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Sample records for altering mrna stability

  1. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  2. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis.

  3. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  4. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Müller, Maren; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Gommlich, Jessie; Balagopal, Vidya; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC) reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization. PMID:27543059

  5. Glucose-stimulated somatostatin gene expression in the Brockmann bodies of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) results from increased mRNA transcription and not from altered mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Ehrman, Melissa M; Melroe, Gregory T; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we showed that glucose increases the steady-state levels of the mRNAs encoding two distinct preprosomatostatins (each containing [Tyr7, Gly10]-somatostatin-14 at their C-termini; denoted PPSS II' and PPSS II") in the endocrine pancreas (Brockmann body) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the present study, isolated islet cells were used to determine whether glucose-stimulated expression resulted from altered rates of transcription and/or from changes in RNA stability. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that the number of PPSS II nascent transcripts were significantly higher in nuclei isolated from islet cells cultured in 10 mM glucose compared to those isolated from cells incubated in 4 mM glucose. High glucose (10 mM) did not, however, affect the stability of PPSS II mRNAs. These results indicate that glucose-stimulated somatostatin expression in the Brockmann bodies of rainbow trout results from increased endogenous mRNA transcription and not from altered mRNA stability. PMID:14745108

  6. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  7. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm‑2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  8. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm-2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  9. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  10. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  11. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Tjandrawinata, R R; Vincent, V L; Hughes-Fulford, M

    1997-05-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  12. Connections Underlying Translation and mRNA Stability.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Green, Rachel

    2016-09-11

    Gene expression and regulation in organisms minimally depends on transcription by RNA polymerase and on the stability of the RNA product (for both coding and non-coding RNAs). For coding RNAs, gene expression is further influenced by the amount of translation by the ribosome and by the stability of the protein product. The stabilities of these two classes of RNA, non-coding and coding, vary considerably: tRNAs and rRNAs tend to be long lived while mRNAs tend to be more short lived. Even among mRNAs, however, there is a considerable range in stability (ranging from seconds to hours in bacteria and up to days in metazoans), suggesting a significant role for stability in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we review recent experiments from bacteria, yeast and metazoans indicating that the stability of most mRNAs is broadly impacted by the actions of ribosomes that translate them. Ribosomal recognition of defective mRNAs triggers "mRNA surveillance" pathways that target the mRNA for degradation [Shoemaker and Green (2012) ]. More generally, even the stability of perfectly functional mRNAs appears to be dictated by overall rates of translation by the ribosome [Herrick et al. (1990), Presnyak et al. (2015) ]. Given that mRNAs are synthesized for the purpose of being translated into proteins, it is reassuring that such intimate connections between mRNA and the ribosome can drive biological regulation. In closing, we consider the likelihood that these connections between protein synthesis and mRNA stability are widespread or whether other modes of regulation dominate the mRNA stability landscape in higher organisms. PMID:27261255

  13. Tar DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), 14-3-3 proteins and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) interact to modulate NFL mRNA stability. Implications for altered RNA processing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Volkening, Kathryn; Leystra-Lantz, Cheryl; Yang, Wenchang; Jaffee, Howard; Strong, Michael J

    2009-12-11

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurological disease characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration in association with neurofilament (NF) aggregate formation. This process is accompanied by an alteration in the stoichiometry of NF subunit protein expression such that the steady state levels of the low molecular weight NF (NFL) mRNA levels are selectively suppressed. We have previously shown that each of TDP-43, 14-3-3 and mutant SOD1 can function as NFL mRNA 3'UTR binding proteins that directly affect the stability of NFL transcripts. In this study, we demonstrate that the interaction of TDP-43 with the NFL mRNA 3' UTR involves ribonucleotide (UG) motifs present on stem loops of the 3'UTR as well as the RRM1 and RRM2 motifs of TDP-43. Ex vivo, TDP-43, 14-3-3 and SOD1 proteins interact to modulate NFL mRNA stability, although in vivo, only TDP-43 and either mutant or wild-type SOD1 co-localize in ALS motor neurons. TDP-43 was observed to co-localize to RNA transport granules (Staufen immunoreactive) in both control and ALS spinal motor neurons. In contrast, both stress granules (TIA-1 immunoreactive) and processing bodies (P-bodies; XRN-1 immunoreactive) were more prevalent in ALS motor neurons than in controls and demonstrated strong co-localization with TDP-43. Using RNA-IP-PCR, we further demonstrate that NFL mRNA is preferentially sequestered to both stress granules and P-bodies in ALS. These data suggest that NFL mRNA processing is fundamentally altered in ALS spinal motor neurons to favour compartmentalization within both stress granules and P-bodies, and that TDP-43 plays a fundamental role in this process.

  14. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  15. Effect of ribosome shielding on mRNA stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the experimental evidence that translating ribosomes stabilize the mRNAs, we introduce and study a theoretical model for the dynamic shielding of mRNA by ribosomes. We present an improved fitting of published decay assay data in E. coli and show that only one third of the decay patterns are exponential. Our new transcriptome-wide estimate of the average lifetimes and mRNA half-lives shows that these timescales are considerably shorter than previous estimates. We also explain why there is a negative correlation between mRNA length and average lifetime when the mRNAs are subdivided in classes sharing the same degradation parameters. As a by-product, our model indicates that co-transcriptional translation in E. coli may be less common than previously believed.

  16. mRNA stability and control of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Cristina; Falcone, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Most of the studies on cell proliferation examine the control of gene expression by specific transcription factors that act on transcriptional initiation. In the last few years, it became evident that mRNA stability/turnover provides an important mechanism for post-transcriptional control of gene expression. In eukaryotes, mRNAs are mainly degraded after deadenylation by decapping and exosome pathways. Mechanisms of mRNA surveillance comprise deadenylation-independent pathways such as NMD (nonsense-mediated decay), when mRNAs harbour a PTC (premature termination codon), NSD (non-stop decay, when mRNAs lack a termination codon, and NGD (no-go decay), when mRNA translation elongation stalls. Many proteins involved in these processes are conserved from bacteria to yeast and humans. Recent papers showed the involvement of proteins deputed to decapping in controlling cell proliferation, virus replication and cell death. In this paper, we will review the newest findings in this field.

  17. Glucocorticoids enhance stability of human growth hormone mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Paek, I; Axel, R

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the control of expression of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene introduced into the chromosomes of mouse fibroblasts. Cell lines transformed with the hGH gene expressed low levels of intact hGH mRNA and secreted hGH protein into the medium. Although the level of expression of hGH mRNA was low, the gene remained responsive to induction by glucocorticoid hormones. To localize the sequences responsible for induction and to determine the mechanism by which these cis-acting sequences enhance gene expression, we have constructed a series of fusion genes between the hGH gene and the herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) gene. We have demonstrated that a fusion gene in which hGH cDNA is flanked at its 5' terminus by an HSV tk promoter and is flanked at its 3' terminus by 3' HSV tk DNA remains inducible by glucocorticoids. Our studies indicate that the hGH exons contain sequences which are responsible for glucocorticoid hormone induction. Pulse-chase experiments, in vitro nuclear transcription, and approach to steady-state measurements indicate that the mechanisms responsible for induction of the hGH cDNA fusion gene operate posttranscriptionally to enhance the stability of hGH mRNA. Moreover, this increased stability was associated with an increase in the length of the 3' poly(A) tail on hGH mRNA. Images PMID:3037323

  18. Differential regulation of plastid mRNA stability. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    Our goal is to identify cis-acting sequences and transacting factors that function in plastid mRNA maturation, stabilization, and/or decay through an in vitro and in vivo analysis of mRNA:protein interactions. Our previous results emphasized the study of 3{prime}end inverted repeat sequences (IRs) that serve both as mRNA processing elements and stability determinants, and associate with plastid proteins that potentially play enzymatic, structural and/or regulatory roles. We seek to define, by single base and internal deletion mutagenesis, the sequence and structural requirements for protein binding to the 3{prime} IRs of petD and psbA mRNAs; to purify RNA-binding proteins that demonstrate gene- or sequence-specific binding, or that are implicated in RNA stabilization or decay; and to investigate the native form of mRNA in the plastid, by attempting to purify ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles from organelles. Our view of mRNA decay is that it is regulated by three interactive components: RNA structure, ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins. We have used mutagenesis to study the role of RNA structure in regulating RNA decay rates, and to identify protein binding and endonuclease recognition sites. We have identified at least three endonuclease activities; one that cleaves psbA RNA; and two whose cleavage patterns with petD 3{prime} IR-RNA has been studied (endoC1 and endoC2). Additionally, we have continued to analyze the properties of the major RNA processing exoribonuclease. We have concentrated our efforts on three RNA-binding proteins. A 100 kd protein with properties suggestive of a mammalian RNP component has been purified. A protein of 55 kd that may also be an endonuclease has been partially purified. We have studied the interaction of a 29 kd protein with the petD stem/loop, and its role in RNA processing. Recently, we have used a novel gel shift/SDS-PAGE technique to identify new RNA-binding proteins.

  19. mRNA stability changes precede changes in steady-state mRNA amounts during hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Molin, Claes; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Warringer, Jonas; Nerman, Olle; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2009-04-01

    Under stress, cells need to optimize the activity of a wide range of gene products during the response phases: shock, adaptation, and recovery. This requires coordination of several levels of regulation, including turnover and translation efficiencies of mRNAs. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways are implicated in many aspects of the environmental stress response, including initiation of transcription, translation efficiency, and mRNA turnover. In this study, we analyze mRNA turnover rates and mRNA steady-state levels at different time points following mild hyperosmotic shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The regulation of mRNA stability is transient and affects most genes for which there is a change in transcript level. These changes precede and prepare for the changes in steady-state levels, both regarding the initial increase and the later decline of stress-induced mRNAs. The inverse is true for stress-repressed genes, which become stabilized during hyperosmotic stress in preparation of an increase as the cells recover. The MAP kinase Hog1 affects both steady-state levels and stability of stress-responsive transcripts, whereas the Hog1-activated kinase Rck2 influences steady-state levels without a major effect on stability. Regulation of mRNA stability is a wide-spread, but not universal, effect on stress-responsive transcripts during transient hyperosmotic stress. By destabilizing stress-induced mRNAs when their steady-state levels have reached a maximum, the cell prepares for the subsequent recovery phase when these transcripts are to return to normal levels. Conversely, stabilization of stress-repressed mRNAs permits their rapid accumulation in the recovery phase. Our results show that mRNA turnover is coordinated with transcriptional induction.

  20. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  1. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  2. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G. H.; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-06-01

    Emulsions–liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid–are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number–the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability.

  3. Altering Emulsion Stability with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob G H; Chen, Haosheng; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions-liquid droplets dispersed in another immiscible liquid-are widely used in a broad spectrum of applications, including food, personal care, agrochemical, and pharmaceutical products. Emulsions are also commonly present in natural crude oil, hampering the production and quality of petroleum fuels. The stability of emulsions plays a crucial role in their applications, but controlling the stability without external driving forces has been proven to be difficult. Here we show how heterogeneous surface wettability can alter the stability and dynamics of oil-in-water emulsions, generated by a co-flow microfluidic device. We designed a useful methodology that can modify a micro-capillary of desired heterogeneous wettability (e.g., alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) without changing the hydraulic diameter. We subsequently investigated the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion. The experimental data revealed a universal critical timescale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain stable and intact, whereas below they become adhesive or inverse. A simple theoretical model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition of emulsion dynamics, depending on the droplet size and the Capillary number-the ratio of viscous to surface effects. These results give insight into how to control the stability and dynamics of emulsions in microfluidics with flow velocity and different wettability. PMID:27256703

  4. Gravitational loading of a simulated launch alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1996-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1a) were centrifuged under a regime designed to simulate a space shuttle launch (maximum of 3g). Messenger RNA levels for eight genes involved in bone growth and maintenance were determined using RT-PCR. Following 30 min of centrifugation, mRNA level for early response gene c-fos was significantly increased 89% (P < 0.05). The c-fos induction was transient and returned to control levels after 3 h. The mRNA level for the mineralization marker gene osteocalcin was significantly decreased to 44% of control level (P < 0.005) 3 h after centrifugation. No changes in mRNA levels were detected for c-myc, TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, cyclophilin A, or actin. No basal mRNA level for TGFbeta3 was detected. In addition, no change in the steady-state synthesis of prostaglandin E2 was detected, possibly due to lack of lipid substrates in serum-deprived cells, suggesting that the increase in c-fos mRNA in response to gravitational loading is a result of mechanical stimulation. These results indicate that a small magnitude mechanical loading, such as that experienced during a shuttle launch, can alter mRNA levels in quiescent osteoblastic cells.

  5. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications.

  6. qPCR based mRNA quality score show intact mRNA after heat stabilization.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Segerström, Lova; Sjöback, Robert; Nylander, Ingrid; Borén, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of multiple analytes from biological samples can be challenging as different analytes require different preservation measures. Heat induced enzymatic inactivation is an efficient way to preserve proteins and their modifications in biological samples but RNA quality, as measured by RIN value, has been a concern in such samples. Here, we investigate the effect of heat stabilization compared with standard snap freezing on RNA quality using two RNA extraction protocols, QiaZol with and without urea pre-solubilization, and two RNA quality measurements: RIN value, as defined by the Agilent Bioanalyzer, and an alternative qPCR based method. DNA extraction from heat stabilized brain samples was also examined. The snap frozen samples had RIN values about 1 unit higher than heat stabilized samples for the direct QiaZol extraction but equal with stabilized samples using urea pre-solubilization. qPCR based RNA quality measurement showed no difference in quality between snap frozen and heat inactivated samples. The probable explanation for this discrepancy is that the RIN value is an indirect measure based on rRNA, while the qPCR score is based on actual measurement of mRNA quality. The DNA yield from heat stabilized brain tissue samples was significantly increased, compared to the snap frozen tissue, without any effects on purity or quality. Hence, heat stabilization of tissues opens up the possibility for a two step preservation protocol, where proteins and their modifications can be preserved in the first heat based step, while in a second step, using standard RNA preservation strategies, mRNA be preserved. This collection strategy will enable biobanking of samples where the ultimate analysis is not determined without loss of sample quality. PMID:27077049

  7. Major role for mRNA stability in shaping the kinetics of gene induction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background mRNA levels in cells are determined by the relative rates of RNA production and degradation. Yet, to date, most analyses of gene expression profiles were focused on mechanisms which regulate transcription, while the role of mRNA stability in modulating transcriptional networks was to a large extent overlooked. In particular, kinetic waves in transcriptional responses are usually interpreted as resulting from sequential activation of transcription factors. Results In this study, we examined on a global scale the role of mRNA stability in shaping the kinetics of gene response. Analyzing numerous expression datasets we revealed a striking global anti-correlation between rapidity of induction and mRNA stability, fitting the prediction of a kinetic mathematical model. In contrast, the relationship between kinetics and stability was less significant when gene suppression was analyzed. Frequently, mRNAs that are stable under standard conditions were very rapidly down-regulated following stimulation. Such effect cannot be explained even by a complete shut-off of transcription, and therefore indicates intense modulation of RNA stability. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate the key role of mRNA stability in determining induction kinetics in mammalian transcriptional networks. PMID:20409322

  8. Heat Shock Response in Yeast Involves Changes in Both Transcription Rates and mRNA Stabilities

    PubMed Central

    Castells-Roca, Laia; García-Martínez, José; Moreno, Joaquín; Herrero, Enrique; Bellí, Gemma; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2011-01-01

    We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25°C to 37°C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins. PMID:21364882

  9. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Kyren A.; Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C.; To, Sarah Q.; Chand, Ashwini L.; Clyne, Colin D.

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer.

  10. Control of c-myc mRNA half-life in vitro by a protein capable of binding to a coding region stability determinant.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, P L; Herrick, D J; Prokipcak, R D; Ross, J

    1992-04-01

    Polysome-associated c-myc mRNA is degraded relatively rapidly in cells and in an in vitro mRNA decay system containing extracts from cultured mammalian cells. Using this system, a competition/screening assay was devised to search for factors that bind to specific regions of polysome-associated c-myc mRNA and thereby alter its half-life. mRNA stability was first assayed in reactions containing exogenous competitor RNAs corresponding to portions of c-myc mRNA itself. The addition of a 182-nucleotide sense strand fragment from the carboxy-terminal portion of the c-myc-coding region destabilized c-myc mRNA by at least eightfold. This RNA fragment had no effect on the stability of other mRNAs tested. Moreover, c-myc mRNA was not destabilized in reactions containing unrelated competitor RNAs or sense strand RNA from the c-myc 5' region. Polysome-associated globin mRNA containing the c-myc-coding region segment in-frame was also destabilized in vitro by the 182-nucleotide RNA. As determined by UV-cross-linking experiments, the 182-nucleotide RNA fragment was recognized by and bound to an approximately 75-kD polysome-associated protein. On the basis of these data plus Northern blotting analyses of c-myc mRNA decay products, we suggest that the approximately 75-kD protein is normally bound to a c-myc-coding region determinant and protects that region of the mRNA from endonuclease attack. Possible links between the protective protein, translation, ribosome pausing, and c-myc mRNA turnover are discussed.

  11. LMO4 mRNA stability is regulated by extracellular ATP in F11 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsiao-Huei . E-mail: hchen@uottawa.ca; Xu, Jin; Safarpour, Farzaneh; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.

    2007-05-25

    LIM only domain protein 4 (LMO4) interacts with many signaling and transcription factors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation and plasticity. In Drosophila, mutations in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the homologue dLMO cause a gain of function by increasing mRNA stability. LMO4 3'UTR contains several AU-rich elements (ARE) and is highly conserved among vertebrates, suggesting that RNA destabilizing mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved. Here, we found that extracellular ATP stabilized LMO4 mRNA in F11 cells. The LMO4 3'UTR added to a luciferase reporter markedly reduced reporter activity under basal conditions, but increased activity with ATP treatment. Two ARE motifs were characterized in the LMO4 3'UTR. ATP increased binding of HuD protein to ARE1. ARE1 conferred ATP and HuD-dependent mRNA stabilization. In contrast, sequences flanking ARE2 bound CUGBP1 and ATP destabilized this complex. Thus, our results suggest that ATP modulates recruitment of RNA-binding proteins to the 3'UTR to stabilize LMO4 mRNA.

  12. Alterations in Somatostatin mRNA Expression in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Harvey M.; Hashimoto, Takanori; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the inhibitory circuitry of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia include reduced expression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) for somatostatin (SST), a neuropeptide present in a subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons. However, neither the cellular substrate nor the causal mechanisms for decreased SST mRNA levels in schizophrenia are known. We used in situ hybridization to quantify the compartmental, laminar, and cellular levels of SST mRNA expression in the DLPFC of 23 pairs of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and control subjects. We also explored potential causal mechanisms by utilizing similar methods to analyze SST mRNA expression in 2 animal models. The expression of SST mRNA was significantly decreased in layers 2–superficial 6 of subjects with schizophrenia, but not in layer 1, deep 6 or the white matter. At the cellular level, both the density of cortical SST mRNA-positive neurons and the expression of SST mRNA per neuron were reduced in the subjects with schizophrenia. These alterations were not due to potential confounds and appeared to be a downstream consequence of impaired neurotrophin signaling through the trkB receptor. These findings support the hypothesis that a marked reduction in SST mRNA expression in a subset of GABA neurons contributes to DLPFC dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:18203698

  13. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D.; Lai, Wi S.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Hill, Georgette D.; Flake, Gordon P.; Mannie, Mark D.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements (AREs) in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3′UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  14. Codon Usage and 3' UTR Length Determine Maternal mRNA Stability in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Yuichiro; Tomari, Yukihide

    2016-03-17

    The control of mRNA stability plays a central role in regulating gene expression. In metazoans, the earliest stages of development are driven by maternally supplied mRNAs. The degradation of these maternal mRNAs is critical for promoting the maternal-to-zygotic transition of developmental programs, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood in vertebrates. Here, we characterized maternal mRNA degradation pathways in zebrafish using a transcriptome analysis and systematic reporter assays. Our data demonstrate that ORFs enriched with uncommon codons promote deadenylation by the CCR4-NOT complex in a translation-dependent manner. This codon-mediated mRNA decay is conditional on the context of the 3' UTR, with long 3' UTRs conferring resistance to deadenylation. These results indicate that the combined effect of codon usage and 3' UTR length determines the stability of maternal mRNAs in zebrafish embryos. Our study thus highlights the codon-mediated mRNA decay as a conserved regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes. PMID:26990990

  15. A small RNA activates CFA synthase by isoform-specific mRNA stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Kathrin Sophie; Papenfort, Kai; Fekete, Agnes; Vogel, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Small RNAs use a diversity of well-characterized mechanisms to repress mRNAs, but how they activate gene expression at the mRNA level remains not well understood. The predominant activation mechanism of Hfq-associated small RNAs has been translational control whereby base pairing with the target prevents the formation of an intrinsic inhibitory structure in the mRNA and promotes translation initiation. Here, we report a translation-independent mechanism whereby the small RNA RydC selectively activates the longer of two isoforms of cfa mRNA (encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthase) in Salmonella enterica. Target activation is achieved through seed pairing of the pseudoknot-exposed, conserved 5′ end of RydC to an upstream region of the cfa mRNA. The seed pairing stabilizes the messenger, likely by interfering directly with RNase E-mediated decay in the 5′ untranslated region. Intriguingly, this mechanism is generic such that the activation is equally achieved by seed pairing of unrelated small RNAs, suggesting that this mechanism may be utilized in the design of RNA-controlled synthetic circuits. Physiologically, RydC is the first small RNA known to regulate membrane stability. PMID:24141880

  16. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  17. Cocaine treatment alters oxytocin receptor binding but not mRNA production in postpartum rat dams.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, T M; McMurray, M S; Walker, C H; Johns, J M

    2006-06-01

    Gestational cocaine treatment in rat dams results in decreased oxytocin (OT) levels, up-regulated oxytocin receptor (OTR) binding density and decreased receptor affinity in the whole amygdala, all concomitant with a significant increase in maternal aggression on postpartum day six. Rat dams with no gestational drug treatment that received an infusion of an OT antagonist directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) exhibited similarly high levels of maternal aggression towards intruders. Additionally, studies indicate that decreased OT release from the hypothalamic division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is coincident with heightened maternal aggression in rats. Thus, it appears that cocaine-induced alterations in OT system dynamics (levels, receptors, production, and/or release) may mediate heightened maternal aggression following cocaine treatment, but the exact mechanisms through which cocaine impacts the OT system have not yet been determined. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that two likely mechanisms of cocaine's action would be, increased OTR binding specifically in the CeA, and decreased OT mRNA production in the PVN. Autoradiography and in situ hybridization assays were performed on targeted nuclei in brain regions of rat dams on postpartum day six, following gestational treatment twice daily with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or normal saline (1 ml/kg). We now report cocaine-induced reductions in OTR binding density in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), but not the CeA. There was no significant change in OT mRNA production in the PVN following cocaine treatment. PMID:16677710

  18. Sex differences in alcohol consumption and alterations in nucleus accumbens endocannabinoid mRNA in alcohol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Angela M; Berger, Anthony L; Lugo, Janelle M; Baxter-Potter, Lydia N; Bieniasz, Kennedy V; Craft, Rebecca M; McLaughlin, Ryan J

    2016-10-29

    Chronic intermittent alcohol (CIA) exposure produces altered motivational states characterized by anxiety and escalated alcohol consumption during withdrawal. The endocannabinoid (ECB) system contributes to these symptoms, and sex differences in alcohol dependence, as well as bidirectional interactions between ECBs and gonadal hormones have been documented. Thus, we evaluated sex differences in alcohol consumption, anxiety-like behavior, and ECB mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of alcohol-dependent rats during acute withdrawal. Male rats exposed to six weeks of CIA showed escalated alcohol consumption during acute withdrawal and reductions in NAc N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPEPLD), DAG lipase alpha (DAGLα), and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA. Intact alcohol-dependent female rats also escalated their consumption, but notably, this effect was also present in non-dependent females. No differences in NAc ECB mRNA were observed between CIA- and air-exposed females during acute withdrawal. However, when these data were analyzed according to estrous stage, significant differences in NAPEPLD and MAGL mRNA expression emerged in the NAc of air-exposed control rats, which were absent in alcohol-dependent females. We subsequently measured alcohol consumption and NAc ECB mRNA in ovariectomized (OVX) females with or without estradiol (E2) replacement during withdrawal. Neither E2 nor CIA altered alcohol consumption in OVX females. However, E2 reduced both DAGLα and MAGL mRNA, suggesting that E2 may influence the biosynthesis and degradation of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the NAc. Collectively, these studies indicate sexual dimorphism in alcohol consumption in non-dependent rats and suggest that E2-mediated alterations in NAc ECB mRNA expression during withdrawal may be a mechanism by which sex differences in alcohol dependence emerge. PMID:27578612

  19. Posttranscriptional control of Klebsiella pneumoniae nif mRNA stability by the nifL product.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J J; Roberts, G P; Brill, W J

    1986-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control of nif mRNA stability was demonstrated by functional and chemical analyses, using specific probes for four nif transcripts. In the wild type, nif transcripts (except nifLA) were stable during derepression, with half-lives of approximately 30 min. They were dramatically destabilized by O2 or elevated temperature (41 degrees C) and to a lesser extent by NH4+. In contrast, the nifLA message was not particularly stable, and posttranscriptional control was not evident. In NifL- strains, both forms of analysis indicated that the nifL product was involved in nif mRNA destabilization in the presence of O2 and NH4+. PMID:2428807

  20. Codon optimality is a major determinant of mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Presnyak, Vladimir; Alhusaini, Najwa; Chen, Ying-Hsin; Martin, Sophie; Morris, Nathan; Kline, Nicholas; Olson, Sara; Weinberg, David; Baker, Kristian E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Coller, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA degradation represents a critical regulated step in gene expression. While the major pathways in turnover have been identified, accounting for disparate half-lives has been elusive. We show that codon optimality is one feature that contributes greatly to mRNA stability. Genome-wide RNA decay analysis revealed that stable mRNAs are enriched in codons designated optimal, whereas unstable mRNAs contain predominately non-optimal codons. Substitution of optimal codons with synonymous, non-optimal codons results in dramatic mRNA destabilization, while the converse substitution significantly increases stability. Further, we demonstrate that codon optimality impacts ribosome translocation, connecting the processes of translation elongation and decay through codon optimality. Finally, we show that optimal codon content accounts for the similar stabilities observed in mRNAs encoding proteins with coordinated physiological function. This work demonstrates that codon optimization exists as an mechanism to finely tune levels of mRNAs, and ultimately, proteins. PMID:25768907

  1. Herpes simplex virus virion stimulatory protein mRNA leader contains sequence elements which increase both virus-induced transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Blair, E D; Blair, C C; Wagner, E K

    1987-08-01

    To investigate the role of 5' noncoding leader sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA in infected cells, the promoter for the 65,000-dalton virion stimulatory protein (VSP), a beta-gamma polypeptide, was introduced into plasmids bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene together with various lengths of adjacent viral leader sequences. Plasmids containing longer lengths of leader sequence gave rise to significantly higher levels of CAT enzyme in transfected cells superinfected with HSV-1. RNase T2 protection assays of CAT mRNA showed that transcription was initiated from an authentic viral cap site in all VSP-CAT constructs and that CAT mRNA levels corresponded to CAT enzyme levels. Use of cis-linked simian virus 40 enhancer sequences demonstrated that the effect was virus specific. Constructs containing 12 and 48 base pairs of the VSP mRNA leader gave HSV infection-induced CAT activities intermediate between those of the leaderless construct and the VSP-(+77)-CAT construct. Actinomycin D chase experiments demonstrated that the longest leader sequences increased hybrid CAT mRNA stability at least twofold in infected cells. Cotransfection experiments with a cosmid bearing four virus-specified transcription factors (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and VSP-65K) showed that sequences from -3 to +77, with respect to the viral mRNA cap site, also contained signals responsive to transcriptional activation. PMID:3037112

  2. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test.

  3. Alteration of Na,K-ATPase subunit mRNA and protein levels in hypertrophied rat heart.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne, D; Orlowski, J; Oliviero, P; Rannou, F; Sainte Beuve, C; Swynghedauw, B; Lane, L K

    1994-01-14

    To determine if an altered expression of the Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform genes is responsible for an observed increase in cardiac glycoside sensitivity in compensatory hypertrophy, we performed Northern and slot blot analyses of RNA and specific immunological detection of Na,K-ATPase isoforms in rat hearts from normal and pressure overload-treated animals induced by abdominal aortic constriction. During the early phase of hypertrophy, the only alteration is a decrease in the alpha 2 mRNA isoform. In the compensated hypertrophied heart, the levels of the predominant alpha 1 isoform (mRNA and protein) and the beta 1 subunit mRNA are unchanged. In contrast, the alpha 2 isoform (mRNA and protein) is decreased by 35% and up to 61-64% in mild (< 55%) and severe (> 55%) hypertrophy, respectively. The alpha 3 isoform (mRNA and protein), which is extremely low in adult heart, is increased up to 2-fold during hypertrophy but accounts for only approximately equal to 5% of the total alpha isoform mRNA. These findings demonstrate that, in cardiac hypertrophy, the three alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase are independently regulated and that regulation occurs at a pretranslational level. The pattern of expression in hypertrophied adult heart is similar to that of the neonatal heart where the inverse regulation between the alpha 2 and alpha 3 ouabain high affinity isoforms has been reported. This suggests that distinct regulatory mechanisms controlling Na,K-ATPase isoform expression may, at least in part, be involved in the sensitivity to cardiac glycosides. PMID:8288620

  4. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  5. Systematic Discovery of Structural Elements Governing Mammalian mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hani; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Oikonomou, Panos; Greco, Todd M.; Fish, Lisa; Salavati, Reza; Cristea, Ileana M.; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Decoding post-transcriptional regulatory programs in RNA is a critical step in the larger goal to develop predictive dynamical models of cellular behavior. Despite recent efforts1–3, the vast landscape of RNA regulatory elements remain largely uncharacterized. A longstanding obstacle is the contribution of local RNA secondary structure in defining interaction partners in a variety of regulatory contexts, including but not limited to transcript stability3, alternative splicing4 and localization3. There are many documented instances where the presence of a structural regulatory element dictates alternative splicing patterns (e.g. human cardiac troponin T) or affects other aspects of RNA biology5. Thus, a full characterization of post-transcriptional regulatory programs requires capturing information provided by both local secondary structures and the underlying sequence3,6. We have developed a computational framework based on context-free grammars3,7 and mutual information2 that systematically explores the immense space of small structural elements and reveals motifs that are significantly informative of genome-wide measurements of RNA behavior. The application of this framework to genome-wide mammalian mRNA stability data revealed eight highly significant elements with substantial structural information, for the strongest of which we showed a major role in global mRNA regulation. Through biochemistry, mass-spectrometry, and in vivo binding studies, we identified HNRPA2B1 as the key regulator that binds this element and stabilizes a large number of its target genes. Ultimately, we created a global post-transcriptional regulatory map based on the identity of the discovered linear and structural cis-regulatory elements, their regulatory interactions and their target pathways. This approach can also be employed to reveal the structural elements that modulate other aspects of RNA behavior. PMID:22495308

  6. 1,10-phenanthroline stabilizes mRNA of the carcinogen-metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 1a1.

    PubMed

    Chou, Mou-Tsy; Chu, Wen-Cheng; Hong, Wei-Fu; Huang, Min-Cong; Liu, Wen-Je; Lin, Shin-Chang; Huang, See-Chang; Chen, Fei-Yun; Hsiao, Wen-Feng; Liu, Yi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Yi; Su, Jyan-Gwo J

    2010-02-01

    1,10-phenanthroline (phen), flufenamic acid, and indomethacin are inhibitors of aldo-keto reductases 1C1 (AKR1C1), but only phen decreased the benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-induced cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1) protein level. Therefore the decrease in the BaP-induced Cyp1a1 protein level was not due to inhibition of Akr1c1, but to phen itself. Phen decreased the BaP-induced Cyp1a1 promoter activity and protein expression, and in contrast, it increased Cyp1a1 mRNA, resulting from an increase in mRNA stability. Phen is also known as a transition metal ion-chelator. Along with the phen study, we also found that Zn(2+), Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) increased Cyp1a1 mRNA and protein stability. Our results show that phen stabilized the mRNA of Cyp1a1, although it decreased cell viability. In addition, Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) highly neutralized phen's suppression of Cyp1a1 protein expression, but they only slightly neutralized phen's promotion of mRNA stability and suppression of cell viability, and had no effect on phen's suppression of promoter activity. Phen's effect on Cyp1a1 expression was reversible, which indicates that phen is non-covalently linked to its target. This report elucidates a new role for phen of stabilizing Cyp1a1 mRNA, and provides information for further studies on mRNA stabilization.

  7. Norepinephrine does not alter NPY and POMC mRNA expression in neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Sachiko; Tomonaga, Shozo; Sato, Momoka; Yamane, Haruka; Tsuneyoshi, Yousuke; Denbow, D Michael; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2010-05-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), synthesized in both the central and peripheral nervous system, is involved in food intake regulation of both mammals and chickens. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a potent orexigenic peptide, is colocalized with NE neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system, suggesting an interaction. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is the precursor of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, a potent anorexigenic peptide synthesized in the hypothalamus. In this study, two experiments were conducted to examine the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of NE on appetite mediators in neonatal chicks (Gallus gallus). Experiment 1 was done to confirm the effect of centrally administered NE (0, 25, 50, and 100 microg) on food intake following a 3h fast, and to determine the change in NPY mRNA expression in the central nervous system (CNS). In Experiment 2, chicks fed ad libitum were treated ICV with NE (50 microg) to determine if changes occurred in brain NPY and POMC mRNA levels. In Experiment 1, the ICV injection of NE dose-dependently reduced food intake, but there was no change in NPY mRNA expression in the CNS. In Experiment 2, there was no significant change in NPY and POMC mRNA expression between the control and NE-treated group, indicating that ICV injection of NE may not be associated with changes in NPY or POMC gene expression.

  8. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  9. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  10. Stage structure alters how complexity affects stability of ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudolf, V.H.W.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Resolving how complexity affects stability of natural communities is of key importance for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. Central to previous stability analysis has been the assumption that the resources of a consumer are substitutable. However, during their development, most species change diets; for instance, adults often use different resources than larvae or juveniles. Here, we show that such ontogenetic niche shifts are common in real ecological networks and that consideration of these shifts can alter which species are predicted to be at risk of extinction. Furthermore, niche shifts reduce and can even reverse the otherwise stabilizing effect of complexity. This pattern arises because species with several specialized life stages appear to be generalists at the species level but act as sequential specialists that are hypersensitive to resource loss. These results suggest that natural communities are more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than indicated by previous analyses.

  11. Cadmium chloride alters mRNA levels of angiogenesis related genes in primary human endometrial endothelial cells grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helmestam, Malin; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2010-11-01

    Cadmium, is known to cause adverse reproductive effects, and classified as an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC). Human endometrial endothelial cells (HEEC) have a key role in the regulation of endometrial angiogenesis. These cells are known to express estrogen receptors, a feature that makes them potential targets for EDCs such as cadmium. We have designed a co-culture system, in which HEEC were grown in the same cell culture medium as endometrial stromal cells but in separate, communicating chambers. With quantitative PCR, we investigated changes in mRNA expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, sex steroids and endothelial cell specific functions. We found that cadmium altered the mRNA expression of the two important angiogenic molecules VEGF-A and PLGF. Cadmium might thus affect endometrial angiogenesis and as a consequence cause endometrial dysfunction with an increased risk for fertility problems. PMID:20580663

  12. Gad1 mRNA as a reliable indicator of altered GABA release from orexigenic neurons in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Dicken, Matthew S.; Hughes, Alexander R.; Hentges, Shane T.

    2016-01-01

    The strength of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic input is a principle determinant of neuronal activity. However, because of differences in the number of GABA afferent inputs and the sites of synapses, it is difficult to directly assay for altered GABA transmission between specific cells. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of mRNA for the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can provide a reliable proxy for GABA release. This was tested in a mouse hypothalamic circuit important in the regulation of energy balance. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results show that the expression of Gad1 mRNA (encoding the GAD67 enzyme) was increased in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) neurons after an overnight fast, consistent with the ability of GABA from these neurons to stimulate food intake. Optogenetic studies confirmed that the observed increase in Gad1 mRNA correlated with an increase in the probability of GABA release from NPY/AgRP neurons onto downstream proopiomelanocortin neurons. Likewise, there was an increase in the readily releasable pool of GABA in NPY/AgRP neurons. Selective inhibition of GAD activity in NPY/AgRP neurons decreased GABA release, indicating that GAD67 activity, which is largely dictated by expression level, is a key determinant of GABA release. Altogether, it appears that Gad expression may be a reliable proxy of altered GABAergic transmission. Examining changes in Gad mRNA as a proxy for GABA release may be particularly helpful when the downstream targets are not known or when limited tools exist for detecting GABA release at a particular synapse. PMID:26370162

  13. Rpb1 foot mutations demonstrate a major role of Rpb4 in mRNA stability during stress situations in yeast.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Godino, A I; García-López, M C; García-Martínez, J; Pelechano, V; Medina, D A; Pérez-Ortín, J E; Navarro, F

    2016-05-01

    The RPB1 mutants in the foot region of RNA polymerase II affect the assembly of the complex by altering the correct association of both the Rpb6 and the Rpb4/7 dimer. Assembly defects alter both transcriptional activity as well as the amount of enzyme associated with genes. Here, we show that the global transcriptional analysis of foot mutants reveals the activation of an environmental stress response (ESR), which occurs at a permissive temperature under optimal growth conditions. Our data indicate that the ESR that occurs in foot mutants depends mostly on a global post-transcriptional regulation mechanism which, in turn, depends on Rpb4-mRNA imprinting. Under optimal growth conditions, we propose that Rpb4 serves as a key to globally modulate mRNA stability as well as to coordinate transcription and decay. Overall, our results imply that post-transcriptional regulation plays a major role in controlling the ESR at both the transcription and mRNA decay levels. PMID:27001033

  14. Chronic stress alters glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) brain.

    PubMed

    Dickens, M; Romero, L M; Cyr, N E; Dunn, I C; Meddle, S L

    2009-10-01

    Although the glucocorticoid response to acute short-term stress is an adaptive physiological mechanism that aids in the response to and survival of noxious stimuli, chronic stress is associated with a negative impact on health. In wild-caught European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), chronic stress alters the responsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as measured by the acute corticosterone response. In the present study, we investigated potential underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms by comparing glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in the brains of chronically and nonchronically-stressed starlings. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, but not hippocampal, glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in chronically-stressed birds was significantly lower compared to controls, suggesting changes in the efficacy of corticosterone negative feedback. In addition, chronically-stressed birds showed a significant decrease in hippocampal MR mRNA expression. Together, these results suggest that chronic stress changes the brain physiology of wild birds and provides important information for the understanding of the underlying mechanisms that result in dysregulation of the HPA axis in wild animals by chronic stress. PMID:19686439

  15. Altered mRNA Splicing in SMN-Depleted Motor Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todd, A. Gary; Astroski, Jacob W.; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable neurodegenerative disease afflicting 1 in 6–10,000 live births. One of the key functions of the SMN protein is regulation of spliceosome assembly. Reduced levels of the SMN protein that are observed in SMA have been shown to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. SMN-dependent mis-spliced transcripts in motor neurons may cause stresses that are particularly harmful and may serve as potential targets for the treatment of motor neuron disease or as biomarkers in the SMA patient population. We performed deep RNA sequencing using motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells to screen for SMN-dependent mRNA processing changes that occur following acute depletion of SMN. We identified SMN-dependent splicing changes, including an intron retention event that results in the production of a truncated Rit1 transcript. This intron-retained transcript is stable and is mis-spliced in spinal cord from symptomatic SMA mice. Constitutively active Rit1 ameliorated the neurite outgrowth defect in SMN depleted NSC-34 cells, while expression of the truncated protein product of the mis-spliced Rit1 transcript inhibited neurite extension. These results reveal new insights into the biological consequence of SMN-dependent splicing in motor neuron-like cells. PMID:27736905

  16. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenbolone (TREN) was performed to evaluate the response of juvenile coho salmon to EDC exposure. Second, juvenile coho salmon were exposed to 0, 20 or 100% effluent from eight WWTPs from the Puget Sound, WA region for 72h. Juvenile coho salmon exposed to 2 and 10ng EE2L(-1) had 17-fold and 215-fold higher lhb mRNA levels relative to control fish. Hepatic vtg mRNA levels were dramatically increased 6670-fold, but only in response to 10ng EE2L(-1) and Fsh beta-subunit (fshb) mRNA levels were not altered by any of the treatments. In the WWTP effluent exposures, lhb mRNA levels were significantly elevated in fish exposed to five of the WWTP effluents. In contrast, transcript levels of vtg were not affected by any of the WWTP effluent exposures. Mean levels of natural and synthetic estrogens in fish bile were consistent with pituitary lhb expression, suggesting that the observed lhb induction may be due to

  17. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenbolone (TREN) was performed to evaluate the response of juvenile coho salmon to EDC exposure. Second, juvenile coho salmon were exposed to 0, 20 or 100% effluent from eight WWTPs from the Puget Sound, WA region for 72h. Juvenile coho salmon exposed to 2 and 10ng EE2L(-1) had 17-fold and 215-fold higher lhb mRNA levels relative to control fish. Hepatic vtg mRNA levels were dramatically increased 6670-fold, but only in response to 10ng EE2L(-1) and Fsh beta-subunit (fshb) mRNA levels were not altered by any of the treatments. In the WWTP effluent exposures, lhb mRNA levels were significantly elevated in fish exposed to five of the WWTP effluents. In contrast, transcript levels of vtg were not affected by any of the WWTP effluent exposures. Mean levels of natural and synthetic estrogens in fish bile were consistent with pituitary lhb expression, suggesting that the observed lhb induction may be due to

  18. The effect of sequences with high AU content on mRNA stability in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Ohme-Takagi, M; Taylor, C B; Newman, T C; Green, P J

    1993-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that target transcripts for rapid degradation in plants. In mammalian cells, sequences with a high AU content and multiple AUUUA motifs have been shown to cause mRNA instability when present in the 3' untranslated regions of several transcripts. This precedent, coupled with the poor accumulation of AU-rich foreign transcripts in plants (e.g., BT-toxin mRNAs), prompted us to test whether AU sequences could destabilize transcripts in tobacco. To address this question, we made a set of constructs containing sequences with high AU content inserted into the 3' untranslated regions of reporter genes. The stability of the corresponding transcripts was then assayed in stably transformed cell lines of tobacco. These experiments showed that a 60-base sequence containing 11 copies of the AUUUA motif (AUUUA repeat) markedly destabilized a beta-glucuronidase reporter transcript compared to a no-insert control or a 60-base spacer sequence (GC control). Another sequence with an identical A+U content had little effect. The same results were obtained when each sequence was assayed within the 3' untranslated region of a beta-globin reporter transcript. In regenerated transgenic plants, the AUUUA repeat decreased the accumulation of the beta-globin transcript by approximately 14-fold, compared to the GC control. Taken together, our results indicate that the AUUUA repeat is recognized as an instability determinant in plant cells and that the effect is due to the sequence of the element, not simply to the high AU content. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8265631

  19. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  20. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  1. Nutritional status alters saccharin intake and sweet receptor mRNA expression in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Yan, Jianqun; Suo, Yi; Li, Jinrong; Wang, Qian; Lv, Bo

    2010-04-14

    Sweet taste usually signifies the presence of caloric food. It is commonly accepted that a close association exists among sweet taste perception, preference, and nutritional status. However, the mechanisms involved remain unknown. To investigate whether nutritional status affects the preference for palatable solutions and alters sweet taste receptor gene expression in rats, we measured saccharin intake and preference using a two-bottle preference test, and changes in body weight, plasma leptin levels, and gene expression for the sweet taste receptor in taste buds in high-fat diet-induced obese rats and chronically diet-restricted rats. We found that the consumption and preference ratios for 0.01 and 0.04 M saccharin were significantly lower in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats than in the normal diet rats, while the serum leptin levels were markedly increased in obese rats. Consistent with the changes in saccharin intake, the gene expression level of the sweet taste receptor T1R3 was significantly decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats compared with the control rats. By contrast, the chronically diet-restricted rats showed remarkably enhanced consumption and preference for 0.04 M saccharin. The serum leptin concentration was decreased, and the gene expression of the leptin receptor was markedly increased in the taste buds. In conclusion, our results suggest that nutritional status alters saccharin preference and the expression of T1R3 in taste buds. These processes may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the modulation of peripheral sweet taste sensitivity, in which leptin plays a role.

  2. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  3. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Stephanie E; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Ramirez, Claire A; Malpas, Janae M; Propper, Catherine R

    2015-07-15

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring of endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10(-9)M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10(-9)M, 10(-8)M, and 10(-7)M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10(-7)M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10(-9) and 10(-8)M OP, but not 10(-7)M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed within

  4. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Stephanie E; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Ramirez, Claire A; Malpas, Janae M; Propper, Catherine R

    2015-07-15

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring of endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10(-9)M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10(-9)M, 10(-8)M, and 10(-7)M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10(-7)M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10(-9) and 10(-8)M OP, but not 10(-7)M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed within

  5. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  6. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  7. Protein kinase A stimulates binding of multiple proteins to a U-rich domain in the 3'-untranslated region of lactate dehydrogenase A mRNA that is required for the regulation of mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Tian, D; Huang, D; Brown, R C; Jungmann, R A

    1998-10-23

    We have explored the molecular basis of the cAMP-induced stabilization of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) mRNA and identified four cytoplasmic proteins of 96, 67, 52, and 50 kDa that specifically bind to a 30-nucleotide uridine-rich sequence in the LDH 3'-untranslated region with a predicted stem-loop structure. Mutational analysis revealed that specific protein binding is dependent upon an intact primary nucleotide sequence in the loop as well as integrity of the adjoining double-stranded stem structure, thus indicating a high degree of primary and secondary structure specificity. The critical stem-loop region is located between nucleotides 1473 and 1502 relative to the mRNA cap site and contains a previously identified cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) required for LDH-A mRNA stability regulation by the protein kinase A pathway. The 3'-untranslated region binding activity of the proteins is up-regulated after protein kinase A activation, whereas protein dephosphorylation is associated with a loss of binding activity. These results imply a cause and effect relationship between LDH-A mRNA stabilization and CSR-phosphoprotein binding activity. We propose that the U-rich CSR is a recognition signal for CSR-binding proteins and for an mRNA processing pathway that specifically stabilizes LDH mRNA in response to activation of the protein kinase A signal transduction pathway.

  8. Increased intracellular Ca2+ selectively suppresses IL-1-induced NO production by reducing iNOS mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    This study addresses the role of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) in the expression of iNOS, an IL-1 inducible gene in human articular chondrocytes. The calcium ionophore A23187 and ionomycin did not induce NO release or iNOS expression but inhibited dose dependently IL-1- induced NO release with IC50 of 200 nM and 100 nM, respectively. Increased intracellular Ca2+ induced by thapsigargin or cyclopiazonic acid, inhibitors of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, had similar inhibitory effects with IC50 of 1 nM and 3 microM, respectively. LPS and TNF alpha induced NO production were also suppressed by these Ca2+ elevating drugs. Levels of IL-1-induced iNOS protein were reduced by A23187, thapsigargin, and cyclopiazonic acid. These drugs as well as Bay K 8644 and KCl inhibited IL-1-induced iNOS mRNA expression. To analyze the role of Ca2+ in the expression of other IL-1 responsive genes in chondrocytes, these Ca2+ modulating drugs were tested for effects on COXII. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on iNOS mRNA, these drugs induced COXII mRNA expression and in combination with IL-1, enhanced COXII mRNA levels. Ca2+ mediated increases in COXII mRNA expression were associated with an increase in COXII protein. The kinetics of Ca2+ effects on IL-1-induced iNOS mRNA levels suggested a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of iNOS mRNA half life showed that it was 6-7 h in IL-1-stimulated cells and decreased by A23187 to 2- 3 h. In conclusion, these results show that Ca2+ inhibits IL-1-induced NO release, iNOS protein, and mRNA expression in human articular chondrocytes by reducing iNOS mRNA stability. Under identical conditions increased Ca2+ enhances IL-1-induced COXII gene and protein expression. PMID:7540612

  9. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  10. Cadmium Activates Multiple Signaling Pathways That Coordinately Stimulate Akt Activity to Enhance c-Myc mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jia-Shiuan; Chao, Cheng-Han; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a known environmental carcinogen. Exposure of Cd leads to the activation of several proto-oncogenes in cells. We investigated here the mechanism of c-Myc expression in hepatic cells under Cd treatment. The c-Myc protein and mRNA levels increased in dose- and time-dependent manners in HepG2 cells with Cd treatment. This increase was due to an increase in c-Myc mRNA stability. To explore the mechanism involved in enhancing the mRNA stability, several cellular signaling factors that evoked by Cd treatment were analyzed. PI3K, p38, ERK and JNK were activated by Cd. However, ERK did not participate in the Cd-induced c-Myc expression. Further analysis revealed that mTORC2 was a downstream factor of p38. PI3K, JNK and mTORC2 coordinately activated Akt. Akt was phosphorylated at Thr450 in the untreated cells. Cd treatment led to additional phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473. Blocking any of the three signaling factors resulted in the reduction of phosphorylation level at all three Akt sites. The activated Akt phosphorylated Foxo1 and allowed the modified protein to translocate into the cytoplasm. We conclude that Cd-induced accumulation of c-Myc requires the activation of several signaling pathways. The signals act coordinately for Akt activation and drive the Foxo1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Reduction of Foxo1 in the nucleus reduces the transcription of its target genes that may affect c-Myc mRNA stability, resulting in a higher accumulation of the c-Myc proteins. PMID:26751215

  11. The Role of Regulated mRNA Stability in Establishing Bicoid Morphogen Gradient in Drosophila Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2011-01-01

    The Bicoid morphogen is amongst the earliest triggers of differential spatial pattern of gene expression and subsequent cell fate determination in the embryonic development of Drosophila. This maternally deposited morphogen is thought to diffuse in the embryo, establishing a concentration gradient which is sensed by downstream genes. In most model based analyses of this process, the translation of the bicoid mRNA is thought to take place at a fixed rate from the anterior pole of the embryo and a supply of the resulting protein at a constant rate is assumed. Is this process of morphogen generation a passive one as assumed in the modelling literature so far, or would available data support an alternate hypothesis that the stability of the mRNA is regulated by active processes? We introduce a model in which the stability of the maternal mRNA is regulated by being held constant for a length of time, followed by rapid degradation. With this more realistic model of the source, we have analysed three computational models of spatial morphogen propagation along the anterior-posterior axis: (a) passive diffusion modelled as a deterministic differential equation, (b) diffusion enhanced by a cytoplasmic flow term; and (c) diffusion modelled by stochastic simulation of the corresponding chemical reactions. Parameter estimation on these models by matching to publicly available data on spatio-temporal Bicoid profiles suggests strong support for regulated stability over either a constant supply rate or one where the maternal mRNA is permitted to degrade in a passive manner. PMID:21949782

  12. Invaded grassland communities have altered stability-maintenance mechanisms but equal stability compared to native communities.

    PubMed

    Wilsey, Brian J; Daneshgar, Pedram P; Hofmockel, Kirsten; Polley, H Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Theory predicts that stability should increase with diversity via several mechanisms. We tested predictions in a 5-year experiment that compared low-diversity exotic to high-diversity native plant mixtures under two irrigation treatments. The study included both wet and dry years. Variation in biomass across years (CV) was 50% lower in mixtures than monocultures of both native and exotic species. Growth among species was more asynchronous and overyielding values were greater during and after a drought in native than exotic mixtures. Mean-variance slopes indicated strong portfolio effects in both community types, but the intercept was higher for exotics than for natives, suggesting that exotics were inherently more variable than native species. However, this failed to result in higher CV's in exotic communities because species that heavily dominated plots tended to have lower than expected variance. Results indicate that diversity-stability mechanisms are altered in invaded systems compared to native ones they replaced. PMID:24325664

  13. Invaded grassland communities have altered stability-maintenance mechanisms but equal stability compared to native communities.

    PubMed

    Wilsey, Brian J; Daneshgar, Pedram P; Hofmockel, Kirsten; Polley, H Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Theory predicts that stability should increase with diversity via several mechanisms. We tested predictions in a 5-year experiment that compared low-diversity exotic to high-diversity native plant mixtures under two irrigation treatments. The study included both wet and dry years. Variation in biomass across years (CV) was 50% lower in mixtures than monocultures of both native and exotic species. Growth among species was more asynchronous and overyielding values were greater during and after a drought in native than exotic mixtures. Mean-variance slopes indicated strong portfolio effects in both community types, but the intercept was higher for exotics than for natives, suggesting that exotics were inherently more variable than native species. However, this failed to result in higher CV's in exotic communities because species that heavily dominated plots tended to have lower than expected variance. Results indicate that diversity-stability mechanisms are altered in invaded systems compared to native ones they replaced.

  14. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Luca; Barbon, Alessandro; Palumbo, Sara; Mora, Cristina; Toscano, Christopher D; Bosetti, Francesca; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/-)) mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/-) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/-) compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/-) mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/-) mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/-) mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), microglia (CD11b) and astrocyte (GFAP). Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  15. Plakophilins 1 and 3 Bind to FXR1 and Thereby Influence the mRNA Stability of Desmosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Kešo, Regina; Breuninger, Sonja; Hofmann, Sarah; Henn, Manuela; Röhrig, Theresa; Ströbel, Philipp; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilins 1 and 3 (PKP1/3) are members of the arm repeat family of catenin proteins and serve as structural components of desmosomes, which are important for cell-cell-adhesion. In addition, PKP1/3 occur as soluble proteins outside desmosomes, yet their role in the cytoplasm is not known. We found that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 coprecipitated with the RNA-binding proteins FXR1, G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1, and these PKP1/3 complexes also comprised desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNAs. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of PKP1/3 with G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1 but not with FXR1 was RNase sensitive. To address the cytoplasmic function of PKP1/3, we performed gain-and-loss-of-function studies. Both PKP1 and PKP3 knockdown cell lines showed reduced protein and mRNA levels for desmoplakin and PKP2. Whereas global rates of translation were unaffected, desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNA were destabilized. Furthermore, binding of PKP1/3 to FXR1 was RNA independent, and both PKP3 and FXR1 stabilized PKP2 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 are components of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. PMID:25225333

  16. Regional and Duration of Illness Differences in the Alteration of NCAM-180 mRNA Expression within the Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A. S.; Thomas, E. A.; Dean, B

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been proposed to have a neurodevelopmental aetiology. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (NCAM1) is involved in several neurodevelopmental processes and abnormal expression of this gene has been associated in the pathology of schizophrenia and, thus, altered NCAM1 expression may be characteristic of the early stages of the illness. Alternative splicing of the NCAM1 transcript produces 3 major isoforms. Using qPCR we analysed mRNA expression of one of these isoforms; the 180 kDa isoform of NCAM1 (NCAM-180), in Brodmann Area (BA) 46, BA10 and BA17, postmortem, from 15 subjects with a short duration of illness of schizophrenia (<7 years) and 15 control subjects. NCAM-180 mRNA expression was increased in BA46 from subjects with schizophrenia compared to controls (P=0.013). By contrast, there were no significant differences in the expression of NCAM-180 mRNA in BA10 (P=0.575) or BA17 (P=0.772). We then analysed NCAM-180 mRNA expression in BA46 from 15 subjects with a longer duration of illness of schizophrenia (>22 years) and 15 controls. There was no significant difference in NCAM-180 mRNA expression in this second cohort. This data suggests NCAM-180 mRNA expression is altered in a regionally-specific manner in schizophrenia and these changes are associated with the early period following diagnosis. PMID:19411161

  17. Mitochondrial mRNA stability and polyadenylation during anoxia-induced quiescence in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Eads, Brian D; Hand, Steven C

    2003-10-01

    Polyadenylation of messenger RNA is known to be an important mechanism for regulating mRNA stability in a variety of systems, including bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria. By comparison, little is known about the role played by polyadenylation in animal mitochondrial gene expression. We have used embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana to test hypotheses regarding message stability and polyadenylation under conditions simulating anoxia-induced quiescence. In response to anoxia, these embryos undergo a profound and acute metabolic downregulation, characterized by a steep drop in intracellular pH (pH(i)) and ATP levels. Using dot blots of total mitochondrial RNA, we show that during in organello incubations both O(2) deprivation and acidic pH (pH 6.4) elicit increases in half-lives of selected mitochondrial transcripts on the order of five- to tenfold or more, relative to normoxic controls at pH 7.8. Polyadenylation of these transcripts was measured under the same incubation conditions using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assay. The results demonstrate that low pH and anoxia promote significant deadenylation of the stabilized transcripts in several cases, measured either as change over time in the amount of polyadenylation within a given size class of poly(A)(+) tail, or as the total amount of polyadenylation at the endpoint of the incubation. This study is the first direct demonstration that for a metazoan mitochondrion, polyadenylation is associated with destabilized mRNA. This pattern has also been demonstrated in bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria and may indicate a conserved mechanism for regulating message half-life that differs from the paradigm for eukaryotic cytoplasm, where increased mRNA stability is associated with polyadenylation. PMID:12966060

  18. Control of mRNA Stability in Fungi by NMD, EJC and CBC Factors Through 3′UTR Introns

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Sachs, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes the accelerated degradation of mRNAs harboring premature termination codons is controlled by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), exon junction complex (EJC), and nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) factors, but the mechanistic basis for this quality-control system and the specific roles of the individual factors remain unclear. Using Neurospora crassa as a model system, we analyzed the mechanisms by which NMD is induced by spliced 3′-UTR introns or upstream open reading frames and observed that the former requires NMD, EJC, and CBC factors whereas the latter requires only the NMD factors. The transcripts for EJC components eIF4A3 and Y14, and translation termination factor eRF1, contain spliced 3′-UTR introns and each was stabilized in NMD, EJC, and CBC mutants. Reporter mRNAs containing spliced 3′-UTR introns, but not matched intronless controls, were stabilized in these mutants and were enriched in mRNPs immunopurified from wild-type cells with antibody directed against human Y14, demonstrating a direct role for spliced 3′-UTR introns in triggering EJC-mediated NMD. These results demonstrate conclusively that NMD, EJC, and CBC factors have essential roles in controlling mRNA stability and that, based on differential requirements for these factors, there are branched mechanisms for NMD. They demonstrate for the first time autoregulatory control of expression at the level of mRNA stability through the EJC/CBC branch of NMD for EJC core components, eIF4A3 and Y14, and for eRF1, which recognizes termination codons. Finally, these results show that EJC-mediated NMD occurs in fungi and thus is an evolutionarily conserved quality-control mechanism. PMID:26048019

  19. Palmitate alters the rhythmic expression of molecular clock genes and orexigenic neuropeptide Y mRNA levels within immortalized, hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Fick, Laura J; Fick, Gordon H; Belsham, Denise D

    2011-09-30

    The control of energy homeostasis within the hypothalamus is under the regulated control of homeostatic hormones, nutrients and the expression of neuropeptides that alter feeding behavior. Elevated levels of palmitate, a predominant saturated fatty acid in diet and fatty acid biosynthesis, alter cellular function. For instance, a key mechanism involved in the development of insulin resistance is lipotoxicity, through increased circulating saturated fatty acids. Although many studies have begun to determine the underlying mechanisms of lipotoxicity in peripheral tissues, little is known about the effects of excess lipids in the brain. To determine these mechanisms we used an immortalized, clonal, hypothalamic cell line, mHypoE-44, to demonstrate that palmitate directly alters the expression of molecular clock components, by increasing Bmal1 and Clock, or by decreasing Per2, and Rev-erbα, their mRNA levels and altering their rhythmic period within individual neurons. We found that these neurons endogenously express the orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AgRP, thus we determined that palmitate administration alters the mRNA expression of these neuropeptides as well. Palmitate treatment causes a significant increase in NPY mRNA levels and significantly alters the phase of rhythmic expression. We explored the link between AMPK and the expression of neuropeptide Y using the AMPK inhibitor compound C and the AMP analog AICAR. AMPK inhibition decreased NPY mRNA. AICAR also elevated basal NPY, but prevented the palmitate-mediated increase in NPY mRNA levels. We postulate that this palmitate-mediated increase in NPY and AgRP synthesis may initiate a detrimental positive feedback loop leading to increased energy consumption.

  20. Multiplexed digital quantification of binge-like alcohol-mediated alterations in maternal uterine angiogenic mRNA transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Ramadoss, Jayanth; Magness, Ronald R

    2012-06-01

    Genomic studies on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) have utilized either genome-wide microarrays/bioinformatics or targeted real-time PCR (RT-PCR). We utilized herein for the first time a novel digital approach with high throughput as well as the capability to focus on one physiological system. The aim of the present study was to investigate alcohol-induced alterations in uterine angiogenesis-related mRNA abundance using digital mRNA technology. Four biological and three technical replicates of uterine arterial endothelial cells from third-trimester ewes were fluorescence-activated cell sorted, validated, and treated without or with binge-like alcohol. A capture probe covalently bound to an oligonucleotide containing biotin and a color-coded reporter probe were designed for 85 angiogenesis-related genes and analyzed with the Nanostring nCounter system. Twenty genes were downregulated (↓) and two upregulated (↑), including angiogenic growth factors/receptors (↓placental growth factor), adhesion molecules (↓angiopoietin-like-3; ↓collagen-18A1; ↓endoglin), proteases/matrix proteins/inhibitors (↓alanyl aminopeptidase; ↓collagen-4A3; ↓heparanase; ↓plasminogen, ↑plasminogen activator urokinase; ↓platelet factor-4; ↓plexin domain containing-1; ↓tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3), transcription/signaling molecules (↓heart and neural crest derivatives-2; ↓DNA-binding protein inhibitor; ↓NOTCH-4; ↓ribosomal protein-L13a1; ↓ribosomal protein large-P1), cytokines/chemokines (↓interleukin-1B), and miscellaneous growth factors (↓leptin; ↓platelet-derived growth factor-α); ↓transforming growth factor (TGF-α; ↑TGF-β receptor-1). These novel data show significant detrimental alcohol effects on genes controlling angiogenesis supporting a mechanistic role for abnormal uteroplacental vascular development in FASD. The tripartite digital gene expression system is therefore a valuable tool to answer many additional

  1. mRNA expression patterns for GH, PRL, SL, IGF-I and IGF-II during altered feeding status in rabbitfish, Siganus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Ayson, Felix G; de Jesus-Ayson, Evelyn Grace T; Takemura, Akihiro

    2007-01-15

    Feeding time is a major synchronizer of many physiological rhythms in many organisms. Alteration in the nutritional status, specifically fasting, also affects the secretion rhythms of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). In this study, we investigated whether the expression patterns for the mRNAs of GH, prolactin (PRL) and somatolactin (SL) in the pituitary gland, and insulin-like growth factor I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) in the liver of juvenile rabbitfish (Siganus guttatus) follow a rhythm according to feeding time and whether these hormone rhythms changes with starvation. Hormone mRNA levels were determined by real time PCR. The daily expression pattern for the mRNAs of GH, PRL and SL was not altered whether food was given in the morning (10:00 h) or in the afternoon (15:00 h). The daily GH mRNA expression pattern, however, was affected when food was not available for 3 days. In contrast, the daily expression pattern for IGF-I mRNA reaches its peak at roughly 5-6h after feeding. This pattern, however, was not observed with IGF-II mRNA. During 15-day starvation, GH mRNA levels in starved fish were significantly higher than the control fish starting on the 9th day of starvation until day 15. The levels returned to normal after re-feeding. In contrast to GH, PRL mRNA levels in starved fish were significantly lower than the control group starting on the 6th day of starvation until 3 days after re-feeding. SL mRNA levels were not significantly different between the control and starved group at anytime during the experiment. Both IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA levels in starved group were significantly higher than the control fish on the 3rd and 6th day of starvation. mRNA levels of both IGF-I and II in the starved fish decreased starting on the 9th day of starvation. While IGF-I mRNA levels in the starved group continued to decrease as starvation progressed, IGF-II mRNA levels were not significantly different from the control during the rest of the

  2. β-Amyloid-aluminum complex alters cytoskeletal stability and increases ROS production in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo; Lorenzetto, Erika; Valenti, Maria Teresa; Buffelli, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Several lines of evidence have supported the potential involvement of metal ions in the etiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction are still partially unknown. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) aggregation was strongly influenced by the conjugation of the peptide with few metal ions (aluminum, copper, zinc, and iron) that are found in high concentrations in the senile plaque core. The binding of aluminum (Al) to Aβ specifically stabilized the peptide in an oligomeric conformation. Here, we show that the aggregation of Aβ-Al was boosted by sodium dodecyl sulfate, a detergent that mimics some characteristics of biological membrane, suggesting a potential role for membrane components in the Aβ aggregation process. Notably, we also found that Aβ-Al caused mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production in primary cortical neurons. Aβ-Al strongly promoted also alterations in cytoskeleton network as shown by the increased F-actin expression and the occurrence of neuritic beading. Interestingly, the neurotoxic effect of this metal complex was associated with a decreased mRNA expression of ubiquitin thiolesterase, an ubiquitin-dependent protein involved in catabolic process, and by the increased expression of glutaminyl cyclase, responsible for pathological post-translational modification of Aβ. These results suggest that, in neuronal cells, Aβ-Al can induce relevant detrimental changes that resemble pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:23416043

  3. RNAIII of the Staphylococcus aureus agr system activates global regulator MgrA by stabilizing mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi Kr.; Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia Y.

    2015-01-01

    RNAIII, the effector of the agr quorum-sensing system, plays a key role in virulence gene regulation in Staphylococcus aureus, but how RNAIII transcriptionally regulates its downstream genes is not completely understood. Here, we show that RNAIII stabilizes mgrA mRNA, thereby increasing the production of MgrA, a global transcriptional regulator that affects the expression of many genes. The mgrA gene is transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, to produce two mRNA transcripts with long 5′ UTR. Two adjacent regions of the mgrA mRNA UTR transcribed from the upstream P2 promoter, but not the P1 promoter, form a stable complex with two regions of RNAIII near the 5′ and 3′ ends. We further demonstrate that the interaction has several biological effects. We propose that MgrA can serve as an intermediary regulator through which agr exerts its regulatory function. PMID:26504242

  4. Early-life stress induces persistent alterations in 5-HT1A receptor and serotonin transporter mRNA expression in the adult rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Javier A.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Early-life experience plays a major role in the stress response throughout life. Neonatal maternal separation (MS) is an animal model of depression with an altered serotonergic response. We hypothesize that this alteration may be caused by differences in 5-HT1A receptor and serotonin transporter (SERT) mRNA expression in brain areas involved in the control of emotions, memory, and fear as well as in regions controlling the central serotonergic tone. To test this, Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to MS for 3 h daily during postnatal days 2–12. As control, age matched rats were non-separated (NS) from their dams. When animals reached adulthood (11–13 weeks) brain was extracted and mRNA expression of 5-HT1A receptor in amygdala, hippocampus and dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) and SERT in the DRN was analyzed through in situ hybridisation. Densitometric analysis revealed that MS increased 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression in the amygdala, and reduced its expression in the DRN, but no changes were observed in the hippocampus in comparison to NS controls. Also, MS reduced SERT mRNA expression in the DRN when compared to NS rats. These results suggest that early-life stress induces persistent changes in 5-HT1A receptor and SERT mRNA expression in key brain regions involved in the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders. The reduction in SERT mRNA indicates an alteration that is in line with clinical findings such as polymorphic variants in individuals with higher risk of depression. These data may help to understand how early-life stress contributes to the development of mood disorders in adulthood. PMID:24782706

  5. Modulation of TNF-α mRNA stability by human antigen R and miR181s in sepsis-induced immunoparalysis

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Cao; Jinjun, Bian; Zi-Chun, Hua; Lin, Ma; Wei, Chen; Xu, Zhang; Ri, Zhou; Shun, Cheng; Wen-Zhu, Sun; Qing-Cai, Jiao; Wu, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Immunoparalysis is an important pathological mechanism in sepsis. However, an effective small molecule therapy is lacking. Here, we show that ouabain, a Na+,K+-ATPase ligand, can reverse immunoparalysis in vitro, in vivo, and in clinical samples. Notably, the effect of ouabain was critically dependent on TNF-α expression. However, ouabain had opposing effects on the stability of TNF-α mRNA: Ouabain triggered miR-181 transcription, which promoted TNF-α mRNA degradation and induced immunoparalysis, and ouabain triggered the nuclear export of human antigen R (HuR), which stabilized TNF-α mRNA and suppressed immuno-paralysis. Interestingly, because the miR-181 binding site is located within the HuR binding site in the 3′-untranslated region of TNF-α, in ouabain-treated cells, HuR competed with miR-181 for binding to TNF-α mRNA and recruited TNF-α mRNA to stress granules, thereby stabilizing TNF-α mRNA and reversing immunoparalysis. Ouabain also induced GM-CSF and interferon-γ expression in a HuR-dependent manner. Hence, the fine-tuning of TNF-α mRNA stability by HuR and miR181 plays a crucial role in immunoparalysis, and Na+,K+-ATPase ligands are promising agents for immunoparalysis therapy. PMID:25535255

  6. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human nescient helix-loop-helix 2 (NHLH2) gene reduce mRNA stability and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Al Rayyan, Numan; Wankhade, Umesh D; Bush, Korie; Good, Deborah J

    2013-01-01

    Nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, which has been implicated, using mouse knockouts, in adult body weight regulation and fertility. A scan of the known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NHLH2 gene revealed one in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), which lies within an AUUUA RNA stability motif. A second SNP is nonsynonymous within the coding region of NHLH2, and was found in a genome-wide association study for obesity. Both of these SNPs were examined for their effect on NLHL2 by creating mouse mimics and examining mRNA stability, and protein function in mouse hypothalamic cell lines. The 3'UTR SNP causes increased instability and, when the SNP-containing Nhlh2 3'UTR is attached to luciferase mRNA, reduced protein levels in cells. The nonsynonymous SNP at position 83 in the protein changes an alanine residue, conserved in NHLH2 orthologs through the Drosophila sp. to a proline residue. This change affects migration of the protein on an SDS-PAGE gel, and appears to alter secondary structure of the protein, as predicted using in silico methods. These results provide functional information on two rare human SNPs in the NHLH2 gene. One of these has been linked to human obese phenotypes, while the other is present in a relatively high proportion of individuals. Given their effects on NHLH2 protein levels, both SNPs deserve further analysis in whether they are causative and/or additive for human body weight and fertility phenotypes.

  7. Transcript copy number of genes for DNA repair and translesion synthesis in yeast: contribution of transcription rate and mRNA stability to the steady-state level of each mRNA along with growth in glucose-fermentative medium.

    PubMed

    Michán, Carmen; Monje-Casas, Fernando; Pueyo, Carmen

    2005-04-01

    We quantitated the copy number of mRNAs (NTG1, NTG2, OGG1, APN1, APN2, MSH2, MSH6, REV3, RAD30) encoding different DNA repair enzymes and translesion-synthesis polymerases in yeast. Quantitations reported examine how the steady-state number of each transcript is modulated in association with the growth in glucose-fermentative medium, and evaluate the respective contribution of the rate of mRNA degradation and transcription initiation to the specific mRNA level profile of each gene. Each transcript displayed a unique growth-related profile, therefore altering the relative abundance of mRNAs coding for proteins with similar functions, as cells proceed from exponential to stationary phase. Nonetheless, as general trend, they exhibited maximal levels when cells proliferate rapidly and minimal values when cells cease proliferation. We found that previous calculations on the stability of the investigated mRNAs might be biased, in particular regarding those that respond to heat shock stress. Overall, the mRNAs experienced drastic increments in their stabilities in response to gradual depletion of essential nutrients in the culture. However, differences among the mRNA stability profiles suggest a dynamic modulation rather than a passive process. As general rule, the investigated genes were much more frequently transcribed during the fermentative growth than later during the diauxic arrest and the stationary phase, this finding conciliating low steady-state levels with increased mRNA stabilities. Interestingly, while the rate at which each gene is transcribed appeared as the only determinant of the number of mRNA copies at the exponential growth, later, when cell growth is arrested, the rate of mRNA degradation becomes also a key factor for gene expression. In short, our results raise the question of how important the respective contribution of transcription and mRNA stability mechanisms is for the steady-state profile of a given transcript, and how this contribution may

  8. ZFP36L1 and ZFP36L2 control LDLR mRNA stability via the ERK-RSK pathway.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shungo; Homoto, Masae; Tanaka, Rikou; Hioki, Yusaku; Murakami, Hiroshi; Suga, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Hatta, Tomohisa; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru

    2014-09-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA is unstable, but is stabilized upon extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, possibly through the binding of certain proteins to the LDLR mRNA 3'-untranslated region (UTR), although the detailed mechanism underlying this stability control is unclear. Here, using a proteomic approach, we show that proteins ZFP36L1 and ZFP36L2 specifically bind to the 3'-UTR of LDLR mRNA and recruit the CCR4-NOT-deadenylase complex, resulting in mRNA destabilization. We also show that the C-terminal regions of ZFP36L1 and ZFP36L2 are directly phosphorylated by p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, a kinase downstream of ERK, resulting in dissociation of the CCR4-NOT-deadenylase complex and stabilization of LDLR mRNA. We further demonstrate that targeted disruption of the interaction between LDLR mRNA and ZFP36L1 and ZFP36L2 using antisense oligonucleotides results in upregulation of LDLR mRNA and protein. These results indicate that ZFP36L1 and ZFP36L2 regulate LDLR protein levels downstream of ERK. Our results also show the usefulness of our method for identifying critical regulators of specific RNAs and the potency of antisense oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

  9. CUGBP1 and HuR regulate E-cadherin translation by altering recruitment of E-cadherin mRNA to processing bodies and modulate epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting-Xi; Gu, Bei-Lin; Yan, Jun-Kai; Zhu, Jie; Yan, Wei-Hui; Chen, Jie; Qian, Lin-Xi; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness and stability of epithelial barrier depend on apical junctional complexes, which consist of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). E-cadherin is the primary component of AJs, and it is essential for maintenance of cell-to-cell interactions and regulates the epithelial barrier. However, the exact mechanism underlying E-cadherin expression, particularly at the posttranscriptional level, remains largely unknown. RNA-binding proteins CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) and HU antigen R (HuR) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelial tissues and modulate the stability and translation of target mRNAs. Here, we present evidence that CUGBP1 and HuR interact directly with the 3'-untranslated region of E-cadherin mRNA and regulate E-cadherin translation. CUGBP1 overexpression in Caco-2 cells inhibited E-cadherin translation by increasing the recruitment of E-cadherin mRNA to processing bodies (PBs), thus resulting in an increase in paracellular permeability. Overexpression of HuR exhibited an opposite effect on E-cadherin expression by preventing the translocation of E-cadherin mRNA to PBs and therefore prevented CUGBP1-induced repression of E-cadherin expression. Elevation of HuR also abolished the CUGBP1-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction. These findings indicate that CUGBP1 and HuR negate each other's effects in regulating E-cadherin translation by altering the recruitment of E-cadherin mRNA to PBs and play an important role in the regulation of intestinal barrier integrity under various pathophysiological conditions.

  10. Transition State Charge Stabilization and Acid-Base Catalysis of mRNA Cleavage by the Endoribonuclease RelE.

    PubMed

    Dunican, Brian F; Hiller, David A; Strobel, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial toxin RelE is a ribosome-dependent endoribonuclease. It is part of a type II toxin-antitoxin system that contributes to antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. During amino acid starvation, RelE cleaves mRNA in the ribosomal A-site, globally inhibiting protein translation. RelE is structurally similar to microbial RNases that employ general acid-base catalysis to facilitate RNA cleavage. The RelE active site is atypical for acid-base catalysis, in that it is enriched with positively charged residues and lacks the prototypical histidine-glutamate catalytic pair, making the mechanism of mRNA cleavage unclear. In this study, we use a single-turnover kinetic analysis to measure the effect of pH and phosphorothioate substitution on the rate constant for cleavage of mRNA by wild-type RelE and seven active-site mutants. Mutation and thio effects indicate a major role for stabilization of increased negative change in the transition state by arginine 61. The wild-type RelE cleavage rate constant is pH-independent, but the reaction catalyzed by many of the mutants is strongly dependent on pH, suggestive of general acid-base catalysis. pH-rate curves indicate that wild-type RelE operates with the pK(a) of at least one catalytic residue significantly downshifted by the local environment. Mutation of any single active-site residue is sufficient to disrupt this microenvironment and revert the shifted pK(a) back above neutrality. pH-rate curves are consistent with K54 functioning as a general base and R81 as a general acid. The capacity of RelE to effect a large pK(a) shift and facilitate a common catalytic mechanism by uncommon means furthers our understanding of other atypical enzymatic active sites.

  11. LACK OF FUNCTIONAL GABAB RECEPTORS ALTERS Kiss1, Gnrh1 AND Gad1 mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE MEDIAL BASAL HYPOTHALAMUS AT POSTNATAL DAY 4

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Noelia P.; Catalano, Paolo N.; López, Paula V.; González, Betina; Semaan, Sheila J.; López, Gabriela C.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Rulli, Susana B.; Somoza, Gustavo M.; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adult mice lacking functional GABAB receptors (GABAB1KO) show altered Gnrh1 and Gad1 expressions in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POA-AH) and females display disruption of cyclicity and fertility. Here we addressed whether sexual differentiation of the brain and the proper wiring of the GnRH and kisspeptin systems were already disturbed in postnatal day 4 (PND4) GABAB1KO mice. Methods PND4 wild type (WT) and GABAB1KO mice of both sexes were sacrificed; tissues were collected to determine mRNA expression (qPCR), amino acids (HPLC), and hormones (RIA and/or IHC). Results GnRH neuron number (IHC) did not differ among groups in olfactory bulbs or OVLT-POA. Gnrh1 mRNA (qPCR) in POA-AH was similar among groups. Gnrh1 mRNA in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was similar in WTs but was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Hypothalamic GnRH (RIA) was sexually different in WTs (males > females) but this sex difference was lost in GABAB1KOs; the same pattern was observed when analyzing only the MBH, but not in the POA-AH. Arcuate nucleus Kiss1 mRNA (micropunch-qPCR) was higher in WT females than in WT males and GABAB1KO females. Gad1 mRNA in MBH was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Serum LH and gonadal estradiol content were also increased in GABAB1KOs. Conclusion We demonstrate that GABABRs participate in the sexual differentiation of the ARC/MBH, because sex differences in several reproductive genes, such as Gad1, Kiss1 and Gnrh1, are critically disturbed in GABAB1KO mice at PND4, probably altering the organization and development of neural circuits governing the reproductive axis. PMID:24080944

  12. Linear stability analysis for hydrothermal alteration of kimberlitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey; Belyaeva, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The influx of groundwater into hot kimberlite deposits results in the reaction of water with olivine-rich rocks. The products of the reaction are serpentine and release of latent heat. The rise of temperature due to the heat release increases the rate of the reaction. Under certain conditions, this self-speeding up of the reaction can result in instabilities associated with a significantly higher final serpentinization in slightly warmer regions of the kimberlite deposit. We conduct linear stability analysis of serpentinization in an isolated volume of porous kimberlitic rocks saturated with water and an inert gas. There is a counteracting interplay between the heat release tending to destabilize the uniform distribution of parameters and the heat conduction tending to stabilize it by smoothing out temperature perturbations. We determine the critical spatial scale separating the parameters where one phenomenon dominates over another. The perturbations of longer-than-critical length grow, whereas the perturbations of shorter-than-critical length fade. The analytical results of the linear stability analysis are supported by direct numerical simulations using a full nonlinear model.

  13. Prenatal auditory stimulation alters the levels of CREB mRNA, p-CREB and BDNF expression in chick hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2009-10-01

    Prenatal auditory stimulation influences the development of the chick auditory pathway and the hippocampus showing an increase in various morphological parameters as well as expression of calcium-binding proteins. Calcium regulates the activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding (CREB) protein. CREB is known to play a role in development, undergo phosphorylation with neural activity as well as regulate transcription of BDNF. BDNF is important for the survival of neurons and regulates synaptic strength. Hence in the present study, we have evaluated the levels of CREB mRNA and protein along with p-CREB protein as well as BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the chick hippocampus at embryonic days (E) 12, E16, E20 and post-hatch day (PH) 1 following activation by prenatal auditory stimulation. Fertilized eggs were exposed to species-specific sound or sitar music (frequency range: 100-6300Hz) at 65dB levels for 15min/h over 24h from E10 till hatching. The control chick hippocampus showed higher CREB mRNA and p-CREB protein in the early embryonic stages, which later decline whereas BDNF mRNA and BDNF protein levels increase until PH1. The CREB mRNA and p-CREB protein were significantly increased at E12, E16 and PH1 in the auditory stimulated groups as compared to control group. A significant increase in the level of BDNF mRNA was observed from E12 and the protein expression from E16 onwards in both auditory stimulated groups. Therefore, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB during development following prenatal sound stimulation may be responsible for cell survival. Increased levels of p-CREB again at PH1 may trigger synthesis of proteins necessary for synaptic plasticity. Further, the increased levels of BDNF may also help in regulating synaptic plasticity. PMID:19559781

  14. Stabilizing and Managing Patients with Altered Mental Status and Delirium.

    PubMed

    Odiari, Ebelechukwu A; Sekhon, Navdeep; Han, Jin Y; David, Elizabeth H

    2015-11-01

    Present in all patient populations, altered mental status (AMS) is a common, but nonspecific emergency department (ED) presentation that can signify serious underlying pathology. Delirium is a more defined mental status change caused by another medical condition that carries a high morbidity and mortality if missed. However, ED physicians miss the condition in more than 50% of cases. The ED physician should maintain a high index of suspicion for delirium, because if missed in the ED, delirium is more likely to be missed on the floors as well. Management of delirium is directed toward treating the underlying course.

  15. Acute heat stress up-regulates neuropeptide Y precursor mRNA expression and alters brain and plasma concentrations of free amino acids in chicks.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Bahry, Mohammad A; Hui, Yang; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S

    2015-09-01

    Heat stress causes an increase in body temperature and reduced food intake in chickens. Several neuropeptides and amino acids play a vital role in the regulation of food intake. However, the responses of neuropeptides and amino acids to heat-stress-induced food-intake regulation are poorly understood. In the current study, the hypothalamic mRNA expression of some neuropeptides related to food intake and the content of free amino acids in the brain and plasma was examined in 14-day-old chicks exposed to a high ambient temperature (HT; 40±1 °C for 2 or 5 h) or to a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30±1 °C). HT significantly increased rectal temperature and plasma corticosterone level and suppressed food intake. HT also increased the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) precursor mRNA, while no change was observed in pro-opiomelanocortin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, or corticotropin-releasing hormone precursor mRNA. It was further found that the diencephalic content of free amino acids - namely, tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, valine and serine - was significantly higher in HT chicks with some alterations in their plasma amino acids in comparison with CT chicks. The induction of NPY and ASIP expression and the alteration of some free amino acids during HT suggest that these changes can be the results or causes the suppression of food intake.

  16. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  17. Hypoxia increases rate of transcription and stability of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Furnari, B A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1994-01-01

    Reduced arterial oxygen tension (i.e. hypoxia) is a powerful physiological stimulus that induces synthesis and release of dopamine from O2-sensitive (type I) cells in the mammalian carotid bodies. We reported recently that hypoxia stimulates gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis in type I cells of the carotid body. Efforts to identify the mechanisms regulating TH gene expression in O2-sensitive cells during hypoxia have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate model cell culture system. Here we report that TH gene expression in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) is regulated during hypoxia in a manner similar to that measured in carotid body type I cells. PC12 cells might therefore be useful as an experimental model for identifying the molecular mechanisms that regulate TH gene expression during hypoxia. Nuclear runoff assays revealed that transcription of the wild type TH gene was enhanced during exposures to hypoxia lasting 12 h. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays with constructs that contained different fragments of TH promoter revealed that the regulatory sequences that mediate the hypoxia-induced increase in transcription are located between bases -272 and +27 of the TH gene. Findings from experiments in which transcription was inhibited either with actinomycin D or 5,6-dichloro-1-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, as well as pulse-chase experiments using 4-thiouridine showed that the half-life of TH mRNA was substantially increased during hypoxia. Thus, in the present paper we show that TH gene expression in PC12 cells during hypoxia is regulated by increases in both the rate of TH gene transcription and TH mRNA stability. PMID:7903970

  18. Integration of mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels in breast cancer to improve grade definition.

    PubMed

    Cava, Claudia; Bertoli, Gloria; Ripamonti, Marilena; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zoppis, Italo; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Defining the aggressiveness and growth rate of a malignant cell population is a key step in the clinical approach to treating tumor disease. The correct grading of breast cancer (BC) is a fundamental part in determining the appropriate treatment. Biological variables can make it difficult to elucidate the mechanisms underlying BC development. To identify potential markers that can be used for BC classification, we analyzed mRNAs expression profiles, gene copy numbers, microRNAs expression and their association with tumor grade in BC microarray-derived datasets. From mRNA expression results, we found that grade 2 BC is most likely a mixture of grade 1 and grade 3 that have been misclassified, being described by the gene signature of either grade 1 or grade 3. We assessed the potential of the new approach of integrating mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels to select a limited number of genomic BC biomarkers. The combination of mRNA profile analysis and copy number data with microRNA expression levels led to the identification of two gene signatures of 42 and 4 altered genes (FOXM1, KPNA4, H2AFV and DDX19A) respectively, the latter obtained through a meta-analytical procedure. The 42-based gene signature identifies 4 classes of up- or down-regulated microRNAs (17 microRNAs) and of their 17 target mRNA, and the 4-based genes signature identified 4 microRNAs (Hsa-miR-320d, Hsa-miR-139-5p, Hsa-miR-567 and Hsa-let-7c). These results are discussed from a biological point of view with respect to pathological features of BC. Our identified mRNAs and microRNAs were validated as prognostic factors of BC disease progression, and could potentially facilitate the implementation of assays for laboratory validation, due to their reduced number. PMID:24866763

  19. Tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate and triethyl phosphate alter embryonic development, hepatic mRNA expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations in chicken embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Egloff, Caroline; Crump, Doug; Porter, Emily; Williams, Kim L.; Letcher, Robert J.; Gauthier, Lewis T.; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2014-09-15

    The organophosphate flame retardants tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP) are used in a wide range of applications to suppress or delay the ignition and spread of fire. Both compounds have been detected in the environment and TBOEP was recently measured in free-living avian species. In this study, TBOEP and TEP were injected into the air cell of chicken embryos at concentrations ranging from 0 to 45,400 ng/g and 0 to 241,500 ng/g egg, respectively. Pipping success, development, hepatic mRNA expression of 9 target genes, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations were determined. Exposure to the highest doses of TBOEP and TEP resulted in negligible detection of the parent compounds in embryonic contents at pipping indicating their complete metabolic degradation. TBOEP exposure had limited effects on chicken embryos, with the exception of hepatic CYP3A37 mRNA induction. TEP exposure decreased pipping success to 68%, altered growth, increased liver somatic index (LSI) and plasma bile acids, and modulated genes associated with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism and the thyroid hormone pathway. Plasma thyroxine levels were decreased at all TEP doses, including an environmentally-relevant concentration (8 ng/g), and gallbladder hypotrophy was evident at ≥ 43,200 ng/g. Tarsus length and circulating thyroxine concentration emerged as potential phenotypic anchors for the modulation of transthyretin mRNA. The increase in plasma bile acids and LSI, gallbladder hypotrophy, and discoloration of liver tissue represented potential phenotypic outcomes associated with modulation of hepatic genes involved with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism. - Highlights: • TBOEP is not embryolethal to chicken embryos. • TEP affected embryonic viability, morphometric endpoints, and thyroid hormone levels. • TEP altered mRNA levels of xenobiotic and lipid metabolism genes. • TEP increased plasma bile acids and caused gallbladder hypotrophy

  20. Ovarian carcinoma cells in serous effusions show altered MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Reich, R; Berner, A; Givant-Horwitz, V; Goldberg, I; Risberg, B; Kristensen, G B; Trope, C G; Bryne, M; Kopolovic, J; Nesland, J M

    2001-11-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and their inhibitor TIMP-2 in serous effusions from patients with ovarian carcinoma and its association with clinico-pathological parameters were analysed. The findings in carcinoma cells in effusions were compared with corresponding primary and metastatic lesions. Sixty-six effusions and 96 tissue sections were stained for MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 applying immunohistochemistry (IHC) and analysed for MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-2 expression using mRNA in situ hybridisation (ISH). MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA levels in 30 effusions were subsequently analysed using reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). MMP and TIMP expression was detected in both carcinoma and mesothelial cells in effusions. The levels were consistently higher in malignant cells, significantly so for MMP-1 (P=0.016) and MMP-2 (P=0.036) proteins, as well as for TIMP-2 mRNA (P=0.008). In tissue sections, MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expression was mostly localised to tumour cells, while MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-2 mRNA were predominantly detected in stromal cells. Adenocarcinoma cells in effusions showed a significant upregulation of MMP-2 expression compared with primary tumours, with a concomitant downregulation of TIMP-2. RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in 28/30 and 0/30 specimens, respectively. MMP and TIMP are thus mainly synthesised by cancer cells in effusions, while stromal cells have a similar role in solid tumours. MMP-1 and MMP-2 production predominates over that of MMP-9 in effusions. Increased MMP-2 and reduced TIMP-2 levels are seen in ovarian carcinoma cells in effusions, possibly marking the acquisition of a metastatic phenotype. PMID:11597382

  1. Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Gene Expression in Theca Cells: Augmented Transcriptional Regulation and mRNA Stability in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-DeGrave, Velen L.; Legro, Richard S.; Strauss, Jerome F.; McAllister, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism is characteristic of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ovarian theca cells isolated from PCOS follicles and maintained in long-term culture produce elevated levels of progestins and androgens compared to normal theca cells. Augmented steroid production in PCOS theca cells is associated with changes in the expression of genes for several steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, which encodes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage. Here, we further examined CYP11A1 gene expression, at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in normal and PCOS theca cells propagated in long-term culture utilizing quantitative RT-PCR, functional promoter analyses, and mRNA degradation studies. The minimal element(s) that conferred increased basal and cAMP-dependent CYP11A1 promoter function were determined. CYP11A1 mRNA half-life in normal and PCOS theca cells was compared. Results of these cumulative studies showed that basal and forskolin stimulated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance and CYP11A1 promoter activity were increased in PCOS theca cells. Deletion analysis of the CYP11A1 promoter demonstrated that augmented promoter function in PCOS theca cells results from increased basal regulation conferred by a minimal sequence between −160 and −90 bp of the transcriptional start site. The transcription factor, nuclear factor 1C2, was observed to regulate basal activity of this minimal CYP11A1 element. Examination of mRNA stability in normal and PCOS theca cells demonstrated that CYP11A1 mRNA half-life increased >2-fold, from approximately 9.22+/−1.62 h in normal cells, to 22.38+/−0.92 h in PCOS cells. Forskolin treatment did not prolong CYP11A1 mRNA stability in either normal or PCOS theca cells. The 5′-UTR of CYP11A1 mRNA confers increased basal mRNA stability in PCOS cells. In conclusion, these studies show that elevated steady state CYP11A1 mRNA abundance in PCOS cells results from increased transactivation of the CYP

  2. The P-body component USP52/PAN2 is a novel regulator of HIF1A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Bett, John S; Ibrahim, Adel F M; Garg, Amit K; Kelly, Van; Pedrioli, Patrick; Rocha, Sonia; Hay, Ronald T

    2013-04-15

    HIF1A (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) is the master regulator of the cellular response to hypoxia and is implicated in cancer progression. Whereas the regulation of HIF1A protein in response to oxygen is well characterized, less is known about the fate of HIF1A mRNA. In the present study, we have identified the pseudo-DUB (deubiquitinating enzyme)/deadenylase USP52 (ubiquitin-specific protease 52)/PAN2 [poly(A) nuclease 2] as an important regulator of the HIF1A-mediated hypoxic response. Depletion of USP52 reduced HIF1A mRNA and protein levels and resulted in reduced expression of HIF1A-regulated hypoxic targets due to a 3'-UTR (untranslated region)-dependent poly(A)-tail-length-independent destabilization in HIF1A mRNA. MS analysis revealed an association of USP52 with several P-body (processing body) components and we confirmed further that USP52 protein and HIF1A mRNA co-localized with cytoplasmic P-bodies. Importantly, P-body dispersal by knockdown of GW182 or LSM1 resulted in a reduction of HIF1A mRNA levels. These data uncover a novel role for P-bodies in regulating HIF1A mRNA stability, and demonstrate that USP52 is a key component of P-bodies required to prevent HIF1A mRNA degradation.

  3. Non-Invasive Analysis of Recombinant mRNA Stability in Escherichia coli by a Combination of Transcriptional Inducer Wash-Out and qRT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kucharova, Veronika; Strand, Trine Aakvik; Almaas, Eivind; Naas, Adrian E.; Brautaset, Trygve; Valla, Svein

    2013-01-01

    mRNA stability is one among many parameters that can potentially affect the level of recombinant gene expression in bacteria. Blocking of the entire prokaryotic transcription machinery by addition of rifampicin is commonly used in protocols for analysis of mRNA stability. Here we show that such treatment can be effectively replaced by a simple, non-invasive method based on removal of the relevant transcriptional inducers and that the mRNA decay can then be followed by qRT-PCR. To establish the methodology we first used the m-toluate-inducible XylS/Pm expression cassette as a model system and analyzed several examples of DNA modifications causing gene expression stimulation in Escherichia coli. The new method allowed us to clearly discriminate whether an improvement in mRNA stability contributes to observed increases in transcript amounts for each individual case. To support the experimental data a simple mathematical fitting model was developed to calculate relative decay rates. We extended the relevance of the method by demonstrating its application also for an IPTG-inducible expression cassette (LacI/Ptac) and by analyzing features of the bacteriophage T7-based expression system. The results suggest that the methodology is useful in elucidating factors controlling mRNA stability as well as other specific features of inducible expression systems. Moreover, as expression systems based on diffusible inducers are almost universally available, the concept can be most likely used to measure mRNA decay for any gene in any cell type that is heavily used in molecular biology research. PMID:23840466

  4. miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Hung; Ekaterina Rodriguez, C.; Donald, Graham W.; Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Jung, Xiaoman S.; Chang, Hui-Hua; Moro, Aune; Reber, Howard A.; Hines, O. Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Pancreatic cancer cells express low miR-143 levels and elevated p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1. •MEK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 increase miR-143 expression. •miR-143 decreases COX-2 mRNA stability and expression and PGE{sub 2}. •miR-143 decreases p-p38MAPK, p-MEK, p-MAPK and RREB1 expression. -- Abstract: Small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNA), inhibit the translation or accelerate the degradation of message RNA (mRNA) by targeting the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) in regulating growth and survival through gene suppression. Deregulated miRNA expression contributes to disease progression in several cancers types, including pancreatic cancers (PaCa). PaCa tissues and cells exhibit decreased miRNA, elevated cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) resulting in increased cancer growth and metastases. Human PaCa cell lines were used to demonstrate that restoration of miRNA-143 (miR-143) regulates COX-2 and inhibits cell proliferation. miR-143 were detected at fold levels of 0.41 ± 0.06 in AsPC-1, 0.20 ± 0.05 in Capan-2 and 0.10 ± 0.02 in MIA PaCa-2. miR-143 was not detected in BxPC-3, HPAF-II and Panc-1 which correlated with elevated mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK) activation. Treatment with 10 μM of MEK inhibitor U0126 or PD98059 increased miR-143, respectively, by 187 ± 18 and 152 ± 26-fold in BxPC-3 and 182 ± 7 and 136 ± 9-fold in HPAF-II. miR-143 transfection diminished COX-2 mRNA stability at 60 min by 2.6 ± 0.3-fold in BxPC-3 and 2.5 ± 0.2-fold in HPAF-II. COX-2 expression and cellular proliferation in BxPC-3 and HPAF-II inversely correlated with increasing miR-143. PGE{sub 2} levels decreased by 39.3 ± 5.0% in BxPC-3 and 48.0 ± 3.0% in HPAF-II transfected with miR-143. Restoration of miR-143 in PaCa cells suppressed of COX-2, PGE{sub 2}, cellular proliferation and MEK/MAPK activation, implicating this pathway in regulating miR-143 expression.

  5. Engineered Covalent Inactivation of TFIIH-Kinase Reveals an Elongation Checkpoint and Results in Widespread mRNA Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, Juan B; Tseng, Sandra C; Simonett, Shane P; Taunton, Jack; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2016-08-01

    During transcription initiation, the TFIIH-kinase Kin28/Cdk7 marks RNA polymerase II (Pol II) by phosphorylating the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Here we describe a structure-guided chemical approach to covalently and specifically inactivate Kin28 kinase activity in vivo. This method of irreversible inactivation recapitulates both the lethal phenotype and the key molecular signatures that result from genetically disrupting Kin28 function in vivo. Inactivating Kin28 impacts promoter release to differing degrees and reveals a "checkpoint" during the transition to productive elongation. While promoter-proximal pausing is not observed in budding yeast, inhibition of Kin28 attenuates elongation-licensing signals, resulting in Pol II accumulation at the +2 nucleosome and reduced transition to productive elongation. Furthermore, upon inhibition, global stabilization of mRNA masks different degrees of reduction in nascent transcription. This study resolves long-standing controversies on the role of Kin28 in transcription and provides a rational approach to irreversibly inhibit other kinases in vivo. PMID:27477907

  6. WEREWOLF, a regulator of root hair pattern formation, controls flowering time through the regulation of FT mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunjoo; Yu, Jihyeon; Ryu, Kook Hui; Lee, Myeong Min; Lee, Ilha

    2011-08-01

    A key floral activator, FT, integrates stimuli from long-day, vernalization, and autonomous pathways and triggers flowering by directly regulating floral meristem identity genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Since a small amount of FT transcript is sufficient for flowering, the FT level is strictly regulated by diverse genes. In this study, we show that WEREWOLF (WER), a MYB transcription factor regulating root hair pattern, is another regulator of FT. The mutant wer flowers late in long days but normal in short days and shows a weak sensitivity to vernalization, which indicates that WER controls flowering time through the photoperiod pathway. The expression and double mutant analyses showed that WER modulates FT transcript level independent of CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS C. The histological analysis of WER shows that it is expressed in the epidermis of leaves, where FT is not expressed. Consistently, WER regulates not the transcription but the stability of FT mRNA. Our results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of FT that is non cell autonomous.

  7. Identification of sequences within the murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA 3'-untranslated region that mediate mRNA stabilization induced by mitogen treatment of EL-4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Bickel, M; Pluznik, D H; Cohen, R B

    1991-09-25

    Phorbol esters (TPA) and concanavalin A (ConA) are known to induce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production in murine thymoma EL-4 cells by mRNA stabilization. The role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in GM-CSF mRNA stabilization induced by TPA and ConA in EL-4 cells was examined by transfection studies using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructions. The GM-CSF 3'-UTR contains a 63-nucleotide region at its 3' end with repeating ATTTA motifs which is responsible for mRNA degradation in a variety of cell types (Shaw, G., and Kamen, R. (1986) Cell 46, 659-666). We produced constructs containing most of the GM-CSF 3'-UTR (303 nucleotides, pRSV-CATgm) or the 3'-terminal AT-rich region (116 nucleotides, pRSV-CATau) and measured CAT enzyme activity and CAT mRNA after transient transfection into EL-4 and NIH 3T3 cells. Low levels of CAT activity were seen in both cells with either plasmid compared with levels of CAT activity obtained with pRSV-CAT. TPA treatment caused an approximately 10-fold increase in CAT activity and mRNA in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATgm. No increases were seen in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATau or pRSV-CAT. No response to TPA was detected in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, indicating that the response to TPA is relatively cell-specific. There was no increase in CAT activity after ConA treatment in EL-4 or NIH 3T3 cells transfected with any of the constructs suggesting that the GM-CSF 3'-UTR lacks elements that can respond alone to ConA. Nuclear run-on and actinomycin D chase experiments in EL-4 cells showed that TPA induces CAT activity via mRNA stabilization. By linker-substitution mutagenesis we show that TPA inducibility depends on a 60-nucleotide region of the 3'-UTR whose 5' end is located 160 nucleotides upstream of the 5' end of the AU-rich region. PMID:1917935

  8. Altered mRNA expression after long-term soleus electrical stimulation training in humans with paralysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher M; Suneja, Manish; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Shields, Richard K

    2011-01-01

    In humans, spinal cord injury (SCI) induces deleterious changes in skeletal muscle that may be prevented or reversed by electrical stimulation muscle training. The molecular mechanisms underlying muscle stimulation training remain unknown. We studied two unique SCI subjects whose right soleus received >6 years of training (30 minutes/day, 5 days/week). Training preserved torque, fatigue index, contractile speed, and cross-sectional area in the trained leg, but not the untrained leg. Training decreased 10 mRNAs required for fast-twitch contractions and mRNA that encodes for myostatin, an autocrine/paracrine hormone that inhibits muscle growth. Conversely, training increased 69 mRNAs that mediate the slow-twitch, oxidative phenotype, including PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator that inhibits muscle atrophy. When we discontinued right soleus training, training-induced effects diminished slowly, with some persisting for >6 months. Training of paralyzed muscle induces localized and long-lasting changes in skeletal muscle mRNA expression that improve muscle mass and function.

  9. CIL-102 induces matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 down-regulation via simultaneous suppression of genetic transcription and mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Yeh-Long; Chang, Long-Sen

    2012-12-01

    This study explores the CIL-102 suppression mechanism on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expression in human leukemia K562 cells. CIL-102 attenuated K562 cell invasion with decreased MMP-2/MMP-9 protein expression and mRNA levels. Moreover, CIL-102 reduced luciferase activity of MMP-2/MMP-9 promoter constructs and MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA stability. CIL-102 treatment induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation but reduced the phospho-ERK level. Transfection of constitutively active MEK1 restored MMP-2 and MMP-9 promoter activity in CIL-102-treated cells, while suppression of p38 MAPK/JNK activation abolished CIL-102-induced MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay. CIL-102-induced p38 MAPK/JNK activation led to protein phosphatase 2A-mediated tristetraprolin (TTP) down-regulation. The reduction in TTP-KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) complexes formation promoted KSRP-mediated MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay in CIL-102-treated K562 cells. Moreover, CIL-102 reduced invasion and MMP-2/MMP-9 expression in breast and liver cancer cells. Taken together, our data indicate that CIL-102 induces MMP-2/MMP-2 down-regulation via simultaneous suppression of genetic transcription and mRNA stability, and suggest a potential utility for CIL-102 in reducing MMP-2/MMP-9-mediated cancer progression.

  10. MKP-1 mRNA Stabilization and Translational Control by RNA-Binding Proteins HuR and NF90▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kuwano, Yuki; Kim, Hyeon Ho; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Pullmann, Rudolf; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Gorospe, Myriam

    2008-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) plays a major role in dephosphorylating and thereby inactivating the MAP kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Here, we examine the posttranscriptional events underlying the robust MKP-1 induction by oxidants in HeLa cells. H2O2 treatment potently stabilized the MKP-1 mRNA and increased the association of MKP-1 mRNA with the translation machinery. Four RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BPs) that influence mRNA turnover and/or translation (HuR, NF90, TIAR, and TIA-1) were found to bind to biotinylated transcripts spanning the MKP-1 AU-rich 3′ untranslated region. By using ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation analysis, we showed that H2O2 treatment increased the association of MKP-1 mRNA with HuR and NF90 and decreased its association with the translational repressors TIAR and TIA-1. HuR or NF90 silencing significantly diminished the H2O2-stimulated MKP-1 mRNA stability; HuR silencing also markedly decreased MKP-1 translation. In turn, lowering MKP-1 expression in HuR-silenced cultures resulted in substantially elevated phosphorylation of JNK and p38 after H2O2 treatment. Collectively, MKP-1 upregulation by oxidative stress is potently influenced by increased mRNA stability and translation, mediated at least in part by the RNA-BPs HuR and NF90. PMID:18490444

  11. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qipeng; Guo, Xirui; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-03-29

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α-/- cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26918608

  12. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-01-01

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α−/− cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26918608

  13. UU/UA dinucleotide frequency reduction in coding regions results in increased mRNA stability and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Maher; Khabar, Khalid S A

    2012-05-01

    UU and UA dinucleotides are rare in mammalian genes and may offer natural selection against endoribonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. This study hypothesized that reducing UU and UA (UW) dinucleotides in the mRNA-coding sequence, including the codons and the dicodon boundaries, may promote resistance to mRNA decay, thereby increasing protein production. Indeed, protein expression from UW-reduced coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), luciferase, interferon-α, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher when compared to the wild-type protein expression. The steady-state level of UW-reduced EGFP mRNA was higher and the mRNA half-life was also longer. Ectopic expression of the endoribonuclease, RNase L, did not reduce the wild type or UW-reduced mRNA. A mutant form of the mRNA decay-promoting protein, tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36), which has a point mutation in the zinc-finger domain (C124R), was used. The wild-type EGFP mRNA but not the UW-reduced mRNA responded to the dominant negative action of the C124R ZFP36/TTP mutant. The results indicate the efficacy of the described rational approach to formulate a general scheme for boosting recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

  14. Berberine Decreased Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA Stability through Negative Regulation of Human Antigen R in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Choi, Hye-Eun; Seo, SeungHwan; Choi, Jung-Hye; Baek, Nam-In; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-07-01

    Berberine, a major isoquinoline alkaloid found in medicinal herbs, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory effects; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for its actions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of berberine and the molecular mechanisms involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophages and its effects in LPS-induced septic shock in mice. In both macrophage cell types, berberine inhibited the LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression, but it had no effect on iNOS mRNA transcription. Suppression of LPS-induced iNOS protein expression by berberine occurred via a human antigen R (HuR)-mediated reduction of iNOS mRNA stability. Molecular data revealed that the suppression on the LPS-induced HuR binding to iNOS mRNA by berberine was accompanied by a reduction in nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling. Pretreatment with berberine reduced LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR in liver tissues and increased the survival rate of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results show that the suppression of iNOS protein expression by berberine under LPS-induced inflammatory conditions is associated with a reduction in iNOS mRNA stability resulting from inhibition of the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR. PMID:27189969

  15. The use of alternative polyadenylation sites renders integrin β1 (Itgb1) mRNA isoforms with differential stability during mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Naipauer, Julian; Gattelli, Albana; Degese, Maria Sol; Slomiansky, Victoria; Wertheimer, Eva; LaMarre, Jonathan; Castilla, Lucio; Abba, Martin; Kordon, Edith C; Coso, Omar A

    2013-09-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell-surface adhesion receptors that play a critical role in tissue development. Characterization of the full-length mRNA encoding the β1 subunit (Itgb1) revealed an alternative functional cleavage and polyadenylation site that yields a new Itgb1 mRNA isoform 578 bp shorter than that previously reported. Using a variety of experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we found that the two Itgb1 isoforms are expressed at different levels in a variety of mouse tissues, including the mammary gland, where they are differentially regulated at successive developmental stages. The longer mRNA species is prevelant during lactation, whereas the shorter is induced after weaning. In 3D cultures, where expression of integrin β1 protein is required for normal formation of acini, experimental blockade of the longer isoform induced enhanced expression of the shorter species which allowed normal morphological mammary differentiation. The short isoform lacks AU-rich motifs and miRNA target sequences that are potentially implicated in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation efficiency. We further determined that the AU-binding protein HuR appears to selectively stabilize the longer isoform in the mammary gland. In summary, the results of the present study identify a new regulatory instance involved in the fine-tuning of Itgb1 expression during mammary gland development and function.

  16. Tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate and triethyl phosphate alter embryonic development, hepatic mRNA expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Egloff, Caroline; Crump, Doug; Porter, Emily; Williams, Kim L; Letcher, Robert J; Gauthier, Lewis T; Kennedy, Sean W

    2014-09-15

    The organophosphate flame retardants tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP) are used in a wide range of applications to suppress or delay the ignition and spread of fire. Both compounds have been detected in the environment and TBOEP was recently measured in free-living avian species. In this study, TBOEP and TEP were injected into the air cell of chicken embryos at concentrations ranging from 0 to 45,400 ng/g and 0 to 241,500 ng/g egg, respectively. Pipping success, development, hepatic mRNA expression of 9 target genes, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations were determined. Exposure to the highest doses of TBOEP and TEP resulted in negligible detection of the parent compounds in embryonic contents at pipping indicating their complete metabolic degradation. TBOEP exposure had limited effects on chicken embryos, with the exception of hepatic CYP3A37 mRNA induction. TEP exposure decreased pipping success to 68%, altered growth, increased liver somatic index (LSI) and plasma bile acids, and modulated genes associated with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism and the thyroid hormone pathway. Plasma thyroxine levels were decreased at all TEP doses, including an environmentally-relevant concentration (8 ng/g), and gallbladder hypotrophy was evident at ≥ 43,200 ng/g. Tarsus length and circulating thyroxine concentration emerged as potential phenotypic anchors for the modulation of transthyretin mRNA. The increase in plasma bile acids and LSI, gallbladder hypotrophy, and discoloration of liver tissue represented potential phenotypic outcomes associated with modulation of hepatic genes involved with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism.

  17. The association between splenocyte apoptosis and alterations of Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 mRNA expression, and oxidative stress induced by dietary nickel chloride in broilers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wu, Bangyuan

    2013-12-01

    Two hundred and forty avian broilers were equally divided into four groups, and raised with a corn-soybean basal diet or the same diet supplemented with 300, 600, 900 mg/kg NiCl2 for 42 days. Numbers or percentages of apoptotic splenocytes by flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL were higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than those in the control group. Results measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that mRNA expression and contents were significantly higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bax and Caspase-3, and were significantly lower (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in Bcl-2 of the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups. Also, the SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, and the ability to inhibit hydroxyl radical, and GSH contents were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01), and MDA contents were increased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in all groups. In conclusion, dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused apoptosis, altered Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression levels and contents, and induced oxidative stress in the spleen. Also, splenocyte apoptosis was closely related to the alternations of Bax, Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 mRNA expression, and oxidative damage. The splenic immunity and blood filtration functions were impaired in broilers. PMID:24351749

  18. Microtubule Alterations Occur Early in Experimental Parkinsonism and The Microtubule Stabilizer Epothilone D Is Neuroprotective

    PubMed Central

    Cartelli, Daniele; Casagrande, Francesca; Busceti, Carla Letizia; Bucci, Domenico; Molinaro, Gemma; Traficante, Anna; Passarella, Daniele; Giavini, Erminio; Pezzoli, Gianni; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Cappelletti, Graziella

    2013-01-01

    The role of microtubule (MT) dysfunction in Parkinson's disease is emerging. It is still unknown whether it is a cause or a consequence of neurodegeneration. Our objective was to assess whether alterations of MT stability precede or follow axonal transport impairment and neurite degeneration in experimental parkinsonism induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in C57Bl mice. MPTP induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in fibres with altered mitochondria distribution, and early changes in cytoskeletal proteins and MT stability. Indeed, we observed significant increases in neuron-specific βIII tubulin and enrichment of deTyr tubulin in dopaminergic neurons. Finally, we showed that repeated daily administrations of the MT stabilizer Epothilone D rescued MT defects and attenuated nigrostriatal degeneration induced by MPTP. These data suggest that alteration of ΜΤs is an early event specifically associated with dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Pharmacological stabilization of MTs may be a viable strategy for the management of parkinsonism. PMID:23670541

  19. Genomic Convergence Analysis of Schizophrenia: mRNA Sequencing Reveals Altered Synaptic Vesicular Transport in Post-Mortem Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Mudge, Joann; Miller, Neil A.; Khrebtukova, Irina; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; May, Gregory D.; Huntley, Jim J.; Luo, Shujun; Zhang, Lu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Lewis, Sharon; Beavis, William D.; Schilkey, Faye D.; Virk, Selene M.; Black, C. Forrest; Myers, M. Kathy; Mader, Lar C.; Langley, Ray J.; Utsey, John P.; Kim, Ryan W.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Khalsa, Sat Kirpal; Garcia, Meredith; Ambriz-Griffith, Victoria; Harlan, Richard; Czika, Wendy; Martin, Stanton; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Schroth, Gary P.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a common, disabling mental illness with high heritability but complex, poorly understood genetic etiology. As the first phase of a genomic convergence analysis of SCZ, we generated 16.7 billion nucleotides of short read, shotgun sequences of cDNA from post-mortem cerebellar cortices of 14 patients and six, matched controls. A rigorous analysis pipeline was developed for analysis of digital gene expression studies. Sequences aligned to approximately 33,200 transcripts in each sample, with average coverage of 450 reads per gene. Following adjustments for confounding clinical, sample and experimental sources of variation, 215 genes differed significantly in expression between cases and controls. Golgi apparatus, vesicular transport, membrane association, Zinc binding and regulation of transcription were over-represented among differentially expressed genes. Twenty three genes with altered expression and involvement in presynaptic vesicular transport, Golgi function and GABAergic neurotransmission define a unifying molecular hypothesis for dysfunction in cerebellar cortex in SCZ. PMID:18985160

  20. An interplay between the p38 MAPK pathway and AUBPs regulates c-fos mRNA stability during mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Degese, Maria Sol; Tanos, Tamara; Naipauer, Julian; Gingerich, Tim; Chiappe, Diego; Echeverria, Pablo; LaMarre, Jonathan; Gutkind, J Silvio; Coso, Omar A

    2015-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways constitute key regulatory elements linking extracellular stimuli to nuclear gene expression. Immediate-early responsive genes (IEGs) of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) family, such as fos, achieve peak expression levels shortly after cells are stimulated with growth factors and sharply decrease thereafter. Several AU-rich binding proteins (AUBPs), including HuR (Hu-antigen R, Elav-like protein 1, ELAVL1) and KSRP (far upstream element-binding protein 2, KHSRP) bind to a fos AU-rich element (ARE) present in the 3'-UTR (untranslated region) of fos mRNA regulating its stability by a still poorly defined mechanism. We show in the present study that, whereas HuR binds and stabilizes transcribed reporter mRNAs bearing the fos 3'-UTR, KSRP counteracts this effect. Furthermore, we found that fos mRNA stability and HuR phosphorylation status are dependent on the activity of p38 MAPK in both epithelial cells and fibroblasts upon proliferative stimulation. Analysing PPI (protein-protein interaction) networks, we performed a thorough query of interacting proteins for p38 MAPKs, HuR and other AUBPs upon growth factor stimulation. This revealed novel HuR interactors including inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) activity. Over-expression of two of these interactors, pp32 and APRIL (acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member B, ANP32B) and pharmacological inhibition of PP2A stabilized a fos reporter mRNA. Our results indicate that p38 MAPK regulates fos mRNA decay by affecting the state of phosphorylation of HuR while controlling yet to be fully elucidated PP regulatory networks.

  1. The stability of mRNA from the gsiB gene of Bacillus subtilis is dependent on the presence of a strong ribosome binding site.

    PubMed

    Jürgen, B; Schweder, T; Hecker, M

    1998-06-01

    In Bacillus subtilis IS58 starved of glucose or exposed to heat shock, ethanol or salt stress, the sigmaB-dependent general stress protein GsiB is accumulated to a higher level than other general stress proteins. This high-level accumulation of GsiB can at least partially be attributed to the remarkably long half-life (approximately 20 min) of the gsiB mRNA. Analysis of different gsiB-lacZ fusions revealed that this stability is not determined by sequences at the 3' end of the transcript but rather by sequences upstream of the translational start codon. Site-directed mutagenesis established that a strong ribosome binding site was crucial for the increased stability of the gsiB mRNA. A comparison of the sequences upstream of the translational start codons of three general stress genes, gsiB, gspA and ctc, revealed a direct correlation between mRNA stability and the strength of their translational signals.

  2. Reduced stability and bi-allelic, coequal expression of profilaggrin mRNA in keratinocytes cultured from subjects with ichthyosis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nirunsuksiri, W; Zhang, S H; Fleckman, P

    1998-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) is an inherited scaling skin disorder in which expression of profilaggrin is reduced. Previous studies have indicated that the reduction is caused by defective post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Here we present evidence that profilaggrin mRNA in keratinocytes cultured from subjects with IV is intrinsically unstable and has a shorter half-life compared with that in normal cells. When IV-affected keratinocytes were treated with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, the steady-state level of profilaggrin mRNA was increased due to stabilization of the transcript. In addition, the number of filaggrin repeats within the profilaggrin gene was studied. The number of filaggrin repeats (10-12) in individuals with IV did not differ from that of unaffected subjects. Expression of the gene was bi-allelic and coequal in both control and affected individuals. Our results suggest a model in which a labile ribonuclease and a stabilizing factor may modulate the profilaggrin mRNA steady-state level in normal cells, whereas the stabilizing factor may be absent or functionally inactive in IV-affected keratinocytes.

  3. Prenatal ethanol consumption alters the expression of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid receptor mRNA in fetal rat embryo and brain.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Zachman, R D

    1995-12-01

    The mechanism by which prenatal ethanol ingestion causes fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is unknown. We hypothesize that ethanol disrupts the normal function of retinoids in embryogenesis and differentiation, resulting in FAS. The present work was designed to determine if prenatal ethanol ingestion affects the expression of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP) and nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paired timed pregnant rats were fed a liquid diet, one group treated with 36% of carbohydrate calories replaced with ethanol. Maternal serum retinol concentrations during pregnancy peaked on the 6th day of pregnancy, but no difference was noted between the ethanol and control group. At the 12th and 20th day of gestation, embryos or fetal brain were removed, and RNA was isolated for Northern hybridization. The abundance of CRBP mRNA was significantly elevated by ethanol consumption. In both the 12-day embryo (relative density of control: 1.00 +/- 0.10; vs. ethanol: 1.87 +/- 0.30, p < 0.05) and 20-day fetal brain (relative density of control: 1.00 +/- 0.09; vs. ethanol: 1.46 +/- 0.09, p < 0.01). In the embryo, ethanol ingestion resulted in a decrease in the level of RAR-beta mRNA (control: 1.00 +/- 0.05; vs. ethanol: 0.71 +/- 0.07, p < 0.01), but had no effect on RAR-alpha or RAR-gamma mRNA. In contrast to the embryo, the expression of both the 3.7- and 2.7-kb RAR-alpha transcripts was significantly greater in day 20 fetal brain of ethanol-treated rats (3.7-kb RAR-alpha control: 1.00 +/- 0.11; vs. ethanol: 1.65 +/- 0.06; p < 0.001; 2.7-kb RAR-alpha control: 1.00 +/- 0.14; vs. ethanol: 1.74 +/- 0.27, p < 0.05), whereas RAR-beta and RAR-gamma expression were not altered. These observations suggest that altered vitamin A function is a potential factor in the embryopathy of prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:8749798

  4. Photolytic degradation products of two highly brominated flame retardants cause cytotoxicity and mRNA expression alterations in chicken embryonic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Guanyong; Letcher, Robert J; Crump, Doug; Farmahin, Reza; Giesy, John P; Kennedy, Sean W

    2014-10-21

    Tetradecabromo-1,4-diphenoxybenzene (TeDB-DiPhOBz) and 2,2',3,3',4,4',5,5',6,6'-decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) are photolytically unstable flame retarding chemicals. Here, photocatalyzed byproducts of TeDB-DiPhOBz and BDE-209 (i.e Br(8)- to Br(11)-PB-DiPhOBz congeners from TeDB-DiPhOBz, and Br(6)- to Br(8)-BDE congeners from BDE-209), formed after 21 days of natural sunlight irradiation (SI), were assessed for exposure effects on cytotoxicity and mRNA expression levels of selected genes in chicken embryonic hepatocytes (CEH). CEHs were exposed for 36 h to concentrations of SI- and nonirradiated (NI)-TeDB-DiPhOBz and BDE-209. Cytotoxic effects were observed only in CEH exposed to 50 μM SI-BDE-209. Results from a custom-designed Avian ToxChip polymerase chain reaction array showed that NI-TeDB-DiPhOBz and NI-BDE-209, up to maximum concentrations of 1.9 and 9 μM, respectively, caused limited changes in mRNA levels of 27 genes from toxicologically relevant pathways, including phase I/II metabolism, the thyroid hormone pathway, lipid/cholesterol metabolism, oxidative stress, immune response, and cell death. In contrast, 12 and 14 of the 27 genes were altered after exposure to 25 μM SI-TeDB-DiPhOBz or 10 μM SI-BDE-209, respectively. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-related CYP1A4 mRNA levels were the most altered on the PCR array with an induction of 560- and 5200-fold after exposure to 1 or 25 μM SI-TeDB-DiPhOBz, respectively, and 2500- and 2300-fold after exposure to 1 or 10 μM SI-BDE-209, respectively. A dioxin-responsive luciferase reporter gene assay confirmed that the CYP1A4 inductions were independent of the dissolution solvents used (tetrahydrofuran/n-hexane, n-hexane, or methanol) during photolysis. Overall, degradation of TeDB-DiPhOBz and BDE-209 by natural sunlight generates byproducts that affect in vitro expression of genes, especially the AhR-mediated CYP1A4. PMID:25222814

  5. Sunlight Irradiation of Highly Brominated Polyphenyl Ethers Generates Polybenzofuran Products That Alter Dioxin-responsive mRNA Expression in Chicken Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Guanyong; Letcher, Robert J; Crump, Doug; Farmahin, Reza; Giesy, John P; Kennedy, Sean W

    2016-03-01

    We report on two highly brominated polyphenyl ether flame retardants, tetradecabromo-1,4- diphenoxybenzene (TeDB-DiPhOBz) and 2,2',3,3',4,4',5,5',6,6'-decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), that formed photolytic degradation products in tetrahydrofuran (THF)/hexane solvent after 21 days of natural sunlight irradiation (SI). These degradation products of SI-TeDB-DiPhOBz and SI-BDE-209 included the numerous polybrominated homologue groups of polybenzofurans and dibenzofurans, respectively. Formation of similar polybenzofuran and dibenzofuran products was also observed following a 3 month exposure of the solid powder forms of TeDB-DiPhOBz and BDE-209 to natural SI. These resulting degradation product mixtures were administered to chicken embryonic hepatocytes (CEH) to determine effects on mRNA expression levels of 27 dioxin-responsive genes. For the solvent-based SI study, equivalent concentrations of 1 or 25 μM of SI-TeDB-DiPhOBz or 1 or 10 μM of SI-BDE-209 resulted in gene expression profiles that were similar to those of the most potent dioxin-like compound, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. In addition, a concentration-dependent induction of CYP1A4 and CYP1A5 mRNA was observed following exposure to SI-TeDB-DiPhOBz and SI-BDE-209. Based on ECthreshold values for CYP1A4/5 mRNA expression, relative potency (ReP) values were 1 × 10(-6) and 1 × 10(-5) for SI-TeDB-DiPhOBz and SI-BDE-209, respectively. The SI TeDB-DiPhOBz and BDE-209 powder degradation product mixture also significantly induced CYP1A4 mRNA levels in CEH. Our findings clearly show that the environmental stability of TeDB-DiPhOBz and BDE-209, and possibly other highly brominated polyphenyl ethers, is of great concern from a dioxin-like degradation products and toxicity perspective. PMID:26854739

  6. mRNA stability plays a major role in regulating the temperature-specific expression of a Tetrahymena thermophila surface protein

    SciTech Connect

    Love, H.D. Jr.; Allen-Nash, A.; Zhao, Q.; Bannon, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis of the serotype H3 (SerH3) surface antigen is temperature dependent and responds within 1 h to a change in incubation conditions. Recently, a Tetrahymena thermophila cDNA clone has been shown to be homologous to a portion of the SerH3 mRNA, and it was shown that the cellular levels of this RNA rapidly decreased when cells were shifted from 30 to 41/sup 0/C. These observations indicate that synthesis of the SerH3 protein is highly regulated in response to temperature and led us to initiate studies to determine the mechanism(s) by which SerH3 gene expression is controlled. Using pC6 as a hybridization probe for the SerH3 mRNA, they have determined that (i) the level of SerH3 protein synthesis is directly correlated with the amount of SerH3 message available for translation; (ii) there is, at most, a twofold difference between the relative transcription rates of SerH3 genes at 30 and 40/sup 0/C; (iii) the SerH3 mRNA half-life in cells incubated at 30/sup 0/C is greater than 1 h, whereas the half-life in cells incubated at 40/sup 0/C is only -- 3 min. These results demonstrate that Tetrahymena SerH3 surface protein expression is regulated by mRNA abundance. Furthermore, the major mechanism controlling mRNA abundance is a dramatic temperature-dependent change in SerH3 mRNA stability.

  7. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  8. Characterization of the major altered leader sequence of late mRNA induced by SV40 deletion mutant d1-1811.

    PubMed

    Haegeman, G; Iserentant, D; Gheysen, D; Fiers, W

    1979-12-11

    d1-1811 is a viable SV40 mutant with a 40 base pair deletion that includes the major wild-type capping site of late mRNA at map position 0.72. The late viral mRNAs induced by d1-1811 have now been further characterized by inversed S1-mapping analysis. The S1-resistant, 32P-labeled RNA fragments derived from the leader region were examined by fingerprinting and by analysis of RNase T2-generated 5'-terminal cap structures. The results show that most if not all of the mutant leader fragments analyzed have their 5' terminus to the left of the d1-1811 deletion site, i.e., closer to the origin of DNA replication. The major altered leader fragment is a continuous transcript from the DNA in the region 0.716 to 0.761 map unit and its 5' terminus has been precisely mapped at nucleotide L290. The observation that the cap structure of the major altered leader is only a minor cap species in wild-type late RNA suggests regulation in the use of different capping sites in SV40.

  9. Influence of Picual olive ripening on virgin olive oil alteration and stability during potato frying.

    PubMed

    Olivero-David, Raul; Mena, Carmen; Pérez-Jimenez, M Angeles; Sastre, Blanca; Bastida, Sara; Márquez-Ruiz, Gloria; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2014-12-01

    Ripening modifies oil attributes and composition. However, the influence of olive ripening on virgin olive oil (VOO) thermal oxidative stability on food-frying has not been studied yet. Oils from Picual olives of low (VOO1), medium (VOO2), and high (VOO3) ripeness were obtained, and their thermal oxidative stability during 40 potato-fryings was tested. Unused VOO1 showed higher antioxidant content and oxidative stability than VOO2 and VOO3. Polar compounds (PC), oligomers, and altered fatty acid methyl esters (polar-FAME) increased, whereas linoleic acid, polyphenols, and tocopherols decreased in the three VOOs through frying. The alteration was lower in VOO1, followed by VOO2 (0.105, 0.117, and 0.042 g/100 g oil less of PC, oligomers and polar-FAME per frying, respectively, in VOO1 than in VOO3). In conclusion, VOO obtained from low-ripeness Picual olives should be preferred when frying fresh-potatoes due to its higher thermal and oxidative stability, permitting a higher number of potato-frying uses.

  10. Influence of Picual olive ripening on virgin olive oil alteration and stability during potato frying.

    PubMed

    Olivero-David, Raul; Mena, Carmen; Pérez-Jimenez, M Angeles; Sastre, Blanca; Bastida, Sara; Márquez-Ruiz, Gloria; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2014-12-01

    Ripening modifies oil attributes and composition. However, the influence of olive ripening on virgin olive oil (VOO) thermal oxidative stability on food-frying has not been studied yet. Oils from Picual olives of low (VOO1), medium (VOO2), and high (VOO3) ripeness were obtained, and their thermal oxidative stability during 40 potato-fryings was tested. Unused VOO1 showed higher antioxidant content and oxidative stability than VOO2 and VOO3. Polar compounds (PC), oligomers, and altered fatty acid methyl esters (polar-FAME) increased, whereas linoleic acid, polyphenols, and tocopherols decreased in the three VOOs through frying. The alteration was lower in VOO1, followed by VOO2 (0.105, 0.117, and 0.042 g/100 g oil less of PC, oligomers and polar-FAME per frying, respectively, in VOO1 than in VOO3). In conclusion, VOO obtained from low-ripeness Picual olives should be preferred when frying fresh-potatoes due to its higher thermal and oxidative stability, permitting a higher number of potato-frying uses. PMID:25390818

  11. Multi-scale analysis of water alteration on the rockslope stability framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochez, Sandra; Laouafa, Farid; Franck, Christian; Guedon, Sylvine; Martineau, François; D'Amato, Julie; Saintenoy, Albane

    2014-10-01

    Water is an important weathering factor on rock discontinuities and in rock mass mechanical behaviour because of its chemical features such as temperature, pH or salinity which make it a "good" candidate to rock degradation. Furthermore the increase of rainfall frequency or intensity highlights some problems on the rock slope stability analysis. This study aims to evaluate the effect of water flow on the rock slope stability and it is performed at two space scales: in situ scale and laboratory (micro scale and macro scale). It shows how water induces degradation at multi-scale (surface roughness and matrix) and thus may decrease the stability of the discontinuous rock mass. It has two main components: the effect of water-solid chemical mechanisms and the analysis of the mechanical response of the discontinuity modified by the water alteration.

  12. Sex-specific Esr2 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus and amygdala is altered by neonatal bisphenol A exposure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinyan; Joyner, Linwood; Mickens, Jillian A; Leyrer, Stephanie M; Patisaul, Heather B

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal life is a critical window for sexually dimorphic brain organization, and profoundly influenced by steroid hormones. Exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds may disrupt this process, resulting in compromised reproductive physiology and behavior. To test the hypothesis that neonatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure can alter sex-specific postnatal Esr2 (Erβ) expression in brain regions fundamental to sociosexual behavior, we mapped Esr2 mRNA levels in the principal nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTp), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), anterior portion of the medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA), super optic nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and lateral habenula across postnatal days (PNDs) 0-19. Next, rat pups of both sexes were subcutaneously injected with 10 μg estradiol benzoate (EB), 50 μg/kg BPA (LBPA), or 50 mg/kg BPA (HBPA) over the first 3 days of life and Esr2 levels were quantified in each region of interest (ROI) on PNDs 4 and 10. EB exposure decreased Esr2 signal in most female ROIs and in the male PVN. In the BNSTp, Esr2 expression decreased in LBPA males and HBPA females on PND 10, thereby reversing the sex difference in expression. In the PVN, Esr2 mRNA levels were elevated in LBPA females, also resulting in a reversal of sexually dimorphic expression. In the MeA, BPA decreased Esr2 expression on PND 4. Collectively, these data demonstrate that region- and sex-specific Esr2 expression is vulnerable to neonatal BPA exposure in regions of the developing brain critical to sociosexual behavior in rat.

  13. A novel post-translational modification of nucleolin, SUMOylation at Lys-294, mediates arsenite-induced cell death by regulating gadd45α mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongyun; Liang, Yuguang; Xie, Qipeng; Gao, Guangxun; Wei, Jinlong; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-02-20

    Nucleolin is a ubiquitously expressed protein and participates in many important biological processes, such as cell cycle regulation and ribosomal biogenesis. The activity of nucleolin is regulated by intracellular localization and post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, methylation, and ADP-ribosylation. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a category of recently verified forms of post-translational modifications and exerts various effects on the target proteins. In the studies reported here, we discovered SUMOylational modification of human nucleolin protein at Lys-294, which facilitated the mRNA binding property of nucleolin by maintaining its nuclear localization. In response to arsenic exposure, nucleolin-SUMO was induced and promoted its binding with gadd45α mRNA, which increased gadd45α mRNA stability and protein expression, subsequently causing GADD45α-mediated cell death. On the other hand, ectopic expression of Mn-SOD attenuated the arsenite-generated superoxide radical level, abrogated nucleolin-SUMO, and in turn inhibited arsenite-induced apoptosis by reducing GADD45α expression. Collectively, our results for the first time demonstrate that nucleolin-SUMO at K294R plays a critical role in its nucleus sequestration and gadd45α mRNA binding activity. This novel biological function of nucleolin is distinct from its conventional role as a proto-oncogene. Therefore, our findings here not only reveal a new modification of nucleolin protein and its novel functional paradigm in mRNA metabolism but also expand our understanding of the dichotomous roles of nucleolin in terms of cancer development, which are dependent on multiple intracellular conditions and consequently the appropriate regulations of its modifications, including SUMOylation. PMID:25561743

  14. CNOT3 contributes to early B cell development by controlling Igh rearrangement and p53 mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takeshi; Morita, Masahiro; Hijikata, Atsushi; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Adachi, Shungo; Isono, Kyoichi; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Natsume, Tohru; Fukao, Taro; Ohara, Osamu; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    The CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex plays crucial roles in mRNA decay and translational repression induced by poly(A) tail shortening. Although the in vitro activities of each component of this complex have been well characterized, its in vivo role in immune cells remains unclear. Here we show that mice lacking the CNOT3 subunit of this complex, specifically in B cells, have a developmental block at the pro- to pre–B cell transition. CNOT3 regulated generation of germline transcripts in the VH region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus, compaction of the locus, and subsequent Igh gene rearrangement and destabilized tumor suppressor p53 mRNA. The developmental defect in the absence of CNOT3 could be partially rescued by ablation of p53 or introduction of a pre-rearranged Igh transgene. Thus, our data suggest that the CCR4–NOT complex regulates B cell differentiation by controlling Igh rearrangement and destabilizing p53 mRNA. PMID:26238124

  15. Alterations of Nonconserved Residues Affect Protein Stability and Folding Dynamics through Charge-Charge Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Garcìa, Angel E; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-10-15

    Charge-charge interactions play an important role in thermal stability of proteins. We employed an all-atom, native-topology-based model with non-native electrostatics to explore the interplay between folding dynamics and stability of TNfn3 (the third fibronectin type III domain from tenascin-C). Our study elucidates the role of charge-charge interactions in modulating the folding energy landscape. In particular, we found that incorporation of explicit charge-charge interactions in the WT TNfn3 induces energetic frustration due to the presence of residual structure in the unfolded state. Moreover, optimization of the surface charge-charge interactions by altering the evolutionarily nonconserved residues not only increases the thermal stability (in agreement with previous experimental study) but also reduces the formation of residual structure and hence minimizes the energetic frustration along the folding route. We concluded that charge-charge interaction in the rationally designed TNfn3 plays an important role not only in enhancing the stability but also in assisting folding. PMID:26413861

  16. Enhanced stability of microRNA expression facilitates classification of FFPE tumour samples exhibiting near total mRNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J S; Taylor, J; Valentine, H R; Irlam, J J; Eustace, A; Hoskin, P J; Miller, C J; West, C M L

    2012-01-01

    Background: As degradation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples limits the ability to profile mRNA expression, we explored factors predicting the success of mRNA expression profiling of FFPE material and investigated an approach to overcome the limitation. Methods: Bladder (n=140, stored 3–8 years) and cervix (n=160, stored 8–23 years) carcinoma FFPE samples were hybridised to Affymetrix Exon 1.0ST arrays. Percentage detection above background (%DABG) measured technical success. Biological signal was assessed by distinguishing cervix squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC) using a gene signature. As miR-205 had been identified as a marker of SCC, precursor mir-205 was measured by Exon array and mature miR-205 by qRT–PCR. Genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression (Affymetrix miRNA v2.0 arrays) was compared in eight newer FFPE samples with biological signal and eight older samples without. Results: RNA quality controls (QCs) (e.g., RNA integrity (RIN) number) failed to predict profiling success, but sample age correlated with %DABG in bladder (R=−0.30, P<0.01) and cervix (R=−0.69, P<0.01). Biological signal was lost in older samples and neither a signature nor precursor mir-205 separated samples by histology. miR-205 qRT–PCR discriminated SCC from AC, validated by miRNA profiling (26-fold higher in SCC; P=1.10 × 10−5). Genome-wide miRNA (R=0.95) and small nucleolar RNA (R=0.97) expression correlated well in the eight newer vs older FFPE samples and better than mRNA expression (R=0.72). Conclusion: Sample age is the best predictor of successful mRNA profiling of FFPE material, and miRNA profiling overcomes the limitation of age and copes well with older samples. PMID:22805332

  17. Xyloglucan Deficiency Disrupts Microtubule Stability and Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, Altering Cell Growth and Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaowen; Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-01-01

    Xyloglucan constitutes most of the hemicellulose in eudicot primary cell walls and functions in cell wall structure and mechanics. Although Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking detectable xyloglucan are viable, they display growth defects that are suggestive of alterations in wall integrity. To probe the mechanisms underlying these defects, we analyzed cellulose arrangement, microtubule patterning and dynamics, microtubule- and wall-integrity-related gene expression, and cellulose biosynthesis in xxt1 xxt2 plants. We found that cellulose is highly aligned in xxt1 xxt2 cell walls, that its three-dimensional distribution is altered, and that microtubule patterning and stability are aberrant in etiolated xxt1 xxt2 hypocotyls. We also found that the expression levels of microtubule-associated genes, such as MAP70-5 and CLASP, and receptor genes, such as HERK1 and WAK1, were changed in xxt1 xxt2 plants and that cellulose synthase motility is reduced in xxt1 xxt2 cells, corresponding with a reduction in cellulose content. Our results indicate that loss of xyloglucan affects both the stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton and the production and patterning of cellulose in primary cell walls. These findings establish, to our knowledge, new links between wall integrity, cytoskeletal dynamics, and wall synthesis in the regulation of plant morphogenesis.

  18. The arabidopsis polyamine transporter LHRI/AtPUT3 modulates heat responsive gene expression by regulating mRNA stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyamines (PA) involve in the gene regulation by interacting with various anionic macromolecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins and modulating their structure and function. Previous studies have showed that changing in polyamine biosynthesis alters plant response to different abiotic stresses. Here,...

  19. Altered native stability is the dominant basis for susceptibility of α1-antitrypsin mutants to polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Irving, James A.; Haq, Imran; Dickens, Jennifer A.; Faull, Sarah V.; Lomas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Serpins are protease inhibitors whose most stable state is achieved upon transition of a central 5-stranded β-sheet to a 6-stranded form. Mutations, low pH, denaturants and elevated temperatures promote this transition, which can result in a growing polymer chain of inactive molecules. Different types of polymer are possible, but, experimentally only heat has been shown to generate polymers in vitro consistent with ex vivo pathological specimens. Many mutations that alter the rate of heat-induced polymerization have been described, but interpretation is problematic because discrimination is lacking between the effect of global changes in native stability and specific effects on structural mechanism. We show that the temperature midpoint (Tm) of thermal denaturation reflects the transition of α1-antitrypsin to the polymerization intermediate, and determine the relationship with fixed-temperature polymerization half-times (t0.5) in the presence of stabilizing additives [TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide), sucrose and sodium sulfate], point mutations and disulfide bonds. Combined with a retrospective analysis of 31 mutants characterized in the literature, the results of the present study show that global changes to native state stability are the predominant basis for the effects of mutations and osmolytes on heat-induced polymerization, summarized by the equation: ln(t0.5,mutant/t0.5,wild-type)=0.34×ΔTm. It is deviations from this relationship that hold key information about the polymerization process. PMID:24552432

  20. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  1. Maternal consumption of organic trace minerals alters calf systemic and neutrophil mRNA and microRNA indicators of inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jacometo, Carolina B; Osorio, Johan S; Socha, Michael; Corrêa, Marcio N; Piccioli-Cappelli, Fiorenzo; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Organic trace mineral (ORG) supplementation to dairy cows in substitution of sulfate (INO) sources has been associated with improvement in immune function during stressful states such as the peripartal period. However, the effect of supplemental ORG during pregnancy on the neonatal calf is unknown. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of ORG supplementation during late pregnancy on the immune system and growth of the neonatal calf. Of specific interest was the evaluation of inflammation-related microRNA (miRNA) and target gene expression in blood neutrophils as indicators of possible nutritional programming. Forty multiparous cows were supplemented for 30d prepartum with 40 mg/kg of Zn, 20 mg/kg of Mn, 5 mg/kg of Cu, and 1mg/kg of Co from either organic (ORG) or sulfate (INO) sources (total diet contained supplemental 75 mg/kg of Zn, 65 mg/kg of Mn, 11 mg/kg of Cu, and 1 mg/kg of Co, and additional Zn, Mn, and Co provided by sulfates), and a subset of calves (n=8/treatment) was used for blood immunometabolic marker and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) gene and miRNA expression analyses. Samples were collected at birth (before colostrum feeding), 1d (24 h after colostrum intake), and 7 and 21d of age. Data were analyzed as a factorial design with the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS. No differences were detected in BW, but maternal ORG tended to increase calf withers height. Calves from INO-fed cows had greater concentrations of blood glucose, GOT, paraoxonase, myeloperoxidase, and reactive oxygen metabolites. Antioxidant capacity also was greater in INO calves. The PMNL expression of toll-like receptor pathway genes indicated a pro-inflammatory state in INO calves, with greater expression of the inflammatory mediators MYD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, NFKB, and NFKBIA. The lower expression of miR-155 and miR-125b in ORG calves indicated the potential for maternal organic trace minerals in regulating the PMNL inflammatory response at least via alterations in mRNA and

  2. Maternal consumption of organic trace minerals alters calf systemic and neutrophil mRNA and microRNA indicators of inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jacometo, Carolina B; Osorio, Johan S; Socha, Michael; Corrêa, Marcio N; Piccioli-Cappelli, Fiorenzo; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Organic trace mineral (ORG) supplementation to dairy cows in substitution of sulfate (INO) sources has been associated with improvement in immune function during stressful states such as the peripartal period. However, the effect of supplemental ORG during pregnancy on the neonatal calf is unknown. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of ORG supplementation during late pregnancy on the immune system and growth of the neonatal calf. Of specific interest was the evaluation of inflammation-related microRNA (miRNA) and target gene expression in blood neutrophils as indicators of possible nutritional programming. Forty multiparous cows were supplemented for 30d prepartum with 40 mg/kg of Zn, 20 mg/kg of Mn, 5 mg/kg of Cu, and 1mg/kg of Co from either organic (ORG) or sulfate (INO) sources (total diet contained supplemental 75 mg/kg of Zn, 65 mg/kg of Mn, 11 mg/kg of Cu, and 1 mg/kg of Co, and additional Zn, Mn, and Co provided by sulfates), and a subset of calves (n=8/treatment) was used for blood immunometabolic marker and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) gene and miRNA expression analyses. Samples were collected at birth (before colostrum feeding), 1d (24 h after colostrum intake), and 7 and 21d of age. Data were analyzed as a factorial design with the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS. No differences were detected in BW, but maternal ORG tended to increase calf withers height. Calves from INO-fed cows had greater concentrations of blood glucose, GOT, paraoxonase, myeloperoxidase, and reactive oxygen metabolites. Antioxidant capacity also was greater in INO calves. The PMNL expression of toll-like receptor pathway genes indicated a pro-inflammatory state in INO calves, with greater expression of the inflammatory mediators MYD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, NFKB, and NFKBIA. The lower expression of miR-155 and miR-125b in ORG calves indicated the potential for maternal organic trace minerals in regulating the PMNL inflammatory response at least via alterations in mRNA and

  3. Analysis of miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles Highlights Alterations in Ionizing Radiation Response of Human Lymphocytes under Modeled Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Casara, Silvia; Sales, Gabriele; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Celotti, Lucia; Mognato, Maddalena

    2012-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation (IR) can be extremely harmful for human cells since an improper DNA-damage response (DDR) to IR can contribute to carcinogenesis initiation. Perturbations in DDR pathway can originate from alteration in the functionality of the microRNA-mediated gene regulation, being microRNAs (miRNAs) small noncoding RNA that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In this study we gained insight into the role of miRNAs in the regulation of DDR to IR under microgravity, a condition of weightlessness experienced by astronauts during space missions, which could have a synergistic action on cells, increasing the risk of radiation exposure. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed miRNA expression profile of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) incubated for 4 and 24 h in normal gravity (1 g) and in modeled microgravity (MMG) during the repair time after irradiation with 0.2 and 2Gy of γ-rays. Our results show that MMG alters miRNA expression signature of irradiated PBL by decreasing the number of radio-responsive miRNAs. Moreover, let-7i*, miR-7, miR-7-1*, miR-27a, miR-144, miR-200a, miR-598, miR-650 are deregulated by the combined action of radiation and MMG. Integrated analyses of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles, carried out on PBL of the same donors, identified significant miRNA-mRNA anti-correlations of DDR pathway. Gene Ontology analysis reports that the biological category of “Response to DNA damage” is enriched when PBL are incubated in 1 g but not in MMG. Moreover, some anti-correlated genes of p53-pathway show a different expression level between 1 g and MMG. Functional validation assays using luciferase reporter constructs confirmed miRNA-mRNA interactions derived from target prediction analyses. Conclusions/Significance On the whole, by integrating the transcriptome and microRNome, we provide evidence that modeled microgravity can affects the DNA-damage response to IR in human PBL. PMID:22347458

  4. The impact of cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms, morphology and p53 in mantle cell lymphoma: p53 alterations and blastoid morphology are strong predictors of a high proliferation index

    PubMed Central

    Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Koch, Ina; de Leval, Laurence; Keller, Gisela; Klier, Margit; Bink, Karin; Kremer, Marcus; Raffeld, Mark; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2012-01-01

    Background Mantle cell lymphoma is a clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by overexpression of cyclin D1 protein. Blastoid morphology, high proliferation, and secondary genetic aberrations are markers of aggressive behavior. Expression profiling of mantle cell lymphoma revealed that predominance of the 3’UTR-deficient, short cyclin D1 mRNA isoform was associated with high cyclin D1 levels, a high “proliferation signature” and poor prognosis. Design and Methods Sixty-two cases of mantle cell lymphoma were analyzed for cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms and total cyclin D1 levels by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and TP53 alterations were assessed by immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. Results were correlated with proliferation index and clinical outcome. Results Predominance of the short cyclin D1 mRNA was found in 14 (23%) samples, including four with complete loss of the standard transcript. TP53 alterations were found in 15 (24%) cases. Predominance of 3’UTR-deficient mRNA was significantly associated with high cyclin D1 mRNA levels (P=0.009) and more commonly found in blastoid mantle cell lymphoma (5/11, P=0.060) and cases with a proliferation index of >20% (P=0.026). Both blastoid morphology (11/11, P<0.001) and TP53 alterations (15/15, P<0.001) were significantly correlated with a high proliferation index. A proliferation index of 10% was determined to be a significant threshold for survival in multivariate analysis (P=0.01). Conclusions TP53 alterations are strongly associated with a high proliferation index and aggressive behavior in mantle cell lymphoma. Predominance of the 3’UTR-deficient transcript correlates with higher cyclin D1 levels and may be a secondary contributing factor to high proliferation, but failed to reach prognostic significance in this study. PMID:22315488

  5. The ompA 5' untranslated RNA segment functions in Escherichia coli as a growth-rate-regulated mRNA stabilizer whose activity is unrelated to translational efficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Emory, S A; Belasco, J G

    1990-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the long-lived Escherichia coli ompA message can function in vivo as an mRNA stabilizer. Substitution of this ompA mRNA segment for the corresponding segment of the labile bla gene transcripts prolongs their lifetime by a factor of 6. We show here that the function of this ompA mRNA stabilizer requires the presence of a 115-nucleotide ompA RNA segment that lies upstream of the ribosome-binding site. Although deletion of this segment reduced the half-life of the ompA transcript by a factor of 5, its absence had almost no effect on the translational efficiency of ompA mRNA. Like the ompA transcript, but unlike bla mRNA, hybrid ompA-bla messages containing the complete ompA 5' UTR were significantly less stable under conditions of slow bacterial growth. We conclude that the stabilizing activity of the ompA 5' UTR is growth rate regulated and that the mechanism of mRNA stabilization by this RNA segment is not related to the spacing between translating ribosomes. Images PMID:1695894

  6. Water making hot rocks soft: How hydrothermal alteration affects volcano stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    My research involves using numerical models of groundwater flow and slope stability to determine how long-term hydrothermal alteration in stratovolcanoes can cause increases in pore fluid pressure that lead to edifice collapse. Or in simpler terms: We can use computers to figure out how and why water that moves through hot rocks changes them into softer rocks that want to fall down. It's important to pay attention to the soft rocks even if they look safe because this can happen a long time after the stuff that makes them hot goes away or becomes cool. Wet soft rocks can go very far from high places and run over people in their way. I want show where the soft wet rocks are and how they might fall down so people will be safer.

  7. Androgens alter corticotropin releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin mRNA within forebrain sites known to regulate activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Viau, V; Soriano, L; Dallman, M F

    2001-05-01

    To reveal direct effects of androgens, independent of glucocorticoids, we studied the effects of gonadectomy (GDX) in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats with or without androgen replacement on corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA expression within various forebrain sites known to regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. These included the medial parvocellular portion of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (mp PVN), the central and medial nuclei of the amygdala and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BNST). In the mp PVN, ADX stimulated both CRH and AVP mRNA expression. Combined ADX + GDX inhibited only AVP, and testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) restored AVP mRNA. In the central nucleus of the amygdala, ADX decreased CRH mRNA expression, and this response was unaffected by GDX +/- testosterone or DHT replacement. In the medial amygdala, AVP mRNA expression was decreased by ADX, abolished by ADX + GDX, and restored by androgen replacement. ADX had no effect on CRH and AVP mRNA expression in the BNST. GDX + ADX, however, reduced CRH mRNA expression only within the fusiform nuclei of the BNST and reduced the number of AVP-expressing neurones in the posterior BNST. Androgen replacement reversed both responses. In summary, in ADX rats, AVP, but not CRH mRNA expression in the amygdala and mp PVN, is sensitive to GDX +/- androgen replacement. Both CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones in the BNST respond to GDX and androgen replacement, but not to ADX alone. Because androgen receptors are not expressed by hypophysiotropic PVN neurones, we conclude that glucocorticoid-independent, androgenic influences on medial parvocellular AVP mRNA expression are mediated upstream from the PVN, and may involve AVP-related pathways in the medial amygdala, relayed to and through CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones of the BNST.

  8. BCAS2 promotes prostate cancer cells proliferation by enhancing AR mRNA transcription and protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, P-C; Huang, C-W; Lee, C-I; Chang, H-W; Hsieh, S-W; Chung, Y-P; Lee, M-S; Huang, C-S; Tsao, L-P; Tsao, Y-P; Chen, S-L

    2015-01-01

    Background: We showed previously that breast carcinoma amplified sequence 2 (BCAS2) functions as a negative regulator of p53. We also found that BCAS2 is a potential AR-associated protein. AR is essential for the growth and survival of prostate carcinoma. Therefore we characterised the correlation between BCAS2 and AR. Methods: Protein interactions were examined by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Clinical prostate cancer (PCa) specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical assay. AR transcriptional activity and LNCaP cell growth were assessed by luciferase assay and MTT assay, respectively. Results: BCAS2 expression was significantly increased in PCa. BCAS2 stabilised AR protein through both hormone-dependent and -independent manners. There are at least two mechanisms for BCAS2-mediated AR protein upregulation: One is p53-dependent. The p53 is suppressed by BCAS2 that results in increasing AR mRNA and protein expression. The other is via p53-independent inhibition of proteasome degradation. As BCAS2 can form a complex with AR and HSP90, it may function with HSP90 to stabilise AR protein from being degraded by proteasome. Conclusions: In this study, we show that BCAS2 is a novel AR-interacting protein and characterise the correlation between BCAS2 and PCa. Thus we propose that BCAS2 could be a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:25461807

  9. Photoelectrochemical Stability and Alteration Products of n-Type Single-Crystal ZnO Photoanodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Paulauskas, I. E.; Jellison, G. E.; Boatner, L. A.; Brown, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical stability and surface-alteration characteristics of doped and undoped n-type ZnO single-crystal photoanode electrodes were investigated. The single-crystal ZnO photoanode properties were analyzed using current-voltage measurements plus spectral and time-dependent quantum-yield methods. These measurements revealed a distinct anodic peak and an accompanying cathodic surface degradation process at negative potentials. The features of this peak depended on time and the NaOH concentration in the electrolyte, but were independent of the presence of electrode illumination. Current measurements performed at the peak indicate that charging and discharging effects are apparently taking place at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. This result is consistent with themore » significant reactive degradation that takes place on the ZnO single crystal photoanode surface and that ultimately leads to the reduction of the ZnO surface to Zn metal. The resulting Zn-metal reaction products create unusual, dendrite-like, surface alteration structural features that were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. ZnO doping methods were found to be effective in increasing the n-type character of the crystals. Higher doping levels result in smaller depletion widths and lower quantum yields, since the minority carrier diffusion lengths are very short in these materials.« less

  10. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms.

  11. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms. PMID:25414032

  12. Chloroquine enhances TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through up-regulation of DR5 by stabilization of mRNA and protein in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Jung; Min, Kyoung-jin; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Kubatka, Peter; Kruzliak, Peter; Kim, Dong Eun; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial drug, has immune-modulating activity and lysosomotropic activity. In this study, we investigated CQ sensitizes TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells. Combination of CQ and TRAIL significantly induces apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells and various human cancer cells, but not in normal mouse kidney cells (TMCK-1) and human mesangial cells (MC). CQ up-regulates DR5 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Interestingly, CQ regulates DR5 expression through the increased stability in the mRNA and protein of DR5, rather than through the increased transcriptional activity of DR5. Moreover, we found that CQ decreased the expression of Cbl, an E3 ligase of DR5, and knock-down of Cbl markedly enhanced DR5 up-regulation. Other lysosomal inhibitors, including monensin and nigericin, also up-regulated DR5 and sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Therefore, this study demonstrates that lysosomal inhibition by CQ may sensitize TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells via DR5 up-regulation. PMID:26964637

  13. Chloroquine enhances TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through up-regulation of DR5 by stabilization of mRNA and protein in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Min, Kyoung-jin; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Kubatka, Peter; Kruzliak, Peter; Kim, Dong Eun; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial drug, has immune-modulating activity and lysosomotropic activity. In this study, we investigated CQ sensitizes TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells. Combination of CQ and TRAIL significantly induces apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells and various human cancer cells, but not in normal mouse kidney cells (TMCK-1) and human mesangial cells (MC). CQ up-regulates DR5 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Interestingly, CQ regulates DR5 expression through the increased stability in the mRNA and protein of DR5, rather than through the increased transcriptional activity of DR5. Moreover, we found that CQ decreased the expression of Cbl, an E3 ligase of DR5, and knock-down of Cbl markedly enhanced DR5 up-regulation. Other lysosomal inhibitors, including monensin and nigericin, also up-regulated DR5 and sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Therefore, this study demonstrates that lysosomal inhibition by CQ may sensitize TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal cancer Caki cells via DR5 up-regulation. PMID:26964637

  14. RNA Processing Factor 7 and Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Are Necessary for Processing and Stability of nad2 mRNA in Arabidopsis Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Birgit; Zendler, Daniel; Binder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional maturation of plant mitochondrial transcripts requires several steps. Among these, the generation of mature 5′ ends is still one of the most enigmatic processes. Toward a characterization of proteins involved in 5′ processing of mitochondrial transcripts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we now analyzed 5′ maturation of nad2 transcripts. Based on natural genetic variation affecting 5′ ends of nad2 transcripts in ecotype Can-0 and complementation studies we now identified RNA processing factor 7, which takes part in the generation of the 5′ terminus of the mature nad2 mRNA. RPF7 is a relatively short regular P-class pentatricopeptide repeat protein comprising seven canonical P repeats and a single short S repeat. The corresponding allele in Can-0 encodes a truncated version of this protein lacking two C-terminal repeats, which are essential for the function of RPF7. Furthermore we established transgenic plants expressing artifical microRNAs targeting the mitochondrial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), which results in substantial reduction of the PNPase mRNA levels and strong knockdown of this gene. Detailed quantitative studies of 5′ and 3′ extended nad2 precursor RNAs in these knockdown plants as well as in the rpf7–1 knockout mutant suggest that 5′ processing contributes to the stability of mitochondrial transcripts in plants. PMID:25181358

  15. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  16. Chemokine-coupled β2 integrin–induced macrophage Rac2–Myosin IIA interaction regulates VEGF-A mRNA stability and arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Alan R.; Yarovinsky, Timur O.; Young, Bryan D.; Moraes, Filipa; Ross, Tyler D.; Ceneri, Nicolle; Zhang, Jiasheng; Zhuang, Zhen W.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Pardi, Ruggero; Schwartz, Martin A.; Simons, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid cells are important contributors to arteriogenesis, but their key molecular triggers and cellular effectors are largely unknown. We report, in inflammatory monocytes, that the combination of chemokine receptor (CCR2) and adhesion receptor (β2 integrin) engagement leads to an interaction between activated Rac2 and Myosin 9 (Myh9), the heavy chain of Myosin IIA, resulting in augmented vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) expression and induction of arteriogenesis. In human monocytes, CCL2 stimulation coupled to ICAM-1 adhesion led to rapid nuclear-to-cytosolic translocation of the RNA-binding protein HuR. This activation of HuR and its stabilization of VEGF-A mRNA were Rac2-dependent, and proteomic analysis for Rac2 interactors identified the 226 kD protein Myh9. The level of induced Rac2–Myh9 interaction strongly correlated with the degree of HuR translocation. CCL2-coupled ICAM-1 adhesion-driven HuR translocation and consequent VEGF-A mRNA stabilization were absent in Myh9−/− macrophages. Macrophage VEGF-A production, ischemic tissue VEGF-A levels, and flow recovery to hind limb ischemia were impaired in myeloid-specific Myh9−/− mice, despite preserved macrophage recruitment to the ischemic muscle. Micro-CT arteriography determined the impairment to be defective induced arteriogenesis, whereas developmental vasculogenesis was unaffected. These results place the macrophage at the center of ischemia-induced arteriogenesis, and they establish a novel role for Myosin IIA in signal transduction events modulating VEGF-A expression in tissue. PMID:25180062

  17. MDR1 Synonymous Polymorphisms Alter Transporter Specificity and Protein Stability in a Stable Epithelial Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Fung, King Leung; Pan, James; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Lund, Paul E.; Pixley, Jessica N.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The drug efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by MDR1 can be influenced by genetic polymorphisms, including two synonymous changes in the coding region of MDR1. Here we report that the conformation of P-gp and its drug efflux activity can be altered by synonymous polymorphisms in stable epithelial monolayers expressing P-gp. Several cell lines with similar MDR1 DNA copy number were developed and termed LLC-MDR1-WT (expresses wild-type P-gp), LLC-MDR1-3H (expresses common haplotype P-gp), and LLC-MDR1-3HA (a mutant that carries a different valine codon in position 3435). These cell lines express similar levels of recombinant mRNA and protein. P-gp in each case is localized on the apical surface of polarized cells. However, the haplotype and its mutant P-gps fold differently from the wild-type, as determined by UIC2 antibody shift assays and limited proteolysis assays. Surface biotinylation experiments suggest that the non-wild-type P-gps have longer recycling times. Drug transport assays show that wild-type and haplotype P-gp respond differently to P-gp inhibitors that block efflux of rhodamine-123 or mitoxantrone. In addition, cytotoxicity assays show that the LLC-MDR1-3H cells are more resistant to mitoxantrone than the LLC-MDR1-WT cells after being treated with a P-gp inhibitor. Expression of polymorphic P-gp, however, does not affect the host cell’s morphology, growth rate, or monolayer formation. Also, ATPase activity assays indicate that neither basal nor drug-stimulated ATPase activities are affected in the variant P-gps. Taken together, our findings indicate that “silent” polymorphisms significantly change P-gp function, which would be expected to affect interindividual drug disposition and response. PMID:24305879

  18. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  19. Regulation of the stability of poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast interferon mRNA: selective inactivation of interferon mRNA and lack of involvement of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase activation during the shutoff of interferon production.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, P B; Gupta, S L

    1980-06-01

    The inactivation of interferon mRNA during the shutoff phase of interferon production in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast cultures is selective. We have determined that the shutoff of interferon production, which takes place from 3 to 8 hr after the beginning of induction, is not associated with an appreciable declined in the rate of bulk cellular protein synthesis or of cellular protein secretion. While the amount of translatable interferon mRNA declined markedly during the shutoff phase, the level of translatable bulk cellular mRNA and the stability of [3H]uridine-labeled mRNA were unaffected. Superinduction with actinomycin D selectively stabilized interferon mRNA with no apparent effect on the stability of bulk cellular mRNA. Furthermore, an activation of the 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase/endonuclease system does not appear to be involved in the shutoff phenomenon. Uninduced FS-4 cells contained a low basal level of 2'5'-oligo(A) synthetase activity, which was unchanged in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced cells during the shutoff phase. Treatment of FS-4 cells with interferon for 16-18 hr prior to induction increased the enzyme activity by approximately 200-fold. However, this did not inhibit interferon production after induction with poly(I)xpoly(C) alone or after superinduction with cycloheximide or actinomycin D or both. Furthermore, the rates of decay of interferon production were comparable in cells with either a basal or an increased level of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase. Thus a 200-fold increase in 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase level did not affect either the stability of interferon mRNA or the efficacy of interferon superinduction by metabolic inhibitors.

  20. Altered mRNA Expression Related to the Apoptotic Effect of Three Xanthones on Human Melanoma SK-MEL-28 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing J.; Zhang, Wei; Sanderson, Barbara J. S.

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that α-mangostin, γ-mangostin, and 8-deoxygartanin have significant cytotoxic effects on human melanoma SK-MEL-28 cell line. The current study revealed the underlying mechanisms. α-Mangostin (7.5 μg/mL) activated caspase activity, with a 3-fold and 4-fold increased caspase 8 and 9 activity, respectively. The molecular mechanisms were investigated by qRT-PCR for mRNA related to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase (p21WAF1 and cyclin D1), apoptosis (cytochrome C, Bcl-2, and Bax), and survival pathways (Akt1, NFκB, and IκBα). α-Mangostin significantly upregulated mRNA expression of cytochrome C and p21WAF1 and downregulated that of cyclin D1, Akt1, and NFκB. γ-Mangostin significantly downregulated mRNA expression of Akt1 and NFκB and upregulated p21WAF1 and IκBα. 8-Deoxygartanin significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of p21WAF1 and downregulated that of cyclin D1 and NFκB. The three xanthones significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the BRAF V600E mutation. Moreover, α-mangostin and γ-mangostin significantly downregulated Akt phosphorylation at Ser473. In conclusion, the three xanthones induced an inhibitory effect on SK-MEL-28 cells by modulating the molecular targets involved in the apoptotic pathways. PMID:24175297

  1. Analysis of rpoS mRNA in Salmonella dublin: identification of multiple transcripts with growth-phase-dependent variation in transcript stability.

    PubMed

    Paesold, G; Krause, M

    1999-02-01

    In Salmonella dublin, rpoS encodes an alternative sigma factor of the RNA polymerase that activates a variety of stationary-phase-induced genes, including some virulence-associated genes. In this work, we studied the regulation and transcriptional organization of rpoS during growth. We found two transcripts, 2.3 and 1.6 kb in length, that represent the complete rpoS sequence. The 2.3-kb transcript is a polycistronic message that also includes the upstream nlpD gene. It is driven by a weak promoter with increasing activity when cells enter early stationary growth. The 1.6-kb message includes 566 bp upstream of the rpoS start codon. It is transcribed from a strong sigma70 RNA polymerase-dependent promoter which is independent of growth. The decay of this transcript decreases substantially in early stationary growth, resulting in a significant net increase in rpoS mRNA levels. These levels are approximately 10-fold higher than the levels of the 2.3-kb mRNA, indicating that the 1.6-kb message is mainly responsible for RpoS upregulation. In addition to the 2.3- and 1.6-kb transcripts, two smaller 1.0- and 0.4-kb RNA species are produced from the nlpD-rpoS locus. They do not allow translation of full-length RpoS; hence their significance for rpoS regulation remains unclear. We conclude that of four transcripts arising from the nlpD-rpoS locus, only one plays a significant role in rpoS expression in S. dublin. Its upregulation when cells enter stationary growth is due primarily to an increase in transcript stability.

  2. Jasplakinolide, an actin stabilizing agent, alters anaphase chromosome movements in crane-fly spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lele; Forer, Arthur

    2008-11-01

    We added jasplakinolide to anaphase crane-fly spermatocytes and determined its effects on chromosome movement. Previous work showed that the actin depolymerizing agents cytochalasin D or latrunculin B blocked or slowed chromosome movements. We studied the effects of jasplakinolide, a compound that stabilizes actin filaments. Jasplakinolide had the same effect on movements of each half- bivalent in a separating pair of half-bivalents, but different half-bivalent pairs in the same cell often responded differently, even when the concentrations of jasplakinolide varied by a factor of two. Jasplakinolide had no effect on about 20% of the pairs, but otherwise caused movements to slow, or to stop, or, rarely, to accelerate. When cells were kept in jasplakinolide, stopped pairs eventually resumed movement; slowed pairs did not change their speeds. Confocal microscopy indicated that neither the distributions of spindle actin filaments nor the distributions of spindle microtubules were altered by the jasplakinolide. It is possible that jasplakinolide binds to spindle actin and blocks critical binding sites, but we suggest that jasplakinolide affects anaphase chromosome movement by preventing actin-filament depolymerization that is necessary for anaphase to proceed. Overall, our data indicate that actin is involved in one of the redundant mechanisms cells use to move chromosomes. PMID:18688844

  3. Physiological and biochemical responses of transgenic potato plants with altered expression of PSII manganese stabilizing protein.

    PubMed

    Gururani, Mayank Anand; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash; Strasser, Reto J; Woong, Yu Jae; Park, Se Won

    2012-09-01

    Manganese-stabilizing protein (MSP) represents a key component of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Transgenic potato plants with both enhanced (sense) and reduced (anti-sense) MSP expression levels were generated to investigate the possible physiological role of MSP in overall plant growth, particularly in tuber development. MSP antisense plants exhibited both higher tuberization frequency and higher tuber yield with increased total soluble carbohydrates. The photosynthetic efficiencies of the plants were examined using the OJIP kinetics; MSP-antisense plants were photosynthetically more active than the MSP-sense and UT (untransformed) control plants. The oxygen measurements indicated that the relative oxygen evolution was directly proportional to the MSP expression, as MSP-antisense plants showed much lower oxygen evolution compared to MSP-sense as well as UT plants. MSP-sense plants behaved like the UT plants with respect to morphology, tuber yield, and photosynthetic performance. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analyses indicate a possible lack of intact Oxygen Evolving Complexes (OECs) in MSP antisense plants, which allow access to internal non-water electron donors (e.g., ascorbate and proline) and consequently increase the Photosystem II (PSII) activity of those plants. These findings further indicate that this altered photosynthetic machinery may be associated with early tuberization and increased tuberization frequency.

  4. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Robert M.; Didham, Raphael K.; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D.; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L.; Turner, Edgar C.

    2011-01-01

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification. PMID:22006969

  5. Alterations in trace element levels and mRNA expression of Hsps and inflammatory cytokines in livers of duck exposed to molybdenum or/and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huabin; Gao, Feiyan; Xia, Bing; Zhang, Mengmeng; Liao, Yilin; Yang, Zhi; Hu, Guoliang; Zhang, Caiying

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of dietary Molybdenum (Mo) or/and Cadmium (Cd) on trace elements and the mRNA expression levels of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and inflammatory cytokines in duck livers. 240 healthy 11-day-old ducks were randomly divided into six groups with 40 ducks in each group, which were treated with Mo or/and Cd at different doses on the basal diet for 120 days. On days 30, 60, 90 and 120, 10 birds in each group were randomly selected and euthanized and then the livers were collected to determine the contents of Mo, Cd, copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zine (Zn), Selenium (Se) and the mRNA expression levels of Hsps, inflammatory cytokines. In addition, liver tissues at 120 days were subjected to histopathological analysis with the optical microscope. The results showed that the mRNA expression of Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were significantly (P<0.01) upregulated in combination groups; Contents of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se decreased in combined groups (P<0.05) in the later period of the test while contents of Mo and Cd significantly increased (P<0.01); Furthermore severe hepatocyte diffuse fatty, hepatic cords swelling, hepatic sinusoid disappeared, and inflammatory cells infiltrated around the hepatic central vein were observed in Mo combined with Cd groups. The results indicated that dietary Mo or/and Cd might lead to stress, inflammatory response, tissue damage and disturb homeostasis of trace elements in duck livers. Moreover the two elements showed a possible synergistic relationship. And the high mRNA expression of HSPs and inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the resistance of liver toxicity induced by Mo and Cd.

  6. Alterations in trace element levels and mRNA expression of Hsps and inflammatory cytokines in livers of duck exposed to molybdenum or/and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huabin; Gao, Feiyan; Xia, Bing; Zhang, Mengmeng; Liao, Yilin; Yang, Zhi; Hu, Guoliang; Zhang, Caiying

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of dietary Molybdenum (Mo) or/and Cadmium (Cd) on trace elements and the mRNA expression levels of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and inflammatory cytokines in duck livers. 240 healthy 11-day-old ducks were randomly divided into six groups with 40 ducks in each group, which were treated with Mo or/and Cd at different doses on the basal diet for 120 days. On days 30, 60, 90 and 120, 10 birds in each group were randomly selected and euthanized and then the livers were collected to determine the contents of Mo, Cd, copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zine (Zn), Selenium (Se) and the mRNA expression levels of Hsps, inflammatory cytokines. In addition, liver tissues at 120 days were subjected to histopathological analysis with the optical microscope. The results showed that the mRNA expression of Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were significantly (P<0.01) upregulated in combination groups; Contents of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se decreased in combined groups (P<0.05) in the later period of the test while contents of Mo and Cd significantly increased (P<0.01); Furthermore severe hepatocyte diffuse fatty, hepatic cords swelling, hepatic sinusoid disappeared, and inflammatory cells infiltrated around the hepatic central vein were observed in Mo combined with Cd groups. The results indicated that dietary Mo or/and Cd might lead to stress, inflammatory response, tissue damage and disturb homeostasis of trace elements in duck livers. Moreover the two elements showed a possible synergistic relationship. And the high mRNA expression of HSPs and inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the resistance of liver toxicity induced by Mo and Cd. PMID:26682514

  7. 6-Hydroxydopamine induces distinct alterations in GDF5 and GDNF mRNA expression in the rat nigrostriatal system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Aisling M; Walsh, Sinéad; Wyatt, Sean; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2014-02-21

    Growth/differentiation factor (GDF)5 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are neurotrophic factors that promote the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. Both factors have potent neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in rat models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and represent promising new therapies for PD. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of GDF5, GDNF and their receptors in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in rat models of PD. It found that endogenous GDF5, GDNF and their receptors are differentially expressed in two 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of PD. In both striatal and medial forebrain bundle (MFB) lesion models, striatal levels of GDF5 mRNA increased at 10 days post-lesion, while GDNF mRNA levels in the nigrostriatal system decreased after 10 and 28 days. Midbrain mRNA levels for both GDF5 receptors transiently increased after striatal lesion, whereas those of two GDNF receptors decreased at later time-points in both models. Despite the fact that exogenous GDF5 and GDNF have comparable effects on dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo, their endogenous responses to neurotoxic injury are different. This highlights the importance of studying neurotrophic factor expression at distinct disease stages and in various animal models of PD.

  8. Tumor-suppressor NFκB2 p100 interacts with ERK2 and stabilizes PTEN mRNA via inhibition of miR-494.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Xu, J; Gao, G; Li, J; Huang, H; Jin, H; Zhu, J; Che, X; Huang, C

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed that nuclear factor κB2 (nfκb2) gene encoding p100 is genetically deleted or mutated in human cancers, implicating NFκB2 as a potential tumor suppressor. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the antitumorigenic action of p100 remains poorly understood. Here we report that p100 inhibits cancer cell anchorage-independent growth, a hallmark of cellular malignancy, by stabilizing the tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mRNA via a mechanism that is independent of p100's inhibitory role in NFκB activation. We further demonstrate that the regulatory effect of p100 on PTEN expression is mediated by its downregulation of miR-494 as a result of the inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), in turn leading to inhibition of c-Jun/activator protein-1-dependent transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we identify that p100 specifically interacts with non-phosphorylated ERK2 and prevents ERK2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Moreover, the death domain at C-terminal of p100 is identified as being crucial and sufficient for its interaction with ERK2. Taken together, our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the understanding of the tumor-suppressive role for NFκB2 p100. PMID:26686085

  9. Tumor suppressor NFκB2 p100 interacts with ERK2 and stabilizes PTEN mRNA via inhibition of miR-494

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yulei; Xu, Jiawei; Gao, Guangxun; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Jin, Honglei; Zhu, Junlan; Che, Xun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has revealed that nfκb2 gene encoding p100 is genetically deleted or mutated in human cancers, implicating NFκB2 as a potential tumor suppressor. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-tumorigenic action of p100 remains poorly understood. Here, we report that p100 inhibits cancer cell anchorage-independent growth, a hallmark of cellular malignancy, by stabilizing the tumor suppressor PTEN mRNA via a mechanism that is independent of p100’s inhibitory role in NFκB activation. We further demonstrate that the regulatory effect of p100 on PTEN expression is mediated by its downregulation of miR-494 as a result of the inactivation of ERK2, in turn leading to inhibition of c-Jun/AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we identify that p100 specifically interacts with non-phosphorylated ERK2 and prevents ERK2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Moreover, the death domain at C-terminal of p100 is identified as being crucial and sufficient for its interaction with ERK2. Taken together, our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the understanding of the tumor suppressive role for NFκB2 p100. PMID:26686085

  10. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL regulates mRNA splicing and stability during B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xing; Li, Bin; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation is a major mechanism to rewire transcriptomes during differentiation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein LL (hnRNPLL) is specifically induced in terminally differentiated lymphocytes, including effector T cells and plasma cells. To study the molecular functions of hnRNPLL at a genome-wide level, we identified hnRNPLL RNA targets and binding sites in plasma cells through integrated Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Cross-Linking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) and RNA sequencing. hnRNPLL preferentially recognizes CA dinucleotide-containing sequences in introns and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), promotes exon inclusion or exclusion in a context-dependent manner, and stabilizes mRNA when associated with 3′ UTRs. During differentiation of primary B cells to plasma cells, hnRNPLL mediates a genome-wide switch of RNA processing, resulting in loss of B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) expression and increased Ig production—both hallmarks of plasma-cell maturation. Our data identify previously unknown functions of hnRNPLL in B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation and demonstrate that the RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL has a critical role in tuning transcriptomes of terminally differentiating B lymphocytes. PMID:25825742

  11. Alternative Splicing and the Steady-State Ratios of mRNA Isoforms Generated by It Are under Strong Stabilizing Selection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Barberan-Soler, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary studies indicate that a high proportion of alternative splicing (AS) events are species-specific; just 28% of minor-form alternatively spliced exons are conserved between mice and humans. We employed a splicing-sensitive microarray to study the evolution of allele-specific AS in nematodes. We compared splicing levels among five distinct Caenorhabditis elegans lines. Our results indicate that AS is less variable between natural isolates (NIs) from England, Hawaii, and Australia than when compared with mutation accumulation lines (6% vs. 21%, respectively, vary compared with N2). This suggests that strong stabilizing selection shapes the evolution of the ratios of isoforms generated by AS in C. elegans. When we analyzed some of the splicing changes between the NIs, we found examples of changes in both cis and trans that lead to alterations in gene-specific AS. This indicates that both these mechanisms for changing AS are employed along the path toward speciation in nematodes. PMID:18718918

  12. Female pheromones stimulate release of luteinizing hormone and testosterone without altering GnRH mRNA in adult male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Heather N; Nelson, Aaron L A; Ahmed, Eman I; Parfitt, David B; Romeo, Russell D; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2004-09-15

    In many species chemosensory stimuli function as important signals that influence reproductive status. Neurons synthesizing the peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are critical mediators of reproductive function via their regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and they are thought to be responsive to chemosensory information. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the effects of female chemosensory stimuli on the HPG axis in sexually naive adult male Syrian hamsters. In Experiment 1, serial blood samples were collected from catheterized male hamsters following exposure to female pheromones in order to characterize the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to this chemosensory stimulus. In Experiment 2, brains and terminal blood samples were collected from animals 0, 60, and 120 min following pheromone exposure. GnRH mRNA was measured in brain tissue sections using in situ hybridization, and plasma concentrations of LH and testosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Data from Experiment 1 indicated that female pheromones elicited a rapid rise in plasma LH that peaked at 15 min and returned to baseline 45 min after exposure. In Experiment 2, testosterone was elevated in terminal blood samples obtained 60 min, but not 120 min, after exposure to pheromones. LH levels were unaffected at both of these time points. The chemosensory-induced increases in LH and testosterone release were not accompanied by subsequent changes in GnRH mRNA over the time course studied. These data suggest that while activation of the male HPG axis by female pheromones involves release of GnRH, it does not involve increases in GnRH mRNA 1-2 h after pheromonal stimulation as a mechanism for replenishment of released peptide.

  13. Runx3 Expression Inhibits Proliferation and Distinctly Alters mRNA Expression of Bax in AGS and A549 Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torshabi, Maryam; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Tabatabaei Yazdi, Mojtaba; Ostad, Seyyed Naser; Gharemani, Mohammad Hosein

    2011-01-01

    Runx3, a member of Runt-related transcription factor (Runx) proteins with tumor suppressor effect, is a tissue–restricted and cancer related transcription factor that regulate cell proliferation and growth, as well as differentiation. In the present study, exogenous Run3 was transiently expressed in AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma), with undetectable Runx3 protein and in A549 (human lung carcinoma) with low levels of endogenous Runx3 protein. The GFP tagged Runx3 was transfected into AGS and A549 cells using fugene6 and PolyFect and Runx3 expression was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy and RT-PCR. The effect of Runx3 transfection on cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and the results were confirmed by the trypan blue dye exclusion method. The effect of Runx3 expression on mRNA expression of BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) was evaluated using RT-PCR. In AGS and A549 cells, Runx3 expression inhibited cell proliferation (p < 0.01). The growth inhibition was less in A549 cells. We show that Runx3 expression increases Bax mRNA expression in AGS cells when compared with control (p < 0.05), but no significant differences in mRNA expression was observed in both examined cells. Runx3 expression has antiproliferative effect in AGS cell perhaps via increase in expression of Bax. The effect of Runx3 on A549 cells’ viability which has endogenous level of Runx3 is not related to Bax. These findings implicate a complex regulation by Runx3 in inhibition of cell proliferation utilizing Bax. PMID:24250365

  14. Nesfatin-1 suppresses energy intake, co-localises ghrelin in the brain and gut, and alters ghrelin, cholecystokinin and orexin mRNA expression in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, B; Unniappan, S

    2012-02-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a novel anorectic peptide encoded in the precursor protein nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). We recently reported the presence and appetite suppressing effects of nesfatin-1 in goldfish. Nesfatin-1 has been co-localised with ghrelin in the stomach of rats. Whether nesfatin-1 influences other appetite regulatory peptides in goldfish remains unclear. The main objectives of the present study were to investigate whether nesfatin-1 co-localises ghrelin in goldfish, and to test whether exogenous nesfatin-1 influences endogenous ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and orexin A (OXA). We found co-localisation of nesfatin-1-like and ghrelin-like immunoreactivity in the enteroendocrine cells of the goldfish anterior intestine (J-loop). Furthermore, co-localisation of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 was also observed in the posterior nucleus lateralis tuberis of the goldfish hypothalamus, a brain region implicated in the regulation of food intake. These findings suggest a functional relationship between ghrelin and nesfatin-1 in goldfish. In support of this, i.c.v. administration of goldfish (gf) nesfatin-1 [25 ng/g body weight (BW)], suppressed food intake and the expression of mRNAs encoding preproghrelin, ghrelin receptor (GHS-R 1a-1), CCK and NUCB2 in the forebrain of fed fish, as well as ghrelin and NUCB2 mRNA in the hypothalamus of unfed fish, both at 1 h post-injection. Nesfatin-1 stimulated hypothalamic CCK mRNA expression at 30 min post-injection in fed fish, and inhibited OXA mRNA in the unfed fish hypothalamus 1 h post-injection. Similarly, i.c.v. injections of gfghrelin (1 ng/g BW), although stimulating food intake, suppressed NUCB2 and preproghrelin mRNAs, but not ghrelin receptor mRNA expression in the forebrain. It is also evident that exogenous ghrelin and nesfatin-1 mRNAs encoding these peptides. Our novel results indicate interactions between nesfatin-1 and ghrelin, CCK and orexin, and show that nesfatin-1 acts on other appetite regulatory peptides in a time

  15. Sodium fluoride affects zebrafish behaviour and alters mRNA expressions of biomarker genes in the brain: Role of Nrf2/Keap1.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Debdip; Priya, Pooja; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman

    2015-09-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF), used as pesticides and for industrial purposes are deposited in the water bodies and therefore affects its biota. Zebrafish exposed to NaF in laboratory condition showed hyperactivity and frequent surfacing activity, somersaulting and vertical swimming pattern as compared to the control group. Reactive oxygen species level was elevated and glutathione level was depleted along with increased malondialdehyde content in the brain. Levels of glutathione-s-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase were also elevated in the treatment groups. Expression of mRNA of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) during stress condition were observed along with Gst, Cat, NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase 1(Nqo1) and p38. Except Keap1, all other genes exhibited elevated expression. Nrf2/Keap1 proteins had similar expression pattern as their corresponding mRNA. The findings in this study might help to understand the molecular mechanism of fluoride induced neurotoxicity in fish.

  16. 14-3-3 protein binds to the low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA 3' UTR.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei-Wen; Volkening, Kathryn; Leystra-Lantz, Cheryl; Jaffe, Howard; Strong, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that altered stability of low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA in lumbar spinal cord homogenates in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with altered expression of trans-acting 3' UTR mRNA binding proteins. We have identified two hexanucleotide motifs as the main cis elements and, using LC/MS/MS of peptide digests of NFL 3' UTR interacting proteins from human spinal cord, observed that 14-3-3 proteins interact with these motifs. 14-3-3 beta, zeta, tau, gamma, and eta isoforms were found to be expressed in human spinal cord. Each isoform was expressed in vitro and shown to interact with NFL 3' UTR mRNA. Mutation of one or both motifs resulted in decreased 14-3-3 interaction, changes in predicted mRNA structure or alteration in stability of the mRNA. These data show a novel interaction for 14-3-3 with NFL mRNA, and suggests that 14-3-3 may play a role in regulating NFL mRNA stability.

  17. Leukotriene B(4) BLT receptor signaling regulates the level and stability of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA through restricted activation of Ras/Raf/ERK/p42 AUF1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Beibei; Yang, Huiqing; Mancini, Arturo; He, QingWen; Antoniou, John; Di Battista, John A

    2010-07-30

    Recent studies suggest that active resolution of the inflammatory response in animal models of arthritis may involve leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4))-dependent stimulation of "intermediate" prostaglandin production, which in turn favors the synthesis of "downstream" anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins. We explored a putative mechanism involving LTB(4)-dependent control of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, the rate-limiting step in inflammatory prostaglandin biosynthesis. Indeed, LTB(4) potently up-regulated/stabilized interleukin-1beta-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression under conditions of COX-2 inhibitor-dependent blockade of PGE(2) release in human synovial fibroblasts (EC(50) = 16.5 + or - 1.7 nm for mRNA; 19 + or - 2.4 nm for protein, n = 4). The latter response was pertussis toxin-sensitive, and semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the quantitative predominance of the BLT2 receptor. Transfection experiments, using human COX-2 promoter plasmids and chimeric luciferase-COX-2 mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) reporter constructs, revealed that LTB(4) exerted its stabilizing effect at the post-transcriptional level through a 116-bp adenylate/uridylate-rich sequence in the proximal region of the COX-2 3'-UTR. Using luciferase-COX-2 mRNA 3'-UTR reporter constructs and Ras/c-Raf expression and mutant constructs, we showed that the Ras/c-Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway mediated LTB(4)-dependent COX-2 mRNA stabilization. Knockdown experiments with specific short hairpin RNAs confirmed that LTB(4) stabilization of COX-2 mRNA was apparently mediated through the RNA-binding protein, p42 AUF1. The nuclear export of p42 AUF1 was driven by c-Raf/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and sensitive to leptomycin B treatment, suggesting a CRM1-dependent mechanism. We conclude that LTB(4) may support the resolution phase of the inflammatory response by stabilizing COX-2, ensuring a reservoir of ambient pro-resolution lipid

  18. Species dispersal rates alter diversity and ecosystem stability in pond metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Howeth, Jennifer G; Leibold, Mathew A

    2010-09-01

    Metacommunity theory suggests that relationships between diversity and ecosystem stability can be determined by the rate of species dispersal among local communities. The predicted relationships, however, may depend upon the relative strength of local environmental processes and disturbance. Here we evaluate the role of dispersal frequency and local predation perturbations in affecting patterns of diversity and stability in pond plankton metacommunities. Pond metacommunities were composed of three mesocosm communities: one of the three communities maintained constant "press" predation from a selective predator, bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus); the second community maintained "press" conditions without predation; and the third community experienced recurrent "pulsed" predation from bluegill sunfish. The triads of pond communities were connected at either no, low (0.7%/d), or high (20%/d) planktonic dispersal. Richness and composition of zooplankton and stability of plankton biomass and ecosystem productivity were measured at local and regional spatial scales. Dispersal significantly affected diversity such that local and regional biotas at the low dispersal rate maintained the greatest number of species. The unimodal local dispersal-diversity relationship was predator-dependent, however, as selective press predation excluded species regardless of dispersal. Further, there was no effect of dispersal on beta diversity because predation generated local conditions that selected for distinct community assemblages. Spatial and temporal ecosystem stability responded to dispersal frequency but not predation. Low dispersal destabilized the spatial stability of producer biomass but stabilized temporal ecosystem productivity. The results indicate that selective predation can prevent species augmentation from mass effects but has no apparent influence on stability. Dispersal rates, in contrast, can have significant effects on both species diversity and ecosystem

  19. Phosphate Stability in Diagenetic Fluids Constrains the Acidic Alteration Model for Lower Mt. Sharp Sedimentary Rocks in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, J. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; VanBommel, S. J.; McAdam, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars rover Curiosity has encountered silica-enriched bedrock (as strata and as veins and associated halos of alteration) in the largely basaltic Murray Fm. of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) investigations of the Murray Fm. revealed decreasing Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Al, and higher S, as silica increased (Fig. 1). A positive correlation between SiO2 and TiO2 (up to 74.4 and 1.7 wt %, respectively) suggests that these two insoluble elements were retained while acidic fluids leached more soluble elements. Other evidence also supports a silica-retaining, acidic alteration model for the Murray Fm., including low trace element abundances consistent with leaching, and the presence of opaline silica and jarosite determined by CheMin. Phosphate stability is a key component of this model because PO4 3- is typically soluble in acidic water and is likely a mobile ion in diagenetic fluids (pH less than 5). However, the Murray rocks are not leached of P; they have variable P2O5 (Fig. 1) ranging from average Mars (0.9 wt%) up to the highest values in Gale Crater (2.5 wt%). Here we evaluate APXS measurements of Murray Fm. bedrock and veins with respect to phosphate stability in acidic fluids as a test of the acidic alteration model for the Lower Mt. Sharp rocks.

  20. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  1. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Nevarez, Lisette; Pogue, Robert; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP). Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses. PMID:27622494

  2. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and mRNA expression are altered by perinatal arsenic exposure in mice and restored by brief exposure to enrichment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christina R; Allan, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a common and pervasive environmental contaminant found in drinking water in varying concentrations depending on region. Exposure to arsenic induces behavioral and cognitive deficits in both human populations and in rodent models. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard for the allotment of arsenic in drinking water is in the parts-per-billion range, yet our lab has shown that 50 ppb arsenic exposure during development can have far-reaching consequences into adulthood, including deficits in learning and memory, which have been linked to altered adult neurogenesis. Given that the morphological impact of developmental arsenic exposure on the hippocampus is unknown, we sought to evaluate proliferation and differentiation of adult neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus after 50 ppb arsenic exposure throughout the perinatal period of development in mice (equivalent to all three trimesters in humans) using a BrdU pulse-chase assay. Proliferation of the neural progenitor population was decreased by 13% in arsenic-exposed mice, but was not significant. However, the number of differentiated cells was significantly decreased by 41% in arsenic-exposed mice compared to controls. Brief, daily exposure to environmental enrichment significantly increased proliferation and differentiation in both control and arsenic-exposed animals. Expression levels of 31% of neurogenesis-related genes including those involved in Alzheimer's disease, apoptosis, axonogenesis, growth, Notch signaling, and transcription factors were altered after arsenic exposure and restored after enrichment. Using a concentration previously considered safe by the EPA, perinatal arsenic exposure altered hippocampal morphology and gene expression, but did not inhibit the cellular neurogenic response to enrichment. It is possible that behavioral deficits observed during adulthood in animals exposed to arsenic during development derive from the lack of differentiated neural progenitor cells

  3. Broadly altered expression of the mRNA isoforms of FE65, a facilitator of beta amyloidogenesis, in Alzheimer cerebellum and other brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Jin, L W; Starbuck, M Y; Martin, G M

    2000-04-01

    FE65 is a key "adapter" protein that links a multiprotein complex to an intracellular domain of beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaPP). Its overexpression modulates the trafficking of betaPP and facilitates the generation of beta-amyloid (Abeta). FE65 is predominantly expressed in brain tissues. An exon 9-inclusive isoform is exclusively expressed in neurons, and an exon 9-exclusive isoform is only expressed in non-neuronal cells. We quantitated the two isoforms in middle temporal cortex, middle frontal cortex, cerebellar cortex and caudate nucleus of 17 Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, 12 normal controls and 9 non-AD neurodegenerative disease controls by reverse transcription-competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-cPCR). Expression of the two isoforms was significantly and differentially altered, with a 30-57% decrease in levels of the neuronal form (P < 0.05-0.002) and a 73-135% increase in levels of non-neuronal form (P < 0.02-0.001), in the temporal and frontal cortex of AD brains. These alterations presumably reflect advanced neurodegenerative processes of these regions. Surprisingly, expression of both isoforms was significantly up-regulated by 42-66% in the cerebellar cortex and caudate nucleus of AD brains when compared to normal brains (P < 0.05-0.005). Diffuse Abeta-positive plaques were observed in the cerebellum of these AD subjects but not in the normal controls. Selective up-regulation of only the FE65 neuronal isoform was seen in the cerebellar cortex in association with other neurodegenerative diseases (largely Parkinson's disease). Because FE65 modulates trafficking of betaPP toward the production of Abeta, the up-regulation of FE65 in AD cerebellum may be relevant to the genesis of diffuse plaques. Thus, early biochemical alterations in AD, not complicated by advanced pathology, may be beneficially investigated in the less-affected regions of the brain, such as the cerebellum. PMID:10723070

  4. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis and mRNA Expression are Altered by Perinatal Arsenic Exposure in Mice and Restored by Brief Exposure to Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Christina R.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a common and pervasive environmental contaminant found in drinking water in varying concentrations depending on region. Exposure to arsenic induces behavioral and cognitive deficits in both human populations and in rodent models. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard for the allotment of arsenic in drinking water is in the parts-per-billion range, yet our lab has shown that 50 ppb arsenic exposure during development can have far-reaching consequences into adulthood, including deficits in learning and memory, which have been linked to altered adult neurogenesis. Given that the morphological impact of developmental arsenic exposure on the hippocampus is unknown, we sought to evaluate proliferation and differentiation of adult neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus after 50 ppb arsenic exposure throughout the perinatal period of development in mice (equivalent to all three trimesters in humans) using a BrdU pulse-chase assay. Proliferation of the neural progenitor population was decreased by 13% in arsenic-exposed mice, but was not significant. However, the number of differentiated cells was significantly decreased by 41% in arsenic-exposed mice compared to controls. Brief, daily exposure to environmental enrichment significantly increased proliferation and differentiation in both control and arsenic-exposed animals. Expression levels of 31% of neurogenesis-related genes including those involved in Alzheimer’s disease, apoptosis, axonogenesis, growth, Notch signaling, and transcription factors were altered after arsenic exposure and restored after enrichment. Using a concentration previously considered safe by the EPA, perinatal arsenic exposure altered hippocampal morphology and gene expression, but did not inhibit the cellular neurogenic response to enrichment. It is possible that behavioral deficits observed during adulthood in animals exposed to arsenic during development derive from the lack of differentiated neural progenitor

  5. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system.

  6. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  7. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  8. A SNP in the Immunoregulatory Molecule CTLA-4 Controls mRNA Splicing In Vivo but Does Not Alter Diabetes Susceptibility in the NOD Mouse.

    PubMed

    Jakubczik, Fabian; Jones, Ken; Nichols, Jennifer; Mansfield, William; Cooke, Anne; Holmes, Nick

    2016-01-01

    CTLA-4 is a critical "checkpoint" regulator in autoimmunity. Variation in CTLA-4 isoform expression has been linked to type 1 diabetes development in human and NOD mouse studies. In the NOD mouse, a causative link between increased expression of the minor isoform ligand-independent CTLA-4 and a reduction in diabetes has become widely accepted. Altered splicing of CTLA-4 has been attributed to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Ctla4 exon2 (e2_77A/G). To investigate this link, we have used NOD embryonic stem (ES) cells to generate a novel NOD transgenic line with the 77A/G SNP. This strain phenocopies the increase in splicing toward the liCTLA4 isoform seen in B10 Idd5.1 mice. Crucially, the SNP does not alter the spontaneous incidence of diabetes, the incidence of cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes, or the activation of diabetogenic T-cell receptor transgenic CD4(+) T cells after adoptive transfer. Our results show that one or more of the many other linked genetic variants between the B10 and NOD genome are required for the diabetes protection conferred by Idd5.1. With the NOD mouse model closely mimicking the human disease, our data demonstrate that knock-in transgenic mice on the NOD background can test causative mutations relevant in human diabetes.

  9. Neonatal lipopolysaccharide exposure delays puberty and alters hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Knox, A M I; Li, X F; Kinsey-Jones, J S; Wilkinson, E S; Wu, X Q; Cheng, Y S; Milligan, S R; Lightman, S L; O'Byrne, K T

    2009-08-01

    Immunological challenge experienced in early life can have long-term programming effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that permanently influence the stress response. Similarly, neonatal exposure to immunological stress enhances stress-induced suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis in adulthood, but may also affect earlier development, including the timing of puberty. To investigate the timing of the critical window for this programming of the HPG axis, neonatal female rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 microg/kg i.p.) or saline on postnatal days 3 + 5, 7 + 9, or 14 + 16 and monitored for vaginal opening and first vaginal oestrus as markers of puberty. We also investigated the effects of neonatal programming on the development of the expression patterns of kisspeptin (Kiss1) and its receptor (Kiss1r) in hypothalamic sites known to contain kisspeptin-expressing neuronal populations critical to reproductive function: the medial preoptic area (mPOA) and the arcuate nucleus in neonatally-stressed animals. We determined that the critical period for a significant delay in puberty as a result of neonatal LPS exposure is before 7 days of age in the female rat, and demonstrated that Kiss1, but not Kiss1r mRNA, expression in the mPOA is down-regulated in pre-pubertal females. These data suggest that the mPOA population of kisspeptin neurones play a pivotal role in controlling the onset of puberty, and that their function can be affected by neonatal stress.

  10. Yak response to high-altitude hypoxic stress by altering mRNA expression and DNA methylation of hypoxia-inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xianrong; Fu, Mei; Lan, Daoliang; Li, Jian; Zi, Xiangdong; Zhong, Jincheng

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are oxygen-dependent transcriptional activators, which play crucial roles in tumor angiogenesis and mammalian development, and regulate the transcription of genes involved in oxygen homeostasis in response to hypoxia. However, information on HIF-1α and HIF-2α in yak (Bos grunniens) is scarce. The complete coding region of yak HIF-2α was cloned, its mRNA expression in several tissues were determined, and the expression levels were compared with those of closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus), and the methylation status of promoter regions were analyzed to better understand the roles of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in domesticated yak. The yak HIF-2α cDNA was cloned and sequenced in the present work reveals the evolutionary conservation through multiple sequence alignment, although 15 bases changed, resulting in 8 amino acid substitutions in the translated proteins in cattle. The tissue-specific expression results showed that HIF-1α is ubiquitously expressed, whereas HIF-2α expression is limited to endothelial tissues (kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and liver) and blood in yak. Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α expressions were higher in yak tissues than in cattle. The HIF-1α expression level is much higher in yak than cattle in these organs, except for the lung (P < 0.05), but the HIF-2α gene is significantly different in the heart, spleen, and kidney (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the methylation levels in the 5' flanking regulatory regions of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in yak kidney were significantly decreased than cattle counterparts (P < 0.05). Identifying these genes and the comparison of different expressions facilitates the understanding of the biological high-altitude hypoxic stress response mechanism and may assist current medical research to understand hypoxia-related diseases. PMID:25927169

  11. A member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides is produced in the upper airway of the chinchilla and its mRNA expression is altered by common viral and bacterial co-pathogens of otitis media.

    PubMed

    McGillivary, Glen; Ray, William C; Bevins, Charles L; Munson, Robert S; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2007-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a component of the innate immune system, play a major role in defense of mucosal surfaces against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as viral and bacterial co-pathogens of the polymicrobial disease otitis media (OM). To further understand the role of AMPs in OM, we cloned a cDNA encoding a cathelicidin homolog (cCRAMP) from upper respiratory tract (URT) mucosae of the chinchilla, the predominant host used to model experimental OM. Recombinant cCRAMP exhibited alpha-helical secondary structure and killed the three main bacterial pathogens of OM. In situ hybridization showed cCRAMP mRNA production in epithelium of the chinchilla Eustachian tube and RT-PCR was used to amplify cCRAMP mRNA from several other tissues of the chinchilla URT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of chinchilla middle ear epithelial cells (CMEEs) incubated with either viral (influenza A virus, adenovirus, or RSV) or bacterial (nontypeable H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or S. pneumoniae) pathogens associated with OM demonstrated distinct microbe-specific patterns of altered expression. Collectively, these data showed that viruses and bacteria modulate AMP messages in the URT, which likely contributes to the disease course of OM.

  12. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  13. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  14. Numerical solution of the chemical master equation uniqueness and stability of the stationary distribution for chemical networks, and mRNA bursting in a gene network with negative feedback regulation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, E S; Santillán, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a couple of algorithms to compute the stationary probability distribution for the chemical master equation (CME) of arbitrary chemical networks. We further find the conditions guaranteeing the algorithms' convergence and the unity and stability of the stationary distribution. Next, we employ these algorithms to study the mRNA and protein probability distributions in a gene regulatory network subject to negative feedback regulation. In particular, we analyze the influence of the promoter activation/deactivation speed on the shape of such distributions. We find that a reduction of the promoter activation/deactivation speed modifies the shape of those distributions in a way consistent with the phenomenon known as mRNA (or transcription) bursting.

  15. Stabilizing Fluid-Fluid Displacements in Porous Media Through Wettability Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojer, Mathias; Szulczewski, Michael L.; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-05-01

    We study experimentally how wettability impacts fluid-fluid-displacement patterns in granular media. We inject a low-viscosity fluid (air) into a thin bed of glass beads initially saturated with a more-viscous fluid (a water-glycerol mixture). Chemical treatment of glass surfaces allows us to control the wetting properties of the medium and modify the contact angle θ from 5° (drainage) to 120° (imbibition). We demonstrate that wettability exerts a powerful influence on the invasion morphology of unfavorable mobility displacements: increasing θ stabilizes fluid invasion into the granular pack at all capillary numbers. In particular, we report the striking observation of a stable radial displacement at low capillary numbers, whose origin lies on the cooperative nature of fluid invasion at the pore scale.

  16. Interleukin-1β induced Stress Granules Sequester COX-2 mRNA and Regulates its Stability and Translation in Human OA Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammad Y.; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced and immediate expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA is observed in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes but the synthesis of protein found significantly delayed. Here we investigated the role of stress granules (SGs), ribonucleoprotein complexes that regulate mRNA translation, in the delayed translation of COX-2 mRNAs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Stimulation of human chondrocytes with IL-1β activated the stress response genes and the phosphorylation of eIF2α that triggered the assembly of SGs. Using combined immunofluorescence staining of SGs markers and COX-2 protein, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation, the COX-2 mRNAs were found sequestered in SGs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. No increase in COX-2 protein expression was observed during the persistence of SGs but enhanced expression of COX-2 protein was noted upon clearance of the SGs. Inhibition of SGs clearance blocked COX-2 mRNA translation whereas blocking the assembly of SGs by TIA-1 depletion resulted in rapid and increased production of COX-2 and PGE2. Our findings show for the first time assembly of SGs and sequestration of COX-2 mRNAs in human OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 mRNAs translation by SGs indicates a role in IL-1β-mediated catabolic response that could be therapeutically targeted in OA. PMID:27271770

  17. How Mechanical Deformation of Polymers during Vitrification Alters the Subsequent Stability of the Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Laura A. G.; Roth, Connie B.

    2015-03-01

    How stress and mechanical deformation impart mobility to polymer glasses have been studied primarily for materials where the glassy state was formed stress free. Here, we investigate the stability of polymer glasses where a constant stress is applied during the formation of the glassy state (thermal quench). Previously we found that physical aging is strongly dependent on the conditions during glass formation, including cooling rate and (often unintended) stress [Macromolecules 2012, 45, 1701]. We constructed a unique jig to apply a known stress to free-standing films during the thermal quench. We used ellipsometry to measure the physical aging rate of polystyrene films by quantifying the time-dependent decrease in film thickness that results from an increase in average film density during aging. As the magnitude of stress during vitrification increases, the physical aging rate quickly transitions over a small range of stresses to a faster aging rate, indicating the resulting glass is less stable [Soft Matter 2014, 10, 1572]. To explore this unique finding, we have constructed a computer-controlled apparatus to measure and apply stress and strain to polymer films during vitrification in order to characterize the temperature-dependent stress build up.

  18. Chlorine ions but not sodium ions alter genome stability of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alex; Golubov, Andrey; Bilichak, Andriy; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-06-01

    Various environmental stresses influence plant genome stability. Most of these stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals and organic chemicals, represent potent DNA-damaging agents. Here, we show that exposure to NaCl, the stress that is not thought to cause direct DNA damage, results in an increase in the level of strand breaks and homologous recombination rates (RRs) in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The effect of salt stress on the RR was found to be primarily associated with Cl(-) ions, since exposure of plants to Na(2)SO(4) did not increase the RR, whereas exposure to MgCl(2) resulted in an increase. Changes in the number of strand breaks and in the RR were also paralleled by transcriptional activation of AtRad51 and down-regulation of AtKu70. The progeny of exposed plants exhibited higher RRs, higher expression of AtRad51, lower expression of AtKu70, higher tolerance to salt and methyl methane sulfate (MMS) stresses, as well as a higher increase in RR upon further exposure to stress. Our experiments showed that NaCl is a genotoxic stress that leads to somatic and transgenerational changes in recombination rates, and these changes are primarily triggered by exposure to Cl(-) ions. PMID:20385609

  19. Ultraviolet irradiation of diacetylenic liposomes as a strategy to improve size stability and to alter protein binding without cytotoxicity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Temprana, C Facundo; Amor, M Silvia; Femia, A Lis; Gasparri, Julieta; Taira, M Cristina; del Valle Alonso, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Membrane-modification effects, induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in diacetylenic liposomes, were analyzed upon contact with cells, biological membranes, and proteins. Liposomes formulated with mixtures of unsaturated 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and saturated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, in a 1:1 molar ratio, were compared with those that were UV-irradiated and analyzed in several aspects. Membrane polymerization inherence on size stability was studied as well as its impact on mitochondrial and microsomal membrane peroxidation induction, hemolytic activity, and cell viability. Moreover, in order to gain insight about the possible irradiation effect on interfacial membrane properties, interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (Lyso), and apolipoprotein (apoA-I) was studied. Improved size stability was found for polymerized liposomes after a period of 30 days at 4°C. In addition, membrane irradiation had no marked effect on cell viability, hemolysis, or induction of microsomal and mitochondrial membrane peroxidation. Interfacial membrane characteristics were found to be altered after polymerization, since a differential protein binding for polymerized or nonpolymerized membranes was observed for BSA and Lyso, but not for apoA-I. The substantial contribution of this work is the finding that even when maintaining the same lipid composition, changes induced by UV irradiation are sufficient to increase size stability and establish differences in protein binding, in particular, reducing the amount of bound Lyso and BSA, without increasing formulation cytotoxicity. This work aimed at showing that the usage of diacetylenic lipids and UV modification of membrane interfacial properties should be strategies to be taken into consideration when designing new delivery systems.

  20. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H.; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes. PMID:26365394

  1. The role of mRNA and protein stability in the function of coupled positive and negative feedback systems in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Moss Bendtsen, Kristian; Jensen, Mogens H; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Oscillators and switches are important elements of regulation in biological systems. These are composed of coupling negative feedback loops, which cause oscillations when delayed, and positive feedback loops, which lead to memory formation. Here, we examine the behavior of a coupled feedback system, the Negative Autoregulated Frustrated bistability motif (NAF). This motif is a combination of two previously explored motifs, the frustrated bistability motif (FBM) and the negative auto regulation motif (NAR), which both can produce oscillations. The NAF motif was previously suggested to govern long term memory formation in animals, and was used as a synthetic oscillator in bacteria. We build a mathematical model to analyze the dynamics of the NAF motif. We show analytically that the NAF motif requires an asymmetry in the strengths of activation and repression links in order to produce oscillations. We show that the effect of time delays in eukaryotic cells, originating from mRNA export and protein import, are negligible in this system. Based on the reported protein and mRNA half-lives in eukaryotic cells, we find that even though the NAF motif possesses the ability for oscillations, it mostly promotes constant protein expression at the biologically relevant parameter regimes.

  2. KiSS-1 in the mammalian ovary: distribution of kisspeptin in human and marmoset and alterations in KiSS-1 mRNA levels in a rat model of ovulatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gaytán, F; Gaytán, M; Castellano, J M; Romero, M; Roa, J; Aparicio, B; Garrido, N; Sánchez-Criado, J E; Millar, R P; Pellicer, A; Fraser, H M; Tena-Sempere, M

    2009-03-01

    Kisspeptins, the products of the KiSS-1 gene acting via G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54), have recently emerged as pivotal signals in the hypothalamic network triggering the preovulatory surge of gonadotropins and, hence, ovulation. Additional actions of kisspeptins at other levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis have been suggested but remain to date scarcely studied. We report herein the pattern of expression of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in the human and nonhuman primate ovary and evaluate changes in ovarian KiSS-1 expression in a rat model of ovulatory dysfunction. KiSS-1 and GPR54 mRNAs were detected in human ovarian tissue and cultured granulosa-lutein cells. In good agreement, kisspeptin immunoreactivity was observed in cyclic human and marmoset ovaries, with prominent signals in the theca layer of growing follicles, corpora lutea, interstitial gland, and ovarian surface epithelium. GPR54 immunoreactivity was also found in human theca and luteal cells. Administration of indomethacin to cyclic female rats disturbed ovulation and resulted in a dramatic drop in ovarian KiSS-1, but not GPR54, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), or progesterone receptor, mRNA levels at the time of ovulation; an effect mimicked by the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS398 and rescued by coadministration of PGE(2). Likewise, the stimulatory effect of human choriogonadotropin on ovarian KiSS-1 expression was partially blunted by indomethacin. In contrast, KiSS-1 mRNA levels remained unaltered in another model of ovulatory failure, i.e., the RU486-treated rat. In summary, we document for the first time the expression of KiSS-1/kisspeptin and GPR54 in the human and nonhuman primate ovary. In addition, we provide evidence for the ability of inhibitors of COX-2, known to disturb follicular rupture and ovulation, to selectively alter the expression of KiSS-1 gene in rat ovary. Altogether, our results are suggestive of a conserved role of local KiSS-1 in the direct control of ovarian functions in

  3. Biological soil crust as a bio-mediator alters hydrological processes in stabilized dune system of the Tengger Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinrong

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crust (BSC) is a vital component in the stabilized sand dunes with a living cover up to more than 70% of the total, which has been considered as a bio-mediator that directly influences and regulates the sand dune ecosystem processes. However, its influences on soil hydrological processes have been long neglected in Chinese deserts. In this study, BSCs of different successional stages were chose to test their influence on the hydrological processes of stabilized dune, where the groundwater deep exceeds 30m, further to explore why occur the sand-binding vegetation replacement between shrubs and herbs. Our long-term observation (60 years) shows that cyanobacteria crust has been colonized and developed after 3 years since the sand-binding vegetation has been established and dune fixation using planted xerophytic shrubs and made sand barrier (straw-checkerboard) on shifting dune surface, lichen and moss crust occurred after 20 years, and the cover of moss dominated crust could reach 70 % after 50 years. The colonization and development of BSC altered the initial soil water balance of revegetated areas by influencing rainfall infiltration, soil evaporation and dew water entrapment. The results show that BSC obviously reduced the infiltration that occurred during most rainfall events (80%), when rainfall was greater than 5 mm or less than 20 mm. The presence of BSC reduced evaporation of topsoil after small rainfall (<5 mm) because its high proportion of finer particles slowed the evaporation rate, thus keeping the water in the soil surface longer, and crust facilitated topsoil evaporation when rainfall reached 10 mm. The amount of dew entrapment increases with the succession of BSC. Moreover, the effect of the later successional BSC to dew entrapment, rainfall infiltration and evaporation was more obvious than the early successional BSC on stabilized dunes. In general, BSC reduced the amount of rainfall water that reached deeper soil (0.4-3m), which is

  4. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-01-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor–Couette–Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. PMID:25742953

  5. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis.

  6. Effect of pH on Structural Changes in Perch Hemoglobin that Can Alter Redox Stability and Heme Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mark P.; Aranda, IV, Roman; He, Cai; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-01-07

    pH can be manipulated to alter the oxidative stability of fish-based foods during storage. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the ability of reduced pH to cause structural changes in fish hemoglobins that lead to enhanced oxidative degradation. Decreasing pH from 8.0 to 6.3 and 5.7 created a large channel for solvent entry into the heme crevice of perch hemoglobin beta chains. The proton-induced opening of this channel occurred between site CD3 and the heme-6-propionate. Solvent entry into the heme crevice can enhance metHb formation and hemin loss, processes that accelerate lipid oxidation. Reduced pH also decreased the distance between Ile at E11 in one of the alpha chains and the ligand above the heme iron atom. This sterically displaces O{sub 2} and protonated O{sub 2} which increases metHb formation. These studies demonstrate that pH reduction causes structural changes in perch hemoglobin which increase oxidative degradation of the heme pigment.

  7. TATA boxes in gene transcription and poly (A) tails in mRNA stability: New perspective on the effects of berberine

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lu, Xi; Lei, Fan; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Wang, Yu-Gang; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Feng, Tian-Shi; Wang, Xin-Pei; Yu, Xuan; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural compound with variable pharmacological effects and a broad panel of target genes. We investigated berberine’s pharmacological activities from the perspective of its nucleotide-binding ability and discovered that BBR directly regulates gene expression by targeting TATA boxes in transcriptional regulatory regions as well as the poly adenine (poly (A)) tail at the mRNA terminus. BBR inhibits gene transcription by binding the TATA boxes in the transcriptional regulatory region, but it promotes higher levels of expression by targeting the poly (A) tails of mRNAs. The present study demonstrates that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are the first and second primary targets by which BBR regulates gene expression. The final outcome of gene regulation by BBR depends on the structure of the individual gene. This is the first study to reveal that TATA boxes and poly (A) tails are direct targets for BBR in its regulation of gene expression. Our findings provide a novel explanation for the complex activities of a small molecule compound in a biological system and a novel horizon for small molecule-compound pharmacological studies. PMID:26671652

  8. XRN1 Stalling in the 5’ UTR of Hepatitis C Virus and Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Is Associated with Dysregulated Host mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Stephanie L.; Blackinton, Jeffrey G.; Anderson, John R.; Dozier, Mary K.; Dodd, Benjamin J. T.; Keene, Jack D.; Wilusz, Carol J.; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that both Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Bovine Viral Diarrhea virus (BVDV) contain regions in their 5’ UTRs that stall and repress the enzymatic activity of the cellular 5’-3’ exoribonuclease XRN1, resulting in dramatic changes in the stability of cellular mRNAs. We used biochemical assays, virus infections, and transfection of the HCV and BVDV 5’ untranslated regions in the absence of other viral gene products to directly demonstrate the existence and mechanism of this novel host-virus interaction. In the context of HCV infection, we observed globally increased stability of mRNAs resulting in significant increases in abundance of normally short-lived mRNAs encoding a variety of relevant oncogenes and angiogenesis factors. These findings suggest that non-coding regions from multiple genera of the Flaviviridae interfere with XRN1 and impact post-transcriptional processes, causing global dysregulation of cellular gene expression which may promote cell growth and pathogenesis. PMID:25747802

  9. An AU-Rich Sequence Element (UUUN[A/U]U) Downstream of the Edited C in Apolipoprotein B mRNA Is a High-Affinity Binding Site for Apobec-1: Binding of Apobec-1 to This Motif in the 3′ Untranslated Region of c-myc Increases mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2000-01-01

    Apobec-1, the catalytic subunit of the mammalian apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, is a cytidine deaminase with RNA binding activity for AU-rich sequences. This RNA binding activity is required for Apobec-1 to mediate C-to-U RNA editing. Filter binding assays, using immobilized Apobec-1, demonstrate saturable binding to a 105-nt apoB RNA with a Kd of ∼435 nM. A series of AU-rich templates was used to identify a high-affinity (∼50 nM) binding site of consensus sequence UUUN[A/U]U, with multiple copies of this sequence constituting the high-affinity binding site. In order to determine whether this consensus site could be functionally demonstrated from within an apoB RNA, circular-permutation analysis was performed, revealing one major (UUUGAU) and one minor (UU) site located 3 and 16 nucleotides, respectively, downstream of the edited base. Secondary-structure predictions reveal a stem-loop flanking the edited base with Apobec-1 binding to the consensus site(s) at an open loop. A similar consensus (AUUUA) is present in the 3′ untranslated regions of several mRNAs, including that of c-myc, that are known to undergo rapid degradation. In this context, it is presumed that the consensus motif acts as a destabilizing element. As an independent test of the ability of Apobec-1 to bind to this sequence, F442A cells were transfected with Apobec-1 and the half-life of c-myc mRNA was determined following actinomycin D treatment. These studies demonstrated an increase in the half-life of c-myc mRNA from 90 to 240 min in control versus Apobec-1-expressing cells. Apobec-1 expression mutants, in which RNA binding activity is eliminated, failed to alter c-myc mRNA turnover. Taken together, the data establish a consensus binding site for Apobec-1 embedded in proximity to the edited base in apoB RNA. Binding to this site in other target RNAs raises the possibility that Apobec-1 may be involved in other aspects of RNA metabolism, independent of its role as an apoB RNA

  10. Hfq affects mRNA levels independently of degradation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial Lsm protein, Hfq, is an RNA chaperone involved in many reactions related to RNA metabolism, such as replication and stability, control of small RNA activity and polyadenylation. Despite this wide spectrum of known functions, the global role of Hfq is almost certainly undervalued; its capacity to bind DNA and to interact with many other proteins are only now beginning to be taken into account. Results The role of Hfq in the maturation and degradation of the rpsO mRNA of E. coli was investigated in vivo. The data revealed a decrease in rpsO mRNA abundance concomitant to an increase in its stability when Hfq is absent. This indicates that the change in mRNA levels in hfq mutants does not result from its modification of RNA stability. Moreover, a series of independent experiments have revealed that the decrease in mRNA level is not a consequence of a reduction of translation efficiency and that Hfq is not directly implicated in translational control of rpsO expression. Reduced steady-state mRNA levels in the absence of Hfq were also shown for rpsT, rpsB and rpsB-tsf, but not for lpp, pnp or tRNA transcripts. The abundance of chimeric transcripts rpsO-lacZ and rpsB-lacZ, whose expression was driven by rpsO and rpsB promoters, respectively, was also lower in the hfq null-mutants, while the β-galactosidase yield remained about the same as in the parent wild-type strain. Conclusions The data obtained suggest that alteration of rpsO, rpsT and rpsB-tsf transcript levels observed under conditions of Hfq deficiency is not caused by the post-transcriptional events, such as mRNA destabilization or changes in translation control, and may rather result from changes in transcriptional activity. So far, how Hfq affects transcription remains unclear. We propose that one of the likely mechanisms of Hfq-mediated modulation of transcription might operate early in the elongation step, when interaction of Hfq with a nascent transcript would help to overcome

  11. The use of molecular beacons to directly measure bacterial mRNA abundances and transcript degradation.

    PubMed

    Kuechenmeister, Lisa J; Anderson, Kelsi L; Morrison, John M; Dunman, Paul M

    2009-02-01

    The regulation of mRNA turnover is a dynamic means by which bacteria regulate gene expression. Although current methodologies allow characterization of the stability of individual transcripts, procedures designed to measure alterations in transcript abundance/turnover on a high throughput scale are lacking. In the current report, we describe the development of a rapid and simplified molecular beacon-based procedure to directly measure the mRNA abundances and mRNA degradation properties of well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity factors. This method does not require any PCR-based amplification, can monitor the abundances of multiple transcripts within a single RNA sample, and was successfully implemented into a high throughput screen of transposon mutant library members to detect isolates with altered mRNA turnover properties. It is expected that the described methodology will provide great utility in characterizing components of bacterial RNA degradation processes and can be used to directly measure the mRNA levels of virtually any bacterial transcript.

  12. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  13. Manganese Upregulates Cellular Prion Protein and Contributes to Altered Stabilization and Proteolysis: Relevance to Role of Metals in Pathogenesis of Prion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Martin, Dustin P.; Nicholson, Eric M.; Richt, Jürgen A.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases resulting from misfolding of normal cellular prion (PrPC) into an abnormal form of scrapie prion (PrPSc). The cellular mechanisms underlying the misfolding of PrPC are not well understood. Since cellular prion proteins harbor divalent metal-binding sites in the N-terminal region, we examined the effect of manganese on PrPC processing in in vitro models of prion disease. Exposure to manganese significantly increased PrPC levels both in cytosolic and in membrane-rich fractions in a time-dependent manner. Manganese-induced PrPC upregulation was independent of messenger RNA transcription or stability. Additionally, manganese treatment did not alter the PrPC degradation by either proteasomal or lysosomal pathways. Interestingly, pulse-chase analysis showed that the PrPC turnover rate was significantly altered with manganese treatment, indicating increased stability of PrPC with the metal exposure. Limited proteolysis studies with proteinase-K further supported that manganese increases the stability of PrPC. Incubation of mouse brain slice cultures with manganese also resulted in increased prion protein levels and higher intracellular manganese accumulation. Furthermore, exposure of manganese to an infectious prion cell model, mouse Rocky Mountain Laboratory–infected CAD5 cells, significantly increased prion protein levels. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that divalent metal manganese can alter the stability of prion proteins and suggest that manganese-induced stabilization of prion protein may play a role in prion protein misfolding and prion disease pathogenesis. PMID:20176619

  14. Stabilization of garnet in metamorphosed altered turbidites near the St. Eugene lead-zinc deposit, southeastern British Columbia: Equilibrium and kinetic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, David R. M.; Seitz, JennaLee D.

    2012-03-01

    The St. Eugene lead-zinc deposit, near Moyie, southeastern British Columbia, is a Mesoproterozoic vein deposit hosted by metaturbidites of the 1.5-1.4 Ga Belt-Purcell Supergroup. The regional metamorphic grade of the rocks is biotite zone, with the age of metamorphism being Mesoproterozoic (ca. 1.35 Ga). The vein system is enveloped by a metamorphosed alteration zone of increasing intensity as the vein is approached. Thin argillaceous tops of turbidite beds away from the vein are garnet-free, whereas those in the inner alteration zone are garnet-bearing. Compared to rocks away from the vein, those near the vein are enriched in Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn, with proportional reduction in other compositional parameters. Thermodynamic modeling of three rocks across the alteration gradient predicts increasing stabilization of garnet with increasing degree of alteration. Predicted and observed modes of garnet in the samples are in close agreement. In the most altered rock, the garnet-in line is displaced down-temperature by ~ 100 °C relative to the least altered rock. Approximately 2/3 of the garnet stabilization is accounted for by increase in Mn content and the rest by increase in Fe/(Fe + Mg). Kinetic factors played a role in the development of the mineral assemblages, including metastable persistence of zoisite, and disequilibrium (overstepped) initial growth of garnet. Estimates of peak pressure-temperature conditions from mineral assemblage constraints and from compositional isopleths are complicated by the kinetic effects but yield similar results: 490-510 °C and 3.6-4.0 kbar. The pressure-temperature estimates imply an average linear geothermal gradient of ~ 35 °C/km, broadly consistent with burial metamorphism in the Belt-Purcell extensional basin. However, the estimated pressure, equivalent to a depth of 13-15 km, is greater than the estimated ~ 8 km (~ 2.2 kbar) of stratigraphic overburden at the time of metamorphism. The results of this study support the idea that

  15. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  16. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  17. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  18. Triosephosphate Isomerase I170V Alters Catalytic Site, Enhances Stability and Induces Pathology in a Drosophila Model of TPI Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshé A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. The crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. Collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:25463631

  19. Altered levels of POMC, AgRP and MC4-R mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and other parts of the limbic system of mice prone or resistant to chronic high-energy diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu Feng; Han, Mei; South, Tim; Storlien, Len

    2003-11-28

    The melanocortinergic system plays an important role in promoting negative energy balance and preventing excessive fat deposition. This study has investigated the levels of mRNA expression of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R) in diet-induced obese (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) mice. Thirty C57 mice were used in this study. Twenty-four mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HF: 40% of calories from fat, 20% from saturated fat) for 4 weeks and then classified as DIO and DR according to their body weight gain. Six mice were placed on a low-fat diet (LF: 10% of calories from fat, 1% from saturated fat) and were used as controls. After 22 weeks of feeding, visceral fat deposits were more than twice as heavy in the DIO mice as in the DR and LF mice, while the latter two groups had no significant difference. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, this study found that the DIO mice had a significantly lower level of Arc POMC (-29%) and AgRP (-31%) mRNA expression than the DR and LF mice, respectively. The mice on high-fat diets had higher levels of AgRP mRNA expression in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BST), and ventral part of the lateral septal nucleus (LSV) than the LF mice. Furthermore, the DIO mice had a 40% higher level of MC4-R mRNA expression in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and posterodorsal part of the medial amygdaloid nucleus (MePD) than the LF mice. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that differential expression of POMC, AgRP and MC4-R mRNA levels exists in DIO, DR and LF mice. These differences were shown to occur in the specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and other parts of the limbic system. These findings may assist in understanding the involvement of the melanocortinergic system in the regulation of body weight via the autonomic and limbic systems.

  20. Designing excipient emulsions to increase nutraceutical bioavailability: emulsifier type influences curcumin stability and bioaccessibility by altering gastrointestinal fate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Liqiang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chengmei; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2015-08-01

    The influence of emulsifier type on the ability of excipient emulsions to improve the solubility, stability, and bioaccessibility of powdered curcumin was examined. Oil-in-water emulsions prepared using three different emulsifiers (whey protein isolate, caseinate, or Tween 80) were mixed with curcumin powder and then incubated at either 30 °C (to simulate applications of salad dressings) or 100 °C (to simulate applications of cooking sauces). The transfer of curcumin into the excipient emulsions was appreciably higher for excipient emulsions held at 100 °C than those held at 30 °C, and was appreciably higher for surfactant-stabilized emulsions than protein-stabilized emulsions. For example, the amounts of curcumin transferred into emulsions held at 30 and 100 °C were 66 and 280 μg mL(-1) for Tween 80, but only 17 and 208 μg mL(-1) for caseinate. The total curcumin concentration in the digesta and mixed micelle phases collected after excipient emulsions were exposed to a simulated gastrointestinal tract (mouth, stomach, and small intestine) depended on emulsifier type. The total amount of curcumin within the digesta was higher for protein-stabilized emulsions than surfactant-stabilized ones, which was attributed to the ability of the proteins to protect curcumin from chemical degradation. For example, the digesta contained 204 μg mL(-1) curcumin for caseinate emulsions, but only 111 μg mL(-1) for Tween 80 emulsions. This study shows the potential of designing excipient emulsions to increase the oral bioavailability of curcumin for food and pharmaceutical applications.

  1. Hyperresponsive febrile reactions to interleukin (IL) 1α and IL-1β, and altered brain cytokine mRNA and serum cytokine levels, in IL-1β-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Alheim, Katarina; Chai, Zhen; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Hasanvan, Homa; Malinowsky, David; Di Santo, Elena; Ghezzi, Pietro; Dinarello, Charles A.; Bartfai, Tamas

    1997-01-01

    IL-1β is an endogenous pyrogen that is induced during systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or IL-1-induced fever. We have examined the fever and cytokine responses following i.p. injection of IL-1 agonists, IL-1α and IL-1β, and compared these with response to LPS (i.p.) in wild-type and IL-1β-deficient mice. The IL-1β deficient mice appear to have elevated body temperature but exhibit a normal circadian temperature cycle. Exogenously injected IL-1β, IL-1α, or LPS induced hyperresponsive fevers in the IL-1β-deficient mice. We also observed phenotypic differences between wild-type and IL-1β-deficient mice in hypothalamic basal mRNA levels for IL-1α and IL-6, but not for IL-1β-converting enzyme or IL-1 receptor type I or type II. The IL-1α mRNA levels were down-regulated, whereas the IL-6 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the hypothalamus of IL-1β-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice. The IL-1β-deficient mice also responded to LPS challenge with significantly higher serum corticosterone and with lower serum tumor necrosis factor type α levels than the wild-type mice. The data suggest that, in the redundant cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β plays an important but not obligatory role in fever induction by LPS or IL-1α, as well as in the induction of serum tumor necrosis factor type α and corticosterone responses either by LPS or by IL-1α or IL-1β. PMID:9122256

  2. Hyperresponsive febrile reactions to interleukin (IL) 1alpha and IL-1beta, and altered brain cytokine mRNA and serum cytokine levels, in IL-1beta-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Alheim, K; Chai, Z; Fantuzzi, G; Hasanvan, H; Malinowsky, D; Di Santo, E; Ghezzi, P; Dinarello, C A; Bartfai, T

    1997-03-18

    IL-1beta is an endogenous pyrogen that is induced during systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or IL-1-induced fever. We have examined the fever and cytokine responses following i.p. injection of IL-1 agonists, IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, and compared these with response to LPS (i.p.) in wild-type and IL-1beta-deficient mice. The IL-1beta deficient mice appear to have elevated body temperature but exhibit a normal circadian temperature cycle. Exogenously injected IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, or LPS induced hyperresponsive fevers in the IL-1beta-deficient mice. We also observed phenotypic differences between wild-type and IL-1beta-deficient mice in hypothalamic basal mRNA levels for IL-1alpha and IL-6, but not for IL-1beta-converting enzyme or IL-1 receptor type I or type II. The IL-1alpha mRNA levels were down-regulated, whereas the IL-6 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the hypothalamus of IL-1beta-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice. The IL-1beta-deficient mice also responded to LPS challenge with significantly higher serum corticosterone and with lower serum tumor necrosis factor type alpha levels than the wild-type mice. The data suggest that, in the redundant cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta plays an important but not obligatory role in fever induction by LPS or IL-1alpha, as well as in the induction of serum tumor necrosis factor type alpha and corticosterone responses either by LPS or by IL-1alpha or IL-1beta.

  3. Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over alters offspring growth, skeletal mineralisation and tissue mRNA expressions of genes related to vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus homoeostasis in swine.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Laura A; Hernandez, Laura L; Laporta, Jimena; Crenshaw, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over effects were assessed in young pigs to characterise skeletal abnormalities in a diet-induced model of kyphosis. Bone abnormalities were previously induced and bone mineral density (BMD) reduced in offspring from sows fed diets with inadequate vitamin D3. In a nested design, pigs from sows (n 23) fed diets with 0 (-D), 8·125 (+D) or 43·750 (++D) µg D3/kg from breeding through lactation were weaned and, within litter, fed nursery diets arranged as a 2×2 factorial design with 0 (-D) or 7·0 (+D) µg D3/kg, each with 95 % (95P) or 120 % (120P) of P requirements. Selected pigs were euthanised before colostrum consumption at birth (0 weeks, n 23), weaning (3 weeks, n 22) and after a growth period (8 weeks, n 185) for BMD, bone mechanical tests and tissue mRNA analysis. Pigs produced by +D or ++D sows had increased gain at 3 weeks (P<0·05), and at 8 weeks had increased BMD and improved femur mechanical properties. However, responses to nursery diets depended on maternal diets (P<0·05). Relative mRNA expressions of genes revealed a maternal dietary influence at birth in bone osteocalcin and at weaning in kidney 24-hydroxylase (P<0·05). Nursery treatments affected mRNA expressions at 8 weeks. Detection of a maternal and nursery diet interaction (P<0·05) provided insights into the long-term effects of maternal nutritional inputs. Characterising early stages of bone abnormalities provided inferences for humans and animals about maternal dietary influence on offspring skeletal health. PMID:27480125

  4. Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over alters offspring growth, skeletal mineralisation and tissue mRNA expressions of genes related to vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus homoeostasis in swine.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Laura A; Hernandez, Laura L; Laporta, Jimena; Crenshaw, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over effects were assessed in young pigs to characterise skeletal abnormalities in a diet-induced model of kyphosis. Bone abnormalities were previously induced and bone mineral density (BMD) reduced in offspring from sows fed diets with inadequate vitamin D3. In a nested design, pigs from sows (n 23) fed diets with 0 (-D), 8·125 (+D) or 43·750 (++D) µg D3/kg from breeding through lactation were weaned and, within litter, fed nursery diets arranged as a 2×2 factorial design with 0 (-D) or 7·0 (+D) µg D3/kg, each with 95 % (95P) or 120 % (120P) of P requirements. Selected pigs were euthanised before colostrum consumption at birth (0 weeks, n 23), weaning (3 weeks, n 22) and after a growth period (8 weeks, n 185) for BMD, bone mechanical tests and tissue mRNA analysis. Pigs produced by +D or ++D sows had increased gain at 3 weeks (P<0·05), and at 8 weeks had increased BMD and improved femur mechanical properties. However, responses to nursery diets depended on maternal diets (P<0·05). Relative mRNA expressions of genes revealed a maternal dietary influence at birth in bone osteocalcin and at weaning in kidney 24-hydroxylase (P<0·05). Nursery treatments affected mRNA expressions at 8 weeks. Detection of a maternal and nursery diet interaction (P<0·05) provided insights into the long-term effects of maternal nutritional inputs. Characterising early stages of bone abnormalities provided inferences for humans and animals about maternal dietary influence on offspring skeletal health.

  5. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; et al

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstratedmore » an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.« less

  6. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  7. Thermoregulation in rats exposed perinatally to dioxin: core temperature stability to altered ambient temperature, behavioral thermoregulation, and febrile response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Miller, D B

    1998-08-21

    Recent studies have shown that perinatal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) alters thermoregulatory function in adult rats and hamsters, indicated by a reduced body temperature during the animal's nocturnal phase. The present study was designed to assess the behavioral thermoregulation, ability to develop a fever, and thermoregulatory stability as a function of ambient temperature (Ta) in rats exposed perinatally to TCDD. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed on gestational day (GD) 15 to 1 microg TCDD/kg (po). The male offspring were implanted with transmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). The 24-h pattern of core temperature was affected by TCDD exposure, characterized by a reduced nocturnal Tc. At some ages, the diurnal Tc of the TCDD group was elevated. This dysfunction in temperature regulation was most apparent at 7 and 11 mo of age. The 24-h pattern of MA was also altered by TCDD. The hypothermic effects of TCDD were most pronounced at cooler Ta values of 10 to 22 degrees C. In contrast, behavioral thermoregulation, assessed by measuring the selected Ta and Tc of rats in a temperature gradient, was unaffected by TCDD. The ability to develop a fever following administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin (Escherichia coli; 50 microg/kg) was accentuated in the TCDD-treated animals. The data confirm a nocturnal hypothermia in rats prenatally exposed to TCDD. However, the normal behavioral regulation of Tc suggests that hypothalamic thermoregulatory centers are not permanently altered. The accentuated fever in TCDD animals shows possible functional alterations in the neuroimmune and/or thermoregulatory axes involved in fever. PMID:9726785

  8. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy. PMID:26787513

  9. The role of altered proximal femoral geometry in impaired pelvis stability and hip control during CP gait: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Jansen, Karen; Wesseling, Mariska; Molenaers, Guy; Scheys, Lennart; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-02-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often present aberrant hip geometry, more specifically increased femoral anteversion and neck-shaft angle. Furthermore, altered gait patterns are present within this population. This study analyzed the effect of aberrant femoral geometry, as present in subjects with CP, on the ability of muscles to control hip and knee joint kinematics. Given the specific gait deficits observed during crouch gait, increased ability to abduct, externally rotate the hip and extend the knee and hip were denoted as beneficial effects. We ran dynamic simulations of CP and normal gait using two musculoskeletal models, one reflecting normal femoral geometry and one reflecting proximal femoral deformities. The results show that the combination of aberrant bone geometry and CP-specific gait characteristics beneficially increased the ability of gluteus medius and maximus to extend the hip and knee. In contrast, the potentials of the hamstrings to extend the hip decreased whereas the potentials to flex the knee increased. These changes closely followed the observed changes in the muscle moment arm lengths. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the concomitant effect of the presence of proximal femoral deformity and CP gait characteristics on the muscle control of hip and knee joint kinematics during single stance. Not accounting for subject-specific geometry will affect the calculated muscles' potential during gait. Therefore, the use of generic models to assess muscle function in the presence of femoral deformity and CP gait should be treated with caution.

  10. The MuLV 4070A G541R Env mutation decreases the stability and alters the conformation of the TM ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William M. Zheng, Haiyan Cote, Marie L. Roth, Monica J.

    2008-02-05

    Virus-cell and cell-cell fusion events are affected by various properties of the fusogenic Env protein on the cell surface. The G541R mutation within the TM ectodomain of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) 4070A arose by positive selection in viral passage and results in a reduction of cell-cell fusion events while maintaining viral titer. Size exclusion chromatography shows that the multimerization properties are similar among expressed wild-type and mutant ectodomain peptides. Circular dichroism measurements reveal decreased thermal stability of the G541R mutant as compared to wild type. The G541R mutant also renders the peptide more susceptible to Lys-C protease cleavage. The 42-114 monoclonal antibody does not bind to the G541R mutant peptides, suggesting a structural difference from wild type. These altered physical properties result in productive viral infection of G541R bearing virus with decreased syncytia.

  11. The MuLV 4070A G541R Env mutation decreases the stability and alters the conformation of the TM ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, William M.; Zheng, Haiyan; Coté, Marie L.; Roth, Monica J.

    2008-01-01

    Virus-cell and cell-cell fusion events are affected by various properties of the fusogenic Env protein on the cell surface. The G541R mutation within the TM ectodomain of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) 4070A arose by positive selection in viral passage and results in a reduction of cell-cell fusion events while maintaining viral titer. Size exclusion chromatography shows that the multimerization properties are similar among expressed wild-type and mutant ectodomain peptides. Circular dichroism measurements reveal decreased thermal stability of the G541R mutant as compared to wild-type. The G541R mutant also renders the peptide more susceptible to Lys-C protease cleavage. The 42-114 monoclonal antibody does not bind to the G541R mutant peptides, suggesting a structural difference from wildtype. These altered physical properties result in productive viral infection of G541R bearing virus with decreased syncytia. PMID:17961622

  12. A mutation in the N domain of Escherichia coli lon stabilizes dodecamers and selectively alters degradation of model substrates.

    PubMed

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2013-12-01

    Escherichia coli Lon, an ATP-dependent AAA(+) protease, recognizes and degrades many different substrates, including the RcsA and SulA regulatory proteins. More than a decade ago, the E240K mutation in the N domain of Lon was shown to prevent degradation of RcsA but not SulA in vivo. Here, we characterize the biochemical properties of the E240K mutant in vitro and present evidence that the effects of this mutation are complex. For example, Lon(E240K) exists almost exclusively as a dodecamer, whereas wild-type Lon equilibrates between hexamers and dodecamers. Moreover, Lon(E240K) displays degradation defects in vitro that do not correlate in any simple fashion with degron identity, substrate stability, or dodecamer formation. The Lon sequence segment near residue 240 is known to undergo nucleotide-dependent conformational changes, and our results suggest that this region may be important for coupling substrate binding with allosteric activation of Lon protease and ATPase activity.

  13. HER2 Stabilizes EGFR and Itself by Altering Autophosphorylation Patterns in a Manner That Overcomes Regulatory Mechanisms and Promotes Proliferative and Transformation Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary; Zhao, Hua; Agazie, Yehenew M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the causes of breast cancer is overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Enhanced receptor autophosphorylation and resistance to activation-induced down regulation have been suggested as mechanisms for HER2-induced sustained signaling and cell transformation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these possibilities remain incompletely understood. In the current report, we present evidence that show that HER2 overexpression does not lead to receptor hyper-autophosphorylation, but alters patterns in a manner that favors receptor stability and sustained signaling. Specifically, HER2 overexpression blocks EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation on Y1045 and Y1068, the known docking sites of c-Cbl and Grb2, respectively, while promoting phosphorylation on Y1173, the known docking site of the Gab adaptor proteins and phospholipase C gamma (PLCγ). Under these conditions, HER2 itself is phosphorylated on Y1221/1222, with no known role, and on Y1248 that corresponds to Y1173 of EGFR. Interestingly, suppressed EGFR autophosphorylation on the Grb2 and c-Cbl binding sites correlated with receptor stability and sustained signaling, suggesting that HER2 accomplishes these tasks by altering autophosphorylation patterns. In conformity with these findings, mutation of the Grb2 binding site on EGFR (Y1068F-EGFR) conferred resistance to ligand-induced degradation which in turn induced sustained signaling, and increased cell proliferation and transformation. These findings suggest that the Grb2 binding site on EGFR is redundant for signaling, but critical for receptor regulation. On the other hand, mutation of the putative Grb2 binding site in HER2 (Y1139) did not affect stability, signaling or transformation, suggesting that Y1139 in HER2 may not serve as a Grb2 binding site. In agreement with the role of EGFR in HER2 signaling, inhibition of EGFR expression reduced HER2-induced anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenesis. These results imply

  14. Alterations in mRNA expression of steroid receptors and heat shock proteins in the liver of rare minnow (Grobiocypris rarus) exposed to atrazine and p,p'-DDE.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Zha, Jinmiao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Wei; Li, Zhaoli; Wang, Zijian

    2010-07-15

    The chaperon role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) throughout the life cycle of steroid receptors have been demonstrated in vitro. However, the actions of HSPs in steroid pathways in animals especially in fish were unclear. In this study, sexually mature rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) were exposed to typical endocrine disruptors (atrazine and p,p'-DDE). Hypertrophy of hepatocytes at the 333 microg/l atrazine treatment and atrophy of hepatocytes in all p,p'-DDE treatments were observed. The expression of liver hsp70 and hsp90 in atrazine treatments were significantly up-regulated. Moreover, remarkable increases in the expression of androgen receptor (ar) and estrogen receptor (er) were observed, while alterations of the glucoticorcoid receptor (gr) expression was not significant in atrazine exposed fish. The expression of ar, er, gr, hsp70 and hsp90 were significantly suppressed following p,p'-DDE exposure. These results demonstrate that the expression of hsp70 and hsp90 is altered along with changes of steroid receptors in vivo. Therefore, the results are consistent with the possibility that in fish heat shock proteins (HSPs) play chaperon roles for the steroid receptors in vivo, which also concurs with previous in vitro mammalian studies.

  15. Ethanol induced attenuation of oxidative stress is unable to alter mRNA expression pattern of catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S- transferase (GST1A), and superoxide dismutase (SOD3) enzymes in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Minghui; Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Haron, Mona H.; Wu, Mengmeng; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Dasmahapatra, Asok K.

    2010-01-01

    Although the mechanism of ethanol toxicity during embryogenesis is unknown, our earlier studies on Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos indicated that the effects might be mediated through oxidative stress. In this study we have determined the oxidative stress and the mRNA content of four antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase) during Japanese rice fish embryogenesis (from 0 day post-fertilization to hatching) and after exposing the embryos to ethanol (100 and 300 mM) for 48 h at three stages (0–2, 1–3 and 4–6 day post fertilization, dpf) of organogenesis. We observed that oxidative stress was minimal in blastula, gastrula or neurula stages, increased gradually with the advancement of morphogenesis and reached its maximum level in hatchlings. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs were constitutively expressed throughout development; however, the expression pattern was not identical among the enzymes. Catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNAs were minimal in the fertilized eggs, but increased significantly in 1 dpf and then either sharply dropped (SOD) or maintained a steady-state (catalase). Glutathione S-transferase (GST) was very high in fertilized eggs and sharply dropped 1 dpf and then gradually increased thereafter. Glutathione reductase (GR) maintained a steady-state throughout the development. Ethanol was able to attenuate oxidative stress in embryos exposed only to 300 mM 1–3 dpf; no significant difference with controls was observed in other ethanol-treated groups. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs also remained unaltered after ethanol treatment. From these data we conclude that the attenuation of oxidative stress by ethanol is probably due to the inhibition of normal growth of the embryos rather than by inhibiting catalase, GST, GR or SOD- dependent activities. PMID:20965276

  16. pH Shifting alters solubility characteristics and thermal stability of soy protein isolate and its globulin fractions in different pH, salt concentration, and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiang; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie

    2010-07-14

    Soy protein isolate (SPI), beta-conglycinin (7S), and glycinin (11S) were subjected to pH-shifting treatments, that is, unfolding at pH 1.5 or 12.0 followed by refolding at pH 7.0, to induce molten globule structures. Treated samples were analyzed for protein solubility, thermal stability, and aggregation in 0, 0.1, and 0.6 M NaCl solutions at pH 2.0-8.0. The pH(12) shifting resulted in drastic increases (up to 2.5-fold) in SPI solubility in the pH 6.0-7.0 range, especially at 0 M NaCl. The pH(1.5) shifting had a generally lesser effect on solubility. 11S exhibited a solubility pattern similar to that of SPI, but the solubility of 7S was unaffected by pH shifting except at 0.6 M NaCl. The pH shifting, notably at pH 12.0, produced soluble, disulfide-linked polymers from 11S and reduced (P < 0.05) its enthalpy but not its temperature of denaturation. Soy proteins structurally altered by pH shifting had a reduced sensitivity to thermal aggregation.

  17. Quantitative Effect of Suboptimal Codon Usage on Translational Efficiency of mRNA Encoding HIV-1 gag in Intact T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngumbela, Kholiswa C.; Ryan, Kieran P.; Sivamurthy, Rohini; Brockman, Mark A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Kavanagh, Daniel G.

    2008-01-01

    Background The sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) are characterized by low GC content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of DNA vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering RNA stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in DNA vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been quantified. Methodology and Principal Findings To quantify translational efficiency of gag mRNA in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic mRNA corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative ELISA and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per µg of input mRNA. We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold). In contrast when cells were transfected with DNA vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag mRNA, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag production. Conclusions We conclude that suboptimal codon usage by HIV-1 results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from DNA vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear RNA. PMID:18523584

  18. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  19. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  20. A novel role for the RNA-binding protein FXR1P in myoblasts cell-cycle progression by modulating p21/Cdkn1a/Cip1/Waf1 mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Laetitia; Durand, Nelly; Khalfallah, Olfa; Tabet, Ricardo; Barbry, Pascal; Mari, Bernard; Sacconi, Sabrina; Moine, Hervé; Bardoni, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    The Fragile X-Related 1 gene (FXR1) is a paralog of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene (FMR1), whose absence causes the Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. FXR1P plays an important role in normal muscle development, and its absence causes muscular abnormalities in mice, frog, and zebrafish. Seven alternatively spliced FXR1 transcripts have been identified and two of them are skeletal muscle-specific. A reduction of these isoforms is found in myoblasts from Facio-Scapulo Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD) patients. FXR1P is an RNA-binding protein involved in translational control; however, so far, no mRNA target of FXR1P has been linked to the drastic muscular phenotypes caused by its absence. In this study, gene expression profiling of C2C12 myoblasts reveals that transcripts involved in cell cycle and muscular development pathways are modulated by Fxr1-depletion. We observed an increase of p21--a regulator of cell-cycle progression--in Fxr1-knocked-down mouse C2C12 and FSHD human myoblasts. Rescue of this molecular phenotype is possible by re-expressing human FXR1P in Fxr1-depleted C2C12 cells. FXR1P muscle-specific isoforms bind p21 mRNA via direct interaction with a conserved G-quadruplex located in its 3' untranslated region. The FXR1P/G-quadruplex complex reduces the half-life of p21 mRNA. In the absence of FXR1P, the upregulation of p21 mRNA determines the elevated level of its protein product that affects cell-cycle progression inducing a premature cell-cycle exit and generating a pool of cells blocked at G0. Our study describes a novel role of FXR1P that has crucial implications for the understanding of its role during myogenesis and muscle development, since we show here that in its absence a reduced number of myoblasts will be available for muscle formation/regeneration, shedding new light into the pathophysiology of FSHD.

  1. Functional Integration of mRNA Translational Control Programs.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; Cragle, Chad E; Arumugam, Karthik; Fosso, Bruno; Pesole, Graziano; MacNicol, Angus M

    2015-01-01

    Regulated mRNA translation plays a key role in control of cell cycle progression in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in the self-renewal and survival of stem cells and cancer stem cells. While targeting mRNA translation presents an attractive strategy for control of aberrant cell cycle progression, mRNA translation is an underdeveloped therapeutic target. Regulated mRNAs are typically controlled through interaction with multiple RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the mechanisms by which the functions of distinct RBPs bound to a common target mRNA are coordinated are poorly understood. The challenge now is to gain insight into these mechanisms of coordination and to identify the molecular mediators that integrate multiple, often conflicting, inputs. A first step includes the identification of altered mRNA ribonucleoprotein complex components that assemble on mRNAs bound by multiple, distinct RBPs compared to those recruited by individual RBPs. This review builds upon our knowledge of combinatorial control of mRNA translation during the maturation of oocytes from Xenopus laevis, to address molecular strategies that may mediate RBP diplomacy and conflict resolution for coordinated control of mRNA translational output. Continued study of regulated ribonucleoprotein complex dynamics promises valuable new insights into mRNA translational control and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of disease. PMID:26197342

  2. Functional Integration of mRNA Translational Control Programs.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; Cragle, Chad E; Arumugam, Karthik; Fosso, Bruno; Pesole, Graziano; MacNicol, Angus M

    2015-01-01

    Regulated mRNA translation plays a key role in control of cell cycle progression in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in the self-renewal and survival of stem cells and cancer stem cells. While targeting mRNA translation presents an attractive strategy for control of aberrant cell cycle progression, mRNA translation is an underdeveloped therapeutic target. Regulated mRNAs are typically controlled through interaction with multiple RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the mechanisms by which the functions of distinct RBPs bound to a common target mRNA are coordinated are poorly understood. The challenge now is to gain insight into these mechanisms of coordination and to identify the molecular mediators that integrate multiple, often conflicting, inputs. A first step includes the identification of altered mRNA ribonucleoprotein complex components that assemble on mRNAs bound by multiple, distinct RBPs compared to those recruited by individual RBPs. This review builds upon our knowledge of combinatorial control of mRNA translation during the maturation of oocytes from Xenopus laevis, to address molecular strategies that may mediate RBP diplomacy and conflict resolution for coordinated control of mRNA translational output. Continued study of regulated ribonucleoprotein complex dynamics promises valuable new insights into mRNA translational control and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of disease.

  3. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  4. Isolation of ribosome bound nascent polypeptides in vitro to identify translational pause sites along mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sujata S; Komar, Anton A

    2012-01-01

    The rate of translational elongation is non-uniform. mRNA secondary structure, codon usage and mRNA associated proteins may alter ribosome movement on the message(for review see 1). However, it's now widely accepted that synonymous codon usage is the primary cause of non-uniform translational elongation rates(1). Synonymous codons are not used with identical frequency. A bias exists in the use of synonymous codons with some codons used more frequently than others(2). Codon bias is organism as well as tissue specific(2,3). Moreover, frequency of codon usage is directly proportional to the concentrations of cognate tRNAs(4). Thus, a frequently used codon will have higher multitude of corresponding tRNAs, which further implies that a frequent codon will be translated faster than an infrequent one. Thus, regions on mRNA enriched in rare codons (potential pause sites) will as a rule slow down ribosome movement on the message and cause accumulation of nascent peptides of the respective sizes(5-8). These pause sites can have functional impact on the protein expression, mRNA stability and protein folding(for review see 9). Indeed, it was shown that alleviation of such pause sites can alter ribosome movement on mRNA and subsequently may affect the efficiency of co-translational (in vivo) protein folding(1,7,10,11). To understand the process of protein folding in vivo, in the cell, that is ultimately coupled to the process of protein synthesis it is essential to gain comprehensive insights into the impact of codon usage/tRNA content on the movement of ribosomes along mRNA during translational elongation. Here we describe a simple technique that can be used to locate major translation pause sites for a given mRNA translated in various cell-free systems(6-8). This procedure is based on isolation of nascent polypeptides accumulating on ribosomes during in vitro translation of a target mRNA. The rationale is that at low-frequency codons, the increase in the residence time of the

  5. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  6. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  7. Messenger RNA (mRNA) Nanoparticle Tumour Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kyle K.L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-01-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA’s biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research. PMID:24904987

  8. The colR4 and colR15 beta-tubulin mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii confer altered sensitivities to microtubule inhibitors and herbicides by enhancing microtubule stability

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The colR4 and colR15 beta 2-tubulin missense mutations for lysine-350 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Lee and Huang, 1990) were originally isolated by selection for resistance to the growth inhibitory effects of colchicine. The colR4 and colR15 mutants have been found to be cross resistant to vinblastine and several classes of antimitotic herbicides, including the dinitroanilines (oryzalin, trifluralin, profluralin, and ethafluralin); the phosphoric amide amiprophos methyl; and the dimethyl propynl benzamide pronamide. Like colchicine and vinblastine, the antimitotic effects of these plant-specific herbicides have been associated with the depolymerization of microtubules. In contrast to their resistance to microtubule-depolymerizing drugs, the mutants have an increased sensitivity to taxol, a drug which enhances the polymerization and stability of microtubules. This pattern of altered sensitivity to different microtubule inhibitors was found to cosegregate and corevert with the beta-tubulin mutations providing the first genetic evidence that the in vivo herbicidal effects of the dinitroanilines, amiprophos methyl, and pronamide are related to microtubule function. Although wild-type like in their growth characteristics, the colR4 and colR15 mutants were found to have an altered pattern of microtubules containing acetylated alpha-tubulin, a posttranslational modification that has been associated with stable subsets of microtubules found in a variety of cells. Microtubules in the interphase cytoplasm and those of the intranuclear spindle of mitotic cells, which in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells do not contain acetylated alpha-tubulin, were found to be acetylated in the mutants. These data taken together suggest that the colR4 and colR15 missense mutations increase the stability of the microtubules into which the mutant beta-tubulins are incorporated and that the altered drug sensitivities of the mutants are a consequence of this enhanced microtubule stability. PMID

  9. Human ribosomes from cells with reduced dyskerin levels are intrinsically altered in translation.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Rocchi, Laura; Brugiere, Sabine; Carnicelli, Domenica; Onofrillo, Carmine; Couté, Yohann; Brigotti, Maurizio; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Dyskerin is a pseudouridine (ψ) synthase involved in fundamental cellular processes including uridine modification in rRNA and small nuclear RNA and telomere stabilization. Dyskerin functions are altered in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) and cancer. Dyskerin's role in rRNA pseudouridylation has been suggested to underlie the alterations in mRNA translation described in cells lacking dyskerin function, although relevant direct evidences are currently lacking. Our purpose was to establish definitely whether defective dyskerin function might determine an intrinsic ribosomal defect leading to an altered synthetic activity. Therefore, ribosomes from dyskerin-depleted human cells were purified and 1) added to a controlled reticulocyte cell-free system devoid of ribosomes to study mRNA translation; 2) analyzed for protein contamination and composition by mass spectrometry, 3) analyzed for global pseudouridylation levels. Ribosomes purified from dyskerin-depleted cells showed altered translational fidelity and internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. These ribosomes displayed reduced uridine modification, whereas they were not different in terms of protein contamination or ribosomal protein composition with respect to ribosomes from matched control cells with full dyskerin activity. In conclusion, lack of dyskerin function in human cells induces a defect in rRNA uridine modification, which is sufficient to alter ribosome activity.

  10. Triosephosphate isomerase I170V alters catalytic site, enhances stability and induces pathology in a Drosophila model of TPI deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshe A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-10-16

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. In the end, collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis.

  11. Concurrent DNA Copy-Number Alterations and Mutations in Genes Related to Maintenance of Genome Stability in Uninvolved Mammary Glandular Tissue from Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Ronowicz, Anna; Janaszak-Jasiecka, Anna; Skokowski, Jarosław; Madanecki, Piotr; Bartoszewski, Rafal; Bałut, Magdalena; Seroczyńska, Barbara; Kochan, Kinga; Bogdan, Adam; Butkus, Małgorzata; Pęksa, Rafał; Ratajska, Magdalena; Kuźniacka, Alina; Wasąg, Bartosz; Gucwa, Magdalena; Krzyżanowski, Maciej; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Forsberg, Lars; Ochocka, J Renata; Limon, Janusz; Crowley, Michael R; Buckley, Patrick G; Messiaen, Ludwine; Dumanski, Jan P; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz

    2015-11-01

    Somatic mosaicism for DNA copy-number alterations (SMC-CNAs) is defined as gain or loss of chromosomal segments in somatic cells within a single organism. As cells harboring SMC-CNAs can undergo clonal expansion, it has been proposed that SMC-CNAs may contribute to the predisposition of these cells to genetic disease including cancer. Herein, the gross genomic alterations (>500 kbp) were characterized in uninvolved mammary glandular tissue from 59 breast cancer patients and matched samples of primary tumors and lymph node metastases. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization showed 10% (6/59) of patients harbored one to 359 large SMC-CNAs (mean: 1,328 kbp; median: 961 kbp) in a substantial portion of glandular tissue cells, distal from the primary tumor site. SMC-CNAs were partially recurrent in tumors, albeit with considerable contribution of stochastic SMC-CNAs indicating genomic destabilization. Targeted resequencing of 301 known predisposition and somatic driver loci revealed mutations and rare variants in genes related to maintenance of genomic integrity: BRCA1 (p.Gln1756Profs*74, p.Arg504Cys), BRCA2 (p.Asn3124Ile), NCOR1 (p.Pro1570Glnfs*45), PALB2 (p.Ser500Pro), and TP53 (p.Arg306*). Co-occurrence of gross SMC-CNAs along with point mutations or rare variants in genes responsible for safeguarding genomic integrity highlights the temporal and spatial neoplastic potential of uninvolved glandular tissue in breast cancer patients. PMID:26219265

  12. βI-tubulin mutations in the laulimalide/peloruside binding site mediate drug sensitivity by altering drug-tubulin interactions and microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Rowe, Matthew R; Field, Jessica J; Northcote, Peter T; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H; Miller, John H

    2015-09-01

    Peloruside A (PLA) and laulimalide (LAU) are potent microtubule-stabilizing natural products that are effective against a broad spectrum of cancer cells. The interactions of PLA and LAU with tubulin have attracted a great deal of attention, mainly because they bind to β-tubulin at a site that is different from the classical taxoid site. Multiple βI-tubulin amino acid residues have been predicted by computer modelling studies and more recently by protein crystallography to participate in the binding of PLA and LAU to tubulin. The relevance of these residues in determining cellular sensitivity to the compounds, however, remains largely uncertain. To determine the role of four binding site residues, Q291, D295, V333, and N337 on PLA and LAU activity, we introduced single mutations to these sites by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected each mutant tubulin separately into HEK and/or HeLa cells. We found that a Q291M βI-tubulin mutation increased sensitivity of the cells to PLA, but not to LAU, paclitaxel (PTX), or vinblastine (VBL). In contrast, V333W and N337L mutations led to less stable microtubules, with the V333W causing resistance to PLA and PTX, but not LAU, and the N337L causing resistance to PLA, LAU, and PTX. Moreover, cells expressing either W333 or L337 were hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent, VBL. The D295I mutation conferred resistance to both PLA and LAU without affecting microtubule stability or sensitivity to PTX or ixabepilone (IXB). This study identifies the first mammalian βI-tubulin mutation that specifically increases sensitivity to PLA, and reports mutations at PLA and LAU binding site residues that can either reduce microtubule stability or impair drug-tubulin binding, conferring resistance to these microtubule-stabilizing agents. This information provides insights on β-tubulin residues important for maintaining microtubule structural integrity and for sensitivity to microtubule-targeting agents, and suggests novel

  13. Nucleocytoplasmic transport: the influenza virus NS1 protein regulates the transport of spliced NS2 mRNA and its precursor NS1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Caplen, F V; Nemeroff, M E; Qiu, Y; Krug, R M

    1992-02-01

    Influenza virus unspliced NS1 mRNA, like retroviral pre-mRNAs, is efficiently exported from the nucleus and translated in the cytoplasm of infected cells. With human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the transport of viral pre-mRNAs is facilitated by the viral Rev protein. We tested the possibility that the influenza virus NS1 protein, a nuclear protein that is encoded by unspliced NS1 mRNA, has the same function as the HIV Rev protein. Surprisingly, using transient transfection assays, we found that rather than facilitating the nucleocytoplasmic transport of unspliced NS1 mRNA, the NS1 protein inhibited the transport of NS2 mRNA, the spliced mRNA generated from NS1 mRNA. The efficient transport of NS2 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm occurred only when the synthesis of the NS1 protein was abrogated by amber mutations. The NS1 protein down-regulated the export of NS2 mRNA whether or not it was generated by splicing, indicating that the NS1 protein acted directly on transport. Actinomycin D chase experiments verified that the NS1 protein acted on the transport and not on the differential stability of NS2 mRNA in the nucleus as compared to the cytoplasm. In addition, the NS1 protein inhibited the transport of NS1 mRNA itself, which contains all of the sequences in NS2 mRNA, particularly when NS1 mRNA was released from the splicing machinery by mutating its 3'-splice site. Our results indicate that the NS1 protein-mediated inhibition of transport requires sequences in NS2 mRNA. The transport of the viral PB1 protein, nucleocapsid protein, hemagglutinin, membrane protein, and M2 mRNAs was not affected by the NS1 protein. When the NS2 mRNA sequence was covalently attached to the PB1 mRNA, the transport of the chimeric mRNA was inhibited by the NS1 protein. Our results identify a novel function of the influenza virus NS1 protein and demonstrate that post-transcriptional control of gene expression can also occur at the level of the nucleocytoplasmic transport of a

  14. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q mutations alter protein stability and redox properties of the iron centre.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Bárbara J; Lucas, Tânia G; Rodrigues, João V; Frederiksen, Jane H; Teixeira, Miguel S; Tiranti, Valeria; Bross, Peter; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2014-01-01

    ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE). Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1 ± 0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈ 10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association. PMID:25198162

  15. Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q Mutations Alter Protein Stability and Redox Properties of the Iron Centre

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Bárbara J.; Lucas, Tânia G.; Rodrigues, João V.; Frederiksen, Jane H.; Teixeira, Miguel S.; Tiranti, Valeria; Bross, Peter; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2014-01-01

    ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE). Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1±0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association. PMID:25198162

  16. Identification of a competitive translation determinant in the 3' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hann, L E; Webb, A C; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1997-01-01

    We report that the competitive translational activity of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA (CP RNA), a nonadenylated mRNA, is determined in part by the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Competitive translation was characterized both in vitro, with cotranslation assays, and in vivo, with microinjected Xenopus laevis oocytes. In wheat germ extracts, coat protein synthesis was constant when a fixed amount of full-length CP RNA was cotranslated with increasing concentrations of competitor globin mRNA. However, translation of CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR decreased significantly under competitive conditions. RNA stabilities were equivalent. In X. laevis oocytes, which are translationally saturated and are an inherently competitive translational environment, full-length CP RNA assembled into large polysomes and coat protein synthesis was readily detectable. Alternatively, CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR sedimented as small polysomes, and little coat protein was detected. Again, RNA stabilities were equivalent. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to localize RNA sequences or structures required for competitive translation. Since the CP RNA 3' UTR has an unusually large number of AUG nucleotide triplets, two AUG-containing sites were altered in full-length RNA prior to oocyte injections. Nucleotide substitutions at the sequence GAUG, 20 nucleotides downstream of the coat protein termination codon, specifically reduced full-length CP RNA translation, while similar substitutions at the next AUG triplet had little effect on translation. The competitive influence of the 3' UTR could be explained by RNA-protein interactions that affect translation initiation or by ribosome reinitiation at downstream AUG codons, which would increase the number of ribosomes committed to coat protein synthesis. PMID:9121448

  17. Regulated production of an influenza virus spliced mRNA mediated by virus-specific products.

    PubMed

    Smith, D B; Inglis, S C

    1985-09-01

    The influenza virus NS2 mRNA is generated through processing by cellular enzymes of a transcript (the NS1 mRNA) of virion RNA segment 8. Production of this mRNA is altered in cells infected with a mutant of influenza A (fowl plague) virus. The proportion of segment 8 transcripts which accumulated in a spliced form was found to be considerably lower in mutant virus-infected cells than in cells infected with wild-type virus, and the amplification in production of NS2 mRNA relative to that of the NS1 mRNA, which normally occurs during infection with wild-type virus, was not observed with the mutant. The NS1 mRNA specified by the mutant virus has unaltered splice recognition sites and was apparently processed normally during a mixed infection with a strain of virus which is wild-type for production of NS2 mRNA. These results suggest that the production of NS2 mRNA is regulated by virus-specific products; these products may act by increasing the efficiency of splicing of NS1 mRNA.

  18. Fenproporex increases locomotor activity and alters energy metabolism, and mood stabilizers reverse these changes: a proposal for a new animal model of mania.

    PubMed

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Furlanetto, Camila B; Scaini, Giselli; Valvassori, Samira S; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Resende, Wilson R; Cardoso, Mariane R; Varela, Roger B; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-04-01

    Fenproporex (Fen) is converted in vivo into amphetamine, which is used to induce mania-like behaviors in animals. In the present study, we intend to present a new animal model of mania. In order to prove through face, construct, and predictive validities, we evaluated behavioral parameters (locomotor activity, stereotypy activity, and fecal boli amount) and brain energy metabolism (enzymes citrate synthase; malate dehydrogenase; succinate dehydrogenase; complexes I, II, II-III, and IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain; and creatine kinase) in rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of fenproporex, treated with lithium (Li) and valproate (VPA). The administration of Fen increased locomotor activity and decreased the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, and creatine kinase, in most brain structures evaluated. In addition, treatment with mood stabilizers prevented and reversed this effect. Our results are consistent with the literature that demonstrates behavioral changes and mitochondrial dysfunction caused by psychostimulants. These findings suggest that chronic administration of Fen may be a potential animal model of mania. PMID:24126971

  19. Aiding and Abetting Cancer: mRNA export and the nuclear pore

    PubMed Central

    Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Borden, Katherine L.B

    2013-01-01

    mRNA export is a critical step in gene expression. Export of transcripts can be modulated in response to cellular signaling or stress. Consistently, mRNA export is dysregulated in primary human specimens derived from many different forms of cancer. Aberrant expression of export factors can alter export of specific transcripts encoding proteins involved in proliferation, survival and oncogenesis. These specific factors, which are not used for bulk mRNA export, are obvious therapeutic targets. Indeed, given the emerging role of mRNA export in cancer, it is not surprising that efforts to target different aspects of this pathway have reached the clinical trial stage. Thus, like transcription and translation, mRNA export may also play a critical role in cancer genesis and maintenance. PMID:23582887

  20. Cigarette Smoking and Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 mRNA in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus in Suicides

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Helene; Arango, Victoria; Kassir, Suham A.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Mann, J. John; Underwood, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with suicide and mood disorders and stimulates serotonin release. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2) synthesizes serotonin and is over-expressed in suicides. We determined whether smoking is associated with TPH2 mRNA in suicides and controls. TPH2 mRNA was measured postmortem in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of controls (N=26, 17 nonsmokers and nine smokers) and suicides (N=23, 5 nonsmokers and 18 smokers). Psychiatric history was obtained by psychological autopsy. TPH2 mRNA was greater in suicide nonsmokers than suicide smokers, control smokers and control nonsmokers (p=0.006). There was more TPH2 mRNA throughout the DRN. Smoking interferes with the TPH2 mRNA increase observed in suicide nonsmokers. The absence of altered TPH2 expression in non-suicide smokers suggests no pharmacological effect of smoking. PMID:26954509

  1. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth.

  2. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A.; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay. The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  3. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  4. Regulated alpha-globin mRNA decay is a cytoplasmic event proceeding through 3'-to-5' exosome-dependent decapping.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy D; Wang, Zuoren; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2002-12-01

    The alpha-globin mRNA contains a C-rich stability element (CRE) in its 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) which is critical for the stability of this long-lived mRNA. A protein complex, termed the alpha-complex, forms on the CRE and has been shown to contribute to stabilization of the mRNA by at least two mechanisms, first by interacting with the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) to prevent deadenylation, and second by protecting the mRNA from attack by an erythroid endoribonuclease. In this report, we demonstrate that the alpha-globin 3' UTR can confer stability on a heterologous mRNA in cells, and this stability is dependent on the alpha-complex. Moreover, the stability was exclusively detected with cytoplasmic mRNA, suggesting that the regulation of alpha-globin mRNA stability is a cytoplasmic event. An additional mechanism by which the alpha-complex can confer stability on an RNA in vitro was also identified and shown to involve inhibition of 3' to 5' exonucleolytic degradation. Furthermore, using an in vitro mRNA decay system, we were able to follow the demise of the alpha-globin RNA and demonstrate that the decay was initiated by deadenylation followed by 3'-to-5' decay carried out by the exosome and ultimately hydrolysis of the residual cap structure.

  5. Cerebral cortical amyloid protein precursor mRNA expression is similar in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Ohyagi, Y; Takahashi, K; Satoh, Y; Makifuchi, T; Tabira, T

    1992-08-01

    The expression of 3 beta-amyloid protein precursor (APP) mRNAs (695, 751, and 770) in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases was analyzed by the S1 nuclease protection assay. We found no significant Alzheimer's disease-specific alteration of APP mRNA expression when compared to the other neurological diseases as controls. Since the expression of this mRNA was not correlated with amyloid deposition, it is possible that gliosis/neuronal loss may secondarily alter APP mRNA expression. However, the current study revealed no significant correlation between them.

  6. Analysis of mRNA decay and rRNA processing in Escherichia coli multiple mutants carrying a deletion in RNase III.

    PubMed Central

    Babitzke, P; Granger, L; Olszewski, J; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    RNase III is an endonuclease involved in processing both rRNA and certain mRNAs. To help determine whether RNase III (rnc) is required for general mRNA turnover in Escherichia coli, we have created a deletion-insertion mutation (delta rnc-38) in the structural gene. In addition, a series of multiple mutant strains containing deficiencies in RNase II (rnb-500), polynucleotide phosphorylase (pnp-7 or pnp-200), RNase E (rne-1 or rne-3071), and RNase III (delta rnc-38) were constructed. The delta rnc-38 single mutant was viable and led to the accumulation of 30S rRNA precursors, as has been previously observed with the rnc-105 allele (P. Gegenheimer, N. Watson, and D. Apirion, J. Biol. Chem. 252:3064-3073, 1977). In the multiple mutant strains, the presence of the delta rnc-38 allele resulted in the more rapid decay of pulse-labeled RNA but did not suppress conditional lethality, suggesting that the lethality associated with altered mRNA turnover may be due to the stabilization of specific mRNAs. In addition, these results indicate that RNase III is probably not required for general mRNA decay. Of particular interest was the observation that the delta rnc-38 rne-1 double mutant did not accumulate 30S rRNA precursors at 30 degrees C, while the delta rnc-38 rne-3071 double mutant did. Possible explanations of these results are discussed. Images PMID:8416898

  7. Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacts with its mRNA to inhibit muscle formation by attenuating function of miR-34a

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-qiang; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Xiao-Chang; Ma, Mei-ling; Cai, Rui; Gao, Yun; Sun, Yun-mei; Yang, Gong-She; Pang, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate the functions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mediating gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. Our previous study identified a Sirt1 antisense (AS) lncRNA transcribed from the Sirt1 AS strand. However, its role and regulatory mechanism is still unknown in myogenesis. Here, functional analyses showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA overexpression promoted myoblast proliferation, but inhibited differentiation. Mechanistically, Sirt1 AS lncRNA was found to activate its sense gene, Sirt1. The luciferase assay provided evidences that Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacted with Sirt1 3′ UTR and rescued Sirt1 transcriptional suppression by competing with miR-34a. In addition, RNA stability assay showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA prolonged Sirt1 mRNA half-life from 2 to 10 h. Ribonuclease protection assay further indicated that it fully bound to Sirt1 mRNA in the myoblast cytoplasm. Moreover, Sirt1 AS overexpression led to less mouse weight than the control because of less lean mass and greater levels of Sirt1, whereas the fat mass and levels of miR-34a were not altered. Based on the findings, a novel regulatory mechanism was found that Sirt1 AS lncRNA preferably interacted with Sirt1 mRNA forming RNA duplex to promote Sirt1 translation by competing with miR-34a, inhibiting muscle formation. PMID:26902620

  8. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  9. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates degradation of an mRNA transcript encoding the 14 kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Bedard, N

    1996-01-01

    Upon fasting, the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system is activated in skeletal muscle in parallel with the increases in rates of proteolysis. Levels of mRNA encoding the 14 kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2(14K)), which can catalyse the first irreversible reaction in this pathway, rise and fall in parallel with the rates of proteolysis [Wing and Banville (1994) Am.J. Physiol. 267, E39-E48], indicating that the conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins is a regulated step. To characterize the mechanisms of this regulation, we have examined the effects of insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and des(1-3) insulin-like growth factor I (DES-IGF-I), which does not bind IGF-binding proteins, on E2(14K) mRNA levels in L6 myotubes. Insulin suppressed levels of E2(14K) mRNA with an IC50 of 4 x 10(-9) M, but had no effects on mRNAs encoding polyubiquitin and proteasome subunits C2 and C8, which, like E2(14K), also increase in skeletal muscle upon fasting. Reduction of E2(14K) mRNA levels was more sensitive to IGF-I with an IC50 of approx. 5 x 10(-10) M. During the incubation of these cells for 12 h there was significant secretion of IGF-I-binding proteins into the medium. DES-IGF-I, which has markedly reduced affinity for these binding proteins, was found to potently reduce E2(14K) mRNA levels with an IC50 of 3 x 10(-11) M. DES-IGF-I did not alter rates of transcription of the E2(14K) gene, but enhanced the rate of degradation of the 1.2 kb mRNA transcript. The half-life of the 1.2 kb transcript was approximately one-third that of the 1.8 kb transcript and can explain the more marked regulation of this transcript observed previously. This indicates that the additional 3' non-coding sequence in the 1.8 kb transcript confers stability. These observations suggest that IGF-I is an important regulator of E2(14K) expression and demonstrate, for the first time, stimulation of degradation of a specific mRNA transcript by this hormone, while overall RNA accumulates. PMID

  10. Sequence specificity of mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Csepany, T; Lin, A; Baldick, C J; Beemon, K

    1990-11-25

    The sequence specificity of chicken mRNA N6-adenosine methyltransferase has been investigated in vivo. Localization of six new N6-methyladenosine sites on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) virion RNA has confirmed our extended consensus sequence for methylation: RGACU, where R is usually a G (7/12). We have also observed A (2/12) and U (3/12) at the -2 position (relative to m6A at +1) but never a C. At the +3 position, the U was observed 10/12 times; an A and a C were observed once each in weakly methylated sequences. The extent of methylation varied between the different sites up to a maximum of about 90%. To test the significance of this consensus sequence, it was altered by site-specific mutagenesis, and methylation was assayed after transfection of mutated RSV DNA into chicken embryo fibroblasts. We found that changing the G at -1 or the U at +3 to any other residue inhibited methylation. However, inhibition of methylation at all four of the major sites in the RSV src gene did not detectably alter the steady-state levels of the three viral RNA species or viral infectivity. Additional mutants that inactivated the src protein kinase activity produced less virus and exhibited relatively less src mRNA in infected cells. PMID:2173695

  11. Synthetic mRNA: Production, Introduction into Cells, and Physiological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances have made it possible to synthesize mRNA in vitro that is relatively stable when introduced into mammalian cells, has a diminished ability to activate the innate immune response against exogenous (virus-like) RNA, and can be efficiently translated into protein. Synthetic methods have also been developed to produce mRNA with unique investigational properties such as photo-cross-linking, fluorescence emission, and attachment of ligands through click chemistry. Synthetic mRNA has been proven effective in numerous applications beneficial for human health such as immunizing patients against cancer and infections diseases, alleviating diseases by restoring deficient proteins, converting somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells to use in regenerative medicine therapies, and engineering the genome by making specific alterations in DNA. This introductory chapter provides background information relevant to the following 20 chapters of this volume that present protocols for these applications of synthetic mRNA. PMID:27236789

  12. Exaptive origins of regulated mRNA decay in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is extensively controlled at the level of mRNA stability and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are markedly different from their archaeal and bacterial counterparts. We propose that two such mechanisms, nonsense‐mediated decay (NMD) and motif‐specific transcript destabilization by CCCH‐type zinc finger RNA‐binding proteins, originated as a part of cellular defense against RNA pathogens. These branches of the mRNA turnover pathway might have been used by primeval eukaryotes alongside RNA interference to distinguish their own messages from those of RNA viruses and retrotransposable elements. We further hypothesize that the subsequent advent of “professional” innate and adaptive immunity systems allowed NMD and the motif‐triggered mechanisms to be efficiently repurposed for regulation of endogenous cellular transcripts. This scenario explains the rapid emergence of archetypical mRNA destabilization pathways in eukaryotes and argues that other aspects of post‐transcriptional gene regulation in this lineage might have been derived through a similar exaptation route. PMID:27438915

  13. Hypoxia may increase rat insulin mRNA levels by promoting binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich insulin mRNA 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Linda; Welsh, Nils

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent reports identify the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA as crucial for control of insulin messenger stability. This region contains a pyrimidine-rich sequence, which is similar to the hypoxia-responsive mRNA-stabilizing element of tyrosine hydroxylase. This study aimed to determine whether hypoxia affects insulin mRNA levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rat islets were incubated at normoxic or hypoxic conditions and with or without hydrogen peroxide and a nitric oxide donor. Insulin mRNA was determined by Northern hybridization. Islet homogenates were used for electrophoretic mobility shift assay with an RNA-oligonucleotide, corresponding to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of rat insulin I mRNA. The expression of reporter gene mRNA, in islets transfected with reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type or mutated insulin mRNA pyrimidine-rich sequences, was measured by semiquantitive RT-PCR. RESULTS: Insulin mRNA was increased in response to hypoxia. This was paralleled by increased binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA, which was counteracted by hydrogen peroxide. The reporter gene mRNA level containing the wild-type binding site was not increased in response to hypoxia, but mutation of the site resulted in a destabilization of the mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: The complete understanding of different diabetic conditions requires the elucidation of mechanisms that control insulin gene expression. Our data show that hypoxia may increase insulin mRNA levels by promoting the binding of PTB to the insulin mRNA 3'-UTR. Hydrogen peroxide abolishes the hypoxic effect indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species and/or the redox potential in the oxygen-signaling pathway. PMID:12359957

  14. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  15. Altered cell function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    1991-01-01

    The paper overviews published results from investigations of changes in basic biological parameters taking place as a result of spaceflight exposure. These include changes in the rates of the DNA, mRNA, and protein biosyntheses; changes in the growth rate of an organism; and alterations in the cytoskeleton structure, differentiation, hormone accumulation, and collagen matrix secretion. These results, obtained both in complex biological organisms and on cultured cells, suggest that a basic cellular function is influenced and changed by microgravity. Many of the above mentioned changes are also found to take place in aging cells.

  16. Androgen control of secretory component mRNA levels in the rat lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Lambert, R W; Wickham, L A; Banting, G; Sullivan, D A

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the known gender-related differences in, and the endocrine control of, the production of secretory component (SC) by the rat lacrimal gland are associated with alterations in SC mRNA content. Levels of SC mRNA were measured in lacrimal tissues of intact, sham-operated, castrated, hypophysectomized, and testosterone-treated male and female adult rats by Northern blot procedures, which utilized a specific, [alpha-32P]-labelled rat SC cDNA probe. For control purposes, SC mRNA amounts were standardized to the beta-actin content in experimental blots. The location of SC mRNA in lacrimal glands was evaluated by in situ hybridization techniques, which involved exposure of tissue sections to sense or anti-sense [35S]-labelled SC RNA probes. Our results demonstrate that: (1) lacrimal glands of male rats contain a significantly greater amount of SC mRNA than those of female rats, and that this difference co-exists with distinct, gender-associated variations in the distribution of SC mRNA in lacrimal tissue; (2) orchiectomy or hypophysectomy, but not ovariectomy or sham surgery, leads to a marked decline in the lacrimal SC mRNA content; and (3) testosterone, but not placebo, administration to castrated male and female rats induces a significant increase in the SC mRNA levels in lacrimal tissue. Overall, these findings show that gender, androgens and the hypothalamic-pituitary axis exert a considerable influence on the SC mRNA content in the rat lacrimal gland.

  17. Tubular up-regulation of clusterin mRNA in murine lupus-like nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Moll, S.; Menoud, P. A.; French, L.; Sappino, A. P.; Pastore, Y.; Schifferli, J. A.; Izui, S.

    1998-01-01

    Clusterin, a widely distributed glycoprotein, is detected in most tissues and in numerous physiological fluids. In the kidney, this protein is constitutively expressed in tubular epithelial cells, and its expression is enhanced following tubular injuries. In addition, clusterin has been detected in glomerular immune deposits of glomerulonephritis. The present study was designed to define the sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation in murine lupus-like nephritis in comparison with murine tubulopathies. In lupus-like nephritis, a significant increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was demonstrated. This up-regulation was localized exclusively in tubular epithelial cells exhibiting tubulointerstitial alterations, whereas no clusterin mRNA was detectable in diseased glomeruli, excluding an active synthesis of clusterin by glomerular cells. A similar tubular increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was observed in myeloma-like cast nephropathy induced by IgG3 monoclonal cryoglobulins and even in the absence of any detectable histological alterations in a model of septic shock induced by the injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Our results suggest that tubular epithelial cells are the only sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation during the course of lupus-like nephritis and that the tubular up-regulation of clusterin gene expression may reflect the cellular response to various types of tubular injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:9546356

  18. Tubular up-regulation of clusterin mRNA in murine lupus-like nephritis.

    PubMed

    Moll, S; Menoud, P A; French, L; Sappino, A P; Pastore, Y; Schifferli, J A; Izui, S

    1998-04-01

    Clusterin, a widely distributed glycoprotein, is detected in most tissues and in numerous physiological fluids. In the kidney, this protein is constitutively expressed in tubular epithelial cells, and its expression is enhanced following tubular injuries. In addition, clusterin has been detected in glomerular immune deposits of glomerulonephritis. The present study was designed to define the sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation in murine lupus-like nephritis in comparison with murine tubulopathies. In lupus-like nephritis, a significant increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was demonstrated. This up-regulation was localized exclusively in tubular epithelial cells exhibiting tubulointerstitial alterations, whereas no clusterin mRNA was detectable in diseased glomeruli, excluding an active synthesis of clusterin by glomerular cells. A similar tubular increase of clusterin mRNA abundance was observed in myeloma-like cast nephropathy induced by IgG3 monoclonal cryoglobulins and even in the absence of any detectable histological alterations in a model of septic shock induced by the injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Our results suggest that tubular epithelial cells are the only sites of clusterin mRNA accumulation during the course of lupus-like nephritis and that the tubular up-regulation of clusterin gene expression may reflect the cellular response to various types of tubular injuries.

  19. Induction of cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 mRNA expression in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-08-22

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is expressed in vascular endothelial cells and plays a crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the expression of CRIM1 mRNA in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CRIM1 mRNA levels were not altered in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated monolayer HUVECs or in cells in collagen gels without VEGF. In contrast, the expression of CRIM1 mRNA was elevated in VEGF-stimulated cells in collagen gels. The increase in CRIM1 mRNA expression was observed even at 2h when HUVECs did not form tubular structures in collagen gels. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2, Akt and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were activated by VEGF in HUVECs. The VEGF-induced expression of CRIM1 mRNA was significantly abrogated by PD98059 or PF562271, but was not affected by LY294002. These results demonstrate that CRIM1 is an early response gene in the presence of both angiogenic stimulation (VEGF) and environmental (extracellular matrix) factors, and Erk and FAK might be involved in the upregulation of CRIM1 mRNA expression in vascular endothelial cells.

  20. Coupling mRNA Synthesis and Decay

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.—Ecclesiastes 1:9 (New International Version) Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression has an important role in defining the phenotypic characteristics of an organism. Well-defined steps in mRNA metabolism that occur in the nucleus—capping, splicing, and polyadenylation—are mechanistically linked to the process of transcription. Recent evidence suggests another link between RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and a posttranscriptional process that occurs in the cytoplasm—mRNA decay. This conclusion appears to represent a conundrum. How could mRNA synthesis in the nucleus and mRNA decay in the cytoplasm be mechanistically linked? After a brief overview of mRNA processing, we will review the recent evidence for transcription-coupled mRNA decay and the possible involvement of Snf1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, in this process. PMID:25154419

  1. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  2. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization.

  3. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  4. Differential Control of Interleukin-6 mRNA Levels by Cellular Distribution of YB-1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sujin; Lee, Taeyun A.; Ra, Eun A.; Lee, Eunhye; Choi, Hyun jin; Lee, Sungwook; Park, Boyoun

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine production is essential for innate and adaptive immunity against microbial invaders and must be tightly controlled. Cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) is in constant flux between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and in transcription, splicing, or decay; such processes must be tightly controlled. Here, we report a novel function of Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) in modulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in a cell type-specific manner. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages, YB-1 interacts with IL-6 mRNA and actively transports it to the extracellular space by YB-1-enriched vesicles, resulting in the proper maintenance of intracellular IL-6 mRNA levels. YB-1 secretion occurs in a cell type-specific manner. Whereas macrophages actively secret YB-1, dendritic cells maintain it predominantly in the cytoplasm even in response to LPS. Intracellular YB-1 has the distinct function of regulating IL-6 mRNA stability in dendritic cells. Moreover, because LPS differentially regulates the expression of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in macrophages and dendritic cells, this stimulus might control YB-1 acetylation differentially in both cell types. Taken together, these results suggest a unique feature of YB-1 in controlling intracellular IL-6 mRNA levels in a cell type-specific manner, thereby leading to functions that are dependent on the extracellular and intracellular distribution of YB-1. PMID:25398005

  5. Colony-stimulating factor 1 regulates CTP: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Tessner, T G; Rock, C O; Kalmar, G B; Cornell, R B; Jackowski, S

    1991-09-01

    Growth factor regulation of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) metabolism during the G1 stage of the cell cycle was investigated in the colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-dependent murine macrophage cell-line BAC1.2F5. The transient removal of CSF-1 arrested the cells in G1. Incorporation of [3H]choline into PtdCho was stimulated significantly 1 h after growth factor addition to quiescent cells. Metabolic labeling experiments pointed to CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CT) as the rate-controlling enzyme for PtdCho biosynthesis in BAC1.2F5 cells. The amount of CT mRNA increased 4-fold within 15 min of CSF-1 addition and remained elevated for 2 h. The rise in CT mRNA levels was accompanied by a 50% increase in total CT specific activity in cell extracts within 4 h after the addition of CSF-1. CSF-1-dependent elevation of CT mRNA content was neither attenuated nor superinduced by the inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide. The rate of CT mRNA turnover decreased in the presence of CSF-1 indicating that message stabilization was a key factor in determining the levels of CT mRNA. These data point to increased CT mRNA abundance as a component in growth factor-stimulated PtdCho synthesis.

  6. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  7. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  8. Role of miRNAs and alternative mRNA 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation of their mRNA targets in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Soetanto, R; Hynes, C J; Patel, H R; Humphreys, D T; Evers, M; Duan, G; Parker, B J; Archer, S K; Clancy, J L; Graham, R M; Beilharz, T H; Smith, N J; Preiss, T

    2016-05-01

    miRNAs play critical roles in heart disease. In addition to differential miRNA expression, miRNA-mediated control is also affected by variable miRNA processing or alternative 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) of their mRNA targets. To what extent these phenomena play a role in the heart remains unclear. We sought to explore miRNA processing and mRNA APA in cardiomyocytes, and whether these change during cardiac hypertrophy. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) was performed to induce hypertrophy in C57BL/6J mice. RNA extracted from cardiomyocytes of sham-treated, pre-hypertrophic (2 days post-TAC), and hypertrophic (7 days post-TAC) mice was subjected to small RNA- and poly(A)-test sequencing (PAT-Seq). Differential expression analysis matched expectations; nevertheless we identified ~400 mRNAs and hundreds of noncoding RNA loci as altered with hypertrophy for the first time. Although multiple processing variants were observed for many miRNAs, there was little change in their relative proportions during hypertrophy. PAT-Seq mapped ~48,000 mRNA 3'-ends, identifying novel 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) for over 7000 genes. Importantly, hypertrophy was associated with marked changes in APA with a net shift from distal to more proximal mRNA 3'-ends, which is predicted to decrease overall miRNA repression strength. We independently validated several examples of 3'UTR proportion change and showed that alternative 3'UTRs associate with differences in mRNA translation. Our work suggests that APA contributes to altered gene expression with the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and provides a rich resource for a systems-level understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation in physiological and pathological states of the heart. PMID:27032571

  9. The transcription factor ERG recruits CCR4-NOT to control mRNA decay and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Rambout, Xavier; Detiffe, Cécile; Bruyr, Jonathan; Mariavelle, Emeline; Cherkaoui, Majid; Brohée, Sylvain; Demoitié, Pauline; Lebrun, Marielle; Soin, Romuald; Lesage, Bart; Guedri, Katia; Beullens, Monique; Bollen, Mathieu; Farazi, Thalia A; Kettmann, Richard; Struman, Ingrid; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Kruys, Véronique; Simonis, Nicolas; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Dequiedt, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Control of mRNA levels, a fundamental aspect in the regulation of gene expression, is achieved through a balance between mRNA synthesis and decay. E26-related gene (Erg) proteins are canonical transcription factors whose previously described functions are confined to the control of mRNA synthesis. Here, we report that ERG also regulates gene expression by affecting mRNA stability and identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this function in human cells. ERG is recruited to mRNAs via interaction with the RNA-binding protein RBPMS, and it promotes mRNA decay by binding CNOT2, a component of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex. Transcriptome-wide mRNA stability analysis revealed that ERG controls the degradation of a subset of mRNAs highly connected to Aurora signaling, whose decay during S phase is necessary for mitotic progression. Our data indicate that control of gene expression by mammalian transcription factors may follow a more complex scheme than previously anticipated, integrating mRNA synthesis and degradation. PMID:27273514

  10. Analytical and biological considerations in the measurement of cell-associated CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA and protein.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D E; Lai, J P; Tustin, N B; Riedel, E; Tustin, R; Taylor, J; Murray, J; Douglas, S D

    2010-07-01

    The accurate measurement of T cell-associated CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression, including expression of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA as an immune measure of immunologic response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and newer agents, including entry inhibitors, is essential. Previous studies have reported alterations in lymphocyte cell membrane CCR5 expression that were related to blood collection and cell separation media. Clinical trials often require the transport of specimens to central laboratories for evaluation, resulting in significant time delays between specimen procurement and analysis. This study shows that CCR5 expression on naïve and memory T cells is influenced by blood collection media and specimen age. Peripheral blood collected in Streck Vacutainer tubes containing a cell stabilizer and fixative was found to improve detection of CCR5 expression compared to specimens collected in K2 EDTA anticoagulant. The selection of flow cytometry gating strategies for the identification of naïve and memory T-helper cells can also significantly influence the sensitivity of detection of CCR5 expression. Procedural methods are described that allow for the optimal measurement of naïve and memory T-helper cell CCR5 and CXCR4 expression as well as the quantitation of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA.

  11. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  12. Identification and characterization of mutations in the UPF1 gene that affect nonsense suppression and the formation of the Upf protein complex but not mRNA turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Y; Czaplinski, K; Peltz, S W

    1996-01-01

    To understand the relationship between translation and mRNA decay, we have been studying how premature translation termination accelerates the degradation of mRNAs. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Upf1 protein (Upf1p), which contains a cysteine- and histidine-rich region and nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis and helicase motifs, was shown to be a trans-acting factor in this decay pathway. A UPF1 gene disruption results in the stabilization of nonsense-containing mRNAs and leads to a nonsense suppression phenotype. Biochemical analysis of the wild-type Upf1p demonstrated that it has RNA-dependent ATPase, RNA helicase, and RNA binding activities. In the work described in the accompanying paper (Y. Weng, K. Czaplinski, and S. W. Peltz, Mol. Cell. Biol. 16:5477-5490, 1996) mutations in the helicase region of Upf1p that inactivated its mRNA decay function but prevented suppression of leu2-2 and tyr7-1 nonsense alleles are identified. On the basis of these results, we suggested that Upf1p is a multifunctional protein involved in modulating mRNA decay and translation termination at nonsense codons. If this is true, we predict that UPF1 mutations with the converse phenotype should be identified. In this report, we describe the identification and biochemical characterization of mutations in the amino-terminal cysteine- and histidine-rich region of Upf1p that have normal nonsense-mediated mRNA decay activities but are able to suppress leu2-2 and tyr7-1 nonsense alleles. Biochemical characterization of these mutant proteins demonstrated that they have altered RNA binding properties. Furthermore, using the two-hybrid system, we characterized the Upf1p-Upf2p interactions and demonstrated that Upf2p interacts with Upf3p. Mutations in the cysteine- and histidine-rich region of Upf1p abolish Upf1p-Upf2p interaction. On the basis of these results, the role of the Upf complex in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense suppression is discussed. PMID:8816462

  13. Alternative Hfq-sRNA interaction modes dictate alternative mRNA recognition

    PubMed Central

    Schu, Daniel J; Zhang, Aixia; Gottesman, Susan; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria use small RNAs (sRNAs) and the RNA chaperone Hfq to regulate mRNA stability and translation. Hfq, a ring-shaped homohexamer, has multiple faces that can bind both sRNAs and their mRNA targets. We find that Hfq has at least two distinct ways in which it interacts with sRNAs; these different binding properties have strong effects on the stability of the sRNA in vivo and the sequence requirements of regulated mRNAs. Class I sRNAs depend on proximal and rim Hfq sites for stability and turn over rapidly. Class II sRNAs are more stable and depend on the proximal and distal Hfq sites for stabilization. Using deletions and chimeras, we find that while Class I sRNAs regulate mRNA targets with previously defined ARN repeats, Class II sRNAs regulate mRNAs carrying UA-rich rim-binding sites. We discuss how these different binding modes may correlate with different roles in the cell, with Class I sRNAs acting as emergency responders and Class II sRNAs acting as silencers. PMID:26373314

  14. Molecular Determinants of the Axonal mRNA Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cynthia; Merianda, Tanuja T.; Lee, Seung Joon; Yoo, Soonmoon; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal protein synthesis has been shown to play a role in developmental and regenerative growth, as well as in cell body responses to axotomy. Recent studies have begun to identify the protein products that contribute to these autonomous responses of axons. In the peripheral nervous system, intra-axonal protein synthesis has been implicated in the localized in vivo responses to neuropathic stimuli, and there is emerging evidence for protein synthesis in CNS axons in vivo. Despite that hundreds of mRNAs have now been shown to localize into the axonal compartment, knowledge of what RNA binding proteins are responsible for this is quite limited. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of RNA transport mechanisms, and highlight recently uncovered mechanisms for dynamically altering the axonal transcriptome. Both changes in the levels or activities of components of the RNA transport apparatus and alterations in transcription of transported mRNAs can effectively shift the axonal mRNA population. Consistent with this, the axonal RNA population shifts with development, with changes in growth state, and in response to extracellular stimulation. Each of these events must impact the transcriptional and transport apparatuses of the neuron, thus directly and indirectly modifying the axonal transcriptome. PMID:23959706

  15. Acute stress increases neuropsin mRNA expression in the mouse hippocampus through the glucocorticoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akiko; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Komai, Shoji

    2008-05-01

    Stress affects synaptic plasticity and may alter various types of behaviour, including anxiety or memory formation. In the present study, we examined the effects of acute stress (1 h restraint with or without tail-shock) on mRNA levels of a plasticity-related serine protease neuropsin (NP) in the hippocampus using semiquantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We found that NP mRNA expression was dramatically increased shortly after exposure to the acute restraint tail-shock stress and remained at high level for at least 24 h. The level of NP mRNA would be correlated to the elevated plasma concentration of the glucocorticoid corticosterone (CORT) and to the stress intensity. Application of CORT either onto primary cultured hippocampal neurons (5 nM) or in vivo to adrenalectomized (ADX) mice (10 mg/kg B.W., s.c.) mimicked the effect of stress and significantly elevated NP mRNA. These results suggest that the upregulation of NP mRNA after stress is CORT-dependent and point to a role for neuropsin in stress-induced neuronal plasticity.

  16. Amygdala kindling increases fear responses and decreases glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in hippocampal regions.

    PubMed

    Kalynchuk, Lisa E; Meaney, Michael J

    2003-12-01

    Amygdala kindling dramatically increases fearful behavior in rats. Because kindling-induced fear increases in magnitude as rats receive more stimulations, kindling provides an excellent model for studying the nature and neural mechanisms of fear sensitization. In the present experiment, we studied whether the development of kindling-induced fear is related to changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression in various brain regions. Rats received 20, 60 or 100 amygdala kindling stimulations or 100 sham stimulations. One day after the final stimulation, their fearful behavior was assessed in an unfamiliar open field. Then, the rats were sacrificed and their brains were processed for in situ hybridization of GR mRNA expression. We found that compared with the sham-stimulated rats, the rats that received 60 or 100 kindling stimulations were significantly more fearful in the open field and also had significantly less GR mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Importantly, the changes in fearful behavior were significantly correlated with the changes in GR mRNA expression. These results suggest that alterations in GR mRNA expression in hippocampal regions may play a role in the development of kindling-induced fear.

  17. Osteoblast fibronectin mRNA, protein synthesis, and matrix are unchanged after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Gilbertson, V.

    1999-01-01

    The well-defined osteoblast line, MC3T3-E1 was used to examine fibronectin (FN) mRNA levels, protein synthesis, and extracellular FN matrix accumulation after growth activation in spaceflight. These osteoblasts produce FN extracellular matrix (ECM) known to regulate adhesion, differentiation, and function in adherent cells. Changes in bone ECM and osteoblast cell shape occur in spaceflight. To determine whether altered FN matrix is a factor in causing these changes in spaceflight, quiescent osteoblasts were launched into microgravity and were then sera activated with and without a 1-gravity field. Synthesis of FN mRNA, protein, and matrix were measured after activation in microgravity. FN mRNA synthesis is significantly reduced in microgravity (0-G) when compared to ground (GR) osteoblasts flown in a centrifuge simulating earth's gravity (1-G) field 2.5 h after activation. However, 27.5 h after activation there were no significant differences in mRNA synthesis. A small but significant reduction of FN protein was found in the 0-G samples 2.5 h after activation. Total FN protein 27.5 h after activation showed no significant difference between any of the gravity conditions, however, there was a fourfold increase in absolute amount of protein synthesized during the incubation. Using immunofluorescence, we found no significant differences in the amount or in the orientation of the FN matrix after 27.5 h in microgravity. These results demonstrate that FN is made by sera-activated osteoblasts even during exposure to microgravity. These data also suggest that after a total period of 43 h of spaceflight FN transcription, translation, or altered matrix assembly is not responsible for the altered cell shape or altered matrix formation of osteoblasts.

  18. Modulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels by the hepatocellular hydration state.

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, W P; Warskulat, U; Noe, B; Wettstein, M; Stoll, B; Gerok, W; Häussinger, D

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of isolated perfused rat livers to hypo-osmotic (225 mosmol/l) perfusion media for 3 h led to a decrease of about 60% in mRNA levels for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxy-kinase (PEPCK) compared with normo-osmotic (305 mosmol/l) perfusions. Conversely, PEPCK mRNA levels increased about 3-fold during hyperosmotic (385 mosmol/l) perfusions. The anisotonicity effects were not explained by changes in the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration or by changes of the extracellular Na+ or Cl- activity. Similar effects of aniso-osmolarity on PEPCK mRNA levels were found in cultured rat hepatoma H4IIE.C3 cells, the experimental system used for further characterization of the effect. Whereas during the first hour of anisotonic exposure no effects on PEPCK mRNA levels were detectable, near-maximal aniso-osmolarity effects were observed within the next 2-3 h. PEPCK mRNA levels increased sigmoidally with the osmolarity of the medium, and the anisotonicity effects were most pronounced upon modulation of osmolarity between 250 and 350 mosmol/l. The aniso-osmolarity effects on PEPCK mRNA were not affected in presence of Gö 6850, protein kinase C inhibitor. cAMP increased the PEPCK mRNA levels about 2.3-fold in normo-osmotic media, whereas insulin lowered the PEPCK mRNA levels to about 8%. The effects of cAMP and insulin were also observed during hypo-osmotic and hyperosmotic exposure, respectively, but the anisotonicity effects were not abolished in presence of the hormones. The data suggest that hepatocellular hydration affects hepatic carbohydrate metabolism also over a longer term by modulating PEPCK mRNA levels. This is apparently unrelated to protein kinase C or alterations of cAMP levels. The data strengthen the view that cellular hydration is an important determinant for cell metabolic function by extending its regulatory role in carbohydrate metabolism to the level of mRNA. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7998992

  19. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  20. Influenza virus NS1 protein inhibits pre-mRNA splicing and blocks mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Fortes, P; Beloso, A; Ortín, J

    1994-02-01

    The influenza virus RNA segment 8 encodes two proteins, NS1 and NS2, by differential splicing. The collinear transcript acts as mRNA for NS1 protein, while the spliced mRNA encodes NS2 protein. The splicing of NS1 mRNA was studied in cells transfected with a recombinant plasmid that has the cDNA of RNA segment 8 cloned under the SV40 late promoter and polyadenylation signals. As described for influenza virus-infected cells, NS1 mRNA was poorly spliced to yield NS2 mRNA. However, inactivation of the NS1 gene, but not the NS2 gene, led to a substantial increase in the splicing efficiency, as shown by the relative accumulations of NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. This effect was not specific for NS1 mRNA, since the splicing of the endogenous SV40 early transcript was altered in such a way that t-Ag mRNA was almost eliminated. These changes in the splicing pattern coincided with a strong inhibition of the mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport. Both NS1 and NS2 mRNAs were retained in the nucleus of cells expressing NS1 protein, but no effect was observed when only NS2 protein was expressed. Furthermore, other mRNAs tested, such as T-Ag mRNA and the non-spliceable nucleoprotein transcript, were also retained in the nucleus upon expression of NS1 protein, suggesting that it induced a generalized block of mRNA export from the nucleus.

  1. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  2. A ribonucleoprotein complex protects the interleukin-6 mRNA from degradation by distinct herpesviral endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mandy; Hutin, Stephanie; Marigold, Oliver; Li, Kathy H; Burlingame, Al; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2015-05-01

    During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonuclease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs escape SOX-induced cleavage and remain robustly expressed. Prominent among these is interleukin-6 (IL-6), a growth factor important for survival of KSHV infected B cells. IL-6 escape is notable because it contains a sequence within its 3' untranslated region (UTR) that can confer protection when transferred to a SOX-targeted mRNA, and thus overrides the endonuclease targeting mechanism. Here, we pursued how this protective RNA element functions to maintain mRNA stability. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified a set of proteins that associate specifically with the protective element. Although multiple proteins contributed to the escape mechanism, depletion of nucleolin (NCL) most severely impacted protection. NCL was re-localized out of the nucleolus during lytic KSHV infection, and its presence in the cytoplasm was required for protection. After loading onto the IL-6 3' UTR, NCL differentially bound to the translation initiation factor eIF4H. Disrupting this interaction, or depleting eIF4H, reinstated SOX targeting of the RNA, suggesting that interactions between proteins bound to distant regions of the mRNA are important for escape. Finally, we found that the IL-6 3' UTR was also protected against mRNA degradation by the vhs endonuclease encoded by herpes simplex virus, despite the fact that its mechanism of mRNA targeting is distinct from SOX. These findings highlight how a multitude of RNA-protein interactions can impact endonuclease targeting, and identify new features underlying the regulation of the IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25965334

  3. Molecular contacts of ribose-phosphate backbone of mRNA with human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sharifulin, Dmitri E; Grosheva, Anastasia S; Bartuli, Yulia S; Malygin, Alexey A; Meschaninova, Maria I; Ven'yaminova, Aliya G; Stahl, Joachim; Graifer, Dmitri M; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-08-01

    In this work, intimate contacts of riboses of mRNA stretch from nucleotides in positions +3 to +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon were studied using cross-linking of short mRNA analogs with oxidized 3'-terminal riboses bound to human ribosomes in the complexes stabilized by codon-anticodon interactions and in the binary complexes. It was shown that in all types of complexes cross-links of the mRNA analogs to ribosomal protein (rp) uS3 occur and the yield of these cross-links does not depend on the presence of tRNA and on sequences of the mRNA analogs. Site of the mRNA analogs cross-linking in rp uS3 was mapped to the peptide in positions 55-64 that is located away from the mRNA binding site. Additionally, in complexes with P site-bound tRNA, riboses of mRNA nucleotides in positions +4 to +7 cross-linked to the C-terminal tail of rp uS19 displaying a contact specific to the decoding site of the mammalian ribosome, and tRNA bound at the A site completely blocked this cross-linking. Remarkably, rps uS3 and uS19 were also able to cross-link to the fragment of HCV IRES containing unstructured 3'-terminal part restricted by the AUGC tetraplet with oxidized 3'-terminal ribose. However, no cross-linking to rp uS3 was observed in the 48S preinitiation complex assembled in reticulocyte lysate with this HCV IRES derivative. The results obtained show an ability of rp uS3 to interact with single-stranded RNAs. Possible roles of rp uS3 region 55-64 in the functioning of ribosomes are discussed.

  4. Two Seemingly Homologous Noncoding RNAs Act Hierarchically to Activate glmS mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Johannes H; Vogel, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs (sRNA) can function as posttranscriptional activators of gene expression to regulate stress responses and metabolism. We here describe the mechanisms by which two sRNAs, GlmY and GlmZ, activate the Escherichia coli glmS mRNA, coding for an essential enzyme in amino-sugar metabolism. The two sRNAs, although being highly similar in sequence and structure, act in a hierarchical manner. GlmZ, together with the RNA chaperone, Hfq, directly activates glmS mRNA translation by an anti-antisense mechanism. In contrast, GlmY acts upstream of GlmZ and positively regulates glmS by antagonizing GlmZ RNA inactivation. We also report the first example, to our knowledge, of mRNA expression being controlled by the poly(A) status of a chromosomally encoded sRNA. We show that in wild-type cells, GlmY RNA is unstable due to 3′ end polyadenylation; whereas in an E. coli pcnB mutant defective in RNA polyadenylation, GlmY is stabilized and accumulates, which in turn stabilizes GlmZ and causes GlmS overproduction. Our study reveals hierarchical action of two well-conserved sRNAs in a complex regulatory cascade that controls the glmS mRNA. Similar cascades of noncoding RNA regulators may operate in other organisms. PMID:18351803

  5. A Case for Microtubule Vulnerability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Altered Dynamics During Disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jayden A; Yeaman, Elise J; Blizzard, Catherine A; Chuckowree, Jyoti A; Dickson, Tracey C

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an aggressive multifactorial disease converging on a common pathology: the degeneration of motor neurons (MNs), their axons and neuromuscular synapses. This vulnerability and dysfunction of MNs highlights the dependency of these large cells on their intracellular machinery. Neuronal microtubules (MTs) are intracellular structures that facilitate a myriad of vital neuronal functions, including activity dependent axonal transport. In ALS, it is becoming increasingly apparent that MTs are likely to be a critical component of this disease. Not only are disruptions in this intracellular machinery present in the vast majority of seemingly sporadic cases, recent research has revealed that mutation to a microtubule protein, the tubulin isoform TUBA4A, is sufficient to cause a familial, albeit rare, form of disease. In both sporadic and familial disease, studies have provided evidence that microtubule mediated deficits in axonal transport are the tipping point for MN survivability. Axonal transport deficits would lead to abnormal mitochondrial recycling, decreased vesicle and mRNA transport and limited signaling of key survival factors from the neurons peripheral synapses, causing the characteristic peripheral "die back". This disruption to microtubule dependant transport in ALS has been shown to result from alterations in the phenomenon of microtubule dynamic instability: the rapid growth and shrinkage of microtubule polymers. This is accomplished primarily due to aberrant alterations to microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) that regulate microtubule stability. Indeed, the current literature would argue that microtubule stability, particularly alterations in their dynamics, may be the initial driving force behind many familial and sporadic insults in ALS. Pharmacological stabilization of the microtubule network offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in ALS; indeed it has shown promise in many neurological disorders, ALS included

  6. A Case for Microtubule Vulnerability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Altered Dynamics During Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jayden A.; Yeaman, Elise J.; Blizzard, Catherine A.; Chuckowree, Jyoti A.; Dickson, Tracey C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an aggressive multifactorial disease converging on a common pathology: the degeneration of motor neurons (MNs), their axons and neuromuscular synapses. This vulnerability and dysfunction of MNs highlights the dependency of these large cells on their intracellular machinery. Neuronal microtubules (MTs) are intracellular structures that facilitate a myriad of vital neuronal functions, including activity dependent axonal transport. In ALS, it is becoming increasingly apparent that MTs are likely to be a critical component of this disease. Not only are disruptions in this intracellular machinery present in the vast majority of seemingly sporadic cases, recent research has revealed that mutation to a microtubule protein, the tubulin isoform TUBA4A, is sufficient to cause a familial, albeit rare, form of disease. In both sporadic and familial disease, studies have provided evidence that microtubule mediated deficits in axonal transport are the tipping point for MN survivability. Axonal transport deficits would lead to abnormal mitochondrial recycling, decreased vesicle and mRNA transport and limited signaling of key survival factors from the neurons peripheral synapses, causing the characteristic peripheral “die back”. This disruption to microtubule dependant transport in ALS has been shown to result from alterations in the phenomenon of microtubule dynamic instability: the rapid growth and shrinkage of microtubule polymers. This is accomplished primarily due to aberrant alterations to microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) that regulate microtubule stability. Indeed, the current literature would argue that microtubule stability, particularly alterations in their dynamics, may be the initial driving force behind many familial and sporadic insults in ALS. Pharmacological stabilization of the microtubule network offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in ALS; indeed it has shown promise in many neurological disorders, ALS

  7. A Case for Microtubule Vulnerability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Altered Dynamics During Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jayden A.; Yeaman, Elise J.; Blizzard, Catherine A.; Chuckowree, Jyoti A.; Dickson, Tracey C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an aggressive multifactorial disease converging on a common pathology: the degeneration of motor neurons (MNs), their axons and neuromuscular synapses. This vulnerability and dysfunction of MNs highlights the dependency of these large cells on their intracellular machinery. Neuronal microtubules (MTs) are intracellular structures that facilitate a myriad of vital neuronal functions, including activity dependent axonal transport. In ALS, it is becoming increasingly apparent that MTs are likely to be a critical component of this disease. Not only are disruptions in this intracellular machinery present in the vast majority of seemingly sporadic cases, recent research has revealed that mutation to a microtubule protein, the tubulin isoform TUBA4A, is sufficient to cause a familial, albeit rare, form of disease. In both sporadic and familial disease, studies have provided evidence that microtubule mediated deficits in axonal transport are the tipping point for MN survivability. Axonal transport deficits would lead to abnormal mitochondrial recycling, decreased vesicle and mRNA transport and limited signaling of key survival factors from the neurons peripheral synapses, causing the characteristic peripheral “die back”. This disruption to microtubule dependant transport in ALS has been shown to result from alterations in the phenomenon of microtubule dynamic instability: the rapid growth and shrinkage of microtubule polymers. This is accomplished primarily due to aberrant alterations to microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) that regulate microtubule stability. Indeed, the current literature would argue that microtubule stability, particularly alterations in their dynamics, may be the initial driving force behind many familial and sporadic insults in ALS. Pharmacological stabilization of the microtubule network offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in ALS; indeed it has shown promise in many neurological disorders, ALS

  8. CNS development under altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity. In furtherance of this goal, the present studies assessed the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum. Specifically, the expression of selected cerebellar proteins and corresponding genes was compared in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5G) from embryonic day (E) 11 to postnatal day (P) 6 and P9 against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Cerebellar proteins were analyzed by quantitative western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using ribonuclease protection assay (RPA). Densitometric analysis of western blots suggested 21% to 31% reduction in neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and 31% to 45% reduction in glial acidic protein (GFAP). RPA results suggested a small reduction (<10%) in NCAM mRNA and a moderate reduction (<25%) in GFAP mRNA. These data indicate that the expression of selected cerebellar proteins may be affected at both the transcriptional and translational/postranslational level. Furthermore, these results suggest that changes in expression of selected genes may underlie hypergravity's effect on the developing CNS. (Supported by NASA grant NCC2-1042 and BWH Psychiatry Fund).

  9. Decrease in class pi glutathione transferase mRNA levels by ultraviolet irradiation of cultured rat keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, H; Kimura, J; Kumano, T; Hanada, K; Satoh, K; Hashimoto, I; Tsuchida, S

    1997-11-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) B irradiation on pi class glutathione transferase (GST-P) gene expression was examined in cultured rat keratinocytes. Immunoblotting demonstrated GST-P to be the major GST form in the cells, and it was significantly decreased following irradiation. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA decreased to 10-25% of the initial value 24 h after irradiation at a dose of 40 mJ/cm2. No remarkable changes were observed at earlier time points. Hydrogen peroxide treatment enhanced GST-P mRNA expression, with a 70% increase at 250 microM concentration. Alterations in possible trans-acting factors were examined to clarify the mechanism of repression by UV irradiation. c-Jun mRNA was induced 3.5-fold at 4 h after irradiation, but by 24 h fell to a lower level than that observed initially. c-Fos mRNA was increased 10-fold at 1 h but was completely suppressed at 12 and 24 h. Thus, the changes of c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA differed from that of GST-P mRNA. The level of mRNA for silencer factor-B was decreased to less than 10% at 12 h. UV irradiation of cells transfected with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene containing enhancer (GPE I) or silencer regions of the GST-P gene did not suppress CAT activity. Although basal expression of the GST-P gene was mainly dependent on GPE I, altered expression of c-jun, c-fos and other genes coding for factors possibly trans-acting on GPE I did not appear to be responsible for the decreased GST-P mRNA levels.

  10. Distinct regulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) expression at mRNA and peptide levels in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Agoston, D V; Colburn, S; Krajniak, K G; Waschek, J A

    1992-05-25

    Neuronal differentiation was induced in cultures of the human neuroblastoma cell line subclone SH-SY5Y by 14-day treatment with dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP), retinoic acid, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). An approximate 4-fold increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with retinoic acid, whereas no change in VIP mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with dBcAMP or PMA. A short-term treatment of cells with PMA did however result in a 5-fold transient increase in VIP mRNA; prior differentiation with retinoic acid or dBcAMP diminished this effect. Observed increases in VIP mRNA were in all cases accompanied by increases in VIP immunoreactivity. Remarkably, however, long-term treatment of cells with dBcAMP, which caused no change in mRNA levels, resulted in a six-fold increase in VIP immunoreactivity. Acute (36-h) treatment with carbachol also caused an increase in VIP immunoreactivity (about 2-fold, and blocked by atropine) without an increase in VIP mRNA level. Thus, a quantitative change in gene transcription or mRNA stability appears not to be a prerequisite for increased VIP expression, indicating that regulation can occur at translational or post-translational steps.

  11. Dual Posttranscriptional Regulation via a Cofactor-Responsive mRNA Leader

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting mRNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Recently, a class of riboswitches was proposed to respond to the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), which serves as a redox center for metabolic enzymes. The 5′ leader of the Escherichia coli moaABCDE transcript exemplifies this candidate riboswitch class. This mRNA encodes enzymes for Moco biosynthesis, and moaA expression is feedback inhibited by Moco. Previous RNA-seq analyses showed that moaA mRNA copurified with the RNA binding protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator), suggesting that CsrA binds to this RNA in vivo. Among its global regulatory roles, CsrA represses stationary phase metabolism and activates central carbon metabolism. Here, we used gel mobility shift analysis to determine that CsrA binds specifically and with high affinity to the moaA 5′ mRNA leader. Northern blotting and studies with a series of chromosomal lacZ reporter fusions showed that CsrA posttranscriptionally activates moaA expression without altering moaA mRNA levels, indicative of translation control. Deletion analyses, nucleotide replacement studies and footprinting with CsrA-FeBABE identified two sites for CsrA binding. Toeprinting assays suggested that CsrA binding causes changes in moaA RNA structure. We propose that the moaA mRNA leader forms an aptamer, which serves as a target of posttranscriptional regulation by at least two different factors, Moco and the protein CsrA. While we are not aware of similar dual posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, additional examples are likely to emerge. PMID:23274138

  12. Alterations in peripheral blood lymphocyte cytokine expression in obesity

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, R W; Kay, T; Lyle, E A; Traxler, S A; Deveney, C W; Jobe, B A; Roberts, C T; Marks, D; Rosenbaum, J T

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by alterations in immune and inflammatory function. In order to evaluate the potential role of cytokine expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in obesity-associated inflammation, we studied serum protein levels and mRNA levels in PBMC of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1Ra in nine lean and 10 obese subjects. Serum IL-1β was undetectable, IL-1Ra serum levels were elevated, serum levels of TNF-α were decreased and serum levels of IL-6 were similar in obese subjects compared to lean subjects, while transcript levels of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α, but not IL-1Ra, were decreased in PBMC from obese subjects. PBMC from obese subjects did, however, up-regulate cytokine expression in response to leptin. Thus, obesity-associated changes in IL-1Ra serum levels and IL-6 mRNA levels were not correlated with changes in cognate mRNA and serum levels, respectively, while TNF-α serum levels and PBMC mRNA levels were both decreased in obese patients. While immune alterations in obesity are manifest in peripheral blood lymphocytes, the general lack of correlation between altered serum levels and altered PBMC gene expression suggests that PBMC may not be the source of aberrant serum cytokine levels in obesity. PMID:16968396

  13. Protein kinase A alterations in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ragazzon, B; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J

    2012-09-01

    Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Since protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway, studies of the alterations of PKA subunits in endocrine tumors reveal new aspects of the mechanisms of cAMP pathway alterations in human diseases. So far, most alterations have been observed for the regulatory subunits, mainly PRKAR1A and to a lower extent, PRKAR2B. One of the best examples of such alteration today is the multiple neoplasia syndrome Carney complex (CNC). The most common endocrine gland manifestations of CNC are pituitary GH-secreting adenomas, thyroid tumors, testicular tumors, and ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) are observed in about two-third of CNC patients, and also in patients with isolated PPNAD. PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic endocrine tumors. More than 120 different PRKAR1A mutations have been found today. Most of them lead to an unstable mutant mRNA, which will be degraded by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. In vitro and in vivo functional studies are in progress to understand the mechanisms of endocrine tumor development due to PKA regulatory subunits inactivation. PRKAR1A mutations stimulate in most models PKA activity, mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. Cross-talks with other signaling pathways summarized in this review have been described and might participate in endocrine tumorigenesis. PMID:22752956

  14. Final report: FASEB Summer Research Conference on ''Post-transcriptional control of gene expression: Effectors of mRNA decay'' [agenda and attendees list

    SciTech Connect

    Maquat, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this meeting was to provide an interactive forum for scientists working on prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decay. A special seminar presented by a leader in the field of mRNA decay in S. cerevisiae focused on what is known and what needs to be determined, not only for yeast but for other organisms. The large attendance (110 participants) reflects the awareness that mRNA decay is a key player in gene regulation in a way that is affected by the many steps that precede mRNA formation. Sessions were held on the following topics: mRNA transport and mRNP; multicomponent eukaryotic nucleases; nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense-associated altered splicing; Cis-acting sequences/Trans-acting factors of mRNA decay; translational accuracy; multicomponent bacterial nucleases; interplay between mRNA polyadenylation, translation and decay in prokaryotes and prokaryotic organelles; and RNA interference and other RNA mediators of gene expression. In addition to the talks and two poster sessions, there were three round tables: (1) Does translation occur in the nucleus? (2) Differences and similarities in the mechanisms of mRNA decay in different eukaryotes, and (3) RNA surveillance in bacteria?

  15. Discordant regulation of hepatic IGF-I mRNA and circulating IGF-I during compensatory growth in a teleost, the hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysopsxMorone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Picha, Matthew E; Silverstein, Jeffrey T; Borski, Russell J

    2006-06-01

    Compensatory growth (CG) is a period of growth that exceeds normal rates after animals are alleviated of certain growth-stunting conditions. Little is known, however, about the endocrine control of CG in teleosts. So, our aim was to induce CG in juvenile hybrid striped bass (HSB, Morone chrysopsxMorone saxatilis) through manipulations in feeding regimen, and then determine whether changes in circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and hepatic IGF-I gene expression accompany the CG response. A considerable catabolic state was induced in HSB fed a total of two times over 4 weeks (once each in the 2nd and 3rd week). Negative energy balance was evidenced through weight loss (-3.4% BW) and a significant drop in hepatosomatic index (HSI) from a value of 3.71 to 1.46. Upon realimentation, in which HSB were fed ad libitum 2x/day, a significant CG response was observed over a 4-week period. The CG response was characterized by an elevated specific growth rate, hyperphagia, restoration of the HSI and an improvement in feed conversion, all relative to controls that were fed ad libitum 2x/day throughout the experiment. Moreover, the CG response and catabolic state preceding it were marked by a discordant regulation in the expression of hepatic IGF-I mRNA and plasma IGF-I levels, the latter parameter paralleling changes in growth (r(2)=0.56, P<001). The catabolic state was accompanied by an 82% increase in hepatic IGF-I mRNA while levels of plasma IGF-I were significantly depressed relative to controls. During the subsequent CG response, however, hepatic IGF-I mRNA decreased by 61% while plasma IGF-I increased by 86%. The underlying mechanisms for this inverse regulation of hepatic IGF-I mRNA and circulating IGF-I are uncertain, but may reflect alterations in hepatic IGF-I mRNA production, stability, and translation such that hepatic IGF-I mRNA is accumulated during periods of catabolism and then rapidly translated and released into circulation when conditions improve

  16. Quantitative studies of mRNA recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The process of peptide bond synthesis by ribosomes is conserved between species, but the initiation step differs greatly between the three kingdoms of life. This is illustrated by the evolution of roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factor mass found in humans compared with bacteria. Eukaryotic initiation of translation is comprised of a number of sub-steps: (i) recruitment of an mRNA and initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit; (ii) migration of the 40S subunit along the 5' UTR to locate the initiation codon; and (iii) recruitment of the 60S subunit to form the 80S initiation complex. Although the mechanism and regulation of initiation has been studied for decades, many aspects of the pathway remain unclear. In this review, I will focus discussion on what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection and its recruitment to the 40S subunit. I will summarize how the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) is formed and stabilized by interactions between its components. I will discuss what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and how the selected mRNA is recruited to the 43S PIC. The regulation of this process by secondary structure located in the 5' UTR of an mRNA will also be discussed. Finally, I present a possible kinetic model with which to explain the process of mRNA selection and recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome.

  17. Quantitative studies of mRNA recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of peptide bond synthesis by ribosomes is conserved between species, but the initiation step differs greatly between the three kingdoms of life. This is illustrated by the evolution of roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factor mass found in humans compared with bacteria. Eukaryotic initiation of translation is comprised of a number of sub-steps: (i) recruitment of an mRNA and initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit; (ii) migration of the 40S subunit along the 5′ UTR to locate the initiation codon; and (iii) recruitment of the 60S subunit to form the 80S initiation complex. Although the mechanism and regulation of initiation has been studied for decades, many aspects of the pathway remain unclear. In this review, I will focus discussion on what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection and its recruitment to the 40S subunit. I will summarize how the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) is formed and stabilized by interactions between its components. I will discuss what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and how the selected mRNA is recruited to the 43S PIC. The regulation of this process by secondary structure located in the 5′ UTR of an mRNA will also be discussed. Finally, I present a possible kinetic model with which to explain the process of mRNA selection and recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome. PMID:25742741

  18. Identification of European starling GnRH-I precursor mRNA and its seasonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Cadigan, Penelope A; Wang, Ariel; Liu, Jennifer; Bentley, George E

    2009-07-01

    Songbirds show dynamic seasonal changes in their reproductive activities during the year. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) is critical for the control of reproduction in vertebrates. The molecular mechanisms controlling reproduction are not well understood in songbirds, largely because the GnRH-I precursor polypeptide gene was unknown until now. Here, we report the complete sequence and seasonal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA in a songbird, European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). The translated starling GnRH-I precursor polypeptide contained an amino acid sequence that can be processed into chicken GnRH-I peptide (pEHWSYGLQPG-NH(2)). However, the overall homology of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide (including a 23 amino acid signal peptide, the decapeptide hormone and Gly-Lys-Arg cleavage site followed by 55 amino acid GnRH-associated peptide sequences) between starling and chicken was only 58%. GnRH-I mRNA and GnRH-I peptide were observed to be co-localized in the preoptic area of sexually mature birds using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. GnRH-I mRNA exhibited large variance in photosensitive birds, and converged to a high level in photostimulated birds. Subsequently, GnRH-I mRNA decreased to below detectability in most of the photorefractory birds. Changes were also observed in GnRH-I peptide levels, although changes in GnRH-I peptide were not as marked. Our data indicate that GnRH-I mRNA synthesis commences but is variable in photosensitive birds, stabilizes in photostimulated birds, then ceases when birds become photorefractory. Finer-scale investigation into temporal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA will provide insight into its regulation by environmental, social and physiological cues. PMID:19362556

  19. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-Von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2011-11-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex-associated protein/elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase WT IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine whether oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was tolerable, we administered kinetin to eight FD individuals homozygous for the splice mutation. Subjects received 23.5 mg/Kg/d for 28 d. An increase in WT IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes was noted after 8 d in six of eight individuals; after 28 d, the mean increase compared with baseline was significant (p = 0.002). We have demonstrated that kinetin is tolerable in this medically fragile population. Not only did kinetin produce the desired effect on splicing in FD patients but also that effect seems to improve with time despite lack of dose change. This is the first report of a drug that produces in vivo mRNA splicing changes in individuals with FD and supports future long-term trials to determine whether kinetin will prove therapeutic in FD patients. PMID:21775922

  20. Specialized yeast ribosomes: a customized tool for selective mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johann W; Brandl, Clemens; Haubenreisser, Olaf; Wimmer, Bjoern; Weber, Manuela; Karl, Thomas; Klausegger, Alfred; Breitenbach, Michael; Hintner, Helmut; von der Haar, Tobias; Tuite, Mick F; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is now accumulating that sub-populations of ribosomes - so-called specialized ribosomes - can favour the translation of subsets of mRNAs. Here we use a large collection of diploid yeast strains, each deficient in one or other copy of the set of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, to generate eukaryotic cells carrying distinct populations of altered 'specialized' ribosomes. We show by comparative protein synthesis assays that different heterologous mRNA reporters based on luciferase are preferentially translated by distinct populations of specialized ribosomes. These mRNAs include reporters carrying premature termination codons (PTC) thus allowing us to identify specialized ribosomes that alter the efficiency of translation termination leading to enhanced synthesis of the wild-type protein. This finding suggests that these strains can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets in the ribosome. To explore this further we examined the translation of the mRNA encoding the extracellular matrix protein laminin β3 (LAMB3) since a LAMB3-PTC mutant is implicated in the blistering skin disease Epidermolysis bullosa (EB). This screen identified specialized ribosomes with reduced levels of RP L35B as showing enhanced synthesis of full-length LAMB3 in cells expressing the LAMB3-PTC mutant. Importantly, the RP L35B sub-population of specialized ribosomes leave both translation of a reporter luciferase carrying a different PTC and bulk mRNA translation largely unaltered.

  1. PABPN1-Dependent mRNA Processing Induces Muscle Wasting.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Raz, Yotam; van Putten, Maaike; Paniagua-Soriano, Guillem; Krom, Yvonne D; Florea, Bogdan I; Raz, Vered

    2016-05-01

    Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is a multifunctional regulator of mRNA processing, and its expression levels specifically decline in aging muscles. An expansion mutation in PABPN1 is the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy (OPMD), a late onset and rare myopathy. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 expression correlates with symptom manifestation in OPMD. PABPN1 regulates alternative polyadenylation site (PAS) utilization. However, the impact of PAS utilization on cell and tissue function is poorly understood. We hypothesized that altered PABPN1 expression levels is an underlying cause of muscle wasting. To test this, we stably down-regulated PABPN1 in mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by localized injection of adeno-associated viruses expressing shRNA to PABPN1 (shPab). We found that a mild reduction in PABPN1 levels causes muscle pathology including myofiber atrophy, thickening of extracellular matrix and myofiber-type transition. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 levels caused a consistent decline in distal PAS utilization in the 3'-UTR of a subset of OPMD-dysregulated genes. This alternative PAS utilization led to up-regulation of Atrogin-1, a key muscle atrophy regulator, but down regulation of proteasomal genes. Additionally reduced PABPN1 levels caused a reduction in proteasomal activity, and transition in MyHC isotope expression pattern in myofibers. We suggest that PABPN1-mediated alternative PAS utilization plays a central role in aging-associated muscle wasting.

  2. PABPN1-Dependent mRNA Processing Induces Muscle Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; van Putten, Maaike; Paniagua-Soriano, Guillem; Krom, Yvonne D.; Florea, Bogdan I.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) is a multifunctional regulator of mRNA processing, and its expression levels specifically decline in aging muscles. An expansion mutation in PABPN1 is the genetic cause of oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy (OPMD), a late onset and rare myopathy. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 expression correlates with symptom manifestation in OPMD. PABPN1 regulates alternative polyadenylation site (PAS) utilization. However, the impact of PAS utilization on cell and tissue function is poorly understood. We hypothesized that altered PABPN1 expression levels is an underlying cause of muscle wasting. To test this, we stably down-regulated PABPN1 in mouse tibialis anterior (TA) muscles by localized injection of adeno-associated viruses expressing shRNA to PABPN1 (shPab). We found that a mild reduction in PABPN1 levels causes muscle pathology including myofiber atrophy, thickening of extracellular matrix and myofiber-type transition. Moreover, reduced PABPN1 levels caused a consistent decline in distal PAS utilization in the 3’-UTR of a subset of OPMD-dysregulated genes. This alternative PAS utilization led to up-regulation of Atrogin-1, a key muscle atrophy regulator, but down regulation of proteasomal genes. Additionally reduced PABPN1 levels caused a reduction in proteasomal activity, and transition in MyHC isotope expression pattern in myofibers. We suggest that PABPN1-mediated alternative PAS utilization plays a central role in aging-associated muscle wasting. PMID:27152426

  3. New insights on the role of epigenetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Frau, Maddalena; Feo, Claudio F; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence assigns to epigenetic mechanisms heritable differences in gene function that come into being during cell development or via the effect of environmental factors. Epigenetic deregulation is strongly involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It includes changes in methionine metabolism, promoter hypermethylation, or increased proteasomal degradation of oncosuppressors, as well as posttranscriptional deregulation by microRNA or messenger RNA (mRNA) binding proteins. Alterations in the methylation of the promoter of methyl adenosyltransferase MAT1A and MAT2A genes in HCC result in decreased S-adenosylmethionine levels, global DNA hypomethylation, and deregulation of signal transduction pathways linked to methionine metabolism and methyl adenosyltransferases activity. Changes in S-adenosylmethionine levels may also depend on MAT1A mRNA destabilization associated with MAT2A mRNA stabilization by specific proteins. Decrease in MAT1A expression has also been attributed to miRNA upregulation in HCC. A complex deregulation of miRNAs is also strongly involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, with up-regulation of different miRNAs targeting oncosuppressor genes and down-regulation of miRNAs targeting genes involved in cell-cycle and signal transduction control. Oncosuppressor gene down-regulation in HCC is also induced by promoter hypermethylation or posttranslational deregulation, leading to proteasomal degradation. The role of epigenetic changes in hepatocarcinogenesis has recently suggested new promising therapeutic approaches for HCC on the basis of the administration of methylating agents, inhibition of methyl adenosyltransferases, and restoration of the expression of tumor-suppressor miRNAs. PMID:27508177

  4. Exogenous somatotropin alters IGF axis in porcine endometrium and placenta.

    PubMed

    Freese, L G; Rehfeldt, C; Fuerbass, R; Kuhn, G; Okamura, C S; Ender, K; Grant, A L; Gerrard, D E

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether exogenous somatotropin (ST) can alter the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis in the porcine epitheliochorial placenta. Crossbred gilts were injected either 6 mg of recombinant porcine ST or vehicle from days 10 to 27 after artificial insemination (term day 116). Control and ST-treated gilts were euthanized on day 28 (8 control/5 treated), day 37 (4 control/6 treated), and day 62 (4 control/6 treated) of gestation. Endometrium and placental tissue samples were collected and subjected to mRNA analyses. In control gilts, somatotropin receptor (STR) and IGF-I mRNA abundance in the endometrium decreased with gestation. Conversely, the amounts of IGF-II mRNA and of IGF binding protein (BP)-2 and -3 mRNA, which were analyzed in endometrium and placental chorion, increased with gestation. The endometrium contained less IGF-II mRNA but more IGFBP-2 and-3 mRNA than the placental chorion. In response to pST treatment, the amounts of endometrial STR and IGF-I mRNA were lower at days 28 and 37, but higher at day 62 of gestation. The content of IGF-II mRNA was higher in the endometrium of pST-treated than control gilts on day 37. The amount of IGFBP-2 mRNA was increased on day 37 in endometrium and placenta of pST-treated gilts, whereas no changes in IGFBP-3 mRNA were observed. The IGF-II/IGFBP-2 ratio was higher in the placenta in response to pST on day 28 of gestation. Results show that pST treatment of pregnant gilts during early gestation alters IGF axis in maternal and fetal placental tissues and suggest pST may exert an effect on fetal growth by altering the relative amount of IGFBPs and IGFs at the fetal-maternal interface.

  5. Chronic social subordination stress modulates glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits

    PubMed Central

    Makinson, Ryan; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Seroogy, Kim B.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic social subordination is a well-known precipitant of numerous psychiatric and physiological health concerns. In this study, we examine the effects of chronic social stress in the visible burrow system (VBS) on the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) mRNA in forebrain stress circuitry. Male rats in the VBS system form a dominance hierarchy, whereby subordinate males exhibit neuroendocrine and physiological profiles characteristic of chronic exposure to stress. We found that social subordination decreases GAD67 mRNA in the peri-paraventricular nucleus region of the hypothalamus and the interfascicular nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and increases in GAD67 mRNA in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and dorsal medial hypothalamus. Expression of BDNF mRNA increased in the dorsal region of the BNST, but remained unchanged in all other regions examined. Results from this study indicate that social subordination is associated with several region-specific alterations in GAD67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits, whereas changes in the expression of BDNF mRNA are limited to the BNST. PMID:26066725

  6. Recent innovations in mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines are being developed as a means to combine the positive attributes of both live-attenuated and subunit vaccines. Viral vectors and plasmid DNA vaccines have been extensively evaluated in human clinical trials and have been shown to be safe and immunogenic, although none have yet been licensed for human use. Recently, mRNA based vaccines have emerged as an alternative approach. They promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines, without the need for electroporation, but with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. In addition, they avoid the limitations of anti-vector immunity seen with viral vectors, and can be dosed repeatedly. This review highlights the key papers published over the past few years and summarizes prospects for the near future.

  7. Effects of simulated microgravity on microRNA and mRNA expression profile of rat soleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongjie; Wu, Feng; Cao, Hongqing; Kan, Guanghan; Zhang, Hongyu; Yeung, Ella W.; Shang, Peng; Dai, Zhongquan; Li, Yinghui

    2015-02-01

    Spaceflight induces muscle atrophy but mechanism is not well understood. Here, we quantified microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNA shifts of rat soleus in response to microgravity. MiRNAs and mRNA microarray of soleus after tail suspension (TS) for 7 and 14 days were performed followed by target gene and function annotation analysis and qRT-PCR. Relative muscle mass lost by 37.0% in TS-7 but less than 10% in the following three weeks. TS altered 23 miRNAs and 1313 mRNAs with at least 2-fold. QRT-PCR confirmed some of these changes. MiR-214, miR-486-5p and miR-221 continuously decreased. MiR-674 and Let-7e decreased only in TS-7, while miR-320b and miR-187 decreased only in TS-14. But there was no alteration of miR-320 and miR-206 in both time point. For mRNA detection, actn3 (5.1-fold and 13.8-fold) and myh4 (38-fold and 51.6-fold) increased abundantly and a3galt2 decreased. Predicted targeted genes (whyz, ywhaz and SFRP2) of altered miRNAs decreased. GO terms and cellular pathway of these alteration showed enrichment in regulation of muscle metabolism. Integration analysis of the miRNA and mRNA expression profiles confirmed that eleven genes were differently regulated by four miRNAs. This is the first study that showed expression pattern and synergistical regulation of miRNA and mRNA in rat soleus of TS for up to 14 days.

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of satellite cell quiescence by TTP-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Hausburg, Melissa A; Doles, Jason D; Clement, Sandra L; Cadwallader, Adam B; Hall, Monica N; Blackshear, Perry J; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Olwin, Bradley B

    2015-03-27

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells in their niche are quiescent and upon muscle injury, exit quiescence, proliferate to repair muscle tissue, and self-renew to replenish the satellite cell population. To understand the mechanisms involved in maintaining satellite cell quiescence, we identified gene transcripts that were differentially expressed during satellite cell activation following muscle injury. Transcripts encoding RNA binding proteins were among the most significantly changed and included the mRNA decay factor Tristetraprolin. Tristetraprolin promotes the decay of MyoD mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional regulator of myogenic commitment, via binding to the MyoD mRNA 3' untranslated region. Upon satellite cell activation, p38α/β MAPK phosphorylates MAPKAP2 and inactivates Tristetraprolin, stabilizing MyoD mRNA. Satellite cell specific knockdown of Tristetraprolin precociously activates satellite cells in vivo, enabling MyoD accumulation, differentiation and cell fusion into myofibers. Regulation of mRNAs by Tristetraprolin appears to function as one of several critical post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms controlling satellite cell homeostasis.

  9. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA by the Microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsun; Seong, Youngmo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Song, Hoseok

    2014-03-28

    Aurora kinase B regulates the segregation of chromosomes and the spindle checkpoint during mitosis. In this study, we showed that the Microprocessor complex, which is responsible for the processing of the primary transcripts during the generation of microRNAs, destabilizes the mRNA of Aurora kinase B in human cells. The Microprocessor-mediated cleavage kept Aurora kinase B at a low level and prevented premature entrance into mitosis. The cleavage was reduced during mitosis leading to the accumulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA and protein. In addition to Aurora kinase B mRNA, the processing of other primary transcripts of miRNAs were also decreased during mitosis. We found that the cleavage was dependent on an RNA helicase, DDX5, and the association of DDX5 and DDX17 with the Microprocessor was reduced during mitosis. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism by which the Microprocessor complex regulates stability of Aurora kinase B mRNA and cell cycle progression.

  10. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-­turn motif that also occurs in the ‘off’ state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA. PMID:21245530

  11. Neutrophil-derived alpha defensins control inflammation by inhibiting macrophage mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Brook, Matthew; Tomlinson, Gareth H; Miles, Katherine; Smith, Richard W P; Rossi, Adriano G; Hiemstra, Pieter S; van 't Wout, Emily F A; Dean, Jonathan L E; Gray, Nicola K; Lu, Wuyuan; Gray, Mohini

    2016-04-19

    Neutrophils are the first and most numerous cells to arrive at the site of an inflammatory insult and are among the first to die. We previously reported that alpha defensins, released from apoptotic human neutrophils, augmented the antimicrobial capacity of macrophages while also inhibiting the biosynthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. In vivo, alpha defensin administration protected mice from inflammation, induced by thioglychollate-induced peritonitis or following infection withSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium. We have now dissected the antiinflammatory mechanism of action of the most abundant neutrophil alpha defensin, Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 (HNP1). Herein we show that HNP1 enters macrophages and inhibits protein translation without inducing the unfolded-protein response or affecting mRNA stability. In a cell-free in vitro translation system, HNP1 powerfully inhibited both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation while maintaining mRNA polysomal association. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a peptide released from one cell type (neutrophils) directly regulating mRNA translation in another (macrophages). By preventing protein translation, HNP1 functions as a "molecular brake" on macrophage-driven inflammation, ensuring both pathogen clearance and the resolution of inflammation with minimal bystander tissue damage. PMID:27044108

  12. Pseudouridine profiling reveals regulated mRNA pseudouridylation in yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Thomas M; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Zinshteyn, Boris; Shin, Hakyung; Bartoli, Kristen M; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2014-11-01

    Post-transcriptional modification of RNA nucleosides occurs in all living organisms. Pseudouridine, the most abundant modified nucleoside in non-coding RNAs, enhances the function of transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA by stabilizing the RNA structure. Messenger RNAs were not known to contain pseudouridine, but artificial pseudouridylation dramatically affects mRNA function--it changes the genetic code by facilitating non-canonical base pairing in the ribosome decoding centre. However, without evidence of naturally occurring mRNA pseudouridylation, its physiological relevance was unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of pseudouridylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human RNAs using Pseudo-seq, a genome-wide, single-nucleotide-resolution method for pseudouridine identification. Pseudo-seq accurately identifies known modification sites as well as many novel sites in non-coding RNAs, and reveals hundreds of pseudouridylated sites in mRNAs. Genetic analysis allowed us to assign most of the new modification sites to one of seven conserved pseudouridine synthases, Pus1-4, 6, 7 and 9. Notably, the majority of pseudouridines in mRNA are regulated in response to environmental signals, such as nutrient deprivation in yeast and serum starvation in human cells. These results suggest a mechanism for the rapid and regulated rewiring of the genetic code through inducible mRNA modifications. Our findings reveal unanticipated roles for pseudouridylation and provide a resource for identifying the targets of pseudouridine synthases implicated in human disease.

  13. Pseudouridine profiling reveals regulated mRNA pseudouridylation in yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlile, Thomas M.; Rojas-Duran, Maria F.; Zinshteyn, Boris; Shin, Hakyung; Bartoli, Kristen M.; Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification of RNA nucleosides occurs in all living organisms. Pseudouridine, the most abundant modified nucleoside in non-coding RNAs1, enhances the function of transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA by stabilizing RNA structure2–8. mRNAs were not known to contain pseudouridine, but artificial pseudouridylation dramatically affects mRNA function – it changes the genetic code by facilitating non-canonical base pairing in the ribosome decoding center9,10. However, without evidence of naturally occurring mRNA pseudouridylation, its physiological was unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of pseudouridylation in yeast and human RNAs using Pseudo-seq, a genome-wide, single-nucleotide-resolution method for pseudouridine identification. Pseudo-seq accurately identifies known modification sites as well as 100 novel sites in non-coding RNAs, and reveals hundreds of pseudouridylated sites in mRNAs. Genetic analysis allowed us to assign most of the new modification sites to one of seven conserved pseudouridine synthases, Pus1–4, 6, 7 and 9. Notably, the majority of pseudouridines in mRNA are regulated in response to environmental signals, such as nutrient deprivation in yeast and serum starvation in human cells. These results suggest a mechanism for the rapid and regulated rewiring of the genetic code through inducible mRNA modifications. Our findings reveal unanticipated roles for pseudouridylation and provide a resource for identifying the targets of pseudouridine synthases implicated in human disease11–13. PMID:25192136

  14. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  15. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament rupture on the timing and amplitude of gastrocnemius muscle activation: a study of alterations in EMG measures and their relationship to knee joint stability.

    PubMed

    Klyne, David M; Keays, Susan L; Bullock-Saxton, Joanne E; Newcombe, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    Changes in hamstring and quadriceps activity are well known in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD) to potentially compensate for knee joint instability. However, few studies have explored gastrocnemius activity or its relationship to knee stability. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the activation characteristics of medial gastrocnemius (MG) in ACLD subjects and relate any changes to knee joint laxity. Two subject cohorts were assessed: those with unilateral ACLD (n=15) and uninjured control subjects (n=11). Surface EMG of the left and right MG were recorded during a controlled single leg hop on each limb. Onset and offset of MG activation relative to take-off, during flight and landing were calculated as well as muscle activity (RMS). Passive antero-posterior knee laxity was measured with a KT1000 arthrometer during a maximal manual displacement test. Medial gastrocnemius activity on the injured side of ACLD participants demonstrated significantly prolonged activation in preparation to hop, minimal muscle inactivity prior to take-off, and increased duration of overall muscle activity when compared to the uninjured side and control subjects (p<0.05). Significant positive correlations were found between passive knee joint laxity and prolonged activation prior to knee bend. RMS of the muscle signal was not significantly different between limbs. Overall, MG on the ACLD side demonstrated longer activation, with minimal rest during the hop test, which may be an attempt to maintain knee stability. Furthermore, the strong relationship between knee laxity and prolonged muscle activation suggests that individuals with a loss of knee stability are more reliant on active control of the gastrocnemius muscle.

  16. Incorporating alternative splicing and mRNA editing into the genetic analysis of complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Musa A.; Saeij, Jeroen P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The nomination of candidate genes underlying complex traits is often focused on genetic variations that alter mRNA abundance or result in non-conservative changes in amino acids. Although inconspicuous in complex trait analysis, genetic variants that affect splicing or RNA editing can also generate proteomic diversity and impact genetic traits. Indeed it is known that splicing and RNA editing modulate several traits in humans and model organisms. Using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, it is now possible to integrate the genetics of transcript abundance, alternative splicing and editing with the analysis of complex traits. We recently demonstrated that both alternative splicing and mRNA editing are modulated by genetic and environmental factors, and potentially engender phenotypic diversity in a genetically segregating mouse population. Therefore, the analysis of splicing and RNA editing will expand not only the regulatory landscape of transcriptome and proteome complexity, but also the repertoire of candidate genes for complex traits. PMID:25171292

  17. Destabilization of Nucleophosmin mRNA by the HuR/KSRP complex is required for muscle fiber formation

    PubMed Central

    Cammas, Anne; Sanchez, Brenda Janice; Lian, Xian Jin; Dormoy-Raclet, Virginie; van der Giessen, Kate; de Silanes, Isabel López; Ma, Jennifer; Wilusz, Carol; Richardson, John; Gorospe, Myriam; Millevoi, Stefania; Giovarelli, Matteo; Gherzi, Roberto; Di Marco, Sergio; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine

    2014-01-01

    HuR promotes myogenesis by stabilizing the MyoD, Myogenin and p21 mRNAs during the fusion of muscle cells to form myotubes. Here we show that HuR, via a novel mRNA destabilizing activity, promotes the early steps of myogenesis by reducing the expression of the cell cycle promoter nucleophosmin (NPM). Depletion of HuR stabilizes the NPM mRNA, increases NPM protein levels and inhibits myogenesis, while its overexpression elicits the opposite effects. NPM mRNA destabilization involves the association of HuR with the decay factor KSRP as well as the ribonuclease PARN and the exosome. The C-terminus of HuR mediates the formation of the HuR-KSRP complex and is sufficient for maintaining a low level of the NPM mRNA as well as promoting the commitment of muscle cells to myogenesis. We therefore propose a model whereby the downregulation of the NPM mRNA, mediated by HuR, KSRP and its associated ribonucleases, is required for proper myogenesis. PMID:24969639

  18. Genome-wide identification of Wig-1 mRNA targets by RIP-Seq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Cinzia; Huss, Mikael; Giacomello, Stefania; Xu, Li-Di; Bianchi, Julie; Eriksson, Sofi; Jerhammar, Fredrik; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Vilborg, Anna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lui, Weng-Onn; Wiman, Klas G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the regulation of gene expression through a variety of post-transcriptional mechanisms. The p53-induced RBP Wig-1 (Zmat3) binds RNA through its zinc finger domains and enhances stability of p53 and N-Myc mRNAs and decreases stability of FAS mRNA. To identify novel Wig-1-bound RNAs, we performed RNA-immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (RIP-Seq) in HCT116 and Saos-2 cells. We identified 286 Wig-1-bound mRNAs common between the two cell lines. Sequence analysis revealed that AU-rich elements (AREs) are highly enriched in the 3′UTR of these Wig-1-bound mRNAs. Network enrichment analysis showed that Wig-1 preferentially binds mRNAs involved in cell cycle regulation. Moreover, we identified a 2D Wig-1 binding motif in HIF1A mRNA. Our findings confirm that Wig-1 is an ARE-BP that regulates cell cycle-related processes and provide a novel view of how Wig-1 may bind mRNA through a putative structural motif. We also significantly extend the repertoire of Wig-1 target mRNAs. Since Wig-1 is a transcriptional target of the tumor suppressor p53, these results have implications for our understanding of p53-dependent stress responses and tumor suppression. PMID:26672765

  19. Corticosterone effects on BDNF mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus during morris water maze training.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, M J; Sibug, R M; Duurland, R; Fluttert, M F; Oitzl, M S; De Kloet, E R; Vreugdenhil, E

    1999-12-01

    Corticosterone and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) have both been shown to be involved in spatial memory formation in rats. In the present study we have investigated the effect of corticosterone on hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression after training in the Morris water maze in young adult Wistar rats. Therefore, we first studied BDNF mRNA levels in the hippocampus in relation to corticosterone levels at several time points after 4 training trials in the Morris water maze. Corticosterone levels were significantly increased after this procedure, and hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels only displayed a minor change: an increase in CA1 at 1 hr after training. However, in a previous study we observed dramatically decreased hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels in dentate gyrus and CA1 at 3 hr after injection of corticosterone. In order to analyze this discrepancy, we subsequently investigated if hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression is affected by corticosterone at 3 hr after water maze training. Therefore, we incorporated ADX animals and ADX animals which were injected with corticosterone in our study. ADX animals which were subjected to water maze training displayed similar hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels 3 hr after training compared to control ADX animals. Furthermore, ADX animals which were injected with corticosterone showed decreased BDNF mRNA levels in all hippocampal regions compared to control ADX animals. Water maze training did not alter this effect. Thus, the increased corticosterone levels during water maze training do not affect hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression, although exogenous corticosterone is effective under these conditions. Hence, our results suggest that in this situation BDNF is resistant to regulation by endogenous corticosterone, which may be important for learning and memory processes.

  20. Dietary copper can regulate the level of mRNA for dopamine B-hydroxylase in rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sabban, E.L.; Failla, M.L.; McMahon, A.; Seidel, K.E. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Recent studies have shown that Cu deficiency markedly alters the levels of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in several peripheral tissues of rodents. Conversion of DA to NE is mediated by dopamine B-hydroxylase (DBM). Here the authors examined the effect of dietary Cu deficiency on the levels of DA, NE and DBM mRNA in rat adrenal gland. Severe Cu deficiency was induced by feeding low Cu diet to dams beginning at 17d gestation and weaning pups to the same diet. At 7 wks of age rats fed {minus}Cu diet were characterized by depressed growth, low tissue Cu, enlarged hearts and moderate anemia. Concentrations of DA were higher in adrenals and hearts of {minus}Cu rats compared to +Cu controls. While cardiac level of NE in {minus}Cu rats were reduced to 17% that of controls, adrenal NE was unchanged by Cu deficiency. To investigate possible mechanisms responsible for the response of adrenal gland to Cu deficiency, RNA was isolated and the levels of DBH mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA were analyzed by Northern blots. Steady state levels of adrenal DBH mRNA was increased 2-3 fold in {minus}Cu rats, whereas TH mRNA were unchanged by dietary Cu status. Upon feeding the {minus}Cu rats the Cu adequate diet overnight, there was a further increase in DBH mRNA and a slight elevation of TH mRNA levels. The results indicate that dietary copper can markedly affect the level of DBH mRNA in rat adrenal gland.

  1. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  2. Dynein light chain binding to a 3′-untranslated sequence mediates parathyroid hormone mRNA association with microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Eyal; Sela-Brown, Alin; Ringel, Israel; Kilav, Rachel; King, Stephen M.; Benashski, Sharon E.; Yisraeli, Joel K.; Silver, Justin; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2000-01-01

    The 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs binds proteins that determine mRNA stability and localization. The 3′-UTR of parathyroid hormone (PTH) mRNA specifically binds cytoplasmic proteins. We screened an expression library for proteins that bind the PTH mRNA 3′-UTR, and the sequence of 1 clone was identical to that of the dynein light chain LC8, a component of the dynein complexes that translocate cytoplasmic components along microtubules. Recombinant LC8 binds PTH mRNA 3′-UTR, as shown by RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We showed that PTH mRNA colocalizes with microtubules in the parathyroid gland, as well as with a purified microtubule preparation from calf brain, and that this association was mediated by LC8. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a dynein complex protein binding an mRNA. The dynein complex may be the motor that is responsible for transporting mRNAs to specific locations in the cytoplasm and for the consequent is asymmetric distribution of translated proteins in the cell. PMID:10683380

  3. Low-level lasers and mRNA levels of reference genes used in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, A. F.; Machado, Y. L. R. C.; Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    Low-level lasers are widely used for the treatment of diseases and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. Reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is widely used to evaluate mRNA levels and output data from a target gene are commonly relative to a reference mRNA that cannot vary according to treatment. In this study, the level of reference genes from Escherichia coli exposed to red or infrared lasers at different fluences was evaluated. E. coli AB1157 cultures were exposed to red (660 nm) and infrared (808 nm) lasers, incubated (20 min, 37 °C), the total RNA was extracted, and cDNA synthesis was performed to evaluate mRNA levels from arcA, gyrA and rpoA genes by RT-qPCR. Melting curves and agarose gel electrophoresis were carried out to evaluate specific amplification. Data were analyzed by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. The melting curve and agarose gel electrophoresis showed specific amplification. Although mRNA levels from arcA, gyrA or rpoA genes presented no significant variations trough a traditional statistical analysis, Excel-based tools revealed that these reference genes are not suitable for E. coli cultures exposed to lasers. Our data showed that exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers at different fluences alter the mRNA levels from arcA, gyrA and rpoA in E. coli cells.

  4. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  5. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed. PMID:15810684

  6. Slope stability and stabilization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, L.W.; Lee, T.S.; Boyce, G.M.; Sharma, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Slope stability can be a major problem during the construction of surface facilities. Cutting into existing ground disturbs the mechanics of the surrounding area, which can result in landslides and rock falls. This practical reference gives you the comprehensive information you need for slope stability analysis, suitable methods of analysis with and without the use of computers, and examples of common stability problems and stabilization methods for cuts and fills. It includes detailed discussions of methods used in slope stability analysis, including the Ordinary Method of Slices, Simplified Janbu Method, Simplified Bishop Method, Spencer`s Method, other limit equilibrium methods, numerical methods, total stress analysis, effective stress analysis, and the use of computer programs to solve problems. Chapters include: General Slope Stability Concepts; Engineering Geology Principles; Groundwater Conditions; Geologic Site Exploration; Laboratory Testing Interpretation; Slope Stability Concepts; Slope Stabilization Methods; and Design, Construction and Maintenance.

  7. An expanding universe of mRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    The fate of mRNA can be regulated by internal base modifications, with the currently known modified bases being N6-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytosine, and inosine. Three new studies show that yeast and human mRNA also contain pseudouridine residues and that pseudouridylation is induced in various stress states, hinting at a new pathway for post-transcriptional control of mRNA. PMID:25372308

  8. hnRNP-Q1 represses nascent axon growth in cortical neurons by inhibiting Gap-43 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kathryn R.; McAninch, Damian S.; Stefanovic, Snezana; Xing, Lei; Allen, Megan; Li, Wenqi; Feng, Yue; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita; Bassell, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by mRNA-binding proteins is critical for neuronal development and function. hnRNP-Q1 is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA processing events, including translational repression. hnRNP-Q1 is highly expressed in brain tissue, suggesting a function in regulating genes critical for neuronal development. In this study, we have identified Growth-associated protein 43 (Gap-43) mRNA as a novel target of hnRNP-Q1 and have demonstrated that hnRNP-Q1 represses Gap-43 mRNA translation and consequently GAP-43 function. GAP-43 is a neuronal protein that regulates actin dynamics in growth cones and facilitates axonal growth. Previous studies have identified factors that regulate Gap-43 mRNA stability and localization, but it remains unclear whether Gap-43 mRNA translation is also regulated. Our results reveal that hnRNP-Q1 knockdown increased nascent axon length, total neurite length, and neurite number in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and enhanced Neuro2a cell process extension; these phenotypes were rescued by GAP-43 knockdown. Additionally, we have identified a G-quadruplex structure in the 5′ untranslated region of Gap-43 mRNA that directly interacts with hnRNP-Q1 as a means to inhibit Gap-43 mRNA translation. Therefore hnRNP-Q1–mediated repression of Gap-43 mRNA translation provides an additional mechanism for regulating GAP-43 expression and function and may be critical for neuronal development. PMID:26658614

  9. Regional induction of c-fos and heat shock protein-72 mRNA following fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Raghupathi, R.; Welsh, F.A.; Gennarelli, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the cellular response to traumatic brain injury, the expression of mRNA for c-fos and the 72-kDa heat shock protein (hsp72) was determined using in situ hybridization following lateral fluid-percussion injury (2.2-2.4 atm) in rat brain. At 2 h after injury, induction of c-fos mRNA was restricted to regions of the cortex surrounding the contusion area. An increase in c-fos mRNA, but not hsp72 mRNA, was observed bilaterally in the CA{sub 3} subfield of the hippocampus and the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and in the thalamus ipsilateral to the impact site. By 6 h, increased expression of c-fos mRNA was observed only in the corpus callosum on the impact side; hsp72 mRNA persisted in the deep cortical layers and upper layers of the subcortical white matter below the site of maximal injury. By 24 h, both c-fos and hsp72 mRNA had returned to control levels in all regions of the brain. These results demonstrate that lateral fluid-percussion brain injury triggers regionally and temporally specific expression of c-fos and hsp72 mRNA, which may be suggestive of differential neurochemical alterations in neurons and glia following experimental brain injury. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. mRNA Localization and Translational Control in Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasko, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Localization of an mRNA species to a particular subcellular region can complement translational control mechanisms to produce a restricted spatial distribution of the protein it encodes. mRNA localization has been studied most in asymmetric cells such as budding yeast, early embryos, and neurons, but the process is likely to be more widespread. This article reviews the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of mRNA localization and its functions in early embryonic development, focusing on Drosophila where the relevant knowledge is most advanced. Links between mRNA localization and translational control mechanisms also are examined. PMID:22865893

  11. Database for mRNA half-life of 19 977 genes obtained by DNA microarray analysis of pluripotent and differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharova, Lioudmila V; Sharov, Alexei A; Nedorezov, Timur; Piao, Yulan; Shaik, Nabeebi; Ko, Minoru S H

    2009-02-01

    Degradation of mRNA is one of the key processes that control the steady-state level of gene expression. However, the rate of mRNA decay for the majority of genes is not known. We successfully obtained the rate of mRNA decay for 19 977 non-redundant genes by microarray analysis of RNA samples obtained from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Median estimated half-life was 7.1 h and only <100 genes, including Prdm1, Myc, Gadd45 g, Foxa2, Hes5 and Trib1, showed half-life less than 1 h. In general, mRNA species with short half-life were enriched among genes with regulatory functions (transcription factors), whereas mRNA species with long half-life were enriched among genes related to metabolism and structure (extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton). The stability of mRNAs correlated more significantly with the structural features of genes than the function of genes: mRNA stability showed the most significant positive correlation with the number of exon junctions per open reading frame length, and negative correlation with the presence of PUF-binding motifs and AU-rich elements in 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and CpG di-nucleotides in the 5'-UTR. The mRNA decay rates presented in this report are the largest data set for mammals and the first for ES cells.

  12. Age-related changes in mRNA levels of hepatic transporters, cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Atsushi; Ito, Ayami; Yamada, Ayano; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes affect drug pharmacokinetics. Limited information exists on the alteration in mRNA levels of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes with aging. We examined the effects of aging on the mRNA levels of representative hepatic drug transporters and metabolic enzymes by analyzing their levels in 10-, 30- and 50-week-old male and female rats. Levels of mRNA of drug transporters including multidrug resistance protein (Mdr)1a, multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp)2, breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) and organic anion-transporting polypeptide (Oatp)1a1, and the metabolic enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A1, CYP3A2 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 were analyzed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA levels of transporters in male rats did not decrease with age, while the mRNA levels of Bcrp and Oatp1a1 in female rats decreased with age. The mRNA levels of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 in male rats were higher than those in female rats. The mRNA levels of metabolic enzymes decreased with age in female but not male rats. In particular, the mRNA levels of UGT1A1 in 10-week-old female rats were higher than those in male rats. mRNA expression of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes are more susceptible to aging in female than male rats. The age-related decreases in the mRNA levels of Bcrp, Oatp1a1, CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 in female rats may affect the metabolism and transport of substrates. This study showed that aging affected the mRNA expression of hepatic transporters and metabolic enzymes in rats.

  13. N-glycosylation Profiling of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveals Association of Fucosylation with Differentiation and Caudal Type Homebox 1 (CDX1)/Villin mRNA Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Stephanie; Deuss, Anna J. M.; van Pelt, Gabi W.; van Vliet, Sandra J.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Koeleman, Carolien A. M.; Deelder, André M.; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A.; Rombouts, Yoann; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Various cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are associated with alterations in protein glycosylation. CRC cell lines are frequently used to study these (glyco)biological changes and their mechanisms. However, differences between CRC cell lines with regard to their glycosylation have hitherto been largely neglected. Here, we comprehensively characterized the N-glycan profiles of 25 different CRC cell lines, derived from primary tumors and metastatic sites, in order to investigate their potential as glycobiological tumor model systems and to reveal glycans associated with cell line phenotypes. We applied an optimized, high-throughput membrane-based enzymatic glycan release for small sample amounts. Released glycans were derivatized to stabilize and differentiate between α2,3- and α2,6-linked N-acetylneuraminic acids, followed by N-glycosylation analysis by MALDI-TOF(/TOF)-MS. Our results showed pronounced differences between the N-glycosylation patterns of CRC cell lines. CRC cell line profiles differed from tissue-derived N-glycan profiles with regard to their high-mannose N-glycan content but showed a large overlap for complex type N-glycans, supporting their use as a glycobiological cancer model system. Importantly, we could show that the high-mannose N-glycans did not only occur as intracellular precursors but were also present at the cell surface. The obtained CRC cell line N-glycan features were not clearly correlated with mRNA expression levels of glycosyltransferases, demonstrating the usefulness of performing the structural analysis of glycans. Finally, correlation of CRC cell line glycosylation features with cancer cell markers and phenotypes revealed an association between highly fucosylated glycans and CDX1 and/or villin mRNA expression that both correlate with cell differentiation. Together, our findings provide new insights into CRC-associated glycan changes and setting the basis for more in-depth experiments on glycan function and regulation

  14. Differential regulation of amyloid-. beta. -protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-..beta..-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease.

  15. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  16. Effect of propionate on mRNA expression of key genes for gluconeogenesis in liver of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Bequette, Brian J; Donkin, Shawn S

    2015-12-01

    Elevated needs for glucose in lactating dairy cows are met through a combination of increased capacity for gluconeogenesis and increased supply of gluconeogenic precursors, primarily propionate. This study evaluated the effects of propionate on mRNA expression of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1), mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK2), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key gluconeogenic enzymes, and capacity for glucose synthesis in liver of dairy cattle. In experiment 1, six multiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design consisting of a 6-d acclimation or washout phase followed by 8h of postruminal infusion of either propionate (1.68mol), glucose (0.84mol), or an equal volume (10mL/min) of water. In experiment 2, twelve male Holstein calves [39±4 kg initial body weight (BW)] were blocked by birth date and assigned to receive, at 7d of age, either propionate [2mmol·h(-1)·(BW(0.75))(-1)], acetate [3.5mmol·h(-1)·(BW(.75))(-1)], or an equal volume (4mL/min) of saline. In both experiments, blood samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8h relative to the start of infusion and liver biopsy samples were collected at the end of the infusion for mRNA analysis. Liver explants from experiment 1 were used to measure tricarboxylic acid cycle flux and gluconeogenesis using (13)C mass isotopomer distribution analysis from (13)C3 propionate. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not altered by infusions in cows. Serum insulin concentration in cows receiving propionate was elevated than cows receiving water, but was not different from cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK1 and G6PC mRNA and glucose production in cows receiving propionate were not different from cows receiving water, but tended to be higher compared with cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK2 and PC mRNA was not altered by propionate infusion in cows. Blood glucose, insulin, and

  17. Mediator and TREX-2: Emerging links between transcription initiation and mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Tobias; Köhler, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear pore proteins interact dynamically with chromatin to regulate gene activities. A key question is how nucleoporin interactions mechanistically alter a gene's intranuclear position and transcriptional output. We reported recently on a direct interaction between the nuclear pore-associated TREX-2 complex and promoter-bound Mediator. This highlights how nuclear-pore associated adaptors gain regulatory access to the core transcription machinery. In this Extra View, we discuss an additional implication that arises from our work and the recent literature: how promoter elements may regulate mRNA metabolism beyond transcription initiation. PMID:27028218

  18. Frameshift mutations in the v-src gene of avian sarcoma virus act in cis to specifically reduce v-src mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, S B; Stoltzfus, C M

    1994-01-01

    A portion of the avian sarcoma virus (ASV) primary RNA transcripts is alternatively spliced in chicken embryo fibroblast cells to two different messages, the src and env mRNAs. Frameshift mutations of the viral genome causing premature translation termination within the src gene result in a decreased steady-state level of the src mRNA. In marked contrast, frameshift mutations at various positions of the env gene do not decrease the level of the env mRNA. We show that the src gene product is not required in trans for splicing and accumulation of src mRNA. Conversely, the truncated Src proteins do not act negatively in trans to decrease specifically the levels of src mRNA. Taken together, these results indicate that the frameshift mutations act in cis to reduce src mRNA levels. A double mutant with a lesion in the src initiator AUG and a frameshift within the src gene demonstrated wild-type RNA levels, indicating that the src mRNA must be recognized as a translatable mRNA for the effect on src mRNA levels to occur. Our results indicate that the reduced levels do not result from decreased cytoplasmic stability of the mature src mRNA. We also show that the src gene frameshift mutations affect src mRNA levels when expressed from intronless src cDNA clones. We conclude that the reduction of src mRNA levels triggered by the presence of frameshift mutations within the src gene occurs while it is associated with the nucleus. Our data also strongly suggest that this occurs at a step of RNA processing or transport independent of RNA splicing. Images PMID:8114716

  19. Lifelong ethanol consumption and brain regional GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Sarviharju, Maija; Hyytiä, Petri; Hervonen, Antti; Jaatinen, Pia; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R

    2006-11-01

    Brain regional gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit mRNA expression was studied in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol) rats after moderate ethanol drinking for up to 2 years of age. In situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes specific for 13 different subunits was used with coronal cryostat sections of the brains. Selective alterations were observed by ethanol exposure and/or aging in signals for several subunits. Most interestingly, the putative highly ethanol-sensitive alpha4 and beta3 subunit mRNAs were significantly decreased in several brain regions. The age-related alterations in alpha4 subunit expression were parallel to those caused by lifelong ethanol drinking, whereas aging had no significant effect on beta3 subunit expression. The results suggest that prolonged ethanol consumption leading to blood concentrations of about 10 mM may downregulate the mRNA expression of selected GABAA receptor subunits and that aging might have partly similar effects.

  20. Arginine methylation of G3BP1 in response to Wnt3a regulates β-catenin mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Bikkavilli, Rama Kamesh; Malbon, Craig C.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for normal mammalian development. Wnt3a activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through stabilization of β-catenin; a process in which the phosphoprotein Dishevelled figures prominently. Protein arginine methylation in signaling complexes containing Dishevelled was investigated. Mass spectrometry of a prominent arginine-methylated, Dishevelled-associated protein identified the Ras GTPase activating protein-binding protein 1 G3BP1. Stimulation of totipotent mouse embryonic F9 cells with Wnt3a provoked increased methylation of G3BP1. We show that G3BP1 is a novel Ctnnb1 mRNA binding protein. Methylation of G3BP1 constitutes a molecular switch that regulates Ctnnb1 mRNA in response to Wnt3a. Thus, the protein arginine methylation that targets G3BP1 acts as a novel regulator of Ctnnb1 mRNA. PMID:21652632

  1. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  2. 46 CFR 28.510 - Definition of stability terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definition of stability terms. 28.510 Section 28.510... FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.510 Definition of stability terms. Downflooding means the entry of...'s stability and includes: (1) Alterations that result in a change of the vessel's...

  3. 46 CFR 28.510 - Definition of stability terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definition of stability terms. 28.510 Section 28.510... FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.510 Definition of stability terms. Downflooding means the entry of...'s stability and includes: (1) Alterations that result in a change of the vessel's...

  4. Successful personalized chemotherapy for metastatic gastric cancer based on quantitative BRCA1 mRNA expression level: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YING; WU, PUYUAN; LIU, BAORUI; DU, JUAN

    2016-01-01

    Personalized chemotherapy is based on the specific genetic profile of individual patients and is replacing the traditional ‘one size fits all’ medicine. Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) plays a central role in the chemotherapy-induced DNA damage response. It has been repeatedly demonstrated that BRCA1 mRNA levels were negatively associated with cisplatin sensitivity, but positively associated with docetaxel sensitivity in patients with gastric cancer in experimental and clinical studies. This feature leads to customized chemotherapy based on the BRCA1 mRNA expression level and results in a high efficacy of treatment. The present study describes the case of a 77-year-old patient with metastatic gastric cancer who was treated with personalized chemotherapy based on quantitative BRCA1 mRNA expression level. This study and the available literature data suggest that the expression level of BRCA1 mRNA is dynamic to BRCA1-based chemotherapy. More importantly, de novo assessment of BRCA1 status is a preferable option for ciscisplatin- or docetaxel-resistant patients, since the expression levels of BRCA1 mRNA in certain patients may alter significantly following treatment. Therefore, BRCA1 expression should be assessed for predicting differential chemosensitivity and tailoring chemotherapy in gastric cancer. PMID:27313763

  5. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  6. Probing dimensionality beyond the linear sequence of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-05-01

    mRNA is a nexus entity between DNA and translating ribosomes. Recent developments in deep sequencing technologies coupled with structural probing have revealed new insights beyond the classic role of mRNA and place it more centrally as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation, cellular localization, and mRNA degradation. Here, we highlight emerging approaches to probe mRNA secondary structure on a global transcriptome-wide level and compare their potential and resolution. Combined approaches deliver a richer and more complex picture. While our understanding on the effect of secondary structure for various cellular processes is quite advanced, the next challenge is to unravel more complex mRNA architectures and tertiary interactions. PMID:26650615

  7. Hypoxia stimulates binding of a cytoplasmic protein to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of rat tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Dominski, Z; Kole, R; Millhorn, D E

    1994-04-01

    Reduced oxygen tension (hypoxia) induces a 3-fold increase in stability of mRNA for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis, in the pheochromocytoma (PC12) clonal cell line. To investigate the possibility that RNA-protein interactions are involved in mediating this increase in stability, RNA gel shift assays were performed using different fragments of labeled TH mRNA and the S-100 fraction of PC12 cytoplasmic protein extracts. We identified a sequence within the 3'-untranslated region of TH mRNA that binds cytoplasmic protein. RNase T1 mapping revealed that the protein was bound to a 28 nucleotide long sequence that is located between bases 1551-1579 of TH mRNA. Moreover, protein binding to this fragment was prevented with an antisense oligonucleotide directed against bases 1551-1579 and subsequent RNase H digestion. This fragment of the 3'-untranslated region of TH mRNA is rich in pyrimidine nucleotides, and the binding of cytoplasmic protein to this fragment was reduced by competition with other polypyrimidine sequences including poly(C) but not poly(U) polymers. The binding of the protein to TH mRNA was increased when cytoplasmic proteins were extracted from PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia (5% O2) for 24 h. Electrophoresis of the UV cross-linked RNA-protein complex on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a complex of 74 kDa. The potential role of this protein-TH mRNA interaction in regulation of TH mRNA stability during hypoxia is discussed. PMID:7908289

  8. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1.

    PubMed

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem-loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3' splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing.

  9. Changes in mRNA and protein content of SO sub 2 -fumigated maple leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemetz, C.L. ); Roberts, B.R.; Schnipke, V.M. )

    1989-04-01

    The effect of acute SO{sub 2} fumigation on foliar DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 2-yr-old containerized Acer seedlings was examined. While DNA content did not change appreciably in either SO{sub 2}-sensitive red maple (A. rubrum L.) or SO{sub 2}-tolerant silver maple (A. saccharinum L.), significant reductions in mRNA (35% for red maple; 21% for silver maple) were observed after 54 h fumigation (6 h/day {times} 3 days/wk {times} 3 wk) at 2.5 ppm SO{sub 2}. Reductions in mRNA and protein content were accompanied by a corresponding decline in net photosynthesis (Pn). The data from this study suggest that acute SO{sub 2} fumigation alters Pn in red and silver maple by disrupting molecular events, and that species sensitivity for these particular Acer spp may be related to the degree of change associated with mRNA and total protein content.

  10. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  11. Single amino-acid replacement is responsible for the stabilization of ornithine decarboxylase in HMOA cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y; Matsufuji, S; Murakami, Y; Hayashi, S

    1993-06-15

    The half-life of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in HMOA cells, a variant cell line derived from hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells, is markedly increased compared with that in the parental cell line. In the present study, we examined which of the three relevant factors is responsible for the ODC stabilization in HMOA cells, namely ODC itself, a regulatory protein antizyme and an ODC-degrading activity. SDS/PAGE analysis of radiolabeled ODC revealed that ODC from HMOA cells migrated somewhat faster than that from HTC cells, suggesting that HMOA ODC was structurally altered. Direct sequencing of reverse-transcription/polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) products of ODC mRNA from HMOA cells revealed a T to G replacement, causing a Cys441-->Trp replacement near the C-terminus. No alteration was found in the whole coding region of antizyme mRNA. An authentic mutant ODC cDNA with the same replacement was transfected and expressed in C55.7 ODC-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. Upon cycloheximide treatment, the mutant ODC activity did not decrease appreciably for at least 3 h, whereas wild-type ODC activity decreased with a half-life of 1 h. In-vitro-synthesized mutant ODC with the Cys441-->Trp (or Ala) replacement was also stable in a reticulocyte-lysate ODC-degradation system. Metabolically labeled and purified mouse ODC was degraded in HMOA cell extracts in the presence of ATP and antizyme as rapidly as in HTC cell extracts, indicating that HMOA cells have a normal ODC degrading activity. These results indicated that the single amino acid replacement, Cys441-->Trp, is responsible for the stabilization of ODC in HMOA cells and that Cys441 is important for rapid ODC turnover.

  12. Inhibition of mRNA synthesis in the hippocampus impairs consolidation and reconsolidation of spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Weber C; Bonini, Juliana S; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-01-01

    Using two different mRNA synthesis inhibitors, we show that blockade of hippocampal gene expression during restricted posttraining or postretrieval time windows hinders retention of long-term spatial memory for the Morris water maze task, without affecting short-term memory, nonspatial learning, or the functionality of the hippocampus. Our results indicate that spatial memory consolidation induces the activation of the hippocampal transcriptional machinery and suggest the existence of a gene expression-dependent reconsolidation process that operates in the dorsal hippocampus at the moment of retrieval to stabilize the reactivated mnemonic trace.

  13. Selenium Deficiency Reduces the Abundance of mRNA for Se-Dependent Glutathione Peroxidase 1 by a UGA-Dependent Mechanism Likely To Be Nonsense Codon-Mediated Decay of Cytoplasmic mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Patrick M.; Reddy, C. Channa; Maquat, Lynne E.

    1998-01-01

    The mammalian mRNA for selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase 1 (Se-GPx1) contains a UGA codon that is recognized as a codon for the nonstandard amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). Inadequate concentrations of selenium (Se) result in a decrease in Se-GPx1 mRNA abundance by an uncharacterized mechanism that may be dependent on translation, independent of translation, or both. In this study, we have begun to elucidate this mechanism. We demonstrate using hepatocytes from rats fed either a Se-supplemented or Se-deficient diet for 9 to 13 weeks that Se deprivation results in an ∼50-fold reduction in Se-GPx1 activity and an ∼20-fold reduction in Se-GPx1 mRNA abundance. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions revealed that Se deprivation has no effect on the levels of either nuclear pre-mRNA or nuclear mRNA but reduces the level of cytoplasmic mRNA. The regulation of Se-GPx1 gene expression by Se was recapitulated in transient transfections of NIH 3T3 cells, and experiments were extended to examine the consequences of converting the Sec codon (TGA) to either a termination codon (TAA) or a cysteine codon (TGC). Regardless of the type of codon, an alteration in the Se concentration was of no consequence to the ratio of nuclear Se-GPx1 mRNA to nuclear Se-GPx1 pre-mRNA. The ratio of cytoplasmic Se-GPx1 mRNA to nuclear Se-GPx1 mRNA from the wild-type (TGA-containing) allele was reduced twofold when cells were deprived of Se for 48 h after transfection, which has been shown to be the extent of the reduction for the endogenous Se-GPx1 mRNA of cultured cells incubated as long as 20 days in Se-deficient medium. In contrast to the TGA allele, Se had no effect on expression of either the TAA allele or the TGC allele. Under Se-deficient conditions, the TAA and TGC alleles generated, respectively, 1.7-fold-less and 3-fold-more cytoplasmic Se-GPx1 mRNA relative to the amount of nuclear Se-GPx1 mRNA than the TGA allele. These results indicate that (i

  14. Decreased parvalbumin mRNA expression in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Amélie C.; Blatt, Gene J.; Soghomonian, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that expression of the rate-limiting GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is decreased in Brodmann area 9 (BA9) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared to control brains (Lanoue, A.C., Dumitriu, A., Myers, R.H., Soghomonian, JJ., 2010. Exp Neurol. 206(1), 207–217). A subpopulation of cortical GABAergic interneurons expresses the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and plays a critical role in the control of pyramidal neuron excitability and the generation of cortical gamma frequency oscillations. In view of its key role in the physiology of the cerebral cortex, we sought to determine whether the expression of parvalbumin and the number of parvalbumin-expressing neurons are altered in BA9 of PD brains. First, isotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry was used to examine mRNA expression of parvalbumin on post-mortem brain sections. Second, immunohistochemistry and design-based stereology were used to determine the density of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in BA9. Quantification of mRNA labeling at the single cell level showed a significant decrease in parvalbumin expression in PD cases. In contrast, neuronal density of parvalbumin-positive neurons was not significantly different between PD and controls. Results confirm that the GABAergic system is altered in the DLPFC in PD and identify the contribution of parvalbumin-expressing neurons in these alterations. We speculate that these effects could contribute to altered cortical excitability and oscillatory activity previously documented in PD. PMID:23891794

  15. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  16. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor is an NFL mRNA destabilizing factor that forms cytoplasmic inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Droppelmann, Cristian A; Keller, Brian A; Campos-Melo, Danae; Volkening, Kathryn; Strong, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset progressive disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the selective degeneration of motor neurons. Recent evidence supports the hypothesis that alterations in RNA metabolism in motor neurons can explain the development of protein inclusions, including neurofilamentous aggregates, observed in this pathology. In mice, p190RhoGEF, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, is involved in neurofilament protein aggregation in an RNA-triggered transgenic model of motor neuron disease. Here, we observed that rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RGNEF), the human homologue of p190RhoGEF, binds low molecular weight neurofilament mRNA and affects its stability via 3' untranslated region destabilization. We observed that the overexpression of RGNEF in a stable cell line significantly decreased the level of low molecular weight neurofilament protein. Furthermore, we observed RGNEF cytoplasmic inclusions in ALS spinal motor neurons that colocalized with ubiquitin, p62/sequestosome-1, and TAR (trans-active regulatory) DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). Our results provide further evidence that RNA metabolism pathways are integral to ALS pathology. This is also the first described link between ALS and an RNA binding protein with aggregate formation that is also a central cell signaling pathway molecule.

  17. Graph based fusion of miRNA and mRNA expression data improves clinical outcome prediction in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the main goals in cancer studies including high-throughput microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA data is to find and assess prognostic signatures capable of predicting clinical outcome. Both mRNA and miRNA expression changes in cancer diseases are described to reflect clinical characteristics like staging and prognosis. Furthermore, miRNA abundance can directly affect target transcripts and translation in tumor cells. Prediction models are trained to identify either mRNA or miRNA signatures for patient stratification. With the increasing number of microarray studies collecting mRNA and miRNA from the same patient cohort there is a need for statistical methods to integrate or fuse both kinds of data into one prediction model in order to find a combined signature that improves the prediction. Results Here, we propose a new method to fuse miRNA and mRNA data into one prediction model. Since miRNAs are known regulators of mRNAs we used the correlations between them as well as the target prediction information to build a bipartite graph representing the relations between miRNAs and mRNAs. This graph was used to guide the feature selection in order to improve the prediction. The method is illustrated on a prostate cancer data set comprising 98 patient samples with miRNA and mRNA expression data. The biochemical relapse was used as clinical endpoint. It could be shown that the bipartite graph in combination with both data sets could improve prediction performance as well as the stability of the feature selection. Conclusions Fusion of mRNA and miRNA expression data into one prediction model improves clinical outcome prediction in terms of prediction error and stable feature selection. The R source code of the proposed method is available in the supplement. PMID:22188670

  18. Free mRNA in excess upon polysome dissociation is a scaffold for protein multimerization to form stress granules.

    PubMed

    Bounedjah, Ouissame; Desforges, Bénédicte; Wu, Ting-Di; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Marco, Sergio; Hamon, Loic; Curmi, Patrick A; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Piétrement, Olivier; Pastré, David

    2014-07-01

    The sequence of events leading to stress granule assembly in stressed cells remains elusive. We show here, using isotope labeling and ion microprobe, that proportionally more RNA than proteins are present in stress granules than in surrounding cytoplasm. We further demonstrate that the delivery of single strand polynucleotides, mRNA and ssDNA, to the cytoplasm can trigger stress granule assembly. On the other hand, increasing the cytoplasmic level of mRNA-binding proteins like YB-1 can directly prevent the aggregation of mRNA by forming isolated mRNPs, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, we also discovered that enucleated cells do form stress granules, demonstrating that the translocation to the cytoplasm of nuclear prion-like RNA-binding proteins like TIA-1 is dispensable for stress granule assembly. The results lead to an alternative view on stress granule formation based on the following sequence of events: after the massive dissociation of polysomes during stress, mRNA-stabilizing proteins like YB-1 are outnumbered by the burst of nonpolysomal mRNA. mRNA freed of ribosomes thus becomes accessible to mRNA-binding aggregation-prone proteins or misfolded proteins, which induces stress granule formation. Within the frame of this model, the shuttling of nuclear mRNA-stabilizing proteins to the cytoplasm could dissociate stress granules or prevent their assembly.

  19. Genetic analysis of bacteriophage lambda cIII gene: mRNA structural requirements for translation initiation.

    PubMed Central

    Kornitzer, D; Teff, D; Altuvia, S; Oppenheim, A B

    1989-01-01

    The bacteriophage lambda cIII gene product regulates the lysogenic pathway. The cIII gene is located in the leftward operon, which is transcribed from the pL promoter. We have previously shown (S. Altuvia and A. B. Oppenheim, J. Bacteriol. 167:415-419, 1986) that mutations that show elevated expression lie within the cIII coding sequence. We isolated mutants that show decreased CIII activity. All the mutations were found to cause a drastic reduction in the rate of initiation of cIII translation. Several mutations were found to be scattered within the first 40 nucleotides of the cIII coding region. Additional mutations affected the AUG initiation codon, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence, and the upstream RNaseIII processing site. Computer folding of the cIII mRNA suggested the presence of two alternative RNA structures. All the mutations within the coding region that reduce expression reduce the stability of one specific mRNA structure (structure B). Mutations that increase expression lie in the loops of this structure and may in fact stabilize it by interfering with the formation of the alternative structure (structure A). Thus, it appears that a specific mRNA secondary structure at the beginning of the cIII coding region is essential for efficient translation, suggesting that changes in mRNA structure regulate cIII expression. Images PMID:2523380

  20. Flight crew health stabilization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flight crew health stabilization program was developed to minimize or eliminate the possibility of adverse alterations in the health of flight crews during immediate preflight, flight, and postflight periods. The elements of the program, which include clinical medicine, immunology, exposure prevention, and epidemiological surveillance, are discussed briefly. No crewmember illness was reported for the missions for which the program was in effect.

  1. Icaritin Inhibits Collagen Degradation-Related Factors and Facilitates Collagen Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions: A Potential Action for Plaque Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-Kang; Li, Jie; Yan, De-Xin; Leung, Wing-Nang; Zhang, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-28

    Most acute coronary syndromes result from rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The collagen content of plaques may critically affect plaque stability. This study tested whether Icaritin (ICT), an intestinal metabolite of Epimedium-derived flavonoids, could alter the collagen synthesis/degradation balance in atherosclerotic lesions. Rabbits were fed with an atherogenic diet for four months. Oral administration of ICT (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was started after two months of an atherogenic diet and lasted for two months. The collagen degradation-related parameters, including macrophages accumulation, content and activity of interstitial collagenase-1 (MMP-1), and the collagen synthesis-related parameters, including amount and distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and collagen mRNA/protein levels, were evaluated in the aorta. ICT reduced plasma lipid levels, inhibited macrophage accumulation, lowered MMP-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed proteolytic activity of pro-MMP-1 and MMP-1 in the aorta. ICT changed the distribution of the SMCs towards the fibrous cap of lesions without increasing the amount of SMCs. Higher collagen protein content in lesions and aorta homogenates was observed with ICT treatment compared with the atherogenic diet only, without altered collagen mRNA level. These results suggest that ICT could inhibit the collagen degradation-related factors and facilitate collagen accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions, indicating a new potential of ICT in atherosclerotic plaques.

  2. Regulation of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay: Implications for physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Rachid; Wengrod, Jordan; Gardner, Lawrence B; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is an mRNA quality control mechanism that destabilizes aberrant mRNAs harboring premature termination (nonsense) codons (PTCs). Recent studies have shown that NMD also targets mRNAs transcribed from a large subset of wild-type genes. This raises the possibility that NMD itself is under regulatory control. Indeed, several recent studies have shown that NMD activity is modulated in specific cell types and that key components of the NMD pathway are regulated by several pathways, including microRNA circuits and NMD itself. Cellular stress also modulates the magnitude of NMD by mechanisms that are beginning to be understood. Here, we review the evidence that NMD is regulated and discuss the physiological role for this regulation. We propose that the efficiency of NMD is altered in some cellular contexts to regulate normal biological events. In disease states—such as in cancer—NMD is disturbed by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, resulting in altered levels of crucial NMD-targeted mRNAs that lead to downstream pathological consequences. PMID:23500037

  3. Induction of fetal hemoglobin through enhanced translation efficiency of γ-globin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Cynthia K; Lowrey, Christopher H

    2014-10-23

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) induction can ameliorate the clinical severity of sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia. We previously reported that activation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) stress pathway increased HbF through a posttranscriptional mechanism. In this study, we explored the underlying means by which salubrinal, an activator of eIF2α signaling, enhances HbF production in primary human erythroid cells. Initial experiments eliminated changes in globin messenger RNA (mRNA) stability or cellular location and reduction of adult hemoglobin as possible salubrinal mechanisms. We then determined that salubrinal selectively increased the number of actively translating ribosomes on γ-globin mRNA. This enhanced translation efficiency occurred in the recovery phase of the stress response as phosphorylation of eIF2α and global protein synthesis returned toward baseline. These findings highlight γ-globin mRNA translation as a novel mechanism for regulating HbF production and as a pharmacologic target for induction of HbF. PMID:25170120

  4. mRNA profiling for body fluid identification by reverse transcription endpoint PCR and realtime PCR.

    PubMed

    Haas, C; Klesser, B; Maake, C; Bär, W; Kratzer, A

    2009-03-01

    mRNA profiling is a promising new method for the identification of body fluids from biological stains. Major advantages of mRNA profiling are the possibility of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction and of simultaneously isolating DNA without loss of material. A reverse transcription endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and a realtime PCR assay were established for the identification of blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood, and were compared to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests. The results for specificity, sensitivity and suitability to biological stains were satisfying and mRNA stability was demonstrated for up to 2-year-old stains. Two novel multiplex assays were created with the endpoint PCR primers: multiplex 1 amplifies two markers for each of the above mentioned body fluids and is suited for screening; multiplex 2 was designed for the detection of blood, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood. The results demonstrate that both endpoint PCR and realtime PCR are suitable for the identification of body fluids in forensic stains and represent an effective alternative to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests.

  5. Hormonal regulation of vasotocin receptor mRNA in a seasonally breeding songbird.

    PubMed

    Grozhik, Anya V; Horoszko, Christopher P; Horton, Brent M; Hu, Yuchen; Voisin, Dene A; Maney, Donna L

    2014-03-01

    Behaviors associated with breeding are seasonally modulated in a variety of species. These changes in behavior are mediated by sex steroids, levels of which likewise vary with season. The effects of androgens on behaviors associated with breeding may in turn be partly mediated by the nonapeptides vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) in mammals, and vasotocin (VT) in birds. The effects of testosterone (T) on production of these neuropeptides have been well-studied; however, the regulation of VT receptors by T is not well understood. In this study, we investigated steroid-dependent regulation of VT receptor (VTR) mRNA in a seasonally breeding songbird, the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis). We focused on VTR subtypes that have been most strongly implicated in social behavior: V1a and oxytocin-like receptor (OTR). Using in situ hybridization, we show that T-treatment of non-breeding males altered V1a and OTR mRNA expression in several regions associated with seasonal reproductive behaviors. For example, T-treatment increased V1a mRNA expression in the medial preoptic area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and ventromedial hypothalamus. T-treatment also affected both V1a and OTR mRNA expression in nuclei of the song system; some of these effects depended on the presence or absence of a chromosomal rearrangement that affects singing behavior, plasma T, and VT immunolabeling in this species. Overall, our results strengthen evidence that VT helps mediate the behavioral effects of T in songbirds, and suggest that the chromosomal rearrangement in this species may affect the sensitivity of the VT system to seasonal changes in T.

  6. SC35 promotes sustainable stress-induced alternative splicing of neuronal acetylcholinesterase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Meshorer, E; Bryk, B; Toiber, D; Cohen, J; Podoly, E; Dori, A; Soreq, H

    2005-11-01

    Long-lasting alternative splicing of neuronal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) pre-mRNA occurs during neuronal development and following stress, altering synaptic properties. To explore the corresponding molecular events, we sought to identify mRNAs encoding for abundant splicing factors in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following stress. Here we show elevated levels of the splicing factor SC35 in stressed as compared with naïve mice. In cotransfections of COS-1 and HEK293 cells with an AChE minigene allowing 3' splice variations, SC35 facilitated a shift from the primary AChE-S to the stress-induced AChE-R variant, while ASF/SF2 caused the opposite effect. Transfection with chimeric constructs comprising of SC35 and ASF/SF2 RRM/RS domains identified the SC35 RRM as responsible for AChE mRNA's alternative splicing. In poststress PFC neurons, increased SC35 mRNA and protein levels coincided with selective increase in AChE-R mRNA. In the developing mouse embryo, cortical progenitor cells in the ventricular zone displayed transient SC35 elevation concomitant with dominance of AChE-R over AChE-S mRNA. Finally, transgenic mice overexpressing human AChE-R, but not those overexpressing AChE-S, showed significant elevation in neuronal SC35 levels, suggesting a reciprocal reinforcement process. Together, these findings point to an interactive relationship of SC35 with cholinergic signals in the long-lasting consequences of stress on nervous system plasticity and development.

  7. Glutathione depletion induces heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) mRNA and protein in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ewing, J F; Maines, M D

    1993-04-01

    In mammalian systems, the heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes HO-1 (HSP32) and HO-2 oxidatively cleave the heme molecule to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. Although HO-1 is inducible by various chemicals in systemic organs and cell culture systems, this communication reports for the first time the induction of this stress protein and its transcript by a chemical in the brain. In addition, this study demonstrates expression of HO-1 in select populations of cells in the brain in response to GSH depletion. Specifically, treatment of adult rats with diethyl maleate (DEM; 4.7 mmol/kg) caused a pronounced decrease in brain GSH content within 1 h. GSH levels remained significantly depressed for at least 24 h postinjection. Northern blot analysis of brain poly(A)+ mRNA following DEM treatment revealed on the average a sixfold increase in the 1.8-kb HO-1 mRNA level compared with that of controls; concomitant with this change was a decrease in GSH levels. Total brain HO activity was not significantly altered along with the increase in HO-1 mRNA level. The increase in transcription of HO-1 was a direct response to GSH depletion, as judged by the observation that treatment of neonatal rats with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) (3 mmol/kg, twice daily, for 2 days), a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, caused a marked depression in total brain GSH level and a concomitant increase in brain 1.8-kb HO-1 mRNA content. The magnitude of the increase was up to approximately 11.5-fold that of the control level, as evidenced by northern blot analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Elevated tph2 mRNA Expression in a Rat Model of Chronic Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Johnson, Philip L.; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Kellen, Karen E.; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allelic variations in TPH2, the gene encoding tryptophan hydroxylase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis, may be genetic predictors of panic disorder and panic responses to panicogenic challenges in healthy volunteers. To test the hypothesis that tph2 mRNA is altered in chronic anxiety states, we measured tph2 expression in an established rat model of panic disorder. Methods We implanted 16 adult, male rats with bilateral guide cannulae and then primed them with daily injections of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor agonist, urocortin 1 (UCN1, 6 fmoles/100 nl per side, n = 8) or vehicle (n = 8) into the basolateral amygdaloid complex (BL) for 5 consecutive days. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed, 24 hr prior to and 48 hr following priming, in the social interaction (SI) test. A third group (n = 7) served as undisturbed home cage controls. All rats were killed 3 days after the last intra-BL injection to analyze tph2 and slc6a4 (gene encoding the serotonin transporter, SERT) mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), the main source of serotonergic projections to anxiety-related brain regions, using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results UCN1 priming increased anxiety-related behavior in the SI test compared to vehicle-injected controls and elevated tph2, but not slc6a4, mRNA expression in DR subregions, including the ventrolateral DR/ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (DRVL/VLPAG), a subregion previously implicated in control of panic-related physiologic responses. Tph2 mRNA expression in the DRVL/VLPAG was correlated with increased anxiety-related behavior. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that chronic anxiety states are associated with dysregulated tph2 expression. PMID:22511363

  9. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph R.; Cole, John A.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A.

    2015-01-01

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript’s half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories. PMID:26669443

  10. CART mRNA expression in rat monkey and human brain: relevance to cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Fagergren, Pernilla; Hurd, Yasmin

    2007-09-10

    The neuropeptide CART (cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript) is suggested to be regulated by psychostimulant administration. We review here the localization of CART mRNA expression in the human brain and its possible relevance to human cocaine abuse. Except for strong hypothalamic expression, the CART transcript is predominately expressed in target regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, such as the nucleus accumbens shell, amygdala complex, extended amygdala and orbitofrontal, enthorhinal and piriform cortices. The discrete limbic localization strongly implies involvement in reward and reinforcement behaviors. We therefore examined CART mRNA expression in both Sprague Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys that had self-administered cocaine. Cocaine self-administration in the rat (1.5 mg/kg/inj, on a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement for 1 week) and monkey (0.03 or 0.3 mg/kg/inj on a fixed 3 min interval schedule of reinforcement for 5 or 100 days) did not alter transcript levels in CART expressing nucleus accumbens (monkey not studied), amygdala nuclei or cortical areas. However, in the monkey sublenticular extended amygdala, low dose cocaine self-administration resulted in increased CART transcript levels after both 5 and 100 days of self-administration, whereas no difference was found after high dose self-administration. In conclusion, we found no substantial alterations CART mRNA expression during cocaine self-administration, but this neuropeptide has the anatomical and functional potential to modulate brain areas relevant for cocaine abuse. Further studies are needed to evaluate the involvement of CART in other components of the cocaine abuse cycle. PMID:17631364

  11. Predominant localization of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA in the periportal zone of rat liver parenchyma demonstrated by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bartels, H; Linnemann, H; Jungermann, K

    1989-05-01

    In rat liver parenchyma, expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene was studied by Northern blot analysis with a biotinylated cRNA probe and the zonal localization of PEPCK mRNA was demonstrated by in situ hybridization with a radiolabelled cRNA probe. During the feeding period at night, overall PEPCK mRNA levels were low and PEPCK mRNA was detected only in small areas of the periportal zone. At the beginning of the light period (7 am) the overall PEPCK mRNA level began increasing and the periportal areas containing PEPCK mRNA broadened. The maximum of the total abundance and of the area with high levels of PEPCK mRNA was reached at noon. Fasting for 24-72 h did not cause further significant alterations in the level or localization of PEPCK mRNA. The present data are in line with previous findings of the predominant localization of PEPCK activity and enzyme protein in periportal hepatocytes. They suggest that the heterogeneous expression of the PEPCK gene in rat liver is regulated at the pretranslational level.

  12. Effects of repeated tianeptine treatment on CRF mRNA expression in non-stressed and chronic mild stress-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Park, Sang-Ha; Choi, Song-Hyen; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Lee, Kuem-Ju; Kang, Seung Woo; Lee, Min-Soo; Choi, Sang-Hyun; Chun, Boe-Gwun; Shin, Kyung-Ho

    2006-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that dysregulation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) may play a role in depression and that this dysregulation may be corrected by antidepressant drug treatment. Here, we examined whether chronic mild stress (CMS) alters CRF mRNA levels in stress-related brain areas including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), and whether repeated tianeptine treatment can attenuate CMS-induced changes in CRF mRNA levels. Male rats were exposed to CMS for 19 days, and control animals were subjected to brief handling. Both groups were injected daily with tianeptine or saline. CMS significantly increased CRF mRNA levels in the dorsal BNST (dBNST), but not in other areas. Repeated tianeptine treatment prevented the CMS-induced increase in CRF mRNA levels in the dBNST, and reduced CRF mRNA levels in dBNST in non-stressed controls. Moreover, repeated tianeptine treatment significantly decreased CRF mRNA levels in the ventral BNST and CeA of non-stressed controls as well as CMS-exposed rats. These results show that CMS induces a rather selective increase of CRF mRNA in the dBNST. In addition, these results suggest that repeated tianeptine treatment diminishes the basal activity of CRF neurons and reduces their sensitivity to stress.

  13. Translational control of germ cell-expressed mRNA imposed by alternative splicing: opioid peptide gene expression in rat testis.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Collard, M W; Douglass, J O

    1989-01-01

    The three genes encoding the opioid peptide precursors (prodynorphin, proenkephalin, and proopiomelanocortin) are expressed in the rat testis. The sizes of the three opioid mRNAs in the testis differ from the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs in other rat tissues in which these genes are expressed. The smaller testicular proopiomelanocortin mRNA has previously been demonstrated to arise from alternative transcriptional initiation. In the present study, we found that the smaller testicular prodynorphin mRNA, expressed in Sertoli cells, results from alternative mRNA processing. Exon 2, which makes up 5' untranslated sequence, is removed from the mature transcript. Polysome analysis of brain and testis RNA indicates that the alteration of the prodynorphin leader sequence in the testis-specific transcript does not affect the efficiency of translation of this mRNA. The larger testicular proenkephalin transcript, expressed in developing germ cells, also results from alternative mRNA processing. Alternative acceptor site usage in the splicing of intron A results in a germ cell-specific proenkephalin transcript with a 491-nucleotide 5' untranslated leader sequence preceding the preproenkephalin-coding sequence. Polysome analysis indicates that this germ cell-specific proenkephalin mRNA is not efficiently translated. Mechanisms by which alternative mRNA splicing may serve to confer translational regulation upon the testicular proenkephalin transcript are discussed. Images PMID:2573832

  14. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  15. HLA-A*68020103 shows an eight nucleotides deletion within intron 2 but has normal mRNA splicing and serological recognition.

    PubMed

    Balas, A; Sánchez-García, F; Bustamante, L; García-Sánchez, F; Vicario, J L

    2007-09-01

    A novel A*68020103 allele was completely characterized by sequencing in a Spanish bone marrow donor. A*68020103 has an eight nucleotides deletion at the 5'-end of intron 2, when compared with other A*6802 alleles. This alteration does not affect either its mRNA splicing process or serological detection. PMID:17661918

  16. Human low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA interacts with a predicted p190RhoGEF homologue (RGNEF) in humans.

    PubMed

    Volkening, Kathryn; Leystra-Lantz, Cheryl; Strong, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    In the mouse, p190RhoGEF is a low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA stability factor that is involved in NF aggregate formation in neurons. A human homologue of this protein has not been described. Our objective was to identify a human homologue of p190RhoGEF, and to determine its interaction with human NFL mRNA. We used sequence homology searches to predict a human homologue (RGNEF), and RT-PCR to determine the expression of mRNA in ALS and neuropathologically normal control tissues. Gel shift assays determined the interaction of RGNEF with human NFL mRNA in vitro, while IP-RT-PCR and gel shift assays were used to confirm the interaction in tissue lysates. We determined that RGNEF is a human homologue of p190RhoGEF, and that its RNA is expressed in both brain and spinal cord. While RGNEF and NFL mRNA interact directly in vitro, interestingly they only appear to interact in ALS lysates and not in controls. These data add another player to the family of NFL mRNA stability regulators, and raise the intriguing possibility that the mechanism by which p190RhoGEF contributes to murine neuronal NF aggregate formation may be important to human ALS NF aggregate formation.

  17. Primary structure of chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lonberg, N; Gilbert, W

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the cDNA sequence corresponding to chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA; the predicted coding region spans 529 amino acids and establishes the complete amino acid sequence for the vertebrate enzyme. We demonstrate that the level of mRNA for this enzyme is under developmental control and suggest a structural model for the protein kinase-mediated regulation of the mammalian liver isozyme. We report a method for the direct analysis of, and the preparation of cDNA probes from, mRNA which has been fractionated on methylmercury/agarose gels. Images PMID:6574503

  18. Automatic stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1936-01-01

    This report concerns the study of automatic stabilizers and extends it to include the control of the three-control system of the airplane instead of just altitude control. Some of the topics discussed include lateral disturbed motion, static stability, the mathematical theory of lateral motion, and large angles of incidence. Various mechanisms and stabilizers are also discussed. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression, achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  19. Effects of tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate and triphenyl phosphate on receptor-associated mRNA expression in zebrafish embryos/larvae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Wang, Qiangwei; Liang, Kang; Liu, Jingfu; Zhou, Bingsheng; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongling; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia

    2013-03-15

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) are frequently detected in biota, including fish. However, knowledge of the toxicological and molecular effects of these currently used flame retardants is limited. In the present study, an in vivo screening approach was developed to evaluate effects of TDCPP and TPP on developmental endpoints and receptor-associated expression of mRNA in zebrafish embryos/larvae. Exposure to TDCPP or TPP resulted in significantly smaller rates of hatching and survival, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) was 7.0 mg/L for TDCPP and 29.6 mg/L for TPP at 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). Real-time PCR revealed alterations in expression of mRNAs involved in aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs)-, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα)-, estrogenic receptors (ERs)-, thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα)-, glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-, and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-centered gene networks. Exposure to positive control chemicals significantly altered abundances of mRNA in corresponding receptor-centered gene networks, a result that suggests that it is feasible to use zebrafish embryos/larvae to evaluate effects of chemicals on mRNA expression in these gene networks. Exposure to TDCPP altered transcriptional profiles in all six receptor-centered gene networks, thus exerting multiple toxic effects. TPP was easily metabolized and its potency to change expression of mRNA involved in receptor-centered gene networks was weaker than that of TDCPP. The PPARα- and TRα-centered gene networks might be the primary pathways affected by TPP. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TDCPP and TPP could alter mRNA expression of genes involved in the six receptor-centered gene networks in zebrafish embryos/larvae, and TDCPP seemed to have higher potency in changing the mRNA expression of these genes. PMID:23306105

  20. Changes in apoptotic microRNA and mRNA expression profiling in Caenorhabditis elegans during the Shenzhou-8 mission

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Li, Shuai; Xu, Dan; Wang, Junjun; Sun, Yeqing

    2015-01-01

    Radiation and microgravity exposure have been proven to induce abnormal apoptosis in microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA expression, but whether space conditions, including radiation and microgravity, activate miRNAs to regulate the apoptosis is undetermined. For that purpose, we investigated miRNome and mRNA expression in the ced-1 Caenorhabditis elegans mutant vs the wild-type, both of which underwent spaceflight, spaceflight 1g-centrifuge control and ground control conditions during the Shenzhou-8 mission. Results showed that no morphological changes in the worms were detected, but differential miRNA expression increased from 43 (ground control condition) to 57 and 91 in spaceflight and spaceflight control conditions, respectively. Microgravity altered miRNA expression profiling by decreasing the number and significance of differentially expressed miRNA compared with 1 g incubation during spaceflight. Alterations in the miRNAs were involved in alterations in apoptosis, neurogenesis larval development, ATP metabolism and GTPase-mediated signal transduction. Among these, 17 altered miRNAs potentially involved in apoptosis were screened and showed obviously different expression signatures between space conditions. By integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA, miR-797 and miR-81 may be involved in apoptosis by targeting the genes ced-10 and both drp-1 and hsp-1, respectively. Compared with ground condition, space conditions regulated apoptosis though a different manner on transcription, by altering expression of seven core apoptotic genes in spaceflight condition, and eight in spaceflight control condition. Results indicate that, miRNA of Caenorhabditis elegans probably regulates apoptotic gene expression in response to space environmental stress, and shows different behavior under microgravity condition compared with 1 g condition in the presence of space radiation. PMID:26286471

  1. Metastasis-suppressor transcript destabilization through TARBP2 binding of mRNA hairpins

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hani; Zhang, Steven; Buss, Colin G.; Fish, Lisa; Tavazoie, Saeed; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of RNA stability plays an important role in many disease states1,2. Deregulated post-transcriptional modulation, such as that governed by microRNAs targeting linear sequence elements in mRNAs, has been implicated in the progression of many cancer types3-7. A defining feature of RNA is its ability to fold into structures. However, the roles of structural mRNA elements in cancer progression remain unexplored. We performed an unbiased search for post-transcriptional modulators of mRNA stability in breast cancer by conducting whole-genome transcript stability measurements in poorly and highly metastatic isogenic breast cancer lines. Using a computational framework that searches RNA sequence and structure space8, we discovered a family of GC-rich structural cis-regulatory RNA elements, termed sRSE for structural RNA stability element, that is significantly over-represented in transcripts displaying reduced stability in highly metastatic cells. By integrating computational and biochemical approaches, we identified TARBP2, a double-stranded RNA binding protein implicated in micro-RNA processing as the trans factor that binds the sRSE family and similar structural elements—collectively termed TARBP2-binding structural elements (TBSE)—in transcripts. TARBP2 is overexpressed in metastatic cells and metastatic human breast tumours and destabilizes transcripts containing TBSE instances. Endogenous TARBP2 promotes metastatic cell invasion and colonization by destabilizing amyloid precursor protein (APP) and ZNF395 transcripts, two genes previously associated with Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease, respectively. We reveal these genes to be novel metastasis suppressor genes in breast cancer. The cleavage product of APP, extracellular α-amyloid peptide, directly suppresses invasion while ZNF395 transcriptionally represses a pro-metastatic gene expression program. The expression levels of TARBP2, APP, and ZNF395 in human breast carcinomas support

  2. Altered glutathione metabolism in oxaliplatin resistant ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    el-akawi, Z; Abu-hadid, M; Perez, R; Glavy, J; Zdanowicz, J; Creaven, P J; Pendyala, L

    1996-07-19

    Elevation of glutathione (GSH) is commonly observed in cellular resistance to a number of anticancer agents. Most frequently reported change in GSH metabolism that is associated with the elevated GSH levels is increased mRNA expression and activity of gamma-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (gamma GCS), the first enzyme of the GSH biosynthetic pathway. We have isolated sublines of the A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line (C10 and C25) that are 8- and 12-fold resistant to oxaliplatin by repeatedly exposing the cells to increasing concentrations of the platinum agent. The GSH levels in C10 and C25 cell sublines are 3.1- and 3.8-fold higher than the parent A2780 cell line. The mRNA levels and activities for gamma GCS and that for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma GT), the GSH salvage pathway enzyme, were measured in these cells. The mRNA for gamma GT and gamma GCS were measured by RT-PCR, with quantitation of the PCR product by HPLC; mRNA levels are expressed as ratios to beta-actin mRNA, used as an endogenous standard. GSH and gamma GCS activity were measured by HPLC assays and gamma GT activity by a colorimetric assay. The increase in GSH in C10 and C25 was associated with an elevation in gamma GT mRNA (2.5- and 8-fold) and gamma GT activity (2.7- and 2.8-fold). No changes were observed in gamma GCS mRNA levels or activity. The data indicate that alterations in GSH metabolism leading to elevations in cellular GSH in A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells selected for low levels of resistance to oxaliplatin are mediated by gamma GT, the "salvage' pathway, rather than an increase in GSH biosynthesis.

  3. BAY11 enhances OCT4 synthetic mRNA expression in adult human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The OCT4 transcription factor is involved in many cellular processes, including development, reprogramming, maintaining pluripotency and differentiation. Synthetic OCT4 mRNA was recently used (in conjunction with other reprogramming factors) to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discovered that BAY 11-7082 (BAY11), at least partially through an NF-κB-inhibition based mechanism, could significantly increase the expression of OCT4 following transfection of synthetic mRNA (synRNA) into adult human skin cells. Methods We tested various chemical and molecular small molecules on their ability to suppress the innate immune response seen upon synthetic mRNA transfection. Three molecules - B18R, BX795, and BAY11 - were used in immunocytochemical and proliferation-based assays. We also utilized global transcriptional meta-analysis coupled with quantitative PCR to identify relative gene expression downstream of OCT4. Results We found that human skin cells cultured in the presence of BAY11 resulted in reproducible increased expression of OCT4 that did not inhibit normal cell proliferation. The increased levels of OCT4 resulted in significantly increased expression of genes downstream of OCT4, including the previously identified SPP1, DUSP4 and GADD45G, suggesting the expressed OCT4 was functional. We also discovered a novel OCT4 putative downstream target gene SLC16A9 which demonstrated significantly increased expression following elevation of OCT4 levels. Conclusions For the first time we have shown that small molecule-based stabilization of synthetic mRNA expression can be achieved with use of BAY11. This small molecule-based inhibition of innate immune responses and subsequent robust expression of transfected synthetic mRNAs may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics. PMID:23388106

  4. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  5. Retinoic acid and dexamethasone affect RAR-beta and surfactant protein C mRNA in the MLE lung cell line.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Zachman, R D

    1998-01-01

    Lung development and surfactant biosynthesis are affected by retinoic acid (RA) and dexamethasone (Dex). Using a mouse lung epithelial cell line, we are exploring RA-Dex interactions through the study of RA and Dex effects on RA receptor (RAR) and surfactant protein (SP) C mRNA expression. RA increased expression of RAR-beta (5.5 times) and SP-C (2 times) mRNA, with maximal effects at 24 h and at 10(-6) M. The RA induction was not inhibited by cycloheximide, suggesting RA affects transcription. With added actinomycin D, RA did not affect the disappearance rate of RAR-beta mRNA, but SP-C mRNA degradation was slowed, indicating an effect on SP-C mRNA stability. Dex decreased RAR-beta and SP-C expression to 75 and 70% of control values, respectively, with greatest effects at 48 h and at 10(-7) M. There was no effect of Dex on either RAR-beta or SP-C mRNA disappearance with actinomycin D. However, cycloheximide prevented the effect of Dex. Despite Dex, RA increased both RAR-beta and SP-C mRNA. This work suggests that RA and Dex affect RAR-beta and SP-C genes by different mechanisms. PMID:9458794

  6. 3[prime] end maturation of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast atpB mRNA is a two-step process

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.B.; Kindle, K.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The research studied the 3[prime] end maturation of green algae chloroplast atpB mRNA. Most data on transcription termination and 3[prime] end maturation in chloroplasts have been based on in vitro experiments. Newly developed chloroplast transformation techniques have allowed the use of a green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to examine chloroplast mRNA 3[prime] end stability determinants and mRNA processing both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this research showed that Chlamydomonas chloroplast protein extracts contain an endonuclease activity that cleaves a synthetic precursor of atpB mRNA 10 nucleotides downstream on the mature 3[prime] end in vitro. Rapid cleavage by this endonuclease is followed by exonucleolytic removal of 10 nucleotides to yield the mature 3[prime] end.

  7. Polyadenylation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    1974-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mRNA isolated from infected cell polysomes contains polyadenylic acid [poly(A)] sequences. Detergent-activated purified virions in vitro can transcribe complementary RNA, which has sedimentation properties similar to mRNA, and this RNA also contains poly(A) sequences. Digestion of virion RNA with U2 RNase under conditions where hydrolysis is specific for purine linkages leaves no sequences of polyuridylic acid corresponding in length to the poly(A) on the transcripts. Growth of infectious virus is not inhibited by 3-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) under conditions in which it inhibits polyadenylation of cellular mRNA. The virus-specific mRNA produced in the presence of cordycepin has poly(A) sequences of the same size distribution as that synthesized in the absence of cordycepin. PMID:4363251

  8. Multiple crosstalks between mRNA biogenesis and SUMO.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Jérôme O; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Palancade, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    mRNA metabolism involves the orchestration of multiple nuclear events, including transcription, processing (e.g., capping, splicing, polyadenylation), and quality control. This leads to the accurate formation of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) that are finally exported to the cytoplasm for translation. The production of defined sets of mRNAs in given environmental or physiological situations relies on multiple regulatory mechanisms that target the mRNA biogenesis machineries. Among other regulations, post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO, whose prominence in several cellular processes has been largely demonstrated, also plays a key role in mRNA biogenesis. Analysis of the multiple available SUMO proteomes and functional validations of an increasing number of sumoylated targets have revealed the key contribution of SUMO-dependent regulation in nuclear mRNA metabolism. While sumoylation of transcriptional activators and repressors is so far best documented, SUMO contribution to other stages of mRNA biogenesis is also emerging. Modification of mRNA metabolism factors by SUMO determine their subnuclear targeting and biological activity, notably by regulating their molecular interactions with nucleic acids or protein partners. In particular, sumoylation of DNA-bound transcriptional regulators interfere with their association to target sequences or chromatin modifiers. In addition, the recent identification of enzymes of the SUMO pathway within specialized mRNA biogenesis machineries may provide a further level of regulation to their specificity. These multiple crosstalks between mRNA metabolism and SUMO appear therefore as important players in cellular regulatory networks.

  9. Expression of the two mRNA isoforms of the iron transporter Nramp2/DMTI in mice and function of the iron responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Tchernitchko, Dimitri; Bourgeois, Monique; Martin, Marie-Elise; Beaumont, Carole

    2002-01-01

    Nramp2/DMT1 is a transmembrane proton-coupled Fe(2+) transporter. Two different mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing; isoform I contains an iron responsive element (IRE), whereas isoform II does not. They encode two proteins differing at their C-terminal end and by their subcellular localization. IRE-mediated stabilization of isoform I mRNA is thought to stimulate DMT1 expression in response to iron deficiency. We have measured the two mRNAs by real-time quantitative PCR in several mouse tissues, in normal conditions or following injection of phenylhydrazine, a potent haemolytic agent. Isoform I mRNA is expressed in the duodenum and is induced by stimulation of erythropoiesis, whereas the non-IRE isoform is mostly induced in erythropoietic spleen. Surprisingly, both isoforms are highly expressed in the kidney and are not regulated by erythropoiesis. To evaluate the role of the IRE in regulating isoform I mRNA stability, in response to variations in cell iron status, several constructs were made in pCDNA3 with either a normal or a mutated IRE placed at the 3' end of a stable mRNA. These constructs were transfected into HT29 cells and mRNAs were analysed after growing cells in the presence or absence of exogenous iron. There was no difference in the level of expression of the different messages, suggesting that the IRE does not regulate stability of isoform I mRNA. The half-life of the endogenous IRE-mRNA was also measured following actinomycin D addition in iron- or desferrioxamine-treated cells. Decay of the mRNA was very similar in both conditions. These results suggest that additional transcriptional regulations at the promoter level, or iron-dependent regulation of alternative splicing are likely to participate in the induction of isoform I mRNA by iron deficiency. PMID:11964145

  10. Cytokine mRNA quantification in histologically normal canine duodenal mucosa by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Peters, I R; Helps, C R; Calvert, E L; Hall, E J; Day, M J

    2005-01-10

    CD4(+) T helper cells are important for the regulation of immune responses in the intestinal mucosa and they exert their effects through the secretion of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines. Human patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have alterations in the normal intestinal cytokine profile. These cytokine abnormalities have been shown at both the protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level. The role that mucosal cytokines play in the pathogenesis of canine IBD has only been investigated using semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gut tissue, as cytokine antisera are not available for this species. Real-time RT-PCR has been recognised to be a more accurate and sensitive method of quantifying mRNA transcripts, so in this study TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assays for the quantification of mRNA encoding IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta in canine intestinal mucosa were developed. The amount of these templates was quantified in normal canine duodenal mucosa (n = 8). IL-18, TGF-beta and TNF-alpha were found to be the most abundant transcripts, with IL-10 and IFN-gamma present at levels approximately 10-fold less. IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-12 were the least abundant templates, with some RNA samples having no detectable mRNA copies. The methods developed in this study will form the basis of further work investigating the expression of mRNA encoding cytokines in mucosa from dogs with chronic enteropathies. In addition, these real-time PCR assays can also be used for the quantification of canine cytokine mRNA in other diseases.

  11. Mechanisms of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    Endonuclease cleavage was one of the first identified mechanisms of mRNA decay but until recently it was thought to play a minor role to the better-known processes of deadenylation, decapping, and exonuclease-catalyzed decay. Most of the early examples of endonuclease decay came from studies of a particular mRNA whose turnover changed in response to hormone, cytokine, developmental, or nutritional stimuli. Only a few of these examples of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay progressed to the point where the enzyme responsible for the initiating event was identified and studied in detail. The discovery of microRNAs and RISC-catalyzed endonuclease cleavage followed by the identification of PIN (pilT N-terminal) domains that impart endonuclease activity to a number of the proteins involved in mRNA decay has led to a resurgence of interest in endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. PIN domains show no substrate selectivity and their involvement in a number of decay pathways highlights a recurring theme that the context in which an endonuclease function is a primary factor in determining whether any given mRNA will be targeted for decay by this or the default exonuclease-mediated decay processes.

  12. Conventional and unconventional mechanisms for capping viral mRNA.

    PubMed

    Decroly, Etienne; Ferron, François; Lescar, Julien; Canard, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell, capping of mRNA 5' ends is an essential structural modification that allows efficient mRNA translation, directs pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export from the nucleus, limits mRNA degradation by cellular 5'-3' exonucleases and allows recognition of foreign RNAs (including viral transcripts) as 'non-self'. However, viruses have evolved mechanisms to protect their RNA 5' ends with either a covalently attached peptide or a cap moiety (7-methyl-Gppp, in which p is a phosphate group) that is indistinguishable from cellular mRNA cap structures. Viral RNA caps can be stolen from cellular mRNAs or synthesized using either a host- or virus-encoded capping apparatus, and these capping assemblies exhibit a wide diversity in organization, structure and mechanism. Here, we review the strategies used by viruses of eukaryotic cells to produce functional mRNA 5'-caps and escape innate immunity. PMID:22138959

  13. Final Report [Regulated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis: A global analysis of differential control by hormones and the circadian clock

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Pamela J.

    2010-03-18

    The long-term goal of this research was to better understand the influence of mRNA stability on gene regulation, particularly in response to hormones and the circadian clock. The primary aim of this project was to examine this using DNA microarrays, small RNA analysis and other approaches. We accomplished these objectives, although we were only able to detect small changes in mRNA stability in response to these stimuli. However, the work also contributed to a major breakthrough allowing the identification of small RNAs on a genomic scale in eukaryotes. Moreover, the project prompted us to develop a new way to analyze mRNA decay genome wide. Thus, the research was hugely successful beyond our objectives.

  14. Expression of ras oncogenes in cultured human cells alters the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of cytokine genes.

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, G D; Ernst, T J; Pratt, E S; Zenzie, B W; Rheinwald, J G; Griffin, J D

    1990-01-01

    Autonomous production of cytokines such as the hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), IL-1, or IL-6 has been demonstrated in numerous human and murine neoplasms, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of several paraneoplastic syndromes such as leukocytosis, fever, and hypercalcemia. Because of the high frequency with which mutations in ras protooncogenes have been detected in human tumors, as well as evidence linking ras gene products to activation of certain cellular functions, we investigated whether ras mutations might influence the regulation of cytokine genes. Normal human fibroblasts transfected with a mutant val12 H-ras oncogene expressed increased levels of mRNA transcripts encoding granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), and IL-1 beta compared with controls. Human mesothelioma cells transfected with a mutant asp12 N-ras oncogene exhibited similar alterations in cytokine gene expression. Estimates of transcriptional activity by nuclear run-on analysis revealed a selective increase in transcription only for the IL-1 gene. Analysis of mRNA half-life demonstrated a marked increase in the stability of numerous cytokine transcripts, including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1, and IL-6. The addition of anti-IL-1 neutralizing antibody to cultures of cells expressing ras mutants did not block the expression of any of the cytokines examined, suggesting that the baseline expression of GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-6 was not a secondary event due to the increased transcription of IL-1. These results indicate that mutations in ras genes may alter expression of several cytokine genes through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Images PMID:2212010

  15. Dynamic Proteomics Emphasizes the Importance of Selective mRNA Translation and Protein Turnover during Arabidopsis Seed Germination*

    PubMed Central

    Galland, Marc; Huguet, Romain; Arc, Erwann; Cueff, Gwendal; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    During seed germination, the transition from a quiescent metabolic state in a dry mature seed to a proliferative metabolic state in a vigorous seedling is crucial for plant propagation as well as for optimizing crop yield. This work provides a detailed description of the dynamics of protein synthesis during the time course of germination, demonstrating that mRNA translation is both sequential and selective during this process. The complete inhibition of the germination process in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide established that mRNA translation is critical for Arabidopsis seed germination. However, the dynamics of protein turnover and the selectivity of protein synthesis (mRNA translation) during Arabidopsis seed germination have not been addressed yet. Based on our detailed knowledge of the Arabidopsis seed proteome, we have deepened our understanding of seed mRNA translation during germination by combining two-dimensional gel-based proteomics with dynamic radiolabeled proteomics using a radiolabeled amino acid precursor, namely [35S]-methionine, in order to highlight de novo protein synthesis, stability, and turnover. Our data confirm that during early imbibition, the Arabidopsis translatome keeps reflecting an embryonic maturation program until a certain developmental checkpoint. Furthermore, by dividing the seed germination time lapse into discrete time windows, we highlight precise and specific patterns of protein synthesis. These data refine and deepen our knowledge of the three classical phases of seed germination based on seed water uptake during imbibition and reveal that selective mRNA translation is a key feature of seed germination. Beyond the quantitative control of translational activity, both the selectivity of mRNA translation and protein turnover appear as specific regulatory systems, critical for timing the molecular events leading to successful germination and seedling establishment. PMID:24198433

  16. A novel mRNA 3' untranslated region translational control sequence regulates Xenopus Wee1 mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Ying; Charlesworth, Amanda; Byrd, Shannon M; Gregerson, Robert; MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2008-05-15

    Cell cycle progression during oocyte maturation requires the strict temporal regulation of maternal mRNA translation. The intrinsic basis of this temporal control has not been fully elucidated but appears to involve distinct mRNA 3' UTR regulatory elements. In this study, we identify a novel translational control sequence (TCS) that exerts repression of target mRNAs in immature oocytes of the frog, Xenopus laevis, and can direct early cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation during oocyte maturation. The TCS is functionally distinct from the previously characterized Musashi/polyadenylation response element (PRE) and the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE). We report that TCS elements exert translational repression in both the Wee1 mRNA 3' UTR and the pericentriolar material-1 (Pcm-1) mRNA 3' UTR in immature oocytes. During oocyte maturation, TCS function directs the early translational activation of the Pcm-1 mRNA. By contrast, we demonstrate that CPE sequences flanking the TCS elements in the Wee1 3' UTR suppress the ability of the TCS to direct early translational activation. Our results indicate that a functional hierarchy exists between these distinct 3' UTR regulatory elements to control the timing of maternal mRNA translational activation during oocyte maturation.

  17. Regulated expression of a calmodulin isoform alters growth and development in potato.

    PubMed

    Poovaiah, B W; Takezawa, D; An, G; Han, T J

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodulin isoform on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized (Takezawa et al., 1995). Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM1 fused to the CaMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM1 mRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM1 mRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM1 mRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both mRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  18. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  19. Spaceflight has compartment- and gene-specific effects on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in rat femur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. L.; Morey-Holton, E.; Turner, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that the abnormal bone matrix produced during spaceflight may be associated with reduced expression of bone matrix protein genes. To test this possibility, we investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight (SLS-2 experiment) on steady-state mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), osteocalcin, osteonectin, and prepro-alpha(1) subunit of type I collagen in the major bone compartments of rat femur. There were pronounced site-specific differences in the steady-state levels of expression of the mRNAs for the three bone matrix proteins and GAPDH in normal weight-bearing rats, and these relationships were altered after spaceflight. Specifically, spaceflight resulted in decreases in mRNA levels for GAPDH (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteocalcin (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteonectin (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis), and collagen (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis) compared with ground controls. There were no changes in mRNA levels for matrix proteins or GAPDH in the shaft and distal epiphysis. These results demonstrate that spaceflight leads to site- and gene-specific decreases in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that spaceflight-induced decreases in bone formation are caused by concomitant decreases in expression of genes for bone matrix proteins.

  20. Regulation of lipoprotein lipase activity and mRNA in the mammary gland of the lactating mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, D R; Gavigan, S; Sawicki, V; Witsell, D L; Eckel, R H; Neville, M C

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effects of reproductive stage and fasting on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and mRNA in the mouse mammary gland. Heparin-releasable and cell-associated LPL activity rose immediately after birth, followed 1-2 days later by an increase in LPL mRNA. Fasting decreased LPL activity in the mammary gland at all reproductive stages. During lactation, both milk and heparin-releasable LPL were substantially decreased by an overnight fast, whereas cell-associated LPL was less affected and LPL mRNA did not change. These studies indicate that the extracellular, heparin-releasable, fraction of mammary LPL activity responds most rapidly to alterations in physiological state, usually accompanied by smaller changes in cellular enzyme activity. Changes in the level of LPL mRNA were seen only during the transition from pregnancy to lactation, and these tended to follow, rather than precede, changes in enzyme activity. We conclude that in the mammary gland as in adipose tissue, LPL is regulated primarily at the translational and post-translational level. Images Figure 1 PMID:8135737

  1. Differences in correlation of mRNA gene expression in mice sensitive and resistant to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.J.; Piedboeuf, B.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Baggs, R.; Rubin, P.

    1995-05-01

    Fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of collagen, is a late result of thoracic irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix protein and transforming growth factor {beta} mRNA expression are altered late in the course of pulmonary fibrosis after irradiation, and then to determine if these changes differ between two strains of mice which vary in their sensitivity to radiation. Radiation-sensitive (C57BL/6) and radiation-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice were irradiated with a single dose of 5 or 12.5 Gy to the thorax. Total lung RNA was prepared and immobilized by Northern and slot blotting and hybridized with radiolabeled cDNA probes for collagens I, III and IV, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} and {beta}{sub 3}. Autoradiographic data were quantified by video densitometry and results normalized to a control probe encoding for glyceralde-hyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Alterations in mRNA abundance were observed in the sensitive mice at all times, while levels in the resistant mice were unaffected until 26 weeks after irradiation. The relationship between extracellular matrix protein per se and increased mRNA abundance suggests that late matrix protein accumulation may be a function of gene expression. Differences in levels of transforming growth factor {beta}mRNA may lead to strain-dependent variation in fibrotic response and may also contribute to the radiation-induced component of pulmonary fibrosis. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Altered adipocyte structure and function in nutritionally programmed microswine offspring

    PubMed Central

    DuPriest, E. A.; Kupfer, P.; Lin, B.; Sekiguchi, K.; Morgan, T. K.; Saunders, K. E.; Chatkupt, T. T.; Denisenko, O. N.; Purnell, J. Q.; Bagby, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction links obesity of any cause with cardiometabolic disease, but whether early-life nutritional deficiency can program adipocyte dysfunction independently of obesity is untested. In 3–5-month-old juvenile microswine offspring exposed to isocaloric perinatal maternal protein restriction (MPR) and exhibiting accelerated prepubertal fat accrual without obesity, we assessed markers of acquired obesity: adiponectin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels and adipocyte size in intra-abdominal (ABD-AT) and subcutaneous (SC-AT) adipose tissues. Plasma cortisol, leptin and insulin levels were measured in fetal, neonatal and juvenile offspring. In juvenile low-protein offspring (LPO), adipocyte size in ABD-AT was reduced 22% (P=0.011 v. controls), whereas adipocyte size in SC-AT was increased in female LPO (P=0.05) and normal in male LPO; yet, adiponectin mRNA in LPO was low in both sexes and in both depots (P<0.001). Plasma leptin (P=0.004) and cortisol (P<0.05) were reduced only in neonatal LPO during MPR. In juveniles, correlations between % body fat and adiponectin mRNA, TNF-α mRNA or plasma leptin were significant in normal-protein offspring (NPO) but absent in LPO. Plasma glucose in juvenile LPO was increased in males but decreased in females (interaction, P=0.023); plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity were unaffected. Findings support nutritional programming of adipocyte size and gene expression and subtly altered glucose homeostasis. Reduced adiponectin mRNA and adipokine dysregulation in juvenile LPO following accelerated growth occurred independently of obesity, adipocyte hypertrophy or inflammatory markers; thus, perinatal MPR and/or growth acceleration can alter adipocyte structure and disturb adipokine homeostasis in metabolically adverse patterns predictive of enhanced disease risk. PMID:25102010

  3. The role of mRNA turnover in the regulation of tristetraprolin expression: evidence for an extracellular signal-regulated kinase-specific, AU-rich element-dependent, autoregulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Seth A; Connolly, John E; Rigby, William F C

    2004-06-15

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a regulator of TNF-alpha mRNA stability and is the only trans-acting factor shown to be capable of regulating AU-rich element-dependent mRNA turnover at the level of the intact animal. Using the THP-1 myelomonocytic cell line, we demonstrated for the first time that TTP is encoded by an mRNA with a short half-life under resting conditions. Using pharmacologic inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, we show that the induction of TTP by LPS activation is mediated through changes in transcription, mRNA stability, and translation. A coordinate increase in both TTP and TNF-alpha mRNA stability occurs within 15 min of LPS treatment, but is transduced through different mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. This regulation of TTP and TNF-alpha mRNA stability is associated with the finding that TTP binds these mRNA under both resting and LPS-activated conditions in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that TTP can regulate reporter gene expression in a TTP 3' untranslated region-dependent manner and identify three distinct AU-rich elements necessary to mediate this effect. Thus, TTP regulates its own expression in a manner identical to that seen with the TNF-alpha 3' untranslated region, indicating that this autoregulation is mediated at the level of mRNA stability. In this manner, TTP is able to limit the production of its own proteins as well as that of TNF-alpha and thus limit the response of the cell to LPS. PMID:15187101

  4. Nebulisation of IVT mRNA Complexes for Intrapulmonary Administration

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Shan; Rosenecker, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    During the last years the potential role of in vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA as a vehicle to deliver genetic information has come into focus. IVT mRNA could be used for anti-cancer therapies, vaccination purposes, generation of pluripotent stem cells and also for genome engineering or protein replacement. However, the administration of IVT mRNA into the target organ is still challenging. The lung with its large surface area is not only of interest for delivery of genetic information for treatment of e.g. for cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, but also for vaccination purposes. Administration of IVT mRNA to the lung can be performed by direct intratracheal instillation or by aerosol inhalation/nebulisation. The latter approach shows a non-invasive tool, although it is not known, if IVT mRNA is resistant during the process of nebulisation. Therefore, we investigated the transfection efficiency of non-nebulised and nebulised IVT mRNA polyplexes and lipoplexes in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). A slight reduction in transfection efficiency was observed for lipoplexes (Lipofectamine 2000) in the nebulised part compared to the non-nebulised which can be overcome by increasing the amount of Lipofectamine. However, Lipofectamine was more than three times more efficient in transfecting 16HBE than DMRIE and linear PEI performed almost 10 times better than its branched derivative. By contrast, the nebulisation process did not affect the cationic polymer complexes. Furthermore, aerosolisation of IVT mRNA complexes did neither affect the protein duration nor the toxicity of the cationic complexes. Taken together, these data show that aerosolisation of cationic IVT mRNA complexes constitute a potentially powerful means to transfect cells in the lung with the purpose of protein replacement for genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency or for infectious disease vaccines, while bringing along the advantages of IVT mRNA as

  5. Replacement of the yeast TRP4 3' untranslated region by a hammerhead ribozyme results in a stable and efficiently exported mRNA that lacks a poly(A) tail.

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Katrin; Valerius, Oliver; Mangus, David A; Jacobson, Allan; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-01-01

    The mRNA poly(A) tail serves different purposes, including the facilitation of nuclear export, mRNA stabilization, efficient translation, and, finally, specific degradation. The posttranscriptional addition of a poly(A) tail depends on sequence motifs in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the mRNA and a complex trans-acting protein machinery. In this study, we have replaced the 3' UTR of the yeast TRP4 gene with sequences encoding a hammerhead ribozyme that efficiently cleaves itself in vivo. Expression of the TRP4-ribozyme allele resulted in the accumulation of a nonpolyadenylated mRNA. Cells expressing the TRP4-ribozyme mRNA showed a reduced growth rate due to a reduction in Trp4p enzyme activity. The reduction in enzyme activity was not caused by inefficient mRNA export from the nucleus or mRNA destabilization. Rather, analyses of mRNA association with polyribosomes indicate that translation of the ribozyme-containing mRNA is impaired. This translational defect allows sufficient synthesis of Trp4p to support growth of trp4 cells, but is, nevertheless, of such magnitude as to activate the general control network of amino acid biosynthesis. PMID:12003493

  6. Amphiphysin I but not dynamin I nor synaptojanin mRNA expression increased after repeated methamphetamine administration in the rat cerebrum and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Mitsuko; Okouchi, Jiro; Ozawa, Hidetoshi; Kimuro, Yoshihiko; Iwaki, Akiko; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2013-07-01

    Dopamine increases/decreases synaptic vesicle recycling and in schizophrenia the proteins/mRNA is decreased. We isolated cDNA clone, similar to amphiphysin 1 (vesicle protein) mRNA from the neocortex of rats injected repeatedly with methamphetamine using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) differential display. This clone is highly homologous to the 3' region of the human amphiphysin gene. PCR extension study using a primer specific for the rat amphiphysin 1 gene and a primer located within the clone revealed that it is the 3' UTR region of the rat amphiphysin 1 gene. Furthermore, in situ hybridization revealed that amphiphysin 1 mRNA is expressed in the cerebrum, medial thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum. In the cerebellum, amphiphysin mRNA expression was confined to upper granule cell layer. Repeated methamphetamine administration increased amphiphysin I mRNA expression in both anterior part of the cerebrum, and the cerebellum. However, the repeated administration did not alter mRNA expression of the other vesicle proteins, synaptotagmin I, synapsin I, synaptojanin and dynamin I, we conclude that the repeated administration selectively increased amphiphysin 1 mRNA expression. Thus, amphiphysin 1 does not work as synaptic recycling, but it is suggested, as a part of pathogenesis of brain tissue injury (under Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ devoid environment) in repeated methamphetamine-injected states, the gene regulate actin-asssembly, learning, cell stress signaling and cell polarity.

  7. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  8. Bovine milk exosomes contain microRNA and mRNA and are taken up by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hirohisa; Tsuda, Muneya; Sato, Yohei; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Takeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-01

    We reported previously that microRNA (miRNA) are present in whey fractions of human breast milk, bovine milk, and rat milk. Moreover, we also confirmed that so many mRNA species are present in rat milk whey. These RNA were resistant to acidic conditions and to RNase, but were degraded by detergent. Thus, these RNA are likely packaged in membrane vesicles such as exosomes. However, functional extracellular circulating RNA in bodily fluids, such as blood miRNA, are present in various forms. In the current study, we used bovine raw milk and total RNA purified from exosomes (prepared by ultracentrifugation) and ultracentrifuged supernatants, and analyzed them using miRNA and mRNA microarrays to clarify which miRNA and mRNA species are present in exosomes, and which species exist in other forms. Microarray analyses revealed that most mRNA in milk whey were present in exosomes, whereas miRNA in milk whey were present in supernatant as well as exosomes. The RNA in exosomes might exert functional effects because of their stability. Therefore, we also investigated whether bovine milk-derived exosomes could affect human cells using THP-1 cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy studies revealed that bovine milk exosomes were incorporated into differentiated THP-1 cells. These results suggest that bovine milk exosomes might have effects in human cells by containing RNA.

  9. Modified mRNA as an alternative to plasmid DNA (pDNA) for transcript replacement and vaccination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyewon; Chung, June-Key

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Current gene therapy involves replacement of defective gene by delivery of healthy genetic material to precede normal function. Virus-mediated gene delivery is the most successful and efficient method for gene therapy, but it has been challenged due to serious safety concerns. Conversely, gene delivery using plasmid DNA (pDNA) is considered safer, but its transfection efficiency is much lower than virus-mediated gene transfer. Recently, mRNA has been suggested as an alternative option to avoid undesired insertion of delivered DNA sequences with higher transfection efficiency and stability. Area covered: In this review, we summarize the currently available strategies of mRNA modification to increase the therapeutic efficacy; we also highlight the recent improvements of mRNA delivery for in vivo applications of gene therapy. Expert opinion: The use of mRNA-based gene transfer could indeed be a promising new strategy for gene therapy. Notable advantages include no risk of integration into the genomic DNA, adjustable gene expression and easier modulation of the immune system. By reducing or utilizing the immunogenic properties, mRNA offers a promising tool for gene/or transcript replacement. PMID:26125492

  10. IRP1 regulates erythropoiesis and systemic iron homeostasis by controlling HIF2α mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Nicole; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2013-08-29

    Hypoxia inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) transcriptionally activates several genes in response to hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, it undergoes oxygen-dependent degradation by the prolyl hydroxylase (PHD)/von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) system. The presence of an iron-responsive element (IRE) within the 5' untranslated region of HIF2α mRNA suggests a further iron- and oxygen-dependent mechanism for translational regulation of its expression via iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2, respectively). We show here that the disruption of mouse IRP1, but not IRP2, leads to profound HIF2α-dependent abnormalities in erythropoiesis and systemic iron metabolism. Thus, 4- to 6-week-old IRP1(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly and extramedullary hematopoiesis, which is corrected in older animals. These erythropoietic abnormalities are caused by translational de-repression of HIF2α mRNA and subsequent accumulation of HIF2α, which induces expression of erythropoietin (Epo). Increased levels of circulating Epo lead to reticulocytosis, polycythemia, and suppression of hepatic hepcidin mRNA. This in turn promotes hyperferremia and iron depletion in splenic macrophages due to unrestricted expression of ferroportin. Our data demonstrate that IRP1 is the principal regulator of HIF2α mRNA translation in vivo and provide evidence that translational control of HIF2α expression dominates over PHD/VHL-mediated regulation of HIF2α stability in juvenile IRP1(-/-) mice.

  11. [Expression of the Drosophila melanogaster limk1 gene 3'-UTRs mRNA in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, A M; Zakharov, G A; Zhuravlev, A V; Padkina, M V; Savvateeva-Popova, E V; Sambuk, E V

    2014-06-01

    The stability of mRNA and its translation efficacy in higher eukaryotes are influenced by the interaction of 3'-untranscribed regions (3'-UTRs) with microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae lack microRNAs, it is possible to evaluate the contribution of only 3'-UTRs' and RNA-binding proteins' interaction in post-transcriptional regulation. For this, the post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila limk1 gene encoding for the key enzyme of actin remodeling was studied in yeast. Analysis of limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs revealed the potential sites of yeast transcriptional termination. Computer remodeling demonstrated the possibility of secondary structure formation in limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs. For an evaluation of the functional activity of Drosophila 3'-UTRs in yeast, the reporter gene PHO5 encoding for yeast acid phosphatase (AP) fused to different variants of Drosophila limk1 mRNA 3'-UTRs (513, 1075, 1554 bp) was used. Assessments of AP activity and RT-PCR demonstrated that Drosophila limkl gene 3'-UTRs were functionally active and recognized in yeast. Therefore, yeast might be used as an appropriate model system for studies of 3'-UTR's role in post-transcriptional regulation.

  12. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  13. Cardiolipin biosynthesis and remodeling enzymes are altered during development of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saini-Chohan, Harjot K; Holmes, Michael G; Chicco, Adam J; Taylor, William A; Moore, Russell L; McCune, Sylvia A; Hickson-Bick, Diane L; Hatch, Grant M; Sparagna, Genevieve C

    2009-08-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is responsible for modulation of activities of various enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Although energy production decreases in heart failure (HF), regulation of cardiolipin during HF development is unknown. Enzymes involved in cardiac cardiolipin synthesis and remodeling were studied in spontaneously hypertensive HF (SHHF) rats, explanted hearts from human HF patients, and nonfailing Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The biosynthetic enzymes cytidinediphosphatediacylglycerol synthetase (CDS), phosphatidylglycerolphosphate synthase (PGPS) and cardiolipin synthase (CLS) were investigated. Mitochondrial CDS activity and CDS-1 mRNA increased in HF whereas CDS-2 mRNA in SHHF and humans, not in SD rats, decreased. PGPS activity, but not mRNA, increased in SHHF. CLS activity and mRNA decreased in SHHF, but mRNA was not significantly altered in humans. Cardiolipin remodeling enzymes, monolysocardiolipin acyltransferase (MLCL AT) and tafazzin, showed variable changes during HF. MLCL AT activity increased in SHHF. Tafazzin mRNA decreased in SHHF and human HF, but not in SD rats. The gene expression of acyl-CoA: lysocardiolipin acyltransferase-1, an endoplasmic reticulum MLCL AT, remained unaltered in SHHF rats. The results provide mechanisms whereby both cardiolipin biosynthesis and remodeling are altered during HF. Increases in CDS-1, PGPS, and MLCL AT suggest compensatory mechanisms during the development of HF. Human and SD data imply that similar trends may occur in human HF, but not during nonpathological aging, consistent with previous cardiolipin studies. PMID:19001357

  14. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  15. Transcriptional response of hepatic largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) mRNA upon exposure to environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Brian C; Carter, Barbara; Hammers, Heather R; Sepúlveda, María S

    2011-03-01

    Microarrays enable gene transcript expression changes in near-whole genomes to be assessed in response to environmental stimuli. We utilized oligonucleotide microarrays and subsequent gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to assess patterns of gene expression changes in male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) hepatic tissues after a 96 h exposure to common environmental contaminants. Fish were exposed to atrazine, cadmium chloride, PCB 126, phenanthrene and toxaphene via intraperitoneal injection with target body burdens of 3.0, 0.00067, 2.5, 50 and 100 µg g(-1), respectively. This was conducted in an effort to identify potential biomarkers of exposure. The expressions of 4, 126, 118, 137 and 58 mRNA transcripts were significantly (P ≤ 0.001, fold change ≥2×) affected by exposure to atrazine, cadmium chloride, PCB 126, phenanthrene and toxaphene exposures, respectively. GSEA revealed that none, four, five, five and three biological function gene ontology categories were significantly influenced by exposure to these chemicals, respectively. We observed that cadmium chloride elicited ethanol metabolism responses, and along with PCB 126 and phenanthrene affected transcripts associated with protein biosynthesis. PCB 126, phenanthrene and toxaphene also influenced one-carbon compound metabolism while PCB 126 and phenanthrene affected mRNA transcription and mRNA export from the nucleus and may have induced an antiestrogenic response. Atrazine was found to alter the expression of few hepatic transcripts. This work has highlighted several biological processes of interest that may be helpful in the development of gene transcript biomarkers of chemical exposure in fish.

  16. GABAergic mRNA expression is upregulated in the prefrontal cortex of rats sensitized to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Wearne, Travis A; Parker, Lindsay M; Franklin, Jane L; Goodchild, Ann K; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2016-01-15

    Inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission plays an important role in the regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with increasing evidence suggesting that dysfunctional GABAergic processing of the PFC may underlie certain deficits reported across psychotic disorders. Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant that induces chronic psychosis in a subset of users, with repeat administration producing a progressively increased vulnerability to psychotic relapse following subsequent drug administration (sensitization). The aim here was to investigate changes to GABAergic mRNA expression in the PFC of rats sensitized to METH using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) underwent repeated methamphetamine (intraperitoneal (i.p.) or saline injections for 7 days. Following 14 days of withdrawal, rats were challenged with acute methamphetamine (1mg/kg i.p.) and RNA was isolated from the PFC to compare the relative mRNA expression of a range of GABA enzymes, transporters and receptors subunits. METH challenge resulted in a significant sensitized behavioral (locomotor) response in METH pre-treated animals compared with saline pre-treated controls. The mRNAs of transporters (GAT1 and GAT3), ionotropic GABAA receptor subunits (α3 and β1), together with the metabotropic GABAB1 receptor, were upregulated in the PFC of sensitized rats compared with saline controls. These findings indicate that GABAergic mRNA expression is significantly altered at the pre and postsynaptic level following sensitization to METH, with sensitization resulting in the transcriptional upregulation of several inhibitory genes. These changes likely have significant consequences on GABA-mediated neurotransmission in the PFC and may underlie certain symptoms conserved across psychotic disorders, such as executive dysfunction.

  17. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis requires an endoribonuclease-containing multisubunit complex that controls mRNA levels for the matrix gene repressor SinR.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Aaron; Dengler, Vanina; Chai, Yunrong; Losick, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is largely governed by a circuit in which the response regulator Spo0A turns on the gene for the anti-repressor SinI. SinI, in turn, binds to and inactivates SinR, a dedicated repressor of genes for matrix production. Mutants of the genes ylbF, ymcA and yaaT are blocked in biofilm formation, but the mechanism by which they act has been mysterious. A recent report attributed their role in biofilm formation to stimulating Spo0A activity. However, we detect no measurable effect on the transcription of sinI. Instead, we find that the block in biofilm formation is caused by an increase in the levels of SinR and of its mRNA. Evidence is presented that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT interact with, and control the activity of, RNase Y, which is known to destabilize sinR mRNA. We also show that the processing of another target of RNase Y, cggR-gapA mRNA, similarly depends on YlbF and YmcA. Our work suggests that sinR mRNA stability is an additional posttranscriptional control mechanism governing the switch to multicellularity and raises the possibility that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT broadly regulate mRNA stability as part of an RNase Y-containing, multi-subunit complex.

  18. Transcriptome kinetics is governed by a genome-wide coupling of mRNA production and degradation: a role for RNA Pol II.

    PubMed

    Shalem, Ophir; Groisman, Bella; Choder, Mordechai; Dahan, Orna; Pilpel, Yitzhak

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptome dynamics is governed by two opposing processes, mRNA production and degradation. Recent studies found that changes in these processes are frequently coordinated and that the relationship between them shapes transcriptome kinetics. Specifically, when transcription changes are counter-acted with changes in mRNA stability, transient fast-relaxing transcriptome kinetics is observed. A possible molecular mechanism underlying such coordinated regulation might lay in two RNA polymerase (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4 and Rpb7, which are recruited to mRNAs during transcription and later affect their degradation in the cytoplasm. Here we used a yeast strain carrying a mutant Pol II which poorly recruits these subunits. We show that this mutant strain is impaired in its ability to modulate mRNA stability in response to stress. The normal negative coordinated regulation is lost in the mutant, resulting in abnormal transcriptome profiles both with respect to magnitude and kinetics of responses. These results reveal an important role for Pol II, in regulation of both mRNA synthesis and degradation, and also in coordinating between them. We propose a simple model for production-degradation coupling that accounts for our observations. The model shows how a simple manipulation of the rates of co-transcriptional mRNA imprinting by Pol II may govern genome-wide transcriptome kinetics in response to environmental changes.

  19. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    PubMed

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted.

  20. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay - mechanisms of substrate mRNA recognition and degradation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schweingruber, Christoph; Rufener, Simone C; Zünd, David; Yamashita, Akio; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway is well known as a translation-coupled quality control system that recognizes and degrades aberrant mRNAs with truncated open reading frames (ORF) due to the presence of a premature termination codon (PTC). However, a more general role of NMD in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression is indicated by transcriptome-wide mRNA profilings that identified a plethora of physiological mRNAs as NMD targets. In this review, we focus on mechanistic aspects of target mRNA identification and degradation in mammalian cells, based on the available biochemical and genetic data, and point out knowledge gaps. Translation termination in a messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) environment lacking necessary factors for proper translation termination emerges as a key determinant for subjecting an mRNA to NMD, and we therefore review recent structural and mechanistic insight into translation termination. In addition, the central role of UPF1, its crucial phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle and dynamic interactions with other NMD factors are discussed. Moreover, we address the role of exon junction complexes (EJCs) in NMD and summarize the functions of SMG5, SMG6 and SMG7 in promoting mRNA decay through different routes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  2. Oligodendrocyte morphometry and expression of myelin - Related mRNA in ventral prefrontal white matter in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; Mahajan, Gouri; Maciag, Dorota; Sathyanesan, Monica; Iyo, Abiye H; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Kyle, Patrick B; Woolverton, William L; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier; Stockmeier, Craig A; Newton, Samuel S

    2015-06-01

    White matter disturbance in the ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC) in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been noted with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, the cellular and molecular pathology of prefrontal white matter in MDD and potential influence of antidepressant medications is not fully understood. Oligodendrocyte morphometry and myelin-related mRNA and protein expression was examined in the white matter of the vPFC in MDD. Sections of deep and gyral white matter from the vPFC were collected from 20 subjects with MDD and 16 control subjects. Density and size of CNPase-immunoreactive (-IR) oligodendrocytes were estimated using 3-dimensional cell counting. While neither density nor soma size of oligodendrocytes was significantly affected in deep white matter, soma size was significantly decreased in the gyral white matter in MDD. In rhesus monkeys treated chronically with fluoxetine there was no significant effect on oligodendrocyte morphometry. Using quantitative RT-PCR to measure oligodendrocyte-related mRNA for CNPase, PLP1, MBP, MOG, MOBP, Olig1 and Olig2, in MDD there was a significantly reduced expression of PLP1 mRNA (which positively correlated with smaller sizes) and increased expression of mRNA for CNPase, OLIG1 and MOG. The expression of CNPase protein was significantly decreased in MDD. Altered expression of four myelin genes and CNPase protein suggests a mechanism for the degeneration of cortical axons and dysfunctional maturation of oligodendrocytes in MDD. The change in oligodendrocyte morphology in gyral white matter may parallel altered axonal integrity as revealed by DTI.

  3. Oligodendrocyte Morphometry and Expression of Myelin – Related mRNA in Ventral Prefrontal White Matter in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; Mahajan, Gouri; Maciag, Dorota; Sathyanesan, Monica; Iyo, Abiye H.; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Kyle, Patrick B.; Woolverton, William L.; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Newton, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    White matter disturbance in the ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC) in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been noted with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, the cellular and molecular pathology of prefrontal white matter in MDD and potential influence of antidepressant medications is not fully understood. Oligodendrocyte morphometry and myelin-related mRNA and protein expression was examined in the white matter of the vPFC in MDD. Sections of deep and gyral white matter from the vPFC were collected from 20 subjects with MDD and 16 control subjects. Density and size of CNPase-immunoreactive (−IR) oligodendrocytes were estimated using 3-dimensional cell counting. While neither density nor soma size of oligodendrocytes was significantly affected in deep white matter, soma size was significantly decreased in the gyral white matter in MDD. In rhesus monkeys treated chronically with fluoxetine there was no significant effect on oligodendrocyte morphometry. Using quantitative RTPCR to measure oligodendrocyte-related mRNA for CNPase, PLP1, MBP, MOG, MOBP, Olig1 and Olig2, in MDD there was a significantly reduced expression of PLP1 mRNA (which positively correlated with smaller sizes) and increased expression of mRNA for CNPase, OLIG1 and MOG. The expression of CNPase protein was significantly decreased in MDD. Altered expression of four myelin genes and CNPase protein suggests a mechanism for the degeneration of cortical axons and dysfunctional maturation of oligodendrocytes in MDD. The change in oligodendrocyte morphology in gyral white matter may parallel altered axonal integrity as revealed by DTI. PMID:25930075

  4. Decoding Parkinson’s Disease Pathogenesis: The Role of Deregulated mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in a number of genes cause rare familial forms of Parkinson’s disease and provide profound insight into potential mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis. Recently, a role for translation and metabolism of mRNA has emerged in the development of various neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease (PD). In PD, preliminary evidence supports a role for aberrant translation in the disease process stemming from mutations in several genes. Translation control is central to maintaining organism homeostasis under variable environmental conditions and deregulation of this may predispose to certain stressors. Hypothetically, deregulated translation may be detrimental to neuronal viability in PD through the misexpression of a subset of transcripts or through the impact of excessive bulk translation on energy consumption and burden on protein homeostatic mechanisms. While compelling preliminary evidence exists to support a role for translation in PD, much more work is required to identify specific mechanisms linking altered translation to the disease process. PMID:26889638

  5. Effects of testosterone on fever and vasopressin mRNA in wether sheep given endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Parrott, R F; Vellucci, S V

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of testosterone on the febrile response of castrated rams to immunological challenge. Core temperature was recorded by radiotelemetry in wethers (n = 6) injected with lipopolysaccharide endotoxin or saline before and after androgen treatment. The number of cells expressing vasopressin mRNA in the brain region implicated in the anti-pyretic response, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, was determined by in situ hybridisation histochemistry. Endotoxin, but not androgen, increased vasopressin message (P < 0.05), and androgen also did not alter basal or febrile temperatures. Hence, these preliminary findings question whether the androgen-dependent anti-pyretic mechanism described in the male rat is of physiological significance in the ram.

  6. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. PMID:24524972

  7. How Misinformation Alters Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Daniel B.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that a multitude of studies have demonstrated that misleading postevent information affects people's memories. Contents that the fuzzy-trace theory is a positive step toward understanding the malleability of memory. Discusses fuzzy-trace theory in terms of three primary areas of study: altered response format, maximized misinformation…

  8. Effects of simulated microgravity on microRNA and mRNA expression profile of rat soleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhongquan; Wu, Feng; Qu, Lina

    Abstract Spaceflight induces muscle atrophy but mechanism is not well understood. Here, we quantified microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNA shifts of rat soleus after 7, 14 and 28 days tail suspension (TS). Microarray data revealed that TS altered 23 miRNAs and 1313 mRNAs at least 2-fold change. QRT-PCR confirmed changes of miRNAs and mRNAs related to muscle atrophy. MiR-214, miR-486-5p and miR-320 family decreased, but Let-7e increased. Actn3 and myh4 displayed abundant upregulation and a3galt2 downregulated. Predicted targeted genes (whyz, ywhaz and SFRP2) of altered miRNAs decreased. Further analysis of gene functional annotation confirmed consistency of alteration profile between miRNAs and mRNA and enrichment of main clusters in regulation of muscle metabolism. Our results highlight the importance of miR-214, miR-486-5p, miR-320 and Let-7e in muscle atrophy process induced by microgravity.

  9. Occupational Toluene Exposure Induces Cytochrome P450 2E1 mRNA Expression in Peripheral Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Cantú, Ania; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; de León, Mario Bermúdez; Cisneros, Bulmaro; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Rojas-García, Aurora E.; Aguilar-Salinas, Alberto; Manno, Maurizio; Albores, Arnulfo

    2006-01-01

    Print workers are exposed to organic solvents, of which the systemic toxicant toluene is a main component. Toluene induces expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), an enzyme involved in its own metabolism and that of other protoxicants, including some procarcinogens. Therefore, we investigated the association between toluene exposure and the CYP2E1 response, as assessed by mRNA content in peripheral lymphocytes or the 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone (6OH-CHZ)/chlorzoxazone (CHZ) quotient (known as CHZ metabolic ratio) in plasma, and the role of genotype (5′-flanking region RsaI/PstI polymorphic sites) in 97 male print workers. The geometric mean (GM) of toluene concentration in the air was 52.80 ppm (10–760 ppm); 54% of the study participants were exposed to toluene concentrations that exceeded the maximum permissible exposure level (MPEL). The GM of urinary hippuric acid at the end of a work shift (0.041 g/g creatinine) was elevated relative to that before the shift (0.027 g/g creatinine; p < 0.05). The GM of the CHZ metabolic ratio was 0.33 (0–9.3), with 40% of the subjects having ratios below the GM. However, the average CYP2E1 mRNA level in peripheral lymphocytes was 1.07 (0.30–3.08), and CYP2E1 mRNA levels within subjects correlated with the toluene exposure ratio (environmental toluene concentration:urinary hippuric acid concentration) (p = 0.014). Genotype did not alter the association between the toluene exposure ratio and mRNA content. In summary, with further validation, CYP2E1 mRNA content in peripheral lymphocytes could be a sensitive and noninvasive biomarker for the continuous monitoring of toluene effects in exposed persons. PMID:16581535

  10. Integrated miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiling in Inflamed Colon of Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Goten, Jan; Vanhove, Wiebe; Lemaire, Katleen; Van Lommel, Leentje; Machiels, Kathleen; Wollants, Willem-Jan; De Preter, Vicky; De Hertogh, Gert; Ferrante, Marc; Van Assche, Gert; Rutgeerts, Paul; Schuit, Frans; Vermeire, Séverine; Arijs, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with differential colonic expression of genes involved in immune response (e.g. IL8) and barrier integrity (e.g. cadherins). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of gene expression and are involved in various immune-related diseases. In this study, we investigated (1) if miRNA expression in UC mucosa is altered and (2) if any of these changes correlate with mucosal mRNA expression. Integration of mRNA and miRNA expression profiling may allow the identification of functional links between dysregulated miRNAs and their target mRNA. Methodology Colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained from 17 UC (10 active and 7 inactive) patients and 10 normal controls. Total RNA was used to analyze miRNA and mRNA expression via Affymetrix miRNA 2.0 and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0ST arrays, respectively. Both miRNA and gene expression profiles were integrated by correlation analysis to identify dysregulated miRNAs with their corresponding predicted target mRNA. Microarray data were validated with qRT-PCR. Regulation of IL8 and CDH11 expression by hsa-miR-200c-3p was determined by luciferase reporter assays. Results When comparing active UC patients vs. controls, 51 miRNAs and 1543 gene probe sets gave significantly different signals. In contrast, in inactive UC vs. controls, no significant miRNA expression differences were found while 155 gene probe sets had significantly different signals. We then identified potential target genes of the significantly dysregulated miRNAs and genes in active UC vs. controls and found a highly significant inverse correlation between hsa-miR-200c-3p and IL8, an inflammatory marker, and between hsa-miR-200c-3p and CDH11, a gene related to intestinal epithelial barrier function. We could demonstrate that hsa-miR-200c-3p directly regulates IL8 and CDH11 expression. Conclusion Differential expression of immune- and barrier-related genes in inflamed UC mucosa may be influenced by altered expression of mi

  11. Short-term calorie restriction feminizes the mRNA profiles of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how short-term CR alters mRNA profiles of genes that encode metabolism and detoxification machinery in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed CR (0, 15, 30, or 40%) diets for one month, followed by mRNA quantification of 98 xenobiotic processing genes (XPGs) in the liver, including 7 uptake transporters, 39 phase-I enzymes, 37 phase-II enzymes, 10 efflux transporters, and 5 transcription factors. In general, 15% CR did not alter mRNAs of most XPGs, whereas 30 and 40% CR altered over half of the XPGs (32 increased and 29 decreased). CR up-regulated some phase-I enzymes (fold increase), such as Cyp4a14 (12), Por (2.3), Nqo1 (1.4), Fmo2 (5.4), and Fmo3 (346), and numerous number of phase-II enzymes, such as Sult1a1 (1.2), Sult1d1 (2.0), Sult1e1 (33), Sult3a1 (2.2), Gsta4 (1.3), Gstm2 (1.3), Gstm3 (1.7), and Mgst3 (2.2). CR feminized the mRNA profiles of 32 XPGs in livers of male mice. For instance, CR decreased the male-predominantly expressed Oatp1a1 (97%) and increased the female-predominantly expressed Oatp1a4 (11). In conclusion, short-term CR alters the mRNA levels of over half of the 98 XPGs quantified in livers of male mice, and over half of these alterations appear to be due to feminization of the liver.

  12. Short-term Calorie Restriction Feminizes the mRNA Profiles of Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in Livers of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective anti-aging interventions in mammals. A modern theory suggests that aging results from a decline in detoxification capabilities and thus accumulation of damaged macromolecules. The present study aimed to determine how shor