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Sample records for altering phagocyte behavior

  1. Methamphetamine Alters the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Phagocytic Cells during Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mihu, Mircea Radu; Roman-Sosa, Jessica; Varshney, Avanish K.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Shah, Bhavikkumar P.; Ham Lee, Hiu; Nguyen, Long N.; Guimaraes, Allan J.; Fries, Bettina C.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methamphetamine (METH) is a major drug of abuse in the United States and worldwide. Furthermore, Staphylococcus aureus infections and METH use are coemerging public health problems. S. aureus is the single most important bacterial pathogen in infections among injection drug users, with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) being extremely common. Notably, the incidence of SSTI, especially in drug users, is difficult to estimate because such infections are often self-treated. Although there is substantial information on the behavioral and cognitive defects caused by METH in drug users, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding its impact on bacterial infections and immunity. Therefore, we hypothesized that METH exacerbates S. aureus skin infection. Using a murine model of METH administration and wound infection, we demonstrated that METH reduces wound healing and facilitates host-mediated collagen degradation by increased expression and production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Additionally, we found that METH induces S. aureus biofilm formation and leads to detrimental effects on the functions of human and murine phagocytic cells, enhancing susceptibility to S. aureus infection. Our findings provide empirical evidence of the adverse impact of METH use on the antimicrobial efficacy of the cells that comprise innate immunity, the initial host response to combat microbial infection. PMID:26507236

  2. Effect of Estragole on Leukocyte Behavior and Phagocytic Activity of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wiirzler, Luiz Alexandre Marques; Silva-Filho, Saulo Euclides; Kummer, Raquel; Pedroso, Raissa Bocchi; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Silva, Expedito Leite; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Estragole, a chemical constituent of the essential oils of many aromatic plants, is used as flavoring in beverage and food industries. In vivo and in vitro experimental assays have shown that EST has sedative, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anesthetic activity. In this work, we evaluate the effect of EST on leukocyte behavior and phagocytic activity of macrophages. In the peritonitis model, EST (500 and 750 mg/kg) decreased the infiltration of peritoneal exudate leukocytes. In vitro chemotaxis assay showed that EST (3, 10, 30, and 60 μg/mL) inhibited neutrophil migration toward fMLP. In the in vivo microcirculation assay, EST at doses of 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of rolling and adherent leukocytes and at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg decreased number of leukocyte migrated to perivascular tissue. The results showed that EST (3, 10, and 30 μg/mL) was able to stimulate the macrophages phagocytosis but only at concentration of 10 μg/mL promoted an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. In conclusion, this study showed that EST had potential anti-inflammatory effects, likely by inhibiting leukocyte migration and by stimulating macrophages phagocytosis. PMID:25152763

  3. An observational study of phagocytes and Klebsiella pneumoniae relationships: different behaviors.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Elodie; Cateau, Estelle; Delouche, Marion; Quellard, Nathalie; Rodier, Marie-Helene

    2017-01-10

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterium that can be in relation with free living amoebae like Acanthamoeba castellanii in natural environments such as soil and water. This pathogen, which is responsible for community-acquired pneumonia and for nosocomial infections, also has interactions with host defense mechanisms like macrophages. As it has been shown that A. castellanii shares some traits with macrophages, in particular the ability to phagocyte bacteria, we have studied the uptake and the fate of the bacteria after contact with the two phagocytic cells. In our conditions, K. pneumoniae growth was increased in coculture in presence of A. castellanii or Thp-1 macrophagic cells and bacterial development was also increased by A. castellanii supernatant. In addition, we showed that the presence of the bacteria had a negative effect on the macrophages whereas it does not affect amoeba viability. Using gentamicin, which kills bacteria outside cells, we showed that only macrophages were able to internalize K. pneumoniae. This result was confirmed by electron microscopy. We have consequently reported some differences in bacterial uptake and internalization between a free living amoeba and macrophagic cells, highlighting the fact that results obtained with this amoebal model should not be extrapolated to the relationships between K. pneumoniae and macrophages.

  4. The Malnutrition-Related Increase in Early Visceralization of Leishmania donovani Is Associated with a Reduced Number of Lymph Node Phagocytes and Altered Conduit System Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Marwa K.; Barnes, Jeffrey L.; Anstead, Gregory M.; Jimenez, Fabio; Travi, Bruno L.; Peniche, Alex G.; Osorio, E. Yaneth; Ahuja, Seema S.; Melby, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    In a murine model of moderate childhood malnutrition we found that polynutrient deficiency led to a 4–5-fold increase in early visceralization of L. donovani (3 days post-infection) following cutaneous infection and a 16-fold decrease in lymph node barrier function (p<0.04 for all). To begin to understand the mechanistic basis for this malnutrition-related parasite dissemination we analyzed the cellularity, architecture, and function of the skin-draining lymph node. There was no difference in the localization of multiple cell populations in the lymph node of polynutrient deficient (PND) mice, but there was reduced cellularity with fewer CD11c+dendritic cells (DCs), fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), MOMA-2+ macrophages, and CD169+ subcapsular sinus macrophage (p<0.05 for all) compared to the well-nourished (WN) mice. The parasites were equally co-localized with DCs associated with the lymph node conduit network in the WN and PND mice, and were found in the high endothelial venule into which the conduits drain. When a fluorescent low molecular weight (10 kD) dextran was delivered in the skin, there was greater efflux of the marker from the lymph node conduit system to the spleens of PND mice (p<0.04), indicating that flow through the conduit system was altered. There was no evidence of disruption of the conduit or subcapsular sinus architecture, indicating that the movement of parasites into the subcortical conduit region was due to an active process and not from passive movement through a leaking barrier. These results indicate that the impaired capacity of the lymph node to act as a barrier to dissemination of L. donovani infection is associated with a reduced number of lymph node phagocytes, which most likely leads to reduced capture of parasites as they transit through the sinuses and conduit system. PMID:23967356

  5. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  6. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  7. Algal Toxins Alter Copepod Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A.; Waggett, Rebecca J.; Place, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod’s feeding appendages–a “sampling beating” that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration “grazing beating” that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod’s grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod’s feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  8. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes.

  9. The mononuclear phagocyte system.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2006-02-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) has been defined as a family of cells comprising bone marrow progenitors, blood monocytes and tissue macrophages. Macrophages are a major cell population in most of the tissues in the body, and their numbers increase further in inflammation, wounding and malignancy. Their trophic roles for other cell types in development and homeostasis are becoming increasingly evident. The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1R) is expressed in a large proportion of cells considered to be mononuclear phagocytes, including antigen-presenting dendritic cells, which can be considered a specialized adaptive state rather than a separate lineage. The unity of the MPS is challenged by evidence that there is a separate embryonic phagocyte lineage, by the transdifferentiation and fusion of MPS cells with other cell types, and by evidence of local renewal of tissue macrophage populations as opposed to monocyte recruitment. The concept of the MPS may have partly outlived its usefulness.

  10. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  11. Plasmodium and mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Mac-Daniel, Laura; Ménard, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, initially multiplies inside liver cells and then in successive cycles inside erythrocytes, causing the symptoms of the disease. In this review, we discuss interactions between the extracellular and intracellular forms of the Plasmodium parasite and innate immune cells in the mammalian host, with a special emphasis on mononuclear phagocytes. We overview here what is known about the innate immune cells that interact with parasites, mechanisms used by the parasite to evade them, and the protective or detrimental contribution of these interactions on parasite progression through its life cycle and pathology in the host.

  12. Immunity and behavior: antibodies alter emotion.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Patricio T; Kowal, Czeslawa; DeGiorgio, Lorraine A; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2006-01-17

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease in which most patients express Abs that bind double-stranded DNA. Recent work has shown that a subset of lupus Abs can crossreact with the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor. This receptor is expressed in neurons throughout the brain but is at highest density within cells of the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus. The neurons in the CNS are normally protected from brain-reactive Abs by the blood-brain barrier (BBB); however, a breach in the barrier's integrity exposes neurons to potentially pathogenic Abs. Previously, we have shown that mice that are immunized with a peptide mimetope of DNA produce lupus-like Abs that crossreact with DNA and the NMDA receptor. Moreover, after abrogation of the BBB by treatment with lipopolysaccharide, the immunized mice display hippocampal neuron damage with ensuing memory impairment. Given that rises in epinephrine can increase cerebral blood flow and can cause leaks in the BBB, we decided to investigate whether epinephrine could act as a permissive agent for Ab-mediated neurotoxicity. Here, we show that peptide-immunized mice, given epinephrine to open the BBB, lose neurons in the lateral amygdala and develop a behavioral disorder characterized by a deficient response to fear-conditioning paradigms. Thus, the agent used to open the BBB determines which brain region is made vulnerable to neurotoxic Abs, and Abs that penetrate brain tissue can cause changes not only in cognitive competence, but also in emotional behavior.

  13. Parathion alters incubation behavior of laughing gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Hill, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    One member of each pair of incubating laughing gulls at 9 nests was trapped, orally dosed with either 6 mg/kg parathion in corn oil or corn oil alone, and marked about the neck with red dye. Each nest was marked with a numbered stake and the treatment was recorded. A pilot study with captive laughing gulls had determined the proper dosage of parathion that would significantly inhibit their brain AChE activity (about 50% of normal) without overt signs of poisoning. After dosing, birds were released and the nests were observed for 2 1/2 days from a blind on the nesting island. The activities of the birds at each marked nest were recorded at 10-minute intervals. Results indicated that on the day of treatment there was no difference (P greater than 0.05, Chi-square test) in the proportion of time spent on the nest between treated and control birds. However, birds dosed with 6 mg/kg parathion spent significantly less time incubating on days 2 and 3 than did birds receiving only corn oil. By noon on the third day, sharing of nest duties between pair members in the treated group had approached normal, indicating recovery from parathion intoxication. These findings suggest that sublethal exposure of nesting birds to an organophosphate (OP) insecticide, such as parathion, may result in decreased nest attentiveness, thereby making the clutch more susceptible to predation or egg failure. Behavioral changes caused by sublethal OP exposure could be especially detrimental in avian species where only one pair member incubates or where both members are exposed in species sharing nest duties.

  14. Teacher Evaluation in Foreign Language Education: Behavior Alteration Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrott, Carl L.

    A study examined the relationship between French teachers' use of behavior alteration techniques in the classroom, and the perceptions of individuals evaluating the teacher (students, peers, administrators) on the quality of instructional performance. Junior and community college French students, language teachers, and administrators responded to…

  15. Dynamics of behavioral organization and its alteration in major depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toru; Kiyono, Ken; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Nakahara, Rika; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    We describe the nature of human behavioral organization, specifically how resting and active periods are interwoven throughout daily life. Active period durations with physical activity counts successively above a predefined threshold follow a stretched exponential (gamma-type) cumulative distribution with characteristic time, both in healthy individuals and in patients with major depressive disorder. On the contrary, resting period durations below the threshold for both groups obey a scale free power law cumulative distribution over two decades, with significantly lower scaling exponents in the patients. We thus find underlying robust laws governing human behavioral organization, with a parameter altered in depression.

  16. Fishing indirectly structures macroalgal assemblages by altering herbivore behavior.

    PubMed

    Madin, Elizabeth M P; Gaines, Steven D; Madin, Joshua S; Warner, Robert R

    2010-12-01

    Fishing has clear direct effects on harvested species, but its cascading, indirect effects are less well understood. Fishing disproportionately removes larger, predatory fishes from marine food webs. Most studies of the consequent indirect effects focus on density-mediated interactions where predator removal alternately drives increases and decreases in abundances of successively lower trophic-level species. While prey may increase in number with fewer predators, they may also alter their behavior. When such behavioral responses impact the food resources of prey species, behaviorally mediated trophic cascades can dramatically shape landscapes. It remains unclear whether this pathway of change is typically triggered by ocean fishing. By coupling a simple foraging model with empirical observations from coral reefs, we provide a mechanistic basis for understanding and predicting how predator harvest can alter the landscape of risk for herbivores and consequently drive dramatic changes in primary producer distributions. These results broaden trophic cascade predictions for fisheries to include behavioral changes. They also provide a framework for detecting the presence and magnitude of behaviorally mediated cascades. This knowledge will help to reconcile the disparity between expected and observed patterns of fishing-induced cascades in the sea.

  17. Altered avoidance behavior of young black ducks fed cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Haseltine, S.D.; Sileo, L.

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were fed a diet containing 0, 4 or 40 ppm cadmium as cadmium chloride. One-week-old ducklings that had been fed thc same dietary concentrations of cadmium as had their parents were tested for avoidance of a fright stimulus. Ducklings fed 4 ppm cadmium ran significantly farther from the stimulus than did controls or ducklings fed 40 ppm cadmium. Such an alteration in behavior could have harmful effects on wild birds.

  18. Methylglyoxal can mediate behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Pandolfo, Pablo; Galland, Fabiana; Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Batassini, Cristiane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of cognitive function and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are elevated in diabetes and AD and have been suggested to act as mediators of the cognitive decline observed in these pathologies. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an extremely reactive carbonyl compound that propagates glycation reactions and is, therefore, able to generate AGEs. Herein, we evaluated persistent behavioral and biochemical parameters to explore the hypothesis that elevated exogenous MG concentrations, induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion, lead to cognitive decline in Wistar rats. A high and sustained administration of MG (3μmol/μL; subdivided into 6days) was found to decrease the recognition index of rats, as evaluated by the object-recognition test. However, MG was unable to impair learning-memory processes, as shown by the habituation in the open field (OF) and Y-maze tasks. Moreover, a single high dose of MG induced persistent alterations in anxiety-related behavior, diminishing the anxiety-like parameters evaluated in the OF test. Importantly, MG did not alter locomotion behavior in the different tasks performed. Our biochemical findings support the hypothesis that MG induces persistent alterations in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, related to glyoxalase 1 activity, AGEs content and glutamate uptake. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B content, as well as S100B secretion (astroglial-related parameters of brain injury), were not altered by ICV MG administration. Taken together, our data suggest that MG interferes directly in brain function and that the time and the levels of exogenous MG determine the different features that can be seen in diabetic patients.

  19. Alterations of the Host Microbiome Affect Behavioral Responses to Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, Drew D.; Walker, Deena M.; Calipari, Erin S.; Labonte, Benoit; Issler, Orna; Pena, Catherine J.; Ribeiro, Efrain A.; Russo, Scott J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to cocaine and other psychostimulants represents a major public health crisis. The development and persistence of addictive behaviors comes from a complex interaction of genes and environment - the precise mechanisms of which remain elusive. In recent years a surge of evidence has suggested that the gut microbiome can have tremendous impact on behavioral via the microbiota-gut-brain axis. In this study we characterized the influence of the gut microbiota on cocaine-mediated behaviors. Groups of mice were treated with a prolonged course of non-absorbable antibiotics via the drinking water, which resulted in a substantial reduction of gut bacteria. Animals with reduced gut bacteria showed an enhanced sensitivity to cocaine reward and enhanced sensitivity to the locomotor-sensitizing effects of repeated cocaine administration. These behavioral changes were correlated with adaptations in multiple transcripts encoding important synaptic proteins in the brain’s reward circuitry. This study represents the first evidence that alterations in the gut microbiota affect behavioral response to drugs of abuse. PMID:27752130

  20. Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls alters social behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jolous-Jamshidi, Banafsheh; Cromwell, Howard C.; McFarland, Ashley M.; Meserve, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) leads to significant alterations of neural and hormonal systems. These alterations have been shown to impair motor and sensory development. Less is known about the influence of PCB exposure on developing emotional and motivational systems involved in social interactions and social learning. The present study examined the impact of perinatal PCB exposure (mixture of congeners 47 and 77) on social recognition in juvenile animals, conspecific-directed investigation in adults and on neural and hormonal systems involved in social functions. We used a standard habituation–dishabituation paradigm to evaluate juvenile recognition and a social port paradigm to monitor adult social investigation. Areal measures of the periventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus were obtained to provide correlations with related hormone and brain systems. PCB exposed rats were significantly impaired in social recognition as indicated by persistent conspecific-directed exploration by juvenile animals regardless of social experience. As adults, PCB exposure led to a dampening of the isolation-induced enhancement of social investigation. There was not a concomitant alteration of social investigation in pair-housed PCB exposed animals at this stage of development. Interestingly, PVN area was significantly decreased in juvenile animals exposed to PCB during the perinatal period. Shifts in hypothalamic regulation of hormones involved in social behavior and stress could be involved in the behavioral changes observed. Overall, the results suggest that PCB exposure impairs context or experience-dependent modulation of social approach and investigation. These types of social-context deficits are similar to behavioral deficits observed in social disorders such as autism and other pervasive developmental disorders. PMID:20813172

  1. Galantamine reverses scopolamine-induced behavioral alterations in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Amatya, Christina; DeSaer, Cassie J; Dalhoff, Zachary; Eggerichs, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    In planaria (Dugesia tigrina), scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist, induced distinct behaviors of attenuated motility and C-like hyperactivity. Planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) displayed a dose-dependent negative correlation with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mM, and a further increase in scopolamine concentration to 2.25 mM did not further decrease pLMV. Planarian hyperactivity counts was dose-dependently increased following pretreatment with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 0.5 mM and then decreased for scopolamine concentrations ≥ 1 mM. Planarian learning and memory investigated using classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments demonstrated that scopolamine (1 mM) negatively influenced associative learning indicated by a significant decrease in % positive behaviors from 86 % (control) to 14 % (1 mM scopolamine) and similarly altered memory retention, which is indicated by a decrease in % positive behaviors from 69 % (control) to 27 % (1 mM scopolamine). Galantamine demonstrated a complex behavior in planarian motility experiments since co-application of low concentrations of galantamine (0.001 and 0.01 mM) protected planaria against 1 mM scopolamine-induced motility impairments; however, pLMV was significantly decreased when planaria were tested in the presence of 0.1 mM galantamine alone. Effects of co-treatment of scopolamine and galantamine on memory retention in planaria via classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments showed that galantamine (0.01 mM) partially reversed scopolamine (1 mM)-induced memory deficits in planaria as the % positive behaviors increased from 27 to 63 %. The results demonstrate, for the first time in planaria, scopolamine's effects in causing learning and memory impairments and galantamine's ability in reversing scopolamine-induced memory impairments.

  2. Effect of Metasomatic Alteration on Frictional Behavior of Subduction Megathrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirauchi, K. I.; Yamamoto, Y.; Den Hartog, S. A. M.; Spiers, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Along-strike variations in seismicity of subduction megathrusts can be attributed to the frictional properties of the fault-zone material, which is affected by the distribution of weak clays (smectite and illite) within sediments on the incoming plate. In addition, metasomatic alteration of the subducting sediments may result in significant changes in fault strength and slip stability of the megathrust. We examined an exhumed subduction thrust that separates serpentinite from tectonic mélange (argillite) of the Franciscan Complex, central California. The serpentinite represents a cataclastic shear zone, consisting of angular fragments in a fine-grained talc matrix. Talc schist also developed near the fault in beds up to 2 m thick. The argillite away from the fault displays a scaly fabric, composed of illite/muscovite and chlorite, while it is altered near the fault, characterized by the overgrowth of tremolite and minor chlorite along the previous foliation. We determined the frictional characteristics of these samples by performing rotary shear experiments at pore fluid pressures of 40-120 MPa, effective normal stresses (σneff) of 60-180 MPa, temperatures (T) of 20-400°C, and sliding velocities of 0.3-100 μm/s. The serpentinite was frictionally strong (friction coefficient, μ, 0.6) and exhibited velocity strengthening only at 150°C. The talc schist showed a low μ of 0.1-0.2, characterized by velocity-strengthening behavior at all experimental conditions tested. Argillite showed μ ranging from 0.4 to 0.6 with increasing T and σneff and a transition from velocity strengthening to velocity weakening behavior as T increased above 300°C. The tremolite schist had a weaker normal-stress dependence of μ than argillite, with μ of 0.4-0.5 and a velocity strengthening to velocity weakening transition occurring at 400°C. We propose that intense fluid-rock interactions took place during movement of the investigated fault. The serpentinite-argillite contact is

  3. Prenatal tactile stimulation attenuates drug-induced behavioral sensitization, modifies behavior, and alters brain architecture.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Arif; Kolb, Bryan

    2011-07-11

    Based on the findings of postnatal tactile stimulation (TS), a favorable experience in rats, the present study examined the influence of prenatal TS on juvenile behavior, adult amphetamine (AMPH) sensitization, and structural alteration in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the striatum. Female rats received TS through a baby hair brush throughout pregnancy, and the pups born were tested for open field locomotion, elevated plus maze (EPM), novel object recognition (NOR), and play fighting behaviors. Development and persistence of drug-induced behavioral sensitization in adults were tested by repeated AMPH administration and a challenge, respectively. Structural plasticity in the brain was assessed from the prefrontal cortical thickness and striatum size from serial coronal sections. The results indicate that TS females showed enhanced exploration in the open field. TS decreased the frequency of playful attacks whereas the response to face or evade an attack was not affected. Anxiety-like behavior and cognitive performance were not influenced by TS. AMPH administration resulted in gradual increase in locomotor activity (i.e., behavioral sensitization) that persisted at least for 2 weeks. However, both male and female TS rats exhibited attenuated AMPH sensitization compared to sex-matched controls. Furthermore, the drug-associated alteration in the prefrontal cortical thickness and striatum size observed in controls were prevented by TS experience. In summary, TS during prenatal development modified juvenile behavior, attenuated drug-induced behavioral sensitization in adulthood, and reorganized brain regions implicated in drug addiction.

  4. Age-related Alterations in the Dynamic Behavior of Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Damani, Mausam R.; Zhao, Lian; Fontainhas, Aurora M.; Amaral, Juan; Fariss, Robert N.; Wong, Wai T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microglia, the primary resident immune cells of the CNS, exhibit dynamic behavior involving rapid process motility and cellular migration that is thought to underlie key functions of immune surveillance and tissue repair. Although age-related changes in microglial activation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of aging, how dynamic behavior in microglia is influenced by aging is not fully understood. In this study, we employed live imaging of retinal microglia in situ to compare microglial morphology and behavioral dynamics in young and aged animals. We found that aged microglia in the resting state have significantly smaller and less branched dendritic arbors, and also slower process motilities, which likely compromise their ability to continuously survey and interact with their environment. We also found that dynamic microglial responses to injury were age-dependent. While young microglia responded to extracellular ATP, an injury-associated signal, by increasing their motility and becoming more ramified, aged microglia exhibited a contrary response, becoming less dynamic and ramified. In response to laser-induced focal tissue injury, aged microglia demonstrated slower acute responses with lower rates of process motility and cellular migration compared to young microglia. Interestingly, the longer term response of disaggregation from the injury site was retarded in aged microglia, indicating that senescent microglial responses, while slower to initiate, are more sustained. Together, these altered features of microglial behavior at rest and following injury reveal an age-dependent dysregulation of immune response in the CNS that may illuminate microglial contributions to age-related neuroinflammatory degeneration. PMID:21108733

  5. Adolescence as a vulnerable period to alter rodent behavior.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Miriam

    2013-10-01

    Adolescence and puberty are highly important periods for postnatal brain maturation. During adolescence, drastic changes of neuronal architecture and function occur that concomitantly lead to distinct behavioral alterations. Unsurprisingly in view of the multitude of ongoing neurodevelopmental processes in the adolescent brain, most adult neuropsychiatric disorders have their roots exactly during this time span. Adolescence and puberty are therefore crucial developmental periods in terms of understanding the causes and mechanisms of adult mental illness. Valid animal models for adolescent behavior and neurodevelopment might offer better insights into the underlying mechanisms and help to identify specific time windows with heightened susceptibility during development. In order to increase the translational value of such models, we urgently need to define the detailed timing of adolescence and puberty in laboratory rodents. The aim of the present review is to provide a more precise delineation of the time course of these developmental periods during postnatal life in rats and mice and to discuss the impact of adolescence and related neurodevelopmental processes on the heightened susceptibility for mental disorders.

  6. Manipulating the Behavior-Altering Effect of the Motivating Operation: Examination of the Influence on Challenging Behavior during Leisure Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell; Chan, Jeff; Machalicek, Wendy; Langthorne, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We examined the behavior-altering effect of the motivating operation on challenging behavior during leisure activities for three individuals with severe disabilities. Prior functional analyses indicated that challenging behavior was maintained by positive reinforcement in the form of attention or tangible items for all participants. During leisure…

  7. Reactive oxygen species in phagocytic leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Phagocytic leukocytes consume oxygen and generate reactive oxygen species in response to appropriate stimuli. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase, a multiprotein complex, existing in the dissociated state in resting cells becomes assembled into the functional oxidase complex upon stimulation and then generates superoxide anions. Biochemical aspects of the NADPH oxidase are briefly discussed in this review; however, the major focus relates to the contributions of various modes of microscopy to our understanding of the NADPH oxidase and the cell biology of phagocytic leukocytes. PMID:18597105

  8. Phagocyte function in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Repo, H; Saxén, L; Jäättelä, M; Ristola, M; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    1990-01-01

    We studied the chemotaxis of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and monocytes and the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha by monocytes of patients with juvenile periodontitis (JP). As a group, the patients' PMNs showed significantly increased chemotaxis determined by counting the number of migrating cells within a 3-microns-pore-size filter. Determined as distance of migration within the filter, as chemotactic increment based on checkerboard analysis, as leukotactic index calculated on the basis of distance of migration and cell count at different depths within a 3-microns-pore-size filter, as distance of migration under agarose, and as the number of PMNs migrating across a 5-microns-pore-size filter, the chemotactic migration rates of PMNs of patients were similar to those of controls. Evaluation of the data on an individual basis suggested that in terms of PMN chemotaxis some patients were hyperresponsive and some were hyporesponsive. Chemotaxis, spontaneous migration, and the rates of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha production by JP monocytes were similar to those of control cells. Our results give credence to the view that there are minor aberrations in the functions of JP phagocytes, but the extent to which these aberrations are relevant to accumulation of PMNs at sites of infection and inflammation in vivo and possibly contribute to the pathogenesis of JP remains unclear. PMID:2318531

  9. Effect of Calcium on Superoxide Production by Phagocytic Vesicles from Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lew, P. Daniel; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1981-01-01

    Phagocytic vesicles from rabbit lung macrophages produced superoxide in the presence of NADH or NADPH. At 37°C, these vesicles generated 51±7.8 nmol O2−/min per mg protein in the presence of 0.5 mM NADPH. The apparent Km for NADPH and NADH (66 and 266 μM, respectively), the pH optimum for the reaction (6.9), and the cyanide insensitivity were similar to properties of plasma membrane-rich fractions of stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes studied by others. The activity of the phagocytic vesicles was trypsin sensitive. The specific superoxide-generating activity of macrophage phagocytic vesicles isolated from cells incubated up to 90 min with phagocytic particles remained constant. Calcium in micromolar concentrations inhibited the NADPH-dependent O2−-generating activity of phagocytic vesicles. In a physiological ionic medium (100 mM KCl, 2.5 mM MgCl2, 30 mM imidazole-HCl, pH 6.9), a maximal inhibition of O2− generation by phagocytic vesicles of 80% was observed at 40 μM free Ca2+. The half maximum inhibitory effect was at 0.7 μM Ca2+. Variations of the calcium concentration resulted in rapid and reversible alterations in O2−-forming activity. Preincubation of phagocytic vesicles in the presence of EGTA rendered their O2− generation rate in the presence of NADPH insensitive to alterations in the free calcium concentration. This desensitization by low EGTA concentrations (≤100 μM) was reversible by the addition of excess calcium, but desensitization by high EGTA concentrations (>1 mM) was not reversible by the addition of calcium either in the presence or absence of purified rabbit lung macrophage or bovine brain calmodulins. Furthermore, trifluoperazine, a drug that inhibits calmodulin-stimulated reactions, did not alter the activity or the calcium sensitivity of the superoxide-generating system of sensitive phagocytic vesicles. Peripheral plasma membrane vesicles (podosomes) prepared by gentle sonication of macrophages possessed on O2

  10. Pioglitazone restores phagocyte mitochondrial oxidants and bactericidal capacity in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Boyanapalli, Ruby F.; Frasch, S. Courtney; Thomas, Stacey M.; Malcolm, Kenneth C.; Nicks, Michael; Harbeck, Ronald J.; Jakubzick, Claudia V.; Nemenoff, Raphael; Henson, Peter M.; Holland, Steven M.; Bratton, Donna L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deficient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the phagocyte NADPH oxidase in Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) results in susceptibility to certain pathogens secondary to impaired oxidative killing and mobilization of other phagocyte defenses. PPARγ agonists including pioglitazone (Pio), approved for Type 2 diabetes therapy, alter cellular metabolism and can heighten ROS production. It was hypothesized that Pio treatment of gp91phox−/− mice, a murine model of human CGD, would enhance phagocyte oxidant production and killing of S. aureus, a significant pathogen in this disorder. Objectives We sought to determine if Pio treatment of gp91phox−/− mice enhanced phagocyte oxidant production and host defense. Methods Wild type (WT) and gp91phox−/− mice were treated with the PPARγ agonist Pio, and phagocyte ROS and killing of S. aureus investigated. Results As demonstrated by three different ROS sensing probes, short-term treatment of gp91phox−/− mice with Pio enhanced stimulated ROS production in neutrophils and monocytes from blood and neutrophils and inflammatory macrophages recruited to tissues. Mitochondria were identified as the source of ROS (mtROS). Findings were replicated in human CGD monocytes following ex vivo Pio treatment. Importantly, while mtROS were deficient in gp91phox−/− phagocytes, their restoration with treatment significantly enabled killing of S. aureus both ex vivo and in vivo. Conclusions Together, the data support the hypothesis that signaling from the NADPH oxidase under normal circumstances governs phagocyte mtROS production, and that such signaling is lacking in the absence of a functioning phagocyte oxidase. PPARγ agonism appears to bypass the need for the NADPH oxidase for enhanced mtROS production and partially restores host defense in CGD. PMID:25498313

  11. AN ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGEN, VINCLOZOLIN, ALTERS THE ORGANIZATION OF PLAY BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    During mammalian sexual differentiation, the androgens, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are critical for the organization of the male phenotype. In rats, play behavior is sexually dimorphic. Administration of exogenous androgens during the perinatal period r...

  12. Paternal environmental enrichment transgenerationally alters affective behavioral and neuroendocrine phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Shlomo; Short, Annabel K; Bredy, Timothy W; Pang, Terence Y; Hannan, Anthony J

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that paternal stress in rodents can result in modification of offspring behavior. Environmental enrichment, which enhances cognitive stimulation and physical activity, modifies various behaviors and reduces stress responses in adult rodents. We investigated the transgenerational influence of paternal environmental enrichment on offspring behavior and physiological stress response. Adult C57BL/6J male mice (F0) were exposed to either environmental enrichment or standard housing for four weeks and then pair-mated with naïve females. The F2 generation was generated using F1 male offspring. Male and female F1 and F2 offspring were tested for anxiety using the elevated-plus maze and large open field at 8 weeks of age. Depression-related behavior was assessed using the forced-swim test. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function was determined by quantification of serum corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels at baseline and after forced-swim stress. Paternal environmental enrichment was associated with increased body weights of male F1 and F2 offspring. There was no significant effect on F1 offspring anxiety and depression-related behaviors. There were no changes in anxiety-related behaviors in the F2 offspring, however these mice displayed a reduced latency to immobility in the forced-swim test. Furthermore, F2 females had significantly higher serum corticosterone levels post-stress, but not ACTH. These results show that paternal environmental enrichment exerts a sex-specific transgenerational impact on the behavioral and physiological response to stress. Our findings have implications for the modelling of psychiatric disorders in rodents.

  13. Vulnerability of conditional NCAM-deficient mice to develop stress-induced behavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Bisaz, Reto; Sandi, Carmen

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies in rodents showed that chronic stress induces structural and functional alterations in several brain regions, including shrinkage of the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, which are accompanied by cognitive and emotional disturbances. Reduced expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) following chronic stress has been proposed to be crucially involved in neuronal retraction and behavioral alterations. Since NCAM gene polymorphisms and altered expression of alternatively spliced NCAM isoforms have been associated with bipolar depression and schizophrenia in humans, we hypothesized that reduced expression of NCAM renders individuals more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of stress on behavior. Here, we specifically questioned whether mice in which the NCAM gene is inactivated in the forebrain by cre-recombinase under the control of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II promoter (conditional NCAM-deficient mice), display increased vulnerability to stress. We assessed the evolving of depressive-like behaviors and spatial learning and memory impairments following a subchronic stress protocol (2 weeks) that does not result in behavioral dysfunction, nor in altered NCAM expression, in wild-type mice. Indeed, while no behavioral alterations were detected in wild-type littermates after subchronic stress, conditional NCAM-deficient mice showed increased immobility in the tail suspension test and deficits in reversal spatial learning in the water maze. These findings indicate that diminished NCAM expression might be a critical vulnerability factor for the development of behavioral alterations by stress and further support a functional involvement of NCAM in stress-induced cognitive and emotional disturbances.

  14. On the Behavior of Phosphorus During the Aqueous Alteration of CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Chizmadia, Lysa J.

    2005-01-01

    During the earliest period of solar system formation, water played an important role in the evolution of primitive dust, both after accretion of planetesimals and possible before accretion within the protoplanetary disk. Many chondrites show evidence of variable degrees of aqueous alteration, the CM2 chondrites being among the most studied [1]. This group of chondrites is characterized by mineral assemblages of both primary and secondary alteration phases. Hence, these meteorites retain a particularly important record of the reactions that occurred between primary high temperature nebular phases and water. Studies of these chondrites can provide information on the conditions and environments of aqueous alteration and the mobility of elements during alteration. This latter question is at the core of a debate concerning the location of aqueous alteration, i.e. whether alteration occurred predominantly within a closed system after accretion (parent body alteration) or whether some degree of alteration occurred within the solar nebula or on ephemeral protoplanetary bodies prior to accretion. At the core of the parent body alteration model is the hypothesis that elemental exchange between different components, principally chondrules and matrix, must have occurred. chondrules and matrix, must have occurred. In this study, we focus on the behavior of the minor element, phosphorus. This study was stimulated by observations of the behavior of P during the earliest stages of alteration in glassy mesostasis in type II chondrules in CR chondrites and extends the preliminary observations of on Y791198 to other CM chondrites.

  15. Neutrophils and Macrophages: the Main Partners of Phagocyte Cell Systems

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Manuel T.; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Biological cellular systems are groups of cells sharing a set of characteristics, mainly key function and origin. Phagocytes are crucial in the host defense against microbial infection. The previously proposed phagocyte cell systems including the most recent and presently prevailing one, the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), grouped mononuclear cells but excluded neutrophils, creating an unacceptable situation. As neutrophils are archetypical phagocytes that must be members of comprehensive phagocyte systems, Silva recently proposed the creation of a myeloid phagocyte system (MYPS) that adds neutrophils to the MPS. The phagocytes grouped in the MYPS include the leukocytes neutrophils, inflammatory monocytes, macrophages, and immature myeloid DCs. Here the justifications behind the inclusion of neutrophils in a phagocyte system is expanded and the MYPS are further characterized as a group of dedicated phagocytic cells that function in an interacting and cooperative way in the host defense against microbial infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are considered the main arms of this system. PMID:22783254

  16. Effect of prenatal haloperidol exposure on behavioral alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, K P; Singh, Mandavi

    2002-01-01

    Pregnant Charles-Foster rats were exposed to haloperidol (HAL), a neuroleptic drug that binds to and blocks dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight (intraperitoneally) from Gestation Day (GD) 12 to 20. The animals from both treated as well as vehicle control groups were allowed to deliver on GD 21. The offspring culled at birth on the basis of sex and weight were subjected to behavioral tests at the age of 8 weeks. The HAL-treated rat offspring showed a significant increase in anxiogenic behavior on the open field, elevated plus-maze and elevated zero-maze tests when compared with the vehicle-treated (control) rat offspring of the same age group. These findings suggest that prenatal exposure to HAL during a critical period of brain development leaves a lasting imprint on the brain, resulting in abnormal anxiety states, possibly through dopaminergic neurotransmission mechanisms.

  17. Altering Leadership Thinking and Organizational Behavior Through Web Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    result. The proliferation of Web 2.0 services is enabling information sharing among employees and leaders. Regrettably, this level of information...investigates the relationship between Web services, commonly called Web 2.0 , and the influence these services wield on organizational behavior. To support the...infrastructure for those who can use Web 2.0 and other IT services. The data were sorted by officer, noncommissioned officer, and enlisted ranks for the

  18. Peripheral injury alters schooling behavior in squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Megumi; di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Carroll, Julia; Hanlon, Roger T; Walters, Edgar T; Crook, Robyn J

    2016-07-01

    Animals with detectable injuries are at escalated threat of predation. The anti-predation tactic of schooling reduces individual predation risk overall, but it is not known how schooling behavior affects injured animals, or whether risks are reduced equally for injured animals versus other school members. In this laboratory study we examined the effects of minor fin injury on schooling decisions made by squid. Schooling behavior of groups of squid, in which one member was injured, was monitored over 24h. Injured squid were more likely to be members of a school shortly after injury (0.5-2h), but there were no differences compared with sham-injured squid at longer time points (6-24h). Overall, the presence of an injured conspecific increased the probability that a school would form, irrespective of whether the injured squid was a member of the school. When groups containing one injured squid were exposed to a predator cue, injured squid were more likely to join the school, but their position depended on whether the threat was a proximate visual cue or olfactory cue. We found no evidence that injured squid oriented themselves to conceal their injury from salient threats. Overall we conclude that nociceptive sensitization after injury changes grouping behaviors in ways that are likely to be adaptive.

  19. Mononuclear phagocyte subpopulations in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    George, James F; Lever, Jeremie M; Agarwal, Anupam

    2017-04-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are the most common cells in the kidney associated with immunity and inflammation. Although the presence of these cells in the kidney has been known for decades, the study of mononuclear phagocytes in the context of kidney function and dysfunction is still at an early stage. The purpose of this review is to summarize the present knowledge regarding classification of these cells in the mouse kidney and to identify relevant questions that would further advance the field and potentially lead to new opportunities for treatment of acute kidney injury and other kidney diseases.

  20. Manipulating the behavior-altering effect of the motivating operation: examination of the influence on challenging behavior during leisure activities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell; Chan, Jeff; Machalicek, Wendy; Langthorne, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We examined the behavior-altering effect of the motivating operation on challenging behavior during leisure activities for three individuals with severe disabilities. Prior functional analyses indicated that challenging behavior was maintained by positive reinforcement in the form of attention or tangible items for all participants. During leisure sessions, each participant played preferred games (cards, jigsaws) with two individuals without disabilities. The discriminative stimuli for challenging behavior were present during leisure sessions but challenging behavior was never reinforced. Immediately prior to leisure sessions, the participants received either access to the reinforcers that maintained challenging behavior or no access. Access versus no access to reinforcers for challenging behavior prior to leisure sessions was alternated in a multi-element design. Results demonstrated higher levels of challenging behavior during leisure sessions when the participants did not have access to the reinforcers prior to the sessions. Little challenging behavior occurred during leisure sessions when the participants had prior access to the reinforcers. Arguments for further examining the behavior-altering effects of the motivating operation in future applied research are presented.

  1. Phagocytes Get Close to Their Enemies.

    PubMed

    Dustin, Michael L; Davis, Simon J

    2016-01-25

    Phagocytosis is key for many organismal functions. In a recent issue of Cell, Freeman et al. (2016) demonstrate a feed-forward signaling mechanism wherein F-actin and integrin receptors drive contact formation between phagocytes and antibody-coated solid particles, signaling their engulfment. This mechanism translates nanoscale proximity effects into wider self-propagating signals.

  2. The mononuclear phagocyte system and lymphocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter outlines the cellular processes that are activated and interact during host immune responses including: (a) phagocytosis and antigen presentation by cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells), and (b) cell-mediated and humoral immunity ...

  3. Norepinephrine transporter heterozygous knockout mice exhibit altered transport and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fentress, H M; Klar, R; Krueger, J J; Sabb, T; Redmon, S N; Wallace, N M; Shirey-Rice, J K; Hahn, M K

    2013-11-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET(+/-) ), demonstrating that they display an approximately 50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET(+/-) mouse establishes an activated state of existing surface NET proteins. The NET(+/-) mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris water maze. These data suggest that recovery of near basal activity in NET(+/-) mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET(+/-) mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders.

  4. Norepinephrine Transporter Heterozygous Knockout Mice Exhibit Altered Transport and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, HM; Klar, R; Krueger, JK; Sabb, T; Redmon, SN; Wallace, NM; Shirey-Rice, JK; Hahn, MK

    2013-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically-driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET+/−), demonstrating that they display an ~50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity, assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET+/− mouse establishes an activated state of existing, surface NET proteins. NET+/− mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze. These data suggest recovery of near basal activity in NET+/− mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET+/− mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  5. Preserved respiratory and phagocytic functions of phagocytes exposed to flat sheet plasmapheresis equipment.

    PubMed

    Jungi, T W; Aeschbacher, B; Nydegger, U E

    1987-09-01

    Monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were tested for functional integrity after exposure to flat sheet plasmapheresis equipment. Purified PMN were tested for chemiluminescence activity in response to a variety of triggers of the respiratory burst. Monocytes were assessed for their capacity to ingest erythrocytes sensitized with varying amounts of IgG antibodies. Both assays were demonstrated to be sensitive hallmarks of functional modulation. However, no functional differences were noted between phagocytes from blood collected prior to pheresis and those exposed to flat sheet plasmapheresis cylinders. These data suggest that plasmapheresis with the Autopheresis C system does not influence the respiratory and phagocytic function of phagocytes returned back to the donor and implies that contact of phagocytes with artificial surfaces and/or their exposure to surface-activated plasma factors generated in the collection cylinder are minimal when using this plasmapheresis method.

  6. Altered behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms in mice with disrupted NAD+ oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Saurabh; Nin, Veronica; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; Chini, Eduardo Nunes; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Intracellular levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are rhythmic and controlled by the circadian clock. However, whether NAD+ oscillation in turn contributes to circadian physiology is not fully understood. To address this question we analyzed mice mutated for the NAD+ hydrolase CD38. We found that rhythmicity of NAD+ was altered in the CD38-deficient mice. The high, chronic levels of NAD+ results in several anomalies in circadian behavior and metabolism. CD38-null mice display a shortened period length of locomotor activity and alteration in the rest-activity rhythm. Several clock genes and, interestingly, genes involved in amino acid metabolism were deregulated in CD38-null livers. Metabolomic analysis identified alterations in the circadian levels of several amino acids, specifically tryptophan levels were reduced in the CD38-null mice at a circadian time paralleling with elevated NAD+ levels. Thus, CD38 contributes to behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms and altered NAD+ levels influence the circadian clock. PMID:21937766

  7. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions.

  8. Prenatal chlorpyrifos exposure in rats causes persistent behavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Addy, Nii; Baruah, Avanti; Elias, Alana; Christopher, N Channelle; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2002-01-01

    Use of chlorpyrifos (CPF) has been curtailed due to its developmental neurotoxicity. In rats, postnatal CPF administration produces lasting changes in cognitive performance, but less information is available about the effects of prenatal exposure. We administered CPF to pregnant rats on gestational days (GD) 17-20, a peak period of neurogenesis, using doses (1 or 5 mg/kg/day) below the threshold for fetal growth impairment. We then evaluated performance in the T-maze, Figure-8 apparatus and 16-arm radial maze, beginning in adolescence and continuing into adulthood. CPF elicited initial locomotor hyperactivity in the T-maze. Females showed slower habituation in the Fig. 8 maze; no effects were seen in males. In the radial-arm maze, females showed impaired choice accuracy for both working and reference memory and again, males were unaffected. Despite the deficits, all animals eventually learned the maze with continued training. At that point, we challenged them with the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, to determine the dependence of behavioral performance on cholinergic function. Whereas control females showed impairment with scopolamine, CPF-exposed females did not, implying that the delayed acquisition of the task had been accomplished through alternative mechanisms. The differences were specific to muscarinic circuits, as control and CPF groups responded similarly to the nicotinic antagonist, mecamylamine. Surprisingly, adverse effects of CPF were greater in the group receiving 1 mg/kg as compared to 5 mg/kg. Promotional effects of acetylcholine (ACh) on cell differentiation may thus help to offset CPF-induced developmental damage that occurs through other noncholinergic mechanisms. Our results indicate that late prenatal exposure to CPF induces long-term changes in cognitive performance that are distinctly gender-selective. Additional defects may be revealed by similar strategies that subject the animals to acute challenges, thus, uncovering the adaptive

  9. Alteration of eating behaviors in patients with Parkinson's disease: possibly overlooked?

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hideto; Kondo, Tomoyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) occasionally show food cravings and/or compulsive eating that result in significant, undesired weight gain. Dopamine replacement therapy may be the cause of this type of eating disorder. We evaluated 60 consecutive patients to see if they had any alteration of eating patterns after starting levodopa. Among them, five (8.3%) patients exhibited characteristic alterations of food preference following the start of dopamine replacement therapy. One patient showed an undesirable weight gain. Of the five patients exhibiting food preference alterations, all showed increased preference to consume sweet snacks, although this alteration was not always associated with hyperphagia (eating too much). This type of dietary alteration was not related to a specific antiparkinsonian drug, and could be observed in patients undergoing dopamine agonist monotherapy. Alteration of eating behavior may not be uncommon in PD patients, and is possibly overlooked. Since dopamine is closely involved in acquisition of food preferences, dietary changes with/without compulsive eating may be a manifestation of an alteration of appetitive behaviors due to excessive dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  10. Protective effect of alprazolam against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anant; Kumar, Anil

    2008-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is considered as a risk factor for various diseases. Sleep deprivation leads to behavioral, hormonal, neurochemical and biochemical alterations in the animals. The present study was designed to explore the possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of alprazolam against 72h sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice. In the present study, sleep deprivation caused anxiety-like behavior, weight loss, impaired ambulatory movements and oxidative damage as indicated by increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite level and depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in sleep-deprived mice brain. Treatment with alprazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved behavioral alterations. Biochemically, alprazolam treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, reversed raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite level. Combination of flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) with lower dose of alprazolam (0.25mg/kg) significantly antagonized protective effect of alprazolam. However, combination of muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) with alprazolam (0.25 mg/kg, ip) potentiated protective effect of alprazolam. On the basis of these results, it might be suggested that alprazolam might produce protective effect by involving GABAergic system against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and related oxidative damage.

  11. Maternal treatment with picrotoxin in late pregnancy improved female sexual behavior but did not alter male sexual behavior of offspring.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Maria M; Scanzerla, Kayne K; Chamlian, Mayra; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Felicio, Luciano F

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory investigated the effects of picrotoxin (PT), a γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist administered during several perinatal periods, on the sexual behavior of male and female rats. We observed that the time of perinatal exposure to PT is critical to determine either facilitation or impairment of sexual behavior. The present study evaluated the effects of prenatal administration of a single dose of PT on gestation day 18 of dams (the first critical period of male brain sexual differentiation) on sexual behavior of male and female offspring. Thus, female Wistar rats were mated with males and, on gestation day 18, received 0.6 mg/kg of PT or 0.9% saline solution subcutaneously. On postnatal day 1, the offspring were weighed and several measures of sexual development were assessed. The sexual behaviors and the general activity in the open field of adult male and ovariectomized, hormone-treated female rats were observed. On comparison with the control group, maternal PT treatment: (i) did not alter the maternal weight, pup weight, anogenital distance, or male and female general activity; (ii) increased female sexual behavior, that is, decreased the latencies to first mount, first lordosis, and tenth lordosis, and the percentage of females presenting lordosis; and (iii) did not alter male sexual behavior. It is suggested that prenatal PT exposure interfered with epigenetic mechanisms related to the development of sex differences in the brain, leading to the observed sexually dimorphic effects on sexual behavior.

  12. Alterations to functional analysis methodology to clarify the functions of low rate, high intensity problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Davis, Barbara J; Kahng, Sungwoo; Schmidt, Jonathan; Bowman, Lynn G; Boelter, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Current research provides few suggestions for modifications to functional analysis procedures to accommodate low rate, high intensity problem behavior. This study examined the results of the extended duration functional analysis procedures of Kahng, Abt, and Schonbachler (2001) with six children admitted to an inpatient hospital for the treatment of severe problem behavior. Results of initial functional analyses (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) were inconclusive for all children because of low levels of responding. The altered functional analyses, which changed multiple variables including the duration of the functional analysis (i.e., 6 or 7 hrs), yielded clear behavioral functions for all six participants. These results add additional support for the utility of an altered analysis of low rate, high intensity problem behavior when standard functional analyses do not yield differentiated results.

  13. Alterations to Functional Analysis Methodology to Clarify the Functions of Low Rate, High Intensity Problem Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Barbara J; Kahng, SungWoo; Schmidt, Jonathan; Bowman, Lynn G; Boelter, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Current research provides few suggestions for modifications to functional analysis procedures to accommodate low rate, high intensity problem behavior. This study examined the results of the extended duration functional analysis procedures of Kahng, Abt, and Schonbachler (2001) with six children admitted to an inpatient hospital for the treatment of severe problem behavior. Results of initial functional analyses (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) were inconclusive for all children because of low levels of responding. The altered functional analyses, which changed multiple variables including the duration of the functional analysis (i.e., 6 or 7 hrs), yielded clear behavioral functions for all six participants. These results add additional support for the utility of an altered analysis of low rate, high intensity problem behavior when standard functional analyses do not yield differentiated results. PMID:23326628

  14. Parasites alter freshwater communities in mesocosms by modifying invasive crayfish behavior.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Lindsey S; Lodge, David M

    2016-06-01

    Parasites can alter communities by reducing densities of keystone hosts, but few studies have examined how trait-mediated indirect effects of parasites can alter ecological communities. We test how trematode parasites (Microphallus spp.) that affect invasive crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) behavior alter how crayfish impact lake littoral communities. O. rusticus drive community composition in north temperate lakes, and predatory fish can reduce crayfish activity and feeding. In laboratory studies, Microphallus parasites also alter O. rusticus behavior: infected O. rusticus eat fewer macroinvertebrates and are bolder near predatory fish than uninfected individuals. We used a 2 x 2 factorial experiment to test how predatory fish and parasites affect O. rusticus impacts in large mesocosms over 4 weeks. We predicted (1) that when predators were absent, infected crayfish would have lower impacts than uninfected crayfish on macrophytes and macroinvertebrates (as well as reduced growth and higher mortality). However, (2) when predators were present but unable to consume crayfish, infected crayfish would have greater impacts (as well as greater growth and lower mortality) than uninfected crayfish because of increased boldness. Because of its effect on crayfish feeding behavior, we also predicted (3) that infection would alter macrophyte and macroinvertebrate community composition. In contrast to our first hypothesis, we found that infected and uninfected crayfish had similar impacts on lower trophic levels when predators were absent. Across all treatments, infected crayfish were more likely to be outside shelters and had greater growth than uninfected crayfish, suggesting that the reduced feeding observed in short-term experiments does not occur over longer timescales. However, in support of the second hypothesis, when predatory fish were present, infected crayfish ate more macroinvertebrates than did uninfected crayfish, likely due to increased boldness. We also observed a

  15. Targeting oxidative stress attenuates malonic acid induced Huntington like behavioral and mitochondrial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-05-25

    Objective of the present study was to explore the possible role of oxidative stress in the malonic acid induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in rats. In the present study, unilateral single injections of malonic acid at different doses (1.5, 3 and 6 micromol) were made into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. Behavioral parameters were accessed on 1st, 7th and 14th day post malonic acid administration. Oxidative stress parameters and mitochondrial enzyme functions were assessed on day 14 after behavioral observations. Ipsilateral striatal malonic acid (3 and 6 micromol) administration significantly reduced body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination and caused oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation, nitrite, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione) in the striatum as compared to sham treated animal. Mitochondrial enzyme complexes and MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolinium bromide) activity were significantly inhibited by malonic acid. Vitamin E treatment (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed the various behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations in malonic acid treated animals. Our findings show that targeting oxidative stress by vitamin E in malonic acid model, results in amelioration of behavioral and mitochondrial alterations are linked to inhibition of oxidative damage. Based upon these finding present study hypothesize that protection exerted by vitamin E on behavioral, mitochondrial markers indicates the possible preservation of the functional status of the striatal neurons by targeting the deleterious actions of oxidative stress.

  16. Understory avifauna exhibits altered mobbing behavior in tropical forest degraded by selective logging.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fangyuan; Sieving, Kathryn E

    2016-11-01

    In understanding the impacts of selective logging on biodiversity, relatively little is known about the critical behavioral link between altered forest conditions and population persistence. Predator-mobbing is a widespread anti-predator behavior in birds that expresses a well-known trade-off influencing prey survival under predation risk. Here, we ask whether the predator-mobbing behavior of understory forest birds is altered by selective logging and associated forest structural changes in the highly endangered lowland rainforest of Sumatra. At four study sites spanning a gradient of logging-induced forest degradation, we used standardized mobbing and owl call playbacks with predator model presentation to elicit the predator-mobbing behavior of understory prey birds, compared birds' mobbing intensity across sites, and related variation in this intensity to forest vegetation structure. We found that selective logging altered birds' predator-mobbing intensity (measured by behavioral conspicuousness and propensity to approach the predator) as well as forest structure, and that vegetative changes to canopy and understory were correlated with contrasting responses by the two major bird foraging guilds, gleaning versus flycatching birds. We additionally discuss the implications of our findings for further hypothesis testing pertaining to the impacts of selective logging on the ecological processes underlying prey mobbing behavior, particularly with regards to predator-prey interactions and prey accruement of energy reserves.

  17. Alterations in the functional neural circuitry supporting flexible choice behavior in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    D'Cruz, A-M; Mosconi, M W; Ragozzino, M E; Cook, E H; Sweeney, J A

    2016-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors, and a pronounced preference for behavioral and environmental consistency, are distinctive characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Alterations in frontostriatal circuitry that supports flexible behavior might underlie this behavioral impairment. In an functional magnetic resonance imaging study of 17 individuals with ASD, and 23 age-, gender- and IQ-matched typically developing control participants, reversal learning tasks were used to assess behavioral flexibility as participants switched from one learned response choice to a different response choice when task contingencies changed. When choice outcome after reversal was uncertain, the ASD group demonstrated reduced activation in both frontal cortex and ventral striatum, in the absence of task performance differences. When the outcomes of novel responses were certain, there was no difference in brain activation between groups. Reduced activation in frontal cortex and ventral striatum suggest problems in decision-making and response planning, and in processing reinforcement cues, respectively. These processes, and their integration, are essential for flexible behavior. Alterations in these systems may therefore contribute to a rigid adherence to preferred behavioral patterns in individuals with an ASD. These findings provide an additional impetus for the use of reversal learning paradigms as a translational model for treatment development targeting the domain of restricted and repetitive behaviors in ASD. PMID:27727243

  18. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  19. Neonatal handling alters the structure of maternal behavior and affects mother-pup bonding.

    PubMed

    Reis, A R; de Azevedo, M S; de Souza, M A; Lutz, M L; Alves, M B; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M; Silveira, P P; Lucion, A B

    2014-05-15

    During early life, a mother and her pups establish a very close relationship, and the olfactory learning of the nest odor is very important for the bond formation. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a structure that plays a fundamental role in the olfactory learning (OL) mechanism that also involves maternal behavior (licking and contact). We hypothesized that handling the pups would alter the structure of the maternal behavior, affect OL, and alter mother-pup relationships. Moreover, changes in the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation (CREB) and neurotrophic factors could be a part of the mechanism of these changes. This study aimed to analyze the effects of neonatal handling, 1 min per day from postpartum day 1 to 10 (PPD 1 to PPD 10), on the maternal behavior and pups' preference for the nest odor in a Y maze (PPD 11). We also tested CREB's phosphorylation and BDNF signaling in the OB of the pups (PPD 7) by Western blot analysis. The results showed that handling alters mother-pups interaction by decreasing mother-pups contact and changing the temporal pattern of all components of the maternal behavior especially the daily licking and nest-building. We found sex-dependent changes in the nest odor preference, CREB and BDNF levels in pups OB. Male pups were more affected by alterations in the licking pattern, and female pups were more affected by changes in the mother-pup contact (the time spent outside the nest and nursing).

  20. Fragile phagocytes: FMRP positively regulates engulfment activity.

    PubMed

    Logan, Mary A

    2017-03-06

    Defective immune system function is implicated in autism spectrum disorders, including Fragile X syndrome. In this issue, O'Connor et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201607093) demonstrate that phagocytic activity of systemic immune cells is compromised in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Fragile X, highlighting intriguing new mechanistic connections between FMRP, innate immunity, and abnormal development.

  1. Role of oxygen in phagocyte microbicidal action.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, R C

    1994-01-01

    Immune information in the form of inflammatory mediators directs phagocyte locomotion and increases expression of opsonin receptors such that contact with an opsonized microbe results in receptor ligation and activation of microbicidal metabolism. Carbohydrate dehydrogenation and O2 consumption feed reactions that effectively lower the spin quantum number (S) of O2 from 1 to 1/2 and finally to 0. Oxidase-catalyzed univalent reduction of O2 (S = 1; triplet multiplicity) yields hydrodioxylic acid (HO2) and its conjugate base superoxide, O2- (S = 1/2; doublet multiplicity). Acid or enzymatic disproportionation of superoxide yields H2O2 (S = 0; singlet multiplicity). Haloperoxidase catalyzes H2O2-dependent oxidation of Cl- yielding HOCl (S = 0), and reaction of HOCl with H2O2 yields singlet molecular oxygen, 1O2 (S = 0; singlet multiplicity). The Wigner spin conservation rule restricts direct reaction of S = 1 O2 with S = 0 organic molecules. Lowering the S of O2 overcomes this spin restriction and allows microbicidal combustion. High exergonicity dioxygenation reactions yield electronically excited carbonyl products that relax by photon emission, i.e., phagocyte luminescence. Addition of high quantum yield substrates susceptible to spin allowed dioxygenation, i.e., chemiluminigenic substrates, greatly increases detection sensitivity and defines the nature of the oxygenating agent. Measurement of luminescence allows high sensitivity, real-time, and substrate-specific differential analysis of phagocyte dioxygenating activities. Under assay conditions where immune mediator and opsonin exposure are controlled, luminescence analysis of the initial phase of opsonin-stimulated oxygenation activity allows functional assessment of the opsonin receptor expression per circulating phagocyte and can be used to gauge the in vivo state of immune activation. PMID:7705297

  2. Puberty and gonadal hormones: role in adolescent-typical behavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Vetter-O'Hagen, Courtney S; Spear, Linda P

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Adolescence is characterized by a variety of behavioral alterations, including elevations in novelty-seeking and experimentation with alcohol and other drugs of abuse. Some adolescent-typical neurobehavioral alterations may depend upon pubertal rises in gonadal hormones, whereas others may be unrelated to puberty. Using a variety of approaches, studies in laboratory animals have not revealed clear relationships between pubertal-related changes and adolescent- or adult-typical behaviors that are not strongly sexually dimorphic. Data reviewed suggest surprisingly modest influences of gonadal hormones on alcohol intake, alcohol preference and novelty-directed behaviors. Gonadectomy in males (but not females) increased ethanol intake in adulthood following surgery either pre-pubertally or in adulthood, with these increases in intake largely reversed by testosterone replacement in adulthood, supporting an activational role of androgens in moderating ethanol intake in males. In contrast, neither pre-pubertal nor adult gonadectomy influenced sensitivity to the social inhibitory or aversive effects of ethanol when indexed via conditioned taste aversions, although gonadectomy at either age altered the microstructure of social behavior of both males and females. Unexpectedly, the pre-pubertal surgical manipulation process itself was found to increase later ethanol intake, decrease sensitivity to ethanol's social inhibitory effects, attenuate novelty-directed behavior and lower social motivation, with gonadal hormones being necessary for these long-lasting effects of early surgical perturbations.

  3. Fetal grafts alter chronic behavioral outcome after contusion damage to the adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Stokes, B T; Reier, P J

    1992-04-01

    In the present experiments, we have examined the capacity of intraspinal transplants to effect alterations in certain locomotor behaviors after spinal contusion injuries. An electromechanical impactor that was sensitive to tissue biomechanical characteristics was used to produce rapid (20 ms) compression injuries to the thoracic spinal cord (T8). Suspensions of fetal spinal tissue (14-day) were placed at 10 days postinjury into the intraspinal cavity created by these reproducible spinal injuries. In the pre- and postinjury period, a number of general and sensitive motor behaviors were used to characterize the immediate and long-term progress of hindlimb behavioral recovery over an extended period of time (73 days). Our data reveal that a lasting alteration in some motor behaviors can be achieved by suspension grafts. While little improvement in some generalized motor tasks (inclined plane analysis, grid walking) takes place, fetal transplants precipitate a rapid and enduring change in certain motivated fine motor behaviors (gait analysis). The base of support and stride length of the hindlimbs were improved by 7 days post-transplantation and the effect was stable over time. The angle of rotation was, however, not altered. The lasting effect in two gait parameters noted was accompanied by the presence of well-developed spinal grafts that often fused with the host spinal parenchyma. These results provide the first documentation of an influence of fetal transplants on motivated locomotor capacity in a well-characterized spinal injury model that mimics lesions seen in the contused adult human spinal cord.

  4. Mutagenesis and behavioral screening for altered circadian activity identifies the mouse mutant, Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pickard, G E; Sollars, P J; Rinchik, E M; Nolan, P M; Bucan, M

    1995-12-24

    The molecular processes underlying the generation of circadian behavior in mammals are virtually unknown. To identify genes that regulate or alter circadian activity rhythms, a mouse mutagenesis program was initiated in conjunction with behavioral screening for alterations in circadian period (tau), a fundamental property of the biological clock. Male mice of the inbred BALB/c strain, treated with the potent mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea were mated with wild-type hybrids. Wheel-running activity of approximately 300 male progeny was monitored for 6-10 weeks under constant dark (DD) conditions. The tau DD of a single mouse (#187) was longer than the population mean by more than three standard deviations (24.20 vs. 23.32 +/- 0.02 h; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 277). In addition, mouse #187 exhibited other abnormal phenotypes, including hyperactive bi-directional circling/spinning activity and an abnormal response to light. Heterozygous progeny of the founder mouse, generated from outcrossings with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, displayed lengthened tau DD although approximately 20% of the animals showed no wheel-running activity despite being quite active. Under light:dark conditions, all animals displaying circling behavior that ran in the activity wheels exhibited robust wheel-running activity at lights-ON and these animals also showed enhanced wheel-running activity in constant light conditions. The genetic dissection of the complex behavior associated with this mutation was facilitated by the previously described genetic mapping of the mutant locus causing circling behavior, designated Wheels (Whl), to the subcentromeric portion of mouse chromosome 4. In this report, the same locus is shown to be responsible for the abnormal responses to light and presumably for the altered circadian behavior. Characterization of the gene altered in the novel Whl mutation will contribute to understanding the molecular elements involved in mammalian circadian regulation.

  5. Altering the function of commands presented to boys with oppositional and hyperactive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, Jeffrey S.

    2002-01-01

    Mentalistic and behavioral analyses of noncompliance among children with hyperactive behavior are contrasted. Then, a behavioral training program for 3 boys with behavior characteristic of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder is described. The child-focused training was conducted in conjunction with parent training. In an effort to increase the rate of compliance, the child-training program was designed to alter the function of parent commands by teaching the boys to verbalize rules about parent commands and consequences in the context of observing parent—child role-plays. Training was conducted within a multiple baseline design across children. Direct observation of mother—child interactions, telephone interviews, and standardized rating scales showed that training resulted in clinically significant reductions in noncompliance and improved parenting behavior. A 6-month follow-up revealed stable outcomes. PMID:22477227

  6. Morphological changes and depressed phagocytic efficiency in Dictyostelium amoebae treated with toxic concentrations of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.J.; Bernstein, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    The morphology and phagocytic efficiency of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae exposed to cadmium was investigated at two Cd concentrations: a low toxic concentration - 7 x 10/sup -5/ m, and a high toxic concentration - 2 x 10/sup -4/ m. Both concentrations inhibited growth completely; however, only in the culture containing a high toxic concentration of cadmium were severe ultrastructural anomalies observed, notably, nucleolar changes and autophagic vacuolar formation. Using biological indices it was concluded that the high concentration of cadmium was lethal and that morphological changes associated with this dose of cadmium may be secondary to cell death. In contrast, amoebae treated with a low toxic but nonlethal concentration of Cd showed an altered size distribution of cytoplasmic vacuoles and a decreased phagocytic efficiency. Cultures whose growth was completely inhibited with cobalt were also examined, as were untreated control cultures. By 24 hr Cd-treated amoebae showed a 20% decrease in the cytoplasmic mean-vacuolar diameter and a 69% decrease in phagocytic efficiency whereas Co and untreated controls showed no significant decrease in the cytoplasmic mean-vacuolar diameter. Phagocytic efficiency was only slightly diminished by Co. Changes in vacuolar profiles had been shown earlier to be related to membrane utilization in Dictyostelium amoebae. Cd at low toxic concentrations affects membrane function in Dictyostelium amoebae.

  7. The effect of altering self-descriptive behavior on self-concept and classroom behavior.

    PubMed

    Lane, J; Muller, D

    1977-09-01

    This research examined the impact of operant reinforcement of positive self-descriptive behavior on the self-concepts and classroom behavior of 60 fifth-grade students. Three groups of 10 male and 10 female low self-concept students wrote a series of eight essays describing their school performance. The first group (P) received written reinforcement for positive self-descriptions of their school performance. The second group (G) received an equal number of reinforcements for general statements. The third group (C) received no reinforcement for written statements. Three areas of self-concept were measured with the Primary Self-Concept Inventory: personal-self, social-self, and intellectual-self. A frequency count was also made of nine classroom behaviors thought to be influenced by self-concept. The P group displayed increases in the frequency of positive self-descriptive statement and in intellectual self-concept but no changes in personal self-concept, social self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors. The G and C groups showed no change in self-description, self-concept, or the nine classroom behaviors.

  8. Microbiota alteration is associated with the development of stress-induced despair behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Ioana A.; Goertz, Jennifer E.; Ren, Tiantian; Rich, Stephen S.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Farber, Emily; Wu, Martin; Overall, Christopher C.; Kipnis, Jonathan; Gaultier, Alban

    2017-01-01

    Depressive disorders often run in families, which, in addition to the genetic component, may point to the microbiome as a causative agent. Here, we employed a combination of behavioral, molecular and computational techniques to test the role of the microbiota in mediating despair behavior. In chronically stressed mice displaying despair behavior, we found that the microbiota composition and the metabolic signature dramatically change. Specifically, we observed reduced Lactobacillus and increased circulating kynurenine levels as the most prominent changes in stressed mice. Restoring intestinal Lactobacillus levels was sufficient to improve the metabolic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Mechanistically, we identified that Lactobacillus-derived reactive oxygen species may suppress host kynurenine metabolism, by inhibiting the expression of the metabolizing enzyme, IDO1, in the intestine. Moreover, maintaining elevated kynurenine levels during Lactobacillus supplementation diminished the treatment benefits. Collectively, our data provide a mechanistic scenario for how a microbiota player (Lactobacillus) may contribute to regulating metabolism and resilience during stress. PMID:28266612

  9. Microbiota alteration is associated with the development of stress-induced despair behavior.

    PubMed

    Marin, Ioana A; Goertz, Jennifer E; Ren, Tiantian; Rich, Stephen S; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Farber, Emily; Wu, Martin; Overall, Christopher C; Kipnis, Jonathan; Gaultier, Alban

    2017-03-07

    Depressive disorders often run in families, which, in addition to the genetic component, may point to the microbiome as a causative agent. Here, we employed a combination of behavioral, molecular and computational techniques to test the role of the microbiota in mediating despair behavior. In chronically stressed mice displaying despair behavior, we found that the microbiota composition and the metabolic signature dramatically change. Specifically, we observed reduced Lactobacillus and increased circulating kynurenine levels as the most prominent changes in stressed mice. Restoring intestinal Lactobacillus levels was sufficient to improve the metabolic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Mechanistically, we identified that Lactobacillus-derived reactive oxygen species may suppress host kynurenine metabolism, by inhibiting the expression of the metabolizing enzyme, IDO1, in the intestine. Moreover, maintaining elevated kynurenine levels during Lactobacillus supplementation diminished the treatment benefits. Collectively, our data provide a mechanistic scenario for how a microbiota player (Lactobacillus) may contribute to regulating metabolism and resilience during stress.

  10. Altered negative priming in older subjects: first evidence from behavioral and neural level

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Eva; Gebhardt, Helge; Gruppe, Harald; Gallhofer, Bernd; Sammer, Gebhard

    2012-01-01

    The impact of aging on the negative priming (NP) effect has been subject of many studies using behavioral measures. Results are inconsistent and corresponding neural data do not exist. We were interested in, whether or not processing of NP is altered in older in comparison to young adults (YA) on behavioral and neural level. Eighteen young and eighteen older healthy adults performed a location-based NP paradigm during fMRI. YA behaviorally showed a NP effect and NP associated fronto-striatal activation, which is in accordance with the inhibitory model of NP. In older subjects no significant behavioral NP effect and no NP-related activation in predefined brain regions could be found. This is discussed in context of the “loss of efficiency” hypothesis. One possible source for the lack of NP-related activation is a reduction of gray matter (GM) volume in older subjects as shown using voxel based morphometry (VBM). PMID:23060774

  11. Phagocytic, Opsonic and Immunoglobulin Studies in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael E.; Stiehm, E. Richard

    1973-01-01

    Despite improved diagnositc and therapeutic measures, neonatal septicemia continues to be a major clinical problem. Improvement in the management of the septic neonate should result from application of the increasing information being learned of the neonatal host defense mechanisms. The earlier concept that the neonate was “immunologically null” can now be discarded. Evidence summarized in this review has established that the neonate can marshal an immune response to most antigens and infectious agents. A further major advance in recent years has been in understanding of the inflammatory response in the neonate, which includes such activities as chemotaxis, phagocytosis and bactericidal killing of ingested bacteria by phagocytes. PMID:4580226

  12. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis. PMID:26946128

  13. Cortical Structure Alterations and Social Behavior Impairment in p50-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Mastinu, Andrea; Maccarinelli, Giuseppina; Mitola, Stefania; Premoli, Marika; La Rosa, Luca Rosario; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Grilli, Mariagrazia; Memo, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in genes that regulate neurodevelopment can lead to cortical malformations, resulting in malfunction during postnatal life. The NF-κB pathway has a key role during neurodevelopment by regulating the maintenance of the neural progenitor cell pool and inhibiting neuronal differentiation. In this study, we evaluated whether mice lacking the NF-κB p50 subunit (KO) present alterations in cortical structure and associated behavioral impairment. We found that, compared with wild type (WT), KO mice at postnatal day 2 present an increase in radial glial cells, an increase in Reelin protein expression levels, in addition to an increase of specific layer thickness. Moreover, adult KO mice display abnormal columnar organization in the somatosensory cortex, a specific decrease in somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, altered neurite orientation, and a decrease in Synapsin I protein levels. Concerning behavior, KO mice, in addition to an increase in locomotor and exploratory activity, display impairment in social behaviors, with a reduction in social interaction. Finally, we found that risperidone treatment decreased hyperactivity of KO mice, but had no effect on defective social interaction. Altogether, these data add complexity to a growing body of data, suggesting a link between dysregulation of the NF-κB pathway and neurodevelopmental disorders pathogenesis.

  14. [The role of phagocytic cells in periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Matarasso, S; Cafiero, C; Bizzarri, L; Nicolò, M

    1991-04-01

    Having described the morphological and functional characteristics of phagocytic cells, the paper underlines that, in addition to the etiological responsibility of bacterial plaque, the main role in the onset and evolution of periodontitis is played by the host's response. Phagocytic response plays a fundamental role in the host's defence reaction and represents the first barrier to the penetration of bacteria into periodontal tissue. In addition to their defensive role, phagocytic cells may also be responsible for damage to periodontal tissue as a collateral effect of their phagocytic function, thus worsening the periodontal lesion.

  15. NLRP3 INFLAMMASOME ACTIVATION CONTRIBUTES TO LONG-TERM BEHAVIORAL ALTERATIONS IN MICE INJECTED WITH LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, WEI; CAO, FENG-SHENG; FENG, JUN; CHEN, HUA-WENG; WAN, JIE-RU; LU, QING; WANG, JIAN

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) might affect the central nervous system by causing neuroinflammation, which subsequently leads to brain damage and dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated the role of nod-like receptor pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation in long-term behavioral alterations of 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice injected intraperitoneally with LPS (5 mg/kg). At different time points after injection, we assessed locomotor function with a 24-point neurologic deficit scoring system and the rotarod test; assessed recognition memory with the novel object recognition test; and assessed emotional abnormality (anhedonia and behavioral despair) with the tail suspension test, forced swim test, and sucrose preference test. We also assessed protein expression of NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and caspase-1 p10 in hippocampus by Western blotting; measured levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and IL-10 in hippocampus; measured TNFα and IL-1β in serum by ELISA; and evaluated microglial activity in hippocampus by Iba1 immunofluorescence. We found that LPS-injected mice displayed long-term depression-like behaviors and recognition memory deficit; elevated expression of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 p10; increased levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and TNFα; decreased levels of IL-10; and increased microglial activation. These effects were blocked by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor Ac-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-chloromethylketone. The results demonstrate proof of concept that NLRP3 inflammasome activation contributes to long-term behavioral alterations in LPS-exposed mice, probably through enhanced inflammation, and that NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition might alleviate peripheral and brain inflammation and thereby ameliorate long-term behavioral alterations in LPS-exposed mice. PMID:27923741

  16. Altered Sensory Code Drives Juvenile-to-Adult Behavioral Maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Alexandros K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adults perform better than juveniles in food-seeking tasks. Using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to probe the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral maturation, we found that adults and juveniles require different combinations of sensory neurons to generate age-specific food-seeking behavior. We first show that adults and juveniles differ in their response to and preference for food-associated odors, and we analyze genetic mutants to map the neuronal circuits required for those behavioral responses. We developed a novel device to trap juveniles and record their neuronal activity. Activity measurements revealed that adult and juvenile AWA sensory neurons respond to the addition of diacetyl stimulus, whereas AWB, ASK, and AWC sensory neurons encode its removal specifically in adults. Further, we show that reducing neurotransmission from the additional AWB, ASK, and AWC sensory neurons transforms odor preferences from an adult to a juvenile-like state. We also show that AWB and ASK neurons drive behavioral changes exclusively in adults, providing more evidence that age-specific circuits drive age-specific behavior. Collectively, our results show that an odor-evoked sensory code is modified during the juvenile-to-adult transition in animal development to drive age-appropriate behavior. We suggest that this altered sensory code specifically enables adults to extract additional stimulus features and generate robust behavior. PMID:28083560

  17. Postpartum Behavioral Profiles in Wistar Rats Following Maternal Separation - Altered Exploration and Risk-Assessment Behavior in MS15 Dams.

    PubMed

    Daoura, Loudin; Hjalmarsson, My; Oreland, Sadia; Nylander, Ingrid; Roman, Erika

    2010-01-01

    The rodent maternal separation (MS) model is frequently used to investigate the impact of early environmental factors on adult neurobiology and behavior. The majority of MS studies assess effects in the offspring and few address the consequences of repeated pup removal in the dam. Such studies are of interest since alterations detected in offspring subjected to MS may, at least in part, be mediated by variations in maternal behavior and the amount of maternal care provided by the dam. The aim of this study was to investigate how daily short (15 min; MS15) and prolonged (360 min; MS360) periods of MS affects the dam by examining postpartum behavioral profiles using the multivariate concentric square field (MCSF) test. The dams were tested on postpartum days 24-25, i.e., just after the end of the separation period and weaning. The results reveal a lower exploratory drive and lower risk-assessment behavior in MS15 dams relative to MS360 or animal facility reared dams. The present results contrast some of the previously reported findings and provide new information about early post-weaning behavioral characteristics in a multivariate setting. Plausible explanations for the results are provided including a discussion how the present results fit into the maternal mediation hypothesis.

  18. Rat hippocampal alterations could underlie behavioral abnormalities induced by exposure to moderate noise levels.

    PubMed

    Uran, S L; Aon-Bertolino, M L; Caceres, L G; Capani, F; Guelman, L R

    2012-08-30

    Noise exposure is known to affect auditory structures in living organisms. However, it should not be ignored that many of the effects of noise are extra-auditory. Previous findings of our laboratory demonstrated that noise was able to induce behavioral alterations that are mainly related to the cerebellum (CE) and the hippocampus (HC). Therefore, the aim of this work was to reveal new data about the vulnerability of developing rat HC to moderate noise levels through the assessment of potential histological changes and hippocampal-related behavioral alterations. Male Wistar rats were exposed to noise (95-97 dB SPL, 2h daily) either for 1 day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or between postnatal days 15 and 30 (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal histological evaluation as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) habituation and recognition memory assessments were performed. Results showed a mild disruption in the different hippocampal regions after ANE and SANE schemes, along with significant behavioral abnormalities. These data suggest that exposure of developing rats to noise levels of moderate intensity is able to trigger changes in the HC, an extra-auditory structure of the Central Nervous System (CNS), that could underlie the observed behavioral effects.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection inhibits phagocyte clearance of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bimczok, Diane; Smythies, Lesley E; Waites, Ken B; Grams, Jayleen M; Stahl, Richard D; Mannon, Peter J; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, C Mel; Harris, Paul R; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B; Smith, Phillip D

    2013-06-15

    Increased apoptotic death of gastric epithelial cells is a hallmark of Helicobacter pylori infection, and altered epithelial cell turnover is an important contributor to gastric carcinogenesis. To address the fate of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells and their role in H. pylori mucosal disease, we investigated phagocyte clearance of apoptotic gastric epithelial cells in H. pylori infection. Human gastric mononuclear phagocytes were analyzed for their ability to take up apoptotic epithelial cells (AECs) in vivo using immunofluorescence analysis. We then used primary human gastric epithelial cells induced to undergo apoptosis by exposure to live H. pylori to study apoptotic cell uptake by autologous monocyte-derived macrophages. We show that HLA-DR(+) mononuclear phagocytes in human gastric mucosa contain cytokeratin-positive and TUNEL-positive AEC material, indicating that gastric phagocytes are involved in AEC clearance. We further show that H. pylori both increased apoptosis in primary gastric epithelial cells and decreased phagocytosis of the AECs by autologous monocyte-derived macrophages. Reduced macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells was mediated in part by H. pylori-induced macrophage TNF-α, which was expressed at higher levels in H. pylori-infected, compared with uninfected, gastric mucosa. Importantly, we show that H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa contained significantly higher numbers of AECs and higher levels of nonphagocytosed TUNEL-positive apoptotic material, consistent with a defect in apoptotic cell clearance. Thus, as shown in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, insufficient phagocyte clearance may contribute to the chronic and self-perpetuating inflammation in human H. pylori infection.

  20. Waterborne manganese exposure alters plasma, brain, and liver metabolites accompanied by changes in stereotypic behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Fordahl, Steve; Cooney, Paula; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei; Erikson, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    Overexposure to waterborne manganese (Mn) is linked with cognitive impairment in children and neurochemical abnormalities in other experimental models. In order to characterize the threshold between Mn-exposure and altered neurochemistry, it is important to identify biomarkers that positively correspond with brain Mn-accumulation. The objective of this study was to identify Mn-induced alterations in plasma, liver, and brain metabolites using liquid/gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry metabolomic analyses; and to monitor corresponding Mn-induced behavior changes. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats had access to deionized drinking water either Mn-free or containing 1g Mn/L for six weeks. Behaviors were monitored during the sixth week for a continuous 24h period while in a home cage environment using video surveillance. Mn-exposure significantly increased liver, plasma, and brain Mn concentrations compared to control, specifically targeting the globus pallidus (GP). Mn significantly altered 98 metabolites in the brain, liver, and plasma; notably shifting cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in the brain (increased oleic and palmitic acid; 12.57 and 15.48 fold change (FC), respectively), and liver (increased oleic acid, 14.51 FC; decreased hydroxybutyric acid, −14.29 FC). Additionally, Mn-altered plasma metabolites homogentisic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and aspartic acid correlated significantly with GP and striatal Mn. Total distance traveled was significantly increased and positively correlated with Mn-exposure, while nocturnal stereotypic and exploratory behaviors were reduced with Mn-exposure and performed largely during the light cycle compared to unexposed rats. These data provide putative biomarkers for Mn-neurotoxicity and suggest that Mn disrupts the circadian cycle in rats. PMID:22056924

  1. Waterborne manganese exposure alters plasma, brain, and liver metabolites accompanied by changes in stereotypic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Fordahl, Steve; Cooney, Paula; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei; Erikson, Keith M

    2012-01-01

    Overexposure to waterborne manganese (Mn) is linked with cognitive impairment in children and neurochemical abnormalities in other experimental models. In order to characterize the threshold between Mn-exposure and altered neurochemistry, it is important to identify biomarkers that positively correspond with brain Mn-accumulation. The objective of this study was to identify Mn-induced alterations in plasma, liver, and brain metabolites using liquid/gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry metabolomic analyses; and to monitor corresponding Mn-induced behavior changes. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats had access to deionized drinking water either Mn-free or containing 1g Mn/L for 6 weeks. Behaviors were monitored during the sixth week for a continuous 24h period while in a home cage environment using video surveillance. Mn-exposure significantly increased liver, plasma, and brain Mn concentrations compared to control, specifically targeting the globus pallidus (GP). Mn significantly altered 98 metabolites in the brain, liver, and plasma; notably shifting cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in the brain (increased oleic and palmitic acid; 12.57 and 15.48 fold change (FC), respectively), and liver (increased oleic acid, 14.51 FC; decreased hydroxybutyric acid, -14.29 FC). Additionally, Mn-altered plasma metabolites homogentisic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and aspartic acid correlated significantly with GP and striatal Mn. Total distance traveled was significantly increased and positively correlated with Mn-exposure, while nocturnal stereotypic and exploratory behaviors were reduced with Mn-exposure and performed largely during the light cycle compared to unexposed rats. These data provide putative biomarkers for Mn-neurotoxicity and suggest that Mn disrupts the circadian cycle in rats.

  2. Lysosomal and phagocytic activity is increased in astrocytes during disease progression in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David J.; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Keatinge, Marcus; Sokhi, Dilraj; Viskaitis, Paulius; Heath, Paul R.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, gene expression profiling of astrocytes from the pre-symptomatic stage of the SOD1G93A model of ALS has revealed reduced lactate metabolism and altered trophic support. Here, we have performed microarray analysis of symptomatic and late-stage disease astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the lumbar spinal cord of the SOD1G93A mouse to complete the picture of astrocyte behavior throughout the disease course. Astrocytes at symptomatic and late-stage disease show a distinct up-regulation of transcripts defining a reactive phenotype, such as those involved in the lysosome and phagocytic pathways. Functional analysis of hexosaminidase B enzyme activity in the spinal cord and of astrocyte phagocytic ability has demonstrated a significant increase in lysosomal enzyme activity and phagocytic activity in SOD1G93A vs. littermate controls, validating the findings of the microarray study. In addition to the increased reactivity seen at both stages, astrocytes from late-stage disease showed decreased expression of many transcripts involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Staining for the master regulator of cholesterol synthesis, SREBP2, has revealed an increased localization to the cytoplasm of astrocytes and motor neurons in late-stage SOD1G93A spinal cord, indicating that down-regulation of transcripts may be due to an excess of cholesterol in the CNS during late-stage disease possibly due to phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Our data reveal that SOD1G93A astrocytes are characterized more by a loss of supportive function than a toxic phenotype during ALS disease progression and future studies should focus upon restorative therapies. PMID:26528138

  3. Functional characterisation of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrates lack canonical adaptive immunity and mainly rely on innate immune system to fight against pathogens. The phagocytes, which could engulf and kill microbial pathogens, are likely to be of great importance and have to undertake significant roles in invertebrate immune defense. In the present study, flow cytometry combined with histological and lectin staining was employed to characterise functional features of phagocytes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Based on the cell size and cellular contents, haemocytes were categorised into three cell types, i.e., granulocytes, semigranulocytes and agranulocytes. Agranulocytes with smaller cell volume and lower cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio did not show phagocytic activity, while semigranulocytes and agranulocytes exhibited larger cell volume, higher cytoplasmic-to-nuclear ratio and phagocytic activity. In addition, granulocytes with higher side scatter (SSC) exhibited higher phagocytic activity than that of semigranulocytes. When β-integrin and lectin-like receptors were blocked by RGD tripeptide and carbohydrates, respectively, the phagocytic activity of both granulocytes and semigranulocytes was significantly inhibited, indicating that β-integrin and certain lectin-like receptors were involved in phagocytosis towards microbes. Moreover, lipopolysaccharide but not peptidylglycan could enhance phagocytic activity of granulocytes and semigranulocytes towards Vibrio splendidus and Staphylococcus aureus. Lectin staining analysis revealed that Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), binding the epitope polylactosamine, was highly distributed on the extracellular cell surface of phagocytes, and could be utilized as a potential molecular marker to differentiate phagocytes from non-phagocytic haemocytes. The results, collectively, provide knowledge on the functional characters of oyster phagocytes, which would contribute to deep investigation of cell typing and cellular immunity in bivalves. PMID:27994957

  4. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study.

  5. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study. PMID:26417153

  6. Altered anxiety-related and abnormal social behaviors in rats exposed to early life seizures

    PubMed Central

    Castelhano, Adelisandra Silva Santos; Cassane, Gustavo dos Santos Teada; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cysneiros, Roberta Monterazzo

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are the most common manifestation of neurological dysfunction in the neonate. The prognosis of neonatal seizures is highly variable, and the controversy remains whether the severity, duration, or frequency of seizures may contribute to brain damage independently of its etiology. Animal data indicates that seizures during development are associated with a high probability of long-term adverse effects such as learning and memory impairment, behavioral changes and even epilepsy, which is strongly age dependent, as well as the severity, duration, and frequency of seizures. In preliminary studies, we demonstrated that adolescent male rats exposed to one-single neonatal status epilepticus (SE) episode showed social behavior impairment, and we proposed the model as relevant for studies of developmental disorders. Based on these facts, the goal of this study was to verify the existence of a persistent deficit and if the anxiety-related behavior could be associated with that impairment. To do so, male Wistar rats at 9 days postnatal were submitted to a single episode of SE by pilocarpine injection (380 mg/kg, i.p.) and control animals received saline (0.9%, 0.1 mL/10 g). It was possible to demonstrate that in adulthood, animals exposed to neonatal SE displayed low preference for social novelty, anxiety-related behavior, and increased stereotyped behavior in anxiogenic environment with no locomotor activity changes. On the balance, these data suggests that neonatal SE in rodents leads to altered anxiety-related and abnormal social behaviors. PMID:23675329

  7. Chronic social stress in puberty alters appetitive male sexual behavior and neural metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Christel C; Puga, Frank; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Jennings, Kimberly J; Wommack, Joel C; Delville, Yvon

    2014-07-01

    Repeated social subjugation in early puberty lowers testosterone levels. We used hamsters to investigate the effects of social subjugation on male sexual behavior and metabolic activity within neural systems controlling social and motivational behaviors. Subjugated animals were exposed daily to aggressive adult males in early puberty for postnatal days 28 to 42, while control animals were placed in empty clean cages. On postnatal day 45, they were tested for male sexual behavior in the presence of receptive female. Alternatively, they were tested for mate choice after placement at the base of a Y-maze containing a sexually receptive female in one tip of the maze and an ovariectomized one on the other. Social subjugation did not affect the capacity to mate with receptive females. Although control animals were fast to approach females and preferred ovariectomized individuals, subjugated animals stayed away from them and showed no preference. Cytochrome oxidase activity was reduced within the preoptic area and ventral tegmental area in subjugated hamsters. In addition, the correlation of metabolic activity of these areas with the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and anterior parietal cortex changed significantly from positive in controls to negative in subjugated animals. These data show that at mid-puberty, while male hamsters are capable of mating, their appetitive sexual behavior is not fully mature and this aspect of male sexual behavior is responsive to social subjugation. Furthermore, metabolic activity and coordination of activity in brain areas related to sexual behavior and motivation were altered by social subjugation.

  8. Developmental exposure to methylmercury alters learning and induces depression-like behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, Natalia; Tamm, Christoffer; Vahter, Marie; Hökfelt, Tomas; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Delinda A; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the long-term effects of developmental exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), pregnant mice were exposed to at 0.5 mg MeHg/kg/day via drinking water from gestational day 7 until day 7 after delivery. The behavior of offspring was monitored at 5-15 and 26-36 weeks of age using an automated system (IntelliCage) designed for continuous long-term recording of the home cage behavior in social groups and complex analysis of basic activities and learning. In addition, spontaneous locomotion, motor coordination on the accelerating rotarod, spatial learning in Morris water maze, and depression-like behavior in forced swimming test were also studied. The analysis of behavior performed in the IntelliCage without social deprivation occurred to be more sensitive in detecting alterations in activity and learning paradigms. We found normal motor function but decreased exploratory activity in MeHg-exposed male mice, especially at young age. Learning disturbances observed in MeHg-exposed male animals suggest reference memory impairment. Interestingly, the forced swimming test revealed a predisposition to depressive-like behavior in the MeHg-exposed male offspring. This study provides novel evidence that the developmental exposure to MeHg can affect not only cognitive functions but also motivation-driven behaviors.

  9. Neonatal isolation alters the estrous cycle interactions on the acute behavioral effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Therese A; Sanchez, Hayde; Jatlow, Peter I; Kehoe, Priscilla

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrated that neonatal isolation (ISO) increases acquisition of cocaine self-administration and alters psychostimulant-induced ventral striatal dopamine and serotonin levels in female rats. Both dopamine and serotonin modulate the behavioral effects of cocaine and these effects can vary across estrous stages. We now test whether ISO modifies the manner in which estrous stage affects the acute behavioral responses to cocaine. Litters were assigned to ISO (1 h/day isolation; post-natal days 2-9) or non-handled (NH) conditions. In Experiment 1, the ability of cocaine (0.3-30 mg/kg; IP) to disrupt schedule-controlled responding for food was assessed in proestrus, estrus, and diestrus stages. Diestrus and proestrus NH females showed increased response rates at low cocaine doses and decreased rates at higher doses relative to baseline. In contrast, estrus NH females showed decreased responding across all doses. ISO eliminated this estrous stage distinction; only decreased responding to high cocaine doses were seen. Yet, estrous cyclicity during food restriction (Experiment 2) did not differ by group. To confirm this ISO effect, proestrus or estrus rats were administered cocaine (0, 5, 10 mg/kg; IP) and activity monitored in Experiment 3. Locomotor activity differed by estrous stage in NH but not ISO rats. Cocaine plasma levels (Experiment 4) at the time of peak behavioral activity did not differ by group or estrous stage. Results extend prior studies to show estrous stage alters the behavioral effects of cocaine. Neonatal isolation eliminates these effects perhaps reflecting alterations in accumbens monoamine levels or the effects of estrogen on this system.

  10. Invasive plant species alters consumer behavior by providing refuge from predation.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Humberto P; Barnett, Kirk; Reinhardt, Jason R; Marquis, Robert J; Orrock, John L

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the effects of invasive plants on native consumers is important because consumer-mediated indirect effects have the potential to alter the dynamics of coexistence in native communities. Invasive plants may promote changes in consumer pressure due to changes in protective cover (i.e., the architectural complexity of the invaded habitat) and in food availability (i.e., subsidies of fruits and seeds). No experimental studies have evaluated the relative interplay of these two effects. In a factorial experiment, we manipulated cover and food provided by the invasive shrub Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) to evaluate whether this plant alters the foraging activity of native mammals. Using tracking plates to quantify mammalian foraging activity, we found that removal of honeysuckle cover, rather than changes in the fruit resources it provides, reduced the activity of important seed consumers, mice in the genus Peromyscus. Two mesopredators, Procyon lotor and Didelphis virginiana, were also affected. Moreover, we found rodents used L. maackii for cover only on cloudless nights, indicating that the effect of honeysuckle was weather-dependent. Our work provides experimental evidence that this invasive plant species changes habitat characteristics, and in so doing alters the behavior of small- and medium-sized mammals. Changes in seed predator behavior may lead to cascading effects on the seeds that mice consume.

  11. Fluconazole alters the polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus gattii and leads to distinct behaviors in murine Cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Frases, Susana; Bravim, Mayara; Araujo, Glauber de S; Santos, Patrícia Campi; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Maira Juliana Andrade; Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Miranda, Aline Silva; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Santos, Carolina Maria Araújo; Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Gouveia, Ludmila Ferreira; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Souza, Danielle G; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is an emergent human pathogen. Fluconazole is commonly used for treatment of cryptococcosis, but the emergence of less susceptible strains to this azole is a global problem and also the data regarding fluconazole-resistant cryptococcosis are scarce. We evaluate the influence of fluconazole on murine cryptococcosis and whether this azole alters the polysaccharide (PS) from cryptococcal cells. L27/01 strain of C. gattii was cultivated in high fluconazole concentrations and developed decreased drug susceptibility. This phenotype was named L27/01F, that was less virulent than L27/01 in mice. The physical, structural and electrophoretic properties of the PS capsule of L27/01F were altered by fluconazole. L27/01F presented lower antiphagocytic properties and reduced survival inside macrophages. The L27/01F did not affect the central nervous system, while the effect in brain caused by L27/01 strain began after only 12 hours. Mice infected with L27/01F presented lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, with increased cellular recruitment in the lungs and severe pulmonary disease. The behavioral alterations were affected by L27/01, but no effects were detected after infection with L27/01F. Our results suggest that stress to fluconazole alters the capsule of C. gattii and influences the clinical manifestations of cryptococcosis.

  12. Fluconazole Alters the Polysaccharide Capsule of Cryptococcus gattii and Leads to Distinct Behaviors in Murine Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Frases, Susana; Bravim, Mayara; Araujo, Glauber de S.; Santos, Patrícia Campi; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Maira Juliana Andrade; Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Miranda, Aline Silva; Oliveira, Danilo Bretas; Santos, Carolina Maria Araújo; Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Gouveia, Ludmila Ferreira; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Souza, Danielle G.; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is an emergent human pathogen. Fluconazole is commonly used for treatment of cryptococcosis, but the emergence of less susceptible strains to this azole is a global problem and also the data regarding fluconazole-resistant cryptococcosis are scarce. We evaluate the influence of fluconazole on murine cryptococcosis and whether this azole alters the polysaccharide (PS) from cryptococcal cells. L27/01 strain of C. gattii was cultivated in high fluconazole concentrations and developed decreased drug susceptibility. This phenotype was named L27/01F, that was less virulent than L27/01 in mice. The physical, structural and electrophoretic properties of the PS capsule of L27/01F were altered by fluconazole. L27/01F presented lower antiphagocytic properties and reduced survival inside macrophages. The L27/01F did not affect the central nervous system, while the effect in brain caused by L27/01 strain began after only 12 hours. Mice infected with L27/01F presented lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, with increased cellular recruitment in the lungs and severe pulmonary disease. The behavioral alterations were affected by L27/01, but no effects were detected after infection with L27/01F. Our results suggest that stress to fluconazole alters the capsule of C. gattii and influences the clinical manifestations of cryptococcosis. PMID:25392951

  13. Invader danger: lizards faced with novel predators exhibit an altered behavioral response to stress.

    PubMed

    Trompeter, Whitney P; Langkilde, Tracy

    2011-07-01

    Animals respond to stressors by producing glucocorticoid stress hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT). CORT acts too slowly to trigger immediate behavioral responses to a threat, but can change longer-term behavior, facilitating an individual's survival to subsequent threats. To be adaptive, the nature of an animal's behavior following elevated CORT levels should be matched to the predominant threats that they face. Seeking refuge following a stressful encounter could be beneficial if the predominant predator is a visual hunter, but may prove detrimental when the predominant predator is able to enter these refuge sites. As a result, an individual's behavior when their CORT levels are high may differ among populations of a single species. Invasive species impose novel pressures on native populations, which may select for a shift in their behavior when CORT levels are high. We tested whether the presence of predatory invasive fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) at a site affects the behavioral response of native eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus) to elevated CORT levels. Lizards from an uninvaded site were more likely to hide when their CORT levels were experimentally elevated; a response that likely provides a survival advantage for lizards faced with native predatory threats (e.g. birds and snakes). Lizards from a fire ant invaded site showed the opposite response; spending more time moving and up on the basking log when their CORT levels were elevated. Use of the basking log likely reflects a refuge-seeking behavior, rather than thermoregulatory activity, as selected body temperatures were not affected by CORT. Fleeing off the ground may prove more effective than hiding for lizards that regularly encounter small, terrestrially-foraging fire ant predators. This study suggests that invasive species may alter the relationship between the physiological and behavioral stress response of native species.

  14. Early life experience alters behavior during social defeat: focus on serotonergic systems.

    PubMed

    Gardner, K L; Thrivikraman, K V; Lightman, S L; Plotsky, P M; Lowry, C A

    2005-01-01

    Early life experience can have prolonged effects on neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stress. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of early life experience on behavior during social defeat, as well as on associated functional cellular responses in serotonergic and non-serotonergic neurons within the dorsal raphe nucleus, a structure which plays an important role in modulation of stress-related physiology and behavior. Male Long Evans rat pups were exposed to either normal animal facility rearing or 15 min or 180 min of maternal separation from postnatal days 2-14. As adults, these rats were exposed to a social defeat protocol. Differences in behavior were seen among the early life treatment groups during social defeat; rats exposed to 180 min of maternal separation from postnatal days 2-14 displayed more passive-submissive behaviors and less proactive coping behaviors. Analysis of the distribution of tryptophan hydroxylase and c-Fos-like immunoreactivity in control rats exposed to a novel cage and rats exposed to social defeat revealed that, independent of the early life experience, rats exposed to social defeat showed an increase in the number of c-Fos-like immunoreactive nuclei in serotonergic neurons in the middle and caudal parts of the dorsal dorsal raphe nucleus and caudal part of the ventral dorsal raphe nucleus, regions known to contain serotonergic neurons projecting to central autonomic and emotional motor control systems. This is the first study to show that the dorsomedial part of the mid-rostrocaudal dorsal raphe nucleus is engaged by a naturalistic stressor and supports the hypothesis that early life experience alters behavioral coping strategies during social conflict; furthermore, this study is consistent with the hypothesis that topographically organized subpopulations of serotonergic neurons principally within the mid-rostrocaudal and caudal part of the dorsal dorsal raphe nucleus modulate stress

  15. Environmental prenatal stress alters sexual dimorphism of maternal behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Laso, Carmen; Segovia, Santiago; Martín, José Luis R; Ortega, Esperanza; Gómez, Francisco; Del Cerro, M Cruz R

    2008-03-05

    The prenatal external environment can affect fetuses, altering the maternal behavior that they express when mature. In the present study, environmental prenatal stress (EPS) was applied to pregnant rats in their final week of gestation, and when their female offspring reached maturity, the long latency effect of the stress on those offspring was ascertained on their induced maternal behavior (MB), accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) morphology and plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone (Cpd B). EPS reduced: the percentage of these virgins that showed induced MB, their retrieval of foster pups, the time spent crouching, and the quality of nest building; it also increased the incidence of their cannibalism of foster pups. The EPS-treated females presented a male-like pattern of induced MB. They showed increased plasma levels of ACTH and Cpd B and increased numbers of mitral cells in the AOB. These findings provide evidence that stress applied to the pregnant rat produces long-lasting behavioral, neuroanatomical and hormonal alterations in the female offspring that can be observed when they reach maturity.

  16. Effect of sub-lethal concentrations of endosulfan on phagocytic and hematological parameters in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Girón-Pérez, M I; Montes-López, M; García-Ramírez, L A; Romero-Bañuelos, C A; Robledo-Marenco, M L

    2008-03-01

    The effect of endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepin-3-oxide), an organochlorine pesticide, was evaluated on phagocytic (phagocytic index and percentage of active cells) and hematological parameters in Nile tilapia. Experimental data showed that an acute exposure to endosulfan (4.0 and 7.0 microg/L) induces a significant decrease in the phagocytic index and the percentage of active cells in peripherical blood of Nile tilapia. However, hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit (Hto), red blood cell count (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were not significantly altered in fish exposed to endosulfan compared with control group.

  17. Moderate prenatal alcohol exposure alters behavior and neuroglial parameters in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Brolese, Giovana; Lunardi, Paula; Broetto, Núbia; Engelke, Douglas S; Lírio, Franciane; Batassini, Cristiane; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol consumption by women during gestation has become increasingly common. Although it is widely accepted that exposure to high doses of ethanol has long-lasting detrimental effects on brain development, the case for moderate doses is underappreciated, and benchmark studies have demonstrated structural and behavioral defects associated with moderate prenatal alcohol exposure in humans and animal models. This study aimed to investigate the influence of in utero exposure to moderate levels of ethanol throughout pregnancy on learning/memory, anxiety parameters and neuroglial parameters in adolescent offspring. Female rats were exposed to an experimental protocol throughout gestation up to weaning. After mating, the dams were divided into three groups and treated with only water (control), non-alcoholic beer (vehicle) or 10% (vv) beer solution (moderate prenatal alcohol exposure - MPAE). Adolescent male offspring were subjected to the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task to evaluate learning/memory and anxiety-like behavior. Hippocampi were dissected and slices were obtained for immunoquantification of GFAP, NeuN, S100B and the NMDA receptor. The MPAE group clearly presented anxiolytic-like behavior, even though they had learned how to avoid the aversive arm. S100B protein was increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the group treated with alcohol, and alterations in GFAP expression were also shown. This study indicates that moderate ethanol doses administered during pregnancy could induce anxiolytic-like effects, suggesting an increase in risk-taking behavior in adolescent male offspring. Furthermore, the data show the possibility that glial cells are involved in the altered behavior present after prenatal ethanol treatment.

  18. Homeostasis in the mononuclear phagocyte system.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stephen J; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) is a family of functionally related cells including bone marrow precursors, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages. We review the evidence that macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are separate lineages and functional entities, and examine whether the traditional view that monocytes are the immediate precursors of tissue macrophages needs to be refined based upon evidence that macrophages can extensively self-renew and can be seeded from yolk sac/foetal liver progenitors with little input from monocytes thereafter. We review the role of the growth factor colony-stimulating factor (CSF)1, and present a model consistent with the concept of the MPS in which local proliferation and monocyte recruitment are connected to ensure macrophages occupy their well-defined niche in most tissues.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Mononuclear Phagocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Tussiwand, Roxane; Gautier, Emmanuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP) are a quite unique subset of hematopoietic cells, which comprise dendritic cells (DC), monocytes as well as monocyte-derived and tissue-resident macrophages. These cells are extremely diverse with regard to their origin, their phenotype as well as their function. Developmentally, DC and monocytes are constantly replenished from a bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor. The ontogeny of macrophages is more complex and is temporally linked and specified by the organ where they reside, occurring early during embryonic or perinatal life. The functional heterogeneity of MPs is certainly a consequence of the tissue of residence and also reflects the diverse ontogeny of the subsets. In this review, we will highlight the developmental pathways of murine MP, with a particular emphasis on the transcriptional factors that regulate their development and function. Finally, we will discuss and point out open questions in the field. PMID:26539196

  20. Kinetics of MTT-formazan exocytosis in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Beatriz L; Tasat, Deborah R; Palmieri, Mónica A; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2005-01-01

    MTT is taken up by cells by endocytosis and reduced to formazan in the endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Formazan is deposited intracellularly as blue granules and is later exocytosed as needle-like formazan crystals. The present study involves an analysis of the pattern of exocytosis of MTT in different cell types showing clearcut differences in the response that can be associated to their ability to phagocytose. To further assess the characteristics of the exocytic mechanism of MTT/formazan, different experimental conditions were assayed. When culture medium with decreasing serum concentration was used as a metabolic modulator no variations were observed in the proportion of cells with formazan crystals. Conversely, the markedly sensitivity of phagocytic cells to increasing concentrations of genistein constituted a remarkable difference with non-phagocytic cells. These results must be considered when the modulation of MTT exocytosis is used as a signal of the progress of human diseases.

  1. Fluoxetine alters behavioral consistency of aggression and courtship in male Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Hebert, Olivia L

    2012-08-20

    The detrimental effects of steroid-mimics are well known but investigations on non-steroid pharmaceuticals are less common. In addition, most behavioral studies do not examine the effects at multiple time points. This study examined the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on behavior when male Siamese fighting fish encounter female and male dummy conspecifics simultaneously. Thus, how chemical exposure impacts behavioral consistency and whether individuals differ in their sensitivity to exposure was assessed. Overall aggression was reduced after fluoxetine administration while courtship was unaffected. Fluoxetine affected behavioral consistency towards both the male and female, with individuals behaving less consistently to the male and more consistently to the female. In addition, males appeared to differ in their sensitivity to fluoxetine exposure as not all males reduced their aggression after administration. This has important implications for studying the effects of unintended pharmaceutical exposure. Exposure may have evolutionary implications as it may influence both territorial defense and mating success. In sum, these findings demonstrate that pharmaceutical exposure may alter more than just overall level of behavior and stress the importance of examining the effects of exposure on an individual level.

  2. Frustrated Phagocytic Spreading of J774A-1 Macrophages Ends in Myosin II-Dependent Contraction.

    PubMed

    Kovari, Daniel T; Wei, Wenbin; Chang, Patrick; Toro, Jan-Simon; Beach, Ruth Fogg; Chambers, Dwight; Porter, Karen; Koo, Doyeon; Curtis, Jennifer E

    2016-12-20

    Conventional studies of dynamic phagocytic behavior have been limited in terms of spatial and temporal resolution due to the inherent three-dimensionality and small features of phagocytosis. To overcome these issues, we use a series of frustrated phagocytosis assays to quantitatively characterize phagocytic spreading dynamics. Our investigation reveals that frustrated phagocytic spreading occurs in phases and is punctuated by a distinct period of contraction. The spreading duration and peak contact areas are independent of the surface opsonin density, although the opsonin density does affect the likelihood that a cell will spread. This reinforces the idea that phagocytosis dynamics are primarily dictated by cytoskeletal activity. Structured illumination microscopy reveals that F-actin is reorganized during the course of frustrated phagocytosis. F-actin in early stages is consistent with that observed in lamellipodial protrusions. During the contraction phase, it is bundled into fibers that surround the cell and is reminiscent of a contractile belt. Using traction force microscopy, we show that cells exert significant strain on the underlying substrate during the contraction phase but little strain during the spreading phase, demonstrating that phagocytes actively constrict during late-stage phagocytosis. We also find that late-stage contraction initiates after the cell surface area increases by 225%, which is consistent with the point at which cortical tension begins to rise. Moreover, reducing tension by exposing cells to hypertonic buffer shifts the onset of contraction to occur in larger contact areas. Together, these findings provide further evidence that tension plays a significant role in signaling late-stage phagocytic activity.

  3. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.

  4. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  5. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M.; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  6. Alterations of molecular and behavioral responses to cocaine by selective inhibition of Elk-1 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Antoine; Bouveyron, Nicolas; Kappes, Vincent; Pascoli, Vincent; Pagès, Christiane; Heck, Nicolas; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2011-10-05

    Activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway in the striatum is crucial for molecular adaptations and long-term behavioral alterations induced by cocaine. In response to cocaine, ERK controls the phosphorylation levels of both mitogen and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK-1), a nuclear kinase involved in histone H3 (Ser10) and cAMP response element binding protein phosphorylation, and Elk-1, a transcription factor involved in serum response element (SRE)-driven gene regulations. We recently characterized the phenotype of msk-1 knock-out mice in response to cocaine. Herein, we wanted to address the role of Elk-1 phosphorylation in cocaine-induced molecular, morphological, and behavioral responses. We used a cell-penetrating peptide, named TAT-DEF-Elk-1 (TDE), which corresponds to the DEF docking domain of Elk-1 toward ERK and inhibits Elk-1 phosphorylation induced by ERKs without modifying ERK or MSK-1 in vitro. The peptide was injected in vivo before cocaine administration in mice. Immunocytochemical, molecular, morphological, and behavioral studies were performed. The TDE inhibited Elk-1 and H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation induced by cocaine, sparing ERK and MSK-1 activation. Consequently, TDE altered cocaine-induced regulation of genes bearing SRE site(s) in their promoters, including c-fos, zif268, ΔFosB, and arc/arg3.1 (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein). In a chronic cocaine administration paradigm, TDE reversed cocaine-induced increase in dendritic spine density. Finally, the TDE delayed the establishment of cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization and conditioned-place preference. We conclude that Elk-1 phosphorylation downstream from ERK is a key molecular event involved in long-term neuronal and behavioral adaptations to cocaine.

  7. Differential behavioral and molecular alterations upon protracted abstinence from cocaine versus morphine, nicotine, THC and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jérôme A J; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Le Merrer, Julie

    2016-04-28

    Unified theories of addiction are challenged by differing drug-seeking behaviors and neurobiological adaptations across drug classes, particularly for narcotics and psychostimulants. We previously showed that protracted abstinence to opiates leads to despair behavior and social withdrawal in mice, and we identified a transcriptional signature in the extended amygdala that was also present in animals abstinent from nicotine, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and alcohol. Here we examined whether protracted abstinence to these four drugs would also share common behavioral features, and eventually differ from abstinence to the prototypic psychostimulant cocaine. We found similar reduced social recognition, increased motor stereotypies and increased anxiety with relevant c-fos response alterations in morphine, nicotine, THC and alcohol abstinent mice. Protracted abstinence to cocaine, however, led to strikingly distinct, mostly opposing adaptations at all levels, including behavioral responses, neuronal activation and gene expression. Together, these data further document the existence of common hallmarks for protracted abstinence to opiates, nicotine, THC and alcohol that develop within motivation/emotion brain circuits. In our model, however, these do not apply to cocaine, supporting the notion of unique mechanisms in psychostimulant abuse.

  8. Chicoric acid regulates behavioral and biochemical alterations induced by chronic stress in experimental Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Kour, Kiranjeet; Bani, Sarang

    2011-09-01

    The present study was taken up to see the effect of chicoric acid (CA) on behavioral and biochemical alterations induced by chronic restraint stress in experimental Swiss albino mice. CA at 1mg/kg dose level exhibited considerable antidepressant activity as shown by significant decrease in immobility period in the Porsolt's swim stress-induced behavioral despair test and escape failures in Learned "helplessness test". The antidepressant activity shown by CA can be attributed to its modulating effect on nor-adrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and 5- hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) as shown by their quantification in CA treated chronically stressed mice. Further, a significant antioxidant effect was exhibited by CA as shown by estimation of lipid peroxidation, glutathione (GSH) and glycogen in liver of chronically stressed mice. It also normalized altered values of serum glucose, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in a dose dependent manner. The stress busting potential of CA was further confirmed by its regulating effect on raised plasma corticosterone levels and significant attenuation of the depleted ascorbic acid, cholesterol and corticosterone levels in adrenal glands. Thus, our results suggest that CA possesses considerable stress busting potential, and that anti-oxidation may be one of the mechanisms underlying its antistress action.

  9. Phagocytes in cell suspensions of human colon mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Beeken, W; Northwood, I; Beliveau, C; Gump, D

    1987-01-01

    Because little is known of the phagocytes of the human colon we enumerated these cells in mucosal suspensions and studied their phagocytic activity. Phagocyte rich suspensions were made by EDTA collagenase dissociation followed by elutriation centrifugation. Phagocytosis was evaluated by measuring cellular radioactivity after incubation of phagocytes with 3H-adenine labelled E coli ON2 and checked microscopically. Dissociation of normal mucosa from colorectal neoplasms yielded means of 1.9 X 10(6) eosinophils, 1.4 X 10(6) macrophages and 2 X 10(5) neutrophils per gram of mucosa. Visually normal mucosa of inflammatory states yielded 2.2 X 10(6) eosinophils, 2.3 X 10(6) macrophages and 7 X 10(5) neutrophils per gram of mucosa. Phagocyte rich suspensions of normal mucosa from tumour patients phagocytosed 21.8% of a pool of opsonised tritiated E coli ON2 and by microscopy 100% of mucosal neutrophils ingested bacteria, 83% of eosinophils were phagocytic, and 53% of macrophages contained bacteria. These results suggest that in the human colonic mucosa, the eosinophil is more abundant than the macrophage and the per cent of those cells exhibiting phagocytosis is intermediate between that of the macrophage and the neutrophil. Thus these three types of cells are actively phagocytic and share the potential for a major role in host defence against invasive enteric bacteria. PMID:3666566

  10. Functional genomics identifies negative regulatory nodes controlling phagocyte oxidative burst

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Daniel B.; Becker, Christine E.; Doan, Aivi; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J.; Knights, Dan; Mok, Amanda; Ng, Aylwin C.Y.; Doench, John G.; Root, David E.; Clish, Clary B.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    The phagocyte oxidative burst, mediated by Nox2 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, confers host defense against a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss-of-function mutations that impair function of the Nox2 complex result in a life-threatening immunodeficiency, and genetic variants of Nox2 subunits have been implicated in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, alterations in the oxidative burst can profoundly impact host defense, yet little is known about regulatory mechanisms that fine-tune this response. Here we report the discovery of regulatory nodes controlling oxidative burst by functional screening of genes within loci linked to human inflammatory disease. Implementing a multi-omics approach, we define transcriptional, metabolic and ubiquitin-cycling nodes controlled by Rbpj, Pfkl and Rnf145, respectively. Furthermore, we implicate Rnf145 in proteostasis of the Nox2 complex by endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Consequently, ablation of Rnf145 in murine macrophages enhances bacterial clearance, and rescues the oxidative burst defects associated with Ncf4 haploinsufficiency. PMID:26194095

  11. ApoE2 Exaggerates PTSD-Related Behavioral, Cognitive, and Neuroendocrine Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lance A; Zuloaga, Damian G; Bidiman, Erin; Marzulla, Tessa; Weber, Sydney; Wahbeh, Helane; Raber, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is an essential component of lipoprotein particles in both the brain and periphery, and exists in three isoforms in the human population: E2, E3, and E4. ApoE has numerous, well-established roles in neurobiology. Most notably, E4 is associated with earlier onset and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although possession of E2 is protective in the context of AD, E2 appears to confer an increased incidence and severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the biological processes underlying this link remain unclear. In this study, we began to elucidate these associations by examining the effects of apoE on PTSD severity in combat veterans, and on PTSD-like behavior in mice with human apoE. In a group of 92 veterans with PTSD, we observed significantly higher Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and PTSD Checklist scores in E2+ individuals, as well as alterations in salivary cortisol levels. Furthermore, we measured behavioral and biological outcomes in mice expressing human apoE after a single stressful event as well as following a period of chronic variable stress, a model of combat-related trauma. Mice with E2 showed impairments in fear extinction, and behavioral, cognitive, and neuroendocrine alterations following trauma. To the best of our knowledge, these data constitute the first translational demonstration of PTSD severity in men and PTSD-like symptoms in mice with E2, and point to apoE as a novel biomarker of susceptibility, and potential therapeutic target, for PTSD. PMID:25857685

  12. Limited Nesting Stress Alters Maternal Behavior and In Vivo Intestinal Permeability in Male Wistar Pup Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moussaoui, Nabila; Larauche, Muriel; Biraud, Mandy; Molet, Jenny; Million, Mulugeta; Mayer, Emeran; Taché, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    A few studies indicate that limited nesting stress (LNS) alters maternal behavior and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis of dams and offspring in male Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of LNS on maternal behavior in Wistar rats, and on the HPA axis, glycemia and in vivo intestinal permeability of male and female offspring. Intestinal permeability is known to be elevated during the first week postnatally and influenced by glucocorticoids. Dams and neonatal litters were subjected to LNS or normal nesting conditions (control) from days 2 to 10 postnatally. At day 10, blood was collected from pups for determination of glucose and plasma corticosterone by enzyme immunoassay and in vivo intestinal permeability by oral gavage of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran 4kDa. Dams exposed to LNS compared to control showed an increase in the percentage of time spent building a nest (118%), self-grooming (69%), and putting the pups back to the nest (167%). LNS male and female pups exhibited a reduction of body weight by 5% and 4%, adrenal weights/100g body weight by 17% and 18%, corticosterone plasma levels by 64% and 62% and blood glucose by 11% and 12% respectively compared to same sex control pups. In male LNS pups, intestinal permeability was increased by 2.7-fold while no change was observed in females compared to same sex control. There was no sex difference in any of the parameters in control pups except the body weight. These data indicate that Wistar dams subjected to LNS during the first postnatal week have an altered repertoire of maternal behaviors which affects the development of the HPA axis in both sexes and intestinal barrier function in male offspring. PMID:27149676

  13. Crickets in space: morphological, physiological and behavioral alterations induced by space flight and hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, E.; Agricola, H.; Böser, S.; Förster, S.; Kämper, G.; Riewe, P.; Sebastian, C.

    "Crickets in Space" was a Neurolab experiment by which the balance between genetic programs and the gravitational environment for the development of a gravity sensitive neuronal system was studied. The model character of crickets was justified by their external gravity receptors, identified position-sensitive interneurons (PSI) and gravity-related compensatory head response, and by the specific relation of this behavior to neuronal arousal systems activated by locomotion. These advantages allowed to study the impact of modified gravity on cellular processes in a complex organism. Eggs, 1st, 4th and 6th stage larvae of Acheta domesticus were used. Post-flight experiments revealed a low susceptibility of the behavior to micro- and hypergravity while the physiology of the PSI was significantly affected. Immunocytological investigations revealed a stage-dependent sensitivity of thoracic GABAergic motoneurons to 3g-conditions concerning their soma sizes but not their topographical arrangement. The morphology of neuromuscular junctions was not affected by 3g-hypergravity. Peptidergic neurons from cerebral sensorimotor centers revealed no significant modifications by microgravity (μg). The contrary physiological and behavioral results indicate a facilitation of 1g-readaptation originating from accessory gravity, proprioceptive and visual sense organs. Absence of anatomical modifications point to an effective time window of μg- or 3g-expo-sure related to the period of neuronal proliferation. The analysis of basic mechanisms of how animals and man adapt to altered gravitational conditions will profit from a continuation of the project "Crickets in Space".

  14. Exposition to tannery wastewater did not alter behavioral and biochemical parameters in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Felipe dos Santos; Bertoldi, Karine; Spindler, Christiano; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Rodrigues, Marco Antonio Siqueira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-04-22

    There are scarce data on the neurotoxicity in mammalian induced by tannery wastewaters. Previously, the anxiogenic effect of tannery wastewater was demonstrated in mice, while wastewater submitted to photoelectrooxidation (PEO) process treatment did not affect the anxiety state. Considering that species may response differently to xenobiotics, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of exposure to tannery wastewaters (non-PEO or PEO-treated) on behavioral and neurochemical markers in another species of laboratory animals, specifically Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats were given free access to water bottles containing non-PEO or PEO-treated tannery wastewaters (0.1, 1 and 5% in drinking water). During the exposure, behavioral tests of anxiety (elevated plus-maze, neophobia, open field and light-dark box), depression (forced swimming) and memory (inhibitory avoidance, novel object and discriminative avoidance) were performed. On the 30th day, brain structures were dissected out to evaluate cellular oxidative state (hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum) and acetylcholinesterase activity (hippocampus and striatum). Exposure to tannery effluent with or without photoelectrochemical treatment did not alter any behavioral and neurochemical parameters evaluated. Our data indicate that Wistar rats may not be an adequate species for ecotoxicological studies involving tannery effluents and that POE treatment did not generate other toxic compounds.

  15. Ethanol exposure during gastrulation alters neuronal morphology and behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shubham D; Boutin, Savanna; Ferdous, Jannatul; Ali, Declan W

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure during development has been shown to lead to deficits in fine and gross motor control. In this study we used zebrafish embryos to determine the effects of EtOH treatment during gastrulation. We treated embryos in the gastrulation stage (5.25 hours post fertilization (hpf) to 10.75 hpf) with 10 mM, 50 mM or 100 mM EtOH and examined the effects on general animal morphology, the c-start reflex behavior, Mauthner cell (M-cell) morphology and motor neuron morphology. EtOH treated fish exhibited a minor but significant increase in gross morphological deformities compared with untreated fish. Behavioral studies showed that EtOH treatment resulted in an increase in the peak speed of the tail during the escape response. Furthermore, there was a marked increase in abnormally directed c-starts, with treated fish showing greater incidences of c-starts in inappropriate directions. Immunolabeling of the M-cells, which are born during gastrulation, revealed that they were significantly smaller in fish treated with 100 mM EtOH compared with controls. Immunolabeling of primary motor neurons using anti-znp1, showed no significant effect on axonal branching, whereas secondary motor axons had a greater number of branches in ethanol treated fish compared with controls. Together these findings indicate that ethanol exposure during gastrulation can lead to alterations in behavior, neuronal morphology and possibly function.

  16. Chemosensory cues affect amygdaloid neurogenesis and alter behaviors in the socially monogamous prairie vole.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Lieberwirth, C; Jia, X; Curtis, J T; Meredith, M; Wang, Z X

    2014-05-01

    The current study examined the effects of pheromonal exposure on adult neurogenesis and revealed the role of the olfactory pathways on adult neurogenesis and behavior in the socially monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Subjects were injected with a cell proliferation marker [5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] and then exposed to their own soiled bedding or bedding soiled by a same- or opposite-sex conspecific. Exposure to opposite-sex bedding increased BrdU labeling in the amygdala (AMY), but not the dentate gyrus (DG), of female, but not male, voles, indicating a sex-, stimulus-, and brain region-specific effect. The removal of the main olfactory bulbs or lesioning of the vomeronasal organ (VNOX) in females reduced BrdU labeling in the AMY and DG, and inhibited the male bedding-induced BrdU labeling in the AMY, revealing the importance of an intact olfactory pathway for amygdaloid neurogenesis. VNOX increased anxiety-like behavior and altered social preference, but it did not affect social recognition memory in female voles. VNOX also reduced the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells that co-expressed the neuronal marker TuJ1 in the AMY, but not the DG. Together, our data indicate the importance of the olfactory pathway in mediating brain plasticity in the limbic system as well as its role in behavior.

  17. Aniracetam Does Not Alter Cognitive and Affective Behavior in Adult C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Elston, Thomas W.; Pandian, Ashvini; Smith, Gregory D.; Holley, Andrew J.; Gao, Nanjing; Lugo, Joaquin N.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing community of individuals who self-administer the nootropic aniracetam for its purported cognitive enhancing effects. Aniracetam is believed to be therapeutically useful for enhancing cognition, alleviating anxiety, and treating various neurodegenerative conditions. Physiologically, aniracetam enhances both glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. Previous studies of aniracetam have demonstrated the cognition-restoring effects of acute administration in different models of disease. No previous studies have explored the effects of aniracetam in healthy subjects. We investigated whether daily 50 mg/kg oral administration improves cognitive performance in naïve C57BL/6J mice in a variety of aspects of cognitive behavior. We measured spatial learning in the Morris water maze test; associative learning in the fear conditioning test; motor learning in the accelerating rotarod test; and odor discrimination. We also measured locomotion in the open field test, anxiety through the elevated plus maze test and by measuring time in the center of the open field test. We measured repetitive behavior through the marble burying test. We detected no significant differences between the naive, placebo, and experimental groups across all measures. Despite several studies demonstrating efficacy in impaired subjects, our findings suggest that aniracetam does not alter behavior in normal healthy mice. This study is timely in light of the growing community of healthy humans self-administering nootropic drugs. PMID:25099639

  18. Insulin resistance in brain alters dopamine turnover and causes behavioral disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, Andre; Cai, Weikang; Cappellucci, Laura; Ghazarian, Armen; Collins, William R.; Vienberg, Sara G.; Pothos, Emmanuel N.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and insulin resistance are associated with altered brain imaging, depression, and increased rates of age-related cognitive impairment. Here we demonstrate that mice with a brain-specific knockout of the insulin receptor (NIRKO mice) exhibit brain mitochondrial dysfunction with reduced mitochondrial oxidative activity, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation in the striatum and nucleus accumbens. NIRKO mice also exhibit increased levels of monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO A and B) leading to increased dopamine turnover in these areas. Studies in cultured neurons and glia cells indicate that these changes in MAO A and B are a direct consequence of loss of insulin signaling. As a result, NIRKO mice develop age-related anxiety and depressive-like behaviors that can be reversed by treatment with MAO inhibitors, as well as the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, which inhibits MAO activity and reduces oxidative stress. Thus, insulin resistance in brain induces mitochondrial and dopaminergic dysfunction leading to anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, demonstrating a potential molecular link between central insulin resistance and behavioral disorders. PMID:25733901

  19. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    PubMed

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution.

  20. Reduction of GABAergic transmission and alterations in behavior after 6-OHDA treatment of rats.

    PubMed

    Podkletnova, I; Raevsky, V; Alho, H

    1996-07-20

    We studied the effects of neonatal administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) upon gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and noradrenergic neurotransmission in the developing rat brain. After 6-OHDA administration tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunolabelling revealed more than 70% loss of catecholaminergic terminals in cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) immunolabelling showed that the intensity of staining and the density of labelled terminals were decreased by approximately 50% in the prefrontal cortex of 6-OHDA treated animals, but in visual and somatosensory zones there was no difference between lesioned and control cortex. The open field test revealed an altered development of the searching activity after neonatal 6-OHDA injections. A significant difference was found between 6-OHDA treated and control rats in searching, orienting and skills performance. Our results indicate that the behavioral changes observed in young rats after 6-OHDA treatment may be reflections not only of reduced catecholaminergic transmission but also of GABAergic disturbance, occurring in the frontal cortex.

  1. Diet, age, and prior injury status differentially alter behavioral outcomes following concussion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; van Waes, Linda; Esser, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion affects a large portion of the population and although many of these individuals recover completely, a small subset of people experience lingering symptomology and poor outcomes. Little is known about the factors that affect individual susceptibility or resilience to poor outcomes after mTBI and there are currently no biomarkers to delineate mTBI diagnosis or prognosis. Based upon the growing literature associated with caloric intake and altered neurological aging and the ambiguous link between repetitive mTBI and progressive neurodegeneration, the current study was designed to examine the effect of a high fat diet (HFD), developmental age, and repetitive mTBI on behavioral outcomes following a mTBI. In addition, telomere length was examined before and after experimental mTBI. Sprague Dawley rats were maintained on a HFD or standard rat chow throughout life (including the prenatal period) and then experienced an mTBI/concussion at P30, P30 and P60, or only at P60. Behavioral outcomes were examined using a test battery that was administered between P61-P80 and included; beam-walking, open field, elevated plus maze, novel context mismatch, Morris water task, and forced swim task. Animals with a P30 mTBI often demonstrated lingering symptomology that was still present during testing at P80. Injuries at P30 and P60 rarely produced cumulative effects, and in some tests (i.e., beam walking), the first injury may have protected the brain from the second injury. Exposure to the high fat diet exacerbated many of the behavioral deficits associated with concussion. Finally, telomere length was shortened following mTBI and was influenced by the animal's dietary intake. Diet, age at the time of injury, and the number of prior concussion incidents differentially contribute to behavioral deficits and may help explain individual variations in susceptibility and resilience to poor outcomes following an mTBI.

  2. Structural Brain Alterations Associated with Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Salimi, Ali; Dadar, Mahsa; Jones, Barbara E.; Collins, D. Louis; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Characterized by dream-enactment motor manifestations arising from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is frequently encountered in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Yet the specific neurostructural changes associated with RBD in PD patients remain to be revealed by neuroimaging. Here we identified such neurostructural alterations by comparing large samples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 69 PD patients with probable RBD, 240 patients without RBD and 138 healthy controls, using deformation-based morphometry (p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). All data were extracted from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative. PD patients with probable RBD showed smaller volumes than patients without RBD and than healthy controls in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, medullary reticular formation, hypothalamus, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. These results demonstrate that RBD is associated with a prominent loss of volume in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum, where cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are located and implicated in the promotion of REM sleep and muscle atonia. It is additionally associated with more widespread atrophy in other subcortical and cortical regions whose loss also likely contributes to the altered regulation of sleep-wake states and motor activity underlying RBD in PD patients. PMID:27245317

  3. Metabolic and feeding behavior alterations provoked by prenatal exposure to aspartame.

    PubMed

    von Poser Toigo, E; Huffell, A P; Mota, C S; Bertolini, D; Pettenuzzo, L F; Dalmaz, C

    2015-04-01

    The use of artificial sweeteners has increased together with the epidemic growth of obesity. In addition to their widespread use in sodas, artificial sweeteners are added to nearly 6000 other products sold in the US, including baby foods, frozen dinners and even yogurts. It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners can lead to body weight gain and an altered metabolic profile. However, very few studies have evaluated the effects of maternal consumption of artificial non-caloric sweeteners on body weight, feeding behavior or the metabolism of offspring in adult life. In this study, we found that animals exposed to aspartame during the prenatal period presented a higher consumption of sweet foods during adulthood and a greater susceptibility to alterations in metabolic parameters, such as increased glucose, LDL and triglycerides. These effects were observed in both males and females, although they were more pronounced in males. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, and the need for further confirmation of these effects, our data suggest that the consumption of sweeteners during gestation may have deleterious long-term effects and should be used with caution.

  4. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  5. GABAergic modulation with classical benzodiazepines prevent stress-induced neuro-immune dysregulation and behavioral alterations

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Karol; Niraula, Anzela; Sheridan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Psychosocial stress is associated with altered immunity, anxiety, and depression. Repeated social defeat (RSD), a model of social stress, triggers egress of inflammatory myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs; CD11b+ /Ly6Chi) that traffic to the brain, promoting anxiety-like behavior. In parallel, RSD enhances neuroinflammatory signaling and long-lasting social avoidant behavior. Lorazepam and clonazepam are routinely prescribed anxiolytics that act by enhancing GABAergic activity in the brain. Besides binding to the central benzodiazepine binding site (CBBS) in the central nervous system (CNS), lorazepam binds to the translocator protein (TSPO) with high affinity causing immunomodulation. Clonazepam targets the CBBS and has low affinity for the TSPO. Here the aims were to determine if lorazepam and clonazepam would: 1) prevent stress-induced peripheral and central inflammatory responses, and 2) block anxiety and social avoidance behavior in mice subjected to RSD. Methods C57/BL6 mice were divided into experimental groups, and treated with either lorazepam (0.10mg/kg), clonazepam (0.25 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9%NaCl). Behavioral data and tissues were collected the morning after the last cycle of RSD. Results Lorazepam and clonazepam were effective in attenuating mRNA expression of CRH in the hypothalamus and corticosterone in plasma in mice subjected to RSD. Both drugs blocked stress-induced levels of IL-6 in plasma. Lorazepam and clonazepam had different effects on stress-induced enhancement of myelopoiesis and inhibited trafficking of monocytes and granulocytes in circulation. Furthermore, lorazepam, but not clonazepam, inhibited splenomegaly and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the spleen following RSD. Additionally, lorazepam and clonazepam, blocked stress-induced accumulation of macrophages (CD11b+/CD45high) in the CNS. In a similar manner, both lorazepam and clonazepam prevented neuroinflammatory signaling and reversed anxiety-like and

  6. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  7. Altered functional Connectivity in Lesional Peduncular Hallucinosis with REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Maiya R.; Tie, Yanmei; Gabrieli, John D. E.; McGinnis, Scott M.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem lesions causing peduncular hallucinosis (PH) produce vivid visual hallucinations occasionally accompanied by sleep disorders. Overlapping brainstem regions modulate visual pathways and REM sleep functions via gating of thalamocortical networks. A 66-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation developed abrupt-onset complex visual hallucinations with preserved insight and violent dream enactment behavior. Brain MRI showed restricted diffusion in the left rostrodorsal pons suggestive of an acute ischemic infarct. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was diagnosed on polysomnography. We investigated the integrity of ponto-geniculate-occipital circuits with seed-based resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) in this patient compared to 46 controls. Rs-fcMRI revealed significantly reduced functional connectivity between the lesion and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN), and between LGN and visual association cortex compared to controls. Conversely, functional connectivity between brainstem and visual association cortex, and between visual association cortex and PFC was significantly increased in the patient. Focal damage to the left rostrodorsal pons is sufficient to cause RBD and PH in humans, suggesting an overlapping mechanism in both syndromes. This lesion produced a pattern of altered functional connectivity consistent with disrupted visual cortex connectivity via de-afferentation of thalamocortical pathways. PMID:26656284

  8. Can a tablet device alter undergraduate science students' study behavior and use of technology?

    PubMed

    Morris, Neil P; Ramsay, Luke; Chauhan, Vikesh

    2012-06-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating undergraduate biological sciences students' use of technology and computer devices for learning and the effect of providing students with a tablet device. A controlled study was conducted to collect quantitative and qualitative data on the impact of a tablet device on students' use of devices and technology for learning. Overall, we found that students made extensive use of the tablet device for learning, using it in preference to laptop computers to retrieve information, record lectures, and access learning resources. In line with other studies, we found that undergraduate students only use familiar Web 2.0 technologies and that the tablet device did not alter this behavior for the majority of tools. We conclude that undergraduate science students can make extensive use of a tablet device to enhance their learning opportunities without institutions changing their teaching methods or computer systems, but that institutional intervention may be needed to drive changes in student behavior toward the use of novel Web 2.0 technologies.

  9. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; ...

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature nomore » longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.« less

  10. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28-37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found that AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility.

  11. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28–37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility. PMID:24275185

  12. 3. Impact of altered gravity on CNS development and behavior in male and female rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Nguon, K.; Ladd, B.; Sulkowski, V. A.; Sulkowski, Z. L.; Baxter, M. G.

    The present study examined the effect of altered gravity on CNS development. Specifically, we compared neurodevelopment, behavior, cerebellar structure and protein expression in rat neonates exposed perinatally to hypergravity. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 1.5G-1.75G hypergravity on a 24-ft centrifuge starting on gestational day (G) 10, through giving birth on G22/G23, and nursing their offspring through postnatal day (P) 21. Cerebellar mass on P6 was decreased in 1.75G-exposed male pups by 27.5 percent; in 1.75G-exposed female pups it was decreased by 22.5 percent. The observed cerebellar changes were associated with alterations in neurodevelopment and motor behavior. Exposure to hypergravity impaired performance on the following neurocognitive tests: (1) righting time on P3 was more than doubled in 1.75G-exposed rats and the effect appeared more pronounced in female pups, (2) startle response on P10 was delayed in both male and female HG pups; HG pups were one-fifth as likely to respond to a clapping noise as SC pups, and (3) performance on a rotorod on P21 was decreased in HG pups; the duration of the stay on rotorod recorded for HG pups of both sexes was one tenth of the SC pups. Furthermore, Western blot analysis of selected cerebellar proteins suggested gender-specific changes in glial and neuronal proteins. On P6, GFAP expression was decreased by 59.2 percent in HG males, while no significant decrease was observed in female cerebella. Synaptophysin expression was decreased in HG male neonates by 29.9 percent and in HG female neonates by 20.7 percent as compared to its expression in SC cerebella. The results of this experiment suggest that perinatal exposure to hypergravity affects cerebellar development and behavior differently in male and female neonates. If one accepts that hypergravity is a good paradigm to study the effect of microgravity on the CNS, and since males and females were shown to respond differently to hypergravity, it can be

  13. Dynamic microglial alterations underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kreisel, T; Frank, M G; Licht, T; Reshef, R; Ben-Menachem-Zidon, O; Baratta, M V; Maier, S F; Yirmiya, R

    2014-06-01

    The limited success in understanding the pathophysiology of major depression may result from excessive focus on the dysfunctioning of neurons, as compared with other types of brain cells. Therefore, we examined the role of dynamic alterations in microglia activation status in the development of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced depressive-like condition in rodents. We report that following an initial period (2-3 days) of stress-induced microglial proliferation and activation, some microglia underwent apoptosis, leading to reductions in their numbers within the hippocampus, but not in other brain regions, following 5 weeks of CUS exposure. At that time, microglia displayed reduced expression of activation markers as well as dystrophic morphology. Blockade of the initial stress-induced microglial activation by minocycline or by transgenic interleukin-1 receptor antagonist overexpression rescued the subsequent microglial apoptosis and decline, as well as the CUS-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis. Similarly, the antidepressant drug imipramine blocked the initial stress-induced microglial activation as well as the CUS-induced microglial decline and depressive-like behavior. Treatment of CUS-exposed mice with either endotoxin, macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, all of which stimulated hippocampal microglial proliferation, partially or completely reversed the depressive-like behavior and dramatically increased hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas treatment with imipramine or minocycline had minimal or no anti-depressive effects, respectively, in these mice. These findings provide direct causal evidence that disturbances in microglial functioning has an etiological role in chronic stress-induced depression, suggesting that microglia stimulators could serve as fast-acting anti-depressants in some forms of depressive and stress-related conditions.

  14. Environmental prenatal stress eliminates brain and maternal behavioral sex differences and alters hormone levels in female rats.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, M C R; Ortega, E; Gómez, F; Segovia, S; Pérez-Laso, C

    2015-07-01

    Environmental prenatal stress (EPS) has effects on fetuses that are long-lasting, altering their hormone levels, brain morphology and behavior when they reach maturity. In previous research, we demonstrated that EPS affects the expression of induced maternal behavior (MB), the neuroendocrine system, and morphology of the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) involved in reproductive behavior patterns. The bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) is another vomeronasal (VN) structure that plays an inhibitory role in rats in the expression of induced maternal behavior in female and male virgins. In the present study, we have ascertained whether the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neuromorphological alterations of the AOB found after EPS also appear in the BAOT. After applying EPS to pregnant rats during the late gestational period, in their female offspring at maturity we tested induced maternal behavior, BAOT morphology and plasma levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (Cpd B). EPS: a) affected the induction of MB, showed a male-like pattern of care for pups, b) elevated plasma levels of Cpd B and reduced E2 in comparison with the controls, and c) significantly increased the number of BAOT neurons compared to the control females and comparable to the control male group. These findings provide further evidence that stress applied to pregnant rats produces long-lasting behavioral, endocrine and neuroanatomical alterations in the female offspring that are evident when they become mature.

  15. Manipulation of Autophagy in Phagocytes Facilitates Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Kate M; Wilk, Mieszko M; Leech, John M; Murphy, Alison G; Laabei, Maisem; Monk, Ian R; Massey, Ruth C; Lindsay, Jodi A; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2015-09-01

    The capacity for intracellular survival within phagocytes is likely a critical factor facilitating the dissemination of Staphylococcus aureus in the host. To date, the majority of work on S. aureus-phagocyte interactions has focused on neutrophils and, to a lesser extent, macrophages, yet we understand little about the role played by dendritic cells (DCs) in the direct killing of this bacterium. Using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), we demonstrate for the first time that DCs can effectively kill S. aureus but that certain strains of S. aureus have the capacity to evade DC (and macrophage) killing by manipulation of autophagic pathways. Strains with high levels of Agr activity were capable of causing autophagosome accumulation, were not killed by BMDCs, and subsequently escaped from the phagocyte, exerting significant cytotoxic effects. Conversely, strains that exhibited low levels of Agr activity failed to accumulate autophagosomes and were killed by BMDCs. Inhibition of the autophagic pathway by treatment with 3-methyladenine restored the bactericidal effects of BMDCs. Using an in vivo model of systemic infection, we demonstrated that the ability of S. aureus strains to evade phagocytic cell killing and to survive temporarily within phagocytes correlated with persistence in the periphery and that this effect is critically Agr dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that strains of S. aureus exhibiting high levels of Agr activity are capable of blocking autophagic flux, leading to the accumulation of autophagosomes. Within these autophagosomes, the bacteria are protected from phagocytic killing, thus providing an intracellular survival niche within professional phagocytes, which ultimately facilitates dissemination.

  16. Altered hippocampal function before emotional trauma in rats susceptible to PTSD-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Nalloor, Rebecca; Bunting, Kristopher M; Vazdarjanova, Almira

    2014-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that occurs after experiencing a traumatic event. Susceptibility to PTSD exists, as only some trauma-exposed individuals develop this condition. Investigating susceptibilities in animal models can contribute to understanding the etiology of the disorder. We previously reported an animal model which allows reliable pre-classification of rats as susceptible (Sus) or resistant (Res) to developing a PTSD-like phenotype after a later trauma. Here we report that Sus, compared to Res, rats have altered hippocampal function, along the septo-temporal axis, prior to experiencing a traumatic event. In Experiment I, Res and Sus rats explored a novel box twice. Using a cellular imaging method for assessing plasticity-related immediate-early gene expression in large neuronal ensembles, Arc/Homer1a catFISH, we show that Sus rats have smaller vCA3 ensembles during the second exploration. This suppressed vCA3 activation in Sus rats was not due to a difference in exploratory behavior, or to a difference in Arc/Homer1a expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). BLA is a main source of inputs to vCA3, but both the ensemble size and overlap of BLA ensembles activated during the two explorations was similar to that of Res rats. Additionally, Sus rats had significant 'infidelity' in their dorsal hippocampal representations of the second event: a lower overlap, compared to Res rats, of Arc/Homer1a-expressing ensembles activated during the two explorations (the size of the ensembles were similar to those of Res rats). These differences were revealed only in conditions of relatively low stress, because they were not observed when Sus and Res rats experienced fear conditioning (Experiment II). Combined, the findings show that altered hippocampal function exists before experiencing emotional trauma in susceptible rats and suggest that this is a risk factor for PTSD.

  17. Autism-related Neuroligin-3 Mutation Alters Social Behavior and Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Thomas C.; Liu, Shunan; Pettersen, Ami; Birnbaum, Shari G; Powell, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    LAY ABSTRACT Mutations in neuroligin genes have been identified in association with autism. This manuscript provides characterization of a specific mutation in the neuroligin-3 gene that has been associated with autism in two brothers. The resulting autism model has alterations in social and cognitive function reminiscent of autism in patients. This model will be useful to understand the role of neuroligin dysfunction as a rare cause of autism. SCIENTIFIC ABSTRACT Multiple candidate genes have been identified for autism spectrum disorders. While some of these genes reach genome-wide significance, others, such as the R451C point mutation in the synaptic cell adhesion molecule neuroligin-3, appear to be rare. Interestingly, two brothers with the same R451C point mutation in neuroligin-3 present clinically on seemingly disparate sides of the autism spectrum. These clinical findings suggest genetic background may play a role in modifying the penetrance of a particular autism-associated mutation. Animal models may contribute additional support for such mutations as functionally relevant and can provide mechanistic insights. Previously, in collaboration with the Südhof laboratory, we reported that mice with an R451C substitution in neuroligin-3 displayed social deficits and enhanced spatial learning. While some of these behavioral abnormalities have since been replicated independently in the Südhof laboratory, observations from the Crawley laboratory failed to replicate these findings in a similar neuroligin-3 mutant mouse model and suggested that genetic background may contribute to variation in observations across laboratories. Therefore we sought to replicate our findings in the neuroligin-3 R451C point mutant knockin mouse model (NL3R451C) in a different genetic background. We backcrossed our NL3R451C mouse line onto a 129S2/SvPasCrl genetic background and repeated a subset of our previous behavioral testing. NL3R451C mice on a 129S2/SvPasCrl displayed social

  18. Enhancement of extinction learning attenuates ethanol-seeking behavior and alters plasticity in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gass, Justin T; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Kassab, Amanda S; Glen, William B; Olive, M Foster; Chandler, L Judson

    2014-05-28

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder in which relapse is often initiated by exposure to drug-related cues. The present study examined the effects of mGluR5 activation on extinction of ethanol-cue-maintained responding, relapse-like behavior, and neuronal plasticity. Rats were trained to self-administer ethanol and then exposed to extinction training during which they were administered either vehicle or the mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl) or CDPPB. CDPPB treatment reduced active lever responding during extinction, decreased the total number of extinction sessions required to meet criteria, and attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of ethanol seeking. CDPPB facilitation of extinction was blocked by the local infusion of the mGluR5 antagonist 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine into the infralimbic (IfL) cortex, but had no effect when infused into the prelimbic (PrL) cortex. Analysis of dendritic spines revealed alterations in structural plasticity, whereas electrophysiological recordings demonstrated differential alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the PrL and IfL cortex. Extinction was associated with increased amplitude of evoked synaptic PrL and IfL NMDA currents but reduced amplitude of PrL AMPA currents. Treatment with CDPPB prevented the extinction-induced enhancement of NMDA currents in PrL without affecting NMDA currents in the IfL. Whereas CDPPB treatment did not alter the amplitude of PrL or IfL AMPA currents, it did promote the expression of IfL calcium-permeable GluR2-lacking receptors in both abstinence- and extinction-trained rats, but had no effect in ethanol-naive rats. These results confirm changes in the PrL and IfL cortex in glutamatergic neurotransmission during extinction learning and demonstrate that manipulation of mGluR5 facilitates extinction of ethanol cues in association with neuronal plasticity.

  19. Short and long term neuro-behavioral alterations in type 1 diabetes mellitus pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Litmanovitch, Edna; Geva, Ronny; Rachmiel, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting individuals under the age of 18 years, with increasing incidence worldwide, especially among very young age groups, younger than 5. There is still no cure for the disease, and therapeutic goals and guidelines are a challenge. Currently, despite T1DM intensive management and technological interventions in therapy, the majority of pediatric patients do not achieve glycemic control goals. This leads to a potential prognosis of long term diabetic complications, nephrological, cardiac, ophthalmological and neurological. Unfortunately, the neurological manifestations, including neurocognitive and behavioral complications, may present soon after disease onset, during childhood and adolescence. These manifestations may be prominent, but at times subtle, thus they are often not reported by patients or physicians as related to the diabetes. Furthermore, the metabolic mechanism for such manifestations has been inconsistent and difficult to interpret in practical clinical care, as reported in several reviews on the topic of brain and T1DM. However, new technological methods for brain assessment, as well as the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring, provide new insights and information regarding brain related manifestations and glycemic variability and control parameters, which may impact the clinical care of children and youth with T1DM. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the most recently reported behavioral, cognitive domains, sleep related, electrophysiological, and structural alterations in children and adolescences from a novel point of view. The review focuses on reported impairments based on duration of T1DM, its timeline, and modifiable disease related risk parameters. These findings are not without controversy, and limitations of data are presented in addition to recommendations for future research direction. PMID:25789107

  20. Common behaviors alterations after extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure in rat animal model.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Najafi Abedi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Naturally, the presence of electromagnetic waves in our living environment affects all components of organisms, particularly humans and animals, as the large part of their body consists of water. In the present study, we tried to investigate the relation between exposure to the extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and common behaviors such as body weight, food and water intake, anorexia (poor appetite), plasma glucose concentration, movement, rearing and sniffing in rats. For this purpose, rats were exposed to 40  Hz ELF-EMF once a day for 21 days, then at days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after exposure, any changes in the above-mentioned items were assessed in the exposed rats and compared to the non-exposed group as control. Body weight of irradiated rats significantly increased only a week after exposure and decreased after that. No significant change was observed in food and water intake of irradiated rats compared to the control, and the anorexia parameter in the group exposed to ELF-EMF was significantly decreased at one and two weeks after irradiation. A week after exposure, the level of glucose was significantly increased but at other days these changes were not significant. Movements, rearing and sniffing of rats at day 1 after exposure were significantly decreased and other days these changes did not follow any particular pattern. However, the result of this study demonstrated that exposure to ELF-EMF can alter the normal condition of animals and may represent a harmful impact on behavior.

  1. Artificial Outdoor Nighttime Lights Associate with Altered Sleep Behavior in the American General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Milesi, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Our study aims to explore the associations between outdoor nighttime lights (ONL) and sleep patterns in the human population. Methods: Cross-sectional telephone study of a representative sample of the general US population age 18 y or older. 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals (participation rate: 83.2%) were interviewed by telephone. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; sleep, mental and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition; International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition). Individuals were geolocated by longitude and latitude. Outdoor nighttime light measurements were obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), with nighttime passes taking place between 19:30 and 22:30 local time. Light data were correlated precisely to the geolocation of each participant of the general population sample. Results: Living in areas with greater ONL was associated with delayed bedtime (P < 0.0001) and wake up time (P < 0.0001), shorter sleep duration (P < 0.01), and increased daytime sleepiness (P < 0.0001). Living in areas with greater ONL also increased the dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and quality (P < 0.0001) and the likelihood of having a diagnostic profile congruent with a circadian rhythm disorder (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although they improve the overall safety of people and traffic, nighttime lights in our streets and cities are clearly linked with modifications in human sleep behaviors and also impinge on the daytime functioning of individuals living in areas with greater ONL. Citation: Ohayon MM, Milesi C. Artificial outdoor nighttime lights associate with altered sleep behavior in the american general population. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1311–1320. PMID:27091523

  2. Prenatal chlorpyrifos exposure alters motor behavior and ultrasonic vocalization in cd-1 mouse pups

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a non-persistent organophosphate (OP) largely used as pesticide. Studies from animal models indicate that CPF is a developmental neurotoxicant able to target immature central nervous system at dose levels well below the threshold of systemic toxicity. So far, few data are available on the potential short- and long-term adverse effects in children deriving from low-level exposures during prenatal life and infancy. Methods Late gestational exposure [gestational day (GD) 14–17] to CPF at the dose of 6 mg/kg was evaluated in CD-1 mice during early development, by assessment of somatic and sensorimotor maturation [reflex-battery on postnatal days (PNDs) 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15] and ultrasound emission after isolation from the mother and siblings (PNDs 4, 7 and 10). Pups' motor skills were assessed in a spontaneous activity test on PND 12. Maternal behavior of lactating dams in the home cage and in response to presentation of a pup previously removed from the nest was scored on PND 4, to verify potential alterations in maternal care directly induced by CPF administration. Results As for the effects on the offspring, results indicated that on PND 10, CPF significantly decreased number and duration of ultrasonic calls while increasing latency to emit the first call after isolation. Prenatal CPF also reduced motor behavior on PND 12, while a tendency to hyporeflexia was observed in CPF pups by means of reflex-battery scoring. Dams administered during gestation with CPF showed baseline levels of maternal care comparable to those of controls, but higher levels of both pup-directed (licking) and explorative (wall rearing) responses. Conclusion Overall our results are consistent with previous epidemiological data on OP neurobehavioral toxicity, and also indicate ultrasonic vocalization as an early marker of CPF exposure during development in rodent studies, with potential translational value to human infants. PMID:19331648

  3. An Scn1a epilepsy mutation in Scn8a alters seizure susceptibility and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Makinson, Christopher D.; Dutt, Karoni; Lin, Frank; Papale, Ligia A.; Shankar, Anupama; Barela, Arthur J.; Liu, Robert; Goldin, Alan L.; Escayg, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of SCN8A in epilepsy and behavior is critical in light of recently identified human SCN8A epilepsy mutations. We have previously demonstrated that Scn8amed and Scn8amed-jo mice carrying mutations in the Scn8a gene display increased resistance to flurothyl and kainic acid-induced seizures; however, they also exhibit spontaneous absence seizures. To further investigate the relationship between altered SCN8A function and epilepsy, we introduced the SCN1A-R1648H mutation, identified in a family with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), into the corresponding position (R1627H) of the mouse Scn8a gene. Heterozygous R1627H mice exhibited increased resistance to some forms of pharmacologically and electrically induced seizures and the mutant Scn8a allele ameliorated the phenotype of Scn1a-R1648H mutants. Hippocampal slices from heterozygous R1627H mice displayed decreased bursting behavior compared to wild-type littermates. Paradoxically, at the homozygous level, R1627H mice did not display increased seizure resistance and were susceptible to audiogenic seizures. We furthermore observed increased hippocampal pyramidal cell excitability in heterozygous and homozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants, and decreased interneuron excitability in heterozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants. These results expand the phenotypes associated with disruption of the Scn8a gene and demonstrate that an Scn8a mutation can both confer seizure protection and increase seizure susceptibility. PMID:26410685

  4. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha V.; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L.; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S.; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D.; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D’Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency. PMID:28074903

  5. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D'Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-11

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency.

  6. The Relationship between Instructor Misbehaviors and Student Antisocial Behavioral Alteration Techniques: The Roles of Instructor Attractiveness, Humor, and Relational Closeness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Christopher J.; Booth-Butterfield, Melanie; Chory, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    Using rhetorical/relational goal theory as a guiding frame, we examined relationships between instructor misbehaviors (i.e., indolence, incompetence, and offensiveness) and the likelihood of students communicating antisocial behavioral alteration techniques (BATs). More specifically, the study focused on whether students' perceptions of instructor…

  7. Effect of wettability alteration on long-term behavior of fluids in subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Uditha C.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-01-13

    Wettability is an important factor affecting fluid behavior in the subsurface, including oil, gas, and supercritical CO$_2$ in deep geological reservoirs. For example, CO$_2$ is generally assumed to behave as a non-wetting fluid, which favors safe storage. However, because of chemical heterogeneity of the reservoirs, mixed wettability conditions can exist. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that with time, the wettability of super-critical CO$_2$ may change from non-wetting to partially-wetting due to changes in electrostatic interactions. These changes are caused by chemical reactions between dissolved CO$_2$ and its environment. To date, the effect of wettability alteration and mixed wettability on the long term fate of injected CO$_2$ has not well been studied. Here, we use the multiphase Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) Model to study complex pore-scale processes involved in geological CO$_2$ sequestration, including the effect of spatial and temporal wettability variations on long-term distribution of CO$_2$ in porous media. Results reveal that in the absence of dissolution of supercritical CO$_2$ and precipitation of carbonate minerals (mineral trapping), the amount of trapped supercritical CO$_2$ significantly decreases as the wettability of the porous media changes from brine-wet to partial-wet or CO$_2$-wet.

  8. Low dose effects of a Withania somnifera extract on altered marble burying behavior in stressed mice

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Amitabha; Chatterjee, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Withania somnifera root (WSR) extracts are often used in traditionally known Indian systems of medicine for prevention and cure of psychosomatic disorders. The reported experiment was designed to test whether low daily oral doses of such extracts are also effective in suppressing marble burying behavior in stressed mice or not. Materials and Methods: Groups of mice treated with 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg daily oral doses of WSR were subjected to a foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia test on the 1st, 5th, 7th, and 10th day of the experiment. On the 11th and 12th treatment days, they were subjected to marble burying tests. Stress response suppressing effects of low dose WSR were estimated by its effects on body weight and basal core temperature of animals during the course of the experiment. Results: Alterations in bodyweight and basal core temperature triggered by repeated exposures to foot shock stress were absent even in the 10 mg/kg/day WSR treated group, whereas the effectiveness of the extract in foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia and marble burying tests increased with its increasing daily dose. Conclusion: Marble burying test in stressed mice is well suited for identifying bioactive constituents of W. somnifera like medicinal plants with adaptogenic, anxiolytic and antidepressant activities, or for quantifying pharmacological interactions between them. PMID:27366354

  9. Arsenic moiety in gallium arsenide is responsible for neuronal apoptosis and behavioral alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, Swaran J S; Bhatt, Kapil; Mehta, Ashish

    2009-10-15

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), an intermetallic semiconductor finds widespread applications in high frequency microwave and millimeter wave, and ultra fast supercomputers. Extensive use of GaAs has led to increased exposure to humans working in semiconductor industry. GaAs has the ability to dissociate into its constitutive moieties at physiological pH and might be responsible for the oxidative stress. The present study was aimed at evaluating, the principle moiety (Ga or As) in GaAs to cause neurological dysfunction based on its ability to cause apoptosis, in vivo and in vitro and if this neuronal dysfunction translated to neurobehavioral changes in chronically exposed rats. Result indicated that arsenic moiety in GaAs was mainly responsible for causing oxidative stress via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, both in vitro and in vivo. Increased ROS further caused apoptosis via mitochondrial driven pathway. Effects of oxidative stress were also confirmed based on alterations in antioxidant enzymes, GPx, GST and SOD in rat brain. We noted that ROS induced oxidative stress caused changes in the brain neurotransmitter levels, Acetylcholinesterase and nitric oxide synthase, leading to loss of memory and learning in rats. The study demonstrates for the first time that the slow release of arsenic moiety from GaAs is mainly responsible for oxidative stress induced apoptosis in neuronal cells causing behavioral changes.

  10. Developmental Exposure to Aroclor 1254 Alters Migratory Behavior in Juvenile European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Flahr, Leanne M; Michel, Nicole L; Zahara, Alexander R D; Jones, Paul D; Morrissey, Christy A

    2015-05-19

    Birds exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals during development could be susceptible to neurological and other physiological changes affecting migratory behaviors. We investigated the effects of ecologically relevant levels of Aroclor 1254, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture, on moult, fattening, migratory activity, and orientation in juvenile European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Birds were orally administered 0 (control), 0.35 (low), 0.70 (intermediate), or 1.05 (high) μg Aroclor 1254/g-body weight by gavage from 1 through 18 days posthatch and later exposed in captivity to a photoperiod shift simulating an autumn migration. Migratory activity and orientation were examined using Emlen funnel trials. Across treatments, we found significant increases in mass, fat, and moulting and decreasing plasma thyroid hormones over time. We observed a significant increase in activity as photoperiod was shifted from 13L:11D (light:dark) to 12L:12D, demonstrating that migratory condition was induced in captivity. At 12L:12D, control birds oriented to 155.95° (South-Southeast), while high-dosed birds did not. High-dosed birds showed a delayed orientation to 197.48° (South-Southwest) under 10L:14D, concomitant with apparent delays in moult. These findings demonstrate how subtle contaminant-induced alterations during development could lead to longer-scale effects, including changes in migratory activity and orientation, which could potentially result in deleterious effects on fitness and survival.

  11. Arsenic moiety in gallium arsenide is responsible for neuronal apoptosis and behavioral alterations in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Flora, Swaran J.S. Bhatt, Kapil; Mehta, Ashish

    2009-10-15

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), an intermetallic semiconductor finds widespread applications in high frequency microwave and millimeter wave, and ultra fast supercomputers. Extensive use of GaAs has led to increased exposure to humans working in semiconductor industry. GaAs has the ability to dissociate into its constitutive moieties at physiological pH and might be responsible for the oxidative stress. The present study was aimed at evaluating, the principle moiety (Ga or As) in GaAs to cause neurological dysfunction based on its ability to cause apoptosis, in vivo and in vitro and if this neuronal dysfunction translated to neurobehavioral changes in chronically exposed rats. Result indicated that arsenic moiety in GaAs was mainly responsible for causing oxidative stress via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, both in vitro and in vivo. Increased ROS further caused apoptosis via mitochondrial driven pathway. Effects of oxidative stress were also confirmed based on alterations in antioxidant enzymes, GPx, GST and SOD in rat brain. We noted that ROS induced oxidative stress caused changes in the brain neurotransmitter levels, Acetylcholinesterase and nitric oxide synthase, leading to loss of memory and learning in rats. The study demonstrates for the first time that the slow release of arsenic moiety from GaAs is mainly responsible for oxidative stress induced apoptosis in neuronal cells causing behavioral changes.

  12. Alteration of the behavioral effects of nicotine by chronic caffeine exposure.

    PubMed

    Tanda, G; Goldberg, S R

    2000-05-01

    The prevalence of tobacco smoking and coffee drinking place nicotine and caffeine among the most used licit drugs in many societies and their consumption is often characterised by concurrent use. The pharmacological basis for any putative interaction between these drugs remains unclear. Some epidemiological reports support anecdotal evidence, which suggests that smokers consume caffeine to enhance the effects of nicotine. This paper reviews various aspects of the pharmacology of caffeine and nicotine, in humans and experimental animals, important for the understanding of the interactions between these drugs. In particular, recent experiments are reviewed in which chronic exposure to caffeine in the drinking water of rats facilitated acquisition of self-adminstration behavior, enhanced nicotine-induced increases in dopamine levels in the shell of the nucleus accumbens and altered the dopaminergic component of a nicotine discrimination. These studies provide evidence that the rewarding and subjective properties of nicotine can be changed by chronic caffeine exposure and indicate that caffeine exposure may be an important environmental factor in shaping and maintaining tobacco smoking.

  13. Mutations in the circadian gene period alter behavioral and biochemical responses to ethanol in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jennifer; Seggio, Joseph A; Ahmad, S Tariq

    2016-04-01

    Clock genes, such as period, which maintain an organism's circadian rhythm, can have profound effects on metabolic activity, including ethanol metabolism. In turn, ethanol exposure has been shown in Drosophila and mammals to cause disruptions of the circadian rhythm. Previous studies from our labs have shown that larval ethanol exposure disrupted the free-running period and period expression of Drosophila. In addition, a recent study has shown that arrhythmic flies show no tolerance to ethanol exposure. As such, Drosophila period mutants, which have either a shorter than wild-type free-running period (perS) or a longer one (perL), may also exhibit altered responses to ethanol due to their intrinsic circadian differences. In this study, we tested the initial sensitivity and tolerance of ethanol exposure on Canton-S, perS, and perL, and then measured their Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH) and body ethanol levels. We showed that perL flies had slower sedation rate, longer recovery from ethanol sedation, and generated higher tolerance for sedation upon repeated ethanol exposure compared to Canton-S wild-type flies. Furthermore, perL flies had lower ADH activity and had a slower ethanol clearance compared to wild-type flies. The findings of this study suggest that period mutations influence ethanol induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in Drosophila and that flies with longer circadian periods are more sensitive to ethanol exposure.

  14. Alcohol during adolescence selectively alters immediate and long-term behavior and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Badanich, Kimberly A; Kirstein, Cheryl L

    2010-02-01

    Alcohol use increases across adolescence and is a concern in the United States. In humans, males and females consume different amounts of alcohol depending on the age of initiation, and the long-term consequences of early ethanol consumption are not readily understood. The purpose of our work was to better understand the immediate and long-term impact of ethanol exposure during adolescence and the effects it can have on behavior and dopaminergic responsivity. We have assessed sex differences in voluntary ethanol consumption during adolescence and adulthood and the influence of binge ethanol exposure during adolescence. We have observed that males are sensitive to passive social influences that mediate voluntary ethanol consumption, and early ethanol exposure induces long-term changes in responsivity to ethanol in adulthood. Exposure to moderate doses of ethanol during adolescence produced alterations in dopamine in the nucleus accumbens septi during adolescence and later in adulthood. Taken together, all of these data indicate that the adolescent brain is sensitive to the impact of early ethanol exposure during this critical developmental period.

  15. Effect of wettability alteration on long-term behavior of fluids in subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Uditha C.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-04-01

    Wettability is an important factor affecting fluid behavior in the subsurface, including oil, gas, and supercritical hbox {CO}_2 in deep geological reservoirs. For example, hbox {CO}_2 is generally assumed to behave as a non-wetting fluid, which favors safe storage. However, because of chemical heterogeneity of the reservoirs, mixed wettability conditions can exist. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that with time, the wettability of super-critical hbox {CO}_2 may change from non-wetting to partially wetting due to changes in electrostatic interactions. These changes are caused by chemical reactions between dissolved hbox {CO}_2 and its environment. To date, the effect of wettability alteration and mixed wettability on the long-term fate of injected hbox {CO}_2 has not well been studied. Here, we use the multiphase pairwise force smoothed particle hydrodynamics model to study complex pore-scale processes involved in geological hbox {CO}_2 sequestration, including the effect of spatial and temporal wettability variations on long-term distribution of hbox {CO}_2 in porous media. Results reveal that in the absence of dissolution of supercritical hbox {CO}_2 and precipitation of carbonate minerals (mineral trapping), the amount of trapped supercritical hbox {CO}_2 significantly decreases as the wettability of the porous media changes from brine-wet to partial-wet or hbox {CO}_2-wet.

  16. Altered diurnal pattern of steroid hormones in relation to various behaviors, external factors and pathologies: A review.

    PubMed

    Collomp, K; Baillot, A; Forget, H; Coquerel, A; Rieth, N; Vibarel-Rebot, N

    2016-10-01

    The adrenal and gonadal stress steroids [i.e., cortisol, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)] have gathered considerable attention in the last few decades due to their very broad physiological and psychological actions. Their diurnal patterns have become a particular focus following new data implicating altered diurnal hormone patterns in various endocrine, behavioral and cardiovascular risk profiles. In this review of the current literature, we present a brief overview of the altered diurnal patterns of these hormones that may occur in relation to chronic stress, nutritional behaviors, physical exercise, drugs and sleep deprivation/shift. We also present data on the altered diurnal hormone patterns implicated in cardiometabolic and psychiatric/neurologic diseases, cancer and other complex pathologies. We consider the occasionally discrepant results of the studies, and summarize the current knowledge in this new field of interest, underlining the potential effects on both biological and psychological functioning, and assess the implications of these effects. Last, we conclude with some practical considerations and perspectives.

  17. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Chronic Mild Stress Differentially Alter Depressive- and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Male and Female Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Hellemans, Kim G. C.; Verma, Pamela; Yoon, Esther; Yu, Wayne K.; Young, Allan H.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is associated with numerous neuro behavioral alterations, as well as disabilities in a number of domains, including a high incidence of depression and anxiety disorders. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) also alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function, resulting in increased responsiveness to stressors and HPA dysregulation in adulthood. Interestingly, data suggest that pre-existing HPA abnormalities may be a major contributory factor to some forms of depression, particularly when an individual is exposed to stressors later in life. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to stressors in adulthood may unmask an increased vulnerability to depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in PAE animals. Methods Male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol (PAE), pair-fed (PF), and ad libitumfed control (C) treatment groups were tested in adulthood. Animals were exposed to 10 consecutive days of chronic mild stress (CMS), and assessed in a battery of well-validated tasks sensitive to differences in depressive- and / or anxiety-like behaviors. Results We report here that the combination of PAE and CMS in adulthood increases depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in a sexually dimorphic manner. PAE males showed impaired hedonic responsivity (sucrose contrast test), locomotor hyperactivity (open field), and alterations in affiliative and nonaffiliative social behaviors (social interaction test) compared to control males. By contrast, PAE and, to a lesser extent, PF, females showed greater levels of “behavioral despair” in the forced swim test, and PAE females showed altered behavior in the final 5 minutes of the social interaction test compared to control females. Conclusions These data support the possibility that stress may be a mediating or contributing factor in the psychopathologies reported in FASD populations. PMID:20102562

  18. Phagocytic cells metabolize 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, M S; Gray, T K

    1984-01-01

    Phagocytic cells are widely distributed in tissues known to be important in the metabolism of vitamin D. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes and resident rat peritoneal macrophages with 3H-labeled 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 leads to the formation of three radioactive peaks. Peak I is most consistent with a lactone derivative of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, and peak II has been identified as putative 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Peak III is a novel metabolite of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 unlike any of the synthetic standards available in our laboratories. Human neutrophils converted more substrate than did the other phagocytes examined. The stimulation of neutrophils by opsonized zymosan or phorbol myristate acetate led to a 4-fold increase in synthesis of the metabolites. These results suggest that vitamin D metabolism by phagocytic cells may play a role in the microenvironmental events that surround bony metabolism and calcium homeostasis. PMID:6322179

  19. Functional significance of mononuclear phagocyte populations generated through adult hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gutknecht, Michael F.; Bouton, Amy H.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires a complete repertoire of functional macrophages in peripheral tissues. Recent evidence indicates that many resident tissue macrophages are seeded during embryonic development and persist through adulthood as a consequence of localized proliferation. Mononuclear phagocytes are also produced during adult hematopoiesis; these cells are then recruited to sites throughout the body, where they function in tissue repair and remodeling, resolution of inflammation, maintenance of homeostasis, and disease progression. The focus of this review is on mononuclear phagocytes that comprise the nonresident monocyte/macrophage populations in the body. Key features of monocyte differentiation are presented, focusing primarily on the developmental hierarchy that is established through this process, the markers used to identify discrete cell populations, and novel, functional attributes of these cells. These features are then explored in the context of the tumor microenvironment, where mononuclear phagocytes exhibit extensive plasticity in phenotype and function. PMID:25225678

  20. Comparison of fluorescence-based methods to determine nanoparticle uptake by phagocytes and non-phagocytic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Claudia, Meindl; Kristin, Öhlinger; Jennifer, Ober; Eva, Roblegg; Eleonore, Fröhlich

    2017-03-01

    At many portals of entry the relative uptake by phagocytes and non-phagocytic cells has a prominent effect on availability and biological action of nanoparticles (NPs). Cellular uptake can be determined for fluorescence-labeled NPs. The present study compares three methods (plate reader, flow cytometry and image analysis) in order to investigate the influence of particle size and functionalization and medium content on cellular uptake of fluorescence-labeled polystyrene particles and to study the respective method́s suitability for uptake studies. For comparison between the techniques, ratios of macrophage to alveolar epithelial cell uptakes were used. Presence of serum protein in the exposure solution decreased uptake of carboxyl-functionalized and non-functionalized particles; there was no clear effect for the amine-functionalized particles. The 200nm non- or carboxyl-functionalized NPs were taken up preferentially by phagocytes while for amine-functionalized particles preference was lowest. The presence of the serum slightly increased the preference for these particles. In conclusion, due to the possibility of calibration, plate reader measurements might present a better option than the other techniques to (semi)quantify differences between phagocytes and non-phagocytic cells for particles with different fluorescence. In order to obtain unbiased data the fluorescent labeling has to fulfill certain requirements.

  1. Haemopoietic phagocytes in the early differentiating avian retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cuadros, M A; García-Martín, M; Martin, C; Ríos, A

    1991-01-01

    The existence of specialised phagocytic cells is described in regions of the retinal neuroepithelium undergoing intense cell death during early differentiation of the avian embryo retina (2.5-5 days of incubation). These results were obtained using routine techniques for light microscopy, acid phosphatase histochemistry and immunocytochemical staining with antibodies MB-1 and QH-1, both specific for quail endothelial cells and all blood cells except mature erythrocytes. Specialised phagocytes were distinguishable from neuroepithelial cells on the basis of morphological criteria: in the former, the nucleus was not oval in shape and was not oriented perpendicular to basement membrane neuroepithelium. The cytoplasm of the specialised phagocytes was often filled with dead cell fragments. In contrast to neuroepithelial cells, the specialised phagocytes showed acid phosphatase activity and were labelled with both MB-1 and QH-1 antibodies in normal quail embryos and chick----quail yolk sac chimeras. Moreover, some acid phosphatase positive and MB-1/QH-1 positive cells also appeared in the presumptive vitreous body, at the edges of the optic cup and in the surrounding mesenchyme. As the vitreal cells and the specialised phagocytes of the neural retina were immunolabelled in chick----quail yolk sac chimeras, we conclude that they are derived from haemopoietic cells in the yolk sac. Some images suggest that these cells enter the vitreous body from the surrounding mesenchyme and traverse the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium in the optic disc region to give rise to the specialised phagocytes of the retinal neuroepithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 PMID:1769889

  2. Increasing Maternal or Post-Weaning Folic Acid Alters Gene Expression and Moderately Changes Behavior in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Kuizon, Salomon; Buenaventura, Diego; Stapley, Nathan W.; Ruocco, Felicia; Begum, Umme; Guariglia, Sara R.; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have indicated that altered maternal micronutrients and vitamins influence the development of newborns and altered nutrient exposure throughout the lifetime may have potential health effects and increased susceptibility to chronic diseases. In recent years, folic acid (FA) exposure has significantly increased as a result of mandatory FA fortification and supplementation during pregnancy. Since FA modulates DNA methylation and affects gene expression, we investigated whether the amount of FA ingested during gestation alters gene expression in the newborn cerebral hemisphere, and if the increased exposure to FA during gestation and throughout the lifetime alters behavior in C57BL/6J mice. Methods Dams were fed FA either at 0.4 mg or 4 mg/kg diet throughout the pregnancy and the resulting pups were maintained on the diet throughout experimentation. Newborn pups brain cerebral hemispheres were used for microarray analysis. To confirm alteration of several genes, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analyses were performed. In addition, various behavior assessments were conducted on neonatal and adult offspring. Results Results from microarray analysis suggest that the higher dose of FA supplementation during gestation alters the expression of a number of genes in the newborns’ cerebral hemispheres, including many involved in development. QRT-PCR confirmed alterations of nine genes including down-regulation of Cpn2, Htr4, Zfp353, Vgll2 and up-regulation of Xist, Nkx6-3, Leprel1, Nfix, Slc17a7. The alterations in the expression of Slc17a7 and Vgll2 were confirmed at the protein level. Pups exposed to the higher dose of FA exhibited increased ultrasonic vocalizations, greater anxiety-like behavior and hyperactivity. These findings suggest that although FA plays a significant role in mammalian cellular machinery, there may be a loss of benefit from higher amounts of FA. Unregulated high FA supplementation during pregnancy and throughout the

  3. Altered nocifensive behavior in animal models of autism spectrum disorder: The role of the nicotinic cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Almeida, Luis E F; Nettleton, Margaret; Khaibullina, Alfia; Albani, Sarah; Kamimura, Sayuri; Nouraie, Mehdi; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2016-12-01

    Caretakers and clinicians alike have long recognized that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have altered sensory processing, which can contribute to its core symptoms. However, the pathobiology of sensory alterations in ASD is poorly understood. Here we examined nocifensive behavior in ASD mouse models, the BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J (BTBR) and the fragile-X mental retardation-1 knockout (Fmr1-KO) mice. We also examined the effects of nicotine on nocifensive behavior given that nicotine, a nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) agonist that has antinociceptive effects, was shown to improve social deficits and decrease repetitive behaviors in BTBR mice. Compared to respective controls, both BTBR and Fmr1-KO had hyporesponsiveness to noxious thermal stimuli and electrical stimulation of C-sensory fibers, normal responsiveness to electrical stimulation of Aβ- and Aδ-fiber, and hyperresponsiveness to visceral pain after acetic acid intraperitoneal injection. In BTBR, nicotine at lower doses increased, whereas at higher doses, it decreased hotplate latency compared to vehicle. In a significantly different effect pattern, in control mice, nicotine had antinociceptive effects to noxious heat only at the high dose. Interestingly, these nocifensive behavior alterations and differential responses to nicotine antinociceptive effects in BTBR mice were associated with significant downregulation of α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, β3, and β4 nAChR subunits in several cerebral regions both, during embryonic development and adulthood. Taken together, these findings further implicate nAChRs in behaviors alterations in the BTBR model and lend support to the hypothesis that nAChRs may be a target for treatment of behavior deficits and sensory dysfunction in ASD.

  4. Polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy alters neonatal behavior in sheep.

    PubMed

    Capper, Judith L; Wilkinson, Robert G; Mackenzie, Alexander M; Sinclair, Liam A

    2006-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine whether supplementation of pregnant ewes with long-chain (n-3) fatty acids present in fish oil, in combination with dietary vitamin E, would alter neonatal behavior in sheep. Twin- (n=36) and triplet- (n=12) bearing ewes were allocated at d 103 of gestation to 1 of 4 dietary treatments containing 1 of 2 fat sources [Megalac, a calcium soap of palm fatty acid distillate or a fish oil mixture, high in 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3)] and 1 of 2 dietary vitamin E concentrations (50 or 500 mg/kg) in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Feeding fish oil increased gestation length by 2 d and increased the proportion of 22:6(n-3) within neonatal plasma by 5.1-fold and brain by 10%, whereas brain 20:5(n-3) was increased 5-fold. Supranutritional dietary vitamin E concentrations decreased the latency of lambs to stand in ewes fed fish oil but not Megalac, whereas latency to suckle was decreased from 43 to 34 min by fish oil supplementation. Supplementation with fish oil also substantially decreased the secretion rate (mL/h) of colostrum and the yield (g/h) of fat and protein. We conclude that supplementation of ewes with fish oil decreases the latency to suckle, increases gestation length and the 22:6(n-3):20:4(n-6) ratio in the neonatal brain, and may improve lamb survival rate. However, further work is required to determine how to mitigate the negative effects of fish oil on colostrum production.

  5. Chronic Creatine Supplementation Alters Depression-like Behavior in Rodents in a Sex-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patricia J; D'Anci, Kristen E; Kanarek, Robin B; Renshaw, Perry F

    2010-01-01

    Impairments in bioenergetic function, cellular resiliency, and structural plasticity are associated with the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Preliminary evidence suggests that creatine, an ergogenic compound known to promote cell survival and influence the production and usage of energy in the brain, can improve mood in treatment-resistant patients. This study examined the effects of chronic creatine supplementation using the forced swim test (FST), an animal model selectively sensitive to antidepressants with clinical efficacy in human beings. Thirty male (experiment 1) and 36 female (experiment 2) Sprague–Dawley rats were maintained on either chow alone or chow blended with either 2% w/w creatine monohydrate or 4% w/w creatine monohydrate for 5 weeks before the FST. Open field exploration and wire suspension tests were used to rule out general psychostimulant effects. Male rats maintained on 4% creatine displayed increased immobility in the FST as compared with controls with no differences by diet in the open field test, whereas female rats maintained on 4% creatine displayed decreased immobility in the FST and less anxiety in the open field test compared with controls. Open field and wire suspension tests confirmed that creatine supplementation did not produce differences in physical ability or motor function. The present findings suggest that creatine supplementation alters depression-like behavior in the FST in a sex-dependent manner in rodents, with female rats displaying an antidepressant-like response. Although the mechanisms of action are unclear, sex differences in creatine metabolism and the hormonal milieu are likely involved. PMID:19829292

  6. Dopamine D2 receptor over-expression alters behavior and physiology in Drd2-EGFP mice

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Paul F.; Christensen, Christine H.; Hazelwood, Lisa A.; Dobi, Alice; Bock, Roland; Sibley, David R.; Mateo, Yolanda; Alvarez, Veronica A.

    2011-01-01

    BAC transgenic mice expressing the fluorescent reporter protein EGFP under the control of the D1 and D2 dopamine receptor promoters (Drd1-EGFP and Drd2-EGFP) have been widely used to study striatal function and have contributed to our understanding of the physiological and pathological function of the basal ganglia. These tools were produced and promptly made available to address questions in a cell-specific manner that has transformed the way we frame hypotheses in neuroscience. However, these mice have not been fully characterized until now. We found that Drd2-EGFP mice display a ~40% increase in membrane expression of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and a two-fold increase in D2R mRNA levels in the striatum when compared to wild-type and Drd1-EGFP mice D2R over-expression was accompanied by behavioral hypersensitivity to D2R-like agonists, as well as enhanced electrophysiological responses to D2R activation in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. DA transients evoked by stimulation in the nucleus accumbens showed slower clearance in Drd2-EGFP mice and cocaine actions on DA clearance were impaired in these mice. Thus, it was not surprising to find that Drd2-EGFP mice were hyperactive when exposed to a novel environment and locomotion was suppressed by acute cocaine administration. All together, this study demonstrates that Drd2-EGFP mice over-express D2R and have altered dopaminergic signaling that fundamentally differentiates them from wild-type and Drd1-EGFP mice. PMID:21209197

  7. Social Isolation Alters Social and Mating Behavior in the R451C Neuroligin Mouse Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, A. F.; May, C.; Hill, T.; McLachlan, N. M.; Churilov, L.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder typified by impaired social communication and restrictive and repetitive behaviors. Mice serve as an ideal candidate organism for studying the neural mechanisms that subserve these symptoms. The Neuroligin-3 (NL3) mouse, expressing a R451C mutation discovered in two Swedish brothers with ASD, exhibits impaired social interactions and heightened aggressive behavior towards male mice. Social interactions with female mice have not been characterized and in the present study were assessed in male NL3R451C and WT mice. Mice were housed in social and isolation conditions to test for isolation-induced increases in social interaction. Tests were repeated to investigate potential differences in interaction in naïve and experienced mice. We identified heightened interest in mating and atypical aggressive behavior in NL3R451C mice. NL3R451C mice exhibited normal social interaction with WT females, indicating that abnormal aggressive behavior towards females is not due to altered motivation to engage. Social isolation rearing heightened interest in social behavior in all mice. Isolation housing selectively modulated the response to female pheromones in NL3R451C mice. This study is the first to show altered mating behavior in the NL3R451C mouse and has provided new insights into the aggressive phenotype in this model. PMID:28255463

  8. Evaluation of Agaricus blazei in vivo for antigenotoxic, anticarcinogenic, phagocytic and immunomodulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Priscila Lumi; Prado, Carolina Kato; Mauro, Mariana de Oliveira; Carreira, Clísia Mara; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Dichi, Jane Bandeira; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano

    2011-04-01

    The development of various types of cancer results from the interaction among endogenous, environmental and hormonal factors, where the most notable of these factors is diet. The aim of the present study was to determine the antigenotoxic, anticarcinogenic, phagocytic and immunomodulatory activities of Agaricus blazei. The test antigenotoxicity (Comet Assay) and anticarcinogenic (Test of Aberrant Crypt Foci) assess changes in DNA and/or intestinal mucosa that correlate to cancer development. Tests of phagocytosis in the spleen and differential count in blood cells allow the inference of modulation of the immune system as well as to propose a way of eliminating cells with DNA damage. Supplementation with the mushroom was carried out under pre-treatment, simultaneous treatment, post-treatment and pre-treatment+continuous conditions. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the mushroom did not have genotoxic activity but showed antigenotoxic activity. Supplementation caused an increase in the number of monocytes and in phagocytic activity, suggesting that supplementation increases a proliferation of monocytes, consequently increasing phagocytic capacity especially in the groups pre-treatment, simultaneous and pre-treatment+continuous. The data suggest that A. blazei could act as a functional food capable of promoting immunomodulation which can account for the destruction of cells with DNA alterations that correlate with the development of cancer, since this mushroom was demonstrated to have a preventive effect against pre-neoplastic colorectal lesions evaluated by the aberrant crypt foci assay. According to these results and the literature, it is believed that supplementation with A. blazei can be an efficient method for the prevention of cancer as well as possibly being an important coadjuvant treatment in chemotherapy.

  9. The function of the NADPH oxidase of phagocytes and its relationship to other NOXs in plants, invertebrates, and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Anthony W.

    2008-01-01

    The NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase (NOX) of ‘professional’ phagocytic cells transfers electrons across the wall of the phagocytic vacuole, forming superoxide in the lumen. It is generally accepted that this system promotes microbial killing through the generation of reactive oxygen species and through the activity of myeloperoxidase. An alternative scenario exists in which the passage of electrons across the membrane alters the pH and generates a charge that drives ions into, and out of, the vacuole. It is proposed that the primary function of the oxidase is to produce these pH changes and ion fluxes, and the issues surrounding these processes are considered. The neutrophil oxidase is the prototype of a whole family of NOXs that exist throughout biology, from plants to man, which might function, at least in part, in a similar fashion. Some examples of how these other NOXs might influence ion fluxes are examined. PMID:18036868

  10. Chemotactic and Phagocytic Activity of Blood Neutrophils in Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Tainá; Menezes, Maria C S; Silva, Ademir Veras; Stirbulov, Roberto; Forte, Wilma C N

    2015-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease, and has been considered a T helper-2-biased response. Studies suggest that neutrophils may be associated with exacerbation and asthma severity. We sought to evaluate the chemotactic activity and phagocytic capacity by peripheral blood neutrophils from individuals with controlled and uncontrolled allergic asthma, and compare the results with non-asthmatic controls groups. Blood neutrophils were isolated from 95 patients: 24 with controlled asthma, 24 uncontrolled asthma, 24 healthy subjects and 23 patients with IgE-mediated allergies other than asthma. The neutrophil chemotaxis, stimulated with LPS, autologous serum or homologous serum, was determined using Boyden chambers. The phagocytic capacity was assessed by ingestion of zimosan particles, and digestion phase was analyzed by NBT test. The phagocytic digestion phase and chemotaxis by neutrophils from asthmatic patients was higher than in non-asthmatic controls (p  < 0.05). Autologous serum-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in patients with uncontrolled asthma was greater (p  < 0.05) than in other study groups. The ingestion phase of phagocytosis showed similar values in asthmatics and non-asthmatics. We conclude that the blood neutrophil from controlled and uncontrolled asthmatic patients exhibit activation markers, particularly phagocytic digestion and chemotactic activities.

  11. Cellular phagocytic studies in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with levamisole.

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, K M; Dieppe, P A; Scott, J; Huskisson, E C

    1981-01-01

    A simple method is described which allows sequential monitoring of the endocytic activity of blood and synovial fluid cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing therapy with levamisole. Evidence of immediate (24 hours) and long-term (5-7 weeks) cellular phagocytic enhancement is presented. Images PMID:7259330

  12. Tumor Phagocytes Promote Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-14

    cells. Finally, we also used CypHer 5E loading to confirm that epithelial cells have specific phagocytic activity. CypHer5E is a pH- sensitive cyanine ...with the Luminex technology and do not have any definitive data to report from these efforts. Cell culture media from epithelial cultures showed

  13. Experimental investigation of fatigue behavior of spur gear in altered tooth-sum gearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachidananda, H. K.; Gonsalvis, Joseph; Prakash, H. R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with the contact stress, power loss, and pitting of spur gear tooth in altered tooth-sum gearing for a tooth-sum of 100 teeth when altered by ±4% tooth-sum. Analytical and experimental methods were performed to investigate and compare the altered tooth-sum gearing against the standard tooth-sum gearing. The experiments were performed using a power recirculating type test rig. The tooth loads for the experimental investigations were determined considering the surface durability of gears. A clear picture of the surface damage was obtained using a scanning electron microphotograph. The negative alteration in the tooth-sum performed better than the positive alteration in a tooth-sum operating between specified center distances.

  14. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    SciTech Connect

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Cooney, Craig A.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Rau, Jenny L.; Swearingen, Christopher J.; Wessinger, William D.

    2013-06-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL +/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice. Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. - Highlights: • We exposed male mice to low-level trichloroethylene from postnatal days 1 through 42. • This exposure altered redox potential and increased oxidative stress in cerebellum. • This exposure altered metabolites important in cellular methylation in cerebellum. • This exposure promoted DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum. • This exposure enhanced locomotor

  15. Ameliorative potential of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid in restraint stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Rajneet K; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid in acute stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats subjected to restraint stress. The rats were placed in the restrainer (5.5 cm in diameter and 18 cm in length) for 3.5 h. Restraint stress-induced behavioral alterations were assessed using the hole-board, social interactions and open field tests. Restraint stress resulted in a decrease in the frequency of head dips, rearing in the hole board, line crossings and rearings in the open field, and an increase in avoidance behaviors in the social interaction tests. Sodium cromoglycate (25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, ip), a mast cell stabilizer, and diethyldithiocarbamic acid (75 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg, ip), a selective NF-κB inhibitor, were employed to modulate restraint stress-induced behavioral changes. The administration of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid significantly attenuated the restraint stress-induced behavioral changes. The noted beneficial effects of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid may possibly be attributed to mast cell stabilization and inhibition of NF-κB activity, respectively.

  16. Translational Rodent Paradigms to Investigate Neuromechanisms Underlying Behaviors Relevant to Amotivation and Altered Reward Processing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jared W.; Markou, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Amotivation and reward-processing deficits have long been described in patients with schizophrenia and considered large contributors to patients’ inability to integrate well in society. No effective treatments exist for these symptoms, partly because the neuromechanisms mediating such symptoms are poorly understood. Here, we propose a translational neuroscientific approach that can be used to assess reward/motivational deficits related to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia using behavioral paradigms that can also be conducted in experimental animals. By designing and using objective laboratory behavioral tools that are parallel in their parameters in rodents and humans, the neuromechanisms underlying behaviors with relevance to these symptoms of schizophrenia can be investigated. We describe tasks that measure the motivation of rodents to expend physical and cognitive effort to gain rewards, as well as probabilistic learning tasks that assess both reward learning and feedback-based decision making. The latter tasks are relevant because of demonstrated links of performance deficits correlating with negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. These tasks utilize operant techniques in order to investigate neural circuits targeting a specific domain across species. These tasks therefore enable the development of insights into altered mechanisms leading to negative symptom-relevant behaviors in patients with schizophrenia. Such findings will then enable the development of targeted treatments for these altered neuromechanisms and behaviors seen in schizophrenia. PMID:26194891

  17. Study of neurometabolic and behavioral alterations in rodent model of mild traumatic brain injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kavita; Trivedi, Richa; Haridas, Seenu; Manda, Kailash; Khushu, Subash

    2016-12-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is the most common form of TBI (70-90%) with consequences of anxiety-like behavioral alterations in approximately 23% of mTBI cases. This study aimed to assess whether mTBI-induced anxiety-like behavior is a consequence of neurometabolic alterations. mTBI was induced using a weight drop model to simulate mild human brain injury in rodents. Based on injury induction and dosage of anesthesia, four animal groups were included in this study: (i) injury with anesthesia (IA); (ii) sham1 (injury only, IO); (iii) sham2 (only anesthesia, OA); and (iv) control rats. After mTBI, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) and neurobehavioral analysis were performed in these groups. At day 5, reduced taurine (Tau)/total creatine (tCr, creatine and phosphocreatine) levels in cortex were observed in the IA and IO groups relative to the control. These groups showed mTBI-induced anxiety-like behavior with normal cognition at day 5 post-injury. An anxiogenic effect of repeated dosage of anesthesia in OA rats was observed with normal Tau/tCr levels in rat cortex, which requires further examination. In conclusion, this mTBI model closely mimics human concussion injury with anxiety-like behavior and normal cognition. Reduced cortical Tau levels may provide a putative neurometabolic basis of anxiety-like behavior following mTBI.

  18. [Effect of general magnetotherapy on specific activity of blood phagocytes in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Ishutin, I S; Klemenkov, S V; Lesovskaia, M I; Spiridonova, M S; Krotova, T K; Ishutin, E I; Tsyganova, O B

    2007-01-01

    In general magnetotherapy for patients with hyporeactive phagocytes (less than 67% from the level of normal chelicoluminescent response) the adequate level of magnetic induction is 1 mT, for patients with normoreactive phagocytes--0.5 mT and for patients with hyperreactive phagocytes (more than 133% from the level of normal chelicoluminescent response)--0.75 mT daily.

  19. Benefits of agomelatine in behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alterations in prenatal valproic acid induced autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid administration during gestational period causes behavior and biochemical deficits similar to those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder. Although worldwide prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the social impairment are very limited. The present study has been structured to investigate the therapeutic potential of melatonin receptor agonist, agomelatine in prenatal valproic acid (Pre-VPA) induced autism spectrum disorder in animals. Pre-VPA has produced reduction in social interaction (three chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, Pre-VPA has increased locomotor activity (actophotometer), anxiety, brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, and catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage in animals. Treatment with agomelatine has significantly attenuated Pre-VPA induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, agomelatine also attenuated Pre-VPA induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage. It is concluded that, Pre-VPA has induced autism spectrum disorder, which was attenuated by agomelatine. Agomelatine has shown ameliorative effect on behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alteration in Pre-VPA exposed animals. Thus melatonin receptor agonists may provide beneficial therapeutic strategy for managing autism spectrum disorder.

  20. Embryonic intraventricular exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies produces alterations in autistic-like stereotypical behaviors in offspring mice.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Jasmin; Jones, Karen; Miller, Elaine; Ariza, Jeanelle; Noctor, Stephen; Van de Water, Judy; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2014-06-01

    Multiple studies have implicated a role of maternal autoantibodies reactive against fetal brain proteins specific to autism in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the current study, we examined the impact of brain-reactive maternal autoantibodies of mothers of children with autism (MAU) on offspring behavior in mice compared to offspring exposed to non-reactive IgG of mothers of typically developing children (MTD). Embryonic offspring were exposed to a single intraventricular injection of MAU or MTD IgG on embryonic day 14. Offspring were allowed to mature to adulthood and were subsequently tested for sociability and stereotypic behaviors using a 3-chambered social approach task, marble burying task, and assessment of spontaneous grooming behaviors in response to a novel environment. Results indicate that MAU offspring display autistic-like stereotypical behavior in both marble burying and spontaneous grooming behaviors. Additionally, small alterations in social approach behavior were also observed in MAU offspring compared to MTD offspring. This report demonstrates for the first time the effects of a single, low dose intraventricular exposure of IgG derived from individual MAU samples on offspring behavior.

  1. Food, stress, and reproduction: short-term fasting alters endocrine physiology and reproductive behavior in the zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Sharon E; Stamplis, Teresa B; Barrington, William T; Weida, Nicholas; Hudak, Casey A

    2010-07-01

    Stress is thought to be a potent suppressor of reproduction. However, the vast majority of studies focus on the relationship between chronic stress and reproductive suppression, despite the fact that chronic stress is rare in the wild. We investigated the role of fasting in altering acute stress physiology, reproductive physiology, and reproductive behavior of male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with several goals in mind. First, we wanted to determine if acute fasting could stimulate an increase in plasma corticosterone and a decrease in corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) and testosterone. We then investigated whether fasting could alter expression of undirected song and courtship behavior. After subjecting males to fasting periods ranging from 1 to 10h, we collected plasma to measure corticosterone, CBG, and testosterone. We found that plasma corticosterone was elevated, and testosterone was decreased after 4, 6, and 10h of fasting periods compared with samples collected from the same males during nonfasted (control) periods. CBG was lower than control levels only after 10h of fasting. We also found that, coincident with these endocrine changes, males sang less and courted females less vigorously following short-term fasting relative to control conditions. Our data demonstrate that acute fasting resulted in rapid changes in endocrine physiology consistent with hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activation and hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis deactivation. Fasting also inhibited reproductive behavior. We suggest that zebra finches exhibit physiological and behavioral flexibility that makes them an excellent model system for studying interactions of acute stress and reproduction.

  2. Acute exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol alters boldness behavioral syndrome in female Siamese fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Campbell, Brennah A; Marks, Jodi M; Logan, Brittney

    2014-09-01

    The role of anthropogenic sources in generating, maintaining, and influencing behavioral syndromes has recently been identified as an important area of future research. Endocrine disrupting chemicals are prevalent and persistent in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. These chemicals are known to have marked effects on the morphology and behavior of exposed individuals and, as such, may serve as a potential influence on behavioral syndromes. However, both the effects of exposure on behaviors beyond courtship and aggression and how exposure might affect behavioral variation at the individual level are understudied. To address this question, we examined boldness behavior in female Siamese fighting fish in three different assays (Novel Environment, Empty Tank, Shoaling) both before and after they were exposed to the estrogen mimic, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). EE2 influences courtship, aggression, and boldness in males of this species but its effects have not been examined in females, to our knowledge. Females were tested multiple times in each assay before and after exposure so that behavioral consistency could be examined. A behavioral syndrome for boldness and activity level occurred across the three assays. The reductions in boldness and loss of the behavioral syndrome that resulted from EE2 exposure were surprising and suggest that the effects of EE2 exposure on female behavior and physiology should be examined more frequently. This study is one of the first to examine the effects of EE2 in females as well as on correlated behaviors and emphasizes the importance of examining the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on individual behavioral variation and consistency.

  3. Exposure to a low dose of bisphenol A during fetal life or in adulthood alters maternal behavior in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Palanza, Paola L; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Parmigiani, Stefano; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2002-01-01

    Maternal behavior in mammals is the result of a complex interaction between the lactating dam and her developing offspring. Slight perturbations of any of the components of the mother-infant interaction may result in alterations of the behavior of the mother and/or of the offspring. We studied the effects of exposure of female CD-1 mice to the estrogenic chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during fetal life and/or in adulthood during the last part of pregnancy on subsequent maternal behavior. Pregnant females were fed daily doses of corn oil (controls) or 10 microg/kg body weight BPA during gestation days 14-18. As adults, the prenatally treated female offspring were time-mated and again fed either corn oil (controls) or the same doses of BPA on gestation days 14-18, resulting in four treatment groups: controls, prenatal BPA exposure, adult BPA exposure, and both prenatal and adult BPA exposure. Maternal behavior was then observed on postnatal days 2-15 and reflex responses were examined in the offspring. Dams exposed to BPA either as fetuses or in adulthood spent less time nursing their pups and more time out of the nest compared with the control group. Females exposed to BPA both as fetuses and in adulthood did not significantly differ from controls. No alterations in postnatal reflex development were observed in the offspring of the females exposed to BPA. The changes seen in maternal behavior may be the result of a direct effect of BPA on the neuroendocrine substrates underlying the initiation of maternal behavior. PMID:12060838

  4. Dietary exposure to technical hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) alters courtship, incubation and parental behaviors in American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    PubMed

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Bird, David M; Letcher, Robert J; Sullivan, Katrina M; Ritchie, Ian J; Fernie, Kim J

    2012-11-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a high production volume brominated flame retardant that has been detected in the environment and wildlife at increasing concentrations. This study was designed to determine potential effects of dietary exposure to environmentally relevant levels of HBCD on behavior during reproduction in captive American kestrels. Twenty kestrel pairs were exposed to 0.51 μg technical HBCD g(-1) kestrel d(-1) from 4 weeks prior to pairing until chicks hatched (~75 d). Ten pairs of controls received the safflower oil vehicle only and were used for comparison. During the courtship period the chitter-calls were reduced in both sexes (p=0.038) and females performed fewer bonding displays (p=0.053). Both sexes showed a propensity to be less active than controls during courtship. The reduction in male courtship behavior was correlated with reduced courtship behaviors of females (p=0.008) as well as reduced egg mass (p=0.019). During incubation, nest temperatures of treatment pairs were lower at mid-incubation (p=0.038). HBCD-exposed males performed fewer key parental behaviors when rearing nestlings, including entering the nest-box, pair-bonding displays and food-retrievals. HBCD-exposed females appeared to compensate for the reduced parental behavior of their mates by performing these same behaviors more frequently than controls (p=0.004, p=0.027, p=0.025, respectively). This study demonstrates that HBCD affects breeding behavior in American kestrels throughout the reproductive season and behavioral alterations were linked to reproductive changes (egg size). This is the first study to report HBCD effects on reproductive behavior in any animal model.

  5. Post-weaning living with parents during juvenile period alters locomotor activity, social and parental behaviors in mandarin voles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruiyong; Song, Zhenzhen; Tai, Fadao; Wang, Lu; Kong, Lingzhe; Wang, Jianli

    2013-09-01

    Neonatal parental care plays an important role in the development of offspring behavior, but little is known about the effect of post-weaning contact between offspring and parents on locomotory, social and parental behavior. Here, we explore this concept using socially monogamous mandarin voles (Microtus mandarinus). Voles were assigned to live with parents and siblings from the same litter until 45d (natural dispersal time in the field) or to live with siblings from the same litter after weaning at 21d (normally weaned time, the control). At 70d of age, behaviors were recorded in open field and social interaction tests, and parental care toward their own offspring was measured. Results show that voles that live with parents post-weaning engaged in less locomotory activity and rearing behavior in the open field test, less sniffing of novel individuals and displayed more parental care, compared to voles that did not continue to live with their parents. These findings demonstrate that parent-offspring interaction post-weaning alters locomotory activity, social behavior and parental behavior of offspring at adulthood.

  6. Dancing cheek to cheek: Cryptococcus neoformans and phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingshun; Sun, Donglei; Shi, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) has become one of the leading causes of mortality in AIDS patients. Understanding the interactions between Cn and phagocytes is fundamental in exploring the pathogenicity of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Cn may be extracellular or contained in the monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells and even endothelial cells. The internalized Cn may proliferate inside the host cells, or cause the lysis of host cells, or leave the host cells via non-lytic exocytosis, or even hijack the host cells (Trojan horse) for the brain dissemination, which are regulated by microbe factors and also immune molecules. Coexistence of protective and deleterious roles of phagocytes in the progression of cryptococcosis warrant further investigation.

  7. Sphingolipids as Regulators of the Phagocytic Response to Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Arielle M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Luberto, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections pose a significant risk for the increasing population of individuals who are immunocompromised. Phagocytes play an important role in immune defense against fungal pathogens, but the interactions between host and fungi are still not well understood. Sphingolipids have been shown to play an important role in many cell functions, including the function of phagocytes. In this review, we discuss major findings that relate to the importance of sphingolipids in macrophage and neutrophil function and the role of macrophages and neutrophils in the most common types of fungal infections, as well as studies that have linked these three concepts to show the importance of sphingolipid signaling in immune response to fungal infections. PMID:26688618

  8. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Nondiseased Human Lung and Lung-Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Desch, A. Nicole; Gibbings, Sophie L.; Goyal, Rajni; Kolde, Raivo; Bednarek, Joe; Bruno, Tullia; Slansky, Jill E.; Jacobelli, Jordan; Mason, Robert; Ito, Yoko; Messier, Elise; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M.; Segura, Elodie; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Bratton, Donna L.; Janssen, William J.; Henson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: The pulmonary mononuclear phagocyte system is a critical host defense mechanism composed of macrophages, monocytes, monocyte-derived cells, and dendritic cells. However, our current characterization of these cells is limited because it is derived largely from animal studies and analysis of human mononuclear phagocytes from blood and small tissue resections around tumors. Objectives: Phenotypic and morphologic characterization of mononuclear phagocytes that potentially access inhaled antigens in human lungs. Methods: We acquired and analyzed pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes from fully intact nondiseased human lungs (including the major blood vessels and draining lymph nodes) obtained en bloc from 72 individual donors. Differential labeling of hematopoietic cells via intrabronchial and intravenous administration of antibodies within the same lobe was used to identify extravascular tissue-resident mononuclear phagocytes and exclude cells within the vascular lumen. Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to identify mononuclear phagocyte populations among cells labeled by each route of antibody delivery. Measurements and Main Results: We performed a phenotypic analysis of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes isolated from whole nondiseased human lungs and lung-draining lymph nodes. Five pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes were observed, including macrophages, monocyte-derived cells, and dendritic cells that were phenotypically distinct from cell populations found in blood. Conclusions: Different mononuclear phagocytes, particularly dendritic cells, were labeled by intravascular and intrabronchial antibody delivery, countering the notion that tissue and blood mononuclear phagocytes are equivalent systems. Phenotypic descriptions of the mononuclear phagocytes in nondiseased lungs provide a precedent for comparative studies in diseased lungs and potential targets for therapeutics. PMID:26551758

  9. Chronic fluoxetine treatment induces anxiolytic responses and altered social behaviors in medaka, Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Kinoshita, Masato

    2016-04-15

    Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a small freshwater teleost that is an emerging model system for neurobehavioral research and toxicological testing. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants such as fluoxetine is one of the widely prescribed drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on medaka behaviors. To assess the behavioral effects of fluoxetine, we chronically administrated fluoxetine to medaka adult fish and analyzed the anxiety-related and social behaviors using five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and social interaction) with an automated behavioral testing system. Fish chronically treated with fluoxetine exhibited anxiolytic responses such as an overall increased time spent in the top area in the diving test and an increased time spent in center area in the open-field test. Analysis of socially evoked behavior showed that chronic fluoxetine administration decreased the number of mirror biting times in the mirror-biting test and increased latency to first contact in the social interaction test. Additionally, chronic fluoxetine administration reduced the horizontal locomotor activity in the open-field test but not the vertical activity in the diving test. These investigations are mostly consistent with previous reports in the other teleost species and rodent models. These results indicate that behavioral assessment in medaka adult fish will become useful for screening of effects of pharmaceutical and toxicological compounds in animal behaviors.

  10. Group size alters postures, and maintenance, oral, locomotor and social behaviors of veal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of group size on behavior of veal calves. Holstein-Friesian bull calves (n = 168; 44 ± 3 d of age), were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments of group housing with 2, 4, or 8 calves per pen (1.82 m2 per calf for all groups). Behavior was obser...

  11. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    PubMed Central

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Cooney, Craig A.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Rau, Jenny L.; Swearingen, Christopher J.; Wessinger, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. PMID:23566951

  12. Knockdown of RhoA expression alters ovarian cancer biological behavior in vitro and in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Wenyan; Kang, Jiali; Liu, Qicai; Nie, Miaoling

    2015-08-01

    RhoA regulates cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and gene expression. Altered RhoA activity contributes to cancer progression. The present study investigated the effects of RhoA knockdown on the regulation of ovarian cancer biological behavior in vitro and in nude mice. The expression of RhoA was knocked down using a lentivirus carrying RhoA short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in ovarian cancer cells and was confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. The altered ovarian cancer biological behaviors were assayed by cell viability, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL), migration, invasion, and nude mice tumorigenicity assays, while the altered gene expression was detected by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. The results showed that lentivirus-carrying RhoA shRNA significantly suppressed RhoA expression in ovarian cancer cells, which suppressed tumor cell viability, migration, invasion and adhesion in vitro. RhoA silencing also inhibited the tumorigenicity of ovarian cancer cells in nude mice, which was characterized by the suppression of tumor xenograft formation and growth and induction of tumor cell apoptosis. The results of the present study demonstrated that knockdown of RhoA expression had a significant antitumor effect on ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in nude mice, suggesting that RhoA may be a target for the development of a novel therapeutic strategy in the control of ovarian cancer.

  13. Postnatal dietary choline supplementation alters behavior in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nag, Nupur; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E

    2007-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting females, is accompanied by behavioral and neuropathological abnormalities and decreases in brain cholinergic markers. Because the cholinergic system is associated with cognitive and motor functions, cholinergic deficits in RTT may underlie some of the behavioral abnormalities. In rodents, increased choline availability during development enhances transmission at cholinergic synapses and improves behavioral performance throughout life. We examined whether choline supplementation of nursing dams would attenuate deficits in Mecp2(1lox) offspring, a mouse model of RTT. Dams were given choline in drinking water, and pups nursed from birth to weaning. Offspring were assessed on development and behavior. In Mecp2(1lox) males, choline supplementation improved motor coordination and locomotor activity, whereas in females it enhanced grip strength. Choline supplementation did not improve response to fear conditioning. Postnatal choline supplementation attenuates some behavioral deficits in Mecp2(1lox) mice and should be explored further as a therapeutic agent in RTT.

  14. Training Mental Health Professionals to Assess and Manage Suicidal Behavior: Can Provider Confidence and Practice Behaviors Be Altered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oordt, Mark S.; Jobes, David A.; Fonseca, Vincent P.; Schmidt, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Remarkably little systematic research has studied the effects of clinical suicidology training on changing practitioner attitudes and behaviors. In the current study we investigated whether training in an empirically-based assessment and treatment approach to suicidal patients administered through a continuing education workshop could meaningfully…

  15. Cooperation of Gastric Mononuclear Phagocytes with Helicobacter pylori during Colonization.

    PubMed

    Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Tubau-Juni, Nuria; Kronsteiner, Barbara; Leber, Andrew; Philipson, Casandra W; Zoccoli-Rodriguez, Victoria; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2017-03-06

    Helicobacter pylori, the dominant member of the human gastric microbiota, elicits immunoregulatory responses implicated in protective versus pathological outcomes. To evaluate the role of macrophages during infection, we employed a system with a shifted proinflammatory macrophage phenotype by deleting PPARγ in myeloid cells and found a 5- to 10-fold decrease in gastric bacterial loads. Higher levels of colonization in wild-type mice were associated with increased presence of mononuclear phagocytes and in particular with the accumulation of CD11b(+)F4/80(hi)CD64(+)CX3CR1(+) macrophages in the gastric lamina propria. Depletion of phagocytic cells by clodronate liposomes in wild-type mice resulted in a reduction of gastric H. pylori colonization compared with nontreated mice. PPARγ-deficient and macrophage-depleted mice presented decreased IL-10-mediated myeloid and T cell regulatory responses soon after infection. IL-10 neutralization during H. pylori infection led to increased IL-17-mediated responses and increased neutrophil accumulation at the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, we report the induction of IL-10-driven regulatory responses mediated by CD11b(+)F4/80(hi)CD64(+)CX3CR1(+) mononuclear phagocytes that contribute to maintaining high levels of H. pylori loads in the stomach by modulating effector T cell responses at the gastric mucosa.

  16. Fungal invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells.

    PubMed

    Filler, Scott G; Sheppard, Donald C

    2006-12-01

    Many fungi that cause invasive disease invade host epithelial cells during mucosal and respiratory infection, and subsequently invade endothelial cells during hematogenous infection. Most fungi invade these normally non-phagocytic host cells by inducing their own uptake. Candida albicans hyphae interact with endothelial cells in vitro by binding to N-cadherin on the endothelial cell surface. This binding induces rearrangement of endothelial cell microfilaments, which results in the endocytosis of the organism. The capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans is composed of glucuronoxylomannan, which binds specifically to brain endothelial cells, and appears to mediate both adherence and induction of endocytosis. The mechanisms by which other fungal pathogens induce their own uptake are largely unknown. Some angioinvasive fungi, such as Aspergillus species and the Zygomycetes, invade endothelial cells from the abluminal surface during the initiation of invasive disease, and subsequently invade the luminal surface of endothelial cells during hematogenous dissemination. Invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells has different consequences, depending on the type of invading fungus. Aspergillus fumigatus blocks apoptosis of pulmonary epithelial cells, whereas Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces apoptosis of epithelial cells. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which diverse fungal pathogens invade normally non-phagocytic host cells and discusses gaps in our knowledge that provide opportunities for future research.

  17. Fungal Invasion of Normally Non-Phagocytic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Filler, Scott G; Sheppard, Donald C

    2006-01-01

    Many fungi that cause invasive disease invade host epithelial cells during mucosal and respiratory infection, and subsequently invade endothelial cells during hematogenous infection. Most fungi invade these normally non-phagocytic host cells by inducing their own uptake. Candida albicans hyphae interact with endothelial cells in vitro by binding to N-cadherin on the endothelial cell surface. This binding induces rearrangement of endothelial cell microfilaments, which results in the endocytosis of the organism. The capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans is composed of glucuronoxylomannan, which binds specifically to brain endothelial cells, and appears to mediate both adherence and induction of endocytosis. The mechanisms by which other fungal pathogens induce their own uptake are largely unknown. Some angioinvasive fungi, such as Aspergillus species and the Zygomycetes, invade endothelial cells from the abluminal surface during the initiation of invasive disease, and subsequently invade the luminal surface of endothelial cells during hematogenous dissemination. Invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells has different consequences, depending on the type of invading fungus. Aspergillus fumigatus blocks apoptosis of pulmonary epithelial cells, whereas Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces apoptosis of epithelial cells. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which diverse fungal pathogens invade normally non-phagocytic host cells and discusses gaps in our knowledge that provide opportunities for future research. PMID:17196036

  18. Degradation of biomaterials by phagocyte-derived oxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, K; Mahoney, J R; Coury, A J; Eaton, J W

    1993-01-01

    Polymers used in implantable devices, although relatively unreactive, may degrade in vivo through unknown mechanisms. For example, polyetherurethane elastomers used as cardiac pacemaker lead insulation have developed surface defects after implantation. This phenomenon, termed "environmental stress cracking," requires intimate contact between polymer and host phagocytic cells, suggesting that phagocyte-generated oxidants might be involved. Indeed, brief exposure of polyetherurethane to activated human neutrophils, hypochlorous acid, or peroxynitrite produces modifications of the polymer similar to those found in vivo. Damage to the polymer appears to arise predominantly from oxidation of the urethane-aliphatic ester and aliphatic ether groups. There are substantial increases in the solid phase surface oxygen content of samples treated with hypochlorous acid, peroxynitrite or activated human neutrophils, resembling those observed in explanted polyetherurethane. Furthermore, both explanted and hypochlorous acid-treated polyetherurethane show marked reductions in polymer molecular weight. Interestingly, hypochlorous acid and peroxynitrite appear to attack polyetherurethane at different sites. Hypochlorous acid or activated neutrophils cause decreases in the urethane-aliphatic ester stretch peak relative to the aliphatic ether stretch peak (as determined by infrared spectroscopy) whereas peroxynitrite causes selective loss of the aliphatic ether. In vivo degradation may involve both hypohalous and nitric oxide-based oxidants because, after long-term implantation, both stretch peaks are diminished. These results suggest that in vivo destruction of implanted polyetherurethane involves attack by phagocyte-derived oxidants. Images PMID:8227352

  19. Effects of polysaccharides from Silene vulgaris on phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Popov, S V; Popova, G Y; Ovodova, R G; Bushneva, O A; Ovodov, Y S

    1999-09-01

    The effects of the polysaccharides isolated from the intact plant (pectic polysaccharides P1, P2 and P3) and from the callus (acidic arabinogalactan C1 and pectin C2) of Silene vulgaris on phagocytic activity were studied in relation to an uptaking capacity and a myeloperoxidase activity of the peripheral human neutrophils and monocytes and rat peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Both intact plant and callus polysaccharides were shown to increase uptaking capacity of peripheral phagocytes. The callus acidic arabinogalactan C1 was only found to stimulate lysosomal activity of the peripheral phagocytes. Some polysaccharides studied were established to effect on peritoneal resident macrophages. Pectins P1, P3 and C2 failed to enhance myeloperoxidase activity of the macrophages in calcium-free solution, whereas the effect of callus arabinogalactan C1 was established to be independent of extracellular calcium. Polysaccharides studied failed to influence neither complement receptor CR3- nor scavenger receptor SR-mediated adhesion of the macrophages. The data obtained demonstrate that the intact S. vulgaris and its callus may be used as sources of immunoactive polysaccharides and that pectins and weakly acidic arabinogalactan seemed to stimulate macrophages through different mechanisms. Complement receptor type 3 and scavenger receptor failed to mediate the cell activation induced by plant polysaccharides.

  20. Diet-induced obesity progressively alters cognition, anxiety-like behavior and lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior: focus on brain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    André, Caroline; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Ferreira, Guillaume; Layé, Sophie; Castanon, Nathalie

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of mood symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions that emerges as significant risk factors for important health complications such as cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is therefore important to identify the dynamic of development and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these neuropsychiatric symptoms. Obesity is also associated with peripheral low-grade inflammation and increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases. Excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and the resulting activation of the brain tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) have been shown to promote neurobehavioral complications, particularly depression. In that context, questions arise about the impact of diet-induced obesity on the onset of neuropsychiatric alterations and the increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases displayed by obese patients, particularly through brain IDO activation. To answer these questions, we used C57Bl/6 mice exposed to standard diet or western diet (WD; consisting of palatable energy-dense food) since weaning and for 20 weeks. We then measured inflammatory and behavioral responses to a systemic immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in experimental conditions known to alter cognitive and emotional behaviors independently of any motor impairment. We first showed that in absence of LPS, 9 weeks of WD is sufficient to impair spatial recognition memory (in the Y-maze). On the other hand, 18 weeks of WD increased anxiety-like behavior (in the elevated plus-maze), but did not affect depressive-like behavior (in the tail-suspension and forced-swim tests). However, 20 weeks of WD altered LPS-induced depressive-like behavior compared to LPS-treated lean mice and exacerbated hippocampal and hypothalamic proinflammatory cytokine expression and brain IDO activation. Taken together, these results show that WD exposure alters cognition and anxiety in unstimulated

  1. [Alteration of Social Behaviors in Male Mice of CBA/Lac Strain under Agonistic Interactions].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, I L; Kudryavtseva, N N

    2015-01-01

    Ability of people to communicate with each other is a necessary component of social behavior and normal development of individuals living in community. A pronounced impairment in communication may be the result of autism which is characterized by impaired socialization, low communication and restricted and/or repetitive behaviors. It is hypothesized that genes or rare mutations play a key role in the development of autism. However a multifold increase of the cases with autistic spectrum symptoms over the last years cannot be attributed exclusively to genetic mutations or heredity. Environmental contribution to the development of autistic symptoms has to be considered. The paper aimed to analyze the social behaviors of CBA/Lac mice with repeated experience of aggression or social defeats in daily agonistic interactions with accent on searches of associations with autistic symptoms in comparison with previously studied C57BL/6J animals. It has been shown that male mice of both strains with alternative social behaviors demonstrated the changes in social behaviors; however the expression of some form of behaviors was different. The data obtained to assert that long-term hostile social environment lead to development of disturbances in social behaviors, accompanying by autistic-like symptoms.

  2. Mononuclear Phagocytes Are Dispensable for Cardiac Remodeling in Established Pressure-Overload Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bindiya; Ismahil, Mohamed Ameen; Hamid, Tariq; Bansal, Shyam S.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although cardiac and splenic mononuclear phagocytes (MPs), i.e., monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are key contributors to cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction, their role in pressure-overload remodeling is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that these immune cells are required for the progression of remodeling in pressure-overload heart failure (HF), and that MP depletion would ameliorate remodeling. Methods and Results C57BL/6 mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham operation, and assessed for alterations in MPs. As compared with sham, TAC mice exhibited expansion of circulating LyC6hi monocytes and pro-inflammatory CD206− cardiac macrophages early (1 w) after pressure-overload, prior to significant hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction, with subsequent resolution during chronic HF. In contrast, classical DCs were expanded in the heart in a biphasic manner, with peaks both early, analogous to macrophages, and late (8 w), during established HF. There was no significant expansion of circulating DCs, or Ly6C+ monocytes and DCs in the spleen. Periodic systemic MP depletion from 2 to 16 w after TAC in macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MaFIA) transgenic mice did not alter cardiac remodeling progression, nor did splenectomy in mice with established HF after TAC. Lastly, adoptive transfer of splenocytes from TAC HF mice into naïve recipients did not induce immediate or long-term cardiac dysfunction in recipient mice. Conclusions Mononuclear phagocytes populations expand in a phasic manner in the heart during pressure-overload. However, they are dispensable for the progression of remodeling and failure once significant hypertrophy is evident and blood monocytosis has normalized. PMID:28125666

  3. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Nicole M.; Tomaszycki, Michelle L.; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Adult zebra finches (T. guttata) form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homolog of vasopressin) and the V1a receptor (V1aR) early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird. PMID:27065824

  4. Prenatal stress alters the behavior and dendritic morphology of the medial orbitofrontal cortex in mouse offspring during lactation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Cristian; Pascual, Rodrigo; Bustamante, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown that prenatal stress alters neuronal dendritic development in the prefrontal cortex, together with behavioral disturbances (anxiety). Nevertheless, neither whether these alterations are present during the lactation period, nor whether such findings may reflect the onset of anxiety disorders observed in childhood and adulthood has been studied. The central aim of the present study was to determine the effects of prenatal stress on the neuronal development and behavior of mice offspring during lactation (postnatal days 14 and 21). We studied 24 CF-1 male mice, grouped as follows: (i) control P14 (n=6), (ii) stressed P14 (n=6), (iii) control P21 (n=6) and (iv) stressed P21 (n=6). On the corresponding days, animals were evaluated with the open field test and sacrificed. Their brains were then stained in Golgi-Cox solution for 30 days. The morphological analysis dealt with the study of 96 pyramidal neurons. The results showed, first, that prenatal stress resulted in a significant (i) decrease in the apical dendritic length of pyramidal neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex at postnatal day 14, (ii) increase in the apical dendritic length of pyramidal neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex at postnatal day 21, and (iii) reduction in exploratory behavior at postnatal day 14 and 21.

  5. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Arndt, David L; Peterson, Christy J; Cain, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression.

  6. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, David L.; Peterson, Christy J.; Cain, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression. PMID:26154768

  7. Maternal and developmental immune challenges alter behavior and learning ability of offspring.

    PubMed

    Grindstaff, Jennifer L; Hunsaker, Veronica R; Cox, Shelby N

    2012-08-01

    Stimulation of the offspring immune response during development is known to influence growth and behavioral phenotype. However, the potential for maternal antibodies to block the behavioral effects of immune activation during the neonatal period has not been assessed. We challenged female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) prior to egg laying and then challenged offspring during the nestling and juvenile periods with one of two antigens (keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). We then tested the effects of maternal and neonatal immune challenges on offspring growth rates and neophobia and learning ability of offspring during adulthood. Neonatal immune challenge depressed growth rates. Neophobia of adult offspring was influenced by a combination of maternal treatment, offspring treatment, and offspring sex. Males challenged with LPS during the nestling and juvenile periods had reduced learning performance in a novel foraging task; however, female learning was not impacted. Offspring challenged with the same antigen as mothers exhibited similar growth suppression and behavioral changes as offspring challenged with a novel antigen. Thus, developmental immune challenges have long-term effects on the growth and behavioral phenotype of offspring. We found limited evidence that matching of maternal and offspring challenges reduces the effects of immune challenge in the altricial zebra finch. This may be a result of rapid catabolism of maternal antibodies in altricial birds. Our results emphasize the need to address sex differences in the long-term effects of developmental immune challenge and suggest that neonatal immune activation may be one proximate mechanism underlying differences in adult behavior.

  8. Highly active modulators of indole signaling alter pathogenic behaviors in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Minvielle, Marine J; Eguren, Kristen; Melander, Christian

    2013-12-16

    Indole is a universal signal that regulates various bacterial behaviors, such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. To generate mechanistic probes of indole signaling and control indole-mediated pathogenic phenotypes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, we have investigated the use of desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) derivatives to generate highly active indole mimetics. We have developed non-microbicidal dFBr derivatives that are 27-2000 times more active than indole in modulating biofilm formation, motility, acid resistance, and antibiotic resistance. The activity of these analogues parallels indole, because they are dependent on temperature, the enzyme tryptophanase TnaA, and the transcriptional regulator SdiA. This investigation demonstrates that molecules based on the dFBr scaffold can alter pathogenic behaviors by mimicking indole-signaling pathways.

  9. Ifenprodil infusion in agranular insular cortex alters social behavior and vocalizations in rats exposed to moderate levels of ethanol during prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Bird, Clark W; Barto, Daniel; Magcalas, Christy M; Rodriguez, Carlos I; Donaldson, Tia; Davies, Suzy; Savage, Daniel D; Hamilton, Derek A

    2017-03-01

    Moderate exposure to alcohol during development leads to subtle neurobiological and behavioral effects classified under the umbrella term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Alterations in social behaviors are a frequently observed consequence of maternal drinking, as children with FASDs display inappropriate aggressive behaviors and altered responses to social cues. Rodent models of FASDs mimic the behavioral alterations seen in humans, with rats exposed to ethanol during development displaying increased aggressive behaviors, decreased social investigation, and altered play behavior. Work from our laboratory has observed increased wrestling behavior in adult male rats following prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE), and increased expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in the agranular insular cortex (AIC). This study was undertaken to determine if ifenprodil, a GluN2B preferring negative allosteric modulator, has a significant effect on social behaviors in PAE rats. Using a voluntary ethanol exposure paradigm, rat dams were allowed to drink a saccharin-sweetened solution of either 0% or 5% ethanol throughout gestation. Offspring at 6-8 months of age were implanted with cannulae into AIC. Animals were isolated for 24h before ifenprodil or vehicle was infused into AIC, and after 15min they were recorded in a social interaction chamber. Ifenprodil treatment altered aspects of wrestling, social investigatory behaviors, and ultrasonic vocalizations in rats exposed to ethanol during development that were not observed in control animals. These data indicate that GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in AIC play a role in social behaviors and may underlie alterations in behavior and vocalizations observed in PAE animals.

  10. Macrophage reprogramming: influence of latex beads with various functional groups on macrophage phenotype and phagocytic uptake in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akilbekova, Dana; Philiph, Rachel; Graham, Austin; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in initiating immune responses with various functions ranging from wound healing to antimicrobial actions. The type of biomaterial is suggested to influence macrophage phenotype. Here, we show that exposing M1- and M2-activated macrophages to polystyrene latex beads bearing different functional groups can alter secretion profiles, providing a possible method for altering the course of the host response. Macrophages were stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide or interleukin (IL) 4 and cultured for 24 h with 10 different latex beads. Proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and nitrite served as markers for the M1 phenotype and proangiogenic cytokine (IL-10) and arginase activity for M2 cells. The ability of the macrophages to phagocytize Escherichia coli particles and water contact angles of the polymers were also assessed. Different patterns of cytokine expression and phagocytosis activity were induced by the various particles. Particles did not polarize the cells toward one specific phenotype versus another, but rather induced changes in both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest a dependence of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activities on material type and cytokine stimuli. These data also illustrate how biomaterials can be exploited to alter host responses for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

  11. Chronic social instability in adult female rats alters social behavior, maternal aggression and offspring development.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Florent; Babb, Jessica A; Carini, Lindsay; Nephew, Benjamin C

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the consequences of chronic social instability (CSI) during adulthood on social and maternal behavior in females and social behavior of their offspring in a rat model. CSI consisted of changing the social partners of adult females every 2-3 days for 28 days, 2 weeks prior to mating. Females exposed to CSI behaved less aggressively and more pro-socially towards unfamiliar female intruders. Maternal care was not affected by CSI in a standard testing environment, but maternal behavior of CSI females was less disrupted by a male intruder. CSI females were quicker to attack prey and did not differ from control females in their saccharin consumption indicating, respectively, no stress-induced sensory-motor or reward system impairments. Offspring of CSI females exhibited slower growth and expressed more anxiety in social encounters. This study demonstrates continued adult vulnerability to social challenges with an impact specific to social situations for mothers and offspring.

  12. Modeling acclimatization by hybrid systems: condition changes alter biological system behavior models.

    PubMed

    Assar, Rodrigo; Montecino, Martín A; Maass, Alejandro; Sherman, David J

    2014-07-01

    In order to describe the dynamic behavior of a complex biological system, it is useful to combine models integrating processes at different levels and with temporal dependencies. Such combinations are necessary for modeling acclimatization, a phenomenon where changes in environmental conditions can induce drastic changes in the behavior of a biological system. In this article we formalize the use of hybrid systems as a tool to model this kind of biological behavior. A modeling scheme called strong switches is proposed. It allows one to take into account both minor adjustments to the coefficients of a continuous model, and, more interestingly, large-scale changes to the structure of the model. We illustrate the proposed methodology with two applications: acclimatization in wine fermentation kinetics, and acclimatization of osteo-adipo differentiation system linking stimulus signals to bone mass.

  13. Geochemical behavior of rare earth elements of the hydrothermal alterations within the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposits at Balikesir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doner, Zeynep; Abdelnasser, Amr; Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    This work reports the geochemical characteristics and behavior of the rare earth elements (REE) of the hydrothermal alteration of the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au deposit located in the Anatolian tectonic belt at Biga peninsula (Locally Balikesir province), NW Turkey. The Cu-Mo-Au mineralization at this deposit hosted in the hornfels rocks and related to the silicic to intermediate intrusion of Eybek pluton. It locally formed with brecciated zones and quartz vein stockworks, as well as the brittle fracture zones associated with intense hydrothermal alteration. Three main alteration zones with gradual boundaries formed in the mine area in the hornfels rock that represents the host rock, along that contact the Eybek pluton; potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration zones. The potassic alteration zone that formed at the center having high amount of Cu-sulfide minerals contains biotite, muscovite, and sericite with less amount of K-feldspar and associated with tourmalinization alteration. The propylitic alteration surrounds the potassic alteration having high amount of Mo and Au and contains chlorite, albite, epidote, calcite and pyrite. The phyllic alteration zone also surrounds the potassic alteration containing quartz, sericite and pyrite minerals. Based on the REE characteristics and content and when we correlate the Alteration index (AI) with the light REEs and heavy REEs of each alteration zone, it concluded that the light REEs decrease and heavy REEs increase during the alteration processes. The relationships between K2O index with Eu/Eu* and Sr/Sr* reveals a positive correlation in the potassic and phyllic alteration zones and a negative correlation in the propylitic alteration zone. This refers to the hydrothermal solution which is responsible for the studied porphyry deposits and associated potassic and phyllic alterations has a positive Eu and Sr anomaly as well as these elements were added to the altered rock from the hydrothermal solution. Keywords: Rare

  14. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway.

  15. Postnatal undernutrition in rats: attempts to develop alternative methods to food deprive pups without maternal behavioral alteration.

    PubMed

    Codo, W; Carlini, E A

    1979-09-01

    Two methods were investigated as attempts to undernourish rat pups without the disturbances in maternal behavior that accompany the procedures used to date for this purpose. In the 1st method, a litter of 12 pups was raised by both a lactating mother and a "sensitized" female. The sensitized female was provided under the assumption that she could correct for the deficit in maternal care when 1 mother raises a large litter. The results showed that the pups raised by the 2 females were constantly removed by the females from each other's nests; the females engaged in constant fighting and showed altered maternal behavior. As a consequence the pups lost more weight than control underfed young. The 2nd method consisted of removing 6-8 nipples from virgin females which were mated 10 days later. After delivery these females raised litters of 6 pups. Their maternal behavior was equal to that of unoperated controls, and at weaning the pups had 20-50% less body weight. This method could be useful to study undernutrition effects on behavior, without confounding experimental variables.

  16. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Yoshio; Kosugi, Sakurako; Nishikawa, Hiromi; Lin, Ziqiao; Minabe, Yoshio; Toda, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX) to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing) rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates.

  17. Reduced Anxiety-Like Behavior and Altered Hippocampal Morphology in Female p75NTRexon IV−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puschban, Zoe; Sah, Anupam; Grutsch, Isabella; Singewald, Nicolas; Dechant, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in adult basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, precursor cells in the subventricular cell layer and the subgranular cell layer of the hippocampus has been linked to alterations in learning as well as anxiety- and depression- related behaviors. In contrast to previous studies performed in a p75NTRexon III−/− model still expressing the short isoform of the p75NTR, we focused on locomotor and anxiety–associated behavior in p75NTRexon IV−/− mice lacking both p75NTR isoforms. Comparing p75NTRexon IV−/− and wildtype mice for both male and female animals showed an anxiolytic-like behavior as evidenced by increased central activities in the open field paradigm and flex field activity system as well as higher numbers of open arm entries in the elevated plus maze test in female p75NTR knockout mice. Morphometrical analyses of dorsal and ventral hippocampus revealed a reduction of width of the dentate gyrus and the granular cell layer in the dorsal but not ventral hippocampus in male and female p75NTRexon IV−/− mice. We conclude that germ-line deletion of p75NTR seems to differentially affect morphometry of dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus and that p75NTR may play a role in anxiety-like behavior, specifically in female mice. PMID:27313517

  18. Effect of nanohypericum (Hypericum perforatum gold nanoparticles) treatment on restraint stressinduced behavioral and biochemical alteration in male albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, D. Jaya; ArulKumar, S.; Sabesan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Backgorund: Hypericum perforatum extract (HPE), is known for its antidepressant effect. Methods: In the present study we investigated the effect of H. perforatum gold nanoparticles (Nanohypericum-HPGNPs) protective role against restraint stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations in mice. Animals were immobilized for a period of 6 hrs/day. HPE (200 mg/kg) and nanohypericum (20 mg/kg) were administered 30 minutes before the animals were subjected to acute immobilized stress. Behavioral test parameters for anxiety and spatial memory were assessed followed by biochemical parmeters (lipid peroxidation, super oxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, etc.) subsequently. Results: The behavior study showed severe anxiety and memory loss compared to unstressed animals. Biochemical analyses revealed an increase in lipid per oxidation, depletion of super oxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, catalase activity and glutathione per oxidase as compared to unstressed animal. Twenty one days of H. perforatum and nanohypericum treatment in a dose of 200 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively, significantly attenuated restraint stress-induced behavioral and oxidative damage. Conclusion: In conclusion nanohypericum prove the modest activity than the HPE. PMID:21713134

  19. Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Stelinski, Lukasz; Holdcraft, Robert; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Female moths are known to detect their own sex pheromone—a phenomenon called “autodetection”. Autodetection has various effects on female moth behavior, including altering natural circadian rhythm of calling behavior, inducing flight, and in some cases causing aggregations of conspecifics. A proposed hypothesis for the possible evolutionary benefits of autodetection is its possible role as a spacing mechanism to reduce female-female competition. Here, we explore autodetection in two species of tortricids (Grapholita molesta (Busck) and Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris)). We find that females of both species not only “autodetect,” but that learning (change in behavior following experience) occurs, which affects behavior for at least 24 hours after pheromone pre-exposure. Specifically, female calling in both species is advanced at least 24 hours, but not 5 days, following pheromone pre-exposure. Also, the propensity of female moths to initiate flight and the duration of flights, as quantified by a laboratory flight mill, were advanced in pre-exposed females as compared with controls. Pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated moths when they were confined with males in small enclosures over 24 hours in laboratory assays. We discuss the possible implications of these results with respect to management of these known pest species with the use of pheromone-based mating disruption. PMID:26462694

  20. Social Isolation Stress Induces Anxious-Depressive-Like Behavior and Alterations of Neuroplasticity-Related Genes in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Popoli, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a major risk factor in the onset of several neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. Although several studies have shown that social isolation stress during postweaning period induces behavioral and brain molecular changes, the effects of social isolation on behavior during adulthood have been less characterized. Aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between the behavioral alterations and brain molecular changes induced by chronic social isolation stress in adult male mice. Plasma corticosterone levels and adrenal glands weight were also analyzed. Socially isolated (SI) mice showed higher locomotor activity, spent less time in the open field center, and displayed higher immobility time in the tail suspension test compared to group-housed (GH) mice. SI mice exhibited reduced plasma corticosterone levels and reduced difference between right and left adrenal glands. SI showed lower mRNA levels of the BDNF-7 splice variant, c-Fos, Arc, and Egr-1 in both hippocampus and prefrontal cortex compared to GH mice. Finally, SI mice exhibited selectively reduced mGluR1 and mGluR2 levels in the prefrontal cortex. Altogether, these results suggest that anxious- and depressive-like behavior induced by social isolation stress correlates with reduction of several neuroplasticity-related genes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of adult male mice. PMID:26881124

  1. Long-term sex selective hormonal and behavior alterations in mice exposed to low doses of chlorpyrifos in utero.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Julia A; Butz, Daniel E; Porter, Warren P

    2010-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos, O,O-diethyl-O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl) phosphorothioate, is an organophosphate insecticide known to be present in human urine. In utero exposure to chlorpyrifos may cause long-term hormonal and behavior alterations. In this study mice were exposed to 0, 1 or 5mg/kg chlorpyrifos on gestational days 17-20. In utero exposed mice were then tested in a novel foraging behavior maze and assayed for thyroid hormones. Free Thyroxine Index increased significantly in females, but not males. Learning latency and reduced learning ability was evident during training sessions 5-9 in female mice exposed to 1 or 5mg/kg chlorpyrifos. No learning deficiencies were observed in male mice. No differences were seen in behavior when using a standard radial arm maze during the nine training sessions. These data suggest that mice are susceptible to neuro-endocrine reprogramming by chlorpyrifos, and demonstrate the efficacy of the novel foraging maze as an efficient behavior assay tool.

  2. Social Isolation Stress Induces Anxious-Depressive-Like Behavior and Alterations of Neuroplasticity-Related Genes in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Popoli, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a major risk factor in the onset of several neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. Although several studies have shown that social isolation stress during postweaning period induces behavioral and brain molecular changes, the effects of social isolation on behavior during adulthood have been less characterized. Aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between the behavioral alterations and brain molecular changes induced by chronic social isolation stress in adult male mice. Plasma corticosterone levels and adrenal glands weight were also analyzed. Socially isolated (SI) mice showed higher locomotor activity, spent less time in the open field center, and displayed higher immobility time in the tail suspension test compared to group-housed (GH) mice. SI mice exhibited reduced plasma corticosterone levels and reduced difference between right and left adrenal glands. SI showed lower mRNA levels of the BDNF-7 splice variant, c-Fos, Arc, and Egr-1 in both hippocampus and prefrontal cortex compared to GH mice. Finally, SI mice exhibited selectively reduced mGluR1 and mGluR2 levels in the prefrontal cortex. Altogether, these results suggest that anxious- and depressive-like behavior induced by social isolation stress correlates with reduction of several neuroplasticity-related genes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of adult male mice.

  3. Behavioral Phenotype of Fmr1 Knock-Out Mice during Active Phase in an Altered Light/Dark Cycle.

    PubMed

    Saré, R Michelle; Levine, Merlin; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and is a disorder that is also highly associated with autism. FXS occurs as a result of an expanded CGG repeat sequence leading to transcriptional silencing. In an animal model of FXS in which Fmr1 is knocked out (Fmr1 KO), many physical, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of the human disease are recapitulated. Prior characterization of the mouse model was conducted during the day, the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. Circadian rhythms are an important contributor to behavior and may play a role in the study of disease phenotype. Moreover, changes in the parameters of circadian rhythm are known to occur in FXS animal models. We conducted an investigation of key behavioral phenotypes in Fmr1 KO mice during their active phase. We report that phase did not alter the Fmr1 KO phenotype in open field activity, anxiety, and learning and memory. There was a slight effect of phase on social behavior as measured by time in chamber, but not by time spent sniffing. Our data strengthen the existing data characterizing the phenotype of Fmr1 KO mice, indicating that it is independent of circadian phase.

  4. The Use of Simultaneous Feedback to Alter Teaching Behaviors of University Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyquist, Jody L.; Wulff, Donald H.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers used simultaneous feedback, a means of modifying behavior through verbal cues transmitted via a transistorized ear plug, to improve the teaching skills of university faculty engaged in the act of teaching. Faculty identified areas they wished to improve after viewing videotapes of their teaching. (Authors/PP)

  5. Targeting the-Dopaminergic Nervous System: Altering Behavior in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish (Dania rerio) are becoming an important model system in studying the effects of environmental chemicals on behavior. In order to develop a rapid in vivo screen to prioritize toxic chemicals, we have begun assessing the acute locomotor effects of drugs that act on the do...

  6. Diet induced alterations in gastrointestinal bacterial populations affect memory and learning behavior in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of dietary manipulation to influence learning and behavior is well recognized. While the mechanism of action is almost exclusively interpreted as direct effects of dietary constituents on neural functioning within the central nervous system (CNS), the role of dietary modification on bact...

  7. Host behavior alters spiny lobster-viral disease dynamics: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Thomas W; Butler, Mark J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Social behavior confers numerous benefits to animals but also risks, among them an increase in the spread of pathogenic diseases. We examined the trade-off between risk of predation and disease transmission under different scenarios of host spatial structure and disease avoidance behavior using a spatially explicit, individual-based model of the host pathogen interaction between juvenile Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) and Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1). Spiny lobsters are normally social but modify their behavior to avoid diseased conspecifics, a potentially effective means of reducing transmission but one rarely observed in the wild. We found that without lobster avoidance of diseased conspecifics, viral outbreaks grew in intensity and duration in simulations until the virus was maintained continuously at unrealistically high levels. However, when we invoked disease avoidance at empirically observed levels, the intensity and duration of outbreaks was reduced and the disease extirpated within five years. Increased lobster (host) spatial aggregation mimicking that which occurs when sponge shelters for lobsters are diminished by harmful algal blooms, did not significantly increase PaV1 transmission or persistence in lobster populations. On the contrary, behavioral aversion of diseased conspecifics effectively reduced viral prevalence, even when shelters were limited, which reduced shelter availability for all lobsters but increased predation, especially of infected lobsters. Therefore, avoidance of diseased conspecifics selects against transmission by contact, promotes alternative modes of transmission, and results in a more resilient host-pathogen system.

  8. Brief Report: Altered Social Behavior in Isolation-Reared "Fmr1" Knockout Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzer, Andrew M.; Roth, Alexandra K.; Nawrocki, Lauren; Wrenn, Craige C.; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Social behavior abnormalities in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are characterized by social withdrawal, anxiety, and deficits in social cognition. To assess these deficits, a model of FXS, the "Fmr1" knockout mouse ("Fmr1" KO), has been utilized. This mouse model has a null mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene ("Fmr1") and displays…

  9. Altering Misperception of Sleep in Insomnia: Behavioral Experiment Versus Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Nicole K. Y.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight individuals with insomnia were asked to wear an actigraph and keep a sleep diary for 2 nights. On the following day, half were shown the discrepancy between the data recorded on the actigraph and their sleep diary via a behavioral experiment, whereas the other half were told of the discrepancy verbally. Participants were then asked to…

  10. Heat Stress Alters Ruminal Fermentation and Digesta Characteristics, and Behavior in Lactating Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a study designed to assess the impact and interaction of nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) and ruminally degradable protein (RDP) on ruminal characteristics and animal behavior, animals experienced heat stress in the first period (HS), and no/greatly reduced heat stress (NHS) in the second period, all...

  11. Chronic cocaine or ethanol exposure during adolescence alters novelty-related behaviors in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Kirstie H; Kirstein, Cheryl L

    2007-04-01

    Adolescence is a time of high-risk behavior and increased exploration. This developmental period is marked by a greater probability to initiate drug use and is associated with an increased risk to develop addiction and adulthood dependency and drug use at this time is associated with an increased risk. Human adolescents are predisposed toward an increased likelihood of risk-taking behaviors [Zuckerman M. Sensation seeking and the endogenous deficit theory of drug abuse. NIDA Res Monogr 1986;74:59-70.], including drug use or initiation. In the present study, adolescent animals were exposed to twenty days of either saline (0.9% sodium chloride), cocaine (20 mg/kg) or ethanol (1 g/kg) i.p. followed by a fifteen-day washout period. All animals were tested as adults on several behavioral measures including locomotor activity induced by a novel environment, time spent in the center of an open field, novelty preference and novel object exploration. Animals exposed to cocaine during adolescence and tested as adults exhibited a greater locomotor response in a novel environment, spent less time in the center of the novel open field and spent less time with a novel object, results that are indicative of a stress or anxiogenic response to novelty or a novel situation. Adolescent animals chronically administered ethanol and tested as adults, unlike cocaine-exposed were not different from controls in a novel environment, indicated by locomotor activity or time spent with a novel object. However, ethanol-exposed animals approached the novel object more, suggesting that exposure to ethanol during development may result in less-inhibited behaviors during adulthood. The differences in adult behavioral responses after drug exposure during adolescence are likely due to differences in the mechanisms of action of the drugs and subsequent reward and/or stress responsivity. Future studies are needed to determine the neural substrates of these long lasting drug-induced changes.

  12. Altered Neural and Behavioral Dynamics in Huntington's Disease: An Entropy Conservation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S. Lee; Barton, Scott J.; Rebec, George V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited condition that results in neurodegeneration of the striatum, the forebrain structure that processes cortical information for behavioral output. In the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD, striatal neurons exhibit aberrant firing patterns that are coupled with reduced flexibility in the motor system. The aim of this study was to test the patterns of unpredictability in brain and behavior in wild-type (WT) and R6/2 mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Striatal local field potentials (LFP) were recorded from 18 WT and 17 R6/2 mice (aged 8–11 weeks) while the mice were exploring a plus-shaped maze. We targeted LFP activity for up to 2 s before and 2 s after each choice-point entry. Approximate Entropy (ApEn) was calculated for LFPs and Shannon Entropy was used to measure the probability of arm choice, as well as the likelihood of making consecutive 90-degree turns in the maze. We found that although the total number of choice-point crossings and entropy of arm-choice probability was similar in both groups, R6/2 mice had more predictable behavioral responses (i.e., were less likely to make 90-degree turns and perform them in alternation with running straight down the same arm), while exhibiting more unpredictable striatal activity, as indicated by higher ApEn values. In both WT and R6/2 mice, however, behavioral unpredictability was negatively correlated with LFP ApEn. Conclusions/Significance HD results in a perseverative exploration of the environment, occurring in concert with more unpredictable brain activity. Our results support the entropy conservation hypothesis in which unpredictable behavioral patterns are coupled with more predictable brain activation patterns, suggesting that this may be a fundamental process unaffected by HD. PMID:22292068

  13. Alterations in affective behavior during the time course of alcohol hangover.

    PubMed

    Karadayian, Analía G; Busso, María J; Feleder, Carlos; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2013-09-15

    Alcohol hangover is a temporary state described as the unpleasant next-day effects after binge-like drinking. Hangover begins when ethanol is absent in plasma and is characterized by physical and psychological symptoms. Affective behavior is impaired during the acute phase of alcohol intoxication; however, no reports indicate if similar effects are observed during withdrawal. The aim of this work was to study the time-extension and possible fluctuations in affective behavior during a hangover episode. Male Swiss mice were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8g/kg BW) (hangover group). Anxiety, fear-related behavior and despair phenotype were evaluated at a basal point (ZT0) and every 2h up to 20h after blood alcohol levels were close to zero (hangover onset). Also, anhedonia signs and pain perception disabilities were studied. Mice exhibited an increase in anxiety-like behavior during 4h and 14h after hangover onset when evaluated by the elevated-plus maze and open field test respectively (p<0.05). Fear-related behavior was detected in hangover animals by the increase of freezing and decrease of line crossings and rearing frequency during 16h after hangover onset (p<0.001). Depression signs were found in hangover mice during 14h (p<0.05). Hangover mice showed a significant decrease in pain perception when tested by tail immersion test at the beginning of hangover (p<0.05). Our findings demonstrate a time-extension between 14 and 16h for hangover affective impairments. This study shows the long lasting effects of hangover over the phase of ethanol intoxication.

  14. Altered behavioral and neural responsiveness to counterfactual gains in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tobia, Michael J; Guo, Rong; Gläscher, Jan; Schwarze, Ulrike; Brassen, Stefanie; Büchel, Christian; Obermayer, Klaus; Sommer, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Counterfactual information processing refers to the consideration of events that did not occur in comparison to those actually experienced, in order to determine optimal actions, and can be formulated as computational learning signals, referred to as fictive prediction errors. Decision making and the neural circuitry for counterfactual processing are altered in healthy elderly adults. This experiment investigated age differences in neural systems for decision making with knowledge of counterfactual outcomes. Two groups of healthy adult participants, young (N = 30; ages 19-30 years) and elderly (N = 19; ages 65-80 years), were scanned with fMRI during 240 trials of a strategic sequential investment task in which a particular strategy of differentially weighting counterfactual gains and losses during valuation is associated with more optimal performance. Elderly participants earned significantly less than young adults, differently weighted counterfactual consequences and exploited task knowledge, and exhibited altered activity in a fronto-striatal circuit while making choices, compared to young adults. The degree to which task knowledge was exploited was positively correlated with modulation of neural activity by expected value in the vmPFC for young adults, but not in the elderly. These findings demonstrate that elderly participants' poor task performance may be related to different counterfactual processing.

  15. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

  16. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-05-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution.

  17. Chronic Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Exposure Alters Corticotropin Releasing Factor Expression and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BNST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  18. Chronic anabolic androgenic steroid exposure alters corticotropin releasing factor expression and anxiety-like behaviors in the female mouse.

    PubMed

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-11-01

    In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BnST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST.

  19. Modulation of fibronectin gene expression in human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, K; Martinet, Y; Crystal, R G

    1987-01-01

    Under some conditions, mononuclear phagocytes spontaneously synthesize and release fibronectin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein with versatile effects on cell-matrix interactions. To gain insight into the processes that modulate the level of fibronectin secretion by these cells, we used monocytes, in vitro matured monocytes and alveolar macrophages as models to compare fibronectin mRNA levels and fibronectin secretion in a variety of circumstances. Using Northern analysis and dot-blot analysis with a 32P-labeled human fibronectin cDNA probe, we evaluated steady-state mRNA levels and a human fibronectin-specific ELISA was used to evaluate fibronectin secretion. In all cases the amounts of fibronectin secreted paralleled fibronectin mRNA levels. Specifically (a) when fibronectin mRNA was undetectable, as in the case of normal blood monocytes, no fibronectin was secreted, but whenever fibronectin mRNA was present, as in normal alveolar macrophages, fibronectin was secreted by the cells; (b) as monocytes matured into macrophages in vitro, the cells began to express fibronectin mRNA and the cells secreted fibronectin; (c) when alveolar macrophages were activated with surface stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or immune complexes, fibronectin mRNA levels decreased and in parallel, the cells secreted less fibronectin; (d) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), alveolar macrophages contained severalfold more fibronectin mRNA transcripts that normal and the cells spontaneously secreted severalfold more fibronectin than normal; and (e) when IPF alveolar macrophages were placed in culture the fibronectin mRNA levels in the cells decreased with time, and concurrently the amounts of fibronectin produced per unit time continually decreased. The observation of a strict concordance of fibronectin mRNA levels and fibronectin release by mononuclear phagocytes suggests that, at least in many circumstances, fibronectin secretion by mononuclear phagocytes is controlled by

  20. Persistent behavioral impairments and alterations of brain dopamine system after early postnatal administration of thimerosal in rats.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Meyza, Ksenia; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2011-09-30

    The neurotoxic organomercurial thimerosal (THIM), used for decades as vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the pathogenesis of some neurodevelopmental disorders. Previously we showed that neonatal administration of THIM at doses equivalent to those used in infant vaccines or higher, causes lasting alterations in the brain opioid system in rats. Here we investigated neonatal treatment with THIM (at doses 12, 240, 1440 and 3000 μg Hg/kg) on behaviors, which are characteristically altered in autism, such as locomotor activity, anxiety, social interactions, spatial learning, and on the brain dopaminergic system in Wistar rats of both sexes. Adult male and female rats, which were exposed to the entire range of THIM doses during the early postnatal life, manifested impairments of locomotor activity and increased anxiety/neophobia in the open field test. In animals of both sexes treated with the highest THIM dose, the frequency of prosocial interactions was reduced, while the frequency of asocial/antisocial interactions was increased in males, but decreased in females. Neonatal THIM treatment did not significantly affect spatial learning and memory. THIM-exposed rats also manifested reduced haloperidol-induced catalepsy, accompanied by a marked decline in the density of striatal D₂ receptors, measured by immunohistochemical staining, suggesting alterations to the brain dopaminergic system. Males were more sensitive than females to some neurodisruptive/neurotoxic actions of THIM. These data document that early postnatal THIM administration causes lasting neurobehavioral impairments and neurochemical alterations in the brain, dependent on dose and sex. If similar changes occur in THIM/mercurial-exposed children, they could contribute do neurodevelopmental disorders.

  1. Selective behavioral alterations on addition of a 4'-phenyl group to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Seale, T W; Niekrasz, I; Chang, F; Singh, S; Basmadjian, G P

    1996-01-31

    We synthesized a cocaine analog in which a phenyl group was added at the para-position of the benzene ring of cocaine. This substitution caused a modest reduction (four-fold compared with cocaine) in binding potency for the primate (Papio) dopamine transporter as judged by displacement of [3H]WIN 35,428 binding from caudate/putamen membranes. Behavioral effects of this structural modification in the mouse were complex and selective, comprising absence of stimulation of locomotor activity, enhanced inhibition of locomotion and reduced lethal potency. Convulsant potency was unaltered. Substituents at the 4'-position of cocaine are important in its actions. Simple changes in the chemical structure of this drug may produce complex and selective changes in its neurochemical and behavioral actions.

  2. Relationship between dopamine deficit and the expression of depressive behavior resulted from alteration of serotonin system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minkyung; Ryu, Young Hoon; Cho, Won Gil; Kang, Yeo Wool; Lee, Soo Jin; Jeon, Tae Joo; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Kim, Chul Hoon; Kim, Dong Goo; Lee, Kyochul; Choi, Tae Hyun; Choi, Jae Yong

    2015-09-01

    Depression frequently accompanies in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous research suggested that dopamine (DA) and serotonin systems are closely linked with depression in PD. However, comprehensive studies about the relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems are limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of dopaminergic destruction on the serotonin system. The interconnection between motor and depression was also examined. Two PET scans were performed in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned and sham operated rats: [(18) F]FP-CIT for DA transporters and [(18) F]Mefway for serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors. Here, 6-OHDA is a neurotoxin for dopaminergic neurons. Behavioral tests were used to evaluate the severity of symptoms: rotational number for motor impairment and immobility time, acquired from the forced swim test for depression. Region-of-interests were drawn in the striatum and cerebellum for the DA system and hippocampus and cerebellum for the 5-HT system. The cerebellum was chosen as a reference region. Nondisplaceable binding potential in the striatum and hippocampus were compared between 6-OHDA and sham groups. As a result, the degree of DA depletion was negatively correlated with rotational behavior (R(2)  = 0.79, P = 0.003). In 6-OHDA lesioned rats, binding values for 5-HT(1A) receptors was 22% lower than the sham operated group. This decrement of 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was also correlated with the severity of depression (R(2)  = 0.81, P = 0.006). Taken together, this research demonstrated that the destruction of dopaminergic system causes the reduction of the serotonergic system resulting in the expression of depressive behavior. The degree of dopaminergic dysfunction was positively correlated with the impairment of the serotonin system. Severity of motor symptoms was also closely related to depressive behavior.

  3. Determining the phagocytic activity of clinical antibody samples.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Elizabeth G; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Licht, Anna F; Eusebio, Justin R; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2011-11-30

    Antibody-driven phagocytosis is induced via the engagement of Fc receptors on professional phagocytes, and can contribute to both clearance as well as pathology of disease. While the properties of the variable domains of antibodies have long been considered critical to in vivo function, the ability of antibodies to recruit innate immune cells via their Fc domains has become increasingly appreciated as a major factor in their efficacy, both in the setting of recombinant monoclonal antibody therapy, as well as in the course of natural infection or vaccination(1-3). Importantly, despite its nomenclature as a constant domain, the antibody Fc domain does not have constant function, and is strongly modulated by IgG subclass (IgG1-4) and glycosylation at Asparagine 297(4-6). Thus, this method to study functional differences of antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples will facilitate correlation of the phagocytic potential of antibodies to disease state, susceptibility to infection, progression, or clinical outcome. Furthermore, this effector function is particularly important in light of the documented ability of antibodies to enhance infection by providing pathogens access into host cells via Fc receptor-driven phagocytosis(7). Additionally, there is some evidence that phagocytic uptake of immune complexes can impact the Th1/Th2 polarization of the immune response(8). Here, we describe an assay designed to detect differences in antibody-induced phagocytosis, which may be caused by differential IgG subclass, glycan structure at Asn297, as well as the ability to form immune complexes of antigen-specific antibodies in a high-throughput fashion. To this end, 1 μm fluorescent beads are coated with antigen, then incubated with clinical antibody samples, generating fluorescent antigen specific immune complexes. These antibody-opsonized beads are then incubated with a monocytic cell line expressing multiple FcγRs, including both inhibitory and activating. Assay output

  4. Differentiation and heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system.

    PubMed

    Hume, D A

    2008-11-01

    Cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) are found in large numbers in every organ of the body, where they contribute to innate and acquired immunity and homeostasis. This review considers the locations of MPS cells, surface markers that distinguish subsets of monocytes and macrophages, the pathways of MPS differentiation, and the growth factors and transcription factors that guide them. Although the number of MPS sub-populations that can be defined is infinite, the features that unite the MPS remain compelling. Those features clearly include antigen-presenting dendritic cells within the MPS and argue against any basis for separating them from macrophages.

  5. Role of Peroxide in Phagocytic Killing of Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Jane; Bernheimer, Harriet P.

    1974-01-01

    Two mutants of a pneumococcus type I with diminished peroxide production were selected from a population of nitrosoguanidine-treated cells. White cells of normal patients killed the mutant pneumococci as well as the otherwise isogenic wild-type strain. In patients studied with chronic granulomatous disease, however, the peroxide-poor strain was killed far less well than the wild type. These studies indicate that the removal of a peroxide-generating system in the phagocytic vacuole specifically brings forth the killing defect in chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:4148725

  6. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  7. Smart Home-Based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Abdelsalam; Cook, Diane J.; Schmalz, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Background Researchers and medical practitioners have long sought the ability to continuously and automatically monitor patients beyond the confines of a doctor's office. We describe a smart home monitoring and analysis platform that facilitates the automatic gathering of rich databases of behavioral information in a manner that is transparent to the patient. Collected information will be automatically or manually analyzed and reported to the caregivers and may be interpreted for behavioral modification in the patient. Method Our health platform consists of five technology layers. The architecture is designed to be flexible, extensible, and transparent, to support plug-and-play operation of new devices and components, and to provide remote monitoring and programming opportunities. Results The smart home-based health platform technologies have been tested in two physical smart environments. Data that are collected in these implemented physical layers are processed and analyzed by our activity recognition and chewing classification algorithms. All of these components have yielded accurate analyses for subjects in the smart environment test beds. Conclusions This work represents an important first step in the field of smart environment-based health monitoring and assistance. The architecture can be used to monitor the activity, diet, and exercise compliance of diabetes patients and evaluate the effects of alternative medicine and behavior regimens. We believe these technologies are essential for providing accessible, low-cost health assistance in an individual's own home and for providing the best possible quality of life for individuals with diabetes. PMID:20046657

  8. Male-like behavioral patterns and physiological alterations induced by androgenic gland implantation in female crayfish.

    PubMed

    Barki, Assaf; Karplus, Ilan; Khalaila, Isam; Manor, Rivka; Sagi, Amir

    2003-06-01

    The androgenic gland (AG) has been shown to regulate male sexual differentiation and secondary male characteristics in Crustacea. This study presents for the first time in crustaceans evidence for masculinization effects of the AG on reproductive behavior, in addition to morpho-anatomical and physiological effects. AG implantation into immature female red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus inhibited secondary vitellogenesis and development of the ovaries, as well as morphological traits that facilitate maternal egg brooding; it also caused the appearance of secondary male characteristics. However, primary male characteristics and a masculine reproductive system were not developed. In pair encounters, aggression was substantially lower in interactions between AG-implanted and intact females than in interactions within AG-implanted or intact pairs. Moreover, elements of mating behavior, i.e. male courtship displays and false copulations, were exhibited by AG-implanted females in several encounters with intact females. In addition to known morpho-anatomical and physiological effects of the AG in crustaceans, the present study suggests that the AG has novel effects on the neural network that generates social behavior.

  9. Loss of rostral brainstem cholinergic activity results in decreased ultrasonic vocalization behavior and altered sensorimotor gating.

    PubMed

    Machold, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    The parabigeminal (PBG), pedunculopontine (PPTg), and laterodorsal tegmental (LDTg) nuclei located in the rostral brainstem are the primary sources of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) for the midbrain and thalamus, and as part of the ascending reticular activating system, these cholinergic signaling pathways regulate mouse behavioral responses to sensory stimuli. Here, I report that mice harboring a conditional deletion of ACh synthesis specifically within these nuclei (ChAT(En1 KO)) exhibit decreased ultrasonic vocalizations both as pups and adults, consistent with their previously reported hypoactivity when exploring the novel environment of the open field arena. Furthermore, in prepulse inhibition (PPI) tests, ChAT(En1 KO) animals exhibited increased sensorimotor gating in comparison to control littermates. These data suggest that ACh signaling arising from the rostral brainstem modulates animal behavior in part by tuning the levels of sensorimotor gating. Thus, the net effect of this cholinergic activity is to increase sensitivity to environmental stimuli, and loss of this pathway contributes to the hypoactivity in these mutants by raising the sensory threshold for eliciting exploratory behaviors.

  10. Bioconcentration of phenanthrene and metabolites in bile and behavioral alterations in the tropical estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara.

    PubMed

    Torreiro-Melo, Anny Gabrielle A G; Silva, Juliana Scanoni; Bianchini, Adalto; Zanardi-Lamardo, Eliete; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Martins

    2015-08-01

    Quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites in fish bile is widely used to evaluate levels of internal PAH contamination in fish, whereas behavioral effects are deemed important to address potential risks to fish populations. The estuarine guppy Poecilia vivipara was exposed for 96h to waterborne phenanthrene at concentrations of 10, 50, 200 and 500μgL(-1). Phenanthrene and metabolites in bile were analyzed by fixed fluorescence at 260/380nm (excitation/emission) wavelengths. Phenanthrene increased in the bile of exposed fish in a dose-dependent pattern, and log bile bioconcentration factors ranged from 4.3 to 3.9 at 10 and 500μgL(-1) phenanthrene, respectively, values that are similar to predicted bioconcentration factors based on phenanthrene Kow. Swimming resistance index was reduced to 81% of control values at 500μgL(-1). Alteration of swimming speed was non monotonic, with a significant speed increase relative to control fish in treatments 50 and 200μgL(-1) phenanthrene, respectively, followed by a speed decrease in fish exposed to 500μgL(-1). However, swimming trajectories of fish exposed to 50, 200 and 500μgL(-1) was altered by the development of a repetitive circular swimming behavior, in contrast to the controls that explored the entire experimental arena. This change in swimming patterns apparently explains the reduction in prey capture rates at 200μgL(-1) phenanthrene. This study provides important information enabling the use of the estuarine guppy P. vivipara to monitor PAH metabolites in bile and its bioconcentration, linking internal exposure with ecologically relevant behavioral effects in the species.

  11. Broken or maladaptive? Altered trajectories in neuroinflammation and behavior after early life adversity

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Prabarna; Brenhouse, Heather C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to adversity and stress early in development yields vulnerability to mental illnesses throughout the lifespan. Growing evidence suggests that this vulnerability has mechanistic origins involving aberrant development of both neurocircuitry and neuro-immune activity. Here we review the current understanding of when and how stress exposure initiates neuroinflammatory events that interact with brain development. We first review how early life adversity has been associated with various psychopathologies, and how neuroinflammation plays a role in these pathologies. We then summarize data and resultant hypotheses describing how early life adversity may particularly alter neuro-immune development with psychiatric consequences. Finally, we review how sex differences contribute to individualistic vulnerabilities across the lifespan. We submit the importance of understanding how stress during early development might cause outright neural or glial damage, as well as experience-dependent plasticity that may insufficiently prepare an individual for sex-specific or life-stage specific challenges. PMID:25081071

  12. Functional defects in phagocytic cells following thermal injury. Application of flow cytometric analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Duque, R. E.; Phan, S. H.; Hudson, J. L.; Till, G. O.; Ward, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Defective phagocytic cell function may partially account for the morbidity and mortality associated with thermal injury. In experimental thermal injury in the rat, small circulating blood volumes increase the difficulty in obtaining significant data. Furthermore, purification and or elicitation procedures have the potential for altering the cell surface characteristics and/or the functional response of the cell in question. We have examined the circulating neutrophils and pulmonary alveolar macrophages of anesthetized rats following a 16-20% body surface area scald injury to the shaved back. The circulating neutrophils of thermally injured rats were examined by flow cytometry following stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (100 ng/ml) in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity of the potentiometric cyanine dye, dipentyloxocarboxyanine and the formation of the oxidized product of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate-loaded cells. The alveolar macrophages were examined after stimulation with PMA (100 ng/ml) in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity of the potentiometric dye, dipropylthiodicarbocyanine and the generation of superoxide production, as assessed by the superoxide dismutase inhibitable reduction of cytochrome c. Both cells exhibited a profound inhibition of cell function 4 hours after the insult, with partial return toward control values at later time points. Furthermore, the plasma of thermally injured rats, 4 hours after the burn was inhibitory to normal rat neutrophils. Fluorescent compounds suggestive of in vivo lipid peroxidation were maximally detectable at this time point. Further research is needed to establish the role of these products in the induction of phagocytic cell dysfunction. PMID:2981471

  13. Developmental fluoxetine exposure increases behavioral despair and alters epigenetic regulation of the hippocampal BDNF gene in adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Fabien; Pawluski, Jodi L; Homberg, Judith R; Machiels, Barbie; Kroeze, Yvet; Kumar, Neha; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Kenis, Gunter; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of infants are exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications during the perinatal period. Perinatal exposure to SSRI medications alter neuroplasticity and increase depressive- and anxiety-related behaviors, particularly in male offspring as little work has been done in female offspring to date. The long-term effects of SSRI on development can also differ with previous exposure to prenatal stress, a model of maternal depression. Because of the limited work done on the role of developmental SSRI exposure on neurobehavioral outcomes in female offspring, the aim of the present study was to investigate how developmental fluoxetine exposure affects anxiety and depression-like behavior, as well as the regulation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the hippocampus of adult female offspring. To do this female Sprague-Dawley rat offspring were exposed to prenatal stress and fluoxetine via the dam, for a total of four groups of female offspring: 1) No Stress+Vehicle, 2) No Stress+Fluoxetine, 3) Prenatal Stress+Vehicle, and 4) Prenatal Stress+Fluoxetine. Primary results show that, in adult female offspring, developmental SSRI exposure significantly increases behavioral despair measures on the forced swim test, decreases hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels, and increases levels of the repressive histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylated mark at the corresponding promoter. There was also a significant negative correlation between hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels and immobility in the forced swim test. No effects of prenatal stress or developmental fluoxetine exposure were seen on tests of anxiety-like behavior. This research provides important evidence for the long-term programming effects of early-life exposure to SSRIs on female offspring, particularily with regard to affect-related behaviors and their underlying molecular mechanisms.

  14. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test.

  15. Rearrangement of the dendritic morphology in limbic regions and altered exploratory behavior in a rat model of autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Bringas, M E; Carvajal-Flores, F N; López-Ramírez, T A; Atzori, M; Flores, G

    2013-06-25

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a blocker of histone deacetylase widely used to treat epilepsy, bipolar disorders, and migraine; its administration during pregnancy increases the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the child. Thus, prenatal VPA exposure has emerged as a rodent model of ASD. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of prenatal administration of VPA (500mg/kg) at E12.5 on the exploratory behavior and locomotor activity in a novel environment, as well as on neuronal morphological rearrangement in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), in the hippocampus, in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) at three different ages: immediately after weaning (postnatal day 21 [PD21]), prepubertal (PD35) and postpubertal (PD70) ages. Hyper-locomotion was observed in a novel environment in VPA animals at PD21 and PD70. Interestingly, exploratory behavior assessed by the hole board test at PD70 showed a reduced frequency but an increase in the duration of head-dippings in VPA-animals compared to vehicle-treated animals. In addition, the latency to the first head-dip was longer in prenatal VPA-treated animals at PD70. Quantitative morphological analysis of dendritic spine density revealed a reduced number of spines at PD70 in the PFC, dorsal hippocampus and BLA, with an increase in the dendritic spine density in NAcc and ventral hippocampus, in prenatal VPA-treated rats. In addition, at PD70 increases in neuronal arborization were observed in the NAcc, layer 3 of the PFC, and BLA, with retracted neuronal arborization in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus. Our results extend the list of altered behaviors (exploratory behavior) detected in this model of ASD, and indicate that the VPA behavioral phenotype is accompanied by previously undescribed morphological rearrangement in limbic regions.

  16. Altered Behavioral Performance and Live Imaging of Circuit-Specific Neural Deficiencies in a Zebrafish Model for Psychomotor Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Vatine, Gad David; Appelbaum, Lior

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms and treatment of psychomotor retardation, which includes motor and cognitive impairment, are indefinite. The Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS) is an X-linked psychomotor retardation characterized by delayed development, severe intellectual disability, muscle hypotonia, and spastic paraplegia, in combination with disturbed thyroid hormone (TH) parameters. AHDS has been associated with mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (mct8/slc16a2) gene, which is a TH transporter. In order to determine the pathophysiological mechanisms of AHDS, MCT8 knockout mice were intensively studied. Although these mice faithfully replicated the abnormal serum TH levels, they failed to exhibit the neurological and behavioral symptoms of AHDS patients. Here, we generated an mct8 mutant (mct8−/−) zebrafish using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated targeted gene editing system. The elimination of MCT8 decreased the expression levels of TH receptors; however, it did not affect the expression of other TH-related genes. Similar to human patients, mct8−/− larvae exhibited neurological and behavioral deficiencies. High-throughput behavioral assays demonstrated that mct8−/− larvae exhibited reduced locomotor activity, altered response to external light and dark transitions and an increase in sleep time. These deficiencies in behavioral performance were associated with altered expression of myelin-related genes and neuron-specific deficiencies in circuit formation. Time-lapse imaging of single-axon arbors and synapses in live mct8−/− larvae revealed a reduction in filopodia dynamics and axon branching in sensory neurons and decreased synaptic density in motor neurons. These phenotypes enable assessment of the therapeutic potential of three TH analogs that can enter the cells in the absence of MCT8. The TH analogs restored the myelin and axon outgrowth deficiencies in mct8−/− larvae. These findings suggest a mechanism by which MCT8 regulates neural

  17. Altered behavioral performance and live imaging of circuit-specific neural deficiencies in a zebrafish model for psychomotor retardation.

    PubMed

    Zada, David; Tovin, Adi; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Vatine, Gad David; Appelbaum, Lior

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms and treatment of psychomotor retardation, which includes motor and cognitive impairment, are indefinite. The Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS) is an X-linked psychomotor retardation characterized by delayed development, severe intellectual disability, muscle hypotonia, and spastic paraplegia, in combination with disturbed thyroid hormone (TH) parameters. AHDS has been associated with mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (mct8/slc16a2) gene, which is a TH transporter. In order to determine the pathophysiological mechanisms of AHDS, MCT8 knockout mice were intensively studied. Although these mice faithfully replicated the abnormal serum TH levels, they failed to exhibit the neurological and behavioral symptoms of AHDS patients. Here, we generated an mct8 mutant (mct8-/-) zebrafish using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated targeted gene editing system. The elimination of MCT8 decreased the expression levels of TH receptors; however, it did not affect the expression of other TH-related genes. Similar to human patients, mct8-/- larvae exhibited neurological and behavioral deficiencies. High-throughput behavioral assays demonstrated that mct8-/- larvae exhibited reduced locomotor activity, altered response to external light and dark transitions and an increase in sleep time. These deficiencies in behavioral performance were associated with altered expression of myelin-related genes and neuron-specific deficiencies in circuit formation. Time-lapse imaging of single-axon arbors and synapses in live mct8-/- larvae revealed a reduction in filopodia dynamics and axon branching in sensory neurons and decreased synaptic density in motor neurons. These phenotypes enable assessment of the therapeutic potential of three TH analogs that can enter the cells in the absence of MCT8. The TH analogs restored the myelin and axon outgrowth deficiencies in mct8-/- larvae. These findings suggest a mechanism by which MCT8 regulates neural circuit assembly

  18. Dengue Virus-1 Infection Did Not Alter the Behavioral Response of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) to DEET.

    PubMed

    Sugiharto, Victor A; Murphy, Jittawadee R; Turell, Michael J; Olsen, Cara H; Stewart, V Ann; Colacicco-Mayhugh, Michelle G; Grieco, John P; Achee, Nicole L

    2016-05-01

    No licensed vaccine or antiviral drug against dengue virus (DENV) is available; therefore, most of the effort to prevent this disease is focused on reducing vector-host interactions. One of the most widely accepted methods of blocking vector-human contact is to use insect repellents to interfere with mosquito host-seeking behavior. Some arboviruses can replicate in the nervous system of the vector, raising the concern that arboviral infection may alter the insect behavioral response toward chemical stimuli. Three different Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquito cohorts: DENV-1-injected, diluent-injected, and uninjected were subjected to behavioral tests using a high-throughput screening system with 2.5% DEET and 0.14% DEET on 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, and 17 d postinjection. All test cohorts exhibited significant contact irritant or escape responses when they were exposed to 2.5% or 0.14% DEET. However, we found no biologically relevant irritancy response change in DENV-1-infected Ae. aegypti mosquitoes when they were exposed to DEET. Further studies evaluating the effects of other arboviral infections on insect repellents activity are necessary in order to provide better recommendation on the prevention of vector-borne disease transmission.

  19. Lack of thyroid hormone receptor alpha1 is associated with selective alterations in behavior and hippocampal circuits.

    PubMed

    Guadaño-Ferraz, A; Benavides-Piccione, R; Venero, C; Lancha, C; Vennström, B; Sandi, C; DeFelipe, J; Bernal, J

    2003-01-01

    Brain development and function are dependent on thyroid hormone (T3), which acts through nuclear hormone receptors. T3 receptors (TRs) are transcription factors that activate or suppress target gene expression in a hormone-dependent or -independent fashion. Two distinct genes, TRalpha and TRbeta, encode several receptor isoforms with specific functions defined in many tissues but not in the brain. Mutations in the TRbeta gene cause the syndrome of peripheral resistance to thyroid hormone; however, no alterations of the TRalpha gene have been described in humans. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking the TRalpha1 isoform display behavioral abnormalities of hippocampal origin, as shown by the open field and fear conditioning tests. In the open field test mutant mice revealed less exploratory behavior than wild-type mice. In the contextual fear conditioning test mutant mice showed a significantly higher freezing response than wild-type controls when tested 1 week after training. These findings correlated with fewer GABAergic terminals on the CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mutant mice. Our results indicate that TRalpha1 is involved in the regulation of hippocampal structure and function, and raise the possibility that deletions or mutations of this receptor isoform may lead to behavioral changes or even psychiatric syndromes in humans.

  20. Neonatal status epilepticus alters prefrontal-striatal circuitry and enhances methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Chao; Huang, Li-Tung; Huang, Ya-Ni; Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2009-02-01

    Neonatal seizures may alter the developing neurocircuitry and cause behavioral abnormalities in adulthood. We found that rats previously subjected to lithium-pilocarpine (LiPC)-induced neonatal status epilepticus (NeoSE) exhibited enhanced behavioral sensitization to methamphetamine (MA) in adolescence. Neurochemically, dopamine (DA) and metabolites were markedly decreased in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and insignificantly changed in striatum by NeoSE, but were increased in both PFC and striatum by NeoSE+MA. Glutamate levels were increased in both PFC and striatum in the NeoSE+MA group. DA turnover, an index of utilization and activity, was increased by NeoSE but reversed by MA in PFC. Gene expression of the regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) was downregulated in PFC and striatum by NeoSE and further suppressed by MA. These findings suggest NeoSE affects both dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems in the prefrontal-striatal circuitry that manifests as enhanced behavioral sensitization to MA in adolescence.

  1. Melanoma tumors alter proinflammatory cytokine production and monoamine brain function, and induce depressive-like behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Lebeña, Andrea; Vegas, Oscar; Gómez-Lázaro, Eneritz; Arregi, Amaia; Garmendia, Larraitz; Beitia, Garikoitz; Azpiroz, Arantza

    2014-10-01

    Depression is a commonly observed disorder among cancer patients; however, the mechanisms underlying the relationship between these disorders are not well known. We used an animal model to study the effects of tumor development on depressive-like behavior manifestation, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and central monoaminergic activity. Male OF1 mice were inoculated with B16F10 melanoma tumor cells and subjected to a 21-day behavioral evaluation comprising the novel palatable food (NPF) test and tail suspension test (TST). The mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), were measured in the hypothalamus and hippocampus and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were measured in the blood plasma. We similarly determined the monoamine turnover in various brain areas. The tumors resulted in increasing the immobility in TST and the expression level of IL-6 in the hippocampus. These increases corresponded with a decrease in dopaminergic activity in the striatum and a decrease in serotonin turnover in the prefrontal cortex. Similarly, a high level of tumor development produced increases in the brain expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and plasma levels of IL-6. Our findings suggest that these alterations in inflammatory cytokines and monoaminergic system function might be responsible for the manifestation of depressive-like behaviors in tumor-bearing mice.

  2. Transplantation of fecal microbiota from patients with irritable bowel syndrome alters gut function and behavior in recipient mice.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giada; Lynch, Michael D J; Lu, Jun; Dang, Vi T; Deng, Yikang; Jury, Jennifer; Umeh, Genevieve; Miranda, Pedro M; Pigrau Pastor, Marc; Sidani, Sacha; Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Philip, Vivek; McLean, Peter G; Hagelsieb, Moreno-Gabriel; Surette, Michael G; Bergonzelli, Gabriela E; Verdu, Elena F; Britz-McKibbin, Philip; Neufeld, Josh D; Collins, Stephen M; Bercik, Premysl

    2017-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder characterized by altered gut function and often is accompanied by comorbid anxiety. Although changes in the gut microbiota have been documented, their relevance to the clinical expression of IBS is unknown. To evaluate a functional role for commensal gut bacteria in IBS, we colonized germ-free mice with the fecal microbiota from healthy control individuals or IBS patients with diarrhea (IBS-D), with or without anxiety, and monitored gut function and behavior in the transplanted mice. Microbiota profiles in recipient mice clustered according to the microbiota profiles of the human donors. Mice receiving the IBS-D fecal microbiota showed a taxonomically similar microbial composition to that of mice receiving the healthy control fecal microbiota. However, IBS-D mice showed different serum metabolomic profiles. Mice receiving the IBS-D fecal microbiota, but not the healthy control fecal microbiota, exhibited faster gastrointestinal transit, intestinal barrier dysfunction, innate immune activation, and anxiety-like behavior. These results indicate the potential of the gut microbiota to contribute to both intestinal and behavioral manifestations of IBS-D and suggest the potential value of microbiota-directed therapies in IBS patients.

  3. Protective effect of alprazolam in acute immobilization stress-induced certain behavioral and biochemical alterations in mice.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Richa; Anil, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Stress can be viewed as a cause of adverse circumstance that induces a wide range of biochemical and behavioral changes. Oxidative stress is a major contributor to the genesis of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric problems. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of alprazolam in acute immobilization-induced various behavioral and biochemical alteration in mice. Mice were immobilized for a period of 6 h. Alprazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 30 min before subjecting the animals to acute stress and several behavioral (mirror chamber, actophotometer, tail flick test) and biochemical tests (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were performed. Acute immobilization stress for a period of 6 h caused severe anxiety, analgesia and decreased locomotor activity in mice. Biochemical analyses revealed an increase in malondialdehyde, nitrite level and depleted glutathione and catalase activity in stressed brain. Pretreatment with alprazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reversed immobilization stress-induced anxiety, analgesia and impaired locomotor activity. Biochemically, alprazolam pretreatment decreased malondialdehyde, nitrite activity and restored reduced glutathione level and catalase activity. These results suggest that alprazolam has a neuroprotective effect and can be used in the treatment and management of stress and related disorders.

  4. Positive reinforcement training as a technique to alter nonhuman primate behavior: quantitative assessments of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Schapiro, Steven J; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Laule, Gail E

    2003-01-01

    Many suggest that operant conditioning techniques can be applied successfully to improve the behavioral management of nonhuman primates in research settings. However, relatively little empirical data exist to support this claim. This article is a review of several studies that discussed applied positive reinforcement training techniques (PRT) on breeding/research colonies of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and measured their effectiveness. Empirical analyses quantified the amount of time required to train rhesus monkeys to come up, station, target, and stay. Additionally, a study found that time spent affiliating by female rhesus was changed as a function of training low affiliators to affiliate more and high affiliators to affiliate less. Another study successfully trained chimpanzees to feed without fighting and to come inside on command. PRT is an important behavioral management tool that can improve the care and welfare of primates in captivity. Published empirical findings are essential for managers to assess objectively the utility of positive reinforcement training techniques in enhancing captive management and research procedures.

  5. Altered social behavior and sexual characteristics in mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) living downstream of a paper mill.

    PubMed

    Toft, Gunnar; Baatrup, Erik; Guillette, Louis J

    2004-12-10

    Several environmental contaminants have been found in paper mill effluent including substances with androgenic properties. The presence of androgenic substances in paper mill effluent was also indicated in the present study which demonstrated masculinized anal fins of female mosquitofish from the paper mill effluent contaminated Fenholloway River. In addition, when compared to the nearby Econfina River, which does not receive paper mill effluent, fewer females from the contaminated river were pregnant, they were smaller and their estradiol concentration exhibited greater variation. Males from the Fenholloway River and the Econfina River had similar sperm counts, but the testes were larger and greater variation in testosterone concentration was observed in male fish from the Fenholloway River. In males and females from the Fenholloway River, liver weights were increased and computer-aided behavior analysis demonstrated a reduction in their social behavior when compared to reference fish. We conclude that a number of sexual characteristics were affected in mosquitofish living in the paper mill contaminated Fenholloway River, with possible adverse effects on the reproduction of this population.

  6. Colonization of Bacteria on the Surfaces of Cold-Sprayed Copper Coatings Alters Their Electrochemical Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Xinkun; Abdoli, Leila; Liu, Yi; Xia, Peng; Yang, Guanjun; Li, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Copper coatings were fabricated on stainless steel plates by cold spraying. Attachment and colonization of Bacillus sp. on their surfaces in artificial seawater were characterized, and their effects on anticorrosion performances of the coatings were examined. Attached bacteria were observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical behaviors including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with/without bacterial attachment were evaluated using commercial electrochemical analysis station Modulab. Results show that Bacillus sp. opt to settle on low-lying spots of the coating surfaces in early stage, followed by recruitment and attachment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted through metabolism of Bacillus sp. The bacteria survive with the protection of EPS. An attachment model is proposed to illustrate the bacterial behaviors on the surfaces of the coatings. Electrochemical data show that current density under Bacillus sp. environment decreases compared to that without the bacteria. Charge-transfer resistance increases markedly in bacteria-containing seawater, suggesting that corrosion resistance increases and corrosion rate decreases. The influencing mechanism of bacteria settlement on corrosion resistance of the cold-sprayed copper coatings was discussed and elucidated.

  7. Protective effect of curcumin (Curcuma longa), against aluminium toxicity: Possible behavioral and biochemical alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Dogra, Samrita; Prakash, Atish

    2009-12-28

    Aluminium is a potent neurotoxin and has been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) causality for decades. Prolonged aluminium exposure induces oxidative stress and increases amyloid beta levels in vivo. Current treatment modalities for AD provide only symptomatic relief thus necessitating the development of new drugs with fewer side effects. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the protective effect of chronic curcumin administration against aluminium-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage in rats. Aluminium chloride (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered to rats daily for 6 weeks. Rats were concomitantly treated with curcumin (per se; 30 and 60 mg/kg, p.o.) daily for a period of 6 weeks. On the 21st and 42nd day of the study behavioral studies to evaluate memory (Morris water maze and elevated plus maze task paradigms) and locomotion (photoactometer) were done. The rats were sacrificed on 43rd day following the last behavioral test and various biochemical tests were performed to assess the extent of oxidative damage. Chronic aluminium chloride administration resulted in poor retention of memory in Morris water maze, elevated plus maze task paradigms and caused marked oxidative damage. It also caused a significant increase in the acetylcholinesterase activity and aluminium concentration in aluminium treated rats. Chronic administration of curcumin significantly improved memory retention in both tasks, attenuated oxidative damage, acetylcholinesterase activity and aluminium concentration in aluminium treated rats (P<0.05). Curcumin has neuroprotective effects against aluminium-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage.

  8. Trpc2-deficient lactating mice exhibit altered brain and behavioral responses to bedding stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hasen, Nina S; Gammie, Stephen C

    2011-03-01

    The trpc2 gene encodes an ion channel involved in pheromonal detection and is found in the vomeronasal organ. In tprc2(-/-) knockout (KO) mice, maternal aggression (offspring protection) is impaired and brain Fos expression in females in response to a male are reduced. Here we examine in lactating wild-type (WT) and KO mice behavioral and brain responses to different olfactory/pheromonal cues. Consistent with previous studies, KO dams exhibited decreased maternal aggression and nest building, but we also identified deficits in nighttime nursing and increases in pup weight. When exposed to the bedding tests, WT dams typically ignored clean bedding, but buried male-soiled bedding from unfamiliar males. In contrast, KO dams buried both clean and soiled bedding. Differences in brain Fos expression were found between WT and KO mice in response to either no bedding, clean bedding, or soiled bedding. In the accessory olfactory bulb, a site of pheromonal signal processing, KO mice showed suppressed Fos activation in the anterior mitral layer relative to WT mice in response to clean and soiled bedding. However, in the medial and basolateral amygdala, KO mice showed a robust Fos response to bedding, suggesting that regions of the amygdala canonically associated with pheromonal sensing can be active in the brains of KO mice, despite compromised signaling from the vomeronasal organ. Together, these results provide further insights into the complex ways by which pheromonal signaling regulates the brain and behavior of the maternal female.

  9. Ingestion of Giardia lamblia trophozoites by human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D R; Pearson, R D

    1987-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes may be important effector cells against Giardia lamblia. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with G. lamblia trophozoites in 13% heat-inactivated autologous serum. At a G. lamblia/macrophage ratio of 1:1, the number of trophozoites ingested per 100 macrophages ranged from 1 to 12 at 0.5 h and increased for all donors (n = 6) to 10 to 92 at 8 h. Ingestion was confirmed by electron microscopy. Increasing the parasite/phagocyte ratio to 5:1 increased the percentage of macrophages with adherent but not ingested trophozoites. Incubating Giardia cells and macrophages with 20% immune serum increased ingestion of parasites eightfold, indicating that anti-G. lamblia antibody can enhance ingestion. Both phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy documented trophozoite destruction within macrophages. Ingestion of parasites elicited an oxidative burst as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. In vitro, Giardia trophozoites were killed by greater than or equal to 5 X 10(-5) M H2O2. Fusion of lysosomes with parasite-containing phagosomes was suggested by acridine orange-stained preparations. Human macrophages have the capacity to ingest Giardia trophozoites and to kill intracellular parasites, possibly by oxidative microbicidal mechanisms. Images PMID:3679547

  10. Extracellular traps and macrophages: new roles for the versatile phagocyte

    PubMed Central

    Boe, Devin M.; Curtis, Brenda J.; Chen, Michael M.; Ippolito, Jill A.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    MΦ are multipurpose phagocytes with a large repertoire of well-characterized abilities and functions, including regulation of inflammation, wound healing, maintenance of tissue homeostasis, as well as serving as an integral component of the innate-immune defense against microbial pathogens. Working along with neutrophils and dendritic cells, the other myeloid-derived professional phagocytes, MΦ are one of the key effector cells initiating and directing the host reaction to pathogenic organisms and resolving subsequent responses once the threat has been cleared. ETs are a relatively novel strategy of host defense involving expulsion of nuclear material and embedded proteins from immune cells to immobilize and kill bacteria, fungi, and viruses. As research on ETs expands, it has begun to encompass many immune cell types in unexpected ways, including various types of MΦ, which are not only capable of generating METs in response to various stimuli, but recent preclinical data suggest that they are an important agent in clearing ETs and limiting ET-mediated inflammation and tissue damage. This review aims to summarize historical and recent findings of biologic research regarding ET formation and function and discuss the role of MΦ in ET physiology and associated pathologies. PMID:25877927

  11. Mononuclear phagocyte system in kidney disease and repair.

    PubMed

    Alikhan, Maliha A; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-02-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system is comprised of circulating monocytes, tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) that play key roles in tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and immune and non-immune-mediated tissue injury and repair. This review summarizes the various subsets within this system that exhibit significant functional and phenotypic diversity that can adapt to their surrounding microenvironments during inflammation and in response to colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1. The current understanding of the co-ordination of monocyte infiltration into the homeostatic and diseased kidney through adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors, and cytokines are described. Furthermore, the significant confusion and controversy associated with monocyte differentiation into renal macrophages and DCs following infiltration into the kidney, the considerable functional and phenotypic overlap between both tissue populations and their respective roles in immune and non-immune-mediated renal is also discussed. Understanding the factors that control the activation and recruitment of cells from the mononuclear phagocyte system during renal injury may offer an avenue for the development of new cellular and growth factor-based therapies in combination with existing therapies as an alternative treatment option for patients with renal disease.

  12. Meal time shift disturbs circadian rhythmicity along with metabolic and behavioral alterations in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji-Ae; Han, Dong-Hee; Noh, Jong-Yun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin; Kim, Chang-Ju; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Cho, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    In modern society, growing numbers of people are engaged in various forms of shift works or trans-meridian travels. Such circadian misalignment is known to disturb endogenous diurnal rhythms, which may lead to harmful physiological consequences including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and gastric disorders as well as other physical and mental disorders. However, the precise mechanism(s) underlying these changes are yet unclear. The present work, therefore examined the effects of 6 h advance or delay of usual meal time on diurnal rhythmicities in home cage activity (HCA), body temperature (BT), blood metabolic markers, glucose homeostasis, and expression of genes that are involved in cholesterol homeostasis by feeding young adult male mice in a time-restrictive manner. Delay of meal time caused locomotive hyperactivity in a significant portion (42%) of subjects, while 6 h advance caused a torpor-like symptom during the late scotophase. Accordingly, daily rhythms of blood glucose and triglyceride were differentially affected by time-restrictive feeding regimen with concurrent metabolic alterations. Along with these physiological changes, time-restrictive feeding also influenced the circadian expression patterns of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) as well as most LDLR regulatory factors. Strikingly, chronic advance of meal time induced insulin resistance, while chronic delay significantly elevated blood glucose levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that persistent shifts in usual meal time impact the diurnal rhythms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in addition to HCA and BT, thereby posing critical implications for the health and diseases of shift workers.

  13. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069

  14. Behavioral alterations and Fos protein immunoreactivity in brain regions of bile duct-ligated cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana; Viana, Milena B; Nagaoka, Márcia R; Amorim, Ana Laura B; Cardoso, Amanda N; Rodrigues, Bruna C; Mendes, Natália F; Bittencourt, Jackson C; Céspedes, Isabel C

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) encompasses a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms, including anxiety and psychomotor dysfunction. Although HE is a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis, the neurobiological substrates responsible for its clinical manifestations are largely unclear. In the present study, male Wistar rats were bile duct-ligated (BDL), a procedure which induces liver cirrhosis, and on the 21st day after surgery tested in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and in an open field for anxiety and locomotor activity measurements. Analysis of Fos protein immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) was used to better understand the neurobiological alterations present in BDL animals. Plasma levels of ammonia were quantified and histopathological analysis of the livers was performed. BDL rats showed a significant decrease in the percentage of entries and time spent in the open arms of the EPM, an anxiogenic effect. These animals also presented significant decreases in Fos-ir in the lateral septal nucleus and medial amygdalar nucleus. Their ammonia plasma levels were significantly higher when compared to the sham group and the diagnosis of cirrhosis was confirmed by histopathological analysis. These results indicate that the BDL model induces anxiogenic results, possibly related to changes in the activation of anxiety-mediating circuitries and to increases in ammonia plasma levels.

  15. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning.

  16. Air pollution impairs cognition, provokes depressive-like behaviors and alters hippocampal cytokine expression and morphology.

    PubMed

    Fonken, L K; Xu, X; Weil, Z M; Chen, G; Sun, Q; Rajagopalan, S; Nelson, R J

    2011-10-01

    Particulate matter air pollution is a pervasive global risk factor implicated in the genesis of pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Although the effects of prolonged exposure to air pollution are well characterized with respect to pulmonary and cardiovascular function, comparatively little is known about the impact of particulate matter on affective and cognitive processes. The central nervous system may be adversely affected by activation of reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory pathways that accompany particulate matter pollution. Thus, we investigated whether long-term exposure to ambient fine airborne particulate matter (<2.5 μm (PM(2.5))) affects cognition, affective responses, hippocampal inflammatory cytokines and neuronal morphology. Male mice were exposed to either PM(2.5) or filtered air (FA) for 10 months. PM(2.5) mice displayed more depressive-like responses and impairments in spatial learning and memory as compared with mice exposed to FA. Hippocampal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was elevated among PM(2.5) mice. Apical dendritic spine density and dendritic branching were decreased in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, respectively, of PM(2.5) mice. Taken together, these data suggest that long-term exposure to particulate air pollution levels typical of exposure in major cities around the globe can alter affective responses and impair cognition.

  17. Aqueous exposure to the progestin, levonorgestrel, alters anal fin development and reproductive behavior in the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki).

    PubMed

    Frankel, Tyler E; Meyer, Michael T; Orlando, Edward F

    2016-08-01

    significant between the two treatments. LNG caused significant increases in the 4:6 anal fin ratio of males exposed to 100ng/L, with no effects observed in the 10ng/L treatment. In addition, the reproductive behavior of control males paired with female mosquitofish exposed to 100ng/L LNG was also altered, for these males spent more time exhibiting no reproductive behavior, had decreased attending behavior, and a lower number of gonopodial thrusts compared to control males paired to control female mosquitofish. Given the rapid effects on both anal fin morphology and behavior observed in this study, the mosquitofish is an excellent sentinel species for the detection of exposure to LNG and likely other 19-nortestosterone derived contraceptive progestins in the environment.

  18. Does Respondent Driven Sampling Alter the Social Network Composition and Health-Seeking Behaviors of Illicit Drug Users Followed Prospectively?

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Abby E.; Latkin, Carl; Crawford, Natalie D.; Jones, Kandice C.; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2011-01-01

    Respondent driven sampling (RDS) was originally developed to sample and provide peer education to injection drug users at risk for HIV. Based on the premise that drug users' social networks were maintained through sharing rituals, this peer-driven approach to disseminate educational information and reduce risk behaviors capitalizes and expands upon the norms that sustain these relationships. Compared with traditional outreach interventions, peer-driven interventions produce greater reductions in HIV risk behaviors and adoption of safer behaviors over time, however, control and intervention groups are not similarly recruited. As peer-recruitment may alter risk networks and individual risk behaviors over time, such comparison studies are unable to isolate the effect of a peer-delivered intervention. This analysis examines whether RDS recruitment (without an intervention) is associated with changes in health-seeking behaviors and network composition over 6 months. New York City drug users (N = 618) were recruited using targeted street outreach (TSO) and RDS (2006–2009). 329 non-injectors (RDS = 237; TSO = 92) completed baseline and 6-month surveys ascertaining demographic, drug use, and network characteristics. Chi-square and t-tests compared RDS- and TSO-recruited participants on changes in HIV testing and drug treatment utilization and in the proportion of drug using, sex, incarcerated and social support networks over the follow-up period. The sample was 66% male, 24% Hispanic, 69% black, 62% homeless, and the median age was 35. At baseline, the median network size was 3, 86% used crack, 70% used cocaine, 40% used heroin, and in the past 6 months 72% were tested for HIV and 46% were enrolled in drug treatment. There were no significant differences by recruitment strategy with respect to changes in health-seeking behaviors or network composition over 6 months. These findings suggest no association between RDS recruitment and changes in network

  19. Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence for altered processing of anxiety-related words in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Pauli, P; Dengler, W; Wiedemann, G; Montoya, P; Flor, H; Birbaumer, N; Buchkremer, G

    1997-05-01

    Body-related and nonsomatic words were presented tachistoscopically to 15 panic patients and 15 healthy controls at each participant's threshold for correctly identifying 50% of neutral words. Behavioral (proportion of words correctly recognized) and electrocortical (event-related brain potentials [ERPs]) measures were registered. Panic patients recognized more body-related than nonsomatic words, and body-related as compared with nonsomatic words elicited, in these patients, significantly larger P300 amplitudes and enhanced positive slow waves (600 to 800 ms after stimulus presentation). In healthy controls, the number of correct recognized words and the ERPs were not differentially affected by the 2 word types. These results are grossly consistent with cognitive models of panic disorders, assuming that certain bodily sensation are perceived and processed in an affective manner that differentiates panic patients from healthy controls.

  20. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    PubMed

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists.

  1. Silver Nanoparticles Alter Zebrafish Development and Larval Behavior: Distinct Roles for Particle Size, Coating and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Christina M.; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Seidler, Frederic J.; Badireddy, Appala R.; Padilla, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) act as antibacterials by releasing monovalent silver (Ag+) and are increasingly used in consumer products, thus elevating exposures in human and wildlife populations. In vitro models indicate that AgNPs are likely to be developmental neurotoxicants with actions distinct from those of Ag+. We exposed developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) to Ag+ or AgNPs on days 0–5 post-fertilization and evaluated hatching, morphology, survival and swim bladder inflation. Larval swimming behavior and responses to different lighting conditions were assessed 24 hr after the termination of exposure. Comparisons were made with AgNPs of different sizes and coatings: 10 nm citrate-coated AgNP (AgNP-C), and 10 or 50 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs (AgNP-PVP). Ag+ and AgNP-C delayed hatching to a similar extent but Ag+ was more effective in slowing swim bladder inflation, and elicited greater dysmorphology and mortality. In behavioral assessments, Ag+ exposed fish were hyperresponsive to light changes, whereas AgNP-C exposed fish showed normal responses. Neither of the AgNP-PVPs affected survival or morphology but both evoked significant changes in swimming responses to light in ways that were distinct from Ag+ and each other. The smaller AgNP-PVP caused overall hypoactivity whereas the larger caused hyperactivity. AgNPs are less potent than Ag+ with respect to dysmorphology and loss of viability, but nevertheless produce neurobehavioral effects that highly depend on particle coating and size, rather than just reflecting the release of Ag+. Different AgNP formulations are thus likely to produce distinct patterns of developmental neurotoxicity. PMID:21315816

  2. Manganese(II) chloride alters behavioral and neurochemical parameters in larvae and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Altenhofen, Stefani; Wiprich, Melissa Talita; Nery, Laura Roesler; Leite, Carlos Eduardo; Vianna, Monica Ryff Moreira Roca; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal for organisms, but high levels can cause serious neurological damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of MnCl2 exposure on cognition and exploratory behavior in adult and larval zebrafish and correlate these findings with brain accumulation of Mn, overall brain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, dopamine (DA) levels, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and cell death markers in the nervous system. Adults exposed to MnCl2 for 4days (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5mM) and larvae exposed for 5days (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5mM) displayed decreased exploratory behaviors, such as distance traveled and absolute body turn angle, in addition to reduced movement time and an increased number of immobile episodes in larvae. Adults exposed to MnCl2 for 4days showed impaired aversive long-term memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. The overall brain TH levels were elevated in adults and larvae evaluated at 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Interestingly, the protein level of this enzyme was decreased in larval animals at 10dpf. Furthermore, DOPAC levels were increased in adult animals exposed to MnCl2. Protein analysis showed increased apoptotic markers in both the larvae and adult nervous system. The results demonstrated that prolonged exposure to MnCl2 leads to locomotor deficits that may be associated with damage caused by this metal in the CNS, particularly in the dopaminergic system.

  3. Methylphenidate administration to juvenile rats alters brain areas involved in cognition, motivated behaviors, appetite, and stress.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jason D; Punsoni, Michael; Tabori, Nora E; Melton, Jay T; Fanslow, Victoria; Ward, Mary J; Zupan, Bojana; Menzer, David; Rice, Jackson; Drake, Carrie T; Romeo, Russell D; Brake, Wayne G; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Milner, Teresa A

    2007-07-04

    Thousands of children receive methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), yet the long-term neurochemical consequences of MPH treatment are unknown. To mimic clinical Ritalin treatment in children, male rats were injected with MPH (5 mg/kg) or vehicle twice daily from postnatal day 7 (PND7)-PND35. At the end of administration (PND35) or in adulthood (PND135), brain sections from littermate pairs were immunocytochemically labeled for neurotransmitters and cytological markers in 16 regions implicated in MPH effects and/or ADHD etiology. At PND35, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats given MPH showed 55% greater immunoreactivity (-ir) for the catecholamine marker tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), 60% more Nissl-stained cells, and 40% less norepinephrine transporter (NET)-ir density. In hippocampal dentate gyrus, MPH-receiving rats showed a 51% decrease in NET-ir density and a 61% expanded distribution of the new-cell marker PSA-NCAM (polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule). In medial striatum, TH-ir decreased by 21%, and in hypothalamus neuropeptide Y-ir increased by 10% in MPH-exposed rats. At PND135, MPH-exposed rats exhibited decreased anxiety in the elevated plus-maze and a trend for decreased TH-ir in the mPFC. Neither PND35 nor PND135 rats showed major structural differences with MPH exposure. These findings suggest that developmental exposure to high therapeutic doses of MPH has short-term effects on select neurotransmitters in brain regions involved in motivated behaviors, cognition, appetite, and stress. Although the observed neuroanatomical changes largely resolve with time, chronic modulation of young brains with MPH may exert effects on brain neurochemistry that modify some behaviors even in adulthood.

  4. Alteration in scaling behavior of short-term heartbeat time series for professional shooting athletes from rest to exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jian Jun; Ning, Xin Bao; He, Ai Jun; Zou, Ming; Sun, Biao; Wu, Xu Hui

    2008-11-01

    Scaling analysis of heartbeat time series has emerged as a useful tool for assessing the autonomic cardiac control under various physiologic and pathologic conditions. We study the heartbeat activity and scaling behavior of heartbeat fluctuations regulated by autonomic nervous system for professional shooting athletes under two states: rest and exercise, by applying the detrended fluctuation analysis method. We focus on alteration in correlation properties of heartbeat intervals for the shooters from rest to exercise, which may have a potential value in monitoring the quality of training and evaluating the sports capacity of the athletes. The result shows that scaling exponents of short-term heart rate variability signals from the shooters get significantly larger during exercise compared with those obtained at rest. It demonstrates that during exercise stronger correlations appear in the heartbeat series of shooting athletes in order to satisfy the specific requirements for high concentration and better control on their heart beats.

  5. Alterations in splenic function and gene expression in mice with depressive-like behavior induced by exposure to corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Heqin; Huang, Feng; Yan, Fulin; Zhao, Zhenghang; Zhang, Jixia; Cui, Taizhen; Yang, Fan; Hai, Guangfan; Jia, Xiaoman; Shi, Yongji

    2017-01-01

    Depressed patients present with increased cortisol levels and attenuated immune responses. However, little is known about the association between depression and the spleen, as this is the largest peripheral immune organ. In this study, we examined alterations in splenic function and gene expression in mice with depressive-like behavior, well as the expression of certain proteins in related pathways. A mouse model of depression was established with the use of corticosterone. Splenic function and histopathology were assessed using Wright and H&E staining. The Agilent Whole Mouse Genome Oligo Microarray containing >41,174 transcript probes was used to measure the levels of gene-expression in the spleens from control and model mice, and the levels of certain proteins associated with depression were measured by western blot analysis in the brain and spleen separately. We found that splenic function and immunity in the mice with depressive-like behavior were markedly impaired. A total of 53 genes exhibited a differential response in the mice with depressive-like behavior, 11 of which were more notable, including collagen, type VI, α5 (Col6a5), immunoglobulin superfamily, member 11 (Igsf11), D site albumin promoter binding protein (Dbp), tachykinin 2 (Tac2) and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor 2 (Gabbr2). Pathway analysis revealed that the amino acid biosynthesis and the clock gene pathways were more meaningful among these genes. The levels of GABBR2, DBP and substance P (SP; encoded by the Tac2 gene) related proteins in the brain were markedly downregulated, and similar results were observed in the spleen. The anti-depressant, fluoxetine, reversed the changes in the levels of these proteins. The findings of our study regarding changes occurring in the spleen during depression may indirectly elucidate and shed light into the pathogenesis of depression and depressive-like behavior. PMID:28075471

  6. Using a maternal immune stimulation model of schizophrenia to study behavioral and neurobiological alterations over the developmental course.

    PubMed

    Hadar, Ravit; Soto-Montenegro, M Luisa; Götz, Thomas; Wieske, Franziska; Sohr, Reinhard; Desco, Manuel; Hamani, Clement; Weiner, Ina; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine

    2015-08-01

    A growing body of evidence sheds light on the neurodevelopmental nature of schizophrenia with symptoms typically emerging during late adolescence or young adulthood. We compared the pre-symptomatic adolescence period with the full symptomatic period of adulthood at the behavioral and neurobiological level in the poly I:C maternal immune stimulation (MIS) rat model of schizophrenia. We found that in MIS-rats impaired sensorimotor gating, as reflected in disrupted prepusle inhibition (PPI), emerged post-pubertally, with behavioral deficits being only recorded in adulthood but not during adolescence. Using post mortem HPLC we found that MIS-rats show distinct dopamine and serotonin changes in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (Nacc), caudate putamen, globus pallidus, and hippocampus. Further, FDG-PET has shown that these animals had lower glucose uptake in the ventral hippocampus and PFC and a higher metabolism in the amygdala and Nacc when compared to controls. Changes in neurotransmission and metabolic activity varied across brain structures with respect to first appearance and further development. In the mPFC and Hipp, MIS-rats showed abnormal neurochemical and metabolic activity prior to and with the development of behavioral deficits in both adolescent and adult states, reflecting an early impairment of these regions. In contrast, biochemical alteration in the Nacc and globus pallidus developed as a matter of age. Our findings suggest that MIS-induced neurochemical and metabolic changes are neurodevelopmental in nature and either progressive or non-progressive and that the behavioral deficits manifest as these abnormalities increase.

  7. Using a maternal immune stimulation model of schizophrenia to study behavioral and neurobiological alterations over the developmental course

    PubMed Central

    Hadar, Ravit; Soto-Montenegro, Ma Luisa; Götz, Thomas; Wieske, Franziska; Sohr, Reinhard; Desco, Manuel; Hamani, Clement; Weiner, Ina; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence sheds light on the neurodevelopmental nature of schizophrenia with symptoms typically emerging during late adolescence or young adulthood. We compared the pre-symptomatic adolescence period with the full symptomatic period of adulthood at the behavioral and neurobiological level in the poly I:C maternal immune stimulation (MIS) rat model of schizophrenia. We found that in MIS-rats impaired sensorimotor gating, as reflected in disrupted prepusle inhibition (PPI), emerged post-pubertally, with behavioral deficits being only recorded in adulthood but not during adolescence. Using post mortem HPLC we found that MIS-rats show distinct dopamine and serotonin changes in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (Nacc), caudate putamen, globus pallidus, and hippocampus. Further, FDG-PET has shown that these animals had lower glucose uptake in the ventral hippocampus and PFC and a higher metabolism in the amygdala and Nacc when compared to controls. Changes in neurotransmission and metabolic activity varied across brain structures with respect to first appearance and further development. In the mPFC and Hipp, MIS-rats showed abnormal neurochemical and metabolic activity prior to and with the development of behavioral deficits in both adolescent and adult states, reflecting an early impairment of these regions. In contrast, biochemical alteration in the Nacc and globus pallidus developed as a matter of age. Our findings suggest that MIS-induced neurochemical and metabolic changes are neurodevelopmental in nature and either progressive or non-progressive and that the behavioral deficits manifest as these abnormalities increase. PMID:26055633

  8. Sex-related long-term behavioral and hippocampal cellular alterations after nociceptive stimulation throughout postnatal development in rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, Márcia; Malheiros, Jackeline; Negrigo, Aline; Tescarollo, Fabio; Medeiros, Magda; Suchecki, Deborah; Tannús, Alberto; Guinsburg, Ruth; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-02-01

    Early noxious stimuli may alter the neurogenesis rate in the dentate gyrus and the behavioral repertoire of adult rats. This study evaluated the long-term effects of noxious stimulation, imposed in different phases of development, on nociceptive and anxiety-like behaviors, hippocampal activation, cell proliferation, hippocampal BDNF and plasma corticosterone levels in 40 day-old male and female adolescents. Noxious stimulation was induced by intra-plantar injection of Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), on postnatal days (P) 1 (group P1), 8 (P8) or 21 (P21). Control animals were not stimulated in any way. On P21 a subset of animals from each group received BrdU and was perfused on P40 for identification of proliferating cells in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Another subset of rats was subjected to behavioral testing on P40 and one week later, to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition. Noxious stimulation evoked hypoalgesia in adolescents, mainly in females (P < 0.02), reflected by greater latency to withdraw the paw and less paw lickings in the hot plate test than controls (P < 0.001). It also resulted in more time spent in the open arms, e.g., less anxiety-like behavior than controls (P < 0.01), especially in females (P < 0.01, compared with males). Proliferative cell rate in the dentate gyrus was the highest in P8 males and females (P < 0.001), with males exhibiting more proliferation than females on P1 and P8, which was directly related to the hippocampal levels of BDNF and inversely related to plasma corticosterone. Sex differences were also detected in manganese-enhanced MRI signal, which was more prominent in P1 females than males (P < 0.01). This study represents the first step of investigation on the cellular basis of the sex-dependent long-term consequences of nociceptive stimuli in newborns.

  9. Gender-specific behavioral and immunological alterations in an animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tomasz; Roman, Adam; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Kubera, Marta; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Schneider, Karolina; Przewłocki, Ryszard

    2008-07-01

    Autism is a severe behavioral disorder characterized by pervasive impairments in social interactions, deficits in verbal and non-verbal communication, and stereotyped behaviors, with a four times higher incidence in boys than in girls. The core symptoms are frequently accompanied by a spectrum of neurobehavioral and immunological derangements, including: aberrant sensitivity to sensory stimulation, anxiety, and decreased cellular immune capacity. Recently, a new potential rodent model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA rats) has been proposed. In order to determine if gender has an influence on alterations observed in VPA rats, male and female rats have been evaluated in a battery of behavioral, immunological, and endocrinological tests. A plethora of aberrations has been found in male VPA rats: lower sensitivity to pain, increased repetitive/stereotypic-like activity, higher anxiety, decreased level of social interaction, increased basal level of corticosterone, decreased weight of the thymus, decreased splenocytes proliferative response to concanavaline A, lower IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio, and increased production of NO by peritoneal macrophages. Female VPA rats exhibited only increased repetitive/stereotypic-like activity and decreased IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio. Sexual dimorphism characteristics for measured parameters have been observed in both groups of animals, except social interaction in VPA rats. Our results confirm existence of similarities between the observed pattern of aberrations in VPA rats and features of disturbed behavior and immune function in autistic patients, and suggest that they are gender-specific, which is intriguing in light of disproportion in boys to girls ratio in autism.

  10. PFOS Induces Behavioral Alterations, Including Spontaneous Hyperactivity That Is Corrected by Dexamfetamine in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Spulber, Stefan; Kilian, Pascal; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Norhamidah; Onishchenko, Natalia; Ulhaq, Mazhar; Norrgren, Leif; Negri, Sara; Di Tuccio, Marcello; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a widely spread environmental contaminant. It accumulates in the brain and has potential neurotoxic effects. The exposure to PFOS has been associated with higher impulsivity and increased ADHD prevalence. We investigated the effects of developmental exposure to PFOS in zebrafish larvae, focusing on the modulation of activity by the dopaminergic system. We exposed zebrafish embryos to 0.1 or 1 mg/L PFOS (0.186 or 1.858 µM, respectively) and assessed swimming activity at 6 dpf. We analyzed the structure of spontaneous activity, the hyperactivity and the habituation during a brief dark period (visual motor response), and the vibrational startle response. The findings in zebrafish larvae were compared with historical data from 3 months old male mice exposed to 0.3 or 3 mg/kg/day PFOS throughout gestation. Finally, we investigated the effects of dexamfetamine on the alterations in spontaneous activity and startle response in zebrafish larvae. We found that zebrafish larvae exposed to 0.1 mg/L PFOS habituate faster than controls during a dark pulse, while the larvae exposed to 1 mg/L PFOS display a disorganized pattern of spontaneous activity and persistent hyperactivity. Similarly, mice exposed to 0.3 mg/kg/day PFOS habituated faster than controls to a new environment, while mice exposed to 3 mg/kg/day PFOS displayed more intense and disorganized spontaneous activity. Dexamfetamine partly corrected the hyperactive phenotype in zebrafish larvae. In conclusion, developmental exposure to PFOS in zebrafish induces spontaneous hyperactivity mediated by a dopaminergic deficit, which can be partially reversed by dexamfetamine in zebrafish larvae. PMID:24740186

  11. Altered Neuroinflammation and Behavior after Traumatic Brain Injury in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kokiko-Cochran, Olga; Ransohoff, Lena; Veenstra, Mike; Lee, Sungho; Saber, Maha; Sikora, Matt; Teknipp, Ryan; Xu, Guixiang; Bemiller, Shane; Wilson, Gina; Crish, Samuel; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lee, Yu-Shang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has acute and chronic sequelae, including an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TBI-associated neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes; however, recent studies have implicated beta-amyloid as a major manipulator of the inflammatory response. To examine neuroinflammation after TBI and development of AD-like features, these studies examined the effects of TBI in the presence and absence of beta-amyloid. The R1.40 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis was used, with a focus on time points well before robust AD pathologies. Unexpectedly, in R1.40 mice, the acute neuroinflammatory response to TBI was strikingly muted, with reduced numbers of CNS myeloid cells acquiring a macrophage phenotype and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines. At chronic time points, macrophage activation substantially declined in non-Tg TBI mice; however, it was relatively unchanged in R1.40 TBI mice. The persistent inflammatory response coincided with significant tissue loss between 3 and 120 days post-injury in R1.40 TBI mice, which was not observed in non-Tg TBI mice. Surprisingly, inflammatory cytokine expression was enhanced in R1.40 mice compared with non-Tg mice, regardless of injury group. Although R1.40 TBI mice demonstrated task-specific deficits in cognition, overall functional recovery was similar to non-Tg TBI mice. These findings suggest that accumulating beta-amyloid leads to an altered post-injury macrophage response at acute and chronic time points. Together, these studies emphasize the role of post-injury neuroinflammation in regulating long-term sequelae after TBI and also support recent studies implicating beta-amyloid as an immunomodulator.

  12. Does Switching to Reduced Ignition Propensity Cigarettes Alter Smoking Behavior or Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Constituents?

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Vaughan W.; Norton, Kaila J.; Cummings, K. Michael; Connolly, Gregory N.; Alpert, Hillel R.; Sjödin, Andreas; Romanoff, Lovisa; Li, Zheng; June, Kristie M.; Giovino, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2004, several jurisdictions have mandated that cigarettes show reduced ignition propensity (RIP) in laboratory testing. RIP cigarettes may limit fires caused by smoldering cigarettes, reducing fire-related deaths and injury. However, some evidence suggests that RIP cigarettes emit more carbon monoxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and smokers may alter their smoking patterns in response to RIP cigarettes. Both of these could increase smokers’ exposures to harmful constituents in cigarettes. Methods: An 18-day switching study with a comparison group was conducted in Boston, MA (N = 77), and Buffalo, NY (N = 83), in 2006–2007. Current daily smokers completed 4 laboratory visits and two 48-hr field data collections. After a 4-day baseline, Boston participants switched to RIP cigarettes for 14 days, whereas Buffalo participants smoked RIP cigarettes throughout. Outcome measures included cigarettes smoked per day; smoking topography; salivary cotinine; breath CO; and hydroxylated metabolites of pyrene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluorene. Because the groups differed demographically, analyses adjusted for race, age, and sex. Results: We observed no significant changes in smoking topography or CO exposure among participants who switched to RIP cigarettes. Cigarette use decreased significantly in the switched group (37.7 cigarettes/48 hr vs. 32.6 cigarettes/48 hr, p = .031), while hydroxyphenanthrenes increased significantly (555 ng/g creatinine vs. 669 ng/g creatinine, p = .007). No other biomarkers were significantly affected. Discussion: Small increases in exposure to phenanthrene among smokers who switched to RIP versions were observed, while other exposures and smoking topography were not significantly affected. Toxicological implications of these findings are unclear. These findings should be weighed against the potential public health benefits of adopting RIP design standards for cigarette products. PMID:20805292

  13. Meal Time Shift Disturbs Circadian Rhythmicity along with Metabolic and Behavioral Alterations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jong-Yun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin; Kim, Chang-Ju; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Cho, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    In modern society, growing numbers of people are engaged in various forms of shift works or trans-meridian travels. Such circadian misalignment is known to disturb endogenous diurnal rhythms, which may lead to harmful physiological consequences including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and gastric disorders as well as other physical and mental disorders. However, the precise mechanism(s) underlying these changes are yet unclear. The present work, therefore examined the effects of 6 h advance or delay of usual meal time on diurnal rhythmicities in home cage activity (HCA), body temperature (BT), blood metabolic markers, glucose homeostasis, and expression of genes that are involved in cholesterol homeostasis by feeding young adult male mice in a time-restrictive manner. Delay of meal time caused locomotive hyperactivity in a significant portion (42%) of subjects, while 6 h advance caused a torpor-like symptom during the late scotophase. Accordingly, daily rhythms of blood glucose and triglyceride were differentially affected by time-restrictive feeding regimen with concurrent metabolic alterations. Along with these physiological changes, time-restrictive feeding also influenced the circadian expression patterns of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) as well as most LDLR regulatory factors. Strikingly, chronic advance of meal time induced insulin resistance, while chronic delay significantly elevated blood glucose levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that persistent shifts in usual meal time impact the diurnal rhythms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in addition to HCA and BT, thereby posing critical implications for the health and diseases of shift workers. PMID:22952870

  14. Examination of Post-stroke Alteration in Motor Unit Firing Behavior Using High Density Surface EMG Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyan; Holobar, Aleš; Gazzoni, Marco; Merletti, Roberto; Rymer, William Z.; Zhou, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high density surface electromyogram (EMG) decomposition have made it a feasible task to discriminate single motor unit activity from surface EMG interference patterns, thus providing a noninvasive approach for examination of motor unit control properties. In the current study we applied high density surface EMG recording and decomposition techniques to assess motor unit firing behavior alterations post-stroke. Surface EMG signals were collected using a 64-channel 2-dimensional electrode array from the paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles of nine hemiparetic stroke subjects at different isometric discrete contraction levels between 2 N to 10 N with a 2 N increment step. Motor unit firing rates were extracted through decomposition of the high density surface EMG signals, and compared between paretic and contralateral muscles. Across the nine tested subjects, paretic FDI muscles showed decreased motor unit firing rates compared with contralateral muscles at different contraction levels. Regression analysis indicated a linear relation between the mean motor unit firing rate and the muscle contraction level for both paretic and contralateral muscles (p < 0.001), with the former demonstrating a lower increment rate (0.32 pulses per second (pps)/N) compared with the latter (0.67 pps/N). The coefficient of variation (CoV, averaged over the contraction levels) of the motor unit firing rates for the paretic muscles (0.21 ± 0.012) was significantly higher than for the contralateral muscles (0.17 ± 0.014) (p < 0.05). This study provides direct evidence of motor unit firing behavior alterations post-stroke using surface EMG, which can be an important factor contributing to hemiparetic muscle weakness. PMID:25389239

  15. Antioxidant Effect of Melatonin on the Functional Activity of Colostral Phagocytes in Diabetic Women

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes, Danny L. G.; Calderon, Iracema M. P.; França, Eduardo L.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is involved in a number of physiological and oxidative processes, including functional regulation in human milk. The present study investigated the mechanisms of action of melatonin and its effects on the functional activity of colostral phagocytes in diabetic women. Colostrum samples were collected from normoglycemic (N = 38) and diabetic (N = 38) women. We determined melatonin concentration, superoxide release, bactericidal activity and intracellular Ca2+ release by colostral phagocytes treated or not with 8-(Diethylamino) octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate hydrochloride (TMB-8) and incubated with melatonin and its precursor (N-acetyl-serotonin-NAS), antagonist (luzindole) and agonist (chloromelatonin-CMLT). Melatonin concentration was higher in colostrum samples from hyperglycemic than normoglycemic mothers. Melatonin stimulated superoxide release by colostral phagocytes from normoglycemic but not hyperglycemic women. NAS increased superoxide, irrespective of glycemic status, whereas CMTL increased superoxide only in cells from the normoglycemic group. Phagocytic activity in colostrum increased significantly in the presence of melatonin, NAS and CMLT, irrespective of glycemic status. The bactericidal activity of colostral phagocytes against enterophatogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) increased in the presence of melatonin or NAS in the normoglycemic group, but not in the hyperglycemic group. Luzindole blocked melatonin action on colostrum phagocytes. Phagocytes from the normoglycemic group treated with melatonin exhibited an increase in intracellular Ca2+ release. Phagocytes treated with TMB-8 (intracellular Ca2+ inhibitor) decreased superoxide, bactericidal activity and intracellular Ca2+ release in both groups. The results obtained suggest an interactive effect of glucose metabolism and melatonin on colostral phagocytes. In colostral phagocytes from normoglycemic mothers, melatonin likely increases the ability of colostrum to protect against EPEC

  16. Prenatal exposure to aflatoxin B1: developmental, behavioral, and reproductive alterations in male rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriya, Ch.; Reddy, P. Sreenivasula

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) inhibits androgen biosynthesis as a result of its ability to form a high-affinity complex with the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The results of the present study demonstrate the postnatal effects of in utero exposure to AfB1 in the rat. Pregnant Wistar rats were given 10, 20, or 50 μg AfB1/kg body weight daily from gestation day (GD) 12 to GD 19. At parturition, newborns were observed for clinical signs and survival. All animals were born alive and initially appeared to be active. Male pups from control and AfB1-exposed animals were weaned and maintained up to postnatal day (PD) 100. Litter size, birth weight, sex ratio, survival rate, and crown-rump length of the pups were significantly decreased in AfB1-exposed rats when compared to controls. Elapsed time (days) for testes to descend into the scrotal sac was significantly delayed in experimental pups when compared to control pups. Behavioral observations such as cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis, surface rightening activity, ascending wire mesh, open field behavior, and exploratory and locomotory activities were significantly impaired in experimental pups. Body weights and the indices of testis, cauda epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicles, and liver were significantly reduced on PD 100 in male rats exposed to AfB1 during embryonic development when compared with controls. Significant reduction in the testicular daily sperm production, epididymal sperm count, and number of viable, motile, and hypo-osmotic tail coiled sperm was observed in experimental rats. The levels of serum testosterone and activity levels of testicular hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase in the serum follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in experimental rats. Deterioration in the testicular and cauda epididymal architecture was observed in experimental rats. The results of fertility

  17. Symbiotic bacterial communities in ants are modified by invasion pathway bottlenecks and alter host behavior.

    PubMed

    Lester, Philip J; Sébastien, Alexandra; Suarez, Andrew V; Barbieri, Rafael F; Gruber, Monica A M

    2017-03-01

    Biological invasions are a threat to global biodiversity and provide unique opportunities to study ecological processes. Population bottlenecks are a common feature of biological invasions and the severity of these bottlenecks is likely to be compounded as an invasive species spreads from initial invasion sites to additional locations. Despite extensive work on the genetic consequences of bottlenecks, we know little about how they influence microbial communities of the invaders themselves. Due to serial bottlenecks, invasive species may lose microbial symbionts including pathogenic taxa (the enemy release hypothesis) and/or may accumulate natural enemies with increasing time after invasion (the pathogen accumulation and invasive decline hypothesis). We tested these alternate hypotheses by surveying bacterial communities of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile). We found evidence for serial symbiont bottlenecks: the bacterial community richness declined over the invasion pathway from Argentina to New Zealand. The abundance of some genera, such as Lactobacillus, also significantly declined over the invasion pathway. Argentine ants from populations in the United States shared the most genera with ants from their native range in Argentina, while New Zealand shared the least (120 vs. 57, respectively). Nine genera were present in all sites around the globe possibly indicating a core group of obligate microbes. In accordance with the pathogen accumulation and invasive decline hypothesis, Argentine ants acquired genera unique to each specific invaded country. The United States had the most unique genera, though even within New Zealand these ants acquired symbionts. In addition to our biogeographic sampling, we administered antibiotics to Argentine ants to determine if changes in the micro-symbiont community could influence behavior and survival in interspecific interactions. Treatment with the antibiotics spectinomycin and kanamycin only slightly increased Argentine ant

  18. Early-Life Stress Paradigm Transiently Alters Maternal Behavior, Dam-Pup Interactions, and Offspring Vocalizations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heun-Johnson, Hanke; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Animal models can help elucidate the mechanisms through which early-life stress (ELS) has pathophysiological effects on the developing brain. One model that has been developed for rodents consists of limiting the amount of bedding and nesting material during the first postnatal weeks of pup life. This ELS environment has been shown to induce “abusive” behaviors by rat dams towards pups, while mouse dams have been hypothesized to display “fragmented care”. Here, as part of an ongoing study of gene-environment interactions that impact brain development, we analyzed long observation periods of wild-type C57Bl/6J dams caring for wild-type and Met heterozygous pups. Met encodes for the MET receptor tyrosine kinase, which is involved in cortical and hippocampal synaptogenesis. Dams with limited resources from postnatal day (P)2 to P9 preserved regular long on-nest periods, and instead increased the number of discrete dam-pup interactions during regular off-nest periods. Immediately after dams entered the nest during off-nest periods in this ELS environment, pups responded to these qualitatively different interactions with an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) and audible vocalizations (AV), communication signals that have been associated with aversive and painful stimuli. After returning to control conditions, nest entry behaviors normalized, and dams did not show altered anxiety-like or contextual fear learning behaviors after pup weaning. Furthermore, female mice that had undergone ELS as pups did not show atypical nest entry behaviors in control conditions in adulthood, suggesting that these specific maternal behaviors are not learned during the ELS period. The results suggest that atypical responses of both mother and pups during exposure to this ELS environment likely contribute to long-term negative outcomes in mice, and that these responses more closely resemble the effects of limited bedding on rat dams and pups than was previously

  19. Neuroimmune mechanisms of behavioral alterations in a syngeneic murine model of human papilloma virus-related head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Vermeer, Daniel W; Christian, Diana L; Molkentine, Jessica M; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Patients with cancer often experience a high symptom burden prior to the start of treatment. As disease- and treatment-related neurotoxicities appear to be additive, targeting disease-related symptoms may attenuate overall symptom burden for cancer patients and improve the tolerability of treatment. It has been hypothesized that disease-related symptoms are a consequence of tumor-induced inflammation. We tested this hypothesis using a syngeneic heterotopic murine model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. This model has the advantage of being mildly aggressive and not causing cachexia or weight loss. We previously showed that this tumor leads to increased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression in the liver and increased IL-1β expression in the brain. The current study confirmed these features and demonstrated that the tumor itself exhibits high inflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) compared to healthy tissue. While there is a clear relationship between cytokine levels and behavioral deficits in this model, the behavioral changes are surprisingly mild. Therefore, we sought to confirm the relationship between behavior and inflammation by amplifying the effect using a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg). In tumor-bearing mice LPS induced deficits in nest building, tail suspension, and locomotor activity approximately 24h after LPS. However, these mice did not display an exacerbation of LPS-induced weight loss, anorexia, or anhedonia. Further, while heightened serum IL-6 was observed there was minimal priming of liver or brain cytokine expression. Next we sought to inhibit tumor-induced burrowing deficits by reducing inflammation using minocycline. Minocycline (∼50mg/kg/day in drinking water) was able to attenuate tumor-induced inflammation and burrowing deficits. These data provide evidence in favor of an inflammatory-like mechanism for the behavioral alterations associated with tumor growth in a syngeneic

  20. Habitat fragmentation differentially affects trophic levels and alters behavior in a multi-trophic marine system.

    PubMed

    Rielly-Carroll, Elizabeth; Freestone, Amy L

    2017-03-01

    Seagrass, an important subtidal marine ecosystem, is being lost at a rate of 110 km(2) year(-1), leading to fragmented seagrass seascapes. Habitat fragmentation is predicted to affect trophic levels differently, with higher trophic levels being more sensitive, stressing the importance of a multi-trophic perspective. Utilizing the trophic relationship between the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) and hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria), where adult blue crabs prey on juvenile blue crabs, and juvenile blue crabs prey on small hard clams, we examined whether predation rates, abundance, and behavior of predators and prey differed between continuous and fragmented seagrass in a multi-trophic context at two sites in Barnegat Bay, NJ. We tested the hypothesis that fragmented habitats would differentially affect trophic levels within a tri-trophic system, and our results supported this hypothesis. Densities of adult blue crabs were higher in fragmented than continuous habitats. Densities of juvenile blue crabs, the primary predator of hard clams, were lower in fragmented habitats than continuous, potentially due to increased predation by adult blue crabs. Clams experienced lower predation and burrowed to a shallower depth in fragmented habitats than in continuous habitat, likely due in part to the low densities of juvenile blue crabs, their primary predator. Our results suggest that while trophic levels are differentially affected, the impact of habitat fragmentation may be stronger on intermediate rather than top trophic levels in some marine systems.

  1. Invasive ants alter foraging and parental behaviors of a native bird

    PubMed Central

    Siefferman, Lynn; Hill, Geoffrey E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduced species can exert outsized impacts on native biota through both direct (predation) and indirect (competition) effects. Ants frequently become established in new areas after being transported by humans across traditional biological or geographical barriers, and a prime example of such establishment is the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta). Introduced to North America in the 1930's, red imported fire ants are now firmly established throughout the southeastern United States. Although these invasive predators can dramatically impact native arthropods, their effect on vertebrates through resource competition is essentially unknown. Using a paired experimental design, we compared patterns of foraging and rates of provisioning for breeding eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) in unmanipulated (control) territories to those in adjacent (treated) territories where fire ants were experimentally reduced. Bluebirds inhabiting treated territories foraged nearer their nests and provisioned offspring more frequently than bluebirds inhabiting control territories with unmanipulated fire ant levels. Additionally, nestlings from treated territories were in better condition than those from control territories, though these differences were largely confined to early development. The elimination of significant differences in body condition towards the end of the nestling period suggests that bluebird parents in control territories were able to make up the food deficit caused by fire ants, potentially by working harder to adequately provision their offspring. The relationship between fire ant abundance and bluebird behavior hints at the complexity of ecological communities and suggests negative effects of invasive species are not limited to taxa with which they have direct contact. PMID:22844172

  2. Inactivation of Ceramide Synthase 6 in Mice Results in an Altered Sphingolipid Metabolism and Behavioral Abnormalities*

    PubMed Central

    Ebel, Philipp; vom Dorp, Katharina; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Minich, David; Ginkel, Christina; Welcker, Jochen; Degen, Joachim; Eckhardt, Matthias; Dere, Ekrem; Dörmann, Peter; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The N-acyl chain length of ceramides is determined by the specificity of different ceramide synthases (CerS). The CerS family in mammals consists of six members with different substrate specificities and expression patterns. We have generated and characterized a mouse line harboring an enzymatically inactive ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6KO) gene and lacz reporter cDNA coding for β-galactosidase directed by the CerS6 promoter. These mice display a decrease in C16:0 containing sphingolipids. Relative to wild type tissues the amount of C16:0 containing sphingomyelin in kidney is ∼35%, whereas we find a reduction of C16:0 ceramide content in the small intestine to about 25%. The CerS6KO mice show behavioral abnormalities including a clasping abnormality of their hind limbs and a habituation deficit. LacZ reporter expression in the brain reveals CerS6 expression in hippocampus, cortex, and the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. Using newly developed antibodies that specifically recognize the CerS6 protein we show that the endogenous CerS6 protein is N-glycosylated and expressed in several tissues of mice, mainly kidney, small and large intestine, and brain. PMID:23760501

  3. Inactivation of ceramide synthase 6 in mice results in an altered sphingolipid metabolism and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ebel, Philipp; Vom Dorp, Katharina; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Zlomuzica, Armin; Kinugawa, Kiyoka; Mariani, Jean; Minich, David; Ginkel, Christina; Welcker, Jochen; Degen, Joachim; Eckhardt, Matthias; Dere, Ekrem; Dörmann, Peter; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-07-19

    The N-acyl chain length of ceramides is determined by the specificity of different ceramide synthases (CerS). The CerS family in mammals consists of six members with different substrate specificities and expression patterns. We have generated and characterized a mouse line harboring an enzymatically inactive ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6KO) gene and lacz reporter cDNA coding for β-galactosidase directed by the CerS6 promoter. These mice display a decrease in C16:0 containing sphingolipids. Relative to wild type tissues the amount of C16:0 containing sphingomyelin in kidney is ∼35%, whereas we find a reduction of C16:0 ceramide content in the small intestine to about 25%. The CerS6KO mice show behavioral abnormalities including a clasping abnormality of their hind limbs and a habituation deficit. LacZ reporter expression in the brain reveals CerS6 expression in hippocampus, cortex, and the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. Using newly developed antibodies that specifically recognize the CerS6 protein we show that the endogenous CerS6 protein is N-glycosylated and expressed in several tissues of mice, mainly kidney, small and large intestine, and brain.

  4. High fat diet produces brain insulin resistance, synaptodendritic abnormalities and altered behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Steven E; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R; Carlson, Gregory C; Browne, Caroline A; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F; Kim, Sangwon F

    2014-07-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS(616)), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors.

  5. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep.

    PubMed

    Aepli, Andrina; Kurth, Salome; Tesler, Noemi; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2015-10-15

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children's and adolescents' sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10-16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4) and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1), morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1-4.5 Hz) at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects). Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25-9.75 Hz). These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development.

  6. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  7. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Aepli, Andrina; Kurth, Salome; Tesler, Noemi; Jenni, Oskar G.; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children’s and adolescents’ sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10–16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4) and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1), morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1–4.5 Hz) at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects). Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25–9.75 Hz). These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development. PMID:26501326

  8. A trematode parasite alters growth, feeding behavior, and demographic success of invasive rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus).

    PubMed

    Sargent, Lindsey W; Baldridge, Ashley K; Vega-Ross, Maraliz; Towle, Kevin M; Lodge, David M

    2014-07-01

    Nonindigenous species can cause major changes to community interactions and ecosystem processes. The strong impacts of these species are often attributed to their high demographic success. While the importance of enemy release in facilitating invasions has often been emphasized, few studies have addressed the role of parasites in the invasive range in controlling demographic success of potential invaders. Here we examine whether a trematode parasite (Microphallus spp.) can contribute to previously documented alternate states in the abundance of invasive rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) in north temperate lakes in Wisconsin, USA. Microphallus infect O. rusticus after emerging from their first intermediate host, a hydrobiid snail. As previously documented, O. rusticus reduce densities of hydrobiid snails through direct predation and destruction of macrophyte habitat. Therefore, if Microphallus substantially reduce O. rusticus fitness, these parasites may reinforce a state of low crayfish abundance, and, at the other extreme, abundant crayfish may repress these parasites, reinforcing a state of high crayfish abundance. From samples collected from 109 sites in 16 lakes, we discovered (1) a positive relationship between crayfish infection intensity and hydrobiid snail abundance, (2) a negative relationship between parasite prevalence and crayfish abundance, and (3) a negative relationship between parasite prevalence and crayfish population growth. With experiments, we found that infection with Microphallus reduced foraging behavior and growth in O. rusticus, which may be the mechanisms responsible for the population reductions we observed. Overall results are consistent with the hypothesis that Microphallus contributes to alternate states in the abundance and impacts of O. rusticus.

  9. Overexpression of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s alters behavioral activity of rat offspring following prenatal exposure to lindane

    SciTech Connect

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok; Parmar, Devendra

    2007-12-15

    Oral administration of different doses (0.0625, 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg corresponding to 1/1400th, 1/700th or 1/350th of LD{sub 50}) of lindane to the pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 were found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-d) in brain and liver of offspring postnatally at 3 weeks. The increase in the activity of CYP monooxygenases was found to be associated with the increase in the mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYP1A, 2B and 2E1 isoenzymes in the brain and liver of offspring. Dose-dependent alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 3 weeks have suggested that increase in CYP activity may possibly lead to the formation of metabolites to the levels that may be sufficient to alter the behavioral activity of the offspring. Interestingly, the inductive effect on cerebral and hepatic CYPs was found to persist postnatally up to 6 weeks in the offspring at the relatively higher doses (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and up to 9 weeks at the highest dose (0.25 mg/kg), though the magnitude of induction was less than that observed at 3 weeks. Alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 6 and 9 weeks, though significant only in the offspring at 3 and 6-week of age, have further indicated that due to the reduced activity of the CYPs during the ontogeny, lindane and its metabolites may not be effectively cleared from the brain. The data suggest that low dose prenatal exposure to the pesticide has the potential to produce overexpression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs in brain and liver of the offspring which may account for the behavioral changes observed in the offspring.

  10. Creatine and pyruvate prevent behavioral and oxidative stress alterations caused by hypertryptophanemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Vivian Strassburger; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Oliveira, Lenise; Nunes, Mychely Lopes; de Castro, Fernanda Luz; Garcia, Cristina; Gemelli, Tanise; de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Wannmacher, Clóvis Milton Duval

    2012-03-01

    It is known that the accumulation of tryptophan and its metabolites is related to brain damage associated with both hypertryptophanemia and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of tryptophan administration on various parameters of behavior in the open-field task and oxidative stress, and the effects of creatine and pyruvate, on the effect of tryptophan. Forty, 60-day-old male Wistar rats, were randomly divided into four groups: saline, tryptophan, pyruvate + creatine, tryptophan + pyruvate + creatine. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of tryptophan (2 μmol/g body weight each one at 3 h of intervals) and/or pyruvate (200 μg/g body weight 1 h before tryptophan), and/or creatine (400 μg/g body weight twice a day for 5 days before tryptophan twice a day for 5 days before training); controls received saline solution (NaCl 0.85%) at the same volumes (30 μl/g body weight) than the other substances. Results showed that tryptophan increased the activity of the animals, suggesting a reduction in the ability of habituation to the environment. Tryptophan induced increase of TBA-RS and total sulfhydryls. The effects of tryptophan in the open field, and in oxidative stress were fully prevented by the combination of creatine plus pyruvate. In case these findings also occur in humans affected by hypertryptophanemia or other neurodegenerative disease in which tryptophan accumulates, it is feasible that oxidative stress may be involved in the mechanisms leading to the brain injury, suggesting that creatine and pyruvate supplementation could benefit patients affected by these disorders.

  11. Sesamol, a lipid lowering agent, ameliorates aluminium chloride induced behavioral and biochemical alterations in rats

    PubMed Central

    John, Jessy; Nampoothiri, Madhavan; Kumar, Nitesh; Mudgal, Jayesh; Nampurath, Gopalan Kutty; Chamallamudi, Mallikarjuna Rao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sesame oil from the seeds of Sesamum indicum Linn. (Pedaliaceae) has been used traditionally in Indian medical practice of Ayurveda in the treatment of central nervous system disorders and insomnia. A few published reports favor the anti-dementia effect of sesamol (SML), an active constituent of sesame oil. Objective: Thus, the present study was aimed to explore the anti-dementia effect and possible mechanism (s) of SML in aluminium chloride (AlCl3)-induced cognitive dysfunction model in rodents with special emphasis on memory centers viz., hippocampus and frontal cortex. Methods: Male Wistar rats were exposed to AlCl3 (175 mg/kg p.o.) for 60 days. SML (10 and 20 mg/kg) and rivastigmine (1 mg/kg) were administered orally 45 min before administration of AlCl3 for 60 days. Spatial memory was assessed using Morris water maze test. After 60 days of treatment animals were sacrificed, hippocampus and frontal cortex were collected and analyzed for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) level, antioxidant enzymes (Glutathione, catalase), lipid peroxidation, and nitrite level. The circulating triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were also analyzed. Results: SML significantly prevented behavioral impairments in aluminium-exposed rats. Treatment with SML reversed the increased cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL while raised the HDL levels. SML significantly corrected the effect of AlCl3 on AChE activity. Further, SML reversed the elevated nitric oxide, TNF-α and reduced antioxidant enzymes in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Conclusion: The present study suggests the neuro-protection by SML against cognitive dysfunction induced by environmental toxin (AlCl3) in hippocampus and frontal cortex. PMID:25829772

  12. Vowel category boundaries enhance cortical and behavioral responses to speech feedback alterations.

    PubMed

    Niziolek, Caroline A; Guenther, Frank H

    2013-07-17

    Auditory feedback is instrumental in the online control of speech, allowing speakers to compare their self-produced speech signal with a desired auditory target and correct for errors. However, there is little account of the representation of "target" and "error": does error depend purely on acoustic distance from a target, or is error enhanced by phoneme category changes? Here, we show an effect of vowel boundaries on compensatory responses to a real-time auditory perturbation. While human subjects spoke monosyllabic words, event-triggered functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to characterize neural responses to unexpected changes in auditory feedback. Capitalizing on speakers' natural variability, we contrasted the responses to feedback perturbations applied to two classes of utterances: (1) those that fell nearer to the category boundary, for which perturbations were designed to change the phonemic identity of the heard speech; and (2) those that fell farther from the boundary, for which perturbations resulted in only sub-phonemic auditory differences. Subjects' behavioral compensation was more than three times greater when feedback shifts were applied nearer to a category boundary. Furthermore, a near-boundary shift resulted in stronger cortical responses, most notably in right posterior superior temporal gyrus, than an identical shift that occurred far from the boundary. Across participants, a correlation was found between the amount of compensation to the perturbation and the amount of activity in a network of superior temporal and inferior frontal brain regions. Together, these results demonstrate that auditory feedback control of speech is sensitive to linguistic categories learned through auditory experience.

  13. Ethanolic extracts from Curcuma longa attenuates behavioral, immune, and neuroendocrine alterations in a rat chronic mild stress model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xing; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Wei-Yun; Cheng, Guang; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2006-05-01

    The ethanolic extracts from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L. (turmeric), possesses a wide variety of biological activities related to the treatment and prevention of affective disorders. To study their antidepressant effects, the impacts of chronic mild stress (CMS) and of the subsequent administration of ethanolic extracts of C. longa were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to the CMS procedure demonstrated increased serum interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, as well as a reduction of natural killer cell activity in splenocytes. In addition, CMS-treated rats exhibited elevated corticotropin-releasing factor in serum and medulla oblongata and cortisol levels in serum, with no significant change in serum adrenocorticotropin hormone levels. The preferential behavior of reduction in sucrose intake was also observed. These findings indicate that the alterations in immune and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis systems could participate in the behavioral response to the CMS procedure in animals. Administration of ethanolic extracts of C. longa largely reversed the above effects. These results demonstrate the antidepressant-like activity of ethanolic extracts of C. longa in the rat CMS model of depression, at least in part by improving the abnormalities in immune and the HPA axis functions.

  14. Vaccinium virgatum fruit extract as an important adjuvant in biochemical and behavioral alterations observed in animal model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pathise Souto; Gazal, Marta; Flores, Natália Porto; Zimmer, Aline Rigon; Chaves, Vitor Clasen; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Kaster, Manuella Pinto; Tavares, Rejane Giacomelli; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Lencina, Claiton Leoneti; Stefanello, Francieli Moro

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum) fruit extract on metabolic, behavioral and oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice submitted to an experimental model of metabolic syndrome induced by a highly palatable diet (HPD). Mice C57BL/6 were divided into 4 experimental groups: (1) received standard chow and saline orally, (2) received standard chow and blueberry hydroalcoholic extract, (3) received HPD and saline orally, (4) received HPD and blueberry hydroalcoholic extract. The animals were treated for 150days. Our results showed that the animals fed with HPD presented insulin resistance, increased body weight, visceral fat, glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol when compared to the control group. The blueberry extract prevented the increase of these metabolic parameters. Also, the extract was able to reduce the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of animals submitted to HPD. In contrast, no differences were observed in the total thiol content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase. In addition, the HPD fed animals showed a significant increase in immobility time in the forced swimming test and blueberry prevented this alteration, although no changes were observed in the ambulatory behavior, as well as in the anxiolytic profile of these animals. Overall, our findings suggest that chronic consumption of blueberry extract exhibits hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, antidepressant-like and antiperoxidative effects in an animal model of metabolic syndrome.

  15. Qualitatively Assessing the Experiences of College Students Completing AlcoholEdu: Do Participants Report Altering Behavior After Intervention?

    PubMed

    Barry, Adam E; Hobbs, Laura Ansley; Haas, Emily J; Gibson, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    To reduce college student drinking and associated alcohol-related consequences, many universities are turning to e-interventions, such as AlcoholEdu. To date, however, results of evaluations examining the impact of AlcoholEdu are mixed. Among these evaluations, few qualitative assessments have examined the experiences and perceptions of students who complete AlcoholEdu. This investigation aimed to assess whether students (a) find the program educational and engaging, (b) implemented specific strategies learned from participation, and (c) self-report altering their behavior as a result of participation. Even though respondents universally reported an increase in alcohol-related knowledge, there was an evident disconnect between this knowledge and their actual behavior. In other words, respondents reported that they did not implement what was taught in AlcoholEdu. Moreover, students highlighted several limitations associated with the program that would have influenced its overall impact, such as ignoring video segments of the program and clicking through assessments simply to complete the task. If used, college administrators and health professionals should implement e-interventions such as AlcoholEdu as one component of a multifaceted approach rather than a panacea for the current high-risk drinking practices of college students.

  16. Predator odor stress alters corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptor (CRF1R)-dependent behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Roltsch, Emily A; Baynes, Brittni B; Mayeux, Jacques P; Whitaker, Annie M; Baiamonte, Brandon A; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2014-04-01

    Humans with stress-related anxiety disorders exhibit increases in arousal and alcohol drinking, as well as altered pain processing. Our lab has developed a predator odor stress model that produces reliable and lasting increases in alcohol drinking. Here, we utilize this predator odor stress model to examine stress-induced increases in arousal, nociceptive processing, and alcohol self-administration by rats, and also to determine the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor-1 receptors (CRF1Rs) in mediating these behavioral changes. In a series of separate experiments, rats were exposed to predator odor stress, then tested over subsequent days for thermal nociception in the Hargreaves test, acoustic startle reactivity, or operant alcohol self-administration. In each experiment, rats were systemically injected with R121919, a CRF1R antagonist, and/or vehicle. Predator odor stress increased thermal nociception (i.e., hyperalgesia) and acoustic startle reactivity. Systemic administration of R121919 reduced thermal nociception and hyperarousal in stressed rats but not unstressed controls, and reduced operant alcohol responding over days. Stressed rats exhibited increased sensitivity to the behavioral effects of R121919 in all three tests, suggesting up-regulation of brain CRF1Rs number and/or function in stressed rats. These results suggest that post-stress alcohol drinking may be driven by a high-nociception high-arousal state, and that brain CRF1R signaling mediates these stress effects.

  17. A magnetic-dependent protein corona of tailor-made superparamagnetic iron oxides alters their biological behaviors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyao; Zhan, Xiaohui; Yang, Minggang; Yang, Qi; Xu, Xianghui; Lan, Fang; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-04-14

    In recent years, it is becoming increasingly evident that once nanoparticles come into contact with biological fluids, a protein corona surely forms and critically affects the biological behaviors of nanoparticles. Herein, we investigate whether the formation of protein corona on the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) is influenced by static magnetic field. Under static magnetic field, there is no obvious variation in the total amount of protein adsorption, but the proportion of adsorbed proteins significantly changes. Noticeably, certain proteins including apolipoproteins, complement system proteins and acute phase proteins, increase in the protein corona of SPIOs in the magnetic field. More importantly, the magnetic-dependent protein corona of SPIOs enhances the cellular uptake of SPIOs into the normal cell line (3T3 cells) and tumor cell line (HepG2 cells), due to increased adsorption of apolipoprotein. In addition, SPIOs with the magnetic-dependent protein corona cause high cytotoxicity to 3T3 cells and HepG2 cells. This work discloses that superparamagnetism as a key feature of SPIOs affects the composition of protein corona to a large extent, which further alters the biological behaviors of SPIOs.

  18. Contributions of altered permeability of intestinal barrier and defecation behavior to toxicity formation from graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuli; Yin, Li; Li, Xing; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Dayong

    2013-10-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged exposure to 0.5-100 mg L(-1) of GO caused damage on functions of both primary (intestine) and secondary (neuron and reproductive organ) targeted organs. In the intestine, ROS production was significantly correlated with the formation of adverse effects on functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs. GO could be translocated into intestinal cells with loss of microvilli, and distributed to be adjacent to or surrounding mitochondria. Prolonged exposure to GO resulted in a hyper-permeable state of the intestinal barrier, an increase in mean defecation cycle length, and alteration of genes required for intestinal development and defecation behavior. Thus, our data suggest that prolonged exposure to GO may cause potential risk to environmental organisms after release into the environment. GO toxicity may be due to the combinational effects of oxidative stress in the intestinal barrier, enhanced permeability of the biological barrier, and suppressed defecation behavior in C. elegans.

  19. Behavioral alterations in adolescent and adult rats caused by a brief subtoxic exposure to chlorpyrifos during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Icenogle, Laura M; Christopher, N Channelle; Blackwelder, W Paul; Caldwell, D Patrick; Qiao, Dan; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A; Levin, Edward D

    2004-01-01

    The widely used organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), elicits neurobehavioral abnormalities after apparently subtoxic neonatal exposures. In the current study, we administered 1 or 5 mg/kg/day of CPF to pregnant rats on gestational days 9-12, the embryonic phase spanning formation and closure of the neural tube. Although there were no effects on growth or viability, offspring showed behavioral abnormalities when tested in adolescence and adulthood. In the CPF-exposed groups, locomotor hyperactivity was noted in early T-maze trials, and in the elevated plus-maze; alterations in the rate of habituation were also identified. Learning and memory were adversely affected, as assessed using the 16-arm radial maze. Although all CPF-exposed animals eventually learned the task, reference and working memory were impaired in the early training sessions. After training, rats in the CPF group did not show the characteristic amnestic effect of scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine antagonist, suggesting that, unlike the situation in the control group, muscarinic pathways were not used to solve the maze. These results indicate that apparently subtoxic CPF exposure during neurulation adversely affects brain development, leading to behavioral anomalies that selectively include impairment of cholinergic circuits used in learning and memory. The resemblance of these findings to those of late gestational or neonatal CPF exposure indicates a prolonged window of vulnerability of brain development to CPF.

  20. Characterisation of the green turtle's leukocyte subpopulations by flow cytometry and evaluation of their phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, F A; Franco-Noguez, S Y; Gonzalez-Ballesteros, E; Negrete-Philippe, A C; Flores-Romo, L

    2014-06-01

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental aspect of innate immunity that is conserved across many species making it a potentially useful health-assessment tool for wildlife. In non-mammalian vertebrates, heterophils, monocytes, macrophages, melanomacrophages, and thrombocytes all have phagocytic properties. Recently, B lymphocytes from fish, amphibians, and aquatic turtles have also showed phagocytic capacity. Phagocytes can be studied by flow cytometry; however, the use of this tool is complicated in reptiles partly because nucleated erythrocytes complicate the procedure. We separated green turtle leukocytes by density gradient centrifugation and identified subpopulations by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Additionally, we assessed their ability to phagocytize Fluorspheres and Ovoalbumin-Alexa. We found that heterophils and lymphocytes but not monocytes could be easily identified by flow cytometry. While heterophils from adults and juvenile turtles were equally able to phagocytize fluorspheres, adults had significantly more phagocytic ability for OVA-Alexa. Lymphocytes had a mild phagocytic activity with fluorospheres (27-38 %; 39-45 %) and OVA-Alexa (35-46 %; 14-22 %) in juvenile and adult green turtles, respectively. Confocal microscopy confirmed phagocytosis of fluorospheres in both heterophils and lymphocytes. This provides the first evidence that green turtle lymphocytes have phagocytic activity and that this assay could potentially be useful to measure one aspect of innate immunity in this species.

  1. Weight Reduction in Athletes May Adversely Affect the Phagocytic Function of Monocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kono, Ichiro; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the monocyte phagocytic function in nine competitive athletes before and after a two-week weight reduction (through calorie restriction) program revealed that their pre-program phagocytic activity was higher than in sedentary controls but decreased significantly after the program. This suggests calorie restriction may affect the human…

  2. Deficient Grip Force Control in Schizophrenia: Behavioral and Modeling Evidence for Altered Motor Inhibition and Motor Noise

    PubMed Central

    Teremetz, Maxime; Amado, Isabelle; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Lindberg, Pavel G.; Maier, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Whether upper limb sensorimotor control is affected in schizophrenia and how underlying pathological mechanisms may potentially intervene in these deficits is still being debated. We tested voluntary force control in schizophrenia patients and used a computational model in order to elucidate potential cerebral mechanisms underlying sensorimotor deficits in schizophrenia. A visuomotor grip force-tracking task was performed by 17 medicated and 6 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and by 15 healthy controls. Target forces in the ramp-hold-and-release paradigm were set to 5N and to 10% maximal voluntary grip force. Force trajectory was analyzed by performance measures and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A computational model incorporating neural control signals was used to replicate the empirically observed motor behavior and to explore underlying neural mechanisms. Grip task performance was significantly lower in medicated and non-medicated schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Three behavioral variables were significantly higher in both patient groups: tracking error (by 50%), coefficient of variation of force (by 57%) and duration of force release (up by 37%). Behavioral performance did not differ between patient groups. Computational simulation successfully replicated these findings and predicted that decreased motor inhibition, together with an increased signal-dependent motor noise, are sufficient to explain the observed motor deficits in patients. PCA also suggested altered motor inhibition as a key factor differentiating patients from control subjects: the principal component representing inhibition correlated with clinical severity. These findings show that schizophrenia affects voluntary sensorimotor control of the hand independent of medication, and suggest that reduced motor inhibition and increased signal-dependent motor noise likely reflect key pathological mechanisms of the sensorimotor deficit. PMID:25369465

  3. Selenium exposure results in reduced reproduction in an invasive ant species and altered competitive behavior for a native ant species.

    PubMed

    De La Riva, Deborah G; Trumble, John T

    2016-06-01

    Competitive ability and numerical dominance are important factors contributing to the ability of invasive ant species to establish and expand their ranges in new habitats. However, few studies have investigated the impact of environmental contamination on competitive behavior in ants as a potential factor influencing dynamics between invasive and native ant species. Here we investigated the widespread contaminant selenium to investigate its potential influence on invasion by the exotic Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, through effects on reproduction and competitive behavior. For the fecundity experiment, treatments were provided to Argentine ant colonies via to sugar water solutions containing one of three concentrations of selenium (0, 5 and 10 μg Se mL(-1)) that fall within the range found in soil and plants growing in contaminated areas. Competition experiments included both the Argentine ant and the native Dorymyrmex bicolor to determine the impact of selenium exposure (0 or 15 μg Se mL(-1)) on exploitation- and interference-competition between ant species. The results of the fecundity experiment revealed that selenium negatively impacted queen survival and brood production of Argentine ants. Viability of the developing brood was also affected in that offspring reached adulthood only in colonies that were not given selenium, whereas those in treated colonies died in their larval stages. Selenium exposure did not alter direct competitive behaviors for either species, but selenium exposure contributed to an increased bait discovery time for D. bicolor. Our results suggest that environmental toxins may not only pose problems for native ant species, but may also serve as a potential obstacle for establishment among exotic species.

  4. In vivo assessment of phagocytic properties of Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reske, S.N.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Three-compartment analysis was used to assess the kinetics of phagocytosis of Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin microparticles (Tc-99m HSA-MM) in human Kupffer cells in vivo. The tracer turnover in these phagocytic cells could be described by a monoexponential accumulation with a two-stage elimination phase. Three-compartment analysis of the Tc-99m HSA-MM kinetics allowed us to quantify tracer attachment, phagocytosis, and degradation in Kupffer cells. The calculated time course of phagocytosis in ten control subjects proved to be identical to that of phagocytosis of various test substances in mouse macrophage monolayers (1). In addition, an impairment of particle turnover at the macrophage membrane, a significantly diminished (p less than 0.01) phagocytosis rate of the tracer, was observed in ten patients with various tumors.

  5. In vivo assessment of phagocytic properties of Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reske, S.N.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Three-compartment analysis was used to assess the kinetics of phagocytosis of Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin microparticles (Tc-99m HSA-MM) in human Kupffer cells in vivo. The tracer turnover in these phagocytic cells could be described by a monoexponential accumulation with a two-stage elimination phase. Three-compartment analysis of the Tc-99m HSA-MM kinetics allowed us to quantify tracer attachment, phagocytosis, and degradation in Kupffer cells. The calculated time course of phagocytosis in ten control subjects proved to be identicl to that of phagocytosis of various test substances in mouse macrophage monolayers. In addition, an impairment of particle turnover at the macrophage membrane, a significantly diminished phagocytosis rate of the tracer, was observed in ten patients with various tumors.

  6. Manipulation of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been an emerging appreciation about the role of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) to control and eradicate pathogens. Likewise, there have been significant advances in dissecting the mechanisms involved in the microbial subversion of MPS cells, mainly affecting their differentiation and effector functions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a chronic bacterial pathogen that represents an enigma to the field because of its remarkable ability to thrive in humans. One reason is that M. tuberculosis renders a defective MPS compartment, which is perhaps the most ingenious strategy for survival in the host given the prominence of these cells to modulate microenvironments, their function as sentinels and orchestrators of the immune response, and their pathogenic role as reservoirs for microbial persistence. In this article, the principal strategies used by M. tuberculosis to subvert the MPS compartment are presented along with emerging concepts. PMID:25147188

  7. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  8. Septin: a factor in plasma that opsonizes lipopolysaccharide-bearing particles for recognition by CD14 on phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein (LBP) opsonizes endotoxin (LPS) for recognition by CD14 on phagocytes. Here we show that normal human plasma contains high titers of an activity that also binds LPS (Re, 595) and mediates recognition by CD14. Opsonization of LPS-coated particles with plasma enables the particles to be bound by phagocytes. Further, opsonization with plasma also enables subnanogram-per-milliliter concentrations of LPS to induce dramatic alterations in the function of leukocyte integrins on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and to induce secretion of tumor necrosis factor by monocytes, suggesting that opsonization by factors in plasma may be important in responses of cells to endotoxin. The opsonic activity in plasma appears distinct from LBP since it is not blocked by neutralizing antibodies against LBP. Surprisingly, the opsonic activity of plasma is not present in a single protein species, but at least two species must be combined to observe activity. Further, the opsonic activity of plasma for LPS is blocked by addition of protease inhibitors, suggesting that proteolytic activity or activities are required for opsonization. These properties are suggestive of the action of a protease cascade, but opsonic activity of plasma is not affected by blockade or depletion of either the complement or clotting cascades. We propose the name "septin" to describe this novel LPS- opsonizing activity in plasma. PMID:1380975

  9. Exposure to the Contraceptive Progestin, Gestodene, Alters Reproductive Behavior, Arrests Egg Deposition, and Masculinizes Development in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Frankel, Tyler E; Meyer, Michael T; Kolpin, Dana W; Gillis, Amanda B; Alvarez, David A; Orlando, Edward F

    2016-06-07

    Endogenous progestogens and pharmaceutical progestins enter the environment through wastewater treatment plant effluent and agricultural field runoff. Lab studies demonstrate strong, negative exposure effects of these chemicals on aquatic vertebrate reproduction. Behavior can be a sensitive, early indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants associated with altered reproduction yet is rarely examined in ecotoxicology studies. Gestodene is a human contraceptive progestin and a potent activator of fish androgen receptors. Our objective was to test the effects of gestodene on reproductive behavior and associated egg deposition in the fathead minnow. After only 1 day, males exposed to ng/L of gestodene were more aggressive and less interested in courtship and mating, and exposed females displayed less female courtship behavior. Interestingly, 25% of the gestodene tanks contained a female that drove the male out of the breeding tile and displayed male-typical courtship behaviors toward the other female. Gestodene decreased or arrested egg deposition with no observed gonadal histopathology. Together, these results suggest that effects on egg deposition are primarily due to altered reproductive behavior. The mechanisms by which gestodene disrupts behavior are unknown. Nonetheless, the rapid and profound alterations of the reproductive biology of gestodene-exposed fish suggest that wild populations could be similarly affected.

  10. Exposure to the contraceptive progestin, gestodene, alters reproductive behavior, arrests egg deposition, and masculinizes development in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Tyler E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Gillis, Amanda B.; Alvarez, David A.; Orlando, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous progestogens and pharmaceutical progestins enter the environment through wastewater treatment plant effluent and agricultural field runoff. Lab studies demonstrate strong, negative exposure effects of these chemicals on aquatic vertebrate reproduction. Behavior can be a sensitive, early indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants associated with altered reproduction yet is rarely examined in ecotoxicology studies. Gestodene is a human contraceptive progestin and a potent activator of fish androgen receptors. Our objective was to test the effects of gestodene on reproductive behavior and associated egg deposition in the fathead minnow. After only 1 day, males exposed to ng/L of gestodene were more aggressive and less interested in courtship and mating, and exposed females displayed less female courtship behavior. Interestingly, 25% of the gestodene tanks contained a female that drove the male out of the breeding tile and displayed male-typical courtship behaviors toward the other female. Gestodene decreased or arrested egg deposition with no observed gonadal histopathology. Together, these results suggest that effects on egg deposition are primarily due to altered reproductive behavior. The mechanisms by which gestodene disrupts behavior are unknown. Nonetheless, the rapid and profound alterations of the reproductive biology of gestodene-exposed fish suggest that wild populations could be similarly affected.

  11. Female Flinders Sensitive Line rats show estrous cycle-independent depression-like behavior and altered tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eskelund, Amanda; Budac, David P; Sanchez, Connie; Elfving, Betina; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-08-04

    Clinical studies suggest a link between depression and dysfunctional tryptophan (TRP) metabolism. Even though depression is twice as prevalent in women as men, the impact of the estrous cycle on TRP metabolism is not well-understood. Here we investigated 13 kynurenine and serotonin metabolites in female Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic rat model of depression. FSL rats and controls (Flinders Resistant Line rats), 12-20weeks old, were subject to the forced swim test (FST), a commonly used measure of depression-like behavior. Open field was used to evaluate locomotor ability and agoraphobia. Subsequently, plasma and hemispheres were collected and analyzed for their content of TRP metabolites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Vaginal saline lavages were obtained daily for ⩾2 cycles. To estimate the effects of sex and FST we included plasma from unhandled, naïve male FSL and FRL rats. Female FSL rats showed a depression-like phenotype with increased immobility in the FST, not confounded by anxiety. In the brain, 3-hydroxykynurenine was increased whereas anthranilate and 5-hydroxytryptophan were decreased. In plasma, anthranilate and quinolinate levels were lower in FSL rats compared to the control line, independent of sex and FST. The estrous cycle neither impacted behavior nor TRP metabolite levels in the FSL rat. In conclusion, the female FSL rat is an interesting preclinical model of depression with altered TRP metabolism, independent of the estrous cycle. The status of the pathway in brain was not reflected in the plasma, which may indicate that an inherent local, cerebral regulation of TRP metabolism occurs.

  12. Subchronic cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2) treatment during cocaine abstinence alters subsequent cocaine seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    González-Cuevas, Gustavo; Aujla, Harinder; Martin-Fardon, Rémi; López-Moreno, José Antonio; Navarro, Miguel; Weiss, Friedbert

    2007-11-01

    The co-abuse of marijuana with cocaine is widespread, but it has not been until recently that the relationship between the behavioral effects of cannabinoids and cocaine has begun to be unveiled in animal models. Male Wistar rats were trained to intravenously self-administer cocaine until a stable baseline was reached. Rats then were subjected to a 5-day cocaine deprivation period during which they were treated daily with the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (R-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate) (0, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg; i.p.). Following this subchronic treatment, rats were tested, in counterbalanced order, in a test of anxiety (elevated plus-maze), as well as extinction and cue-induced reinstatement tests, the latter conducted according to a between-within procedure. Subchronic administration of WIN 55,212-2 was found to produce dose-dependent alterations of performance in the extinction, reinstatement, and anxiety tests with the lowest dose of WIN 55,212-2 producing the highest resistance to extinction and reinstatement, and the highest dose of WIN 55,212-2 producing the highest anxiolytic activity. Subchronic treatment with WIN 55,212-2 in rats without a history of cocaine self-administration did not affect anxiety levels. The results suggest an important role of the cannabinoid system in neuronal processes underlying cocaine seeking behavior. However, further studies will be necessary to understand possible implications of these findings for a role of the cannabinoid system as a treatment target for human cocaine abuse.

  13. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.

    Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.

    Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  14. The rare DAT coding variant Val559 perturbs DA neuron function, changes behavior, and alters in vivo responses to psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Mergy, Marc A; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Gresch, Paul J; Gantz, Stephanie C; Williams, John; Davis, Gwynne L; Wheeler, C Austin; Stanwood, Gregg D; Hahn, Maureen K; Blakely, Randy D

    2014-11-04

    Despite the critical role of the presynaptic dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) in DA clearance and psychostimulant responses, evidence that DAT dysfunction supports risk for mental illness is indirect. Recently, we identified a rare, nonsynonymous Slc6a3 variant that produces the DAT substitution Ala559Val in two male siblings who share a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), with other studies identifying the variant in subjects with bipolar disorder (BPD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previously, using transfected cell studies, we observed that although DAT Val559 displays normal total and surface DAT protein levels, and normal DA recognition and uptake, the variant transporter exhibits anomalous DA efflux (ADE) and lacks capacity for amphetamine (AMPH)-stimulated DA release. To pursue the significance of these findings in vivo, we engineered DAT Val559 knock-in mice, and here we demonstrate in this model the presence of elevated extracellular DA levels, altered somatodendritic and presynaptic D2 DA receptor (D2R) function, a blunted ability of DA terminals to support depolarization and AMPH-evoked DA release, and disruptions in basal and psychostimulant-evoked locomotor behavior. Together, our studies demonstrate an in vivo functional impact of the DAT Val559 variant, providing support for the ability of DAT dysfunction to impact risk for mental illness.

  15. Chronic FAAH inhibition during nicotine abstinence alters habenular CB1 receptor activity and precipitates depressive-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, A; Zamberletti, E; Cador, M; Rubino, T; Caillé, S

    2017-02-01

    The role of the endocannabinoid system in nicotine addiction is being increasingly acknowledged. Acute inhibition of anandamide (AEA) degradation efficiently reduces nicotine withdrawal-induced affective symptoms in rats and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the degradation enzyme of AEA, has been proposed as a possible treatment against nicotine addiction. However, it is unclear whether chronic inhibition of AEA during nicotine abstinence will have beneficial or deleterious affective side-effects. Using a rat model of nicotine addiction, we found that, during abstinence, rats injected daily with a FAAH inhibitor (URB597) developed a depressive-like phenotype. Our results show that in the nicotine abstinent rats, URB597 induced low saccharin consumption, persistent immobility in the forced swim test and increased corticosterone levels in response to stress. In addition, URB597decreased CB1 receptor binding and activity in the habenula, a key structure in the control of nicotine-related emotional states. In contrast, non-treated abstinent rats showed increased CB1 receptor activity and behaviors comparable to controls. No FAAH inhibition-induced alterations were observed in animals that had a previous history of saline self-administration. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic FAAH inhibition prevents the homeostatic adaptations of habenular CB1 receptor function that are necessary for the recovery from nicotine dependence.

  16. Some determinants of the locomotory behaviour of phagocytes and lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C; Haston, W S; Shields, J M

    1982-01-01

    In this review, we discuss some physical and chemical determinants of locomotor behaviour of phagocytic cells and lymphocytes as studied in visual assays, paying particular attention to the following points. (a) A distinction is made between chemokinesis and other forms of kinesis. We propose that the term chemokinesis be reserved for responses resulting from selective recognition of chemical substances. Many kineses in leucocytes may not involve such recognition, but may result from a variety of physical factors, such as those that alter the adhesiveness between cell and substratum. (b) Neutrophils moving in aligned gels of collagen or fibrin show contact guidance of locomotion, i.e. bidirectional movement along the axis of alignment of the fibres of the gel. Thus neutrophils show directional locomotion not only in chemotactic gradients but also in response to physical properties of the substratum. (c) Lymphocytes adhere poorly and move poorly on 2D protein coated substrata. However they move rapidly through 3D collagen gels. This locomotion may be independent of adhesion since lymphocytes may gain traction for locomotion by expanding pseudopods into gaps in the gel matrix, then using the pseudopod as an anchor for subsequent locomotion in any direction. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:6762268

  17. Stimulation of mesangial phagocytes does not influence the removal of established glomerular immune complex deposits.

    PubMed Central

    Furness, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that mesangial phagocytes are involved in the removal of established glomerular immune complex deposits, either puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was given to rats as they recovered from chronic serum sickness glomerulonephritis. Both these substances increase the number and activity of mesangial macrophages. The nephritis was induced with radiolabelled cationized bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 10 days of such treatment, the animals were killed and the amount of isotope in whole renal cortex and in isolated glomeruli was measured. The volume fraction of subepithelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits was assessed by morphometric methods. Neither PAN nor PVA caused any significant alteration in any of these parameters. These results suggest that the methods by which well established glomerular immune complex deposits are removed do not involve mesangial macrophages to any major extent, and therefore differ from the systems which handle particulate matter and immune complexes as they arrive at the glomerular filter. The morphologic appearances of the deposits at the end of the experiment suggest extracellular dissolution in situ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:2144766

  18. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  19. A Background of a Volatile Plant Compound Alters Neural and Behavioral Responses to the Sex Pheromone Blend in a Moth.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Fabienne; Rouyar, Angéla; Deisig, Nina; Bourgeois, Thomas; Limousin, Denis; Wycke, Marie-Anne; Anton, Sylvia; Renou, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of intra-specific olfactory signals within a complex environment of plant-related volatiles is crucial for reproduction in male moths. Sex pheromone information is detected by specific olfactory receptor neurons (Phe-ORNs), highly abundant on the male antenna. The information is then transmitted to the pheromone processing macroglomerular complex (MGC) within the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe, where it is processed by local interneurons and projection neurons. Ultimately a behavioral response, orientation toward the pheromone source, is elicited. Volatile plant compounds (VPCs) are detected by other functional types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) projecting in another area of the antennal lobe. However, Phe-ORNs also respond to some VPCs. Female-produced sex pheromones are emitted within a rich environment of VPCs, some of which have been shown to interfere with the detection and processing of sex pheromone information. As interference between the different odor sources might depend on the spatial and temporal features of the two types of stimuli, we investigated here behavioral and neuronal responses to a brief sex pheromone blend pulse in a VPC background as compared to a control background in the male noctuid moth Agrotis ipsilon. We observed male orientation behavior in a wind tunnel and recorded responses of Phe-ORNs and MGC neurons to a brief sex pheromone pulse within a background of individual VPCs. We also recorded the global input signal to the MGC using in vivo calcium imaging with the same stimulation protocol. We found that VPCs eliciting a response in Phe-ORNs and MGC neurons masked responses to the pheromone and decreased the contrast between background odor and the sex pheromone at both levels, whereas α-pinene did not interfere with first order processing. The calcium signal produced in response to a VPC background was tonic, lasting longer than the VPC stimulus duration, and masked entirely the pheromone response

  20. A Background of a Volatile Plant Compound Alters Neural and Behavioral Responses to the Sex Pheromone Blend in a Moth

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Fabienne; Rouyar, Angéla; Deisig, Nina; Bourgeois, Thomas; Limousin, Denis; Wycke, Marie-Anne; Anton, Sylvia; Renou, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of intra-specific olfactory signals within a complex environment of plant-related volatiles is crucial for reproduction in male moths. Sex pheromone information is detected by specific olfactory receptor neurons (Phe-ORNs), highly abundant on the male antenna. The information is then transmitted to the pheromone processing macroglomerular complex (MGC) within the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe, where it is processed by local interneurons and projection neurons. Ultimately a behavioral response, orientation toward the pheromone source, is elicited. Volatile plant compounds (VPCs) are detected by other functional types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) projecting in another area of the antennal lobe. However, Phe-ORNs also respond to some VPCs. Female-produced sex pheromones are emitted within a rich environment of VPCs, some of which have been shown to interfere with the detection and processing of sex pheromone information. As interference between the different odor sources might depend on the spatial and temporal features of the two types of stimuli, we investigated here behavioral and neuronal responses to a brief sex pheromone blend pulse in a VPC background as compared to a control background in the male noctuid moth Agrotis ipsilon. We observed male orientation behavior in a wind tunnel and recorded responses of Phe-ORNs and MGC neurons to a brief sex pheromone pulse within a background of individual VPCs. We also recorded the global input signal to the MGC using in vivo calcium imaging with the same stimulation protocol. We found that VPCs eliciting a response in Phe-ORNs and MGC neurons masked responses to the pheromone and decreased the contrast between background odor and the sex pheromone at both levels, whereas α-pinene did not interfere with first order processing. The calcium signal produced in response to a VPC background was tonic, lasting longer than the VPC stimulus duration, and masked entirely the pheromone response

  1. Abuse pattern of gestational toluene exposure alters behavior in rats in a "waiting-for-reward" task.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Scott E; Hannigan, John H; Cooper, Patrick B

    2009-01-01

    Toluene abuse during pregnancy is a world-wide public health concern although the neurobehavioral teratogenic effects of toluene at the high concentrations and binge-like exposure patterns typical of abuse remain understudied. We assessed the effects of binge prenatal toluene exposure on behavior reflective of impulsivity in rat offspring using a "waiting-for-reward" operant task. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 15 min, twice daily, from gestational day (GD) 8 through GD20 to either air, 8000 ppm, 12,000 ppm or 16,000 ppm toluene in a static exposure system. At postnatal day 60, male and female offspring were trained to stable lever pressing in a standard fixed-ratio 50 (FR50) paradigm. A wait requirement was then introduced such that after each FR completion, a "free" pellet was delivered at increasing time intervals (2 s, 4 s, 6 s, etc.) until the rat pressed another lever which reinstated the FR50 component ("FR Reset"). A pattern of increased FR Resets and fewer total pellets received overall and during the wait component is interpretable as "impulsivity." The "wait" component assessment was repeated after the rats had been injected with varying doses of amphetamine. Consistent with our hypotheses, repeated binge prenatal toluene exposure appeared to increase impulsivity based upon decreases in the total number of free pellets received and mean waiting time. However, a toluene dose-dependent decrease in the number of FR Resets and in response rates under all conditions indicated there was a general impairment in performance in rats exposed prenatally to higher doses of toluene. Also, prenatal exposure to 12,000 ppm and 16,000 ppm toluene resulted in a hyposensitivity to the stimulatory effects of the amphetamine challenge in male rats. For female rats, amphetamine further interfered with performance on the task. These results suggest that acute binge prenatal toluene exposure alters performance in this task but the results are not consistent

  2. GBR 12909 administration as an animal model of bipolar mania: time course of behavioral, brain oxidative alterations and effect of mood stabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Ana Isabelle G; de Araújo, Maíra Moraes; da Silva Araújo, Tatiane; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Jesus Souza Machado, Michel; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms in the human dopamine transporter (DAT) are associated with bipolar endophenotype. Based on this, the acute inhibition of DAT using GBR12909 causes behavioral alterations that are prevented by valproate (VAL), being related to a mania-like model. Herein our first aim was to analyze behavioral and brain oxidative alterations during a 24 h period post-GBR12909 to better characterize this model. Our second aim was to determine the preventive effects of lithium (Li) or VAL 2 h post-GBR12909. For this, adult male mice received GBR12909 or saline being evaluated at 2, 4, 8, 12 or 24 h post-administration. Hyperlocomotion, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation in brain areas were assessed at all these time-points. GBR12909 caused hyperlocomotion at 2 and 24 h. Rearing behavior increased only at 2 h. GSH levels decreased in the hippocampus and striatum at the time points of 2, 4, 8 and 12 h. Increased lipid peroxidation was detected at the time-points of 2 and 12 h in all brain areas studied. At the time-point of 2 h post-GBR12909 Li prevented the hyperlocomotion and rearing alterations, while VAL prevented only rearing alterations. Both drugs prevented pro-oxidative changes. In conclusion, we observed that the main behavioral and oxidative alterations took place at the time-period of 2 h post-GBR12909, what points to this time-period as the best for the assessment of alterations in this model. Furthermore, the present study expands the predictive validity of the model by the determination of the preventive effects of Li.

  3. Brain transcription factor gene expression, neurotransmitter levels, and novelty response behaviors: alterations during rat amphetamine withdrawal and following chronic injection stress.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; Schindler, C W; Zaczek, R; Brannock, M T; Uhl, G R

    1995-03-01

    Transcription factors are known to act as gene expression regulators, possibly linking extracellular stimuli to long-term modifications at the neuronal level. Such modifications may potentially underlie chronic psychostimulant- and stress-induced behavioral alterations. This study illustrates how a 2 week, twice daily 7.5 mg/kg d-amphetamine or saline regimen alters rat brain regional expression of transcription factor genes, including c-fos, fos-B, jun-B, c-jun, and zif 268, and seeks potential correlations between those changes and alterations in neurotransmitter levels and behavioral novelty responses. Amphetamine withdrawal-induced decreases in transcription factor mRNA levels, assessed using Northern blot analysis, appear most prominent in prefrontal cortex, begin approximately 12 h after the last injection, and largely recover to control levels by 54 h. Prefrontal cortical and striatal dopamine content, assessed using HPLC, decrease and recover over a similar time course. Behavioral "stereotypy time" manifest by animals exposed to a novel environment, a measure sensitive to psychostimulant withdrawal, also decreases beginning 12 h after the last injection, is still significantly reduced at 54 h, and recovers at 72 h. Chronic saline injections are followed by a consistent decrease in transcription factor gene expression, observed 6 h after the last injection, followed by a "rebound" increase at 12 h. These changes are accompanied by dramatic, mostly biphasic alterations in prefrontal cortical biogenic amines and by a short-lived increase in striatal dopamine turnover. At the same time, rats display much longer-lasting decreases in locomotor responses when exposed to a novel environment, with recovery occurring only 54 h after the last injection. The delayed recovery of behavioral responses to novelty is consistent with potential involvement of changes in transcription factor-mediated gene expression in neurochemical mechanisms underlying psychostimulant

  4. Effects of social isolation on neuromuscular excitability and aggressive behaviors in Drosophila: Altered responses by Hk and gsts1, two mutations implicated in redox regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Social deprivation is known to trigger a variety of behavioral and physiological modifications in animal species but the underlying genetic and cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. As we described previously, adult female flies reared in isolation show increased frequency of aggressive behaviors than those reared in group. Here we report that isolated rearing also caused significantly altered nerve and muscle excitability and enhanced synaptic transmission at larval neuromuscular junctions. We found that mutations of two genes, Hyperkinetic (Hk) and glutathione S-transferase-S1 (gsts1) alter the response to social isolation in Drosophila. Hk and gsts1 mutations increased adult female aggression and larval neuromuscular hyperexcitability even when reared in group. Unlike wild type, these behavioral and electrophysiological phenotypes were not further enhanced in these mutants by isolated rearing. Products of these two genes have been implicated in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. We previously reported in these mutants increased signals from a ROS probe at larval neuromuscular junctions and this study revealed distinct effects of isolation rearing on these mutants compared to the control larvae in ROS-probe signals. Our data further demonstrated modified nerve and muscle excitability by a reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Our results suggest that altered cellular ROS regulation can exert pleiotropic effects on nerve, synapse, and muscle functions and may involve different redox mechanisms in different cell types to modify behavioral expressions. Therefore, ROS regulation may take part in the cellular responses to social isolation stress, underlying an important form of neural and behavioral plasticity. PMID:19863269

  5. Fibronectin receptors of mononuclear phagocytes: Binding characteristics and biochemical isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Pardo, A.; Ferreira, O.C.; Valinsky, J.; Bianco, C. )

    1989-04-01

    Fibronectin receptors on mononuclear phagocytes are involved in the localization of monocytes at inflammatory sites and in the subsequent expression of macrophage-like phenotypes. In this study, the authors have investigated the hypothesis that preteolytically derived fragments of fibronectin may interfere with binding of fibronectin to monocytes in the extracellular matrix. They report on the reactivity of U937 cells with an 80-kDa tryptic fragment of fibronectin which contains the cell-binding domain but lacks the gelatin/collagen-binding domain. U937 cells attached to surfaces coated with the 80-kDa fragment as well as with intact fibronectin. Preincubation of the cells with the 80-kDa fragment inhibited attachment to both surfaces while intact fibronectin had little or no inhibitory effect. This complex resolved into a single diffuse band of 144 kDa upon reduction. Binding of the protein complex to the affinity column required divalent cations. The complex bound to wheat germ agglutinin and could be specifically eluted by N-acetylglucosamine. Similar cell-surface proteins were isolated from peripheral blood monocytes.

  6. Self-organizing actin waves that simulate phagocytic cup structures.

    PubMed

    Gerisch, Günther

    2010-03-18

    This report deals with actin waves that are spontaneously generated on the planar, substrate-attached surface of Dictyostelium cells. These waves have the following characteristics. (1) They are circular structures of varying shape, capable of changing the direction of propagation. (2) The waves propagate by treadmilling with a recovery of actin incorporation after photobleaching of less than 10 seconds. (3) The waves are associated with actin-binding proteins in an ordered 3-dimensional organization: with myosin-IB at the front and close to the membrane, the Arp2/3 complex throughout the wave, and coronin at the cytoplasmic face and back of the wave. Coronin is a marker of disassembling actin structures. (4) The waves separate two areas of the cell cortex that differ in actin structure and phosphoinositide composition of the membrane. The waves arise at the border of membrane areas rich in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5) trisphosphate (PIP3). The inhibition of PIP3 synthesis reversibly inhibits wave formation. (5) The actin wave and PIP3 patterns resemble 2-dimensional projections of phagocytic cups, suggesting that they are involved in the scanning of surfaces for particles to be taken up.PACS Codes: 87.16.Ln, 87.19.lp, 89.75.Fb.

  7. Metabolic Reprograming of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tannahill, Gillian Margaret; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Frezza, Christian; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Accumulation of brain damage in progressive MS is partly the result of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) attacking myelin sheaths in the CNS. Although there is no cure yet for MS, significant advances have been made in the development of disease modifying agents. Unfortunately, most of these drugs fail to reverse established neurological deficits and can have adverse effects. Recent evidence suggests that MPs polarization is accompanied by profound metabolic changes, whereby pro-inflammatory MPs (M1) switch toward glycolysis, whereas anti-inflammatory MPs (M2) become more oxidative. It is therefore possible that reprograming MPs metabolism could affect their function and repress immune cell activation. This mini review describes the metabolic changes underpinning macrophages polarization and anticipates how metabolic re-education of MPs could be used for the treatment of MS. Key points: Inflammation in progressive MS is mediated primarily by MPs.Cell metabolism regulates the function of MPs.DMAs can re-educate the metabolism of MPs to promote healing. PMID:25814990

  8. Effect of low power laser irradiation on macrophage phagocytic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Song, Sheng; Tang, Yu; Zhou, Feifan

    2011-03-01

    Phagocytosis and subsequent degradation of pathogens by macrophages play a pivotal role in host innate immunity in mammals. Laser irradiation has been found to produce photobiological effects with evidence of interference with immunological functions. However, the effects of laser on the immune response have not been extensively characterized. In this study, we focused our attention on the effects of He-Ne laser on the phagocytic activity of macrophages by using flow cytometry (FCM). After irradiating at fluence of 0, 1, 2 J/cm2 with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm, 3mw), the cells were incubated with microsphere and then subjected to FACS analysis. The results showed that Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) leads to an increase in phagocytosis on both mouse peritoneal macrophages and the murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7. In addition, we demonstrated that LPLI increased phagocytosis of microsphere in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum at fluence of 2 J/cm2. Taken together, our results indicated that Low-power laser irradiation with appropriate dosage can enhance the phagocytosis of macrophage, and provided a theoretical base for the clinical use of the He-Ne laser.

  9. Phagocytes as Corrupted Policemen in Cancer-Related Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, Eduardo; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Jaillon, Sebastien; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a key component of the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) are prototypic inflammatory cells in cancer-related inflammation. Macrophages provide a first line of resistance against infectious agents but in the ecological niche of cancer behave as corrupted policemen. TAMs promote tumor growth and metastasis by direct interactions with cancer cells, including cancer stem cells, as well as by promoting angiogenesis and tissue remodeling and suppressing effective adaptive immunity. In addition, the efficacy of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and checkpoint blockade inhibitors is profoundly affected by regulation of TAMs. In particular, TAMs can protect and rescue tumor cells from cytotoxic therapy by orchestrating a misguided tissue repair response. Following extensive preclinical studies, there is now proof of concept that targeting tumor-promoting macrophages by diverse strategies (e.g., Trabectedin, anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor antibodies) can result in antitumor activity in human cancer and further studies are ongoing. Neutrophils have long been overlooked as a minor component of the tumor microenvironment, but there is evidence for an important role of TANs in tumor progression. Targeting phagocytes (TAMs and TANs) as corrupted policemen in cancer may pave the way to innovative therapeutic strategies complementing cytoreductive therapies and immunotherapy.

  10. The inflammatory role of phagocyte apoptotic pathways in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Carla M.; Pope, Richard M.; Perlman, Harris

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis affects nearly 1% of the world's population and is a debilitating autoimmune condition that can result in joint destruction. During the past decade, inflammatory functions have been described for signalling molecules classically involved in apoptotic and non-apoptotic death pathways, including but not limited to toll-like receptor signalling, inflammasome activation, cytokine production, macrophage polarization and antigen citrullination. In light of these remarkable advances in the understanding of inflammatory mechanisms of the death machinery, this review provides a snapshot of the available evidence implicating death pathways, especially within the phagocyte populations of the innate immune system, in the perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis. Elevated levels of signalling mediators of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic as well as the autophagy death pathways are observed in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, in rheumatoid arthritis patients, risk polymorphisms are present in signalling molecules of the extrinsic apoptotic and autophagy death pathways. Although research into the mechanisms underlying these death pathways has made considerable progress, this review highlights areas where further investigation is particularly needed. This exploration is critical, as new discoveries in this field could lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. PMID:27549026

  11. Can group-based reassuring information alter low back pain behavior? A cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Indahl, Aage; Andersen, Lars L.; Burton, Kim; Hertzum-Larsen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is common in the population and multifactorial in nature, often involving negative consequences. Reassuring information to improve coping is recommended for reducing the negative consequences of LBP. Adding a simple non-threatening explanation for the pain (temporary muscular dysfunction) has been successful at altering beliefs and behavior when delivered with other intervention elements. This study investigates the isolated effect of this specific information on future occupational behavior outcomes when delivered to the workforce. Design A cluster-randomized controlled trial. Methods Publically employed workers (n = 505) from 11 Danish municipality centers were randomized at center-level (cluster) to either intervention (two 1-hour group-based talks at the workplace) or control. The talks provided reassuring information together with a simple non-threatening explanation for LBP—the ‘functional-disturbance’-model. Data collections took place monthly over a 1-year period using text message tracking (SMS). Primary outcomes were self-reported days of cutting down usual activities and work participation. Secondary outcomes were self-reported back beliefs, work ability, number of healthcare visits, bothersomeness, restricted activity, use of pain medication, and sadness/depression. Results There was no between-group difference in the development of LBP during follow-up. Cumulative logistic regression analyses showed no between-group difference on days of cutting down activities, but increased odds for more days of work participation in the intervention group (OR = 1.83 95% CI: 1.08–3.12). Furthermore, the intervention group was more likely to report: higher work ability, reduced visits to healthcare professionals, lower bothersomeness, lower levels of sadness/depression, and positive back beliefs. Conclusion Reassuring information involving a simple non-threatening explanation for LBP significantly increased the odds for days of

  12. Brain and Behavioral Evidence for Altered Social Learning Mechanisms among Women with Assault-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cisler, Josh M.; Bush, Keith; Steele, J. Scott; Lenow, Jennifer K.; Smitherman, Sonet; Kilts, Clinton D.

    2015-01-01

    Current neurocircuitry models of PTSD focus on the neural mechanisms that mediate hypervigilance for threat and fear inhibition/extinction learning. Less focus has been directed towards explaining social deficits and heightened risk of revictimization observed among individuals with PTSD related to physical or sexual assault. The purpose of the present study was to foster more comprehensive theoretical models of PTSD by testing the hypothesis that assault-related PTSD is associated with behavioral impairments in a social trust and reciprocity task and corresponding alterations in the neural encoding of social learning mechanisms. Adult women with assault-related PTSD (n=25) and control women (n=15) completed a multi-trial trust game outside of the MRI scanner. A subset of these participants (15 with PTSD and 14 controls) also completed a social and non-social reinforcement learning task during 3T fMRI. Brain regions that encoded the computationally modeled parameters of value expectation, prediction error, and volatility (i.e., uncertainty) were defined and compared between groups. The PTSD group demonstrated slower learning rates during the trust game and social prediction errors had a lesser impact on subsequent investment decisions. PTSD was also associated with greater encoding of negative expected social outcomes in perigenual anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral middle frontal gyri, and greater encoding of social prediction errors in the left temporoparietal junction. These data suggest mechanisms of PTSD-related deficits in social functioning and heightened risk for re-victimization in assault victims; however, comorbidity in the PTSD group and the lack of a trauma-exposed control group temper conclusions about PTSD specifically. PMID:25769397

  13. Behavior of Paramecium sp. in solutions containing Sr and Pb: Do Paramecium sp. alter chemical forms of those metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Koka, Masahi; Satoh, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of Paramecium sp. (Paramecium bursaria) in aqueous solutions containing Sr and Pb was investigated to determine the role of protozoa in the migration of radionuclides in the environment. Precultured living cells of P. bursaria were exposed to aqueous solutions containing 0.01 or 0.05 mM Sr or Pb at pH 7 for 24 h. For comparison, pre-killed cells were treated with the metal solutions in the same way. Two-dimensional elemental mappings of cells were obtained by micro-PIXE. Aquatic species of Sr and Pb were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The amounts of Sr adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h and adsorbed on pre-killed cells were below the detection limit. Cells of P. bursaria adsorbed or took up a fraction of Pb. The Pb adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h in the Pb solution was barely detectable, while the Pb adsorbed on pre-killed cells was clearly mappable. These findings suggest that living cells of P. bursaria have functions that reduce adsorption or uptake of Pb on the cells. Quantitative and SEC-UV-ICP-MS analyses of the Sr and Pb in aqueous phases showed no clear evidences that living cells of P. bursaria alter the chemical form of Sr or Pb remaining in the aqueous phases after the cell-solution contact.

  14. Recruitment of hippocampal neurons to encode behavioral events in the rat: Alterations in cognitive demand and cannabinoid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Goonawardena, Anushka V; Robinson, Lianne; Riedel, Gernot; Hampson, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Successful performance by rats of a delayed-nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) task is hippocampal dependent. We have shown that neurons in hippocampus differentially encode task-relevant events. These responses are critical for correct DNMS performance and are diminished by exogenous cannabinoids. We therefore reasoned that hippocampal neural correlates of behavior are likely shaped during learning; however, to date, no work has examined these correlates during DNMS acquisition training. Consequently, the present study assessed the emergence of hippocampal neural encoding when (i) cognitive task demands were increased through prolongation of delay intervals between sample and nonmatch phase, and (ii) when animals are under cannabinoid treatment and performance is compromised. Adult, male Long-Evans rats were trained to perform the DNMS task without delay and then implanted with multi-electrode recording arrays directed to CA3 and CA1 sub-fields of the hippocampus. Following recovery, single units were isolated and animals divided into two treatment groups: vehicle or WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2, 0.35 mg/kg). Ensemble firing was monitored during retraining in DNMS task at 0s, and subsequently delay intervals were progressively increased to 1–10s, 11–20s and 21–30s when animals met criterion (80% correct) at each respective interval. Hippocampal CA3 and CA1 principal cells were isolated and recorded throughout treatment. Extention of the delay led to an increase in the number of task-correlated neurons in controls. This recruitment of novel cells was reduced/prevented in the presence of WIN-2 and was paralleled by impairment in acquisition learning at longer delay intervals. Moreover, WIN-2 suppressed hippocampal ensemble firing during the sample (encoding) but not nonmatch phase of the DNMS task across all delays. These cannabinoid induced alterations in hippocampal neuronal activity may explain the observed deficits in DNMS performance. PMID:19771586

  15. Brain and behavioral evidence for altered social learning mechanisms among women with assault-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Cisler, Josh M; Bush, Keith; Scott Steele, J; Lenow, Jennifer K; Smitherman, Sonet; Kilts, Clinton D

    2015-04-01

    Current neurocircuitry models of PTSD focus on the neural mechanisms that mediate hypervigilance for threat and fear inhibition/extinction learning. Less focus has been directed towards explaining social deficits and heightened risk of revictimization observed among individuals with PTSD related to physical or sexual assault. The purpose of the present study was to foster more comprehensive theoretical models of PTSD by testing the hypothesis that assault-related PTSD is associated with behavioral impairments in a social trust and reciprocity task and corresponding alterations in the neural encoding of social learning mechanisms. Adult women with assault-related PTSD (n = 25) and control women (n = 15) completed a multi-trial trust game outside of the MRI scanner. A subset of these participants (15 with PTSD and 14 controls) also completed a social and non-social reinforcement learning task during 3T fMRI. Brain regions that encoded the computationally modeled parameters of value expectation, prediction error, and volatility (i.e., uncertainty) were defined and compared between groups. The PTSD group demonstrated slower learning rates during the trust game and social prediction errors had a lesser impact on subsequent investment decisions. PTSD was also associated with greater encoding of negative expected social outcomes in perigenual anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral middle frontal gyri, and greater encoding of social prediction errors in the left temporoparietal junction. These data suggest mechanisms of PTSD-related deficits in social functioning and heightened risk for re-victimization in assault victims; however, comorbidity in the PTSD group and the lack of a trauma-exposed control group temper conclusions about PTSD specifically.

  16. Altered dermal fibroblast behavior in a collagen V haploinsufficient murine model of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    DeNigris, John; Yao, Qingmei; Birk, Erika K; Birk, David E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in collagen V are associated with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). A significant percentage of these mutations result in haploinsufficiency for collagen V. The purpose of this work was to determine if changes in collagen V expression are associated with altered dermal fibroblast behavior contributing to the poor wound healing response. A haploinsufficient Col5a1(+/-) mouse model of EDS was utilized. In vivo wound healing studies demonstrated that mutant mice healed significantly slower than Col5a1(+/+) mice. The basis for this difference was examined in vitro using dermal fibroblast strains isolated from Col5a1(+/-) and Col5a1(+/+) mice. Fibroblast proliferation was determined for each strain by counting cells at different time points after seeding as well as using the proliferation marker Ki-67. Fibroblast attachment to collagens I and III and fibronectin also was analyzed. In addition, in vitro scratch wounds were used to analyze fibroblast wound closure. Significantly decreased fibroblast proliferation was observed in Col5a1(+/-) compared to Col5a1(+/+) fibroblasts. Our data indicate that the decreased fibroblast number was not due to apoptosis. Wildtype Col5a1(+/+) fibroblasts attached significantly better to components of the wound matrix (collagens I and III and fibronectin) than Col5a1(+/-) fibroblasts. A significant difference in in vitro scratch wound closure rates also was observed. Col5a1(+/+) fibroblasts closed wounds in 22 h, while Col5a1(+/-) fibroblasts demonstrated ~80% closure. There were significant differences in closure at all time points analyzed. Our data suggest that decreased fibroblast proliferation, extracellular matrix attachment, and migration contribute to the decreased wound healing response in classic EDS.

  17. The Potency of Hyaluronan of Different Molecular Weights in the Stimulation of Blood Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Safrankova, Barbora; Gajdova, Silvie; Kubala, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    The regulatory functions of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) are suggested to be dependent on its molecular weight (MW). Proinflammatory and stimulatory effects are proposed mainly for the low MW HA. However, the complex response of blood phagocytes to HA of different MW is unclear. Herein, the effects of highly purified HA of precisely defined MW (52, 250, and 970 kDa) on human blood phagocytes were tested. All MW HA activated blood phagocytes, including the spontaneous production of ROS, degranulation, and the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, with low MW HA 52 kDa having the highest potency and high MW HA 970 kDa having the lowest potency. Interestingly, HA inhibited ROS production stimulated by opsonized zymosan particles and, in contrast, potentiated starch-activated ROS production, mostly independent of MW. Data showed a significant effect of HA of different MW on blood phagocytes, including high MW HA. PMID:21403830

  18. Beta cells transfer vesicles containing insulin to phagocytes for presentation to T cells.

    PubMed

    Vomund, Anthony N; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Hughes, Jing; Calderon, Boris; Valderrama, Carolina; Ferris, Stephen T; Wan, Xiaoxiao; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Carrero, Javier A; Urano, Fumihiko; Unanue, Emil R

    2015-10-06

    Beta cells from nondiabetic mice transfer secretory vesicles to phagocytic cells. The passage was shown in culture studies where the transfer was probed with CD4 T cells reactive to insulin peptides. Two sets of vesicles were transferred, one containing insulin and another containing catabolites of insulin. The passage required live beta cells in a close cell contact interaction with the phagocytes. It was increased by high glucose concentration and required mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Live images of beta cell-phagocyte interactions documented the intimacy of the membrane contact and the passage of the granules. The passage was found in beta cells isolated from islets of young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and nondiabetic mice as well as from nondiabetic humans. Ultrastructural analysis showed intraislet phagocytes containing vesicles having the distinct morphology of dense-core granules. These findings document a process whereby the contents of secretory granules become available to the immune system.

  19. Prion-like transmission of neuronal huntingtin aggregates to phagocytic glia in the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Margaret M.P.; Spartz, Ellen J.; Hong, Weizhe; Luo, Liqun; Kopito, Ron R.

    2015-01-01

    The brain has a limited capacity to self-protect against protein aggregate-associated pathology, and mounting evidence supports a role for phagocytic glia in this process. We have established a Drosophila model to investigate the role of phagocytic glia in clearance of neuronal mutant huntingtin (Htt) aggregates associated with Huntington disease. We find that glia regulate steady-state numbers of Htt aggregates expressed in neurons through a clearance mechanism that requires the glial scavenger receptor Draper and downstream phagocytic machinery. Remarkably, some of these engulfed neuronal Htt aggregates effect prion-like conversion of soluble, wild-type Htt in the glial cytoplasm. We provide genetic evidence that this conversion depends strictly on the Draper signaling pathway, unveiling a previously unanticipated role for phagocytosis in transfer of pathogenic protein aggregates in an intact brain. These results suggest a potential mechanism by which phagocytic glia contribute to both protein aggregate-related neuroprotection and pathogenesis in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25866135

  20. Functional characteristics of enhanced Fc receptor expression of beta 2 integrin-deficient bovine mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Higuchi, H; Goji, N; Noda, H; Kuwabara, M

    1996-01-01

    Fc receptor expression, cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling, chemiluminescent (CL) response, and electron spin resonance (ESR) combined with spin trapping of blood mononuclear phagocytes from control heifers and a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) were evaluated to elucidate the relationships between complement receptor type 3 (CR3) and Fc receptor expression and their functional responses. The mean fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-bovine IgG bound to mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was 1.8-fold higher than that of control heifers. The mean increments of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD stimulated with OPZ, Agg-IgG, and PMA were 39.4 (P < 0.05), 118, and 71.6% compared with those of control heifers. A 1.27-fold increase in the CL response relative to control heifers was detected when mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD were stimulated with Agg-IgG. The OPZ-induced CL response of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased, whereas the PMA-induced CL response was similar to that of control heifers. The ESR spectrum of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was increased when stimulated with Agg-IgG, and was impaired when stimulated by OPZ compared with that of control heifers. The ESR spectrum of mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with PMA was similar in control heifers and the heifer with LAD. Fc receptors on mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD were enhanced, and their cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling, CL response, and ESR-spin trapping when stimulated with Agg-IgG and OPZ appeared to be associated with enhanced Fc receptors.

  1. Injury switches melatonin production source from endocrine (pineal) to paracrine (phagocytes) - melatonin in human colostrum and colostrum phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Gerlândia N; Cardoso, Elaine C; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda M S; Markus, Regina P

    2006-09-01

    A large number of data show that melatonin has immunomodulatory properties and is produced by immunocompetent cells; also, some evidence suggests a 'feedback' of the activated immune system on the pineal gland. In this paper, we studied immune-pineal interactions in colostrum obtained from healthy puerperae and mothers with mastitis taking into account that, (a) melatonin levels in milk reflects pineal activity and (b) colostrum quiescent mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes from healthy mothers in culture are adequate for evaluating the ability of immunocompetent cells to produce melatonin. Here we compared the diurnal and nocturnal melatonin levels in colostrum from healthy puerperae and mothers with mastitis; this is a unique noninvasive model for determining pineal activity in the proinflammatory phase of a defense response. In addition, we determined the 'in vitro' production of melatonin by colostrum immunocompetent cells stimulated by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli or zymosan. Suppression of nocturnal melatonin rise in mothers with mastitis was highly correlated with increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion. This result, interpreted taking into account the presence of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B in pineal gland, suggest that the proinflammatory cytokine can inhibit nocturnal pineal melatonin production. On the other hand, stimulated, but not quiescent, immunocompetent cells secreted in the colostrum produced melatonin in vitro. In addition, this production ceases after bacteria killing. These results suggest that during the response to an injury the production of melatonin can be transiently shifted from an endocrine (pineal) to a paracrine (immunocompetent cells) source.

  2. The Non-phagocytic Route of Collagen Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Melander, Maria C.; Kjøller, Lars; Moyer, Amanda; Honoré, Christian; Madsen, Charlotte A.; Garred, Peter; Burgdorf, Sven; Bugge, Thomas H.; Behrendt, Niels; Engelholm, Lars H.

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of collagens, the most abundant proteins of the extracellular matrix, is involved in numerous physiological and pathological conditions including cancer invasion. An important turnover pathway involves cellular internalization and degradation of large, soluble collagen fragments, generated by initial cleavage of the insoluble collagen fibers. We have previously observed that in primary mouse fibroblasts, this endocytosis of collagen fragments is dependent on the receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180. Others have identified additional mechanisms of collagen uptake, with different associated receptors, in other cell types. These receptors include β1-integrins, being responsible for collagen phagocytosis, and the mannose receptor. We have now utilized a newly developed monoclonal antibody against uPARAP/Endo180, which down-regulates the receptor protein level on treated cells, to examine the role of uPARAP/Endo180 as a mediator of collagen internalization by a wide range of cultured cell types. With the exception of macrophages, all cells that proved capable of efficient collagen internalization were of mesenchymal origin and all of these utilized uPARAP/Endo180 for their collagen uptake process. Macrophages internalized collagen in a process mediated by the mannose receptor, a protein belonging to the same protein family as uPARAP/Endo180. β1-Integrins were found not to be involved in the endocytosis of soluble collagen, irrespectively of whether this was mediated by uPARAP/Endo180 or the mannose receptor. This further distinguishes these pathways from the phagocytic uptake of particulate collagen. PMID:21652704

  3. Repeated social defeat increases reactive emotional coping behavior and alters functional responses in serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Paul, Evan D; Hale, Matthew W; Lukkes, Jodi L; Valentine, McKenzie J; Sarchet, Derek M; Lowry, Christopher A

    2011-08-03

    Chronic stress is a vulnerability factor for a number of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and affective disorders. Social defeat in rats has proven to be a useful paradigm to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying physiologic and behavioral adaptation to acute and chronic stress. Previous studies suggest that serotonergic systems may contribute to the physiologic and behavioral adaptation to chronic stress, including social defeat in rodent models. In order to test the hypothesis that repeated social defeat alters the emotional behavior and the excitability of brainstem serotonergic systems implicated in control of emotional behavior, we exposed adult male rats either to home cage control conditions, acute social defeat, or social defeat followed 24h later by a second social defeat encounter. We then assessed behavioral responses during social defeat as well as the excitability of serotonergic neurons within the dorsal raphe nucleus using immunohistochemical staining of tryptophan hydroxylase, a marker of serotonergic neurons, and the protein product of the immediate-early gene, c-fos. Repeated social defeat resulted in a shift away from proactive emotional coping behaviors, such as rearing (explorative escape behavior), and toward reactive emotional coping behaviors such as freezing. Both acute and repeated defeat led to widespread increases in c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Changes in behavior following a second exposure to social defeat, relative to acute defeat, were associated with decreased c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within the dorsal and ventral parts of the mid-rostrocaudal dorsal raphe nucleus, regions that have been implicated in 1) serotonergic modulation of fear- and anxiety-related behavior and 2) defensive behavior in conspecific aggressive encounters, respectively. These data support the hypothesis that serotonergic systems play a role in physiologic and behavioral responses to both

  4. Neonatal exposure to estradiol decreases hypothalamic allopregnanolone concentrations and alters agonistic and sexual but not affective behavior in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Berretti, R; Santoru, F; Locci, A; Sogliano, C; Calza, A; Choleris, E; Porcu, P; Concas, A

    2014-02-01

    Exposure of developing female rats to estradiol during the perinatal period induced long-lasting dysregulation of gonadal axis and decreased cerebrocortical and plasma concentrations of allopregnanolone. We have now examined the effects of neonatal estradiol administration in female rats on hypothalamic allopregnanolone concentrations and on exploratory, affective, agonistic and sexual behaviors as well as social learning. A single administration of β-estradiol 3-benzoate (EB, 10μg) on the day of birth resulted in a delay of vaginal opening, acyclicity and ovarian failure. These alterations were associated with a significant decrease in the concentrations of allopregnanolone in the hypothalamus at 21 and 60days, but not at 7days, after birth. Neonatal administration of EB also increased agonistic behaviors in adult rats, such as dominant behaviors and following of an ovariectomized intruder, while living attacks unaffected. EB-treated rats showed also an increase in anogenital investigation, associated with a drastic reduction in spontaneous and induced female sexual behaviors (receptivity and proceptivity). In contrast, neonatal administration of EB did not affect locomotor activity, anxiety- and mood-related behaviors, the social transmission of flavor preferences, and seizures sensitivity. These effects of estradiol suggest that it plays a major role in regulation of both the abundance of allopregnanolone and the expression of agonistic and sexual behaviors, while failing to influence affective behaviors and social learning. Thus, the pronounced and persistent decrease in hypothalamic allopregnanolone concentration may be related to the manifestation of agonistic and sexual behaviors.

  5. Depressive-like behaviors alterations induced by intranigral MPTP, 6-OHDA, LPS and rotenone models of Parkinson's disease are predominantly associated with serotonin and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ronise M; Barbieiro, Janaína; Lima, Marcelo M S; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2010-08-16

    Depression is a frequently encountered non-motor feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and it can have a significant impact on patient's quality of life. Considering the differential pathophysiology of depression in PD, it prompts the idea that a degenerated nigrostriatal system plays a role in depressive-like behaviors, whilst animal models of PD are employed. Therefore, we addressed the question of whether dopamine (DA) depletion, promoted by the neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and rotenone are able to induce depressive-like behaviors and neurotransmitters alterations similarly that encountered in PD. To test this rationale, we performed intranigral injections of each neurotoxin, followed by motor behavior, depressive-like behaviors, histological and neurochemical tests. After the motor recovery period, MPTP, 6-OHDA and rotenone were able to produce anhedonia and behavioral despair. These altered behavioral responses were accompanied by reductions of striatal DA, homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) restricted to the 6-OHDA group. Additionally, decreases on the hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) content were detected for the MPTP, 6-OHDA and rotenone groups. Notably, strong correlations were detected among the groups when 5-HT and DA were correlated with swimming (r=+0.97; P=0.001) and immobility (r=-0.90; P=0.012), respectively. Our data indicate that MPTP, 6-OHDA and rotenone, but not LPS were able to produce depressive-like behaviors accompanied primarily by hippocampal 5-HT reductions. Moreover, DA and 5-HT strongly correlated with "emotional" impairments suggesting an important participation of these neurotransmitters in anhedonia and behavioral despair after nigral lesions promoted by the neurotoxins.

  6. Prenatal stress alters the negative correlation between neuronal activation in limbic regions and behavioral responses in rats exposed to high and low anxiogenic environments.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Jérôme; Viltart, Odile; Salomé, Nicolas; Giuliani, Alessandro; Catalani, Assia; Casolini, Paola; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2007-08-01

    Behavioral adaptation to an anxiogenic environment involves the activity of various interconnected limbic regions, such as the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Prenatal stress (PS) in rats affects the ability to cope with environmental challenges and alters brain plasticity, leading to long-lasting behavioral and neurobiological alterations. We examined in PS and control animals whether behavioral reactivity was correlated to neuronal activation by assessing Fos protein expression in limbic regions of rats exposed to a low or high anxiogenic environment (the closed and open arms of an elevated plus maze, respectively). A negative correlation was found between behavioral and neuronal activation, with a lower behavioral reactivity and a higher neuronal response observed in rats exposed to the more anxiogenic environment (the open arm) with respect to the less anxiogenic environment (the closed arm). Interestingly, the variation in the neurobehavioral response between the two arms of the maze was less pronounced in rats that had been subjected to PS. This study provides a remarkable example of how long-lasting changes in brain plasticity induced by PS affect the ability of limbic neurons to cope with anxiogenic stimuli of different strength.

  7. Hematological parameters and phagocytic activity in fat snook (Centropomus parallelus) bred in captivity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Antenor Aguiar; Ranzani-Paiva, Maria José T; da Veiga, Marcelo Leite; Faustino, Lucas; Egami, Mizue I

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the hematological parameters and the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal macrophages of fat snook related to sex, stage of gonadal maturation and seasonal cycle. Blood was collected from 135 animals (78 females and 57 males) and used for determinations of: erythrocyte number, hematocrit, hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), total and differential leukocyte counts, and thrombocyte count. The phagocytic capacity and phagocytic index were determined after Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculation in the peritoneal cavity of the animals. The hematological results according to sex showed that the erythrocyte, total leukocyte and thrombocyte counts were statistically higher in males than females, with the latter showing a higher MCV. Concerning to erythrocyte count, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration analyzed separately by sex and stage of gonadal maturation, males were found to have significantly elevated values in the mature stage and decreased levels in the resting stage. The results of the erythrocyte and leukocyte series, thrombocytes and phagocytic activity related to seasonal cycle showed significant differences in both sexes, where hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were lower in winter and higher in the other seasons, mean corpuscular volume was higher in the summer and lower in the winter and fall, total leukocytes and thrombocytes lower in the spring and higher in the fall, lymphocytes low in the winter and summer and high in the spring and phagocytic capacity and phagocytic index high in the summer and low in the winter and fall. The results showed that the hematological values in males are statistically higher than those in females, the erythrocyte values in males increase with the progression of gonadal maturation and that winter is the season of the year least favorable for hematological and phagocytic responses for survival of fat

  8. Developmental treatment with ethinyl estradiol, but not bisphenol A, causes alterations in sexually dimorphic behaviors in male and female Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sherry A; Law, Charles Delbert; Kissling, Grace E

    2014-08-01

    The developing central nervous system may be particularly sensitive to bisphenol A (BPA)-induced alterations. Here, pregnant Sprague Dawley rats (n = 11-12/group) were gavaged daily with vehicle, 2.5 or 25.0 μg/kg BPA, or 5.0 or 10.0 μg/kg ethinyl estradiol (EE2) on gestational days 6-21. The BPA doses were selected to be below the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 5 mg/kg/day. On postnatal days 1-21, all offspring/litter were orally treated with the same dose. A naïve control group was not gavaged. Body weight, pubertal age, estrous cyclicity, and adult serum hormone levels were measured. Adolescent play, running wheel activity, flavored solution intake, female sex behavior, and manually elicited lordosis were assessed. No significant differences existed between the vehicle and naïve control groups. Vehicle controls exhibited significant sexual dimorphism for most behaviors, indicating these evaluations were sensitive to sex differences. However, only EE2 treatment caused significant effects. Relative to female controls, EE2-treated females were heavier, exhibited delayed vaginal opening, aberrant estrous cyclicity, increased play behavior, decreased running wheel activity, and increased aggression toward the stimulus male during sexual behavior assessments. Relative to male controls, EE2-treated males were older at testes descent and preputial separation and had lower testosterone levels. These results suggest EE2-induced masculinization/defeminization of females and are consistent with increased volume of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) at weaning in female siblings of these subjects (He, Z., Paule, M. G. and Ferguson, S. A. (2012) Low oral doses of bisphenol A increase volume of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area in male, but not female, rats at postnatal day 21. Neurotoxicol. Teratol. 34, 331-337). Although EE2 treatment caused pubertal delays and decreased testosterone levels in males, their

  9. Possible role of citalopram and desipramine against sleep deprivation-induced anxiety like-behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ruchika; Kumar, Anil

    2008-11-01

    Sleep is an essential physiological process for maintaining physical, mental, and emotional health. Sleep deprivation and associated disorders like depression and anxiety are one of the major problems now-days. The present study was designed to explore the neuroprotecitve effect of citalopram and desipramine on 72 hr sleep deprivation-induced behavioral alterations and oxidative damage in mice. Various behavioral tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer), body weight followed by oxidative parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were assessed. Treatment with citalopram (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip) and desipramine (10 and 20 mg/kg, ip) for 5 days significantly improved locomotor activity, anti-anxiety like behavior in all paradigms tasks (mirror chamber, plus maze, zero maze) as compared to control (72 hr sleep-deprived). Biochemically, citalopram and desipramine treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared to control (72 hr sleep-deprived) animals. Results of present study suggest that citalopram (5 and 10mg/kg, ip) and desipramine (10 and 20 mg/kg, ip) have neuroprotective effect against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alteration and oxidative damage in mice.

  10. Persons with unilateral lower-limb amputation have altered and asymmetric trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviors estimated using multidirectional trunk perturbations.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Brad D; Bazrgari, Babak; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2013-07-26

    Among persons with unilateral lower-limb amputation (LLA), proximal compensations and preferential use of the sound limb during gait and movement may lead to chronic alterations and/or asymmetries in trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviors. Trunk stiffness, the magnitude and timing of maximum reflex force, and EMG reflex delays of superficial trunk muscles, were estimated here using multidirectional (anteriorly- and laterally-directed) position-controlled horizontal trunk perturbations (±5mm, applied at T8) with the pelvis immobilized. Alterations and asymmetries in these trunk behaviors were quantified and compared among eight males with unilateral LLA, and eight male non-amputation controls. During anteriorly-directed perturbations, trunk stiffness and maximum reflex force were 24% and 23% lower, respectively, among participants with LLA compared to non-amputation controls, and the timing of maximum reflex force was 8% later. During lateral perturbations, trunk stiffness and maximum reflex force were also significantly lower among participants with LLA, by 22% and 27%, respectively. Bilateral asymmetries were present in trunk stiffness and the timing of maximum reflex force among persons with LLA. Specifically, trunk stiffness was 20% lower and timing of maximum reflex force was 9% later during perturbations involving spinal tissues and muscles ipsilateral to the side of amputation. Reduced and asymmetric trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviors may suggest a condition of reduced trunk stability among individuals with LLA, which could be due to repeated exposure to altered and asymmetric gait and movement and/or compensatory muscle recruitment in response to lost or altered musculature subsequent to LLA.

  11. Spironolactone Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Injury Partially via Modulating Mononuclear Phagocyte Phenotype Switching in Circulating and Alveolar Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Yi-Dan; Lu, Rui-Yi; Guo, Zhao-Zeng; Sun, Hai-Ying; Hu, Dao-Chuan; Yang, Guo-Hong; Li, Yu-Ming; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent experimental studies provide evidence indicating that manipulation of the mononuclear phagocyte phenotype could be a feasible approach to alter the severity and persistence of pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been reported as a target to regulate macrophage polarization. The present work was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential of MR antagonism in bleomycin-induced acute lung injury and fibrosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We first demonstrated the expression of MR in magnetic bead-purified Ly6G-/CD11b+ circulating monocytes and in alveolar macrophages harvested in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from C57BL/6 mice. Then, a pharmacological intervention study using spironolactone (20mg/kg/day by oral gavage) revealed that MR antagonism led to decreased inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine production (downregulated monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor β1, and interleukin-1β at mRNA and protein levels) and collagen deposition (decreased lung total hydroxyproline content and collagen positive area by Masson’ trichrome staining) in bleomycin treated (2.5mg/kg, via oropharyngeal instillation) male C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, serial flow cytometry analysis in blood, BALF and enzymatically digested lung tissue, revealed that spironolactone could partially inhibit bleomycin-induced circulating Ly6Chi monocyte expansion, and reduce alternative activation (F4/80+CD11c+CD206+) of mononuclear phagocyte in alveoli, whereas the phenotype of interstitial macrophage (F4/80+CD11c-) remained unaffected by spironolactone during investigation. Conclusions/Significance The present work provides the experimental evidence that spironolactone could attenuate bleomycin-induced acute pulmonary injury and fibrosis, partially via inhibition of MR-mediated circulating monocyte and alveolar macrophage phenotype switching. PMID:24260540

  12. Decreased phagocytic function in neutrophils and monocytes from peripheral blood in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    CARNEIRO, Valéria Martins Araújo; BEZERRA, Ana Cristina Barreto; GUIMARÃES, Maria do Carmo Machado; MUNIZ-JUNQUEIRA, Maria Imaculada

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes constitutes the main defense mechanism against bacterial challenges in periodontitis. Phagocytosis by neutrophils has already been evaluated, whereas phagocytic function of monocytes has hardly been addressed so far. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes in periodontitis. Material and Methods The sample included 30 subjects with severe periodontitis and 27 control subjects without periodontal disease. The phagocytic index (PhI) was calculated as the mean number of adhered/ingested Saccharomyces cerevisiae per phagocytozing monocyte or neutrophil multiplied by the percentage of phagocytes involved in phagocytosis. Results A significant reduction in phagocyte functions was observed in individuals with periodontitis. The median of PhI of neutrophils using non-sensitized S. cerevisiae was 3 for the control group, and 1.5 for the periodontitis group (p=0.01, Mann-Whitney test). The median of PhI of monocytes with non-sensitized S. cerevisiae was 26.13 for the control group, and 13.23 for the periodontitis group (p=0.03, Mann Whitney test). The median of PhI of monocytes assessed with sensitized S. cerevisiae was 97.92 for the control group and 60.1 for the periodontitis group (p=0.005, t-test). Conclusion The data demonstrated a reduction in the function of phagocytes, suggesting a decrease in immune defenses in periodontitis. PMID:23138734

  13. Heterogeneity of lung mononuclear phagocytes during pneumonia: contribution of chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lanlin; Zhang, Zhimin; Barletta, Kathryn E; Burdick, Marie D; Mehrad, Borna

    2013-11-15

    Bacterial pneumonia is a common and dangerous illness. Mononuclear phagocytes, which comprise monocyte, resident and recruited macrophage, and dendritic cell subsets, are critical to antimicrobial defenses, but the dynamics of their recruitment to the lungs in pneumonia is not established. We hypothesized that chemokine-mediated traffic of mononuclear phagocytes is important in defense against bacterial pneumonia. In a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumonia, circulating Ly6C(hi) and, to a lesser extent, Ly6C(lo) monocytes expanded in parallel with accumulation of inflammatory macrophages and CD11b(hi) dendritic cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the lungs, whereas numbers of alveolar macrophages remained constant. CCR2 was expressed by Ly6C(hi) monocytes, recruited macrophages, and airway dendritic cells; CCR6 was prominently expressed by airway dendritic cells; and CX3CR1 was ubiquitously expressed by blood monocytes and lung CD11b(hi) dendritic cells during infection. CCR2-deficient, but not CCL2-, CX3CR1-, or CCR6-deficient animals exhibited worse outcomes of infection. The absence of CCR2 had no detectable effect on neutrophils but resulted in reduction of all subsets of lung mononuclear phagocytes in the lungs, including alveolar macrophages and airway and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. In addition, absence of CCR2 skewed the phenotype of lung mononuclear phagocytes, abrogating the appearance of M1 macrophages and TNF-producing dendritic cells in the lungs. Taken together, these data define the dynamics of mononuclear phagocytes during pneumonia.

  14. ABCA7 Mediates Phagocytic Clearance of Amyloid-β in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Fu, YuHong; Hsiao, Jen-Hsiang T; Paxinos, George; Halliday, Glenda M; Kim, Woojin Scott

    2016-09-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dementia and abnormal deposits of aggregated amyloid-β in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed that ABCA7 is strongly associated with AD. In vitro evidence suggests that the role of ABCA7 is related to phagocytic activity. Deletion of ABCA7 in a mouse model of AD exacerbates cerebral amyloid-β plaque load. However, the biological role of ABCA7 in AD brain pathogenesis is unknown. We show that ABCA7 is highly expressed in microglia and when monocytes are differentiated into macrophages. We hypothesized that ABCA7 plays a protective role in the brain that is related to phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β. We isolated microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- and wild type mice and tested them for their capacity to phagocytose amyloid-β oligomers. We found that the phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β was substantially reduced in both microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- mice compared to wild type mice. Consistent with these results, in vivo phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β oligomers in the hippocampus was reduced in Abca7-/- mice. Furthermore, ABCA7 transcription was upregulated in AD brains and in amyloidogenic mouse brains specifically in the hippocampus as a response to the amyloid-β pathogenic state. Together these results indicate that ABCA7 mediates phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β in the brain, and reveal a mechanism by which loss of function of ABCA7 increases the susceptibility to AD.

  15. Bactericidal capacity of newborn phagocytes against group B beta-hemolytic streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, I D; Robinson, O M; Bazán, T S; López-Osuna, M; Kretschmer, R R

    1981-01-01

    The bactericidal capacity of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes obtained from normal newborn infants and from healthy adults was evaluated in vitro, using two group B beta-hemolytic streptococci (GBBHS) serotypes (GBBHS-Ia-SS-615/28 and GBBHS-III-SS-620/50) and uniform opsonic conditions. No intertype differences in bacteriolysis of these two serotypes were observed among leukocytes from newborns or adults. As group, only polymorphonuclear phagocytes from newborns disclosed a significantly lower mean bactericidal capacity than their adult cellular counterpart, and only with respect to GBBHS-III-SS-620/50. On the other hand, 4 or 16 polymorphonuclear samples from newborns tested revealed significantly low bactericidal capacities against both GBBHS serotypes, and an additional sample revealed a bactericidal capacity against GBBHS-III-SS-620/50 alone. Interstrain variations in the intrinsic bactericidal capacity of polymorphonuclear phagocytes from newborns against GBBHS-III may exist, as suggested by a single observation made by using four clinical isolates of GBBHS-III. Such deviant phagocytic capacities of polymorphonuclear phagocytes from newborns may constitute an additional selective risk factor in the genesis of GBBHS sepsis of the newborn. PMID:7030963

  16. Wright-Giemsa staining to observe phagocytes in Locusta migratoria infected with Metarhizium acridum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Cao, Yueqing; Xia, Yuxian; Liu, Feihong

    2016-09-01

    Hemocytes are the first line of defense in the invertebrate immune system. Understanding their roles in cellular immunity is important for developing more efficient mycoinsecticides. However, the exact classification of hemocytes has been inconsistent and the various types of phagocytes in Locusta migratoria are poorly defined. Herein, the Wright-Giemsa staining method and microscopy were employed to characterize the hemocytes of L. migratoria following infection by Metarhizium acridum. Hemocytes were classified into four types, including granulocytes, plasmatocytes, prohemocytes, and oenocytoids, based on size, morphology, and dye-staining properties. Each type of hemocyte was classified into several subtypes according to different ultrastructural features. At least four subtypes of granulocytes or plasmatocytes, including small-nucleus plasmatocytes, basophil vacuolated plasmatocytes, homogeneous plasmatocytes, and eosinophilic granulocytes, carried out phagocytosis. The percentage of total phagocytes increased two days after infection by M. acridum, then gradually declined during the next two days, and then increased sharply again at the fifth day. Our data suggested that plasmatocytes and granulocytes may be the major phagocytes that protect against invasion by a fungal pathogen in L. migratoria. Total hemocytes in locusts significantly increased in the initial days after infection and decreased in the late period of infection compared to controls. In the hemocoel, hyphal bodies were recognized, enwrapped, and digested by the phagocytes. Then, the broken hyphal pieces were packaged as vesicles to be secreted from the cell. Moreover, locusts might have a sensitive and efficient cellular immune system that can regulate phagocyte differentiation and proliferation before fungi colonize the host hemolymph.

  17. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Kłak, Marlena; Bubak, Barbara; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Żaczek, Maciej; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Górski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired). Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients' peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients' phagocytes' ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy. PMID:26783541

  18. Infection-Mediated Priming of Phagocytes Protects against Lethal Secondary Aspergillus fumigatus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Savers, Amélie; Rasid, Orhan; Parlato, Marianna; Brock, Matthias; Jouvion, Gregory; Ryffel, Bernhard; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Eberl, Gerard; Ibrahim-Granet, Oumaïma

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytes restrict the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and prevent the establishment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunecompetent mice. Here we report that immunecompetent mice recovering from a primary A. fumigatus challenge are protected against a secondary lethal challenge. Using RAGγc knock-out mice we show that this protection is independent of T, B and NK cells. In protected mice, lung phagocytes are recruited more rapidly and are more efficient in conidial phagocytosis and killing. Protection was also associated with an enhanced expression of CXCR2 and Dectin-1 on bone marrow phagocytes. We also show that protective lung cytokine and chemokine responses are induced more rapidly and with enhanced dynamics in protected mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that following a first encounter with a non-lethal dose of A. fumigatus conidia, the innate immune system is primed and can mediate protection against a secondary lethal infection. PMID:27078879

  19. Differential toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles toward phagocytic and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malugin, Alexander; Herd, Heather; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of size and surface functionality of amorphous silica nanoparticles (SNPs) on their interaction with cultured cells. The intracellular uptake, phagocytic activity, and possible mechanisms of toxicity induced by SNPs were studied on murine alveolar macrophages and two epithelial cancer cell lines. It was found that phagocytic cells are more susceptible to amorphous SNPs than epithelial cells. SNPs with functionalized surfaces were capable to induce the formation of apoptotic cells to a higher extent than plain particles. Plain SNPs induced plasma membrane damage in phagocytic cells to a higher extent and caused cell death in a shorter period of time than surface-functionalized SNPs. The prevalence of necrotic mode of cell death was observed after treatment with plain SNPs. In the range studied surface functionality played an important role in SNPs toxicity.

  20. Blood phagocyte activity after race training sessions in Thoroughbred and Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Cywinska, Anna; Szarska, Ewa; Degorski, Andrzej; Guzera, Maciej; Gorecka, Renata; Strzelec, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Sylwester; Schollenberger, Antoni; Winnicka, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Intensive exercise and exertion during competition promote many changes that may result in the impairment of immunity and increased susceptibility to infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of "the first line of defense": neutrophils and monocytes in racing Thoroughbred and Arabian horses after routine training sessions. Twenty-three (12 Thoroughbred and 11 Arabian) horses were examined. Routine haematological (number of red blood cells - RBC, haemoglobin concentration - HGB, haematocrit - HCT, total number of white blood cells - WBC), biochemical (creatine phosphokinase activity - CPK and total protein concentration - TP) parameters, cortisol concentration as well as phagocytic and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils and monocytes were determined. The values of basic parameters and the activity of phagocytes differed between breeds and distinct patterns of exercise-induced changes were observed. The training sessions did not produce the decrease in phagocyte activity that might lead to the suppression of immunity.

  1. Effect of labor on neutrophil phagocytic function in patients with uncomplicated term pregnancies

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, P.; Danley, D.; Polakoff, J.; Stinnett, T.

    1986-02-01

    This investigation analyzed the effect of labor on the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in women with uncomplicated term pregnancies. Nineteen healthy women who were not pregnant and did not use oral contraceptives or glucocorticoids served as controls. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from 15 study patients who were in the active phase of labor (5-10 cm of dilation). Neutrophil phagocytic function was evaluated with the radioiodine fixation test. Assays were conducted utilizing both pooled homologous serum and autologous serum. There was no statistically significant difference in the neutrophil phagocytic function of laboring patients and controls. In addition, there was no evidence that serum from pregnant women exerted a depressant effect on phagocytosis.

  2. In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni with phagocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehlbauch, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Campylobacter jejuni was studied using three types of mononuclear phagocytes: a J774G8 peritoneal macrophage line, resident BABL/c peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes. In phagocytosis assays using CFU determinations, phagocytosis increased steadily over an 8 hr time period. Results obtained using a /sup 51/Cr assay indicated no consistent significant difference between phagocytosis of C. jejuni between the three mononuclear phagocytes or PMN's and that maximum infection occurred prior to 0.5 hr and maintained throughout the 4 hr assay. Further investigation of the mechanism of attachment and entry of C. jejuni revealed this process required the expenditure of energy by the phagocyte, but was not inhibited by inhibitors of microfilament functions. In addition, phagocytosis was enhanced by the presence of 20% FCS,

  3. Interactions of phagocytes with the Lyme disease spirochete: role of the Fc receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Benach, J.L.; Fleit, H.B.; Habicht, G.S.; Coleman, J.L.; Bosler, E.M.; Lane, B.P.

    1984-10-01

    The phagocytic capacity of murine and human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes (including peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils), rabbit and murine peritoneal exudate cells, and the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 against the Lyme disease spirochete was studied. All of these cells were capable of phagocytosing the spirochete; phagocytosis was measured by the uptake of radiolabeled spirochetes, the appearance of immunofluorescent bodies in phagocytic cells, and electron microscopy. Both opsonized and nonopsonized organisms were phagocytosed. The uptake of opsonized organisms by neutrophils was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Fc receptor and by immune complexes; these findings suggested that most phagocytosis is mediated by the Fc receptor. Similarly, the uptake of opsonized organisms by human monocytes was inhibited by human monomeric IgG1 and by immune complexes. These results illustrate the role of immune phagocytosis of spirochetes in host defense against Lyme disease.

  4. Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W.; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Betty Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

  5. Behavioral dysfunctions correlate to altered physiology in rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss) exposed to cholinesterase-inhibiting chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Little, E.E.; DeLonay, A.J.; Beauvais, S.L.; Jones, S.B.; Ellersieck, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    We selected four metrics of swimming behavior (distance swam, speed, rate of turning, and tortuosity of path) and the commonly used biochemical marker, brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity, to assess (1) the sensitivity and reliability of behavior as a potential biomarker in monitoring work, (2) the potential for these endpoints to be used in automated monitoring, and (3) the linkage between behavior and its underlying biochemistry. Malathion-exposed fish exhibited large decreases in distance and speed and swam in a more linear path than control fish after 24 h exposure. By 96 h exposure, fish still swam slower and traveled less distance; fish fully recovered after 48 h in clean water. Diazinon-exposed fish exhibited decreases in distance, speed, and turning rate compared to controls. After 48 h recovery in clean water, fish exposed to diazinon had not recovered to control levels. The behavioral responses provided measures of neurotoxicity that were easily quantifiable by automated means, implying that the inclusion of behavior in monitoring programs can be successful. Furthermore, correlations between behavior and biochemical endpoints, such as ChE inhibition, suggest that this approach can provide a meaningful link between biochemistry and behavior and can provide useful information on toxicant impacts.

  6. Altered behavior and neural activity in conspecific cagemates co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyunwoo; Jung, Seungmoon; Seo, Jinsoo; Khalid, Arshi; Yoo, Jung-Seok; Park, Jihyun; Kim, Soyun; Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun; Jeon, Daejong

    2016-09-01

    The psychosocial environment is one of the major contributors of social stress. Family members or caregivers who consistently communicate with individuals with brain disorders are considered at risk for physical and mental health deterioration, possibly leading to mental disorders. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. To address this, we developed a social stress paradigm in which a mouse model of epilepsy or depression was housed long-term (>4weeks) with normal conspecifics. We characterized the behavioral phenotypes and electrophysiologically investigated the neural activity of conspecific cagemate mice. The cagemates exhibited deficits in behavioral tasks assessing anxiety, locomotion, learning/memory, and depression-like behavior. Furthermore, they showed severe social impairment in social behavioral tasks involving social interaction or aggression. Strikingly, behavioral dysfunction remained in the cagemates 4weeks following co-housing cessation with the mouse models. In an electrophysiological study, the cagemates showed an increased number of spikes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. Our results demonstrate that conspecifics co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders develop chronic behavioral dysfunctions, and suggest a possible association between abnormal mPFC neural activity and their behavioral pathogenesis. These findings contribute to the understanding of the psychosocial and psychiatric symptoms frequently present in families or caregivers of patients with brain disorders.

  7. Migration and interaction tracking for quantitative analysis of phagocyte-pathogen confrontation assays.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Susanne; Dietrich, Stefanie; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2017-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections are emerging as a significant health risk for humans. The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading micro-organisms and involves the recruitment of phagocytes, which engulf and kill pathogens, to the site of infection. To gain a quantitative understanding of the interplay between phagocytes and fungal pathogens, live-cell imaging is a modern approach to monitor the dynamic process of phagocytosis in time and space. However, this requires the processing of large amounts of video data that is tedious to be performed manually. Here, we present a novel framework, called AMIT (algorithm for migration and interaction tracking), that enables automated high-throughput analysis of multi-channel time-lapse microscopy videos of phagocyte-pathogen confrontation assays. The framework is based on our previously developed segmentation and tracking framework for non-rigid cells in brightfield microscopy (Brandes et al., 2015). We here present an advancement of this framework to segment and track different cell types in different video channels as well as to track the interactions between different cell types. For the confrontation assays of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and Candida glabrata considered in this work, the main focus lies on the correct detection of phagocytic events. To achieve this, we introduced different PMN states and a state-transition model that represents the basic principles of phagocyte-pathogen interactions. The framework is validated by a direct comparison of the automatically detected phagocytic activity of PMNs to a manual analysis and by a qualitative comparison with previously published analyses (Duggan et al., 2105; Essig et al., 2015). We demonstrate the potential of our algorithm by comprehensive quantitative and multivariate analyses of confrontation assays involving human PMNs and the fungus C. glabrata.

  8. Neurochemical and electrophysiological deficits in the ventral hippocampus and selective behavioral alterations caused by high-fat diet in female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Krishna, S; Keralapurath, M M; Lin, Z; Wagner, J J; de La Serre, C B; Harn, D A; Filipov, N M

    2015-06-25

    Mounting experimental evidence, predominantly from male rodents, demonstrates that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption and ensuing obesity are detrimental to the brain. To shed additional light on the neurological consequences of HFD consumption in female rodents and to determine the relatively early impact of HFD in the likely continuum of neurological dysfunction in the context of chronic HFD intake, this study investigated effects of HFD feeding for up to 12weeks on selected behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological parameters in adult female C57BL/6 mice; particular focus was placed on the ventral hippocampus (vHIP). Selected locomotor, emotional and cognitive functions were evaluated using behavioral tests after 5weeks on HFD or control (low-fat diet) diets. One week later, mice were sacrificed and brain regional neurochemical (monoamine) analysis was performed. Behaviorally naïve mice were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 5-6weeks at which time synaptic plasticity was determined in ex vivo slices from the vHIP. HFD-fed female mice exhibited increased: (i) locomotor activity in the open field testing, (ii) mean turn time on the pole test, (iii) swimming time in the forced swim test, and (iv) number of marbles buried in the marble burying test. In contrast, the novel object recognition memory was unaffected. Mice on HFD also had decreased norepinephrine and dopamine turnover, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex and the vHIP. HFD consumption for a total of 11-12weeks altered vHIP synaptic plasticity, evidenced by significant reductions in the paired-pulse ratio and long-term potentiation (LTP) magnitude. In summary, in female mice, HFD intake for several weeks induced multiple behavioral alterations of mainly anxiety-like nature and impaired monoamine pathways in a brain region-specific manner, suggesting that in the female, certain behavioral domains (anxiety) and associated brain regions, i.e., the vHIP, are preferentially

  9. The prebiotics 3'Sialyllactose and 6'Sialyllactose diminish stressor-induced anxiety-like behavior and colonic microbiota alterations: Evidence for effects on the gut-brain axis.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Andrew J; Galley, Jeffrey D; Fisher, Sydney E; Chichlowski, Maciej; Berg, Brian M; Bailey, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    There are extensive bidirectional interactions between the gut microbiota and the central nervous system (CNS), and studies demonstrate that stressor exposure significantly alters gut microbiota community structure. We tested whether oligosaccharides naturally found in high levels in human milk, which have been reported to impact brain development and enhance the growth of beneficial commensal microbes, would prevent stressor-induced alterations in gut microbial community composition and attenuate stressor-induced anxiety-like behavior. Mice were fed standard laboratory diet, or laboratory diet containing the human milk oligosaccharides 3'Sialyllactose (3'SL) or 6'Sialyllactose (6'SL) for 2 weeks prior to being exposed to either a social disruption stressor or a non-stressed control condition. Stressor exposure significantly changed the structure of the colonic mucosa-associated microbiota in control mice, as indicated by changes in beta diversity. The stressor resulted in anxiety-like behavior in both the light/dark preference and open field tests in control mice. This effect was associated with a reduction in immature neurons in the dentate gyrus as indicated by doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining. These effects were not evident in mice fed milk oligosaccharides; stressor exposure did not significantly change microbial community structure in mice fed 3'SL or 6'SL. In addition, 3'SL and 6'SL helped maintain normal behavior on tests of anxiety-like behavior and normal numbers of DCX+ immature neurons. These studies indicate that milk oligosaccharides support normal microbial communities and behavioral responses during stressor exposure, potentially through effects on the gut microbiota-brain axis.

  10. SOCIAL PLAY BEHAVIOR IS ALTERED IN THE MALE RAT DUE TO PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO THE ANTIANDROGEN VINCLOZOLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract:
    During mammalian sexual differentiation, androgens, and specifically, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, are critical for the organization of the male phenotype. In rats, social play behavior is organized by androgens during the neonatal period. Males play more ...

  11. SOCIAL PLAY BEHAVIOR IS ALTERED IN THE RAT BY PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ANDROGENS AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGEN, VINCLOZOLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    During mammalian sexual differentiation, the androgens, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are critical for the organization of the male phenotype. In rats, play behavior is sexually dimorphic. Administration of exogenous androgens during the perinatal period results in masculi...

  12. Lack of GPR88 enhances medium spiny neuron activity and alters motor- and cue-dependent behaviors.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Albert; Sanz, Elisenda; Wang, Wengang; Storey, Granville P; Güler, Ali D; Wanat, Matthew J; Roller, Bryan A; La Torre, Anna; Amieux, Paul S; McKnight, G Stanley; Bamford, Nigel S; Palmiter, Richard D

    2012-11-01

    The striatum regulates motor control, reward and learning. Abnormal function of striatal GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) is believed to contribute to the deficits in these processes that are observed in many neuropsychiatric diseases. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR88 is robustly expressed in MSNs and is regulated by neuropharmacological drugs, but its contribution to MSN physiology and behavior is unclear. We found that, in the absence of GPR88, MSNs showed increased glutamatergic excitation and reduced GABAergic inhibition, which promoted enhanced firing rates in vivo, resulting in hyperactivity, poor motor coordination and impaired cue-based learning in mice. Targeted viral expression of GPR88 in MSNs rescued the molecular and electrophysiological properties and normalized behavior, suggesting that aberrant MSN activation in the absence of GPR88 underlies behavioral deficits and its dysfunction may contribute to behaviors observed in neuropsychiatric disease.

  13. Altered serotonin receptor expression is associated with depression-related behavior in the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pang, Terence Y C; Du, Xin; Zajac, Michelle S; Howard, Monique L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2009-02-15

    Dysregulation of the serotonergic signaling system has been implicated in the pathology of mood disorders including depression, and various rodent models of disrupted serotonergic signaling display depression-related behavioral phenotypes. Depression is a common neuropsychiatric feature of preclinical Huntington's disease (HD) but the underlying changes in the HD brain contributing to the development of depression are unknown. Using the R6/1 transgenic mouse model of HD, we show that pre-motor symptomatic HD mice display sex-specific depressive-related behaviors on the forced-swim (FST), tail-suspension (TST) and novelty-suppressed feeding (NSFT) tests while having muted responses to acute anti-depressant administration. The baseline behaviors of HD mice were similar to the behavioral phenotypes of serotonin (5-HT) receptor and transporter null mutants, and gene expression of specific serotonin receptors were subsequently found to be reduced in the hippocampus and cortex of HD mice. Female HD mice had an additional deficit in cortical expression of serotonin transporter (SerT). Environmental enrichment normalized the FST behavioral response of female HD mice corresponding with increased gene expression of specific 5-HT receptors in the hippocampus and cortex. Our findings implicate altered serotonergic signaling as the basis for the development of depression during the preclinical stages of HD.

  14. Behavioral and transcriptome alterations in male and female mice with postnatal deletion of TrkB in dorsal striatal medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor, TrkB, is the primary receptor for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and plays an important role in development, maintenance and plasticity of the striatal output medium size spiny neuron. The striatal BDNF/TrkB system is thereby implicated in many physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, the latter including mood disorders, addiction, and Huntington’s disease. We crossed a mouse harboring a transgene directing cre-recombinase expression primarily to postnatal, dorsal striatal medium spiny neurons, to a mouse containing a floxed TrkB allele (fB) mouse designed for deletion of TrkB to determine its role in the adult striatum. Results We found that there were sexually dimorphic alterations in behaviors in response to stressful situations and drugs of abuse. Significant sex and/or genotype differences were found in the forced swim test of depression-like behaviors, anxiety-like behaviors on the elevated plus maze, and cocaine conditioned reward. Microarray analysis of dorsal striatum revealed significant dysregulation in individual and groups of genes that may contribute to the observed behavioral responses and in some cases, represent previously unidentified downstream targets of TrkB. Conclusions The data point to a set of behaviors and changes in gene expression following postnatal deletion of TrkB in the dorsal striatum distinct from those in other brain regions. PMID:24369067

  15. Supraependymal cells of hypothalamic third ventricle: identification as resident phagocytes of the brain.

    PubMed

    Bleier, R; Albrecht, R; Cruce, J A

    1975-07-25

    Cells lying on the ventricular surface of the hypothalamic ependyma of the tegu lizard exhibit the pseudopodial and flaplike processes characteristic of macrophages found elsewhere. Since they ingest latex beads, they may be considered a resident phagocytic system of the brain. The importance of ependyma and ventricular phagocytes as a first line of defense against viral invasion of the brain, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of certain virus-related diseases, is suggested by a number of experimental and clinical observations.

  16. A Hitchhiker's Guide to Myeloid Cell Subsets: Practical Implementation of a Novel Mononuclear Phagocyte Classification System.

    PubMed

    Guilliams, Martin; van de Laar, Lianne

    2015-01-01

    The classification of mononuclear phagocytes as either dendritic cells or macrophages has been mainly based on morphology, the expression of surface markers, and assumed functional specialization. We have recently proposed a novel classification system of mononuclear phagocytes based on their ontogeny. Here, we discuss the practical application of such a classification system through a number of prototypical examples we have encountered while hitchhiking from one subset to another, across species and between steady-state and inflammatory settings. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of such a classification system and propose a number of improvements to move from theoretical concepts to concrete guidelines.

  17. From the Reticuloendothelial to Mononuclear Phagocyte System – The Unaccounted Years

    PubMed Central

    Yona, Simon; Gordon, Siamon

    2015-01-01

    It is over 125 years since Ilya Metchnikoff described the significance of phagocytosis. In this review, we examine the early origins and development of macrophage research continuing after his death in 1916, through the period of the reticuloendothelial system. Studies on these cells resulted in a substantial literature spanning immunology, hematology, biochemistry, and pathology. Early histological studies on morphology and in situ labeling laid the foundations to appreciate the diversity and functional capacity of these cells in the steady state and during pathology. We complete this phagocyte retrospective with the establishment of the mononuclear phagocyte system nomenclature half a century ago. PMID:26191061

  18. Aggregation of Sea Urchin Phagocytes Is Augmented In Vitro by Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Majeske, Audrey J.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Smith, L. Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Development of protocols and media for culturing immune cells from marine invertebrates has not kept pace with advancements in mammalian immune cell culture, the latter having been driven by the need to understand the causes of and develop therapies for human and animal diseases. However, expansion of the aquaculture industry and the diseases that threaten these systems creates the need to develop cell and tissue culture methods for marine invertebrates. Such methods will enable us to better understand the causes of disease outbreaks and to develop means to avoid and remedy epidemics. We report a method for the short-term culture of phagocytes from the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, by modifying an approach previously used to culture cells from another sea urchin species. The viability of cultured phagocytes from the purple sea urchin decreases from 91.6% to 57% over six days and phagocyte morphology changes from single cells to aggregates leading to the formation of syncytia-like structures. This process is accelerated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide suggesting that phagocytes are capable of detecting this molecular pattern in culture conditions. Sea urchin immune response proteins, called Sp185/333, are expressed on the surface of a subset of phagocytes and have been associated with syncytia-like structures. We evaluated their expression in cultured phagocytes to determine their possible role in cell aggregation and in the formation of syncytia-like structures. Between 0 and 3 hr, syncytia-like structures were observed in cultures when only ∼10% of the cells were positive for Sp185/333 proteins. At 24 hr, ∼90% of the nuclei were Sp185/333-positive when all of the phagocytes had aggregated into syncytia-like structures. Consequently, we conclude that the Sp185/333 proteins do not have a major role in initiating the aggregation of cultured phagocytes, however the Sp185/333 proteins are associated with the clustered nuclei within the

  19. Genetic deletion of MT1 melatonin receptors alters spontaneous behavioral rhythms in male and female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Adamah-Biassi, E B; Hudson, R L; Dubocovich, M L

    2014-09-01

    Behaviors vary over the 24h light/dark cycle and these temporal patterns reflect in part modulation by circadian neural circuits and hormones, such as melatonin. The goal of this study was to investigate the involvement of MT1 melatonin receptors in behavioral regulation by comparing male and female C57 wild type (WT) mice with C57 mice with genetic deletion of the MT1 receptor (MT1KO). A comprehensive array of fifteen distinct spontaneous behaviors was recorded continuously in the homecage over multiple days using the HomeCageScan system. Behaviors assessed were activity-like (i.e. come down, hang, jump, walk), exploration-like (i.e. dig, groom, rear up, sniff, stretch), resting-like (i.e. awake, remain low, rest, twitch) and ingestion-like (i.e. drink, eat). Phenotypic array and temporal distribution analysis revealed distinct behavioral rhythms that differed between WT and MT1KO mice. The rhythms were consistent from day to day in males and varied with the estrous cycle in females. We also studied the role of MT1 receptors on depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Genetic deletion of MT1 receptors increased immobility time in the forced swim test and decreased the number of marbles buried in the marble burying test in both male and female C57 mice. We conclude that MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in neural pathways modulating diurnal rhythms of spontaneous behavior in the homecage as well as pathways regulating depressive and anxiolytic-like behaviors.

  20. The specificity of immune priming in silkworm, Bombyx mori, is mediated by the phagocytic ability of granular cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Li, Mei; Liu, Yi; Ding, Ying; Yi, Yunhong

    2015-10-01

    In the past decade, the phenomenon of immune priming was documented in many invertebrates in a large number of studies; however, in most of these studies, behavioral evidence was used to identify the immune priming. The underlying mechanism and the degree of specificity of the priming response remain unclear. We studied the mechanism of immune priming in the larvae of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and analyzed the specificity of the priming response using two closely related Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria (Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 and P. luminescens H06) and one Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium (Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1). Primed with heat-killed bacteria, the B. mori larvae were more likely to survive subsequent homologous exposure (the identical bacteria used in the priming and in the subsequent challenge) than heterologous (different bacteria used in the priming and subsequent exposure) exposure to live bacteria. This result indicated that the B. mori larvae possessed a strong immune priming response and revealed a degree of specificity to TT01, H06 and HD-1 bacteria. The degree of enhanced immune protection was positively correlated with the level of phagocytic ability of the granular cells and the antibacterial activity of the cell-free hemolymph. Moreover, the granular cells of the immune-primed larvae increased the phagocytosis of a previously encountered bacterial strain compared with other bacteria. Thus, the enhanced immune protection of the B. mori larvae after priming was mediated by the phagocytic ability of the granular cells and the antibacterial activity of the hemolymph; the specificity of the priming response was primarily attributed to the phagocytosis of bacteria by the granular cells.

  1. In utero and lactational exposure to bisphenol A, in contrast to ethinyl estradiol, does not alter sexually dimorphic behavior, puberty, fertility, and anatomy of female LE rats.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Bryce C; Hotchkiss, Andrew K; Crofton, Kevin M; Gray, L Earl

    2010-03-01

    Many chemicals released into the environment display estrogenic activity including the oral contraceptive ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and the plastic monomer bisphenol A (BPA). EE2 is present in some aquatic systems at concentrations sufficient to alter reproductive function of fishes. Many concerns have been raised about the potential effects of BPA. The National Toxicology Program rated the potential effects of low doses of BPA on behavior and central nervous system (CNS) as an area of "some concern," whereas most effects were rated as of "negligible" or "minimal" concern. However, the number of robust studies in this area was limited. The current study was designed to determine if maternal exposure to relatively low oral doses of EE2 or BPA in utero and during lactation would alter the expression of well-characterized sexually dimorphic behaviors or alter the age of puberty or reproductive function in the female Long-Evans rat offspring. Pregnant rats were gavaged with vehicle, EE2 (0.05-50 microg/kg/day), or BPA (2, 20, and 200 microg/kg/day) from day 7 of gestation to postnatal day (PND) 18, and the female offspring were studied. EE2 (50 microg/kg/day) increased anogenital distance and reduced pup body weight at PND2, accelerated the age at vaginal opening, reduced F1 fertility and F2 litter sizes, and induced malformations of the external genitalia (5 microg/kg). F1 females exposed to EE2 also displayed a reduced (male-like) saccharin preference (5 microg/kg) and absence of lordosis behavior (15 microg/kg), indications of defeminization of the CNS. BPA had no effect on any of the aforementioned measures. These results demonstrate that developmental exposure to pharmacologically relevant dosage levels of EE2 can permanently disrupt the reproductive morphology and function of the female rat.

  2. Evaluation of potential gender-related differences in behavioral and cognitive alterations following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Clarissa Vasconcelos de; Grigoletto, Jéssica; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider

    2015-05-01

    Together with pharmacoresistant seizures, the quality of life of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients is negatively impacted by behavioral comorbidities including but not limited to depression, anxiety and cognitive deficits. The pilocarpine model of TLE has been widely used to study characteristics of human TLE, including behavioral comorbidities. Since the outcomes of pilocarpine-induced TLE might vary depending on several experimental factors, we sought to investigate potential gender-related differences regarding selected behavioral alterations in C57BL6 mice. We found that epileptic mice, independent of gender, displayed increased anxiety-like behavior in the open-field test. In the object recognition test, epileptic mice, regardless of gender, showed a decreased recognition index at 24 (but not at 4) hours after training. On the other hand, no significant differences were found regarding mice learning and memory performance in the Barnes maze paradigm. Motor coordination and balance as assessed by the beam walk and rotarod tests were not impaired in epileptic mice of both genders. However, female mice, independent of epilepsy, performed the beam walk and rotarod tasks better than their male counterparts. We also found that only male epileptic mice displayed disturbed behavior in the forced swim test, but the mice of both genders displayed anhedonia-like behavior in the taste preference test. Lastly, we found that the extent of hilar cell loss is similar in both genders. In summary, both genders can be successfully employed to study behavioral comorbidities of TLE; however, taking the potential gender differences into account may help choose the more appropriated gender for a given task, which may be of value for the minimization of the number of animals used during the experiments.

  3. Foraging Behavior under Starvation Conditions Is Altered via Photosynthesis by the Marine Gastropod, Elysia clarki

    PubMed Central

    Middlebrooks, Michael L.; Pierce, Sidney K.; Bell, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    It has been well documented that nutritional state can influence the foraging behavior of animals. However, photosynthetic animals, those capable of both heterotrophy and symbiotic photosynthesis, may have a delayed behavioral response due to their ability to photosynthesize. To test this hypothesis we subjected groups of the kleptoplastic sea slug, Elysia clarki, to a gradient of starvation treatments of 4, 8, and 12 weeks plus a satiated control. Compared to the control group, slugs starved 8 and 12 weeks displayed a significant increase in the proportion of slugs feeding and a significant decrease in photosynthetic capability, as measured in maximum quantum yield and [chl a]. The 4 week group, however, showed no significant difference in feeding behavior or in the metrics of photosynthesis compared to the control. This suggests that photosynthesis in E. clarki, thought to be linked to horizontally-transferred algal genes, delays a behavioral response to starvation. This is the first demonstration of a link between photosynthetic capability in an animal and a modification of foraging behavior under conditions of starvation. PMID:21799783

  4. Environmental enrichment reverses the impaired exploratory behavior and altered gene expression induced by early-life seizures.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sookyong; Chung, Hyokwon; Xia, Hongjing; Mahadevia, Amit; Song, Youngju

    2005-10-01

    Behavioral problems, school failure, and memory impairment are common among children with epilepsy. Currently, no effective treatment exists to promote recovery and neuron regeneration after seizures. To investigate the efficacy of environmental enrichment in reversing early-life seizure-induced changes in exploratory behavior and gene expression, we injected postnatal day 20 to 25 rats with kainic acid or saline and placed them either singly in a cage or as a group of eight in an enriched environment for 7 to 10 days. Exploratory behavior was quantified in an open field, and hippocampal gene analysis was performed on oligonucleotide microarrays. Exploratory behavior in kainic acid isolated rats were decreased in open field, whereas kainic acid rats exposed to an enriched environment behaved similarly to controls (n = 37, analysis of variance, P < .001). Correlated with an improvement in behavior, genes involved in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation, such as Arc, Homer1a, and Egr1, were significantly increased in rats exposed to environmental enrichment. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction confirmed our microarray data on select genes. Our results provide an experimental basis for promoting enriching education programs for children with epilepsy.

  5. Gestational and early postnatal hypothyroidism alters VGluT1 and VGAT bouton distribution in the neocortex and hippocampus, and behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Daniela; Alvarado, Mayvi; Navarrete, Francisco; Giner, Manuel; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Manzanares, Jorge; Berbel, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are fundamental for the expression of genes involved in the development of the CNS and their deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological diseases including mental retardation, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorders. We examined in rat whether developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism affects the distribution of vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGluT1; glutamatergic) and vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VGAT; GABAergic) immunoreactive (ir) boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex, and the behavior of the pups. Hypothyroidism was induced by adding 0.02% methimazole (MMI) and 1% KClO4 to the drinking water starting at embryonic day 10 (E10; developmental hypothyroidism) and E21 (early postnatal hypothyroidism) until day of sacrifice at postnatal day 50. Behavior was studied using the acoustic prepulse inhibition (somatosensory attention) and the elevated plus-maze (anxiety-like assessment) tests. The distribution, density and size of VGluT1-ir and VGAT-ir boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex was abnormal in MMI pups and these changes correlate with behavioral changes, as prepulse inhibition of the startle response amplitude was reduced, and the percentage of time spent in open arms increased. In conclusion, both developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism significantly decreases the ratio of GABAergic to glutamatergic boutons in dentate gyrus leading to an abnormal flow of information to the hippocampus and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex, and alter behavior in rats. Our data show cytoarchitectonic alterations in the basic excitatory hippocampal loop, and in local inhibitory circuits of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus that might contribute to the delayed neurocognitive outcome observed in thyroid hormone deficient children born in iodine deficient areas, or suffering from congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:25741243

  6. Combination of Methamphetamine and HIV-1 gp120 causes distinct long-term alterations of behavior, gene expression, and injury in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Hoefer, Melanie M.; Sanchez, Ana B.; Maung, Ricky; de Rozieres, Cyrus M.; Catalan, Irene C.; Dowling, Cari C.; Thaney, Victoria E.; Piña-Crespo, Juan; Zhang, Dongxian; Roberts, Amanda J.; Kaul, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is frequent in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and is suspected to aggravate HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). METH is a psychostimulant that compromises several neurotransmitter systems and HIV proteins trigger neuronal injury but the combined effects of viral infection and METH abuse are incompletely understood. In this study we treated transgenic mice expressing the HIV envelope protein gp120 in the brain (HIV/gp120tg) at 3–4 months of age with an escalating-dose, multiple-binge METH regimen. The long-term effects were analyzed after 6–7 months of drug abstinence employing behavioral tests and analysis of neuropathology, electrophysiology and gene expression. Behavioral testing showed that both HIV/gp120tg and WT animals treated with METH displayed impaired learning and memory. Neuropathological analysis revealed that METH similar to HIV/gp120 caused a significant loss of neuronal dendrites and pre-synaptic terminals in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of WT animals. Electrophysiological studies in hippocampal slices showed that METH exposed HIV/gp120tg animals displayed reduced post-tetanic potentiation, whereas both gp120 expression and METH lead to reduced long-term potentiation. A quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction array showed that gp120 expression, METH and their combination each caused a significant dysregulation of specific components of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission systems, providing a possible mechanism for synaptic dysfunction and behavioral impairment. In conclusion, both HIV-1/gp120 and METH caused lasting behavioral impairment in association with neuropathology and altered gene expression. However, combined METH exposure and HIV-1/gp120 expression resulted in the most pronounced, long lasting pre-and post-synaptic alterations coinciding with impaired learning and memory. PMID:25246228

  7. Prenatal stress, regardless of concurrent escitalopram treatment, alters behavior and amygdala gene expression of adolescent female rats

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, David E.; Neigh, Gretchen N.; Bourke, Chase H.; Nemeth, Christina L.; Hazra, Rimi; Ryan, Steven J.; Rowson, Sydney; Jairam, Nesha; Sholar, Courtney; Rainnie, Donald G.; Stowe, Zachary N.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Depression during pregnancy has been linked to in utero stress and is associated with long-lasting symptoms in offspring, including anxiety, helplessness, attentional deficits, and social withdrawal. Depression is diagnosed in 10-20% of expectant mothers, but the impact of antidepressant treatment on offspring development is not well documented, particularly for females. Here, we used a prenatal stress model of maternal depression to test the hypothesis that in utero antidepressant treatment could mitigate the effects of prenatal stress. We also investigated the effects of prenatal stress and antidepressant treatment on gene expression related to GABAergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in the amygdala, which may underlie behavioral effects of prenatal stress. Nulliparous female rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering clinically-relevant concentrations of escitalopram and mated. Pregnant dams were exposed to 12 days of mixed-modality stressors, and offspring were behaviorally assessed in adolescence (postnatal day 28) and adulthood (beyond day 90) to determine the extent of behavioral change. We found that in utero stress exposure, regardless of escitalopram treatment, increased anxiety-like behavior in adolescent females and profoundly influenced amygdala expression of the chloride transporters KCC2 and NKCC1, which regulate GABAergic function. In contrast, prenatal escitalopram exposure alone elevated amygdala expression of 5-HT1A receptors. In adulthood, anxiety-like behavior returned to baseline and gene expression effects in the amygdala abated, whereas deficits emerged in novel object recognition for rats exposed to stress during gestation. These findings suggest prenatal stress causes age-dependent deficits in anxiety-like behavior and amygdala function in female offspring, regardless of antidepressant exposure. PMID:26032436

  8. Early deprivation alters the vocalization behavior of neonates directing maternal attention in a rat model of child neglect.

    PubMed

    Zimmerberg, Betty; Kim, Ju H; Davidson, Abigail N; Rosenthal, Abigail J

    2003-12-01

    Animal models of child neglect (known as maternal separation or early deprivation) have suggested a causal link to subsequent depression and/or anxiety in children. In this experiment, the acoustical features of the ultrasonic calls emitted by a rat pup when separated from its dam were analyzed as well as the maternal behavior when the dam was allowed to retrieve the pup. Bout structure and harmonic double shifts did differ between controls and "neglected" pups, as did maternal attention. This model will be used to determine neural mechanisms underlying deficits in attachment behavior.

  9. An acute stressor alters steroid hormone levels and activity but not sexual behavior in male and female Ocoee salamanders (Desmognathus ocoee).

    PubMed

    Woodley, Sarah K; Lacy, Eva L

    2010-08-01

    Stressors that are chronic have clear suppressive effects on reproductive behaviors in both males and females. Stressors that are acute have effects on reproductive behavior that are less clear. We measured the effects of an acute bout of handling in laboratory-housed male and female Ocoee salamanders (Desmognathus ocoee), a species with a prolonged mating season. Handling resulted in decreased locomotory activity and elevated plasma corticosterone, a hallmark of the vertebrate stress response. Handling also decreased plasma testosterone in males and elevated plasma estradiol in females. Despite the handling-induced changes in hormone levels, handling had minimal impact on courtship and mating. Other species in which reproduction is insensitive to acute stressors may live in extreme environments with limited reproductive opportunities, whereas Ocoee salamanders live in a relatively temperate environment with multiple reproductive opportunities. Together, these data indicate that an allostatic response to a stressor can alter locomotory activity and elevate corticosterone without suppressing nonessential behaviors like courtship and mating in a species in which reproductive opportunities can occur over a period of multiple months. The lack of reproductive suppression in Ocoee salamanders might be due to the low energetic cost of courtship and mating in this species combined with potentially elevated energetic stores, highlighting the importance of considering energy budgets when making predictions about behavioral effects of acute stressors.

  10. Acute Exposure to 17α-Ethinylestradiol Alters Aggressive Behavior of Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) Toward Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Dang, Hieu M; Inagaki, Yoshihiko; Yamauchi, Yuta; Kurihara, Takaaki; Vo, Cong H; Sakakibara, Yutaka

    2017-02-03

    Behavior of the mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) toward the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) was tested under exposure to environmental 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), a synthetic derivative of natural estrogen, estradiol. The mosquitofish were exposed to EE2 at different concentrations-0, 0.5, 5.0, and 50.0 ng/L-for 2 days, before their behavioral changes toward the medaka were observed. Results indicate that female mosquitofish became more aggressive at the high level of EE2 (50 ng/L), in terms of how persistently they attempted to approach the medaka. The males showed increased aggressive behavior toward the medaka, by significantly increasing the number and persistence of approach attempts at the low (0.5 and 5 ng/L) levels of EE2. At the highest EE2 concentration (50 ng/L), however, the number of attempts decreased, while the persistence increased in the males showing the same pattern as in the females. All behavioral changes were reversed once EE2 was removed from the environment.

  11. Early mood behavioral changes following exposure to monotonous environment during isolation stress is associated with altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Baitharu, Iswar; Barhwal, Kalpana; Hota, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-26

    Social isolation stress and its effect on mood have been well reported, but the effect of monotony (a state of repetition of events for a considerable period of time without variation) on mood and hippocampal synaptic plasticity needs to be addressed. Present study was conducted on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Singly housed (SH) rats were subjected to monotony stress by physical, visual and pheromonal separation in specially designed animal segregation chamber. Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) was administered orally. Behavioral assessment showed anxiety and depression like traits in SH group. Monotony stress exposure to SH group resulted in increased pyknosis, decreased apical dendritic arborization and increased asymmetric (excitatory) synapses with the corresponding decrease in the symmetric (inhibitory) synapses in the hippocampal CA3 region. Monotonous environment during isolation stress also decreased the serotonin level and reduced the expression of synaptophysin and pCREB in the hippocampus. Fluoxetine administration to singly housed rats resulted in amelioration of altered mood along with improvement in serotonin and decrease in excitatory synaptic density but no change in altered inhibitory synaptic density in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that monotony during isolation contributes to early impairment in mood state by altering hippocampal synaptic density and neuronal morphology.

  12. Streptozotocin diabetic mice display depressive-like behavior and alterations in the structure, neurotransmission and plasticity of medial prefrontal cortex interneurons.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Gómez, Esther; Coviello, Simona; Perez-Rando, Marta; Curto, Yasmina; Carceller, Héctor; Salvador, Alicia; Nacher, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus patients are at increased risk of developing depression, although the neurobiological bases of this comorbidity are not yet fully understood. These patients show CNS alterations, similar to those found in major depression, including changes in the structure and neurotransmission of excitatory neurons. However, although depressive patients and animal models also display alterations in inhibitory networks, little is known about the effects of diabetes on interneurons. Our main objective was to study the impact of diabetes on interneurons of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), one of the regions most affected by major depression. For this purpose we have induced diabetes with high-dose streptozotozin in transgenic mice displaying fluorescent interneurons. These animals showed a depressive-like behavior (increased immobility time in tail suspension test) in parallel with reductions in interneuronal dendritic arborization and in the expression of GAD67, the enzyme that synthetizes the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. However, the levels of PSA-NCAM, a plasticity-related molecule exclusively expressed by interneurons in the mPFC, were unaltered in the different regions and layers of this cortical area. Interestingly, diabetic mice also showed increased levels of synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle protein. These results indicate that the structure and neurotransmission of interneurons is altered in the mPFC of diabetic mice and suggest that these changes may play a key role in the depressive symptoms associated to diabetes.

  13. Tunic phagocytes are involved in allorejection reaction in the colonial tunicate Aplidium yamazii (Polyclinidae, Ascidiacea).

    PubMed

    Ishii, Teruhisa; Hirose, Euichi; Taneda, Yasuho

    2008-04-01

    The colonial ascidian Aplidium yamazii exhibited an allorejection reaction when two allogeneic colonies were brought into contact at their growing edges or at artificial cut surfaces. This species has no vascular network in the tunic, unlike the botryllid ascidians, which have a vascular network throughout the colony's common tunic. In the allorejection reaction induced by contact at the growing edges, some small, hard-packed tunic masses were formed at the contact points. Histological and electron microscopic investigation of these tunic masses revealed that they contained aggregates of tunic cells, with tunic phagocytes being the major cell type present. Some of the tunic phagocytes in these tunic masses appeared to be disintegrating. When allogeneic colonies were placed in contact at their artificial cut surfaces, the colonies partially fused, then separated. In this allorejection reaction, some loosely packed tunic masses remained in the gap between the two withdrawn colonies. These results strongly suggest that the tunic phagocytes are likely to be the major effector cells in the allorejection reaction. We also propose that the tunic phagocytes are not only the effector cells in the allorejection reaction but also bear the sites of allorecognition.

  14. Myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation promotes the oxidative modification of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Magon, Nicholas J; Harwood, D Tim; Kettle, Anthony J; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-04-10

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation.

  15. Voltage Gated Proton Channels Find Their Dream Job Managing the Respiratory Burst in Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The voltage gated proton channel bears surprising resemblance to the voltage-sensing domain (S1–S4) of other voltage gated ion channels, but is a dimer with two conduction pathways. The proton channel seems designed for efficient proton extrusion from cells. In phagocytes, it facilitates the production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. PMID:20134026

  16. Morphological and Phagocytic Profile of Microglia in the Developing Rat Cerebellum1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    VanRyzin, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Microglia are being increasingly recognized as playing important roles in neurodevelopment. The cerebellum matures postnatally, undergoing major growth, but the role of microglia in the developing cerebellum is not well understood. Using the laboratory rat we quantified and morphologically categorized microglia throughout the vermis and across development using a design-based unbiased stereology method. We found that microglial morphology changed from amoeboid to ramified during the first 3 postnatal weeks in a region specific manner. These morphological changes were accompanied by the sudden appearance of phagocytic cups during the third postnatal week from P17 to P19, with an approximately fourfold increase compared with the first week, followed by a prompt decline at the end of the third week. The microglial phagocytic cups were significantly higher in the granular layer (∼69%) than in the molecular layer (ML; ∼31%) during a 3 d window, and present on ∼67% of microglia with thick processes and ∼33% of microglia with thin processes. Similar proportions of phagocytic cups associated to microglia with either thick or thin processes were found in the ML. We observed cell nuclei fragmentation and cleaved caspase-3 expression within some microglial phagocytic cups, presumably from dying granule neurons. At P17 males showed an approximately twofold increase in microglia with thin processes compared with females. Our findings indicate a continuous process of microglial maturation and a nonuniform distribution of microglia in the cerebellar cortex that implicates microglia as an important cellular component of the developing cerebellum. PMID:26464992

  17. NADPH Oxidase-Driven Phagocyte Recruitment Controls Candida albicans Filamentous Growth and Prevents Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kimberly M.; Gratacap, Remi L.; Barker, Sarah E.; Newman, Zachary R.; Norum, Ashley; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human commensal and clinically important fungal pathogen that grows as both yeast and hyphal forms during human, mouse and zebrafish infection. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidases play diverse roles in immunity, including their long-appreciated function as microbicidal oxidants. Here we demonstrate a non-traditional mechanistic role of NADPH oxidase in promoting phagocyte chemotaxis and intracellular containment of fungi to limit filamentous growth. We exploit the transparent zebrafish model to show that failed NADPH oxidase-dependent phagocyte recruitment to C. albicans in the first four hours post-infection permits fungi to germinate extracellularly and kill the host. We combine chemical and genetic tools with high-resolution time-lapse microscopy to implicate both phagocyte oxidase and dual-specific oxidase in recruitment, suggesting that both myeloid and non-myeloid cells promote chemotaxis. We show that early non-invasive imaging provides a robust tool for prognosis, strongly connecting effective early immune response with survival. Finally, we demonstrate a new role of a key regulator of the yeast-to-hyphal switching program in phagocyte-mediated containment, suggesting that there are species-specific methods for modulation of NADPH oxidase-independent immune responses. These novel links between ROS-driven chemotaxis and fungal dimorphism expand our view of a key host defense mechanism and have important implications for pathogenesis. PMID:24098114

  18. Myeloperoxidase-dependent Lipid Peroxidation Promotes the Oxidative Modification of Cytosolic Proteins in Phagocytic Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P.; Magon, Nicholas J.; Harwood, D. Tim; Kettle, Anthony J.; Vissers, Margreet C.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Hampton, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation. PMID:25697357

  19. Value of phagocyte function screening for immunotoxicity of nanoparticles in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) present in the environment and in consumer products can cause immunotoxic effects. The immune system is very complex, and in vivo studies are the gold standard for evaluation. Due to the increased amount of NPs that are being developed, cellular screening assays to decrease the amount of NPs that have to be tested in vivo are highly needed. Effects on the unspecific immune system, such as effects on phagocytes, might be suitable for screening for immunotoxicity because these cells mediate unspecific and specific immune responses. They are present at epithelial barriers, in the blood, and in almost all organs. This review summarizes the effects of carbon, metal, and metal oxide NPs used in consumer and medical applications (gold, silver, titanium dioxide, silica dioxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) and polystyrene NPs on the immune system. Effects in animal exposures through different routes are compared to the effects on isolated phagocytes. In addition, general problems in the testing of NPs, such as unknown exposure doses, as well as interference with assays are mentioned. NPs appear to induce a specific immunotoxic pattern consisting of the induction of inflammation in normal animals and aggravation of pathologies in disease models. The evaluation of particle action on several phagocyte functions in vitro may provide an indication on the potency of the particles to induce immunotoxicity in vivo. In combination with information on realistic exposure levels, in vitro studies on phagocytes may provide useful information on the health risks of NPs. PMID:26060398

  20. Trafficking of phagocytic peritoneal cells in hypoinsulinemic-hyperglycemic mice with systemic candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candidemia is a severe fungal infection that primarily affects hospitalized and/or immunocompromised patients. Mononuclear phagocytes have been recognized as pivotal immune cells which act in the recognition of pathogens, phagocytosis, inflammation, polarization of adaptive immune response and tissue repair. Experimental studies have showed that the systemic candidiasis could be controlled by activated peritoneal macrophages. However, the mechanism to explain how these cells act in distant tissue during a systemic fungal infection is still to be elucidated. In the present study we investigate the in vivo trafficking of phagocytic peritoneal cells into infected organs in hypoinsulinemic-hyperglycemic (HH) mice with systemic candidiasis. Methods The red fluorescent vital dye PKH-26 PCL was injected into the peritoneal cavity of Swiss mice 24 hours before the intravenous inoculation with Candida albicans. After 24 and 48 hours and 7 days of infection, samples of the spleen, liver, kidneys, brain and lungs were submitted to the microbiological evaluation as well as to phagocytic peritoneal cell trafficking analyses by fluorescence microscopy. Results In the present study, PKH+ cells were observed in the peritoneum, kidney, spleen and liver samples from all groups. In infected mice, we also found PKH+ cells in the lung and brain. The HH condition did not affect this process. Conclusions In the present study we have observed that peritoneal phagocytes migrate to tissues infected by C. albicans and the HH condition did not interfere in this process. PMID:23521724

  1. Interference of Antibacterial Agents with Phagocyte Functions: Immunomodulation or “Immuno-Fairy Tales”?

    PubMed Central

    Labro, Marie-Thérése

    2000-01-01

    Professional phagocytes (polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) are a main component of the immune system. These cells are involved in both host defenses and various pathological settings characterized by excessive inflammation. Accordingly, they are key targets for immunomodulatory drugs, among which antibacterial agents are promising candidates. The basic and historical concepts of immunomodulation will first be briefly reviewed. Phagocyte complexity will then be unravelled (at least in terms of what we know about the origin, subsets, ambivalent roles, functional capacities, and transductional pathways of this cell and how to explore them). The core subject of this review will be the many possible interactions between antibacterial agents and phagocytes, classified according to demonstrated or potential clinical relevance (e.g., neutropenia, intracellular accumulation, and modulation of bacterial virulence). A detailed review of direct in vitro effects will be provided for the various antibacterial drug families, followed by a discussion of the clinical relevance of these effects in two particular settings: immune deficiency and inflammatory diseases. The prophylactic and therapeutic use of immunomodulatory antibiotics will be considered before conclusions are drawn about the emerging (optimistic) vision of future therapeutic prospects to deal with largely unknown new diseases and new pathogens by using new agents, new techniques, and a better understanding of the phagocyte in particular and the immune system in general. PMID:11023961

  2. Interference of antibacterial agents with phagocyte functions: immunomodulation or "immuno-fairy tales"?

    PubMed

    Labro, M T

    2000-10-01

    Professional phagocytes (polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) are a main component of the immune system. These cells are involved in both host defenses and various pathological settings characterized by excessive inflammation. Accordingly, they are key targets for immunomodulatory drugs, among which antibacterial agents are promising candidates. The basic and historical concepts of immunomodulation will first be briefly reviewed. Phagocyte complexity will then be unravelled (at least in terms of what we know about the origin, subsets, ambivalent roles, functional capacities, and transductional pathways of this cell and how to explore them). The core subject of this review will be the many possible interactions between antibacterial agents and phagocytes, classified according to demonstrated or potential clinical relevance (e.g., neutropenia, intracellular accumulation, and modulation of bacterial virulence). A detailed review of direct in vitro effects will be provided for the various antibacterial drug families, followed by a discussion of the clinical relevance of these effects in two particular settings: immune deficiency and inflammatory diseases. The prophylactic and therapeutic use of immunomodulatory antibiotics will be considered before conclusions are drawn about the emerging (optimistic) vision of future therapeutic prospects to deal with largely unknown new diseases and new pathogens by using new agents, new techniques, and a better understanding of the phagocyte in particular and the immune system in general.

  3. Gadd45b is an epigenetic regulator of juvenile social behavior and alters local pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the rodent amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kigar, Stacey L; Chang, Liza; Auger, Anthony P

    2015-05-01

    Precise regulation of the epigenome during perinatal development is critical to the formation of species-typical behavior later in life. Recent data suggests that Gadd45b facilitates active DNA demethylation by recruiting proteins involved in base excision repair (BER), which will catalyze substitution of 5-methyl-cytosine (5mC) for an unmodified cytosine. While a role for Gadd45b has been implicated in both hippocampal and amygdalar learning tasks, to the best of our knowledge, no study has been done investigating the involvement of Gadd45b in neurodevelopmental programming of social behavior. To address this, we used a targeted siRNA delivery approach to transiently knock down Gadd45b expression in the neonatal rat amygdala. We chose to examine social behavior in the juvenile period, as social deficits associated with neurodevelopmental disorders tend to emerge in humans at an equivalent age. We find that neonatal Gadd45b knock-down results in altered juvenile social behavior and reduced expression of several genes implicated in psychiatric disorders, including methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2), Reelin, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We furthermore report a novel role for Gadd45b in the programmed expression of α2-adrenoceptor (Adra2a). Consistent with Gadd45b's role in the periphery, we also observed changes in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (Il-6) and interleukin-1beta (Il-1beta) in the amygdala, which could potentially mediate or exacerbate effects of Gadd45b knockdown on the organization of social behavior. These data suggest a prominent role for Gadd45b in the epigenetic programming of complex juvenile social interactions, and may provide insight into the etiology of juvenile behavioral disorders such as ADHD, autism, and/or schizophrenia.

  4. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  5. Subchronic treatment with phencyclidine in adolescence leads to impaired exploratory behavior in adult rats without altering social interaction or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor binding levels.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, A; Willems, R; Kooijman, E J M; Renjaän, V A; Klein, P J; Windhorst, A D; Donck, L Ver; Leysen, J E; Berckel, B N M van

    2014-11-01

    Although both the onset of schizophrenia and human phencyclidine (PCP) abuse typically present within the interval from adolescence to early adulthood, the majority of preclinical research employing the PCP model of schizophrenia has been conducted on neonatal or adult animals. The present study was designed to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence. Male 35-42-day-old Sprague Dawley rats were subcutaneously administered either saline (10 ml · kg(-1) ) or PCP hydrochloride (10 mg · kg(-1) ) once daily for a period of 14 days (n = 6/group). The animals were allowed to withdraw from treatment for 2 weeks, and their social and exploratory behaviors were subsequently assessed in adulthood by using the social interaction test. To examine the effects of adolescent PCP administration on the regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), quantitative autoradiography was performed on brain sections of adult, control and PCP-withdrawn rats by using 20 nM (3) H-MK-801. Prior subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence had no enduring effects on the reciprocal contact and noncontact social behavior of adult rats. Spontaneous rearing in response to the novel testing arena and time spent investigating its walls and floor were reduced in PCP-withdrawn animals compared with control. The long-term behavioral effects of PCP occurred in the absence of persistent deficits in spontaneous locomotion or self-grooming activity and were not mediated by altered NMDAR density. Our results document differential effects of adolescent PCP administration on the social and exploratory behaviors of adult rats, suggesting that distinct neurobiological mechanisms are involved in mediating these behaviors.

  6. Embryonic GABAB Receptor Blockade Alters Cell Migration, Adult Hypothalamic Structure, and Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors Sex Specifically in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T.; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J.; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABAB receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABAB receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11–E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABAB receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABAB receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABAB receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABAB receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  7. Adolescent Opiate Exposure in the Female Rat Induces Subtle Alterations in Maternal Care and Transgenerational Effects on Play Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicole L.; Carini, Lindsay; Schenk, Marian E.; Stewart, Michelle; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription opiates, such as Vicodin® and MSContin®, has increased dramatically over the past decade. Of particular concern is the rising popularity of these drugs in adolescent female populations. Use during this critical developmental period could have significant long-term consequences for both the female user as well as potential effects on her future offspring. To address this issue, we have begun modeling adolescent opiate exposure in female rats and have observed significant transgenerational effects despite the fact that all drugs are withdrawn several weeks prior to pregnancy. The purpose of the current set of studies was to determine whether adolescent morphine exposure modifies postpartum care. In addition, we also examined juvenile play behavior in both male and female offspring. The choice of the social play paradigm was based on previous findings demonstrating effects of both postpartum care and opioid activity on play behavior. The findings revealed subtle modifications in the maternal behavior of adolescent morphine-exposed females, primarily related to the amount of time females’ spend nursing and in non-nursing contact with their young. In addition, male offspring of adolescent morphine-exposed mothers (MOR-F1) demonstrate decreased rough and tumble play behaviors, with no significant differences in general social behaviors (i.e., social grooming and social exploration). Moreover, there was a tendency toward increased rough and tumble play in MOR-F1 females, demonstrating the sex-specific nature of these effects. Given the importance of the postpartum environment on neurodevelopment, it is possible that modifications in maternal–offspring interactions, related to a history of adolescent opiate exposure, plays a role in the observed transgenerational effects. Overall, these studies indicate that the long-term consequences of adolescent opiate exposure can impact both the female and her future offspring. PMID:21713113

  8. Sickness behavior induced by cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a murine head and neck cancer model is associated with altered mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Molkentine, Jessica M; Vermeer, Daniel W; Walker, Adam K; Feng, Rebekah; Holder, Gerard; Luu, Katherine; Mason, Ryan M; Saligan, Leo; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-15

    The present study was undertaken to explore the possible mechanisms of the behavioral alterations that develop in response to cancer and to cancer therapy. For this purpose we used a syngeneic heterotopic mouse model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer in which cancer therapy is curative. Mice implanted or not with HPV+ tumor cells were exposed to sham treatment or a regimen of cisplatin and radiotherapy (chemoradiation). Sickness was measured by body weight loss and reduced food intake. Motivation was measured by burrowing, a highly prevalent species specific behavior. Tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual decrease in burrowing over time and increased brain and liver inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression by 28 days post tumor implantation. Chemoradiation administered to healthy mice resulted in a mild decrease in burrowing, body weight, and food intake. Chemoradiation in tumor-bearing mice decreased tumor growth and abrogated liver and brain inflammation, but failed to attenuate burrowing deficits. PCR array analysis of selected hypoxia and mitochondrial genes revealed that both the tumor and chemoradiation altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism within the liver and brain and increased expression of genes related to HIF-1α signaling within the brain. The most prominent changes in brain mitochondrial genes were noted in tumor-bearing mice treated with chemoradiation. These findings indicate that targeting mitochondrial dysfunction following cancer and cancer therapy may be a strategy for prevention of cancer-related symptoms.

  9. Early exposure to ethanol but not red wine at the same alcohol concentration induces behavioral and brain neurotrophin alterations in young and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marco; Laviola, Giovanni; Aloe, Luigi; di Fausto, Veronica; Mancinelli, Rosanna; Ceccanti, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during pregnancy is one of the major causes of mental retardation in western countries by inducing fetal-alcohol-like-syndromes. Red wine is known to contain ethanol but also compounds with putative antioxidant properties. It has also been shown that nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are severely affected by ethanol during prenatal and postnatal life. The aim of the current study was to investigate in male CD1 mice brain alterations in NGF and BDNF due to chronic early exposure to ethanol solution (11 vol%) or to red wine at the same alcohol concentration starting from 60 days before pregnancy up to pups weaning. Data revealed no differences between groups of dams in pregnancy duration, neither in pups delivery, pups mortality and sex ratio. Data also showed that adult animals exposed to only ethanol had disrupted levels of both NGF and BDNF in the hippocampus and other brain areas. This profile was associated with impaired ChAT immunopositivity in the septum and Nuclei Basalis and with altered cognition and emotional behavior. Quite interestingly mice exposed to red wine had no change in the behavior or in ChAT immunopositivity but a decrease in hippocampal BDNF and a mild NGF decrease in the cortex. Also NGF-induced neuritic outgrowth in PC-12 cells was still present when exposed to red wine but not when exposed to ethanol solution only. Data suggest differences in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity between red wine and ethanol solution only.

  10. Alteration of Mesoscopic Properties and Mechanical Behavior of Sandstone Due to Hydro-Physical and Hydro-Chemical Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Liping; Wang, Zhechao; Huang, Anda

    2017-02-01

    The hydro-physical and hydro-chemical interactions between groundwater and a rock mass can lead to changes in the mineral composition and structure of the rock (e.g., generation of voids and dissolution pores and an increase in the porosity), thereby altering the macroscopic mechanical characteristics of the rock mass. Sandstone specimens were saturated with distilled water and five aqueous solutions characterized by various ion concentrations and pH values for several months, and their porosity was measured in real time. Simultaneously, the concentration and pH of each aqueous solution were monitored every 30 days. The results indicate that after immersion in the aqueous solutions for 180 days, the porosity of the sandstone specimens and the ion concentrations and pH of the aqueous solutions tended to stabilize. Then, the immersed sandstone specimens were analyzed in thin section and subjected to computerized tomography scanning. It turns out that the mineral composition and structure of the specimens had all changed to various degrees. Finally, the uniaxial compression tests were conducted on the sandstone specimens to analyze the effects of the hydro-physical and hydro-chemical alteration on the macroscopic mechanical characteristics of the rock (e.g., the stress-strain relationship, elastic modulus, and peak strength). The results of this study can serve as a reference for investigations into theories and applications of water-rock interactions and for research in related fields.

  11. Antioxidant-Rich Fraction of Urtica dioica Mediated Rescue of Striatal Mito-Oxidative Damage in MPTP-Induced Behavioral, Cellular, and Neurochemical Alterations in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Rohit; Joshi, Bhuwan Chandra; Kalia, Ajudhiya Nath; Prakash, Atish

    2016-09-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) having a complex and multi-factorial neuropathology includes mainly the degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway, which is a cumulative effect of depleted endogenous antioxidant enzymes, increased oxidative DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, and neuroinflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of a potent antioxidant from Urtica dioica in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. MPTP was administered intranigrally for the induction of PD in male Wistar rats. Behavioral alterations were assessed in between the study period. Animals were sacrificed immediately after behavioral session, and different biochemical, cellular, and neurochemical parameters were measured. Intranigrally repeated administration of MPTP showed significant impairment of motor co-ordination and marked increase of mito-oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in rats. Intranigral MPTP significantly decreases the dopamine and its metabolites with impairment of dopaminergic cell density in rat brain. However, post-treatment with the potent antioxidant fraction of Urtica dioica Linn. (UD) (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) improved the motor function, mito-oxidative defense alteration significantly and dose dependently in MPTP-treated rats. In addition, the potent antioxidant fraction of UD attenuated the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-β) and restored the level of dopamine and its metabolites in MPTP-induced PD in rats. Moreover, minocycline (30 mg/kg) with lower dose of UD (20 mg/kg) had significantly potentiated the protective effect of minocycline as compared to its effect with other individual drug-treated groups. In conclusion, Urtica dioica protected the dopaminergic neurons probably by reducing mito-oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and cellular alteration along with enhanced neurotrophic potential. The above results revealed that the antioxidant rich

  12. Protective effect of montelukast against quinolinic acid/malonic acid induced neurotoxicity: possible behavioral, biochemical, mitochondrial and tumor necrosis factor-α level alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, H; Kumar, P; Kumar, A; Nehru, B

    2010-11-24

    The present study has been designed to explore the protective effect of montelukast (leukotriene receptor antagonist) against intrastriatal quinolinic acid (QA; 300 nmol) and malonic acid (MA; 6 μmol) induced Huntington's like symptoms in rats. Quinolinic acid has been reported to induce excitotoxicity by stimulating the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, causing calcium overload which in turn leads to the neurodegeneration. On the other hand, MA, being a reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial enzyme complex-II, leads to energy crisis and free radical generation. Recent studies have reported the therapeutic potential of leukotriene receptor antagonists in different neurodegenerative disorders. However, their exact role is yet to be established. The present study accordingly, is an attempt to investigate the effect of montelukast against QA and MA induced behavioral, biochemical and molecular alterations in rat striatum. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial enzyme complex and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were evaluated on day 21st and 14th post intrastriatal QA and MA treatment, respectively. Findings of the present study demonstrate significant alteration in the locomotor activity and motor coordination as well as oxidative burden (increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased endogenous antioxidants), mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities and TNF-α level, in both intrastriatal QA and MA treated animals. Further, montelukast (0.4, 0.8 mg/kg p.o.) treatment for 21 and 14 days respectively, attenuated the behavioral alterations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and TNF-α level in these models of Huntington's disease in a significant manner. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the neuroprotective potential of montelukast in the therapeutic management of Huntington like symptoms.

  13. Pathophysiology and Treatments of Oxidative Injury in Ischemic Stroke: Focus on the Phagocytic NADPH Oxidase 2

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Federico; Teixeira, Priscila Camillo; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Mach, François; Vuilleumier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Phagocytes play a key role in promoting the oxidative stress after ischemic stroke occurrence. The phagocytic NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2 is a membrane-bound enzyme complex involved in the antimicrobial respiratory burst and free radical production in these cells. Recent Advances: Different oxidants have been shown to induce opposite effects on neuronal homeostasis after a stroke. However, several experimental models support the detrimental effects of NOX activity (especially the phagocytic isoform) on brain recovery after stroke. Therapeutic strategies selectively targeting the neurotoxic ROS and increasing neuroprotective oxidants have recently produced promising results. Critical Issues: NOX2 might promote carotid plaque rupture and stroke occurrence. In addition, NOX2-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) released by resident and recruited phagocytes enhance cerebral ischemic injury, activating the inflammatory apoptotic pathways. The aim of this review is to update evidence on phagocyte-related oxidative stress, focusing on the role of NOX2 as a potential therapeutic target to reduce ROS-related cerebral injury after stroke. Future Directions: Radical scavenger compounds (such as Ebselen and Edaravone) are under clinical investigation as a therapeutic approach against stroke. On the other hand, NOX inhibition might represent a promising strategy to prevent the stroke-related injury. Although selective NOX inhibitors are not yet available, nonselective compounds (such as apocynin and fasudil) provided encouraging results in preclinical studies. Whereas additional studies are needed to better evaluate this therapeutic potential in human beings, the development of specific NOX inhibitors (such as monoclonal antibodies, small-molecule inhibitors, or aptamers) might further improve brain recovery after stroke. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 460–489. PMID:24635113

  14. Misassembly of full-length Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 protein is linked to altered dopamine homeostasis and behavioral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Trossbach, S V; Bader, V; Hecher, L; Pum, M E; Masoud, S T; Prikulis, I; Schäble, S; de Souza Silva, M A; Su, P; Boulat, B; Chwiesko, C; Poschmann, G; Stühler, K; Lohr, K M; Stout, K A; Oskamp, A; Godsave, S F; Müller-Schiffmann, A; Bilzer, T; Steiner, H; Peters, P J; Bauer, A; Sauvage, M; Ramsey, A J; Miller, G W; Liu, F; Seeman, P; Brandon, N J; Huston, J P; Korth, C

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a mental illness gene first identified in a Scottish pedigree. So far, DISC1-dependent phenotypes in animal models have been confined to expressing mutant DISC1. Here we investigated how pathology of full-length DISC1 protein could be a major mechanism in sporadic mental illness. We demonstrate that a novel transgenic rat model, modestly overexpressing the full-length DISC1 transgene, showed phenotypes consistent with a significant role of DISC1 misassembly in mental illness. The tgDISC1 rat displayed mainly perinuclear DISC1 aggregates in neurons. Furthermore, the tgDISC1 rat showed a robust signature of behavioral phenotypes that includes amphetamine supersensitivity, hyperexploratory behavior and rotarod deficits, all pointing to changes in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. To understand the etiology of the behavioral deficits, we undertook a series of molecular studies in the dorsal striatum of tgDISC1 rats. We observed an 80% increase in high-affinity DA D2 receptors, an increased translocation of the dopamine transporter to the plasma membrane and a corresponding increase in DA inflow as observed by cyclic voltammetry. A reciprocal relationship between DISC1 protein assembly and DA homeostasis was corroborated by in vitro studies. Elevated cytosolic dopamine caused an increase in DISC1 multimerization, insolubility and complexing with the dopamine transporter, suggesting a physiological mechanism linking DISC1 assembly and dopamine homeostasis. DISC1 protein pathology and its interaction with dopamine homeostasis is a novel cellular mechanism that is relevant for behavioral control and may have a role in mental illness. PMID:26754951

  15. Maternal antibodies from mothers of children with autism alter brain growth and social behavior development in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Bauman, M D; Iosif, A-M; Ashwood, P; Braunschweig, D; Lee, A; Schumann, C M; Van de Water, J; Amaral, D G

    2013-07-09

    Antibodies directed against fetal brain proteins of 37 and 73 kDa molecular weight are found in approximately 12% of mothers who have children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but not in mothers of typically developing children. This finding has raised the possibility that these immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibodies cross the placenta during pregnancy and impact brain development, leading to one form of ASD. We evaluated the pathogenic potential of these antibodies by using a nonhuman primate model. IgG was isolated from mothers of children with ASD (IgG-ASD) and of typically developing children (IgG-CON). The purified IgG was administered to two groups of female rhesus monkeys (IgG-ASD; n=8 and IgG-CON; n=8) during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. Another control group of pregnant monkeys (n=8) was untreated. Brain and behavioral development of the offspring were assessed for 2 years. Behavioral differences were first detected when the macaque mothers responded to their IgG-ASD offspring with heightened protectiveness during early development. As they matured, IgG-ASD offspring consistently deviated from species-typical social norms by more frequently approaching familiar peers. The increased approach was not reciprocated and did not lead to sustained social interactions. Even more striking, IgG-ASD offspring displayed inappropriate approach behavior to unfamiliar peers, clearly deviating from normal macaque social behavior. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analyses revealed that male IgG-ASD offspring had enlarged brain volume compared with controls. White matter volume increases appeared to be driving the brain differences in the IgG-ASD offspring and these differences were most pronounced in the frontal lobes.

  16. Dysregulation of the Axonal Trafficking of Nuclear-encoded Mitochondrial mRNA alters Neuronal Mitochondrial Activity and Mouse Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Amar N.; Sun, Ching-Yu; Reichard, Kathryn; Gervasi, Noreen M.; Pickel, James; Nakazawa, Kazu; Gioio, Anthony E.; Kaplan, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    Local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is essential for mitochondrial activity, yet there is little insight into the role that axonal trafficking of these transcripts play in neuronal function and behavior. Previously, we identified a 38 nucleotide stem-loop structure (zipcode) in the 3′ untranslated region of the Cytochrome C oxidase IV (COXIV) mRNA that directs the transport of a reporter mRNA to the axon of superior cervical ganglion neurons (SCG). Over-expression of a chimeric reporter mRNA with the COXIV zipcode competed with the axonal trafficking of endogenous COXIV mRNA, and led to attenuated axon growth in SCG neurons. Here, we show that exogenous expression of the COXIV zipcode in cultured SCG neurons also results in the reduction of local ATP levels and increases levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the axon. We took advantage of this “competition” phenotype to investigate the in vivo significance of axonal transport of COXIV mRNA. Towards this end, we generated transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent reporter fused to COXIV zipcode under a forebrain-specific promoter. Immunohistological analyses and RT-PCR analyses of RNA from the transgenic mouse brain showed expression of the reporter in the deep layer neurons in the pre-frontal and frontal cortex. Consistent with the in vitro studies, we observed increased ROS levels in neurons of these transgenic animals. A battery of behavioral tests on transgenic mice expressing the COXIV zipcode revealed an “anxiety-like” behavioral phenotype, suggesting an important role for axonal trafficking of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs in neuronal physiology and animal behavior. PMID:24151253

  17. Evaluation of Evidence for Altered Behavior and Auditory Deficits in Fishes Due to Human-Generated Noise Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    canals in the skin that have periodic openings to the water. Although there is considerable structural diversity in this sensory system among fishes...experiments. Only one species was involved in most of the five experiments ( olive rockfish, Sebastes serranoides); however an interesting species...sounds, but vermilion rockfish (S. miniatus) and olive rockfish had more individual responses. A comparison of the pre-exposure behavior and

  18. Quinolinic acid released from polymeric brain implants causes behavioral and neuroanatomical alterations in a rodent model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Haik, K L; Shear, D A; Schroeder, U; Sabel, B A; Dunbar, G L

    2000-06-01

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is an N-methyl-d-aspartate agonist that has been shown to produce neurotoxic effects that mimic certain neurodegenerative diseases when administered to laboratory animals. Intrastriatal injections of QA in rats have been used extensively to produce some of the neuropathological and behavioral deficits that are analogous to Huntington's disease (HD). However, acute intrastriatal injections of QA produce symptoms that are not analogous to the progressive nature of HD. Thus far, models using chronic administration of QA that produce HD-like behavioral and neuroanatomical changes have necessitated the use of a relatively bulky and fragile microdialytic pump apparatus. The present study tested an alternative way of chronically administering QA. Specifically, this study tested whether gradual release of QA from ethylene vinylacetate (EVA) polymers could produce symptoms analogous to HD. Rats received either no implants or bilateral intrastriatal implants of polymers with or without QA. Subsequent tests for spontaneous motor activity (SMA), grip strength, balance, and learning ability in a radial-arm-water-maze task revealed QA-induced impairments in balance and learning ability, but did not affect grip strength or SMA. Histological analysis revealed QA-induced enlargement of lateral ventricles, striatal atrophy, and striatal neuronal loss, with relative sparing of NADPH-diaphorase-positive neurons. These results suggest that QA released from polymers can produce behavioral and neuropathological profiles analogous to early stages of HD and that EVA polymers offer a useful means of chronically delivering QA in rodent models of neurodegeneration.

  19. Performances of survival, feeding behavior, and gene expression in aphids reveal their different fitness to host alteration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Yang, Pengcheng; Xu, Yongyu; Luo, Lan; Zhu, Junjie; Cui, Na; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-13

    Insect populations feeding on different plant species are under selection pressure to adapt to these differences. A study integrating elements of the ecology, behavior, and gene expression of aphids on different host plants has not yet been well-explored. The present study explores the relationship between host fitness and survival, feeding behavior, and salivary gland gene expression of a pea (Pisum sativum) host race of Acyrthosiphon pisum feeding on a common host Vicia faba and on three genetically-related hosts (Vicia villosa, Medicago truncatula, and Medicago sativa). Life table data indicated that aphids on non-favored hosts exhibited small size, low reproduction rate, slow population increase and individual development, and long lifespan. Electrical penetration graph results showed that the aphids spent significantly less time in passive ingestion of phloem sap on all non-preferred host plants before acclimation. After a period of acclimation on M. truncatula and V. villosa, pea host race individuals showed improved feeding behavior. No individuals of the pea host race completed its life history on M. sativa. Interestingly, the number of host-specific differentially-expressed salivary gland genes was negatively correlated with the fitness of aphids on this host plant. This study provided important cues in host plant specialization in aphids.

  20. Novel Shank3 mutant exhibits behaviors with face validity for autism and altered striatal and hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Thomas C; Speed, Haley E; Xuan, Zhong; Reimers, Jeremy M; Escamilla, Christine Ochoa; Weaver, Travis P; Liu, Shunan; Filonova, Irina; Powell, Craig M

    2017-01-01

    Mutations/deletions in the SHANK3 gene are associated with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability. Here, we present electrophysiological and behavioral consequences in novel heterozygous and homozygous mice with a transcriptional stop cassette inserted upstream of the PDZ domain-coding exons in Shank3 (Shank3(E13) ). Insertion of a transcriptional stop cassette prior to exon 13 leads to loss of the two higher molecular weight isoforms of Shank3. Behaviorally, both Shank3(E13) heterozygous (HET) and homozygous knockout (KO) mice display increased repetitive grooming, deficits in social interaction tasks, and decreased rearing. Shank3(E13) KO mice also display deficits in spatial memory in the Morris water maze task. Baseline hippocampal synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity are preserved in Shank3(E13) HET and KO mice, while both HET and KO mice exhibit impaired hippocampal long-term plasticity. Additionally, Shank3(E13) HET and KO mice display impaired striatal glutamatergic synaptic transmission. These results demonstrate for the first time in this novel Shank3 mutant that both homozygous and heterozygous mutation of Shank3 lead to behavioral abnormalities with face validity for autism along with widespread synaptic dysfunction. Autism Res 2017, 10: 42-65. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Striatal patch compartment lesions alter methamphetamine-induced behavior and immediate early gene expression in the striatum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ryan C; Gilbert, Yamiece E; Logan, Anna S; Hebbard, John C; Horner, Kristen A

    2014-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) induces stereotypy, which is characterized as inflexible, repetitive behavior. Enhanced activation of the patch compartment of the striatum has been correlated with stereotypy, suggesting that stereotypy may be related to preferential activation of this region. However, the specific contribution of the patch compartment to METH-induced stereotypy is not clear. To elucidate the involvement of the patch compartment to the development of METH-induced stereotypy, we determined if destruction of this sub-region altered METH-induced behaviors. Animals were bilaterally infused in the striatum with the neurotoxin dermorphin-saporin (DERM-SAP; 17 ng/μl) to specifically ablate the neurons of the patch compartment. Eight days later, animals were treated with METH (7.5 mg/kg), placed in activity chambers, observed for 2 h and killed. DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the number and total area of mu-labeled patches in the striatum. DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the intensity of METH-induced stereotypy and the spatial immobility typically observed with METH-induced stereotypy. In support of this observation, DERM-SAP pretreatment also significantly increased locomotor activity in METH-treated animals. In the striatum, DERM-SAP pretreatment attenuated METH-induced c-Fos expression in the patch compartment, while enhancing METH-induced c-Fos expression in the matrix compartment. DERM-SAP pretreatment followed by METH administration augmented c-Fos expression in the SNpc and reduced METH-induced c-Fos expression in the SNpr. In the medial prefrontal, but not sensorimotor cortex, c-Fos and zif/268 expression was increased following METH treatment in animals pre-treated with DERM-SAP. These data indicate that the patch compartment is necessary for the expression of repetitive behaviors and suggests that alterations in activity in the basal ganglia may contribute to this phenomenon.

  2. Cigarette smoke attenuates phagocytic ability of macrophages through down-regulating Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) expressions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueqin; Luo, Guangwei; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Rui; Zhu, Jianhua; Hu, Na; Huang, Wei; Cheng, Guilian; Jia, Min; Su, Bingtao; Zhang, Nian; Cui, Tianpen

    2017-02-14

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common inflammatory diseases resulting from habitual smoking. Impaired clearance of apoptotic cell by airway macrophages contributes to lung inflammation. Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8), as a link between apoptotic cells and phagocytes, facilitates clearance of apoptotic cells and attenuates inflammation. We sought to investigate altered expression and potential role of MFG-E8 in COPD. In this study, apoptosis was increased and the level of MFG-E8 was decreased while HMGB1 expression was increased in lung tissues of CS-exposed mice. Compared with CS-exposed WT mice, more apoptotic cells were accumulated in lung tissues of CS-exposed MFG-E8 deficiency mice. Exposure of a range of macrophages to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) resulted in decreased MFG-E8 expression. Administration of rmMFG-E8 ameliorated phagocytic ability of RAW264.7 cells and suppressed inflammatory response induced by CS-exposure. 10% CSE stimulation suppressed Rac1 membrane localization in RAW264.7 cells which was restored by administration of rmMFG-E8. MFG-E8 deficiency diminished uptake of apoptotic thymocytes by peritoneal macrophages upon CSE exposure. Overall, the findings in current work provide a novel target for diagnosing and treating COPD.

  3. Effects of the in vitro administered ethanol and lipopolysaccharide toxin on membrane properties, intracellular free calcium and phagocytic function of isolated rat kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, A.; Smith, T.; Abril, E.; Hamlin, E.; Earnest, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Low concentrations of ethanol slightly stimulated phagocytosis of cultured Kupffer cells (KC), producing practically no effect on membrane microviscosity and cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. On the contrary, high concentrations of ethanol significantly suppressed phagocytic function, increased fluidity of membrane lipids and caused a sustained rise in (Ca{sup 2}){sub i}; above the resting level of 41-85 nM. Treatment of KC with colchicine and cytochalasin B dramatically destructurized the plasma membrane lipids. Short term preincubation of KC with high doses of alcohol stimulated the disordering effects of both drugs, suggesting direct interaction of ethanol with microtubule and microfilament structures. The authors hypothesize that ethanol impairs phagocytosis of KC by concerted actions on membrane lipid fluidity, cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} and functioning of cytoskeleton. On the other hand, incubation of KC with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced no changes in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}; or plasma membrane fluidity but reduced by several fold the fluidizing effect of subsequently added ethanol. They suggested that low doses of LPS, by activating second messengers other than Ca{sup 2+}, alter the functioning of the cytoskeleton and cause reorganization of the plasma membrane thus making KC membranes more resistent to the fluidizing action of ethanol and partially restoring the phagocytic function.

  4. Cigarette smoke attenuates phagocytic ability of macrophages through down-regulating Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) expressions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yueqin; Luo, Guangwei; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Rui; Zhu, Jianhua; Hu, Na; Huang, Wei; Cheng, Guilian; Jia, Min; Su, Bingtao; Zhang, Nian; Cui, Tianpen

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common inflammatory diseases resulting from habitual smoking. Impaired clearance of apoptotic cell by airway macrophages contributes to lung inflammation. Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8), as a link between apoptotic cells and phagocytes, facilitates clearance of apoptotic cells and attenuates inflammation. We sought to investigate altered expression and potential role of MFG-E8 in COPD. In this study, apoptosis was increased and the level of MFG-E8 was decreased while HMGB1 expression was increased in lung tissues of CS-exposed mice. Compared with CS-exposed WT mice, more apoptotic cells were accumulated in lung tissues of CS-exposed MFG-E8 deficiency mice. Exposure of a range of macrophages to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) resulted in decreased MFG-E8 expression. Administration of rmMFG-E8 ameliorated phagocytic ability of RAW264.7 cells and suppressed inflammatory response induced by CS-exposure. 10% CSE stimulation suppressed Rac1 membrane localization in RAW264.7 cells which was restored by administration of rmMFG-E8. MFG-E8 deficiency diminished uptake of apoptotic thymocytes by peritoneal macrophages upon CSE exposure. Overall, the findings in current work provide a novel target for diagnosing and treating COPD. PMID:28195210

  5. Deletion of GIRK2 Subunit of GIRK Channels Alters the 5-HT1A Receptor-Mediated Signaling and Results in a Depression-Resistant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Llamosas, Nerea; Bruzos-Cidón, Cristina; Rodríguez, José Julio; Ugedo, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Targeting dorsal raphe 5-HT1A receptors, which are coupled to G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, has revealed their contribution not only to behavioral and functional aspects of depression but also to the clinical response to its treatment. Although GIRK channels containing GIRK2 subunits play an important role controlling excitability of several brain areas, their impact on the dorsal raphe activity is still unknown. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate the involvement of GIRK2 subunit-containing GIRK channels in depression-related behaviors and physiology of serotonergic neurotransmission. Methods: Behavioral, functional, including in vivo extracellular recordings of dorsal raphe neurons, and neurogenesis studies were carried out in wild-type and GIRK2 mutant mice. Results: Deletion of the GIRK2 subunit promoted a depression-resistant phenotype and determined the behavioral response to the antidepressant citalopram without altering hippocampal neurogenesis. In dorsal raphe neurons of GIRK2 knockout mice, and also using GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q, the basal firing rate was higher than that obtained in wild-type animals, although no differences were observed in other firing parameters. 5-HT1A receptors were desensitized in GIRK2 knockout mice, as demonstrated by a lower sensitivity of dorsal raphe neurons to the inhibitory effect of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, and the antidepressant citalopram. Conclusions: Our results indicate that GIRK channels formed by GIRK2 subunits determine depression-related behaviors as well as basal and 5-HT1A receptor-mediated dorsal raphe neuronal activity, becoming alternative therapeutic targets for psychiatric diseases underlying dysfunctional serotonin transmission. PMID:25956878

  6. Stress-induced alterations in anxiety-like behavior and adaptations in plasticity in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Kelly L; Louderback, Katherine M; Gessner, Caitlin P; Winder, Danny G

    2011-08-03

    In vulnerable individuals, exposure to stressors can result in chronic disorders such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The extended amygdala is critically implicated in mediating acute and chronic stress responsivity and anxiety-like behaviors. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a subregion of the extended amygdala, serves as a relay of corticolimbic information to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) to directly influence the stress response. To investigate the influence of the corticosteroid milieu and housing conditions on BNST function, adult C57Bl/6J were either acutely or chronically administered corticosterone (CORT, 25mg/kg in sesame oil) or vehicle (sesame oil) or were group housed or socially isolated for 1 day (acute) or 6-8 weeks (chronic). To ascertain whether these stressors could influence anxiety-like behavior, studies were performed using the novel open-field (NOF) and the elevated zero maze (EZM) tests. To investigate potential associated changes in plasticity, alterations in BNST function were assessed using ex vivo extracellular field potential recordings in the (dorsal-lateral) dlBNST and a high frequency stimulus protocol to induce long-term potentiation (LTP). Our results suggest that chronic CORT injections and chronic social isolation housing conditions lead to an increase in anxiety-like behavior on the EZM and NOF. Chronically stressed mice also displayed a parallel blunting of LTP in the dlBNST. Conversely, acute social isolation housing had no effect on anxiety-like behavior but still resulted in a blunting of LTP in the dlBNST. Collectively, our results suggest acute and chronic stressors can have a distinct profile on plasticity in the BNST that is not uniformly associated with an increase in anxiety-like behavior.

  7. Single episode of mild murine malaria induces neuroinflammation, alters microglial profile, impairs adult neurogenesis, and causes deficits in social and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Guha, Suman K; Tillu, Rucha; Sood, Ankit; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Nanavaty, Ishira N; Sengupta, Arjun; Sharma, Shobhona; Vaidya, Vidita A; Pathak, Sulabha

    2014-11-01

    Cerebral malaria is associated with cerebrovascular damage and neurological sequelae. However, the neurological consequences of uncomplicated malaria, the most prevalent form of the disease, remain uninvestigated. Here, using a mild malaria model, we show that a single Plasmodium chabaudi adami infection in adult mice induces neuroinflammation, neurogenic, and behavioral changes in the absence of a blood-brain barrier breach. Using cytokine arrays we show that the infection induces differential serum and brain cytokine profiles, both at peak parasitemia and 15days post-parasite clearance. At the peak of infection, along with the serum, the brain also exhibited a definitive pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, and gene expression analysis revealed that pro-inflammatory cytokines were also produced locally in the hippocampus, an adult neurogenic niche. Hippocampal microglia numbers were enhanced, and we noted a shift to an activated profile at this time point, accompanied by a striking redistribution of the microglia to the subgranular zone adjacent to hippocampal neuronal progenitors. In the hippocampus, a distinct decline in progenitor turnover and survival was observed at peak parasitemia, accompanied by a shift from neuronal to glial fate specification. Studies in transgenic Nestin-GFP reporter mice demonstrated a decline in the Nestin-GFP(+)/GFAP(+) quiescent neural stem cell pool at peak parasitemia. Although these cellular changes reverted to normal 15days post-parasite clearance, specific brain cytokines continued to exhibit dysregulation. Behavioral analysis revealed selective deficits in social and anxiety-like behaviors, with no change observed in locomotor, cognitive, and depression-like behaviors, with a return to baseline at recovery. Collectively, these findings indicate that even a single episode of mild malaria results in alterations of the brain cytokine profile, causes specific behavioral dysfunction, is accompanied by hippocampal microglial

  8. Prolonged cultures of unstimulated human neutrophils lead to the apparition and persistence of rest-in-plate structures (RIPs) recognized by professional phagocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vallières, Francis; Simard, Jean-Christophe; Stafford-Richard, Théo; Girard, Denis

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells (PMNs) are known to spontaneously undergo apoptosis and then eliminated by professional phagocytes to prevent inflammation, a process called efferocytosis. However, when efferocytosis is impaired, PMNs will fall into secondary necrosis. Whether this state can persist for a certain period of time is unclear, since most of the studies investigating secondary necrosis are performed within 24h following induction by a proapoptotic agent. In this study, freshly isolated human PMNs were incubated without addition of exogenous agents in order to force them to undergo apoptosis and then secondary necrosis, an ideal experimental condition to study the behavior of secondary necrotic PMNs in absence of efferocytosis. By monitoring PMN cell morphology over time, we observed that an increasing proportion of cells harbored a ghost-like phenotype. Because these cellular remnants persist in plates for several days, we introduce here the terminology RIPs for 'rest-in-plate' structure. Heating of freshly isolated PMNs for 5min did not lead to the apparition of RIPs over time. In vivo administration of 7-days old RIPs in the murine air pouch model induced a slight inflammation resorbed within 24h. PKH26-stained RIPs were found to be ingested by professional phagocytes in vitro and in vivo in the murine air pouch and peritonitis models. Therefore, aged-PMNs have the potential to become RIPs in absence of efficient efferocytosis. Fortunately RIPs are recognized by professional phagocytes and, therefore, the concept of resolution of inflammation based on elimination of apoptotic and secondary necrotic PMNs could also be applied to RIPs.

  9. Acute Dietary Tryptophan Manipulation Differentially Alters Social Behavior, Brain Serotonin and Plasma Corticosterone in Three Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wynne Q.; Smolik, Corey M.; Barba-Escobedo, Priscilla A.; Gamez, Monica; Sanchez, Jesus J.; Javors, Martin A.; Daws, Lynette C.; Gould, Georgianna G.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical evidence indicates brain serotonin (5-HT) stores and neurotransmission may be inadequate in subpopulations of individuals with autism, and this may contribute to characteristically impaired social behaviors. Findings that depletion of the 5-HT precursor tryptophan (TRP) worsens autism symptoms support this hypothesis. Yet dietetic studies show and parents report that many children with autism consume less TRP than peers. To measure the impact of dietary TRP content on social behavior, we administered either diets devoid of TRP, with standard TRP (0.2 gm%), or with 1% added TRP (1.2 gm%) overnight to three mouse strains. Of these, BTBRT+Itpr3tf/J and 129S1/SvImJ consistently exhibit low preference for social interaction relative to C57BL/6. We found that TRP depletion reduced C57BL/6 and 129S social interaction preference, while TRP enhancement improved BTBR sociability (p < 0.05; N= 8–10). Subsequent marble burying was similar regardless of grouping. After behavior tests, brain TRP levels and plasma corticosterone were higher in TRP enhanced C57BL/6 and BTBR, while 5-HT levels were reduced in all strains by TRP depletion (p <0.05; N= 4 −10). Relative hyperactivity of BTBR and hypoactivity of 129S, evident in self-grooming and chamber entries during sociability tests, were uninfluenced by dietary TRP. Our findings demonstrate mouse sociability and brain 5-HT turnover are reduced by acute TRP depletion, and can be enhanced by TRP supplementation. This outcome warrants further basic and/or clinical studies employing biomarker combinations such as TRP metabolism and 5-HT regulated hormones to characterize the conditions wherein TRP supplementation can best ameliorate sociability deficits. PMID:25445490

  10. Effects of altering flow and odor information on plume tracking behavior in walking cockroaches, Periplaneta americana (L.).

    PubMed

    Willis, Mark A; Avondet, Jennifer L; Finnell, Andrew S

    2008-07-01

    Animals using odor plumes to locate resources are activated to track these plumes by the presence of an attractive odor, and typically steer toward the source using directional cues from the flowing air or water bearing the odor. We challenged freely walking virgin male cockroaches, Peripl