanced antibacterial resistance, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that NMD contributes to innate immunity in Arabidopsis by controlling the turnover of numerous TIR domain-containing, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (TNL) immune receptor-encoding mRNAs. Autoimmunity resulting from NMD impairment depends on TNL signaling pathway components and can be triggered through deregulation of a single TNL gene, RPS6. Bacterial infection of plants causes host-programmed inhibition of NMD, leading to stabilization of NMD-regulated TNL transcripts. Conversely, constitutive NMD activity prevents TNL stabilization and impairs plant defense, demonstrating that host-regulated NMD contributes to disease resistance. Thus, NMD shapes plant innate immunity by controlling the threshold for activation of TNL resistance pathways.

  10. Effects of repeated tianeptine treatment on CRF mRNA expression in non-stressed and chronic mild stress-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Park, Sang-Ha; Choi, Song-Hyen; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Lee, Kuem-Ju; Kang, Seung Woo; Lee, Min-Soo; Choi, Sang-Hyun; Chun, Boe-Gwun; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2006-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that dysregulation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) may play a role in depression and that this dysregulation may be corrected by antidepressant drug treatment. Here, we examined whether chronic mild stress (CMS) alters CRF mRNA levels in stress-related brain areas including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), and whether repeated tianeptine treatment can attenuate CMS-induced changes in CRF mRNA levels. Male rats were exposed to CMS for 19 days, and control animals were subjected to brief handling. Both groups were injected daily with tianeptine or saline. CMS significantly increased CRF mRNA levels in the dorsal BNST (dBNST), but not in other areas. Repeated tianeptine treatment prevented the CMS-induced increase in CRF mRNA levels in the dBNST, and reduced CRF mRNA levels in dBNST in non-stressed controls. Moreover, repeated tianeptine treatment significantly decreased CRF mRNA levels in the ventral BNST and CeA of non-stressed controls as well as CMS-exposed rats. These results show that CMS induces a rather selective increase of CRF mRNA in the dBNST. In addition, these results suggest that repeated tianeptine treatment diminishes the basal activity of CRF neurons and reduces their sensitivity to stress.

  11. Nonsense codons can reduce the abundance of nuclear mRNA without affecting the abundance of pre-mRNA or the half-life of cytoplasmic mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J; Maquat, L E

    1993-01-01

    The abundance of the mRNA for human triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is decreased to approximately 20% of normal by frameshift and nonsense mutations that cause translation to terminate at a nonsense codon within the first three-fourths of the reading frame. Results of previous studies inhibiting RNA synthesis with actinomycin D suggested that the decrease is not attributable to an increased rate of cytoplasmic mRNA decay. However, the step in TPI RNA metabolism that is altered was not defined, and the use of actinomycin D, in affecting all polymerase II-transcribed genes, could result in artifactual conclusions. In data presented here, the nonsense codon-mediated reduction in the level of TPI mRNA is shown to be characteristic of both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of the cell, indicating that the altered metabolic step is nucleus associated. Neither aberrancies in gene transcription nor aberrancies in RNA splicing appear to contribute to the reduction since there were no accompanying changes in the amount of nuclear run-on transcription, the level of any of the six introns in TPI pre-mRNA, or the size of processed mRNA in the nucleus. Deletion of all splice sites that reside downstream of a nonsense codon does not abrogate the reduction, indicating that the reduction takes place independently of the splicing of a downstream intron. Experiments that placed TPI gene expression under the control of the human c-fos promoter, which can be transiently activated by the addition of serum to serum-deprived cells, verified that there is no detectable effect of a nonsense codon on the turnover of cytoplasmic mRNA. Images PMID:8441420

  12. Linking gene regulation to mRNA production and export.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana; Hurt, Ed

    2011-06-01

    Regulation of gene expression can occur at many different levels. One important step in the gene expression process is the transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In recent years, studies have described how nuclear mRNA export depends on the steps preceding and following transport through nuclear pore complexes. These include gene activation, transcription, mRNA processing and mRNP assembly and disassembly. In this review, we summarise recent insights into the links between these steps in the gene expression cascade.

  13. Identification of a quality-control mechanism for mRNA 5'-end capping.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xinfu; Xiang, Song; Oh, Chanseok; Martin, Charles E; Tong, Liang; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2010-09-30

    The 7-methylguanosine cap structure at the 5' end of eukaryotic messenger RNAs is a critical determinant of their stability and translational efficiency. It is generally believed that 5'-end capping is a constitutive process that occurs during mRNA maturation and lacks the need for a quality-control mechanism to ensure its fidelity. We recently reported that the yeast Rai1 protein has pyrophosphohydrolase activity towards mRNAs lacking a 5'-end cap. Here we show that, in vitro as well as in yeast cells, Rai1 possesses a novel decapping endonuclease activity that can also remove the entire cap structure dinucleotide from an mRNA. This activity is targeted preferentially towards mRNAs with unmethylated caps in contrast to the canonical decapping enzyme, Dcp2, which targets mRNAs with a methylated cap. Capped but unmethylated mRNAs generated in yeast cells with a defect in the methyltransferase gene are more stable in a rai1-gene-disrupted background. Moreover, rai1Δ yeast cells with wild-type capping enzymes show significant accumulation of mRNAs with 5'-end capping defects under nutritional stress conditions of glucose starvation or amino acid starvation. These findings provide evidence that 5'-end capping is not a constitutive process that necessarily always proceeds to completion and demonstrates that Rai1 has an essential role in clearing mRNAs with aberrant 5'-end caps. We propose that Rai1 is involved in an as yet uncharacterized quality control process that ensures mRNA 5'-end integrity by an aberrant-cap-mediated mRNA decay mechanism.

  14. Alteration of the platelet transcriptome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Plé, Hélène; Maltais, Manon; Corduan, Aurélie; Rousseau, Guy; Madore, François; Provost, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Bleeding and thrombotic disorders are major complications affecting patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Exposure of circulating platelets to uraemic toxins and contact with artificial surfaces during dialysis induce platelet abnormalities and alter the platelet proteome. We hypothesised that these changes may be subsequent to changes in the composition and/or regulation of the platelet transcriptome. In this study, we investigated the circulating platelets of 10 CKD patients (i.e. five chronic haemodialysis patients and five stage 4 CKD uraemic patients) and five age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. We observed an alteration of the platelet messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA transcriptome in CKD patients. Impaired in uraemic platelets, the levels of some mRNAs and of most microRNAs appeared to be corrected by dialysis, which is consistent with a beneficial effect of dialysis and a mRNA regulatory role of platelet microRNAs. Reduced in platelets of uraemic patients, phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PCTP) and WD repeat-containing protein 1 (WDR1) were found to be regulated by microRNAs, the latter of which involving hsa-miR-19b, a microRNA increased in platelets of uraemic patients and involved in platelet reactivity. These results suggest that an alteration of microRNA-based mRNA regulatory mechanisms may underlie the platelet response to uremia and entail the development of platelet-related complications in CKD.

  15. Altered RECQ Helicase Expression in Sporadic Primary Colorectal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Welcsh, Piri; Luo, Yanxin; Carter, Kelly T; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Dintzis, Suzanne; Meza, Jane; Sarvetnick, Nora E; Monnat, Raymond J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Grady, William M

    2013-08-01

    Deregulation of DNA repair enzymes occurs in cancers and may create a susceptibility to chemotherapy. Expression levels of DNA repair enzymes have been shown to predict the responsiveness of cancers to certain chemotherapeutic agents. The RECQ helicases repair damaged DNA including damage caused by topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as irinotecan. Altered expression levels of these enzymes in colorectal cancer (CRC) may influence the response of the cancers to irinotecan. Thus, we assessed RECQ helicase (WRN, BLM, RECQL, RECQL4, and RECQL5) expression in primary CRCs, matched normal colon, and CRC cell lines. We found that BLM and RECQL4 mRNA levels are significantly increased in CRC (P = .0011 and P < .0001, respectively), whereas RECQL and RECQL5 are significantly decreased (P = .0103 and P = .0029, respectively). RECQ helicase expression patterns varied between specific molecular subtypes of CRCs. The mRNA and protein expression of the majority of the RECQ helicases was closely correlated, suggesting that altered mRNA expression is the predominant mechanism for deregulated RECQ helicase expression. Immunohistochemistry localized the RECQ helicases to the nucleus. RECQ helicase expression is altered in CRC, suggesting that RECQ helicase expression has potential to identify CRCs that are susceptible to specific chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Role of RNase Y in Clostridium perfringens mRNA Decay and Processing.

    PubMed

    Obana, Nozomu; Nakamura, Kouji; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2017-01-15

    RNase Y is a major endoribonuclease that plays a crucial role in mRNA degradation and processing. We study the role of RNase Y in the Gram-positive anaerobic pathogen Clostridium perfringens, which until now has not been well understood. Our study implies an important role for RNase Y-mediated RNA degradation and processing in virulence gene expression and the physiological development of the organism. We began by constructing an RNase Y conditional knockdown strain in order to observe the importance of RNase Y on growth and virulence. Our resulting transcriptome analysis shows that RNase Y affects the expression of many genes, including toxin-producing genes. We provide data to show that RNase Y depletion repressed several toxin genes in C. perfringens and involved the virR-virS two-component system. We also observe evidence that RNase Y is indispensable for processing and stabilizing the transcripts of colA (encoding a major toxin collagenase) and pilA2 (encoding a major pilin component of the type IV pili). Posttranscriptional regulation of colA is known to be mediated by cleavage in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR), and we observe that RNase Y depletion diminishes colA 5'UTR processing. We show that RNase Y is also involved in the posttranscriptional stabilization of pilA2 mRNA, which is thought to be important for host cell adherence and biofilm formation.

  17. Temperature-sensitive mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MRT4, GRC5, SLA2 and THS1 genes result in defects in mRNA turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, D; Belk, J P; Jacobson, A

    1999-01-01

    In a screen for factors involved in mRNA turnover, four temperature-sensitive yeast strains (ts1189, ts942, ts817, and ts1100) exhibited defects in the decay of several mRNAs. Complementation of the growth and mRNA decay defects, and genetic experiments, revealed that ts1189 is mutated in the previously unknown MRT4 gene, ts942 is mutated in GRC5 (encoding the L9 ribosomal protein), ts817 contains a mutation in SLA2 (encoding a membrane protein), and ts1100 contains a mutation in THS1 (encoding the threonyl-tRNA synthetase). Three of the four mutants (mrt4, grc5, and sla2) were not defective in protein synthesis, suggesting that these strains contain mutations in factors that may play a specific role in mRNA decay. The mRNA stabilization observed in the ths1 strain, however, could be due to the significant drop in translation observed in this mutant at 37 degrees. While the three interesting mutants appear to encode novel mRNA decay factors, at least one could be linked to a previously characterized mRNA decay pathway. The growth and mRNA decay defects of ts942 (grc5) cells were suppressed by overexpression of the NMD3 gene, encoding a protein shown to participate in a two-hybrid interaction with the nonsense-mediated decay protein Upf1p. PMID:10471698

  18. Translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ohlmann, Théophile; Mengardi, Chloé; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Translation initiation of the full-length mRNA of the human immunodeficiency virus can occur via several different mechanisms to maintain production of viral structural proteins throughout the replication cycle. HIV-1 viral protein synthesis can occur by the use of both a cap-dependant and IRES-driven mechanism depending on the physiological conditions of the cell and the status of the ongoing infection. For both of these mechanisms there is a need for several viral and cellular co-factors for optimal translation of the viral mRNA. In this review we will describe the mechanism used by the full-length mRNA to initiate translation highlighting the role of co-factors within this process. A particular emphasis will be given to the role of the DDX3 RNA helicase in HIV-1 mRNA translation initiation. PMID:26779410

  19. Translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, Théophile; Mengardi, Chloé; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Translation initiation of the full-length mRNA of the human immunodeficiency virus can occur via several different mechanisms to maintain production of viral structural proteins throughout the replication cycle. HIV-1 viral protein synthesis can occur by the use of both a cap-dependant and IRES-driven mechanism depending on the physiological conditions of the cell and the status of the ongoing infection. For both of these mechanisms there is a need for several viral and cellular co-factors for optimal translation of the viral mRNA. In this review we will describe the mechanism used by the full-length mRNA to initiate translation highlighting the role of co-factors within this process. A particular emphasis will be given to the role of the DDX3 RNA helicase in HIV-1 mRNA translation initiation.

  20. Multiple crosstalks between mRNA biogenesis and SUMO.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Jérôme O; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Palancade, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    mRNA metabolism involves the orchestration of multiple nuclear events, including transcription, processing (e.g., capping, splicing, polyadenylation), and quality control. This leads to the accurate formation of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) that are finally exported to the cytoplasm for translation. The production of defined sets of mRNAs in given environmental or physiological situations relies on multiple regulatory mechanisms that target the mRNA biogenesis machineries. Among other regulations, post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO, whose prominence in several cellular processes has been largely demonstrated, also plays a key role in mRNA biogenesis. Analysis of the multiple available SUMO proteomes and functional validations of an increasing number of sumoylated targets have revealed the key contribution of SUMO-dependent regulation in nuclear mRNA metabolism. While sumoylation of transcriptional activators and repressors is so far best documented, SUMO contribution to other stages of mRNA biogenesis is also emerging. Modification of mRNA metabolism factors by SUMO determine their subnuclear targeting and biological activity, notably by regulating their molecular interactions with nucleic acids or protein partners. In particular, sumoylation of DNA-bound transcriptional regulators interfere with their association to target sequences or chromatin modifiers. In addition, the recent identification of enzymes of the SUMO pathway within specialized mRNA biogenesis machineries may provide a further level of regulation to their specificity. These multiple crosstalks between mRNA metabolism and SUMO appear therefore as important players in cellular regulatory networks.

  1. Final Report [Regulated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis: A global analysis of differential control by hormones and the circadian clock

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Pamela J.

    2010-03-18

    The long-term goal of this research was to better understand the influence of mRNA stability on gene regulation, particularly in response to hormones and the circadian clock. The primary aim of this project was to examine this using DNA microarrays, small RNA analysis and other approaches. We accomplished these objectives, although we were only able to detect small changes in mRNA stability in response to these stimuli. However, the work also contributed to a major breakthrough allowing the identification of small RNAs on a genomic scale in eukaryotes. Moreover, the project prompted us to develop a new way to analyze mRNA decay genome wide. Thus, the research was hugely successful beyond our objectives.

  2. Stabilizing population.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Mitchell, J

    1998-04-01

    This article is a reprint of the Worldwatch Institute's "State of the World Report," Chapter 10: "Building a New Economy." 16 countries reached zero population growth by 1997. 33 countries have stabilized population, which amounts to 14% of world population. It is estimated that by 2050 population will include an additional 3.6 billion people beyond the present 6 billion. About 60% of the added population will be in Asia, an increase from 3.4 billion in 1995 to 5.4 billion in 2050. China's current population of 1.2 billion will reach 1.5 billion. India's population is expected to rapidly rise from 930 million to 1.53 billion. Populations in the Middle East and North Africa are expected to double in size. Sub-Saharan population is expected to triple in size. By 2050, Nigeria will have 339 million people, which was the entire population of Africa in 1960. There is a great need to stabilize population in a number of currently unstabilized countries. In 1971, Bangladesh and Pakistan had the same population; however, by 2050, Pakistan, without a strong commitment to reducing population growth, will have 70 million more people than Bangladesh. Population stabilization will depend on removal of physical and social barriers that prevent women from using family planning services and thereby help them control their own unwanted fertility. Stabilization will require poverty alleviation and removal of the need for large families. Family size is reduced with lower infant and child mortality risk, increased education, a higher legal age of marriage, and investment in stabilization programs. Solutions to global population growth cannot wait for health reform and budget deficit reductions.

  3. Estrogen regulates the development of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Solum, Derek T; Handa, Robert J

    2002-04-01

    During development, estrogen has a variety of effects on morphological and electrophysiological properties of hippocampal neurons. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) also plays an important role in the survival and differentiation of neurons during development. We examined the effects of gonadectomy with and without estrogen replacement on the mRNA and protein of BDNF and its receptor, trkB, during early postnatal development of the rat hippocampus. We used immunocytochemistry to demonstrate that estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and BDNF were localized to the same cells within the developing hippocampus. BDNF and ERalpha were colocalized in pyramidal cells of the CA3 subregion and to a lesser extent in CA1. To determine whether BDNF mRNA was regulated by estrogen during development, we gonadectomized male rat pups at postnatal day 0 (P0) and examined mRNA and protein levels from P0 to P25 using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. After gonadectomy, BDNF mRNA levels are significantly reduced on P7, but after treatment of gonadectomized animals with estradiol benzoate on P0, levels at all ages were similar to those in intact animals. BDNF mRNA changes after gonadectomy are accompanied by an increase in the levels of BDNF protein, which were reduced by estrogen treatment at P0. We also examined the effect of postnatal estrogen treatment on trkB. There were no significant changes in trkB mRNA or protein in gonadectomized or estrogen-replaced animals. These results suggest that a direct interaction may exist between ERalpha and BDNF to alter hippocampal physiology during development in the rat.

  4. Sequence analysis of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2003-10-01

    Ascites syndrome, also known as pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), is a common metabolic disorder in rapidly growing meat-type chickens. Environmental factors, such as cold, altitude, and diet, play significant roles in development of the disease, but there is also an important genetic component to PHS susceptibility. The human disease familial primary pulmonary hypertension (FPPH) is similar to PHS in broilers both genetically and physiologically. Several recent studies have shown that mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2) gene are a cause of FPPH in humans. To determine whether mutations in the chicken BMPR2 gene play a similar role in PHS susceptibility, BMPR-II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers were sequenced and compared with the published Leghorn chicken BMPR-II mRNA sequence. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in the commercial broiler BMPR-II mRNA. No mutations unique to ascites-susceptible broilers were present in the coding, 5' untranslated or 3' untranslated regions of BMPR-II mRNA. The twelve SNP present within the coding region of BMPR-II mRNA were synonymous substitutions and did not alter the BMPR-II protein sequence. In addition, analysis of BMPR2 gene expression by reverse transcriptase-PCR indicated that there were no differences in BMPR-II mRNA levels in ascitic and nonascitic birds. Therefore, it appears unlikely that mutations in the BMPR2 gene were responsible for susceptibility to PHS in these commercial broilers.

  5. Fucoxanthin regulates adipocytokine mRNA expression in white adipose tissue of diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Nishikawa, Sho; Emi, Shingo; Tsukui, Takayuki; Beppu, Fumiaki; Okada, Tomoko; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    Fucoxanthin, a marine carotenoid found in edible brown seaweeds, attenuates white adipose tissue (WAT) weight gain and hyperglycemia in diabetic/obese KK-A(y) mice, although it does not affect these parameters in lean C57BL/6J mice. In perigonadal and mesenteric WATs of KK-A(y) mice fed fucoxanthin, mRNA expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which are considered to induce insulin resistance, were markedly reduced compared to control mice. In contrast to KK-A(y) mice, fucoxanthin did not alter MCP-1 and TNF-α mRNA expression levels in the WAT of lean C57BL/6J mice. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA expression levels in WAT were also decreased by fucoxanthin in KK-A(y) mice. In differentiating 3T3-F442A adipocytes, fucoxanthinol, which is a fucoxanthin metabolite found in WAT, attenuated TNF-α-induced MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNA overexpression and protein secretion into the culture medium. In addition, fucoxanthinol decreased TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells stimulated by palmitic acid. These findings indicate that fucoxanthin regulates mRNA expression of inflammatory adipocytokines involved in insulin resistance, iNOS, and COX-2 in WAT and has specific effects on diabetic/obese KK-A(y) mice, but not on lean C57BL/6J mice.

  6. Cytoplasmic deadenylase Ccr4 is required for translational repression of LRG1 mRNA in the stationary phase

    PubMed Central

    Duy, Duong Long; Suda, Yasuyuki; Irie, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Ccr4 is a major cytoplasmic deadenylase involved in mRNA poly(A) tail shortening in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have previously shown that Ccr4 negatively regulates expression of LRG1 mRNA encoding a GTPase-activating protein for the small GTPase Rho1, a component of cell wall integrity pathway, and deletion of LRG1 suppresses the temperature-sensitive growth defect of the ccr4Δ mutant. We have also shown that the slow growth of the ccr4Δ mutant is suppressed by deletion of another gene, PBP1, encoding a poly(A)-binding protein (Pab1)-binding protein 1; however, the underlying mechanism still remains unknown. In this study, we investigated how ccr4Δ and pbp1Δ mutations influence on the length of poly(A) tail and LRG1 mRNA and protein levels during long-term cultivation. In the log-phase ccr4Δ mutant cells, LRG1 poly(A) tail was longer and LRG1 mRNA level was higher than those in the log-phase wild-type (WT) cells. Unexpectedly, Lrg1 protein level in the ccr4Δ mutant cells was comparable with that in WT. In the stationary-phase ccr4Δ mutant cells, LRG1 poly(A) tail length was still longer and LRG1 mRNA level was still higher than those in WT cells. In contrast to the log phase, Lrg1 protein level in the stationary-phase ccr4Δ mutant cells was maintained much higher than that in the stationary-phase WT cells. Consistently, active translating ribosomes still remained abundant in the stationary-phase ccr4Δ mutant cells, whereas they were strongly decreased in the stationary-phase WT cells. Loss of PBP1 reduced the LRG1 poly(A) tail length as well as LRG1 mRNA and protein levels in the stationary-phase ccr4Δ mutant cells. Our results suggest that Ccr4 regulates not only LRG1 mRNA level through poly(A) shortening but also the translation of LRG1 mRNA, and that Pbp1 is involved in the Ccr4-mediated regulation of mRNA stability and translation. PMID:28231297

  7. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  8. Dynamic proteomics emphasizes the importance of selective mRNA translation and protein turnover during Arabidopsis seed germination.

    PubMed

    Galland, Marc; Huguet, Romain; Arc, Erwann; Cueff, Gwendal; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    During seed germination, the transition from a quiescent metabolic state in a dry mature seed to a proliferative metabolic state in a vigorous seedling is crucial for plant propagation as well as for optimizing crop yield. This work provides a detailed description of the dynamics of protein synthesis during the time course of germination, demonstrating that mRNA translation is both sequential and selective during this process. The complete inhibition of the germination process in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide established that mRNA translation is critical for Arabidopsis seed germination. However, the dynamics of protein turnover and the selectivity of protein synthesis (mRNA translation) during Arabidopsis seed germination have not been addressed yet. Based on our detailed knowledge of the Arabidopsis seed proteome, we have deepened our understanding of seed mRNA translation during germination by combining two-dimensional gel-based proteomics with dynamic radiolabeled proteomics using a radiolabeled amino acid precursor, namely [(35)S]-methionine, in order to highlight de novo protein synthesis, stability, and turnover. Our data confirm that during early imbibition, the Arabidopsis translatome keeps reflecting an embryonic maturation program until a certain developmental checkpoint. Furthermore, by dividing the seed germination time lapse into discrete time windows, we highlight precise and specific patterns of protein synthesis. These data refine and deepen our knowledge of the three classical phases of seed germination based on seed water uptake during imbibition and reveal that selective mRNA translation is a key feature of seed germination. Beyond the quantitative control of translational activity, both the selectivity of mRNA translation and protein turnover appear as specific regulatory systems, critical for timing the molecular events leading to successful germination and seedling establishment.

  9. Dynamic Proteomics Emphasizes the Importance of Selective mRNA Translation and Protein Turnover during Arabidopsis Seed Germination*

    PubMed Central

    Galland, Marc; Huguet, Romain; Arc, Erwann; Cueff, Gwendal; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    During seed germination, the transition from a quiescent metabolic state in a dry mature seed to a proliferative metabolic state in a vigorous seedling is crucial for plant propagation as well as for optimizing crop yield. This work provides a detailed description of the dynamics of protein synthesis during the time course of germination, demonstrating that mRNA translation is both sequential and selective during this process. The complete inhibition of the germination process in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide established that mRNA translation is critical for Arabidopsis seed germination. However, the dynamics of protein turnover and the selectivity of protein synthesis (mRNA translation) during Arabidopsis seed germination have not been addressed yet. Based on our detailed knowledge of the Arabidopsis seed proteome, we have deepened our understanding of seed mRNA translation during germination by combining two-dimensional gel-based proteomics with dynamic radiolabeled proteomics using a radiolabeled amino acid precursor, namely [35S]-methionine, in order to highlight de novo protein synthesis, stability, and turnover. Our data confirm that during early imbibition, the Arabidopsis translatome keeps reflecting an embryonic maturation program until a certain developmental checkpoint. Furthermore, by dividing the seed germination time lapse into discrete time windows, we highlight precise and specific patterns of protein synthesis. These data refine and deepen our knowledge of the three classical phases of seed germination based on seed water uptake during imbibition and reveal that selective mRNA translation is a key feature of seed germination. Beyond the quantitative control of translational activity, both the selectivity of mRNA translation and protein turnover appear as specific regulatory systems, critical for timing the molecular events leading to successful germination and seedling establishment. PMID:24198433

  10. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of the adenovirus DNA-binding protein alter its ability to enhance its own synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, N; Delsert, C; Klessig, D F

    1989-01-01

    The multifunctional adenovirus single-strand DNA-binding protein (DBP) is highly phosphorylated. Its phosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal domain of the protein, and its DNA- and RNA-binding activity resides in the carboxy-terminal half of the polypeptide. We have substituted cysteine or alanine for up to 10 of these potential phosphorylation sites by using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Alteration of one or a few of these sites had little effect on the viability of virus containing the mutated DBP. However, when eight or more sites were altered, viral growth decreased significantly. This suggests that the overall phosphorylation state of the protein was more important than whether any particular site was modified. The reduction in growth correlated with both depressed DNA replication and expression of late genes. This reduction was probably the result of lower DBP accumulation in mutant-infected cells. Interestingly, although the stability of the mutated DBP was not affected, DBP synthesis and the level of its mRNA were depressed 5- to 10-fold for the underphosphorylated protein. These results suggest that DBP enhances its own expression and imply that phosphorylation of the DBP may be important for this function. Similarities to several eucaryotic transcriptional activators, which are composed of negatively charged activating domains and separate binding domains, are discussed. Images PMID:2585602

  11. Enhanced protein expression by internal ribosomal entry site-driven mRNA translation as a novel approach for in vitro loading of dendritic cells with antigens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Yonghong

    2008-01-01

    Transfection of dendritic cells (DCs) with messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is a promising strategy for cancer vaccines. TAA mRNA can be generated by in vitro transcription using DNA encoding the TAA gene as a template. A cap analog is usually added upon in vitro transcription to stabilize mRNA and enhance the efficiency of mRNA translation. However, the inclusion of the cap analog correlates with significantly lower-yield mRNA transcription, potentially leading to an expensive vaccine manufacturing process. To solve this problem, we present a novel approach in which DNA templates are modified with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) sequence inserted upstream of the gene of interest to replace the use of the cap analog. The presence of IRES greatly enhanced transcription for the mRNA in vitro compared with the cap analog. Also, higher transgene expression was achieved using luciferase (Luc) mRNA with IRES than using capped Luc mRNA to transfect DCs. Immunization of mice with DCs transfected with IRES-containing mRNA encoding chicken ovalbumin (OVA) induced significant levels of antigen-specific interferon gamma-producing CD8(+) T cells and in vivo killing of antigen-bearing cells. Consistently, mice immunized with IRES-containing OVA mRNA-transfected DCs were protected from pulmonary metastasis of melanoma cells injected intravenously. We suggest that IRES can be used for the production of larger quantities of mRNA and that such IRES-containing mRNAs may be useful for DC-based antitumor immunotherapy.

  12. Upregulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein in adrenal medulla of water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Feng-Jie; Huang, Shiue-Shin; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Hsin, Shih-Chie; Wu, Chin-Han; Hsin, Ya-Chieh; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate whether adrenal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA and protein expression are responsive to alterations in body volume. Using an RT-PCR technique, the relative quantities of nNOS mRNA as well as the tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase mRNA in the adrenals of water-deprived rats significantly increased from 12 hr to 4 days. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical study showed that water deprivation activated nNOS mRNA and protein expression in the adrenal medulla. Four days after water deprivation, nNOS protein expression determined by Western blot significantly increased in the adrenal gland. Our results are the first to demonstrate that nNOS syntheses in the adrenal medulla are markedly increased in water-deprived rats. This study also indicates that the upregulation of nNOS synthesis of the adrenal medulla is associated with the activation of adrenal medullary function in the face of volume depletion.

  13. Spaceflight has compartment- and gene-specific effects on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in rat femur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. L.; Morey-Holton, E.; Turner, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that the abnormal bone matrix produced during spaceflight may be associated with reduced expression of bone matrix protein genes. To test this possibility, we investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight (SLS-2 experiment) on steady-state mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), osteocalcin, osteonectin, and prepro-alpha(1) subunit of type I collagen in the major bone compartments of rat femur. There were pronounced site-specific differences in the steady-state levels of expression of the mRNAs for the three bone matrix proteins and GAPDH in normal weight-bearing rats, and these relationships were altered after spaceflight. Specifically, spaceflight resulted in decreases in mRNA levels for GAPDH (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteocalcin (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteonectin (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis), and collagen (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis) compared with ground controls. There were no changes in mRNA levels for matrix proteins or GAPDH in the shaft and distal epiphysis. These results demonstrate that spaceflight leads to site- and gene-specific decreases in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that spaceflight-induced decreases in bone formation are caused by concomitant decreases in expression of genes for bone matrix proteins.

  14. Tumor cells derived exosomes contain hTERT mRNA and transform nonmalignant fibroblasts into telomerase positive cells

    PubMed Central

    Beery, Einat; Nordenberg, Jardena; Pinchasi, Maria; Goldvaser, Hadar; Henick, Steven; Goldberg, Michal; Lahav, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small (30-100nm) vesicles secreted from all cell types serving as inter-cell communicators and affecting biological processes in “recipient” cells upon their uptake. The current study demonstrates for the first time that hTERT mRNA, the transcript of the enzyme telomerase, is shuttled from cancer cells via exosomes into telomerase negative fibroblasts, where it is translated into a fully active enzyme and transforms these cells into telomerase positive, thus creating a novel type of cells; non malignant cells with telomerase activity. All tested telomerase positive cells, including cancer cells and non malignant cells with overexpressed telomerase secreted exosomal hTERT mRNA in accordance with the endogenous levels of their hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity. Similarly exosomes isolated from sera of patients with pancreatic and lung cancer contained hTERT mRNA as well. Telomerase activity induced phenotypic changes in the recipient fibroblasts including increased proliferation, extension of life span and postponement of senescence. In addition, telomerase activity protected the fibroblasts from DNA damage induced by phleomycin and from apoptosis, indicating that also telomerase “extracurricular” activities are manifested in the recipient cells. The shuttle of telomerase from cancer cells into fibroblasts and the induction of these changes may contribute to the alterations of cancer microenvironment and its role in cancer. The described process has an obvious therapeutic potential which will be explored in further studies. PMID:27385095

  15. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another.

  16. Caterpillar labial saliva alters tomato plant