Science.gov

Sample records for alternate magnetic fusion

  1. Review of alternative concepts for magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Although the Tokamak represents the mainstay of the world's quest for magnetic fusion power, with the tandem mirror serving as a primary backup concept in the US fusion program, a wide range of alternative fusion concepts (AFC's) have been and are being pursued. This review presents a summary of past and present reactor projections of a majority of AFC's. Whenever possible, quantitative results are given.

  2. Integrated simulation and modeling capability for alternate magnetic fusion concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E.B.; Jarboe, T. R.; LoDestro, L. L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    1998-11-03

    This document summarizes a strategic study addressing the development of a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability for magnetic fusion experiments with particular emphasis on devices that are alternatives to the mainline tokamak device. A code development project in this area supports two defined strategic thrust areas in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program: (1) comprehensive simulation and modeling of magnetic fusion experiments and (2) development, operation, and modeling of magnetic fusion alternate- concept experiment

  3. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  4. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  6. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached.

  7. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  8. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  9. Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion condition is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion. .

  10. Magnetless magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A.D. |; Tajima, T.

    1994-02-01

    The authors propose a concept of thermonuclear fusion reactor in which the plasma pressure is balanced by direct gas-wall interaction in a high-pressure vessel. The energy confinement is achieved by means of the self-contained toroidal magnetic configuration sustained by an external current drive or charged fusion products. This field structure causes the plasma pressure to decrease toward the inside of the discharge and thus it should be magnetohydrodynamically stable. The maximum size, temperature and density profiles of the reactor are estimated. An important feature of confinement physics is the thin layer of cold gas at the wall and the adjacent transitional region of dense arc-like plasma. The burning condition is determined by the balance between these nonmagnetized layers and the current-carrying plasma. They suggest several questions for future investigation, such as the thermal stability of the transition layer and the possibility of an effective heating and current drive behind the dense edge plasma. The main advantage of this scheme is the absence of strong external magnets and, consequently, potentially cheaper design and lower energy consumption.

  11. Magnetic fusion energy and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups.

  12. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  13. Comments on open-ended magnetic systems for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1990-09-24

    Differentiating characteristics of magnetic confinement systems having externally generated magnetic fields that are open'' are listed and discussed in the light of their several potential advantages for fusion power systems. It is pointed out that at this stage of fusion research high-Q'' (as deduced from long energy confinement times) is not necessarily the most relevant criterion by which to judge the potential of alternate fusion approaches for the economic generation of fusion power. An example is given of a hypothetical open-geometry fusion power system where low-Q operation is essential to meeting one of its main objectives (low neutron power flux).

  14. Developments in inertial fusion energy and beam fusion at magnetic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich

    2004-10-01

    The 70-year anniversary of the first nuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen isotopes by Oliphant, Harteck, and Rutherford is an opportunity to realize how beam fusion is the path for energy production, including both branches, the magnetic confinement fusion and the inertial fusion energy (IFE). It is intriguing that Oliphant's basic concept for igniting controlled fusion reactions by beams has made a comeback even for magnetic confinement plasma, after this beam fusion concept was revealed by the basically nonlinear processes of the well-known alternative of inertial confinement fusion using laser or particle beams. After reviewing the main streams of both directions some results are reported—as an example of possible alternatives—about how experiments with skin layer interaction and avoiding relativistic self-focusing of clean PW ps laser pulses for IFE may possibly lead to a simplified fusion reactor scheme without the need for special compression of solid deuterium tritium fuel.

  15. Superconducting magnets for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1987-07-02

    Fusion magnet technology has made spectacular advances in the past decade; to wit, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility and the Large Coil Project. However, further advances are still required for advanced economical fusion reactors. Higher fields to 14 T and radiation-hardened superconductors and insulators will be necessary. Coupled with high rates of nuclear heating and pulsed losses, the next-generation magnets will need still higher current density, better stability and quench protection. Cable-in-conduit conductors coupled with polyimide insulations and better steels seem to be the appropriate path. Neutron fluences up to 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in niobium tin are achievable. In the future, other amorphous superconductors could raise these limits further to extend reactor life or decrease the neutron shielding and corresponding reactor size.

  16. Magnetic fusion 1985: what next

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K.

    1985-03-01

    Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion.

  17. Magnetic fusion commercial power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John

    1994-09-01

    Toroidal magnetic systems offer the best opportunity to make a commercial fusion power plant. They have, between them, all the features needed; however, no one system yet meets the ideal requirements. The tokamak is the most advanced system, and the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will build upon the existing program to prepare for an advanced tokamak demonstration plant. Complementary toroidal systems such as the spherical torus, stellarator, reversed-field pinch, field-reversed configuration, and spheromak offer, between them, potential advantages in each area and should be studied in a balanced fusion development program.

  18. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1992-09-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called ``International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)`` will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind.

  19. Magnetic systems for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1985-02-01

    Mirror experiments have led the way in applying superconductivity to fusion research because of unique requirements for high and steady magnetic fields. The first significant applications were Baseball II at LLNL and IMP at ORNL. More recently, the MFTF-B yin-yang coil was successfully tested and the entire tandem configuration is nearing completion. Tokamak magnets have also enjoyed recent success with the large coil project tests at ORNL, preceded by single coil tests in Japan and Germany. In the USSR, the T-7 Tokamak has been operational for many years and the T-15 Tokamak is under construction, with the TF coils nearing completion. Also the Tore Supra is being built in France.

  20. Prospects for developing attractive magnetic fusion concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    Comments are made pertaining to a generic magnetic fusion reactor study carried out at ORNL. A second study was made of the required reactor characteristics for attractive fusion reactors. The study concluded that both the physics and economics would be achievable with present magnetic configurations.

  1. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a

  2. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  3. Magnetic-fusion energy and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups.

  4. Magnetic fusion driventransmutation of nuclear waste (FTW)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin; Cheng, E.T.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of magnetic Fusion driven Transmutation of Waste (FTW) was revisted and discussed recently. Nuclear wastes include all transuranium elements: Pu isotopes, minor actinides separated from the spent fission fuel, and fissile products. Elimination of thse long-life nuclear wastes is necessary for the long-term viability of fission power. A Small Business Innovative Research program has been initiated under the leadership of TSI Research to examine the efficacy of fusion transmutation of waste utilizing small fusion drivers.

  5. Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John; Milora, Stanley

    2015-11-01

    The original Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor paper was published in 1986. This update describes what has changed in 30 years. Notably, the construction of ITER is providing important benchmark numbers for technologies and costs. In addition, we use a more conservative neutron wall flux and fluence. But these cost-increasing factors are offset by greater optimism on the thermal-electric conversion efficiency and potential availability. The main examples show the cost of electricity (COE) as a function of aspect ratio and neutron flux to the first wall. The dependence of the COE on availability, thermo-electric efficiency, electrical power output, and the present day's low interest rates is also discussed. Interestingly, at fixed aspect ratio there is a shallow minimum in the COE at neutron flux around 2.5 MW/m2. The possibility of operating with only a small COE penalty at even lower wall loadings (to 1.0 MW/m2 at larger plant size) and the use of niobium-titanium coils are also investigated. J. Sheffield was supported by ORNL subcontract 4000088999 with the University of Tennessee.

  6. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This Standard identifies safety requirements for magnetic fusion facilities. Safety functions are used to define outcomes that must be achieved to ensure that exposures to radiation, hazardous materials, or other hazards are maintained within acceptable limits. Requirements applicable to magnetic fusion facilities have been derived from Federal law, policy, and other documents. In addition to specific safety requirements, broad direction is given in the form of safety principles that are to be implemented and within which safety can be achieved.

  7. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  8. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an emerging, relatively unexplored approach to fusion for electrical power and propulsion application. The physical principles of the concept are founded upon both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). It attempts to combine the favorable attributes of both these orthogonal approaches to fusion, but at the same time, avoiding the extreme technical challenges of both by exploiting a fusion regime intermediate between them. It uses a material liner to compress, heat and contain the fusion reacting plasma (the target plasma) mentally. By doing so, the fusion burn could be made to occur at plasma densities as high as six orders of magnitude higher than conventional MCF such as tokamak, thus leading to an approximately three orders of magnitude reduction in the plasma energy required for ignition. It also uses a transient magnetic field, compressed to extremely high intensity (100's T to 1000T) in the target plasma, to slow down the heat transport to the liner and to increase the energy deposition of charged-particle fusion products. This has several compounding beneficial effects. It leads to longer energy confinement time compared with conventional ICF without magnetized target, and thus permits the use of much lower plasma density to produce reasonable burn-up fraction. The compounding effects of lower plasma density and the magneto-insulation of the target lead to greatly reduced compressional heating power on the target. The increased energy deposition rate of charged-particle fusion products also helps to lower the energy threshold required for ignition and increasing the burn-up fraction. The reduction in ignition energy and the compressional power compound to lead to reduced system size, mass and R&D cost. It is a fusion approach that has an affordable R&D pathway, and appears attractive for propulsion application in the nearer term.

  9. Economic potential of magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1981-03-10

    Scientific feasibility of magnetic fusion is no longer seriously in doubt. Rapid advances have been made in both tokamak and mirror research, leading to a demonstration in the TFTR tokamak at Princeton in 1982 and the tandem mirror MFTF-B at Livermore in 1985. Accordingly, the basis is established for an aggressive engineering thrust to develop a reactor within this century. However, care must be taken to guide the fusion program towards an economically and environmentally viable goal. While the fusion fuels are essentially free, capital costs of reactors appear to be at least as large as current power plants. Accordingly, the price of electricity will not decline, and capital availability for reactor constructions will be important. Details of reactor cost projections are discussed and mechanisms suggested for fusion power implementation. Also discussed are some environmental and safety aspects of magnetic fusion.

  10. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

  11. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

  12. Physics of Dust in Magnetic Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Skinner, Charles H.; Luca Delzanno, Gian; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Lapenta, Gianni M.; Pigarov, Alexander Yu.; Shukla, Padma K.; Smirnov, Roman D.; Ticos, Catalin M.; West, W. Phil

    2008-03-01

    Significant amount of dust will be produced in the next generation magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. The dust inventory must be controlled as it can pose a safety hazard and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. Questions regarding dust in magnetic fusion devices therefore may be divided into dust safety, dust production, dust motion (dynamics), characteristics of dust, dust-plasma interactions, and most important of all, can dust be controlled in ways so that it will not become a severe problem for magnetic fusion energy production? The answer is not apparent at this time, which has motivated this work. Although dust safety and dust chemistry are important, our discussions primarily focus on dust physics. We describe theoretical frameworks, mostly due to dust research under a nonfusion context, that have already been established and can be used to answer many dust-related questions. We also describe dust measurements in fusion devices, numerical methods and results, and laboratory experiments related to the physics of fusion dust. Although qualitative understanding of dust in fusion has been or can be achieved, quantitative understanding of most dust physics in magnetic fusion is still needed. In order to find an effective way to deal with dust, future research activities include better dust diagnosis and monitoring, basic dusty plasma experiments emulating fusion conditions (for example, by using a mockup facility), numerical simulations bench-marked by experimental data, and development of a new generation of wall materials for fusion, which may include wall materials with engineered nanostructures.

  13. Magnetized Target Fusion in Advanced Propulsion Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cylar, Rashad

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) Propulsion lab at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has a program in place that has adopted to attempt to create a faster, lower cost and more reliable deep space transportation system. In this deep space travel the physics and development of high velocity plasma jets must be understood. The MTF Propulsion lab is also in attempt to open up the solar system for human exploration and commercial use. Fusion, as compared to fission, is just the opposite. Fusion involves the light atomic nuclei combination to produce denser nuclei. In the process, the energy is created by destroying the mass according to the distinguished equation: E = mc2 . Fusion energy development is being pursued worldwide as a very sustainable form of energy that is environmentally friendly. For the purposes of space exploration fusion reactions considered include the isotopes of hydrogen-deuterium (D2) and tritium (T3). Nuclei have an electrostatic repulsion between them and in order for the nuclei to fuse this repulsion must be overcome. One technique to bypass repulsion is to heat the nuclei to very high temperatures. The temperatures vary according to the type of reactions. For D-D reactions, one billion degrees Celsius is required, and for D-T reactions, one hundred million degrees is sufficient. There has to be energy input for useful output to be obtained form the fusion To make fusion propulsion practical, the mass, the volume, and the cost of the equipment to produce the reactions (generally called the reactor) need to be reduced by an order of magnitude or two from the state-of-the-art fusion machines. Innovations in fusion schemes are therefore required, especially for obtaining thrust for propulsive applications. Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is one of the innovative fusion concepts that have emerged over the last several years. MSFC is working with Los Alamos National Laboratory and other research groups in studying the

  14. Magnetized Target Fusion: Prospects for Low-Cost Fusion Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter J.; Barnes, Daniel C.; Degnan, James; Parks, Paul; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) has attracted renewed interest in recent years because it has the potential to resolve one of the major problems with conventional fusion energy research - the high cost of facilities to do experiments and in general develop practical fusion energy. The requirement for costly facilities can be traced to fundamental constraints. The Lawson condition implies large system size in the case of conventional magnetic confinement, or large heating power in the case of conventional inertial confinement. The MTF approach is to use much higher fuel density than with conventional magnetic confinement (corresponding to megabar pressures), which results in a much-reduced system size to achieve Lawson conditions. Intrinsically the system must be pulsed because the pressures exceed the strength of any known material. To facilitate heating the fuel (or "target") to thermonuclear conditions with a high-power high-intensity source of energy, magnetic fields are used to insulate the high-pressure fuel from material surroundings (thus "magnetized target"). Because of magnetic insulation, the required heating power intensity is reduced by many orders of magnitude compared to conventional inertial fusion, even with relatively poor energy confinement in the magnetic field, such as that characterized by Bohm diffusion. In this paper we show semi-quantitatively why MTF-should allow fusion energy production without costly facilities within the same generally accepted physical constraints used for conventional magnetic and inertial fusion. We also briefly discuss potential applications of this technology ranging from nuclear rockets for space propulsion to a practical commercial energy system. Finally, we report on the exploratory research underway, and the interesting physics issues that arise in the MTF regime of parameters. Experiments at Los Alamos are focused on formation of a suitable plasma target for compression, utilizing the knowledge base for compact

  15. Magnetized Target Fusion: Prospects for Low-Cost Fusion Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter J.; Barnes, Daniel C.; Degnan, James; Parks, Paul; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) has attracted renewed interest in recent years because it has the potential to resolve one of the major problems with conventional fusion energy research - the high cost of facilities to do experiments and in general develop practical fusion energy. The requirement for costly facilities can be traced to fundamental constraints. The Lawson condition implies large system size in the case of conventional magnetic confinement, or large heating power in the case of conventional inertial confinement. The MTF approach is to use much higher fuel density than with conventional magnetic confinement (corresponding to megabar pressures), which results in a much-reduced system size to achieve Lawson conditions. Intrinsically the system must be pulsed because the pressures exceed the strength of any known material. To facilitate heating the fuel (or "target") to thermonuclear conditions with a high-power high-intensity source of energy, magnetic fields are used to insulate the high-pressure fuel from material surroundings (thus "magnetized target"). Because of magnetic insulation, the required heating power intensity is reduced by many orders of magnitude compared to conventional inertial fusion, even with relatively poor energy confinement in the magnetic field, such as that characterized by Bohm diffusion. In this paper we show semi-quantitatively why MTF-should allow fusion energy production without costly facilities within the same generally accepted physical constraints used for conventional magnetic and inertial fusion. We also briefly discuss potential applications of this technology ranging from nuclear rockets for space propulsion to a practical commercial energy system. Finally, we report on the exploratory research underway, and the interesting physics issues that arise in the MTF regime of parameters. Experiments at Los Alamos are focused on formation of a suitable plasma target for compression, utilizing the knowledge base for compact

  16. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities.

  17. An Alternate View Of Munition Sensor Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayersak, J. R.

    1988-08-01

    An alternate multimode sensor fusion scheme is treated. The concept is designed to acquire and engage high value relocatable targets in a lock-on-after-launch sequence. The approach uses statistical decision concepts to determine the authority to be assigned to each mode in the acquisition sequence voting and decision process. Statistical target classification and recognition in the engagement sequence is accomplished through variable length feature vectors set by adaptive logics. The approach uses multiple decision for acquisition and classification, in the number of spaces selected, is adaptively weighted and adjusted. The scheme uses type of climate -- arctic, temperate, desert, and equatorial -- diurnal effects --- time of day -- type of background, type of countermeasures present -- signature suppresssion or obscuration, false target decoy or electronic warfare -- and other factors to make these selections. The approach is discussed in simple terms. Voids and deficiencies in the statistical data base used to train such algorithms is discussed. The approach is being developed to engage deep battle targets such as surface-to-surface missile systems, air defense units and self-propelled artillery.

  18. Nanometric alternating magnetic field generator.

    PubMed

    Espejo, A P; Tejo, F; Vidal-Silva, N; Escrig, J

    2017-07-05

    In this work we introduce an alternating magnetic field generator in a cylindrical nanostructure. This field appears due to the rotation of a magnetic domain wall located at some position, generating a magnetic region that varies its direction of magnetization alternately, thus inducing an alternating magnetic flux in its vicinity. This phenomenon occurs due to the competition between a spin-polarized current and a magnetic field, which allows to control both the angular velocity and the pinning position of the domain wall. As proof of concept, we study the particular case of a diameter-modulated nanowire with a spin-polarized current along its axis and the demagnetizing field produced by its modulation. This inhomogeneous field allows one to control the angular velocity of the domain wall as a function of its position along the nanowire allowing frequencies in the GHz range to be achieved. This generator could be used in telecommunications for devices in the range of radiofrequencies or, following Faraday's induction law, could also induce an electromotive force and be used as a movable alternate voltage source in future nanodevices.

  19. Magnetic Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Zheng, Xianjun; Deng, Baiquan; Liu, Wei; Ou, Wei; Huang, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Based on the similarity in models of the early Sun and the 3-D common focal region of the micro-pinch in X-pinch experiments, a novel hybrid fusion configuration by continuous focusing of multiple Z-pinched plasma beams on spatially symmetric plasma is proposed. By replacing gravity with Lorentz force with subsequent centripetal spherical pinch, the beam-target fusion reactivity is enhanced in a quasi-spherical converging region, thus achieving MICF. An assessment, presented here, suggests that a practical fusion power source could be achieved using deuterium alone. Plasma instabilities can be suppressed by fast rotation resulting from an asymmetric tangential torsion in the spherical focal region of this configuration. Mathematical equivalence with the Sun allows the development of appropriate equations for the focal region of MICF, which are solved numerically to provide density, temperature and pressure distributions that produce net fusion energy output. An analysis of MICF physics and a preliminary experimental demonstration of a single beam are also carried out. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11374217 and 11176020)

  20. Perspectives on Magnetized Target Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    One approach to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) builds upon the ongoing experimental effort (FRX-L) to generate a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma suitable for translation and cylindrical-liner (i.e., converging flux conserver) implosion. Numerical modeling is underway to elucidate key performance drivers for possible future power-plant extrapolations. The fusion gain, Q (ratio of DT fusion yield to the sum of initial liner kinetic energy plus plasma formation energy), sets the power-plant duty cycle for a nominal design electric power [ e.g. 1,000 MWe(net)]. A pulsed MTF power plant of this type derives from the historic Fast Liner Reactor (FLR) concept and shares attributes with the recent Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Z-pinch and laser-driven pellet HYLIFE-II conceptual designs.

  1. Magnetic mirror fusion: status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1980-02-11

    Two improved mirror systems, the tandem mirror (TM) and the field-reversed mirror (FRM) are being intensively studied. The twin practical aims of these studies: to improve the economic prospects for mirror fusion power plants and to reduce the size and/or complexity of such plants relative to earlier approaches to magnetic fusion. While at the present time the program emphasis is still strongly oriented toward answering scientific questions, the emphasis is shifting as the data accumulates and as larger facilities - ones with a heavy technological and engineering orientation - are being prepared. The experimental and theoretical progress that led to the new look in mirror fusion research is briefly reviewed, the new TM and the FRM ideas are outlined, and the projected future course of mirror fusion research is discussed.

  2. Acoustically Driven Magnetized Target Fusion At General Fusion: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Peter; Laberge, M.; Donaldson, M.; Delage, M.; the Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) involves compressing an initial magnetically confined plasma of about 1e23 m-3, 100eV, 7 Tesla, 20 cm radius, >100 μsec life with a 1000x volume compression in 100 microseconds. If near adiabatic compression is achieved, the final plasma of 1e26 m-3, 10keV, 700 Tesla, 2 cm radius, confined for 10 μsec would produce interesting fusion energy gain. General Fusion (GF) is developing an acoustic compression system using pneumatic pistons focusing a shock wave on the CT plasma in the center of a 3 m diameter sphere filled with liquid lead-lithium. Low cost driver, straightforward heat extraction, good tritium breeding ratio and excellent neutron protection could lead to a practical power plant. GF (65 employees) has an active plasma R&D program including both full scale and reduced scale plasma experiments and simulation of both. Although acoustic driven compression of full scale plasmas is the end goal, present compression studies use reduced scale plasmas and chemically accelerated Aluminum liners. We will review results from our plasma target development, motivate and review the results of dynamic compression field tests and briefly describe the work to date on the acoustic driver front.

  3. Generic Stellarator-like Magnetic Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John; Spong, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor paper, published in 1985, has been updated, reflecting the improved science and technology base in the magnetic fusion program. Key changes beyond inflation are driven by important benchmark numbers for technologies and costs from ITER construction, and the use of a more conservative neutron wall flux and fluence in modern fusion reactor designs. In this paper the generic approach is applied to a catalyzed D-D stellarator-like reactor. It is shown that an interesting power plant might be possible if the following parameters could be achieved for a reference reactor: R/ < a > ~ 4 , confinement factor, fren = 0.9-1.15, < β > ~ 8 . 0 -11.5 %, Zeff ~ 1.45 plus a relativistic temperature correction, fraction of fast ions lost ~ 0.07, Bm ~ 14-16 T, and R ~ 18-24 m. J. Sheffield was supported under ORNL subcontract 4000088999 with the University of Tennessee.

  4. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  5. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rawls, J.M.; Peuron, A.U.

    1980-07-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma and a toroidal field coil. A mechanism for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  6. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, John M.; Peuron, Unto A.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors (30a, 30b, etc.) formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma (12) and a toroidal field coil (18). A mechanism (60) for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  7. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag. The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag-2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed-power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NTF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  8. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Chrien, R. E.; Christian, J. M.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Goforth, J. H.; Haight, R. C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N. S.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Larson, R. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Olinger, B. W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P. T.; Shlachter, J. S.; Smith, R. C.; Veeser, L. R.; Warthen, B. J.; Younger, S. M.; Chernyshev, V. K.; Mokhov, V. N.; Demin, A. N.; Dolin, Y. N.; Garanin, S. F.; Ivanov, V. A.; Korchagin, V. P.; Mikhailov, O. D.; Morozov, I. V.; Pak, S. V.; Pavlovskii, E. S.; Seleznev, N. Y.; Skobelev, A. N.; Volkov, G. I.; Yakubov, V. A.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 μs magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 μs electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 1013 D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  9. Thermochemical hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikorian, O. H.; Brown, L. C.

    1982-06-01

    Conceptual design studies were carried out on an integrated fusion/chemical plant system using a Tandem Mirror Reactor fusion energy source to drive the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Water-Splitting Cycle and produce hydrogen as a future feedstock for synthetic fuels. Blanket design studies for the Tandem Mirror Reactor show that several design alternatives are available for providing heat at sufficiently high temperatures to drive the General Atomic Cycle. The concept of a Joule-boosted decomposer is introduced in one of the systems investigated to provide heat electrically for the highest temperature step in the cycle (the SO3 decomposition step), and thus lower blanket design requirements and costs. Flowsheeting and conceptual process designs have been developed for a complete fusion-driven hydrogen plant, and the information has been used to develop a plot plan for the plant and to estimate hydrogen production costs.

  10. Turbulent particle transport in magnetized fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for particle transport is of the utmost importance for magnetized fusion plasmas. A peaked density profile is attractive to improve the fusion rate, which is proportional to the square of the density, and to self-generate a large fraction of non-inductive current required for continuous operation. Experiments in various tokamak devices (ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET, TCV, TEXT, TFTR) indicate the existence of a turbulent particle pinch. Recently, such a turbulent pinch has been unambiguously identified in Tore Supra very long discharges, in the absence of both collisional particle pinch and central particle source, for more than 4 min (Hoang et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 155002). This turbulent pinch is predicted by a quasilinear theory of particle transport (Weiland J et al 1989 Nucl. Fusion 29 1810), and confirmed by non-linear turbulence simulations (Garbet et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 035001) and general considerations based on the conservation of motion invariants (Baker et al 2004 Phys. Plasmas 11 992). Experimentally, the particle pinch is found to be sensitive to the magnetic field gradient in many cases (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Zabolotsky et al 2003 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 45 735, Weisen et al 2004 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 751, Baker et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 1003), to the temperature profile (Hoang et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 135003, Angioni et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 827) and also to the collisionality that changes the nature of the microturbulence (Angioni et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 205003, Garzotti et al 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 1829, Weisen et al 2004 31st EPS Conf. on Plasma Phys. (London) vol 28G (ECA) P-1.146, Lopes Cardozo N J 1995 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37 799). The consistency of some of the observed dependences with the theoretical predictions gives us a clearer understanding of the particle pinch in tokamaks, allowing us to predict more accurately the density

  11. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, Glen A.

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  12. Introduction to magnetic confinement fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1980-06-06

    These notes present a brief survey of some of the current diagnostic techniques used in magnetic fusion plasma devices. To give an idea of the range of parameters and geometries encountered the parameters of four representative experiments - PLT, TMX, ZT-40 and EBT-I(S) - are given. The central issue of all experiments is to understand the flow of power which can be summarized by two volume integrated equations for the ions and electrons.

  13. Fixed Field Alternating Gradient recirculator for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.; Neil, V.K.

    1991-03-01

    A heavy ion fusion driver is considered in which a beam is passed repeatedly through a LIA (linear induction accelerator) by recirculating with two spiral sector FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) 180 degree bends. The driver consists of three such rings: a 10--100 MeV low energy ring (LER), a 100--1000 MeV medium energy ring (MER), and a 1--10 GeV high energy ring (HER). Using a scaling field of 14 kG and taking the length of the straight sections to equal the path length in the bends, the circumference of the three rings would be 187, 590, and 1890 meters. Four matching sections in each of the three rings provide the interface between the two straight sections accommodating the LIA and the FFAG bends. These matching sections consist of dipoles which provide a dispersion free match between the linear induction accelerator and the energy dependent equilibrium orbits of the FFAG ring. The advantage in the use of the spiral sector FFAG over other recirculator concepts is that the fields are time invariant. This removes the problems associated with time dependent field penetration into the vacuum chamber and the large amount of energy which must be expended to change the magnetic field on the small time scale associated with the required pulse repetition frequency. The disadvantage, as we show in this work is the relatively weak alternating gradient focusing. The FFAG will not accommodate the level of beam current possible in a separate function lattice of bending magnets and quadrupoles.

  14. Alternative grafts in anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangxiang; He, Wenzhuan; Mahaney, Kelly; Noeller, Jennifer; Mhanna, Nakhle; Viljoen, Stephen; Torner, James; Hitchon, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    The present retrospective study was conducted to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages, or allograft. We retrospectively reviewed cases of ACDF using allograft in 20 patients, and CFRP in 19 who had sequential radiographs before and after surgery, and at 1 year. There were no apparent significant differences between the 2 groups in age (p=0.057), gender (p=0.635), or complications (p=0.648). At 12 months, there were no cases of construct failure, and fusion appeared to have been achieved in patients of both groups. Lordosis was increased significantly in both groups after surgery (p<0.001 in allograft and p=0.025 in CFRP), and was maintained up until 1 year (p<0.018 in allograft and p=0.05 in CFRP) without a difference between groups (p=0.721). Anterior interbody height was significantly increased (p<0.001 in both groups at each time points) after surgery, without a significant difference between groups (p>0.21). This increase in height was greatest in magnitude immediately after surgery, and declined with the passage of time. There was no detectable health-related quality of life difference between allograft and CFRP group after surgery (p>0.05). The present study demonstrates that CFRP cages appear to have comparable fusion rates, restoration of lordosis and disc space height, and complication rates to patients who undergo ACDF with allograft. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic mirror fusion systems: Characteristics and distinctive features

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1987-08-10

    A tutorial account is given of the main characteristics and distinctive features of conceptual magnetic fusion systems employing the magnetic mirror principle. These features are related to the potential advantages that mirror-based fusion systems may exhibit for the generation of economic fusion power.

  16. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  17. Electron cyclotron emission imaging and applications in magnetic fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Benjamin John

    Energy production through the burning of fossil fuels is an unsustainable practice. Exponentially increasing energy consumption and dwindling natural resources ensure that coal and gas fueled power plants will someday be a thing of the past. However, even before fuel reserves are depleted, our planet may well succumb to disastrous side effects, namely the build up of carbon emissions in the environment triggering world-wide climate change and the countless industrial spills of pollutants that continue to this day. Many alternatives are currently being developed, but none has so much promise as fusion nuclear energy, the energy of the sun. The confinement of hot plasma at temperatures in excess of 100 million Kelvin by a carefully arranged magnetic field for the realization of a self-sustaining fusion power plant requires new technologies and improved understanding of fundamental physical phenomena. Imaging of electron cyclotron radiation lends insight into the spatial and temporal behavior of electron temperature fluctuations and instabilities, providing a powerful diagnostic for investigations into basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion reactor operation. This dissertation presents the design and implementation of a new generation of Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics on toroidal magnetic fusion confinement devices, or tokamaks, around the world. The underlying physics of cyclotron radiation in fusion plasmas is reviewed, and a thorough discussion of millimeter wave imaging techniques and heterodyne radiometry in ECEI follows. The imaging of turbulence and fluid flows has evolved over half a millennium since Leonardo da Vinci's first sketches of cascading water, and applications for ECEI in fusion research are broad ranging. Two areas of physical investigation are discussed in this dissertation: the identification of poloidal shearing in Alfven eigenmode structures predicted by hybrid gyrofluid-magnetohydrodynamic (gyrofluid-MHD) modeling, and

  18. Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics via Massive Resistive Electromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, R.D.

    1998-08-19

    Abandoning superconductors for magnetic fusion reactors and instead using resistive magnet designs based on cheap copper or aluminum conductor material operating at "room temperature" (300 K) can reduce the capital cost per unit fusion power and simplify plant operations. By increasing unit size well beyond that of present magnetic fusion energy conceptual designs using superconducting electromagnets, the recirculating power fraction needed to operate resistive electromagnets can be made as close to zero as needed for economy without requiring superconductors. Other advantages of larger fusion plant size, such as very long inductively driven pulses, may also help reduce the cost per unit fusion power.

  19. Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Slough, John

    2012-04-18

    Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking described in this report was to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The FRC must also survive during the time it takes for the metal liner to compress the FRC target. The initial work at the UW was focused on developing adequate preionization and flux trapping that were found to be essential in past experiments for obtaining the density, flux and most critically, FRC lifetime required for MTF. The timescale for testing and development of such a source can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with

  20. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  1. Laser-driven magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Davies, J. R.; Barnak, D. H.; Betti, R.; ...

    2017-06-05

    A laser-driven, magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiment is designed in this paper for the OMEGA Laser System by scaling down the Z point design to provide the first experimental data on MagLIF scaling. OMEGA delivers roughly 1000× less energy than Z, so target linear dimensions are reduced by factors of ~10. Magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system could provide an axial magnetic field of 10 T. Two-dimensional hydrocode modeling indicates that a single OMEGA beam can preheat the fuel to a mean temperature of ~200 eV, limited by mix caused by heat flow into the wall. One-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelingmore » is used to determine the pulse duration and fuel density that optimize neutron yield at a fuel convergence ratio of roughly 25 or less, matching the Z point design, for a range of shell thicknesses. A relatively thinner shell, giving a higher implosion velocity, is required to give adequate fuel heating on OMEGA compared to Z because of the increase in thermal losses in smaller targets. Two-dimensional MHD modeling of the point design gives roughly a 50% reduction in compressed density, temperature, and magnetic field from 1-D because of end losses. Finally, scaling up the OMEGA point design to the MJ laser energy available on the National Ignition Facility gives a 500-fold increase in neutron yield in 1-D modeling.« less

  2. Laser-driven magnetized liner inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. R.; Barnak, D. H.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Chang, P.-Y.; Sefkow, A. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Sinars, D. B.; Weis, M. R.

    2017-06-01

    A laser-driven, magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiment is designed for the OMEGA Laser System by scaling down the Z point design to provide the first experimental data on MagLIF scaling. OMEGA delivers roughly 1000× less energy than Z, so target linear dimensions are reduced by factors of ˜10. Magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system could provide an axial magnetic field of 10 T. Two-dimensional hydrocode modeling indicates that a single OMEGA beam can preheat the fuel to a mean temperature of ˜200 eV, limited by mix caused by heat flow into the wall. One-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling is used to determine the pulse duration and fuel density that optimize neutron yield at a fuel convergence ratio of roughly 25 or less, matching the Z point design, for a range of shell thicknesses. A relatively thinner shell, giving a higher implosion velocity, is required to give adequate fuel heating on OMEGA compared to Z because of the increase in thermal losses in smaller targets. Two-dimensional MHD modeling of the point design gives roughly a 50% reduction in compressed density, temperature, and magnetic field from 1-D because of end losses. Scaling up the OMEGA point design to the MJ laser energy available on the National Ignition Facility gives a 500-fold increase in neutron yield in 1-D modeling.

  3. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Richeson, Jeff; Schmidt, George; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Turchi, Peter J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). For the successful implementation of the scheme, plasma jets of the requisite momentum flux density need to be produced. Their transport over sufficiently large distances (a few meters) needs to be assured. When they collide and merge into a liner, relative differences in velocity, density and temperature of the jets could give rise to instabilities in the development of the liner. Variation in the jet properties must be controlled to ensure that the growth rate of the instabilities are not significant over the time scale of the liner formation before engaging with the target plasma. On impact with the target plasma, some plasma interpenetration might occur between the liner and the target. The operating parameter space needs to be identified to ensure that a reasonably robust and conducting contact surface is formed between the liner and the target. A mismatch in the "impedance" between the liner and the target plasma could give rise to undesirable shock heating of the liner leading to increased entropy (thermal losses) in the liner. Any irregularities in the liner will accentuate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the compression of the target plasma by the liner.

  4. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report encompasses work on two separate projects, both related to developing sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetic fusion plasmas. The report is therefore divided into two parts as follows: Free electron laser with small period wigglers; and theory and modeling of high frequency, high power gryotron operation. Task A is experimental and eventually aims at developing continuously tunable, cw sources for ECRH with power per unit as high as 5 megawatts. Task B provides gryotron theory and modeling in support of the gryotron development programs at MIT and Varian.

  5. Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D.A.

    1987-12-10

    Fusion, the process that powers our sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerz, D. A.

    1987-12-01

    Fusion, the process that powers our Sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on Earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the Moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical.

  7. Magnetic Compression Experiment at General Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlea, Carl; Howard, Stephen; Epp, Kelly; Zawalski, Wade; Kim, Charlson; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic compression experiment at General Fusion was designed as a repetitive non-destructive test to study plasma physics applicable to Magnetic Target Fusion compression. A spheromak compact torus (CT) is formed with a co-axial gun into a containment region with an hour-glass shaped inner flux conserver, and an insulating outer wall. The experiment has external coils to keep the CT off the outer wall (levitation) and then rapidly compress it inwards. Experiments used a variety of levitation/compression field profiles. The optimal configuration was seen to improve levitated CT lifetime by around 50% over that with the original design field. Suppression of impurity influx to the plasma is thought to be a significant factor in the improvement, as supported by spectrometer data. Improved levitation field may reduce the amount of edge plasma and current that intersects the insulating outer wall during the formation process. Higher formation current and stuffing field, and correspondingly higher CT flux, was possible with the improved configuration. Significant field and density compression factors were routinely observed. The level of MHD activity was reduced, and lifetime was increased further by matching the decay rate of the levitation field to that of the CT fields. Details of experimental results and comparisons to equilibrium models and MHD simulations will be presented.

  8. Auto-magnetizing liners for magnetized inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, S. A.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Shipley, G. A.; Hutsel, B. T.; Lamppa, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions [Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator using external field coils to magnetize the fuel before compression. We present a novel concept (AutoMag), which uses a composite liner with helical conduction paths separated by insulating material to provide fuel magnetization from the early part of the drive current, which by design rises slowly enough to avoid electrical breakdown of the insulators. Once the magnetization field is established, the drive current rises more quickly, which causes the insulators to break down allowing the drive current to follow an axial path and implode the liner in the conventional z-pinch manner. There are two important advantages to AutoMag over external field coils for the operation of MagLIF. Low inductance magnetically insulated power feeds can be used to increase the drive current, and AutoMag does not interfere with diagnostic access. Also, AutoMag enables a pathway to energy applications for MagLIF, since expensive field coils will not be damaged each shot. Finally, it should be possible to generate Field Reversed Configurations (FRC) by using both external field coils and AutoMag in opposite polarities. This would provide a means to studying FRC liner implosions on the 100 ns time scale.

  9. Auto-magnetizing liners for magnetized inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Slutz, S. A.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; ...

    2017-01-20

    Here, the MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions on the Z accelerator using external field coils to magnetize the fuel before compression. We present a novel concept (AutoMag), which uses a composite liner with helical conduction paths separated by insulating material to provide fuel magnetization from the early part of the drive current, which by design rises slowly enough to avoid electrical breakdown of the insulators. Once the magnetization field is established, the drive current rises more quickly, which causes the insulators to break down allowing the drive current to follow an axial path andmore » implode the liner in the conventional z-pinch manner. There are two important advantages to AutoMag over external field coils for the operation of MagLIF. Low inductance magnetically insulated power feeds can be used to increase the drive current, and AutoMag does not interfere with diagnostic access. Also, AutoMag enables a pathway to energy applications for MagLIF, since expensive field coils will not be damaged each shot. Finally, it should be possible to generate Field Reversed Configurations (FRC) by using both external field coils and AutoMag in opposite polarities. This would provide a means to studying FRC liner implosions on the 100 ns time scale.« less

  10. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): Principles, Status, and International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-11-16

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between the two extremes of inertial and magnetic confinement. Target plasma preparation is followed by compression to fusion conditions. The use of a magnetic field to reduce electron thermal conduction and potentially enhance DT alpha energy deposition allows the compression rate to be drastically reduced relative to that for inertial confinement fusion. This leads to compact systems with target driver power and intensity requirements that are orders of magnitude lower than for ICF. A liner on plasma experiment has been proposed to provide a firm proof of principle for MTF.

  11. Role of supercomputers in magnetic fusion and energy research programs

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1985-06-01

    The importance of computer modeling in magnetic fusion (MFE) and energy research (ER) programs is discussed. The need for the most advanced supercomputers is described, and the role of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in meeting these needs is explained.

  12. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. General principles of magnetic fusion confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    A few of the areas are described in which there is close interaction between atomic/molecular (A and M) and magnetic fusion physics. The comparisons between predictions of neoclassical transport theory and experiment depend on knowledge of ionization and recombination rate coefficients. Modeling of divertor/scrapeoff plasmas requires better low energy charge exchange cross sections for H + A/sup n+/ collisions. The range of validity of neutral beam trapping cross sections must be broadened, both to encompass the energies typical of present injection experiments and to deal with the problem of prompt trapping of highly excited beam atoms at high energy. Plasma fueling models present certain anomalies that could be resolved by calculation and measurement of low energy (<1 keV) charge exchange cross sections.

  15. The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, Stewart

    2011-05-04

    When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

  16. Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R. W.; Martovetsky, N. N.; Molvik, A. W.; Ryutov, D. D.; Simonen, T. C.

    2011-05-13

    The achieved performance of the gas dynamic trap version of magnetic mirrors and today’s technology we believe are sufficient with modest further efforts for a neutron source for material testing (Q=Pfusion/Pinput~0.1). The performance needed for commercial power production requires considerable further advances to achieve the necessary high Q>>10. An early application of the mirror, requiring intermediate performance and intermediate values of Q~1 are the hybrid applications. The Axisymmetric Mirror has a number of attractive features as a driver for a fusion-fission hybrid system: geometrical simplicity, inherently steady-state operation, and the presence of the natural divertors in the form of end tanks. This level of physics performance has the virtue of low risk and only modest R&D needed and its simplicity promises economy advantages. Operation at Q~1 allows for relatively low electron temperatures, in the range of 4 keV, for the DT injection energy ~ 80 keV. A simple mirror with the plasma diameter of 1 m and mirror-to-mirror length of 35 m is discussed. Simple circular superconducting coils are based on today’s technology. The positive ion neutral beams are similar to existing units but designed for steady state. A brief qualitative discussion of three groups of physics issues is presented: axial heat loss, MHD stability in the axisymmetric geometry, microstability of sloshing ions. Burning fission reactor wastes by fissioning actinides (transuranics: Pu, Np, Am, Cm, .. or just minor actinides: Np, Am, Cm, …) in the hybrid will multiply fusion’s energy by a factor of ~10 or more and diminish the Q needed to less than 1 to overcome the cost of recirculating power for good economics. The economic value of destroying actinides by fissioning is rather low based on either the cost of long-term storage or even deep geologic disposal so most of the revenues of hybrids will come from electrical power. Hybrids that obtain revenues from

  17. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  18. Preliminary analysis of patent trends for magnetic fusion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.; Ashton, W.B.; Campbell, R.S.

    1984-02-01

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of development trends in magnetic fusion technology based on data from US patents. The research is limited to identification and description of general patent activity and ownership characteristics for 373 patents. The results suggest that more detailed studies of fusion patents could provide useful R and D planning information.

  19. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb/sub 3/Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing.

  20. Plasma-sprayed materials for magnetic fusion energy devices

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; Croessmann, C.D.; Hosking, F.M.; Watson, R.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma spray technology is being evaluated as a means to address important fabrication and maintenance problems associated with plasma-interactive components in magnetic fusion devices (e.g., limiters, divertors, and some first wall surfaces). Low-oxygen vacuum plasma sprayed copper has been tested as a ductile, high thermal conductivity interlayer to limit thermal stress and prevent cracking when brazing pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles to high-strength metal cooling tubes. A brazed tile/tube assembly with this sprayed interlayer has survived thermal testing up to a surface heat flux of 2.0 kW cm{sup {minus}2} as computed on the basis of the power removed in the sample cooling water. A vacuum-sprayed, tungsten-wire-reinforced, copper composite has also been studied as a means to produce an interlayer with highly anisotropic thermal expansion similar to that of PG. Beryllium and tungsten are the present alternatives to graphite for plasma-facing surfaces. High heat flux testing of plasma-sprayed beryllium samples indicates that adhesion and thermal conductivity must be improved. Plasma-sprayed tungsten has performed well in thermal tests, but other factors may rule out the use of tungsten in near term fusion devices. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Hahn, Kelly; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Schmit, Paul; Awe, Thomas James; McBride, Ryan D.; Jennings, Christopher; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Peterson, K. J.; Rovang, Dean C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Herrmann, Mark C.; Mark Harry Hess; Johns, Owen; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.; Blue, B. E.; Ryutov, D.; Schroen, Diana; Tomlinson, K.

    2015-05-14

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (~1012 DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmasinertially confined by slow (~10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Moreover, effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 1010. Further analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopicx-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ~3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm3 densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  2. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S. B. Gomez, M. R.; Sefkow, A. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Awe, T. J.; McBride, R. D.; Jennings, C. A.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Rovang, D. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hess, M. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (∼10{sup 12} DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmas inertially confined by slow (∼10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 10{sup 10}. Analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopic x-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ∼3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  3. Diagnosing magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on Z

    DOE PAGES

    Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Sefkow, Adam B.; ...

    2015-05-14

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments performed at Sandia's Z facility have demonstrated significant thermonuclear fusion neutron yields (~1012 DD neutrons) from multi-keV deuterium plasmasinertially confined by slow (~10 cm/μs), stable, cylindrical implosions. Moreover, effective magnetic confinement of charged fusion reactants and products is signaled by high secondary DT neutron yields above 1010. Further analysis of extensive power, imaging, and spectroscopicx-ray measurements provides a detailed picture of ~3 keV temperatures, 0.3 g/cm3 densities, gradients, and mix in the fuel and liner over the 1–2 ns stagnation duration.

  4. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Volume 2, Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in Vol. 1 of this Standard. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While Vol. 1 is generally applicable in that requirements there apply to a wide range of fusion facilities, this volume is concerned mainly with large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This volume is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment.

  5. The Parameter Space of Magnetized Target Fusion (aka Magneto-Inertial Fusion)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, Irvin

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), aka Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), is an approach to fusion that compresses a preformed, magnetized (but not necessarily magnetically confined) plasma with an imploding liner or pusher. MTF/MIF operates in a density regime in between the eleven orders of magnitude (1011) in density that separate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) from magnetic confinement fusion MCF. Compared to MCF, the higher density, shorter confinement times, and compressional heating as the dominant heating mechanism potentially reduce the impact of magnetic instabilities. Compared to ICF, the magnetically reduced thermal transport and lower density leads to orders-of-magnitude reduction in the difficult-to-achieve areal-density parameter and a significant reduction in required implosion velocity and radial convergence, potentially reducing the deleterious effects of implosion hydrodynamic instabilities. This tutorial presents fundamental analysis and simple time-dependent modeling to show where significant fusion gain might be achieved in the intermediate-density regime. The analysis shows that the fusion design space is potentially a continuum between ICF and MCF but practical considerations limit the space in which ignition might be obtained. Generic time-dependent modeling addresses the key physics requirements and defines ``ball-park'' values needed for target-plasma initial density, temperature, and magnetic field and implosion system size, energy, and velocity. The modeling shows energy gains greater than 30 can potentially be achieved and that high gain may be obtained at low convergence ratios, e.g., less than 15. A non-exhaustive review of past and present MTF/MIF efforts is presented and the renewed interest in MTF/MIF within the US (e.g., ARPA-E's ALPHA program) and abroad is noted.

  6. Magnetically insulated inertial fusion: A new approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, A.; Daido, H.; Fujita, M.; Mima, K.; Murakami, M.; Nakai, S.; Nishihara, K.; Terai, K.; Yamanaka, C.

    1986-01-13

    By combination of the benefits of magnetic and inertial confinements, a new fusion scheme is introduced with a plasma density of > or approx. =10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/ whose pressure is confined by inertia of a metallic container of a cannonball type while its heat is insulated by a self-generated magnetic field of > or approx. =100 T.

  7. Alternative divertor target concepts for next step fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazul, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    The operational conditions of a divertor target in the next steps of fusion devices are more severe in comparison with ITER. The current divertor designs and technologies have a limited application concerning these conditions, and so new design concepts/technologies are required. The main reasons which practically prevent the use of the traditional motionless solid divertor target are analyzed. We describe several alternative divertor target concepts in this paper. The comparative analysis of these concepts (including the advantages and the drawbacks) is made and the prospects for their practical implementation are prioritized. The concept of the swept divertor target with a liquid metal interlayer between the moving armour and motionless heat-sink is presented in more detail. The critical issues of this design are listed and outlined, and the possible experiments are presented.

  8. Magnetic fusion development for global warming suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangang; Zhang, Jie; Duan, Xuru

    2010-01-01

    Energy shortage and environmental pollution are two critical issues for human beings in the 21st century. There is an urgent need for new sustainable energy to meet the fast growing demand for clean energy. Fusion is one of the few options which may be able to satisfy the requirement for large scale sustainable energy generation and global warming suppression and therefore must be developed as quickly as possible. Fusion research has been carried out for the past 50 years. It is too long to wait for another 50 years to generate electricity by fusion. A much more aggressive approach should be taken with international collaboration towards the early use of fusion energy to meet the urgent needs for energy and global warming suppression.

  9. Properties of radiation stable insulation composites for fusion magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Huang, Rongjin; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    High field superconducting magnets made of Nb3Al will be a suitable candidate for future fusion device which can provide magnetic field over 15T without critical current degradation caused by strain. The higher magnetic field and the larger current will produce a huge electromagnetic force. Therefore, it is necessary to develop high strength cryogenic structural materials and electrical insulation materials with excellent performance. On the other hand, superconducting magnets in fusion devices will experience significant nuclear radiation exposure during service. While typical structural materials like stainless steel and titanium have proven their ability to withstand these conditions, electrical insulation materials used in these coils have not fared as well. In fact, recent investigations have shown that electrical insulation breakdown is a limiting factor in the performance of high field magnets. The insulation materials used in the high field fusion magnets should be characterized by excellent mechanical properties, high radiation resistivity and good thermal conductivity. To meet these objectives, we designed various insulation materials based on epoxy resins and cyanate ester resins and investigated their processing characteristic and mechanical properties before and after irradiation at low temperature. In this paper, the recent progress of the radiation stable insulation composites for high field fusion magnet is presented. The materials have been irradiated by 60Co γ-ray irradiation in air at ambient temperature with a dose rate of 300 Gy/min. The total doses of 1 MGy, 5 MGy and 10 MGy were selected to the test specimens.

  10. Engineering of the Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, G.; White, S.; Adams, R. B.; Thio, Y. C. F.; Santarius, J.; Alexander, R.; Chapman, J.; Fincher, S.; Philips, A.; Polsgrove, T.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering details are presented for a magnetized target fusion (MTF) propulsion system designed to support crewed missions to the outer solar system. Basic operation of an MTF propulsion system is introduced. Structural, thermal, radiation-management and electrical design details are presented. The propellant storage and supply system design is also presented. A propulsion system mass estimate and associated performance figures are given. The advantages of helium-3 as a fusion fuel for an advanced MTF system are discussed.

  11. Magnetic and inertial fusion status and development plans

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.; Storm, E.

    1987-12-04

    Controlled fusion, pursued by investigators in both the magnetic and inertial confinement research programs, continues to be a strong candidate as an intrinsically safe and virtually inexhaustible long-term energy source. We describe the status of magnetic and inertial confinement fusion in terms of the accomplishments made by the research programs for each concept. The improvement in plasma parameters (most frequently discussed in terms of the Tn tau product of ion temperature, T, density, n, and confinement time, tau) can be linked with the construction and operation of experimental facilities. The scientific progress exhibited by larger scale fusion experiments within the US, such as Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Fusion Test Reactor for magnetic studies and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Nova laser for inertial studies, has been optimized by the theoretical advances in plasma and computational physics. Both TFTR and Nova have exhibited ion temperatures in excess of 10 keV at confinement parameters of n tau near 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ . sec. At slightly lower temperatures (near a few keV), the value of n tau has exceeded 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ . sec in both devices. Near-term development plans in fusion research include experiments within the US, Europe, and Japan to improve the plasma performance to reach conditions where the rate of fusion energy production equals or exceeds the heating power incident upon the plasma. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Evolution towards Economically Viable Magnetic Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furth, H. P.

    1996-11-01

    Large pedestrian dinosaurs have long been extinct, while flying dinosaurs have evolved from the archaeopteryx to the common sparrow. Removal of superfluous constraints was the key. In order for soi-disant intelligent life to have emerged on Earth, fusion-power emission from our Sun must have been kept sufficiently feeble and slow-changing (c.f., Bethe's Carbon-Cycle) so as to allow time for non-trivial evolution. By contrast, any economically viable fusion-reactor scheme must use some fast-burning fuel (e.g. D-D,D-T,etc.), so as to elude the economic constraints of excessive single-unit size and cost. The quest for livelier fusion fuel tends to motivate various departures from a strictly thermalized ``Maxwellian'' reactor-plasma distribution. Illustrative material will include specific options for applying the joint resources of the international ``Three-Large-Tokamak Collaboration''.

  13. Computational problems in magnetic fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1981-08-31

    Numerical calculations have had an important role in fusion research since its beginning, but the application of computers to plasma physics has advanced rapidly in the last few years. One reason for this is the increasing sophistication of the mathematical models of plasma behavior, and another is the increased speed and memory of the computers which made it reasonable to consider numerical simulation of fusion devices. The behavior of a plasma is simulated by a variety of numerical models. Some models used for short times give detailed knowledge of the plasma on a microscopic scale, while other models used for much longer times compute macroscopic properties of the plasma dynamics. The computer models used in fusion research are surveyed. One of the most active areas of research is in time-dependent, three-dimensional, resistive magnetohydrodynamic models. These codes are reviewed briefly.

  14. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  15. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; hide

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  16. Fission and fusion scenarios for magnetic microswimmer clusters.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Lastra, Francisca; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-11-22

    Fission and fusion processes of particle clusters occur in many areas of physics and chemistry from subnuclear to astronomic length scales. Here we study fission and fusion of magnetic microswimmer clusters as governed by their hydrodynamic and dipolar interactions. Rich scenarios are found that depend crucially on whether the swimmer is a pusher or a puller. In particular a linear magnetic chain of pullers is stable while a pusher chain shows a cascade of fission (or disassembly) processes as the self-propulsion velocity is increased. Contrarily, magnetic ring clusters show fission for any type of swimmer. Moreover, we find a plethora of possible fusion (or assembly) scenarios if a single swimmer collides with a ringlike cluster and two rings spontaneously collide. Our predictions are obtained by computer simulations and verifiable in experiments on active colloidal Janus particles and magnetotactic bacteria.

  17. Fission and fusion scenarios for magnetic microswimmer clusters

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Lastra, Francisca; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Fission and fusion processes of particle clusters occur in many areas of physics and chemistry from subnuclear to astronomic length scales. Here we study fission and fusion of magnetic microswimmer clusters as governed by their hydrodynamic and dipolar interactions. Rich scenarios are found that depend crucially on whether the swimmer is a pusher or a puller. In particular a linear magnetic chain of pullers is stable while a pusher chain shows a cascade of fission (or disassembly) processes as the self-propulsion velocity is increased. Contrarily, magnetic ring clusters show fission for any type of swimmer. Moreover, we find a plethora of possible fusion (or assembly) scenarios if a single swimmer collides with a ringlike cluster and two rings spontaneously collide. Our predictions are obtained by computer simulations and verifiable in experiments on active colloidal Janus particles and magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:27874006

  18. Fission and fusion scenarios for magnetic microswimmer clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Guzmán-Lastra, Francisca; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-11-22

    Fission and fusion processes of particle clusters occur in many areas of physics and chemistry from subnuclear to astronomic length scales. Here we study fission and fusion of magnetic microswimmer clusters as governed by their hydrodynamic and dipolar interactions. Rich scenarios are found that depend crucially on whether the swimmer is a pusher or a puller. In particular a linear magnetic chain of pullers is stable while a pusher chain shows a cascade of fission (or disassembly) processes as the self-propulsion velocity is increased. Contrarily, magnetic ring clusters show fission for any type of swimmer. Moreover, we find a plethoramore » of possible fusion (or assembly) scenarios if a single swimmer collides with a ringlike cluster and two rings spontaneously collide. Lastly, our predictions are obtained by computer simulations and verifiable in experiments on active colloidal Janus particles and magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  19. Fission and fusion scenarios for magnetic microswimmer clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Lastra, Francisca; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-11-01

    Fission and fusion processes of particle clusters occur in many areas of physics and chemistry from subnuclear to astronomic length scales. Here we study fission and fusion of magnetic microswimmer clusters as governed by their hydrodynamic and dipolar interactions. Rich scenarios are found that depend crucially on whether the swimmer is a pusher or a puller. In particular a linear magnetic chain of pullers is stable while a pusher chain shows a cascade of fission (or disassembly) processes as the self-propulsion velocity is increased. Contrarily, magnetic ring clusters show fission for any type of swimmer. Moreover, we find a plethora of possible fusion (or assembly) scenarios if a single swimmer collides with a ringlike cluster and two rings spontaneously collide. Our predictions are obtained by computer simulations and verifiable in experiments on active colloidal Janus particles and magnetotactic bacteria.

  20. Fission and fusion scenarios for magnetic microswimmer clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guzmán-Lastra, Francisca; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-11-22

    Fission and fusion processes of particle clusters occur in many areas of physics and chemistry from subnuclear to astronomic length scales. Here we study fission and fusion of magnetic microswimmer clusters as governed by their hydrodynamic and dipolar interactions. Rich scenarios are found that depend crucially on whether the swimmer is a pusher or a puller. In particular a linear magnetic chain of pullers is stable while a pusher chain shows a cascade of fission (or disassembly) processes as the self-propulsion velocity is increased. Contrarily, magnetic ring clusters show fission for any type of swimmer. Moreover, we find a plethora of possible fusion (or assembly) scenarios if a single swimmer collides with a ringlike cluster and two rings spontaneously collide. Lastly, our predictions are obtained by computer simulations and verifiable in experiments on active colloidal Janus particles and magnetotactic bacteria.

  1. In vivo heating of magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Babincová, M; Altanerová, V; Altaner, C; Cicmanec, P; Babinec, P

    2004-08-01

    We have evaluated heating capabilities of new magnetic nanoparticles. In in vitro experiments they were exposed to an alternating magnetic field with frequency 3.5 MHz and induction 1.5 mT produced in three turn pancake coil. In in vivo experiments rats with injected magnetic nanoparticles were also exposed to an ac field. An optimal increase of temperature of the tumor to 44 degrees C was achieved after 10 minutes of exposure. Obtained results showed that magnetic nanoparticles may be easily heated in vitro as well as in vivo, and may be therefore useful for hyperthermic therapy of cancer.

  2. Tandem mirror magnet system for the mirror fusion test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bulmer, R.H.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1980-10-14

    The Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will be a large magnetic fusion experimental facility containing 22 supercounducting magnets including solenoids and C-coils. State-of-the-art technology will be used extensively to complete this facility before 1985. Niobium titanium superconductor and stainless steel structural cases will be the principle materials of construction. Cooling will be pool boiling and thermosiphon flow of 4.5 K liquid helium. Combined weight of the magnets will be over 1500 tonnes and the stored energy will be over 1600 MJ. Magnetic field strength in some coils will be more than 8 T. Detail design of the magnet system will begin early 1981. Basic requirements and conceptual design are disclosed in this paper.

  3. Passive levitation in alternating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aronson, Eugene A.

    2009-06-16

    Stable levitation of an object in an alternating magnetic field can be achieved by eliminating coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object. Stable levitation can also be achieved by varying the coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object, while maintaining one or more of the rotational and translational forces steady in time.

  4. Passive levitation in alternating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aronson, Eugene A.

    2010-09-14

    Stable levitation of an object in an alternating magnetic field can be achieved by eliminating coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object. Stable levitation can also be achieved by varying the coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object, while maintaining one or more of the rotational and translational forces steady in time.

  5. The Magnetic Dipole as an Attractive Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, John M.

    1997-11-01

    Stability for low β plasma confined by closed B field lines is PV^γ = C_0, P = pressure, V = flux tube volume, γ is c_p/cv = 5/3. Kesner(J. Kesner, Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop, Mar. 3-6, 1997) proposed a levitated current ring with the plasma stabilized by this condition as an alternate fusion reactor. Such a reactor has many attractive features; at radii large compared to the ring radius, V goes like r^4; the stability condition is Pr^20/3 = C_1. If nr^4 = C_2, then interchanges keep the density constant. The temperature can drop according to Tr^8/3 = C_3. If the chamber is ten times the ring radius, the density can drop from 10^14 near the ring to 10^10 at the edge and the temperature can drop from 50 keV near the ring to 100 eV at the edge. This plasma should present no problems for a divertor. Reacting plasma near the ring will heat it, upsetting the stability relation and cause convection to carry burnt plasma out; it will cool as it expands. At the same time the convection will bring in fresh fuel from the outside which will be compressed and heated to ignition. A super conducting ring design that can float in reacting D-He^3 for 16 hours exists(J.M. Dawson, FUSION, edited by Edward Teller, Vol. 1, Magnetic Confinement, Part, Ch. 16, Academic Press, 1981).

  6. Technological requisites of the magnetic fusion energy programme

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    An integral part of magnetic fusion energy research is the development of the technologies necessary for the confinement and heating of reactor-level plasmas. Heating systems based on energetic neutral beam particle injection or radio frequency waves (or both) will be required to heat plasmas to the temperatures at which fusion is self-sustaining. These systems may be used also to drive plasma currents. The magnet systems required to confine reactor-sized plasmas rely on the development of effective superconductors. Issues associated with safety and tritium handling concerns become important considerations in designing reactor concepts.

  7. Overview of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wiffen, F.W. ); Dowling, R.J.; Marton, W.A.; Eckstrand, S.A. . Office of Fusion Energy)

    1990-01-01

    Since the 1988 Symposium on Fusion Technology, steady progress has been made in the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. The large US tokamaks have reached new levels of plasma performance with associated improvements in the understanding of transport. The technology support for ongoing and future devices is similarly advancing with notable advances in magnetic, rf heating tubes, pellet injector, plasma interactive materials, tritium handling, structural materials, and system studies. Currently, a high level DOE review of the program is underway to provide recommendations for a strategic plan.

  8. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  9. Laser-driven magnetized liner inertial fusion on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sefkow, A. B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Weis, M. R.; Chang, P.-Y.

    2017-05-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) combines the compression of fusion fuel, a hallmark of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), with strongly magnetized plasmas that suppress electron heat losses, a hallmark of magnetic fusion. It can reduce the traditional velocity, pressure, and convergence ratio requirements of ICF. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept being studied at the Z Pulsed-Power Facility is a key target concept in the U.S. ICF Program. Laser-driven MagLIF is being developed on OMEGA to test the scaling of MagLIF over a range of absorbed energy of the order of 1 kJ on OMEGA to 500 kJ on Z. It is also valuable as a platform for studying the key physics of MIF. An energy-scaled point design has been developed for OMEGA that is roughly 10 × smaller in linear dimensions than Z MagLIF targets. A 0.6-mm-outer-diameter plastic cylinder filled with 2.4 mg/cm3 of D2 is placed in a ˜10-T axial magnetic field, generated by a Magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system, the cylinder is compressed by 40 OMEGA beams, and the gas fill is preheated by a single OMEGA beam propagating along the axis. Preheating to >100 eV and axially uniform compression over 0.7 mm have been demonstrated, separately, in a series of preparatory experiments that meet our initial expectations. The preliminary results from the first integrated experiments combining magnetization, compression, and preheat demonstrating a roughly 2 x increase in the neutron yield will be reported here for the first time.

  10. Magnetic and inertial fusion status and development plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, D.; Storm, E.

    1987-12-01

    Controlled fusion, pursued by investigators in both the magnetic and inertial confinement research programs, continues to be a strong candidate as an intrinsically safe and virtually inexhaustible long-term energy source. We describe the status of magnetic and inertial confinement fusion in terms of the accomplishments made by the research programs for each concept. The improvement in plasma parameters (most frequently discussed in terms of the Tn tau product of ion temperature, T, density, n, and confinement time, tau) can be linked with the construction and operation of experimental facilities. The scientific progress exhibited by larger scale fusion experiments within the US, such as Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Fusion Test Reactor for magnetic studies and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Nova laser for inertial studies, has been optimized by the theoretical advances in plasma and computational physics. Both the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and Nova have exhibited ion temperatures in excess of 10 keV at confinement parameters of n tau near 10 to the 13th power cm (-3) sec. At slightly lower temperatures (near a few keV), the value of n tau has exceeded 10 to the 13th power cm (-3) sec in both devices.

  11. Cost assessment of a generic magnetic fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.; Cohn, S.M.; Delene, J.G.; Parsly, L.F.; Ashby, D.E.T.F.; Reiersen, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of generating electricity by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components that are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium-burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reversed-field pinches (RFPs), and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak; rather, it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion rectors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent, it is not as good an approximation to systems such as the RFP in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure, and coils. The model shows that a 1200-MW(e) power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Studies of the sensitivity of the model to variations in the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that a fusion reactor of this scale may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities.

  12. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yuhu; Kessel, Chuck; El-guebaly, Laila; Titus, Peter

    2016-02-25

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  13. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Kessel, C.; El-Guebaly, L.; Titus, P.

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  14. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Zhai, Yuhu; Kessel, Chuck; El-guebaly, Laila; ...

    2016-02-25

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center withmore » plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.« less

  15. Computational and experimental investigation of magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.T.; Guzik, J.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1996-07-01

    In Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions. Because the magnetic field suppresses losses by electron thermal conduction in the fuel during the target implosion heating process, the compression may be over a much longer time scale than in traditional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Bigger targets and much lower initial target densities than in ICF can be used, reducing radiative energy losses. Therefore, ``liner-on-plasma`` compressions, driven by relatively inexpensive electrical pulsed power, may be practical. Potential MTF target plasmas must meet minimum temperature, density, and magnetic field starting conditions, and must remain relatively free of high-Z radiation-cooling-enhancing contaminants. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, computational and experimental research is being pursued into MTF target plasmas, such as deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches, and the Russian-originated MAGO plasma. In addition, liner-on-plasma compressions of such target plasmas to fusion conditions are being computationally modeled, and experimental investigation of such heavy liner implosions has begun. The status of the research will be presented.

  16. Engineering of the Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, G.; White, S.; Adams, R. B.; Thio, Y. C. F.; Santarius, J.; Alexander, R.; Fincher, S.; Polsgrove, T.; Chapman, J.; Philips, A.

    2002-01-01

    Engineering details are presented for a magnetized target fusion (MTF) propulsion system designed to support crewed missions to the outer solar system. Structural, thermal and radiation-management design details are presented. Propellant storage and supply options are also discussed and a propulsion system mass estimate is given.

  17. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-12-07

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 11/ rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/.

  18. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; ...

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Wemore » determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.« less

  19. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Kimmel, Mark W.; Knapp, Patrick; Lewis, Sean M.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle; Schollmeier, Marius; Scoglietti, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shores, Jonathon; Sinars, Daniel; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Speas, Christopher; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L.

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. We determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  20. Open-ended magnetic confinement systems for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-05-01

    Magnetic confinement systems that use externally generated magnetic fields can be divided topologically into two classes: ``closed`` and `open``. The tokamak, the stellarator, and the reversed-field-pinch approaches are representatives of the first category, while mirror-based systems and their variants are of the second category. While the recent thrust of magnetic fusion research, with its emphasis on the tokamak, has been concentrated on closed geometry, there are significant reasons for the continued pursuit of research into open-ended systems. The paper discusses these reasons, reviews the history and the present status of open-ended systems, and suggests some future directions for the research.

  1. FIRE, A Next Step Option for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.M.

    2002-09-12

    The next major frontier in magnetic fusion physics is to explore and understand the strong nonlinear coupling among confinement, MHD stability, self-heating, edge physics, and wave-particle interactions that is fundamental to fusion plasma behavior. The Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) Design Study has been undertaken to define the lowest cost facility to attain, explore, understand, and optimize magnetically confined fusion-dominated plasmas. The FIRE is envisioned as an extension of the existing Advanced Tokamak Program that could lead to an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The FIRE activities have focused on the physics and engineering assessment of a compact, high-field tokamak with the capability of achieving Q approximately equal to 10 in the ELMy H-mode for a duration of about 1.5 plasma current redistribution times (skin times) during an initial burning-plasma science phase, and the flexibility to add Advanced Tokamak hardware (e.g., lower-hybrid current drive) later. The configuration chosen for FIRE is similar to that of ARIES-RS, the U.S. Fusion Power Plant study utilizing an Advanced Tokamak reactor. The key ''Advanced Tokamak'' features are: strong plasma shaping, double-null pumping divertors, low toroidal field ripple (<0.3%), internal control coils, and space for wall stabilization capabilities. The reference design point is R subscript ''o'' = 2.14 m, a = 0.595 m, B subscript ''t''(R subscript ''o'') = 10 T, I subscript ''p'' = 7.7 MA with a flattop time of 20 s for 150 MW of fusion power. The baseline magnetic fields and pulse lengths can be provided by wedged BeCu/OFHC toroidal-field (TF) coils and OFHC poloidal-field (PF) coils that are pre-cooled to 80 K prior to the pulse and allowed to warm up to 373 K at the end of the pulse. A longer-term goal of FIRE is to explore Advanced Tokamak regimes sustained by noninductive current drive (e.g., lower-hybrid current drive) at high fusion gain (Q > 5) for a duration of 1 to 3 current

  2. Laser-Driven Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnak, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an approach that combines the implosion and compression of fusion fuel (a hallmark of inertial fusion) with strongly magnetized plasmas that suppress electron heat losses (a hallmark of magnetic fusion). It is of interest because it could potentially reduce some of the traditional velocity, pressure, and convergence ratio requirements of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept being studied at the Z Pulsed-Power Facility is a key target concept in the U.S. ICF Program. Laser-driven MagLIF is being developed to enable a test of the scaling of MagLIF over a range of absorbed energy from of the order of 20 kJ (on OMEGA) to 500 kJ (on Z). It is also valuable as a platform for studying the key physics of MIF. An energy-scaled point design has been developed for the Omega Laser Facility that is roughly 10 × smaller in linear dimensions than Z MagLIF targets. A 0.6-mm-outer-diam plastic cylinder filled with 2.4 mg/cm3 of D2 is placed in a 10-T axial magnetic field, generated by MIFEDS (magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system), the cylinder is compressed by 40 OMEGA beams, and the gas fill is preheated by a single OMEGA beam propagating along the axis. Preheating to >100 eV and axially uniform compression over a 0.7-mm height have been demonstrated, separately, in a series of preparatory experiments that meet our initial expectations. Preliminary results from the first integrated experiments combining magnetization, compression, and preheat will be reported for the first time. The scaling of laser-driven MagLIF from OMEGA up to the 1800 kJ available on the NIF (National Ignition Facility) will also be described briefly. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2009-07-01

    The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical

  4. The ignition design space of magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, Irvin R.

    2015-12-15

    The simple magnetized target implosion model of Lindemuth and Kirkpatrick [Nucl. Fusion 23, 263 (1983)] has been extended to survey the potential parameter space in which three types of magnetized targets—cylindrical with axial magnetic field, cylindrical with azimuthal magnetic field, and spherical with azimuthal magnetic field—might achieve ignition and produce large gain at achievable radial convergence ratios. The model has been used to compute the dynamic, time-dependent behavior of many initial parameter sets that have been based upon projected ignition conditions using the quasi-adiabatic and quasi-flux-conserving properties of magnetized target implosions. The time-dependent calculations have shown that energy gains greater than 30 can potentially be achieved for each type of target. By example, it is shown that high gain may be obtained at extremely low convergence ratios, e.g., less than 15, for appropriate initial conditions. It is also shown that reaching the ignition condition, i.e., when fusion deposition rates equal total loss rates, does not necessarily lead to high gain and high fuel burn-up. At the lower densities whereby fusion temperatures can be reached in magnetized targets, the fusion burn rate may be only comparable with the hydrodynamic heating/cooling rates. On the other hand, when the fusion burn rates significantly exceed the hydrodynamic rates, the calculations show a characteristic rapid increase in temperature due to alpha particle deposition with a subsequent increased burn rate and high gain. A major result of this paper is that each type of target operates in a different initial density-energy-velocity range. The results of this paper provide initial target plasma parameters and driver parameters that can be used to guide plasma formation and driver development for magnetized targets. The results indicate that plasmas for spherical, cylindrical with azimuthal field, and cylindrical with axial field targets must have an initial

  5. The ignition design space of magnetized target fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, Irvin R.

    2015-12-01

    The simple magnetized target implosion model of Lindemuth and Kirkpatrick [Nucl. Fusion 23, 263 (1983)] has been extended to survey the potential parameter space in which three types of magnetized targets—cylindrical with axial magnetic field, cylindrical with azimuthal magnetic field, and spherical with azimuthal magnetic field—might achieve ignition and produce large gain at achievable radial convergence ratios. The model has been used to compute the dynamic, time-dependent behavior of many initial parameter sets that have been based upon projected ignition conditions using the quasi-adiabatic and quasi-flux-conserving properties of magnetized target implosions. The time-dependent calculations have shown that energy gains greater than 30 can potentially be achieved for each type of target. By example, it is shown that high gain may be obtained at extremely low convergence ratios, e.g., less than 15, for appropriate initial conditions. It is also shown that reaching the ignition condition, i.e., when fusion deposition rates equal total loss rates, does not necessarily lead to high gain and high fuel burn-up. At the lower densities whereby fusion temperatures can be reached in magnetized targets, the fusion burn rate may be only comparable with the hydrodynamic heating/cooling rates. On the other hand, when the fusion burn rates significantly exceed the hydrodynamic rates, the calculations show a characteristic rapid increase in temperature due to alpha particle deposition with a subsequent increased burn rate and high gain. A major result of this paper is that each type of target operates in a different initial density-energy-velocity range. The results of this paper provide initial target plasma parameters and driver parameters that can be used to guide plasma formation and driver development for magnetized targets. The results indicate that plasmas for spherical, cylindrical with azimuthal field, and cylindrical with axial field targets must have an initial

  6. Impact of target modifications on Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Matthew; Knapp, Patrick; Sefkow, Adam; Slutz, Stephen; Awe, Thomas; Hansen, Stephanie; Hahn, Kelly; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher; McBride, Ryan; Sinars, Daniel; Rochau, Gregory; Peterson, Kyle

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) is a magnetically-driven fusion concept in which an axial magnetic field and laser heating are used to relax the implosion requirements of inertial confinement fusion. Initial experiments demonstrated the promise of the concept with relatively high yields (primary DD = 2e12), ion temperatures (2.5 keV), and magnetic field-radius products (>0.3 MG-cm). In order to better understand the portions of parameter space in which MagLIF can operate effectively, a series of experiments are being conducted to test the impact of various changes (e.g., laser-entrance-hole window thickness, imploding height of the target, endcap material, laser energy, laser spot size, initial fuel density). The impact of these changes on target performance (primary neutron yield, ion temperature, stagnation volume, etc.) will be discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Construction and testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kozman, T.; Shimer, D.; VanSant, J.; Zbasnik, J.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes the construction and testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility superconducting magnet set. Construction of the first Yin Yang magnet was started in 1978. And although this particular magnet was later modified, the final construction of these magnets was not completed until 1985. When completed these 42 magnets weighed over 1200 tonnes and had a maximum stored energy of approximately 1200 MJ at full field. Together with power supplies, controls and liquid nitrogen radiation shields the cost of the fabrication of this system was over $100M. General Dynamics/Convair Division was responsible for the system design and the fabrication of 20 of the magnets. This contract was the largest single procurement action at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the PACE acceptance tests, the 26 major magnets were operated at full field for more than 24 hours while other MFTF subsystems were tested. From all of the data, the magnets operated to the performance specifications. For physics operation in the future, additional helium and nitrogen leak checking and repair will be necessary. In this report we will discuss the operation and testing of the MFTF Magnet System, the world's largest superconducting magnet set built to date. The topics covered include a schedule of the major events, summary of the fabrication work, summary of the installation work, summary of testing and test results, and lessons learned.

  8. Magnetic charge lattices, moduli spaces and fusion rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmeijer, L.; Slingerland, J. K.; Schroers, B. J.; Bais, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the labelling and fusion properties of magnetic charge sectors consisting of smooth BPS monopoles in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with arbitrary gauge group G spontaneously broken to a subgroup H. The magnetic charges are restricted by a generalized Dirac quantization condition and by an inequality due to Murray. Geometrically, the set of allowed charges is a solid cone in the coroot lattice of G, which we call the Murray cone. We argue that magnetic charge sectors correspond to points in this cone divided by the Weyl group of H so that magnetic charge sectors are labelled by dominant integral weights of the dual group H. We define generators of the Murray cone modulo Weyl group, and interpret the monopoles in the associated magnetic charge sectors as basic; monopoles in sectors with decomposable charges are interpreted as composite configurations. This interpretation is supported by the dimensionality of the moduli spaces associated to the magnetic charges and by classical fusion properties for smooth monopoles in particular cases. Throughout the paper we compare our findings with corresponding results for singular monopoles recently obtained by Kapustin and Witten.

  9. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an “all-or-none” manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  10. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  11. Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion: Plasma Injectors for MTF Guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2003-01-01

    To achieve increased payload size and decreased trip time for interplanetary travel, a low mass, high specific impulse, high thrust propulsion system is required. This suggests the need for research into fusion as a source of power and high temperature plasma. The plasma would be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) research consists of several related investigations into these topics. These include the orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the gun as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability are under investigation. One of the items under development is the plasma injector. This is a surface breakdown driven plasma generator designed to function at very low pressures. The performance, operating conditions and limitations of these injectors need to be determined.

  12. Failure modes and effects analysis of fusion magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, M; Kazimi, M S; Siu, N O; Thome, R J

    1988-12-01

    A failure modes and consequence analysis of fusion magnet system is an important contributor towards enhancing the design by improving the reliability and reducing the risk associated with the operation of magnet systems. In the first part of this study, a failure mode analysis of a superconducting magnet system is performed. Building on the functional breakdown and the fault tree analysis of the Toroidal Field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET), several subsystem levels are added and an overview of potential sources of failures in a magnet system is provided. The failure analysis is extended to the Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of interactions within the fusion device caused by the operation of the PF magnets is presented in the form of an Interaction Matrix. A number of these interactions may have significant consequences for the TF magnet system particularly interactions triggered by electrical failures in the PF magnet system. In the second part of this study, two basic categories of electrical failures in the PF magnet system are examined: short circuits between the terminals of external PF coils, and faults with a constant voltage applied at external PF coil terminals. An electromagnetic model of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is used to examine the mechanical load conditions for the PF and the TF coils resulting from these fault scenarios. It is found that shorts do not pose large threats to the PF coils. Also, the type of plasma disruption has little impact on the net forces on the PF and the TF coils. 39 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Organic insulators and the copper stabilizer for fusion-reactor magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    The materials which compose the large composite superconducting fusion reactor magnets are subjected to mechanical stress, neutron and gamma-ray radiation with broad energy spectra, high magnetic fields, and thermal cycling from 4 to 300 K. Of the materials now considered for use in the magnets, results show that the organic insulators and the Cu stabilizer are the most sensitive to this environment. In response to the need for stabilizer data, magnetoresistivity changes were studied in eight variously prepared specimens of Cu throughout five cycles of an alternate neutron irradiation (4.0 K) and annealing (14 h at 307 K) program. The results were combined with those on the radiation behavior of epoxy and polyimide organic insulators to provide a preliminary assessment of their comparative radiation resistance in a typical magnet location of the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR).

  14. Spectral Line Shapes as a Diagnostic Tool in Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, R; Capes, H; Demura, A; Godbert-Mouret, L; Koubiti, M; Marandet, Y; Mattioli, M; Rosato, J; Rosmej, F; Fournier, K B

    2006-07-22

    Spectral line shapes and intensities are used for obtaining information on the various regions of magnetic fusion devices. Emission from low principal quantum numbers of hydrogen isotopes is analyzed for understanding the complex recycling mechanism. Lines emitted from high principal quantum numbers of hydrogen and helium are dominated by Stark effect, allowing an electronic density diagnostic in the divertor. Intensities of lines emitted by impurities are fitted for a better knowledge of ion transport in the confined plasma.

  15. Infrared and Visual Image Fusion through Fuzzy Measure and Alternating Operators

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The crucial problem of infrared and visual image fusion is how to effectively extract the image features, including the image regions and details and combine these features into the final fusion result to produce a clear fused image. To obtain an effective fusion result with clear image details, an algorithm for infrared and visual image fusion through the fuzzy measure and alternating operators is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the alternating operators constructed using the opening and closing based toggle operator are analyzed. Secondly, two types of the constructed alternating operators are used to extract the multi-scale features of the original infrared and visual images for fusion. Thirdly, the extracted multi-scale features are combined through the fuzzy measure-based weight strategy to form the final fusion features. Finally, the final fusion features are incorporated with the original infrared and visual images using the contrast enlargement strategy. All the experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective for infrared and visual image fusion. PMID:26184229

  16. High-Energy Space Propulsion Based on Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Landrum, D. B.; Freeze, B.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Gerrish, H.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an approach in which a magnetized target plasma is compressed inertially by an imploding material wall. A high energy plasma liner may be used to produce the required implosion. The plasma liner is formed by the merging of a number of high momentum plasma jets converging towards the center of a sphere where two compact toroids have been introduced. Preliminary 3-D hydrodynamics modeling results using the SPHINX code of Los Alamos National Laboratory have been very encouraging and confirm earlier theoretical expectations. The concept appears ready for experimental exploration and plans for doing so are being pursued. In this talk, we explore conceptually how this innovative fusion approach could be packaged for space propulsion for interplanetary travel. We discuss the generally generic components of a baseline propulsion concept including the fusion engine, high velocity plasma accelerators, generators of compact toroids using conical theta pinches, magnetic nozzle, neutron absorption blanket, tritium reprocessing system, shock absorber, magnetohydrodynamic generator, capacitor pulsed power system, thermal management system, and micrometeorite shields.

  17. High-Energy Space Propulsion Based on Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Landrum, D. B.; Freeze, B.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Gerrish, H.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is an approach in which a magnetized target plasma is compressed inertially by an imploding material wall. A high energy plasma liner may be used to produce the required implosion. The plasma liner is formed by the merging of a number of high momentum plasma jets converging towards the center of a sphere where two compact toroids have been introduced. Preliminary 3-D hydrodynamics modeling results using the SPHINX code of Los Alamos National Laboratory have been very encouraging and confirm earlier theoretical expectations. The concept appears ready for experimental exploration and plans for doing so are being pursued. In this talk, we explore conceptually how this innovative fusion approach could be packaged for space propulsion for interplanetary travel. We discuss the generally generic components of a baseline propulsion concept including the fusion engine, high velocity plasma accelerators, generators of compact toroids using conical theta pinches, magnetic nozzle, neutron absorption blanket, tritium reprocessing system, shock absorber, magnetohydrodynamic generator, capacitor pulsed power system, thermal management system, and micrometeorite shields.

  18. A Magnetic Diagnostic Code for 3D Fusion Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel A. Lazerson, S. Sakakibara and Y. Suzuki

    2013-03-12

    A synthetic magnetic diagnostics code for fusion equilibria is presented. This code calculates the response of various magnetic diagnostics to the equilibria produced by the VMEC and PIES codes. This allows for treatment of equilibria with both good nested flux surfaces and those with stochastic regions. DIAGNO v2.0 builds upon previous codes through the implementation of a virtual casing principle. The code is validated against a vacuum shot on the Large Helical Device (LHD) where the vertical field was ramped. As an exercise of the code, the diagnostic response for various equilibria are calculated on the LHD.

  19. High-Energy Space Propulsion Based on Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Freeze, B.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Landrum, B.; Gerrish, H.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A conceptual study is made to explore the feasibility of applying magnetized target fusion (MTF) to space propulsion for omniplanetary travel. Plasma-jet driven MTF not only is highly amenable to space propulsion, but also has a number of very attractive features for this application: 1) The pulsed fusion scheme provides in situ a very dense hydrogenous liner capable of moderating the neutrons, converting more than 97% of the neutron energy into charged particle energy of the fusion plasma available for propulsion. 2) The fusion yield per pulse can be maintained at an attractively low level (< 1 GJ) despite a respectable gain in excess of 70. A compact, low-weight engine is the result. An engine with a jet power of 25 GW, a thrust of 66 kN, and a specific impulse of 77,000 s, can be achieved with an overall engine mass of about 41 metric tons, with a specific power density of 605 kW/kg, and a specific thrust density of 1.6 N/kg. The engine is rep-rated at 40 Hz to provide this power and thrust level. At a practical rep-rate limit of 200 Hz, the engine can deliver 128 GW jet power and 340 kN of thrust, at specific power and thrust density of 1,141 kW/kg and 3 N/kg respectively. 3) It is possible to operate the magnetic nozzle as a magnetic flux compression generator in this scheme, while attaining a high nozzle efficiency of 80% in converting the spherically radial momentum of the fusion plasma to an axial impulse. 4) A small fraction of the electrical energy generated from the flux compression is used directly to recharge the capacitor bank and other energy storage equipment, without the use of a highvoltage DC power supply. A separate electrical generator is not necessary. 5) Due to the simplicity of the electrical circuit and the components, involving mainly inductors, capacitors, and plasma guns, which are connected directly to each other without any intermediate equipment, a high rep-rate (with a maximum of 200 Hz) appears practicable. 6) All fusion related

  20. High-Energy Space Propulsion Based on Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Freeze, B.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Landrum, B.; Gerrish, H.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A conceptual study is made to explore the feasibility of applying magnetized target fusion (MTF) to space propulsion for omniplanetary travel. Plasma-jet driven MTF not only is highly amenable to space propulsion, but also has a number of very attractive features for this application: 1) The pulsed fusion scheme provides in situ a very dense hydrogenous liner capable of moderating the neutrons, converting more than 97% of the neutron energy into charged particle energy of the fusion plasma available for propulsion. 2) The fusion yield per pulse can be maintained at an attractively low level (< 1 GJ) despite a respectable gain in excess of 70. A compact, low-weight engine is the result. An engine with a jet power of 25 GW, a thrust of 66 kN, and a specific impulse of 77,000 s, can be achieved with an overall engine mass of about 41 metric tons, with a specific power density of 605 kW/kg, and a specific thrust density of 1.6 N/kg. The engine is rep-rated at 40 Hz to provide this power and thrust level. At a practical rep-rate limit of 200 Hz, the engine can deliver 128 GW jet power and 340 kN of thrust, at specific power and thrust density of 1,141 kW/kg and 3 N/kg respectively. 3) It is possible to operate the magnetic nozzle as a magnetic flux compression generator in this scheme, while attaining a high nozzle efficiency of 80% in converting the spherically radial momentum of the fusion plasma to an axial impulse. 4) A small fraction of the electrical energy generated from the flux compression is used directly to recharge the capacitor bank and other energy storage equipment, without the use of a highvoltage DC power supply. A separate electrical generator is not necessary. 5) Due to the simplicity of the electrical circuit and the components, involving mainly inductors, capacitors, and plasma guns, which are connected directly to each other without any intermediate equipment, a high rep-rate (with a maximum of 200 Hz) appears practicable. 6) All fusion related

  1. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    2015-05-15

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primary fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized α-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We also discuss some important physics insights gained as a result of developing this model, such as the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated.

  2. A semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    2015-05-21

    Presented is a semi-analytic model of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF). This model accounts for several key aspects of MagLIF, including: (1) preheat of the fuel (optionally via laser absorption); (2) pulsed-power-driven liner implosion; (3) liner compressibility with an analytic equation of state, artificial viscosity, internal magnetic pressure, and ohmic heating; (4) adiabatic compression and heating of the fuel; (5) radiative losses and fuel opacity; (6) magnetic flux compression with Nernst thermoelectric losses; (7) magnetized electron and ion thermal conduction losses; (8) end losses; (9) enhanced losses due to prescribed dopant concentrations and contaminant mix; (10) deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium primarymore » fusion reactions for arbitrary deuterium to tritium fuel ratios; and (11) magnetized α-particle fuel heating. We show that this simplified model, with its transparent and accessible physics, can be used to reproduce the general 1D behavior presented throughout the original MagLIF paper [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We also discuss some important physics insights gained as a result of developing this model, such as the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated.« less

  3. Heavy-ion fusion final focus magnet shielding designs

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R

    2000-10-11

    At the Thirteenth International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF Symposium), we presented magnet shielding calculations for 72-, 128, 200, and 288-beam versions of the HYLIFE-II power plant design. In all cases, we found the radiation-limited lifetimes of the last set of final focusing magnets to be unacceptably short. Since that time, we have completed follow-on calculations to improve the lifetime of the 72-beam case. Using a self-consistent final focusing model, we vary parameters such as the shielding thicknesses and compositions, focusing length, angle-of-attack to the target, and the geometric representation of the flibe pocket, chamber, and blanket. By combining many of these shielding features, we are able to demonstrate a magnet shielding design that would enable the last set of final focusing magnets to survive for the lifetime of the power plant.

  4. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main

  5. High temperature superconducting current leads for fusion magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.L.; Dederer, J.T.; Singh, S.K. . Science and Technology Center); Hull, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for fusion applications typically have very high operating currents. These currents are transmitted from the room temperature power supplies to the low temperature superconducting coils by way of helium-vapor-cooled current leads. Because of the high current magnitude and the resistive characteristics associated with the normal metallic lead conductors, a substantial amount of power is dissipated in the lead. To maintain a stable operation, a high rate of helium vapor flow, generated by the boil-off of liquid helium, is required to cool the lead conductors. This helium boil-off substantially increases both the installation capacity and the operating cost of the helium refrigerator/liquefier. The boil-off of liquid helium can be significantly reduced by employing ceramic high temperature superconductors, such as Y-Ba-Cu-O, in the low temperature part of the lead conductor structure. This concept utilizes the superconducting, as well as the low thermal conductivity properties of the superconductor materials in eliminating power dissipation in part of the current lead and in inhibiting heat conduction into the liquid helium pool, resulting in reduced helium boil-off. This design concept has been conclusively demonstrated by a 2-kA current lead test model using Y-Ba-Cu-O (123) material which, although not optimized in design, has significantly reduced the rate of helium boil-off in comparison to optimized conventional leads. There appear to be no major technological barriers for scaling up this design to higher current levels for applications in fusion magnet systems or in fusion related testing activities. The theoretical basis of the current lead concept, as well as the important design and technology issues are addressed. The potential cost saving derived from employing these leads in fusion magnets is also discussed. In addition, a design concept for a 10-kA lead is presented.

  6. Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Li, Yangfang

    2012-08-08

    It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given

  7. Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions with Seeded Magnetic Fields on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments applying laser-driven magnetic-flux compression to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to enhance the fuel-assembly performance are described. Spherical CH targets filled with 10 atm of deuterium gas were imploded by the OMEGA laser in polar-drive geometry. The targets were embedded with an 80-kG magnetic seed field. Upon laser irradiation, the high-implosion velocities and ionization of the target fill lead to trapping of the magnetic field inside the capsule and its amplification through flux compression to up to tens of megagauss. At such strong magnetic fields, the hot spot inside a spherical target becomes strongly magnetized, reducing the heat losses through electron confinement. The experimentally observed ion temperature was enhanced by 15% and the neutron yield was increased by 30%, compared to nonmagnetized implosions. This represents the first experimental verification of performance enhancement resulting from embedding a strong magnetic field into an ICF capsule. The compressed field was probed via proton deflectometry using the 14.7-MeV protons generated in the D+3He fusion reactions from a laser-imploded glass microballoon. Experimental data for the fuel-assembly performance and magnetic field are compared to numerical results from combining the 1-D hydrodynamics code LILAC with a 2-D, azimuthal symmetry MHD postprocessor. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-04ER54789 and DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with P.-Y. Chang, G. Fiksel, J. P. Knauer, R. Betti, F. J. Marshall, and D. D. Meyerhofer (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester), and F. H. Séguin and R. D. Petrasso (PSFC, MIT).

  8. Magnetized Target Fusion and Prospects for Truly Low-Cost Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Richard E.

    1998-04-01

    As the world population grows, and standards of living improve, the demand for energy will increase considerably. At the same time, the importance of shifting away from burning fossil fuel and reducing emissions of CO2 is becoming widely recognized. Many technologies are possible in principle, but nuclear fission or nuclear fusion are among the more promising. Fission is technically well established, continues to be improved in its economics, reliability and safety, and in this speaker's opinion is bound to play a major role. Fusion is generally viewed as a long shot that remains to be proven technically. Not everyone realizes that fusion tokamak devices studied around the world have demonstrated impressive scientific advances. In recent years, tokamaks TFTR at Princeton and JET at Culham have come close to demonstrating energy break even. Some recent tokamak data will be described. The main problem with the tokamak is that it must operate with a very large unit size (many Gigawatts) for well-understood fundamental reasons. Consequently, tokamak cost of development is high, even invoking international collaborations to build future facilities such as the proposed 10-billion dollar International Thermonuclear Tokamak Reactor. An exciting alternative approach to fusion being examined at Los Alamos in collaboration with LLNL, SNL, AFRL, GA, PPPL, and other institutions is called Magnetized Target Fusion. The basic idea is to burn a small amount of DT fuel in a short very-high-pressure pulse. The 14-MeV neutrons produced by the fusion reactions could then be used to flash heat a blanket of lithium or lithium-containing material to a temperature of 10,000 to 20,000 degrees Kelvin. The vaporized neutron-absorbing blanket thus becomes a hot working fluid, which can be used to create electricity by passing it through a magnetohydrodynamic generator. Estimates of the capital cost for such a system are even lower than for fission reactors, suggesting 2-cent

  9. Characteristics of a magnetic fluid under an orthogonal alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Hu, J. H.; Zou, J. B.; Zhao, B.; Li, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinearity is a primary characteristic of a magnetic fluid. Under an orthogonal alternating magnetic field, the magnetization characteristics change, which produce a variable magnetic field in the magnetic fluid region. A mathematical model of a magnetic fluid under an orthogonal alternating magnetic field is here proposed. The model is solved by an analytic method, and the validity of the solution is verified using the finite element method in addition to experimental results. It is shown that the frequency of the magnetic field in a magnetic fluid is twice that of the orthogonal alternating magnetic field.

  10. Magnetic-Nozzle Studies for Fusion Propulsion Applications: Gigawatt Plasma Source Operation and Magnetic Nozzle Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Mikekkides, Ioannis; Mikellides, Pavlos; Gregorek, Gerald; Marriott, Darin

    2004-01-01

    This project has been a multiyear effort to assess the feasibility of a key process inherent to virtually all fusion propulsion concepts: the expansion of a fusion-grade plasma through a diverging magnetic field. Current fusion energy research touches on this process only indirectly through studies of plasma divertors designed to remove the fusion products from a reactor. This project was aimed at directly addressing propulsion system issues, without the expense of constructing a fusion reactor. Instead, the program designed, constructed, and operated a facility suitable for simulating fusion reactor grade edge plasmas, and to examine their expansion in an expanding magnetic nozzle. The approach was to create and accelerate a dense (up to l0(exp 20)/m) plasma, stagnate it in a converging magnetic field to convert kinetic energy to thermal energy, and examine the subsequent expansion of the hot (100's eV) plasma in a subsequent magnetic nozzle. Throughout the project, there has been a parallel effort between theoretical and numerical design and modelling of the experiment and the experiment itself. In particular, the MACH2 code was used to design and predict the performance of the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) plasma accelerator, and to design and predict the design and expected behavior for the magnetic field coils that could be added later. Progress to date includes the theoretical accelerator design and construction, development of the power and vacuum systems to accommodate the powers and mass flow rates of interest to out research, operation of the accelerator and comparison to theoretical predictions, and computational analysis of future magnetic field coils and the expected performance of an integrated source-nozzle experiment.

  11. Final report on the Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    John Slough

    2009-09-08

    Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The timescale for testing and development can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with these IPAs have demonstrated the ability to rapidly form, accelerate and merge two hypervelocity FRCs into a compression chamber. The resultant FRC that was formed was hot (T&ion ~ 400 eV), stationary, and stable with a configuration lifetime several times that necessary for the MTF liner experiments. The accelerator length was less than

  12. Pronuclear fusion failure: an alternate conjugational pathway in Tetrahymena thermophila, induced by vinblastine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.P.; Suhr-Jessen, P.B.; Orias, E.

    1988-04-01

    Vinblastine is shown to induce pronuclear fusion failure in conjugating Tetrahymena thermophila. In this alternate conjugational pathway gametic pronuclei are exchanged between conjugants but do not fuse. Each pronucleus undergoes one mitotic division to produce a new macro- and micronucleus. Genetic consequences of pronuclear fusion failure include the following: (1) the progeny are whole genome homozygotes with nuclei derived from single meiotic products, and (2) half of the progeny are heterokaryons with micro- and macronuclei of different genetic origins. These facts make this process extremely useful in strain construction and mutant isolation. The induction of pronuclear fusion failure by vinblastine suggests that microtubules play an essential role in pronuclear fusion. In this paper the authors present autoradiographic and genetic evidence that vinblastine induces pronuclear fusion failure in T. thermophila.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, PE; Wootton, A.; Gorini, G.; Sindoni, E.; Batani, D.

    2003-02-01

    This book is a collection of papers, written by specialists in the field, on advanced topics of nuclear fusion diagnostics. The 78 contributions were originally presented at the International Conference on Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Fusion held at Villa Monastero, Italy in September 2001. Both magnetically confined and inertial fusion programmes are quite extensively covered, with more emphasis given to the former scheme. In the case of magnetic confinement, since the present international programme is strongly focused on next-step devices, particular attention is devoted to techniques and technologies viable in an environment with strong neutron fluxes. Indeed, in the first section, the various methods are considered in the perspective of performing the measurements of the relevant parameters in conditions approaching a burning plasma, mainly in the Tokamak configuration. The most demanding requirements, like the implications of the use of tritium and radiation resistance, are reviewed and the most challenging open issues, which require further research and development, are also clearly mentioned. The following three sections are devoted to some of the most recent developments in plasma diagnostics, which are grouped according to the following classification: `Neutron and particle diagnostics', `Optical and x-ray diagnostics' and `Interferometry, Polarimetry and Thomson Scattering'. In these chapters, several of the most recent results are given, covering measurements taken on the most advanced experiments around the world. Here the developments described deal more with the requirements imposed by the physical issues to be studied. They are therefore more focused on the approaches adopted to increase the spatial and time resolution of the diagnostics, on some methods to improve the characterisation of the turbulence and on fast particles. Good coverage is given to neutron diagnostics, which are assuming increasing relevance as the plasma

  14. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.; Battles, James E.; Hull, John R.; Rote, Donald M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  15. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  16. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1990-12-04

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

  17. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ∼10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (∼10{sup −10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (∼10{sup 28}m{sup −3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  18. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Alan G; Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ∼10(4) T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (∼10(-10)m(3)) at high plasma densities (∼10(28)m(-3)) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  19. Prototyping of radial plates for fusion relevant superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, M.; Bhavasar, D.; Panchal, A.; Udgata, S.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-04-01

    The fabrication trials for prototype radial plate to support its conceptual design and development for fusion relevant superconducting magnet have been discussed in this paper. The simulation approach with CAD has been presented for prototyping of radial plates. Extensive trials have been done on SS316LN plates to estimate and establish machining sequences, machine parameters, machining tools to achieve required tolerances. The critical machining operation and parameters has been discussed in this paper. Inspection procedures with articulated arm coordinate measuring machine for prototype radial plate has been conceptualized and verified.

  20. Magnetic-mirror principle as applied to fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1983-08-11

    A tutorial account is given of the key physics issues in the confinement of high temperature plasma in magnetic mirror systems. The role of adiabatic invariants and particle drifts and their relationship to equilibrium and stability are discussed, in the context of the various forms of mirror field geometry. Collisional effects and the development and the control of ambipolar potentials are reviewed. The topic of microinstabilities is discussed together with the means for their control. The properties and advantages for fusion power purposes of various special embodiments of the mirror idea, including tandem mirrors, are discussed.

  1. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  2. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  3. Magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF), an update

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1998-03-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) was reported in two papers at the First Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. MTF is intermediate between two very different mainline approaches to fusion: Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). The only US MTF experiments in which a target plasma was compressed were the Sandia National Laboratory ``Phi targets``. Despite the very interesting results from that series of experiments, the research was not pursued, and other embodiments of MTF concept such as the Fast Liner were unable to attract the financial support needed for a firm proof of principle. A mapping of the parameter space for MTF showed the significant features of this approach. The All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) has an on-going interest in this approach to thermonuclear fusion, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and VNIIEF have done joint target plasma generation experiments relevant to MTF referred to as MAGO (transliteration of the Russian acronym for magnetic compression). The MAGO II experiment appears to have achieved on the order of 200 eV and over 100 KG, so that adiabatic compression with a relatively small convergence could bring the plasma to fusion temperatures. In addition, there are other experiments being pursued for target plasma generation and proof of principle. This paper summarizes the previous reports on MTF and MAGO and presents the progress that has been made over the past three years in creating a target plasma that is suitable for compression to provide a scientific proof of principle experiment for MAGO/MTF.

  4. Generation and compression of a target plasma for magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is intermediate between the two very different approaches to fusion: inertial and magnetic confinement fusion (ICF and MCF). Results from collaboration with a Russian MTF team on their MAGO experiments suggest they have a target plasma suitable for compression to provide an MTF proof of principle. This LDRD project had tow main objectives: first, to provide a computational basis for experimental investigation of an alternative MTF plasma, and second to explore the physics and computational needs for a continuing program. Secondary objectives included analytic and computational support for MTF experiments. The first objective was fulfilled. The second main objective has several facets to be described in the body of this report. Finally, the authors have developed tools for analyzing data collected on the MAGO a nd LDRD experiments, and have tested them on limited MAGO data.

  5. Overview of NASA Magnet and Linear Alternator Research Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    2005-02-01

    The Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for NASA Space Science missions. NASA Glenn is conducting in-house research on rare earth permanent magnets and on linear alternators to assist in developing a free-piston Stirling convertor for the SRG110 and for developing advanced technology. The permanent magnet research efforts include magnet characterization, short-term magnet aging tests, and long-term magnet aging tests. Linear alternator research efforts have begun just recently at GRC with the characterization of a moving iron type linear alternator using GRC's alternator test rig. This paper reports on the progress and future plans of GRC's magnet and linear alternator research efforts.

  6. Overview of NASA Magnet and Linear Alternator Research Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for NASA Space Science missions. NASA Glenn is conducting in-house research on rare earth permanent magnets and on linear alternators to assist in developing a free-piston Stirling convertor for the SRG110 and for developing advanced technology. The permanent magnet research efforts include magnet characterization, short-term magnet aging tests, and long-term magnet aging tests. Linear alternator research efforts have begun just recently at GRC with the characterization of a moving iron type linear alternator using GRC's alternator test rig. This paper reports on the progress and future plans of GRC's magnet and linear alternator research efforts.

  7. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  8. Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Neef, W.S.

    1990-07-20

    Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available.

  9. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  10. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the implosion requirements to achieve inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept were recently conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z coils. Despite the relatively slow implosion velocity (70 km/s) in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were approximately 3 keV, and thermonuclear DD neutron yields up to 2e12 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had a width ranging from 60-120 microns over a roughly 6 mm height and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray spectra from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.4 g/cm3 . In these experiments 1-5e10 secondary DT neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized. This is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the DT neutron time of flight spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and DD yields greater than 1e10. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to radiate away the laser energy deposited in the fuel also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; ...

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as highmore » as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.« less

  12. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6-8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2-0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 × 1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1-2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  13. Experimental demonstration of fusion-relevant conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A..; Sefkow, Adam B.; ...

    2014-10-06

    This Letter presents results from the first fully integrated experiments testing the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], in which a cylinder of deuterium gas with a preimposed axial magnetic field of 10 T is heated by Z beamlet, a 2.5 kJ, 1 TW laser, and magnetically imploded by a 19 MA current with 100 ns rise time on the Z facility. Despite a predicted peak implosion velocity of only 70 km/s, the fuel reaches a stagnation temperature of approximately 3 keV, with Te ≈ Ti, and produces up to 2e12 thermonuclearmore » DD neutrons. In this study, X-ray emission indicates a hot fuel region with full width at half maximum ranging from 60 to 120 μm over a 6 mm height and lasting approximately 2 ns. The number of secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons observed was greater than 1010, indicating significant fuel magnetization given that the estimated radial areal density of the plasma is only 2 mg/cm2.« less

  14. Experimental demonstration of fusion-relevant conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A..; Sefkow, Adam B.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Harding, Eric C.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Awe, Thomas James; Geissel, Matthias; Rovang, Dean C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Herrmann, Mark; Hess, M. H.; Johns, Owen; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew R.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle J.; Porter, John L.; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Rochau, Gregory A.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Savage, Mark E.; Smith, Ian C.; Stygar, William A.; Vesey, Roger A.

    2014-10-06

    This Letter presents results from the first fully integrated experiments testing the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], in which a cylinder of deuterium gas with a preimposed axial magnetic field of 10 T is heated by Z beamlet, a 2.5 kJ, 1 TW laser, and magnetically imploded by a 19 MA current with 100 ns rise time on the Z facility. Despite a predicted peak implosion velocity of only 70 km/s, the fuel reaches a stagnation temperature of approximately 3 keV, with Te ≈ Ti, and produces up to 2e12 thermonuclear DD neutrons. In this study, X-ray emission indicates a hot fuel region with full width at half maximum ranging from 60 to 120 μm over a 6 mm height and lasting approximately 2 ns. The number of secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons observed was greater than 1010, indicating significant fuel magnetization given that the estimated radial areal density of the plasma is only 2 mg/cm2.

  15. Safety and environmental comparisons of stainless steel with alternative structural materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzig, A.P.; Holdren, J.P.; Hibbard, P.J.

    1994-08-01

    Using the FuseDose II computer code, we calculated and compared several indices of safety and environmental (S&E) hazards for conceptual magnetic-fusion reactor designs based on a variety of structural materials-stainless steel, ferritic steel, vanadium-chromium-titanium alloy, and silicon-carbide-and, for comparison, the fuel of a liquid-metal fast breeder fission reactor. FuseDose II is a second-generation code derived from the Fuse-Dose code used in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM) study in the late 1980s. The comparisons update and extend those of the ESECOM study by adding the stainless-steel case, some new indices, graphical representation of the results, and other refinements. The results of our analysis support earlier conclusions concerning the S&E liabilities of stainless steel: The use of stainless steel would significantly reduce the S&E advantages of fusion over fission that are implied by the indices we consider, compared with the advantages portrayed in the ESECOM results for lower-activation fusion materials. The dose potentials represented by the radioactive materials that conceivably could be mobilized in severe accidents are substantially higher for the stainless steel case than for the lower activation fusion designs analyzed by ESECOM, and the waste disposal burden imposed by a stainless steel fusion reactor, though significantly smaller than that associated with a fission reactor of the same output, is high enough to rule out the chance of qualification for shallow burial under current regulations (in contrast to some of the lower activation fusion cases). This work underscores the conclusion that research to demonstrate the viability of the low-activation materials is essential if fusion is to achieve its potential for large and easily demonstrated S&E advantages over fission. 37 refs., 17 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectraa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2015-05-01

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG . cm, a ˜ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  17. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; ...

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used tomore » infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG · cm, a ~ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.« less

  18. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Peterson, Kyle J.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Awe, Thomas James; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Savage, Mark E.; Smith, Ian C.; Stygar, William A.; Herrmann, Mark

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG · cm, a ~ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  19. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/−0.06) MG · cm, a ∼ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  20. Magnetized Inertial Fusion (MIF) Research at the Shiva Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, C.; Domonkos, M.; Ruden, E. L.; Amdahl, D. J.; White, W. M.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Wurden, G. A.; Weber, T. E.

    2015-11-01

    The AFRL Shiva Star capacitor bank (1300 μF, up to 120 kV) used typically at 4 to 5 MJ stored energy, 10 to 15 MA current, 10 μs current rise time, has been used to drive metal shell (solid liner) implosions for compression of axial magnetic fields to multi-megagauss levels, suitable for compressing magnetized plasmas to MIF conditions. MIF approaches use magnetic field to reduce thermal conduction relative to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). MIF substantially reduces required implosion speed and convergence. Using profiled thickness liner enables large electrode apertures and field-reversed configuration (FRC) injection. Using a longer capture region, FRC trapped flux lifetime was made comparable to implosion time and an integrated compression test was conducted. The FRC was radially compressed a factor of ten, to 100x density >1018 cm-3 (a world FRC record), but temperatures were only 300-400 eV, compared to intended several keV. Compression to megabar pressures was inferred by the observed liner rebound, but the heating rate during the first half of the compression was less than the normal FRC decay rate. Principal diagnostics were soft x-ray imaging, soft x-ray diodes, and neutron measurements. This work has been supported by DOE-OFES.

  1. Fusion energy program. The role of TPX and alternate concepts. Background paper

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The background paper, responding to a request by the House Committee on Science, focuses on the following two questions for the U.S. fusion energy program. First, what is the role of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), an approximately $700 million fusion reactor currently awaiting a congressional decision to begin construction. Second, what is the role of alternatives to the tokamak concept in a broad-based fusion energy program. While the focus of the study is on the TPX and alternate concepts, it also provides a history of the overall fusion energy program. With this context, the study identifies (but does not answer) some underlying qeustions that must be addressed. The most pressing of these are: what is the potential role of the fusion energy program in meeting long-term energy needs; what level of research funding is justified by that role; and what are the most reasonable goals and directions for the program under scenarios of flat or declining budgets.

  2. Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Glass, A.J. ); Hasegawa, A. ); Santarius, J.F. . Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1992-08-01

    In this paper, the unique advantages of fusion rocket propulsion systems for distant missions are explored using the magnetic dipole configuration as an example. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of 1 kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in 1 yr and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 yr. This is about ten times better specific power performance than nuclear electric fission systems. Possibilities to further increase the specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as is an approach to implementing the concept through proof testing on the moon.

  3. Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. ); Hasegawa, A. ); Santarius, J.F. . Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1991-07-15

    The unique advantages of fusion rocket propulsion systems for distant missions are explored using the magnetic dipole configurations as an example. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power performance than nuclear electric fission systems. Possibilities to further increase the specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as is an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 20 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. ); Hasegawa, A. ); Santarius, J.F. . Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1991-04-12

    A conceptual design is discussed for a fusion rocket propulsion system based on the magnetic dipole configuration. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Example parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of 1 kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as in an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 21 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  6. Numerical modeling studies of a coaxial plasma accelerator as a standoff driver for magnetized target fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason T.

    The principal objective of the dissertation is to explore the theoretical feasibility of the coaxial plasma accelerator as a candidate driver for magnetized target fusion (MTF) by the use of detailed 2-D magnetohydrodynamics modeling studies. MACH2, a 2-D magnetohydrodynamic code, was the primary computational tool for this study. We found that incorporating the appropriate physics models is critical in getting good agreement with experimental results. We modeled plasma liner formation and implosion of a magnetized plasma by twelve plasma jets to put the remaining study in a magnetized target fusion context. The results show that the magnetic flux is compressed with the target, and the magnetic field suppresses the cross-field thermal conduction losses. Assuming that the working plasma satisfies a proposed set of microphysics conditions that might enhance the likelihood of accelerating the plasma as a "slug," the macrodynamics of accelerating the plasma in a standard, conventional coaxial plasma gun was systematically studied with respect to the driving current, mass distribution, initial plasma temperature, and electrode dimensions with the help of the 2-D MHD MACH2 code. The 2-D MHD modeling identifies a dynamical instability, which we called the "blowby" instability, that limits the performance. Density profile, ratio of electrode radii, initial jet length were found to be important in determining the onset of the instability. Guided by the 2-D modeling results, a plasma accelerator point design was proposed and studied. The modeling study shows that the blowby instability could be suppressed through appropriate shaping of the electrodes and plasma injection to induce a favorable density profile and an initial canting of the current sheet with the leading edge along the outer electrodes. With only four cases investigated, the desired performance objectives were reached. With further adjustments and/or alternate geometries, greater success and better accelerator

  7. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sinars, D. B.; Harding, E. C.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Smith, I. C.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hess, M. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 10{sup 12} have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm{sup 3}. In these experiments, up to 5 × 10{sup 10} secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm{sup 2}, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 10{sup 10}. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  8. Demonstration of thermonuclear conditions in magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Harding, Eric C.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Awe, Thomas James; Geissel, Matthias; Rovang, Dean C.; Smith, Ian C.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Herrmann, Mark C.; Mark Harry Hess; Lamppa, Derek C.; Martin, Matthew R.; McBride, Ryan D.; Peterson, Kyle J.; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Savage, Mark E.; Schroen, Diana G.; Stygar, William A.; Vesey, Roger Alan

    2015-04-29

    In this study, the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] utilizes a magnetic field and laser heating to relax the pressure requirements of inertial confinement fusion. The first experiments to test the concept [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] were conducted utilizing the 19 MA, 100 ns Z machine, the 2.5 kJ, 1 TW Z Beamlet laser, and the 10 T Applied B-field on Z system. Despite an estimated implosion velocity of only 70 km/s in these experiments, electron and ion temperatures at stagnation were as high as 3 keV, and thermonuclear deuterium-deuterium neutron yields up to 2 × 1012 have been produced. X-ray emission from the fuel at stagnation had widths ranging from 50 to 110 μm over a roughly 80% of the axial extent of the target (6–8 mm) and lasted approximately 2 ns. X-ray yields from these experiments are consistent with a stagnation density of the hot fuel equal to 0.2–0.4 g/cm3. In these experiments, up to 5 ×1010 secondary deuterium-tritium neutrons were produced. Given that the areal density of the plasma was approximately 1–2 mg/cm2, this indicates the stagnation plasma was significantly magnetized, which is consistent with the anisotropy observed in the deuterium-tritium neutron spectra. Control experiments where the laser and/or magnetic field were not utilized failed to produce stagnation temperatures greater than 1 keV and primary deuterium-deuterium yields greater than 1010. An additional control experiment where the fuel contained a sufficient dopant fraction to substantially increase radiative losses also failed to produce a relevant stagnation temperature. The results of these experiments are consistent with a thermonuclear neutron source.

  9. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. Panel on Integrated Simulation and Optimization of Magnetic Fusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, Jill; Corones, James; Batchelor, Donald; Bramley, Randall; Greenwald, Martin; Jardin, Stephen; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Laub, Alan; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Lindl, John; Lokke, William; Rosenbluth, Marshall; Ross, David; Schnack, Dalton

    2002-11-01

    Fusion is potentially an inexhaustible energy source whose exploitation requires a basic understanding of high-temperature plasmas. The development of a science-based predictive capability for fusion-relevant plasmas is a challenge central to fusion energy science, in which numerical modeling has played a vital role for more than four decades. A combination of the very wide range in temporal and spatial scales, extreme anisotropy, the importance of geometric detail, and the requirement of causality which makes it impossible to parallelize over time, makes this problem one of the most challenging in computational physics. Sophisticated computational models are under development for many individual features of magnetically confined plasmas and increases in the scope and reliability of feasible simulations have been enabled by increased scientific understanding and improvements in computer technology. However, full predictive modeling of fusion plasmas will require qualitative improvements and innovations to enable cross coupling of a wider variety of physical processes and to allow solution over a larger range of space and time scales. The exponential growth of computer speed, coupled with the high cost of large-scale experimental facilities, makes an integrated fusion simulation initiative a timely and cost-effective opportunity. Worldwide progress in laboratory fusion experiments provides the basis for a recent FESAC recommendation to proceed with a burning plasma experiment (see FESAC Review of Burning Plasma Physics Report, September 2001). Such an experiment, at the frontier of the physics of complex systems, would be a huge step in establishing the potential of magnetic fusion energy to contribute to the world’s energy security. An integrated simulation capability would dramatically enhance the utilization of such a facility and lead to optimization of toroidal fusion plasmas in general. This science-based predictive capability, which was cited in the FESAC

  10. Particle Simulations of Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyster, Peter Michael

    1987-09-01

    This thesis contains a numerical study of the dynamics of axis encircling charged particles in ion rings and layers. Part of this work deals with the coalescence of ion rings to form field reversed rings, which may be useful for Compact Torus magnetic fusion reactors. The coalescence of weak ion rings with Compact Toroids is also investigated. This is important because a component of energetic particles may help to maintain the flux or stabilize these configurations against a number of macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Several different types of particle codes are used. RINGA and CIDER are two and one half-dimensional codes in cylindrical axisymmetric geometry. For the RINGA code, a simple Ohm's law is used for modeling a resistive background plasma. For CIDER, the massless electron momentum equation is used for modeling a conductive background plasma. In a resistive plasma, ring coalescence can be achieved if the initial relative translational velocity is not excessive, and if the plasma conductivity is chosen to maximize the dissipation of ring energy. A theoretical and computational study is made of a mechanism by which ring translational energy is transferred to Alfven waves in a conductive plasma. A new collective phenomenon is discussed, whereby the merging of rings is improved if they have stronger initial self fields. A study is made of the coalescence of strong field-reversed ion rings in highly conductive plasmas, in which it is found that magnetic field line reconnection is an important process. Finally, a study of the magnetic compression of ion layers in conductive plasmas is presented. BAGSHAW, a one-dimensional particle code which treats the background plasma in the two fluid approximation, was developed for this purpose. Compression on a timescale which is comparable with the Alfven transit time may create considerable transients in the system. In a one-dimensional system, the plasma return current does not cancel the increase in the

  11. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  12. Manpower requirements and supply for magnetic-fusion energy, 1981-2000

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, M.G.; Hansen, A.H.; Harr, P.A.

    1981-09-01

    This study has been conducted to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) complete a task assigned to it by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-386). The law requires that the Secretary make recommendations regarding the need for increased support for education in engineering and scientific disciplines. This study focuses on estimating current employment and future manpower requirements for magnetic fusion energy to the year 2000. It also examines sources of labor for fusion energy and competing demands for the disciplines most important to the future growth of fusion energy.

  13. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  14. Considerations of the high magnetic field tokamak path on the approach to fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    This tutorial will review the physics basis, and its applications, for high magnetic field, compact visions of steady-state pilot plants and fusion reactors. This includes: energy and particle confinement; transport barriers; heating and current drive; scrape-off layer and divertor physics including implications for power handling, and ash/impurity control. The development of new technologies, particularly high-temperature, high critical magnetic field superconducting materials opens a new opportunity to consider the leverage of on-axis magnetic fields of 10T or more, enabling the feasibility of smaller sized devices on the path to fusion energy, including a pilot plant which could produce hundreds of megawatts of net electricity in a 10T tokamak with major radius of order 3 meter. Incorporating jointed magnetic coils, also made feasible by the high temperature superconductors, can dramatically improve flexibility of experimental superconducting facilities, and ultimately maintainability for reactor systems. Steady-state requires high bootstrap fraction, combined with efficient off-axis current drive, and existing and new approaches for RF sustainment will be covered, including Lower Hybrid Current Drive (both from the low- and high-field side), ECCD, and fast-wave techniques. External torque drive from neutral beams, routinely used in most present-day experiments to enhance confinement and suppress instabilities, will be weak or absent in reactors. Alternative, RF-based flow drive, using mode-converted ICRF waves will be discussed. All reactor concepts have extraordinary power handling requirements, combined with stringent limits on PFC erosion and impurity sources; the current state of the art in divertor configurations will be compared with emerging and new concepts, including snowflake, x-point, x-divertor and liquid metals, to meet these challenges. Supported by USDOE.

  15. Is tutobone an efficient alternative to other implants used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgeries?

    PubMed

    Prakash, Savithru Kumar; Mukerji, Nitin; Nath, Fredrik Prem

    2017-06-01

    The graft site morbidity following iliac crest harvesting is significant. To overcome this, different bone substitutes like coral dowels, solvent dissolved bovine/human bone substitutes, and carbon fiber/titanium cages have been used. This study was undertaken to assess the postoperative radiological fusion rates and symptom relief in patients who had Tutobone used as an interbody spacer compared to autologous bone graft (ABG), cages, surgibone and coral dowels. This was a retrospective, observational study. Case notes and post-operative cervical spine radiographs done at two subsequent follow-ups were reviewed. Data were derived from all Anterior Cervical Discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgeries performed at our centre over a 10-year period for degenerative cervical spine disease. We analysed 530 patients. Exclusion criteria included incomplete notes, complex cervical surgery (both anterior and posterior fixation and vertebrectomies). Patients were divided into 3 groups, patients treated with (1) Autologous bone graft, (2) Tutobone and (3) other implants which include cages, surgibone and coral dowels. An analysis of 530 patients who had ACDF with either ABG (n = 328) or tutobone (n = 95) or other implants (n = 90) is presented. A significantly greater number of patients in whom autologous bone was used had more than one level surgery. The median follow-up times were 3 months and 12 months. Rates of fusion and time to fusion with bone substitutes were inferior to ABG in our series, but there was not much to choose amongst them. The use of ABG in ACDF leads to fusion in a shorter duration and greater proportion of patients, when compared to substitutes. Other implants like Tutobone (cheaper alternative), cages, etc can also be used in ACDF procedures with good efficacy with the added advantage of preventing donor site morbidity. There was no association between fusion rates and symptom relief and between use of plating and fusion.

  16. Avalanche boron fusion by laser picosecond block ignition with magnetic trapping for clean and economic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hora, H.; Korn, G.; Eliezer, S.; Nissim, N.; Lalousis, P.; Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Miley, G. H.; Moustaizis, S.; Martinez-Val, J. -M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Kirchhoff, G. J.

    2016-10-11

    Measured highly elevated gains of proton–boron (HB11) fusion (Picciottoet al., Phys. Rev. X4, 031030 (2014)) confirmed the exceptional avalanche reaction process (Lalousiset al., Laser Part. Beams 32, 409 (2014); Horaet al., Laser Part. Beams33, 607 (2015)) for the combination of the non-thermal block ignition using ultrahigh intensity laser pulses of picoseconds duration. The ultrahigh accelerationabove<alternatives>$10^{20}~\\text{cm}~\\text{s}^{-2}$alternatives> for plasma blocks was theoretically and numerically predicted since 1978 (Hora,Physics of Laser Driven Plasmas(Wiley, 1981), pp. 178 and 179) and measured (Sauerbrey, Phys. Plasmas3, 4712 (1996)) in exact agreement (Horaet al., Phys. Plasmas14, 072701 (2007)) when the dominating force was overcoming thermal processes. This is based on Maxwell’s stress tensor by the dielectric properties of plasma leading to the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force <alternatives>$f_{\\text{NL}}$alternatives> resulting in ultra-fast expanding plasma blocks by a dielectric explosion. Combining this with measured ultrahigh magnetic fields and the avalanche process opens an option for an environmentally absolute clean and economic boron fusion power reactor. Finally, this is supported also by other experiments with very high HB11 reactions under different conditions (Labauneet al., Nature Commun.4, 2506 (2013)).

  17. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  18. Magnetic properties in an alternating-spin ferromagnetic Ising chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, D.; Ramos, F. B.

    2011-08-01

    Using the transfer matrix technique, we investigated the magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic Ising chain with alternating-spins ( S, S') and single-ion anisotropy. We have calculated some physical quantities of interest such as the z component of the total magnetization per particle ( m) and magnetic susceptibility. In the regime of low temperatures, we observed the existence of magnetization plateaus. We constructed the phase diagrams of the magnetization in terms of the magnetic field and of the single-ion anisotropy for the case {1}/{2}≤(S,S')≤{9}/{2}. We were able to find a general rule for the magnetic transitions. We observed that the saturation value of the magnetization is msat=(S+S')/2.

  19. Water flow patterns induced by bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subjected to alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Nix, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of water flow induced by the bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subject to an external alternating magnetic field. The magnetic fluid bridge is formed in the space between a pair of identical coaxial cylindrical permanent magnets submerged in water. The direction of alternating magnetic field is parallel /antiparallel to the magnetic field produced by two permanent magnets. The magnetic fluid bridge responds to the external alternating magnetic field with harmonic oscillation. The oscillation of magnetic fluid bridge generates water flow around the bridge. Water flow is visualized using a thin milk film at the container bottom. Water flows are observed with a high-speed video camera analysis system. The experimental results show that the flow pattern induced by the bridge oscillation depends on the Keulegan-Carpenter number.

  20. Magnetic refrigeration: recent developments and alternative configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanza, Morgan; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Yonnet, Jean-Paul; Legait, Ulrich; Roudaut, Julien

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic refrigeration, based on magnetocaloric effect, is an upcoming environmentaly friendly technology with a high potential to improve energy efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. It is a multidisciplinary research theme and its real emergence requires, to overcome scientific and technical issues related to both material and system. This paper presents the state of the art in magnetic cooling, the main recent works achieved and discusses in more details the thermodynamic phenomenon according to the G2Elab experience in the field. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014)", edited by Adel Razek

  1. Non-superconducting magnet structures for near-term, large fusion experimental devices

    SciTech Connect

    File, J.; Knutson, D.S.; Marino, R.E.; Rappe, G.H.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the magnet and structural design in the following American tokamak devices: the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Joint European Torus (JET), also presented herein, has a magnet structure evolved from several European programs and, like TFTR, represents state of the art magnet and structure design.

  2. Diagnosing laser-preheated magnetized plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Sefkow, Adam B.; Nagayama, Taisuke N.; Wei, Mingsheng; Campbell, Edward Michael; Fiksel, Gennady; Chang, Po -Yu; Davies, Jonathan R.; Barnak, Daniel H.; Glebov, Vladimir Y.; Fitzsimmons, Paul; Fooks, Julie; Blue, Brent E.

    2015-12-22

    In this paper, we present a platform on the OMEGA EP Laser Facility that creates and diagnoses the conditions present during the preheat stage of the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. Experiments were conducted using 9 kJ of 3ω (355 nm) light to heat an underdense deuterium gas (electron density: 2.5 × 1020 cm-3 = 0.025 of critical density) magnetized with a 10 T axial field. Results show that the deuterium plasma reached a peak electron temperature of 670 ± 140 eV, diagnosed using streaked spectroscopy of an argon dopant. The results demonstrate that plasmas relevant to the preheat stage of MagLIF can be produced at multiple laser facilities, thereby enabling more rapid progress in understanding magnetized preheat. Results are compared with magneto-radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, and plans for future experiments are described.

  3. Diagnosing laser-preheated magnetized plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Sefkow, Adam B.; Nagayama, Taisuke N.; ...

    2015-12-22

    In this paper, we present a platform on the OMEGA EP Laser Facility that creates and diagnoses the conditions present during the preheat stage of the MAGnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept. Experiments were conducted using 9 kJ of 3ω (355 nm) light to heat an underdense deuterium gas (electron density: 2.5 × 1020 cm-3 = 0.025 of critical density) magnetized with a 10 T axial field. Results show that the deuterium plasma reached a peak electron temperature of 670 ± 140 eV, diagnosed using streaked spectroscopy of an argon dopant. The results demonstrate that plasmas relevant to the preheatmore » stage of MagLIF can be produced at multiple laser facilities, thereby enabling more rapid progress in understanding magnetized preheat. Results are compared with magneto-radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, and plans for future experiments are described.« less

  4. The effects of magnetic field topology on secondary neutron spectra in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Pecover, J.; Chittenden, J.

    2017-03-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept involves the compression of a magnetized fuel such that the stagnated fuel contains a magnetic field that can suppress heat flow losses and confine α particles. Magnetic confinement of α particles reduces the fuel ρR required for ignition. Recent work [1,2] has demonstrated that the magnitude of the magnetic field in deuterium fuel can be inferred from the yields and spectra of secondary DT neutrons. In this work we investigate the potential for using the shape of the secondary neutron spectra to diagnose the magnetic field topology in the stagnated fuel. Three different field topologies that could possibly occur in MagLIF experiments are studied: (1) a cylindrical fuel column containing axial and azimuthal magnetic field components, (2) a fuel column which is pinched at the ends to form a magnetic mirror and (3) a fuel column that has a helical tube shape with magnetic field lines following the helical path of the tube's axis. Each topology is motivated by observations from experimental or simulated MagLIF data. For each topology we use a multi-physics model to investigate the shapes of the secondary neutron spectra emitted from a steady-state stagnated fuel column. It is found that the azimuthal and helical topologies are more suitable than the mirror topology for reproducing an asymmetry in the axial spectra that was observed in experiments. Gorgon MHD simulations of the MagLIF implosion in 1D are also carried out. These show that sufficient azimuthal magnetic field can penetrate from the liner into the fuel to qualitatively reproduce the observed spectral asymmetry.

  5. Assessment of some of the problems in the USA of superconducting magnets for fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, D.N.

    1981-11-05

    This paper discusses some of the general difficulties and problems encountered during the development of the technology of superconductors and superconducting magnets for fusion and expresses some personal concerns.

  6. Large orbit magnetic confinement systems for advanced fusion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, N.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the grant/contract was to illuminate the problem of magnetic confinement for plasmas where the majority of ions have large gyro-orbits and do not obey adiabatic particle dynamics. The electrons are adiabatic. We considered a class of equilibria where large orbit ions dominate; the equilibria are rigorous solutions of the Vlasov/Maxwell equations. For a simple cse -- the infinitely long, low beta, rotating plasma a complete stability analysis was carried out. This problem was the basis of the first paper on finite Larmor radius stabilization. In that paper an expansion in {var epsilon} = {bar {alpha}}{sub i}/r{sub o} was carried out to the first significant order beyond MHD. In this report the same problem is solved to all orders in {var epsilon}. While this case is of limited applicability to experiments it is rigorous and without approximations, so that it can be used to verify approximations to be developed for more complex and useful cases. The application of the results to date to small fusion reactors is described in the second paper which was written after the termination of the contract, but is based in part on material developed during the contract period.

  7. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  8. Implications of NSTX lithium results for magnetic fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Bell, M. G.; Canik, John; Diem, Stephanie J; Maingi, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to similar to 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium re-loadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, edge localized mode (ELM) control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  9. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-14

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  10. Steady State Turbulent Transport in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. W.; Ethier, S.; Kolesnikov, R.; Wang, W. X.; Tang, W. M.

    2007-12-20

    For more than a decade, the study of microturbulence, driven by ion temperature gradient (ITG) drift instabilities in tokamak devices, has been an active area of research in magnetic fusion science for both experimentalists and theorists alike. One of the important impetus for this avenue of research was the discovery of the radial streamers associated the ITG modes in the early nineties using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. Since then, ITG simulations based on the codes with increasing realism have become possible with the dramatic increase in computing power. The notable examples were the demonstration of the importance of nonlinearly generated zonal flows in regulating ion thermal transport and the transition from Bohm to GyroBoham scaling with increased device size. In this paper, we will describe another interesting nonlinear physical process associated with the parallel acceleration of the ions, that is found to play an important role for the steady state turbulent transport. Its discovery is again through the use of the modern massively parallel supercomputers.

  11. An alternative sensor fusion method for object orientation using low-cost MEMS inertial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Joshua L.

    This thesis develops an alternative sensor fusion approach for object orientation using low-cost MEMS inertial sensors. The alternative approach focuses on the unique challenges of small UAVs. Such challenges include the vibrational induced noise onto the accelerometer and bias offset errors of the rate gyroscope. To overcome these challenges, a sensor fusion algorithm combines the measured data from the accelerometer and rate gyroscope to achieve a single output free from vibrational noise and bias offset errors. One of the most prevalent sensor fusion algorithms used for orientation estimation is the Extended Kalman filter (EKF). The EKF filter performs the fusion process by first creating the process model using the nonlinear equations of motion and then establishing a measurement model. With the process and measurement models established, the filter operates by propagating the mean and covariance of the states through time. The success of EKF relies on the ability to establish a representative process and measurement model of the system. In most applications, the EKF measurement model utilizes the accelerometer and GPS-derived accelerations to determine an estimate of the orientation. However, if the GPS-derived accelerations are not available then the measurement model becomes less reliable when subjected to harsh vibrational environments. This situation led to the alternative approach, which focuses on the correlation between the rate gyroscope and accelerometer-derived angle. The correlation between the two sensors then determines how much the algorithm will use one sensor over the other. The result is a measurement that does not suffer from the vibrational noise or from bias offset errors.

  12. Use of the Nanofitin Alternative Scaffold as a GFP-Ready Fusion Tag

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Simon; Gorre, Harmony; Perrocheau, Anaëlle; Picot, Justine; Cinier, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous diversification of recombinant DNA technologies, the possibilities for new tailor-made protein engineering have extended on an on-going basis. Among these strategies, the use of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion domain has been widely adopted for cellular imaging and protein localization. Following the lead of the direct head-to-tail fusion of GFP, we proposed to provide additional features to recombinant proteins by genetic fusion of artificially derived binders. Thus, we reported a GFP-ready fusion tag consisting of a small and robust fusion-friendly anti-GFP Nanofitin binding domain as a proof-of-concept. While limiting steric effects on the carrier, the GFP-ready tag allows the capture of GFP or its blue (BFP), cyan (CFP) and yellow (YFP) alternatives. Here, we described the generation of the GFP-ready tag from the selection of a Nanofitin variant binding to the GFP and its spectral variants with a nanomolar affinity, while displaying a remarkable folding stability, as demonstrated by its full resistance upon thermal sterilization process or the full chemical synthesis of Nanofitins. To illustrate the potential of the Nanofitin-based tag as a fusion partner, we compared the expression level in Escherichia coli and activity profile of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) constructs, fused to a SUMO or GFP-ready tag. Very similar expression levels were found with the two fusion technologies. Both domains of the GFP-ready tagged TNFα were proved fully active in ELISA and interferometry binding assays, allowing the simultaneous capture by an anti-TNFα antibody and binding to the GFP, and its spectral mutants. The GFP-ready tag was also shown inert in a L929 cell based assay, demonstrating the potent TNFα mediated apoptosis induction by the GFP-ready tagged TNFα. Eventually, we proposed the GFP-ready tag as a versatile capture and labeling system in addition to expected applications of anti-GFP Nanofitins (as

  13. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  14. Magnetized target fusion: An ultra high energy approach in an unexplored parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetized target fusion is a concept that may lead to practical fusion applications in a variety of settings. However, the crucial first step is to demonstrate that it works as advertised. Among the possibilities for doing this is an ultrahigh energy approach to magnetized target fusion, one powered by explosive pulsed power generators that have become available for application to thermonuclear fusion research. In a collaborative effort between Los Alamos and the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) a very powerful helical generator with explosive power switching has been used to produce an energetic magnetized plasma. Several diagnostics have been fielded to ascertain the properties of this plasma. We are intensively studying the results of the experiments and calculationally analyzing the performance of this experiment.

  15. Computational modeling of joint U.S.-Russian experiments relevant to magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1997-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) experiments, in which a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions, present some challenging computational modeling problems. Recently, joint experiments relevant to MTF (Russian acronym MAGO, for Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) have been performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). Modeling of target plasmas must accurately predict plasma densities, temperatures, fields, and lifetime; dense plasma interactions with wall materials must be characterized. Modeling of magnetically driven imploding solid liners, for compression of target plasmas, must address issues such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in the presence of material strength, and glide plane-liner interactions. Proposed experiments involving liner-on-plasma compressions to fusion conditions will require integrated target plasma and liner calculations. Detailed comparison of the modeling results with experiment will be presented.

  16. Rotational versus alternating hysteresis losses in nonoriented soft magnetic laminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorillo, F.; Rietto, A. M.

    1993-05-01

    Rotational and alternating hysteresis losses have been investigated in theory and experiment in nonoriented soft magnetic laminations. Attention has been focused on the dependence of energy loss on peak magnetization Ip. The experiments, performed in a wide induction range (˜2×10-4 T≤Ip≤˜1.6 T), show that the ratio between rotational and alternating energy losses Whr/Wha is a monotonically decreasing function of Ip. A quantitative theoretical investigation is carried out through modeling of the magnetization process under rotating field and its relation to processes under alternating field. Three basic mechanisms of magnetization rotation are considered: linear combination of unidirectional hysteresis loops at low inductions (Rayleigh region), cyclic rearrangement of magnetic domains between different easy directions at intermediate inductions, and coherent spin rotation toward the approach to magnetic saturation. The ensuing predicted behavior of Whr/Wha is found to be in good agreement with the experiments performed in nonoriented low carbon steel and 3% FeSi laminations.

  17. Mirror fusion propulsion system - A performance comparison with alternate propulsion systems for the manned Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveny, M.; Carpenter, S.; O'Connell, T.; Schulze, N.

    1993-01-01

    The performance characteristics of several propulsion technologies applied to piloted Mars missions are compared. The characteristics that are compared are Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO), mission flexibility, and flight times. The propulsion systems being compared are both demonstrated and envisioned: Chemical (or Cryogenic), Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) solid core, NTR gas core, Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and a mirror fusion space propulsion system. The proposed magnetic mirror fusion reactor, known as the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS), is described. The description is an overview of a design study that was conducted to convert a mirror reactor experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) into a viable space propulsion system. Design principles geared towards minimizing mass and maximizing power available for thrust are identified and applied to the LLNL reactor design, resulting in the MFPS. The MFPS' design evolution, reactor and fuel choices, and system configuration are described. Results of the performance comparison shows that the MFPS minimizes flight time to 60 to 90 days for flights to Mars while allowing continuous return-home capability while at Mars. Total MFPS IMLEO including propellant and payloads is kept to about 1,000 metric tons.

  18. Mirror fusion propulsion system: A performance comparison with alternate propulsion systems for the manned Mars Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Carpenter, Scott A.; Deveny, Marc E.; Oconnell, T.

    1993-01-01

    The performance characteristics of several propulsion technologies applied to piloted Mars missions are compared. The characteristics that are compared are Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO), mission flexibility, and flight times. The propulsion systems being compared are both demonstrated and envisioned: Chemical (or Cryogenic), Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) solid core, NTR gas core, Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and a mirror fusion space propulsion system. The proposed magnetic mirror fusion reactor, known as the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS), is described. The description is an overview of a design study that was conducted to convert a mirror reactor experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) into a viable space propulsion system. Design principles geared towards minimizing mass and maximizing power available for thrust are identified and applied to the LLNL reactor design, resulting in the MFPS. The MFPS' design evolution, reactor and fuel choices, and system configuration are described. Results of the performance comparison shows that the MFPS minimizes flight time to 60 to 90 days for flights to Mars while allowing continuous return-home capability while at Mars. Total MFPS IMLEO including propellant and payloads is kept to about 1,000 metric tons.

  19. Mirror fusion propulsion system - A performance comparison with alternate propulsion systems for the manned Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveny, M.; Carpenter, S.; O'Connell, T.; Schulze, N.

    1993-01-01

    The performance characteristics of several propulsion technologies applied to piloted Mars missions are compared. The characteristics that are compared are Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO), mission flexibility, and flight times. The propulsion systems being compared are both demonstrated and envisioned: Chemical (or Cryogenic), Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) solid core, NTR gas core, Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and a mirror fusion space propulsion system. The proposed magnetic mirror fusion reactor, known as the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS), is described. The description is an overview of a design study that was conducted to convert a mirror reactor experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) into a viable space propulsion system. Design principles geared towards minimizing mass and maximizing power available for thrust are identified and applied to the LLNL reactor design, resulting in the MFPS. The MFPS' design evolution, reactor and fuel choices, and system configuration are described. Results of the performance comparison shows that the MFPS minimizes flight time to 60 to 90 days for flights to Mars while allowing continuous return-home capability while at Mars. Total MFPS IMLEO including propellant and payloads is kept to about 1,000 metric tons.

  20. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedditch, John; Bowden-Reid, Richard; Khachan, Joe

    2015-10-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  1. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hedditch, John Bowden-Reid, Richard Khachan, Joe

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  2. Drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Damien; Sandre, Olivier; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie

    2017-02-24

    The use of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to generate non-invasively and spatially a localized heating from a magnetic nano-mediator has become very popular these last years to develop magnetic hyperthermia (MH) as a promising therapeutic modality already used in the clinics. AMF has become highly attractive this last decade over others radiations, as AMF allows a deeper penetration in the body and a less harmful ionizing effect. In addition to pure MH which induces tumor cell death through local T elevation, this AMF-generated magneto-thermal effect can also be exploited as a relevant external stimulus to trigger a drug release from drug-loaded magnetic nanocarriers, temporally and spatially. This review article is focused especially on this concept of AMF induced drug release, possibly combined with MH. The design of such magnetically responsive drug delivery nanoplatforms requires two key and complementary components: a magnetic mediator which collects and turns the magnetic energy into local heat, and a thermoresponsive carrier ensuring thermo-induced drug release, as a consequence of magnetic stimulus. A wide panel of magnetic nanomaterials/chemistries and processes are currently developed to achieve such nanoplatforms. This review article presents a broad overview about the fundamental concepts of drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by AMF, their formulations, and their efficiency in vitro and in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editors: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader.

  3. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  4. An induction heating device using planar coil with high amplitude alternating magnetic fields for magnetic hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zuhe; Zhuo, Zihang; Cai, Dongyang; Wu, Jian'an; Wang, Jie; Tang, Jintian

    2015-01-01

    Induction heating devices using the induction coil and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are the way that the magnetic hyperthermia is heading. To facilitate the induction heating of in vivo magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia experiments on large animals. An induction heating device using a planar coil was designed with a magnetic field frequency of 328 kHz. The coil's magnetic field distribution and the device's induction heating performance on different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were measured. The alternating magnetic field produced in the axis position 165 mm away from the coil center is 40 Gs in amplitude; magnetic nanoparticles with a concentration higher than 80 mg. mL-1 can be heated up rapidly. Our results demonstrate that the device can be applied not only to in vitro and in small animal experiments of magnetic hyperthermia using MNPs, but also in large animal experiments.

  5. Magnetically-Channeled SIEC Array (MCSA) Fusion Device for Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.; Stubbers, R.; Webber, J.; Momota, H.

    2004-02-01

    A radical new Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) concept, the Magnetically-Channeled Spherical-IEC Array (MCSA) fusion propulsion system, was proposed earlier for use in the high performance Space Ship II fusion propulsion ship (Burton, 2003). This ship was designed for a fast manned round trip mission to Jupiter. The MCSA fusion power plant represents a key enabling technology needed for this mission. The details of the proposed MCSA design are presented here, along with a discussion of some possible experiments that could be performed to confirm key physics aspects.

  6. Inertial confinement fusion with direct electric generation by magnetic flux comparession

    SciTech Connect

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    A high-power-density laser-fusion-reactor concept in investigated in which directed kinetic enery imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium--in which the fusion target is centrally located--is maximized. In turn, this kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with, potentially, very high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the concept maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall can be many orders of magnitude less than is typical of D-T fusion reactor concepts.

  7. Compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR): a high-density approach to magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Byrne, R.N.; Dobrott, D.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the unique magnetic topology associated with the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), the compact reactor embodiment for this approach is particularly attractive from the viewpoint of low-field resistive coils operating with Ohmic losses that can be made small relative to the fusion power. The cost-optimized Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) design would operate with fusion-power-core power densities and mass utilizations that are comparable to fission power plants and are an order of magnitude more favorable than the conventional fusion approaches. A comprehensive system model predicts the CRFPR point design to be surprisingly resilient to changes in key, but relatively unknown, physics and systems parameters.

  8. FED-R: a fusion engineering device utilizing resistive magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Kalsi, S.S.

    1983-04-01

    The principal purpose of the FED-R tokamak facility is to provide a substantial quasi-steady flux of fusion neutrons irradiating a large test area in order to carry out thermal, neutronic, and radiation effects testing of experimental blanket assemblies having a variety of configurations, compositions, and purposes. The design of the FED-R device also suggests potential for an upgrade that could be employed as a full-scale demonstration reactor for some specific fusion-neutron application when required.

  9. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  10. Magnetic resonance-transcranial ultrasound fusion imaging: A novel tool for brain electrode location.

    PubMed

    Walter, Uwe; Müller, Jan-Uwe; Rösche, Johannes; Kirsch, Michael; Grossmann, Annette; Benecke, Reiner; Wittstock, Matthias; Wolters, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    A combination of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with real-time transcranial ultrasound, known as fusion imaging, may improve postoperative control of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode location. Fusion imaging, however, employs a weak magnetic field for tracking the position of the ultrasound transducer and the patient's head. Here we assessed its feasibility, safety, and clinical relevance in patients with DBS. Eighteen imaging sessions were conducted in 15 patients (7 women; aged 52.4 ± 14.4 y) with DBS of subthalamic nucleus (n = 6), globus pallidus interna (n = 5), ventro-intermediate (n = 3), or anterior (n = 1) thalamic nucleus and clinically suspected lead displacement. Minimum distance between DBS generator and magnetic field transmitter was kept at 65 cm. The pre-implantation MRI dataset was loaded into the ultrasound system for the fusion imaging examination. The DBS lead position was rated using validated criteria. Generator DBS parameters and neurological state of patients were monitored. Magnetic resonance-ultrasound fusion imaging and volume navigation were feasible in all cases and provided with real-time imaging capabilities of DBS lead and its location within the superimposed magnetic resonance images. Of 35 assessed lead locations, 30 were rated optimal, three suboptimal, and two displaced. In two cases, electrodes were re-implanted after confirming their inappropriate location on computed tomography (CT) scan. No influence of fusion imaging on clinical state of patients, or on DBS implantable pulse generator function, was found. Magnetic resonance-ultrasound real-time fusion imaging of DBS electrodes is safe with distinct precautions and improves assessment of electrode location. It may lower the need for repeated CT or MRI scans in DBS patients. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. The role of Z-pinches and related configurations in magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1997-07-10

    The use of a magnetic field within a fusion target is now known as Magnetized Target Fusion in the US and as MAGO (Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) in Russia. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (e.g., ICF), MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm, magnetized, wall-confined plasma of intermediate density within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression and heating of the plasma by imploding the confining wall, or pusher. In many ways, MTF can be considered a marriage between the more mature MFE and ICF approaches, and this marriage potentially eliminates some of the hurdles encountered in the other approaches. When compared to ICF, MTF requires lower implosion velocity, lower initial density, significantly lower radial convergence, and larger targets, all of which lead to substantially reduced driver intensity, power, and symmetry requirements. When compared to MFE, MTF does not require a vacuum separating the plasma from the wall, and, in fact, complete magnetic confinement, even if possible, may not be desirable. The higher density of MTF and much shorter confinement times should make magnetized plasma formation a much less difficult step than in MFE. The substantially lower driver requirements and implosion velocity of MTF make z-pinch magnetically driven liners, magnetically imploded by existing modern pulsed power electrical current sources, a leading candidate for the target pusher of an MTF system.

  12. Immobilization of enterokinase on magnetic supports for the cleavage of fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Santana, Sara D F; Pina, Ana S; Roque, Ana C A

    2012-10-31

    Magnetic nanobiocatalysts for tag cleavage on fusion proteins have been prepared by immobilizing enterokinase (EK) onto iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles coated with biopolymers. Two different chemistries have been explored for the covalent coupling of EK, namely carbodiimide (EDC coupling) and maleimide activation (Sulfo coupling). Upon immobilization, EK initial activity lowered but EDC coupling lead to higher activity retention. Regarding the stability of the nanobiocatalysts, these were recycled up to ten times with the greater activity losses observed in the first two cycles. The immobilized EK also proved to cleave a control fusion protein and to greatly simplify the separation of the enzyme from the reaction mixture.

  13. Current status of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography fusion software platforms for guidance of prostate biopsies.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jennifer K; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Turkbey, Baris; Gomella, Andrew; Amalou, Hayet; Choyke, Peter L; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Prostate MRI is currently the best diagnostic imaging method for detecting PCa. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasonography (US) fusion allows the sensitivity and specificity of MRI to be combined with the real-time capabilities of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). Multiple approaches and techniques exist for MRI/US fusion and include direct 'in bore' MRI biopsies, cognitive fusion, and MRI/US fusion via software-based image coregistration platforms. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  14. Alternative magnetic flux leakage modalities for pipeline inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Katragadda, G.; Lord, W.; Sun, Y.S.; Udpa, S.; Udpa, L.

    1996-05-01

    Increasing quality consciousness is placing higher demands on the accuracy and reliability of inspection systems used in defect detection and characterization. Nondestructive testing techniques often rely on using multi-transducer approaches to obtain greater defect sensitivity. This paper investigates the possibility of taking advantage of alternative modalities associated with the standard magnetic flux leakage tool to obtain additional defect information, while still using a single excitation source.

  15. Focal Laser Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Feasibility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion for Guidance.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Shyam; Jones, Tonye A; Priester, Alan M; Geoghegan, Rory; Lieu, Patricia; Delfin, Merdie; Felker, Ely; Margolis, Daniel J A; Sisk, Anthony; Pantuck, Allan; Grundfest, Warren; Marks, Leonard S

    2017-10-01

    Focal laser ablation is a potential treatment in some men with prostate cancer. Currently focal laser ablation is performed by radiologists in a magnetic resonance imaging unit (in bore). We evaluated the safety and feasibility of performing focal laser ablation in a urology clinic (out of bore) using magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion for guidance. A total of 11 men with intermediate risk prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective, institutional review board approved pilot study. Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion was used to guide laser fibers transrectally into regions of interest harboring intermediate risk prostate cancer. Thermal probes were inserted for real-time monitoring of intraprostatic temperatures during laser activation. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (3 Tesla) was done immediately after treatment and at 6 months along with comprehensive fusion biopsy. Ten of 11 patients were successfully treated while under local anesthesia. Mean procedure time was 95 minutes (range 71 to 105). Posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging revealed a confined zone of nonperfusion in all 10 men. Mean zone volume was 4.3 cc (range 2.1 to 6.0). No CTCAE grade 3 or greater adverse events developed and no changes were observed in urinary or sexual function. At 6 months magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion biopsy of the treatment site showed no cancer in 3 patients, microfocal Gleason 3 + 3 in another 3 and persistent intermediate risk prostate cancer in 4. Focal laser ablation of prostate cancer appears safe and feasible with the patient under local anesthesia in a urology clinic using magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion for guidance and thermal probes for monitoring. Further development is necessary to refine out of bore focal laser ablation and additional studies are needed to determine appropriate treatment margins and oncologic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  16. Understanding Fuel Magnetization and Mix Using Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, P. F.; Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155003] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  17. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  18. Computational modeling of pulsed-power-driven magnetized target fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Lindemuth, I.

    1995-08-01

    Direct magnetic drive using electrical pulsed power has been considered impractically slow for traditional inertial confinement implosion of fusion targets. However, if the target contains a preheated, magnetized plasma, magnetothermal insulation may allow the near-adiabatic compression of such a target to fusion conditions on a much slower time scale. 100-MJ-class explosive flux compression generators with implosion kinetic energies far beyond those available with conventional fusion drivers, are an inexpensive means to investigate such magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems. One means of obtaining the preheated and magnetized plasma required for an MTF system is the recently reported {open_quotes}MAGO{close_quotes} concept. MAGO is a unique, explosive-pulsed-power driven discharge in two cylindrical chambers joined by an annular nozzle. Joint Russian-American MAGO experiments have reported D-T neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 13} from this plasma preparation stage alone, without going on to the proposed separately driven NM implosion of the main plasma chamber. Two-dimensional MED computational modeling of MAGO discharges shows good agreement to experiment. The calculations suggest that after the observed neutron pulse, a diffuse Z-pinch plasma with temperature in excess of 100 eV is created, which may be suitable for subsequent MTF implosion, in a heavy liner magnetically driven by explosive pulsed power. Other MTF concepts, such as fiber-initiated Z-pinch target plasmas, are also being computationally and theoretically evaluated. The status of our modeling efforts will be reported.

  19. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Mori, Yoshitaka; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2011-08-15

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  20. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Daniel; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  1. Cerebral magnetic resonance image segmentation using data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rajapakse, J.C.; Giedd, J.N.; Krain, A.L.; Hamburger, S.D.; Rapoport, J.L.; DeCarli, C.

    1996-03-01

    A semiautomated method is described for segmenting dual echo MR head scans into gray and white matter and CSF. The method is applied to brain scans of 80 healthy children and adolescents. A probabilistic data fusion equation was used to combine simultaneously acquired T2-weighted and proton density head scans for tissue segmentation. The fusion equation optimizes the probability of a voxel being a particular tissue type, given the corresponding probabilities from both images. The algorithm accounts for the intensity inhomogeneities present in the images by fusion of local regions of the images. The method was validated using a phantom (agarose gel with iron oxide particles) and hand-segmented imager. Gray and white matter volumes for subjects aged 20-30 years were close to those previously published. White matter and CSF volume increased and gray matter volume decreased significantly across ages 4-18 years. White matter, gray matter, and CSF volumes were larger for males than for females. Males and females showed similar change of gray and white matter volumes with age. This simple, reliable, and valid method can be employed in clinical research for quantification of gray and white matter and CSF volumes in MR head scans. Increase in white matter volume may reflect ongoing axonal growth and myelination, and gray matter reductions may reflect synaptic pruning or cell death in the age span of 4-18 years. 41 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, George P.

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  3. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  4. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance fusion imaging in cholesteatoma preoperative assessment.

    PubMed

    Campos, Agustín; Mata, Federico; Reboll, Rosa; Peris, María Luisa; Basterra, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a method for developing fusion imaging for the preoperative evaluation of cholesteatoma. In 33 patients diagnosed with cholesteatoma, a high-resolution temporal bone computed tomography (CT) scan without intravenous contrast and propeller diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. Both studies were then sent to the BrainLAB work station, where the images were fused to obtain a morphological and color map. Intraoperative findings coincided with fusion CT-MRI imaging in all but two patients. In addition, one false positive and one false negative case were observed. CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are complementary techniques that should be employed to assess a cholesteatoma prior to surgery in many cases. Hence, to combine the advantages of each technique, we developed a fusion image technique similar to those that are routinely employed for radiotherapy planning and positron emission tomography-CT imaging. Fusion images can prove useful in selected cases.

  5. Quantifying Fusion Born Ion Populations in Magnetically Confined Plasmas using Ion Cyclotron Emission

    DOE PAGES

    Carbajal, L.; Warwick Univ., Coventry; Dendy, R. O.; ...

    2017-03-07

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) offers unique promise as a diagnostic of the fusion born alpha-particle population in magnetically confined plasmas. Pioneering observations from JET and TFTR found that ICE intensity P ICE scales approximately linearly with the measured neutron flux from fusion reactions, and with the inferred concentration, n /n i , of fusion-born alpha-particles confined within the plasma. We present fully nonlinear self-consistent kinetic simulations that reproduce this scaling for the first time. This resolves a longstanding question in the physics of fusion alpha particle confinement and stability in MCF plasmas. It confirms the MCI as the likely emissionmore » mechanism and greatly strengthens the basis for diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future burning plasmas.« less

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion biopsy for prediction of final prostate pathology.

    PubMed

    Le, Jesse D; Stephenson, Samuel; Brugger, Michelle; Lu, David Y; Lieu, Patricia; Sonn, Geoffrey A; Natarajan, Shyam; Dorey, Frederick J; Huang, Jiaoti; Margolis, Daniel J A; Reiter, Robert E; Marks, Leonard S

    2014-11-01

    We explored the impact of magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy on the prediction of final surgical pathology. A total of 54 consecutive men undergoing radical prostatectomy at UCLA after fusion biopsy were included in this prospective, institutional review board approved pilot study. Using magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion, tissue was obtained from a 12-point systematic grid (mapping biopsy) and from regions of interest detected by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (targeted biopsy). A single radiologist read all magnetic resonance imaging, and a single pathologist independently rereviewed all biopsy and whole mount pathology, blinded to prior interpretation and matched specimen. Gleason score concordance between biopsy and prostatectomy was the primary end point. Mean patient age was 62 years and median prostate specific antigen was 6.2 ng/ml. Final Gleason score at prostatectomy was 6 (13%), 7 (70%) and 8-9 (17%). A tertiary pattern was detected in 17 (31%) men. Of 45 high suspicion (image grade 4-5) magnetic resonance imaging targets 32 (71%) contained prostate cancer. The per core cancer detection rate was 20% by systematic mapping biopsy and 42% by targeted biopsy. The highest Gleason pattern at prostatectomy was detected by systematic mapping biopsy in 54%, targeted biopsy in 54% and a combination in 81% of cases. Overall 17% of cases were upgraded from fusion biopsy to final pathology and 1 (2%) was downgraded. The combination of targeted biopsy and systematic mapping biopsy was needed to obtain the best predictive accuracy. In this pilot study magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion biopsy allowed for the prediction of final prostate pathology with greater accuracy than that reported previously using conventional methods (81% vs 40% to 65%). If confirmed, these results will have important clinical implications. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion Biopsy During Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Tran, Geraldine N; Leapman, Michael S; Nguyen, Hao G; Cowan, Janet E; Shinohara, Katsuto; Westphalen, Antonio C; Carroll, Peter R

    2017-08-01

    Fusion biopsy using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound has demonstrated favorable detection rates of high-grade prostate cancer (PCa) among previously undiagnosed men. However, the diagnostic yield among men with active surveillance (AS) remains undefined. To determine the utility of MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy during AS by reporting rates of PCa upgrading and comparing findings with systematic biopsy. We identified patients with low- and intermediate-risk PCa enrolled in AS who received MRI-ultrasound fusion surveillance biopsies. All completed prostate multiparametric MRI with 3-T and endorectal coil reviewed by radiologists selecting regions of interest, and all underwent MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy with concurrent systematic biopsy. We report MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy findings, rates of Gleason score (GS) upgrading to ≥3 + 4 (any upgrading) and to ≥4 + 3 (major upgrading), tumor involvement estimates using descriptive statistics, McNemar's test of symmetry, and multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 207 men underwent MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy following radiologic suspicion on multiparametric MRI and met inclusion criteria. Agreement between systematic and MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy GS was borderline statistically significant (p<0.047). In total, 83 men (40%) experienced any upgrading, including 49 (24%) on systematic sampling, 30 (14%) on MRI-targeted cores, and four (2%) on both. Among those with negative results on MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy, seven (9%) exhibited major upgrading with systematic biopsy. MRI suspicion scores were high (4/5) for all but two patients with any upgrading and for all who experienced major upgrading. On multivariate analysis, older age was associated with higher odds of any upgrading for men with GS ≤3 + 3 on previous biopsy (odds ratio: 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.20; p=0.03). MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy resulted in upgrading otherwise undetected by systematic

  8. Investigation of energy losses in low-coercivity resin-bonded magnets in alternating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milov, E. V.; Sipin, I. A.; Milov, V. N.; Andreenko, A. S.; Balan, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    Energy losses during alternating remagnetization of low-coercitivity resin-bonded magnets and commercially produced electrical steels were studied experimentally. The studies were conducted on several samples of resin-bonded magnets with different manufacturing technologies and samples of electrical steel sheets of various thicknesses. The static and dynamic magnetic properties of the samples were measured on a vibration magnetometer and a specially designed apparatus, respectively. It was found that the studied samples of bonded magnets have a relatively high level of hysteresis losses associated with high coercivity, which reaches a value of 4-5 Oe. At the same time, the remagnetization losses due to the Foucault currents in the bonded magnets are considerably lower than in electrical steels. The measurement results show that bonded magnets at high frequencies of remagnetization, especially in high-rpm motors, can be competitive in comparison with electrical steels.

  9. A plan for the study of the costs and environmental impact of fusion compared with alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, W. R.; Monsler, M. J.

    1990-03-01

    Based on our work during this contract and our discussions with LLNL personnel at the presentation made to LLNL on Wednesday, February 14, we have defined the following set of tasks for a study on the total cost of fusion compared to alternative energy sources. The proposed study is not intended to be exhaustive or comprehensive. It will, however, help LLNL to develop a greater understanding, to quantify some comparisons between fusion power and alternative energy sources, and to communicate the benefits of fusion to Congress and other decision makers. We recommend that the study focus on energy use in the U.S., but conclusions relative to global factors should be included to the extent possible.

  10. Dynamic and biocompatible thermo-responsive magnetic hydrogels that respond to an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Federica; Moore, Thomas L.; Mortato, Mariangela; Geers, Christoph; Haeni, Laetitia; Hirt, Ann M.; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic thermo-responsive hydrogels are a new class of materials that have recently attracted interest in biomedicine due to their ability to change phase upon magnetic stimulation. They have been used for drug release, magnetic hyperthermia treatment, and can potentially be engineered as stimuli-responsive substrates for cell mechanobiology. In this regard, we propose a series of magnetic thermo-responsive nanocomposite substrates that undergo cyclical swelling and de-swelling phases when actuated by an alternating magnetic field in aqueous environment. The synthetized substrates are obtained with a facile and reproducible method from poly-N-isopropylacrylamide and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Their conformation and the temperature-related, magnetic, and biological behaviors were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, swelling ratio analysis, vibrating sample magnetometry, alternating magnetic field stimulation and indirect viability assays. The nanocomposites showed no cytotoxicity with fibroblast cells, and exhibited swelling/de-swelling behavior near physiological temperatures (around 34 °C). Therefore these magnetic thermo-responsive hydrogels are promising materials as stimuli-responsive substrates allowing the study of cell-behavior by changing the hydrogel properties in situ.

  11. Symposium: new trends in unconventional approaches to magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1983-04-05

    An extensive review of the meeting is given. The concepts discussed included reverse-field pinches, compact tori, advanced stellarators, multipoles, surface magnetic confinement systems, the bumpy torus, and a collection of mirror-based approaches. (MOW)

  12. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  13. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  14. Studies of Hydrodynamic Processes in Alternative Magneto-Inertial Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lina

    The main goal of the research is evaluation of the plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) concept via simulations. To achieve this goal, the development of mathematical models and numerical algorithms for PJMIF has been performed, and large-scale simulation studies have been conducted. In the PJMIF concept, a plasma liner, formed by the merger of a large number of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on a magnetized plasma target and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. 1- (spherically symmetric), 2- and 3-dimensional simulations of the implosion of plasma liners and compression of plasma targets have been performed using the FronTier code based on the method of front tracking. Scaling laws and related fusion theories have been investigated and their conclusions compared with our results. Compared to previous theoretical and numerical studies of PJMIF, our numerical models and algorithms implement several new physics models important to PJMIF. One of them is a numerical model for atomic physics processes. The influence of atomic physics processes on the plasma liners for magneto-inertial nuclear fusion has been studied based on equation of state models with dissociation and ionization. These atomic processes in imploding liners reduce the temperature and increase the Mach number of liners, result in higher stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain. Other factors influencing liner implosion are the residual vacuum gas and heat conduction. By replacing the idealized vacuum region with realistic residual gas and adding the Spitzer electronic thermal conductivity, we quantified their effects in the low-energy simulation regime. We have demonstrated that the internal structure of argon plasma liners, formed by the merger of plasma jets is strongly influenced by a cascade of oblique shock waves generated by colliding jets. Corresponding studies have been performed using 2- and 3-dimensional simulations. 10 times reduction of the

  15. Understanding plasma facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Koel, B. E.; Roszell, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The plasma-material interface is recognized to be the most critical challenge in the realization of fusion energy. Liquid metals offer a self-healing, renewable interface that bypasses present issues with solid, neutron-damaged materials such as tungsten. Lithium in particular has dramatically improved plasma performance in many tokamaks through a reduction of hydrogen recycling. However the detailed chemical composition and properties of the top few nm that interact with the plasma are often obscure. Surface analysis has proven to be a key tool in semiconductor processing and a new laboratory has been established at PPPL to apply surface science techniques to plasma facing materials. We have shown that lithiated PFC surfaces in tokamaks will likely be oxidized during the intershot interval. Present work is focused on deuterium uptake of solid and liquid metals for plasma density control and sub-micron scale wetting of liquid metals on their substrates. The long-term goal is to provide a material database for designing liquid metal plasma facing components for tokamaks such as National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and Fusion Nuclear Science Facility-ST (FNSF-ST). Support was provided through DOE-PPPL Contract Number is DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Low-energy nuclear fusion data and their relation to magnetic and laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jarmie, N.

    1980-04-01

    The accuracy of the basic fusion data for the T(d,n)/sup 4/He, /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He, T(t,2n)/sup 4/He, D(d,n)/sup 3/He, and D(d,p)T reactions was investigated in the 10- to 100-keV bombarding energy region, and the effects of inaccuracies on the design of fusion reactors were assessed. The data base for these reactions (particularly, the most critical T(d,n)/sup 4/He reaction) rests on 25-year-old experiments the accuracy (often assumed to be +- 5%) of which has rarely been questioned: yet, in all except the d + d reactions, there are significant differences among data sets. The errors in the basic data sets may be considerably larger than previously expected, and the effect on design calculations should be significant. Much of the trouble apparently lies in the accuracy of the energy measurements, which are difficult at low energies. Systematic errors of up to 50% are possible in the reactivity values of the present T(d,n)/sup 4/He data base. The errors in the reactivity will propagate proportionately into the errors in fusion probabilities in reactor calculations. /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He reaction cross sections could be in error by as much as 50% in the low-energy region. The D(d,n)/sup 3/He and D(d,p)T cross sections appear to be well known and consistent. The T(t,2n)/sup 4/He cross section is poorly known and may be subject to large systematic errors. Improved absolute measurements for all the reactions in the low bombarding energy region (10 to 100 keV) are needed, but until they are done, the data sets should be left as they are (except for T(t,2n)/sup 4/He data, which could be lowered by about 50%). The apparent uncertainties of these data sets should be kept in mind. 14 figures.

  17. Application of Magnetized Target Fusion to High-Energy Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Schmidt, G. R.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most fusion propulsion concepts that have been investigated in the past employ some form of inertial or magnetic confinement. Although the prospective performance of these concepts is excellent, the fusion processes on which these concepts are based still require considerable development before they can be seriously considered for actual applications. Furthermore, these processes are encumbered by the need for sophisticated plasma and power handling systems that are generally quite inefficient and have historically resulted in large, massive spacecraft designs. Here we present a comparatively new approach, Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), which offers a nearer-term avenue for realizing the tremendous performance benefits of fusion propulsion'. The key advantage of MTF is its less demanding requirements for driver energy and power processing. Additional features include: 1) very low system masses and volumes, 2) high gain and relatively low waste heat, 3) substantial utilization of energy from product neutrons, 4) efficient, low peak-power drivers based on existing pulsed power technology, and 5) very high Isp, specific power and thrust. MTF overcomes many of the problems associated with traditional fusion techniques, thus making it particularly attractive for space applications. Isp greater than 50,000 seconds and specific powers greater than 50 kilowatts/kilogram appear feasible using relatively near-term pulse power and plasma gun technology.

  18. Application of Magnetized Target Fusion to High-Energy Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Schmidt, G. R.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most fusion propulsion concepts that have been investigated in the past employ some form of inertial or magnetic confinement. Although the prospective performance of these concepts is excellent, the fusion processes on which these concepts are based still require considerable development before they can be seriously considered for actual applications. Furthermore, these processes are encumbered by the need for sophisticated plasma and power handling systems that are generally quite inefficient and have historically resulted in large, massive spacecraft designs. Here we present a comparatively new approach, Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), which offers a nearer-term avenue for realizing the tremendous performance benefits of fusion propulsion'. The key advantage of MTF is its less demanding requirements for driver energy and power processing. Additional features include: 1) very low system masses and volumes, 2) high gain and relatively low waste heat, 3) substantial utilization of energy from product neutrons, 4) efficient, low peak-power drivers based on existing pulsed power technology, and 5) very high Isp, specific power and thrust. MTF overcomes many of the problems associated with traditional fusion techniques, thus making it particularly attractive for space applications. Isp greater than 50,000 seconds and specific powers greater than 50 kilowatts/kilogram appear feasible using relatively near-term pulse power and plasma gun technology.

  19. Integrated simulation of magnetic-field-assist fast ignition laser fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sunahara, A.; Sentoku, Y.; Sakagami, H.; Hata, M.; Taguchi, T.; Mima, K.; Kai, Y.; Ajimi, D.; Isoda, T.; Endo, T.; Yogo, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.

    2017-01-01

    To enhance the core heating efficiency in fast ignition laser fusion, the concept of relativistic electron beam guiding by external magnetic fields was evaluated by integrated simulations for FIREX class targets. For the cone-attached shell target case, the core heating performance deteriorates by applying magnetic fields since the core is considerably deformed and most of the fast electrons are reflected due to the magnetic mirror formed through the implosion. On the other hand, in the case of a cone-attached solid ball target, the implosion is more stable under the kilo-tesla-class magnetic field. In addition, feasible magnetic field configuration is formed through the implosion. As a result, the core heating efficiency doubles by magnetic guiding. The dependence of core heating properties on the heating pulse shot timing was also investigated for the solid ball target.

  20. Heating of polyacrylamide ferrogel by alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronov, A. P.; Samatov, O. M.; Tyukova, I. S.; Mikhnevich, E. A.; Beketov, I. V.

    2016-10-01

    Ferrogel based on polacryamide network with embedded maghemite nanoparticles with mean number average particle diameter 12 nm was synthesized by radical polymerization in water-based ferrofluid. The network structure of ferrogel was characterized by Flory-Rehner theory and it was shown that the embedded particles were substantially larger than the mesh size. It prevented the translational movement of particles in the ferrogel. The immobilization of particles was confirmed by dynamic light scattering. The adhesion of macromolecular chains to the particles was determined by calorimetry using thermochemical cycle. The enthalpy of interfacial adhesion was found several orders of magnitude higher than the energy of dipoles in typically applied magnetic fields. Despite the differenve in the mobility of particles in ferrofluid and ferrogel the comparative study of their heating in alternating magnetic field, however, revealed their close similarity. In both cases it was goverened by superposing of Neel and Brownian relaxation mechanisms.

  1. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schissel, David P.; Abla, G.; Burruss, J. R.; Feibush, E.; Fredian, T. W.; Goode, M. M.; Greenwald, M. J.; Keahey, K.; Leggett, T.; Li, K.; McCune, D. C.; Papka, M. E.; Randerson, L.; Sanderson, A.; Stillerman, J.; Thompson, M. R.; Uram, T.; Wallace, G.

    2012-12-20

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES Grid (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  2. Magnetic field generation in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Dimonte, Guy; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-04-20

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the field generation by 2D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma. Self-generated magnetic fields are predicted and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇n(e)×∇T(e) term in the generalized Ohm's law. Scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, Atwood number, and perturbation wavelength.

  3. On the helical instability and efficient stagnation pressure production in thermonuclear magnetized inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion experiments produce thermonuclear neutrons from plasma compressed to high convergence via z-pinch. Fusion fuel contained within a cylindrical metal liner is premagnetized with an axial field and laser-preheated prior to the liner's implosion by the JxB force. Convergence greater than 40 is inferred from x-ray self-emission spectroscopy and backlit x-ray radiography. The unprecedented stability is enabled by helical modes induced in the magnetized liner, the cause of which will be discussed, because of the suppression of the ubiquitous m=0 modes of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability found in many z-pinch implosions. The plasma temperature and flux are compressed to several keV and 100 MG at stagnation, enough to magnetically trap alpha particles and provide ``bootstrap'' self-heating when scaled to larger fusion yields with DT fuel. We present quantitative comparison between experimental observables and 3D modeling in support of the interpretation that this approach to laboratory fusion can scale to larger thermonuclear yields. Namely, the implosions efficiently convert liner kinetic energy to stagnated fuel internal energy with the expected pressures of 1 Gbar and burn durations of 2 ns, in agreement with both 2D and 3D modeling. Therefore, the analysis indicates the magnetized hot-spot dynamics are not dominated by implosion instability or residual kinetic energy in our best-performing experiments, wherein laser-induced non-fuel mix into the forming hot spot is low.

  4. Autocatalytic Fusion-Fission Burn in the Focus of Two Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2003-11-01

    A configuration made up of two nested magnetically insulated transmission lines, the inner one carrying a high voltage lower current - and the outer one a high current lower voltage - pulse, was in a previous communication proposed for the ignition of a magnetic field assisted thermonuclear detonation wave. Unlike the fast ignition concept, it does not require the compression of the DT fusion fuel to densities in excess of the solid state. Here I show that with the same configuration, but by surrounding the DT fusion fuel with a blanket of solid U238, Th232 or B10, the ignition of a thermonuclear detonation wave is possible with densities of the DT fuel less than solid state densities, because the DT fusion neutrons can make a sufficient number of fission reactions, greatly increasing the pressure in the blanket, compressing the DT to high densities, launching a magnetic field assisted thermonuclear detonation wave. This autocatalytic fusion-fission burn has the further advantage that it can burn natural uranium, thorium and even boron.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Review of Technology, Techniques, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kongnyuy, Michael; George, Arvin K; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Pinto, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided (12-14 core) systematic biopsy of the prostate is the recommended standard for patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). Advances in imaging have led to the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of PCa with subsequent development of software-based co-registration allowing for the integration of MRI with real-time TRUS during prostate biopsy. A number of fusion-guided methods and platforms are now commercially available with common elements in image and analysis and planning. Implementation of fusion-guided prostate biopsy has now been proven to improve the detection of clinically significant PCa in appropriately selected patients.

  6. Magnet and conductor developments for the Mirror Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, D.N.

    1981-10-09

    The conductor development and the magnet design and construction for the MFTF are described. Future plans for the Mirror Program and their influence on the associated superconductor development program are discussed. Included is a summary of the progress being made to develop large, high-field, multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductors and the feasibility of building a 12-T yin-yang set of coils for the machine to follow MFTF. In a further look into the future, possible magnetic configurations and requirements for mirror reactors are surveyed.

  7. Recent Advances of RF Systems for Magnetic Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinot, J.; Beaumont, B.; Hoang, G. T.; Kobayashi, N.

    2007-09-01

    The physics and technology advances in ECRF, ICRF and LHCD systems for the next steps in fusion research are reviewed. The areas where further progress is necessary are identified and discussed. Although many difficulties in technology and physics understanding have been solved, all systems proposed for ITER require specific R&D and no single system can accomplish all the tasks required for its mission. This is particularly true for long pulse operation which is challenging due to demanding plasma β requirements and off-axis current drive efficiency. Such a regime requires several efficient plasma actuators working at the same time to provide central heating (preferably ions), local instability stabilisation and off-axis current drive. Valuable experience is available from presently operating facilities and will be considerably strengthened by several new super conducting devices becoming on line.

  8. Mirror fusion test facility magnet system. Final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Hodges, A.J.; VanSant, J.H.; Dalder, E.N.; Hinkle, R.E.; Horvath, J.A.; Scanlan, R.M.; Shimer, D.W.; Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.

    1980-09-03

    Information is given on each of the following topics: (1) magnet description, (2) superconducting manufacture, (3) mechanical behavior of conductor winding, (4) coil winding, (5) thermal analysis, (6) cryogenic system, (7) power supply system, (8) structural analysis, (9) structural finite element analysis refinement, (10) structural case fault analysis, and (11) structural metallurgy. (MOW)

  9. Development of superconductors for applications in high-field, high-current-density magnets for fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, L.T.; Miller, J.R.

    1986-09-26

    The development of large-bore, high-field magnets for fusion energy applications requires a system approach to both magnet and conductor design. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the criteria used to choose superconductors include: strain tolerance, radiation tolerance, heat removal, stability, fabricability, and cost. We report on the performance of industrially produced, prototype, Ti-modified Nb/sub 3/Sn wires developed with LLNL support. Wire performance characteristics evaluated include critical current as a function of magnetic field, temperature, and applied strain. Tests were performed to determine how this performance translates to the performance of a cable-in-conduit conductor system using this wire. An alternative to Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductors is NbN, which is strain and radiation insensitive. We report preliminary efforts to produce multifilamentary NbN conductors by liquid-metal infiltration of NbN-coated, high-strength fibers. In addition, we discuss the fabrication of multifilamentary NbN conductors and their possible impact on magnet design.

  10. Practical methods for generating alternating magnetic fields for biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Michael G.; Howe, Christina M.; Bono, David C.; Perreault, David J.; Anikeeva, Polina

    2017-08-01

    Alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) cause magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to dissipate heat while leaving surrounding tissue unharmed, a mechanism that serves as the basis for a variety of emerging biomedical technologies. Unfortunately, the challenges and costs of developing experimental setups commonly used to produce AMFs with suitable field amplitudes and frequencies present a barrier to researchers. This paper first presents a simple, cost-effective, and robust alternative for small AMF working volumes that uses soft ferromagnetic cores to focus the flux into a gap. As the experimental length scale increases to accommodate animal models (working volumes of 100s of cm3 or greater), poor thermal conductivity and volumetrically scaled core losses render that strategy ineffective. Comparatively feasible strategies for these larger volumes instead use low loss resonant tank circuits to generate circulating currents of 1 kA or greater in order to produce the comparable field amplitudes. These principles can be extended to the problem of identifying practical routes for scaling AMF setups to humans, an infrequently acknowledged challenge that influences the extent to which many applications of MNPs may ever become clinically relevant.

  11. Thin film metallic sensors in an alternating magnetic field for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Z. A.; Boekelheide, Z.

    In magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia in an alternating magnetic field for cancer therapy, it is important to monitor the temperature in situ. This can be done optically or electrically, but electronic measurements can be problematic because conducting parts heat up in a changing magnetic field. Microfabricated thin film sensors may be advantageous because eddy current heating is a function of size, and are promising for further miniaturization of sensors and fabrication of arrays of sensors. Thin films could also be used for in situ magnetic field sensors or for strain sensors. For a proof of concept, we fabricated a metallic thin film resistive thermometer by photolithographically patterning a 500Å Au/100Å Cr thin film on a glass substrate. Measurements were taken in a solenoidal coil supplying 0.04 T (rms) at 235 kHz with the sensor parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the parallel orientation, the resistive thermometer mirrored the background heating from the coil, while in the perpendicular orientation self-heating was observed due to eddy current heating of the conducting elements by Faraday's law. This suggests that metallic thin film sensors can be used in an alternating magnetic field, parallel to the field, with no significant self-heating.

  12. A superconducting quadrupole magnet array for a heavy ion fusion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Bangerter, r.; Chow, K.; Faltens, A.; Gourley, S.; Hinkins, R.; Gupta, R.; Lee, E.; McInturff, A.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.; Wolgast, D.

    2000-06-27

    A multi-channel quadrupole array has been proposed to increase beam intensity and reduce space charge effects in a Heavy Ion Fusion Driver. A single array unit composed of several quadrupole magnets, each with its own beam line, will be placed within a ferromagnetic accelerating core whose cost is directly affected by the array size. A large number of focusing arrays will be needed along the accelerating path. The use of a superconducting quadrupole magnet array will increase the field and reduce overall cost. We report here on the design of a compact 3 x 3 superconducting quadrupole magnet array. The overall array diameter and length including the cryostat is 900 x 700 mm. Each of the 9 quadrupole magnets has a 78 mm warm bore and an operating gradient of 50 T/m over an effective magnetic length of 320 mm.

  13. Preliminary magnet design for a stellarator fusion reactor. [UWTOR-M reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.; Derr, J.; Shalil, A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1981-09-01

    Conceptual design of the superconducting magnets for a stellarator fusion power reactor UWTOR-M are presented. The emphasis in the magnet design is toward modularity and maintainability by approximating the continuous helical coil geometry with a number of discrete windings. Magnetic field requirements are reasonable (B/sub max/ approximately 10 T) allowing for modest extrapolations of present technology. The unique features of the design are: (1) use of NbTiTa with superfluid helium cooling to achieve high current density cryo-stability; (2) a monolithic conductor, made possible by the lack of pulsed magnetic fields; and (3) an innovative construction technique required by nonaxisymmetric geometry of the magnets. 8 refs.

  14. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  15. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 200/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200/sup 0/C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented.

  16. Technical assessment of critical Plasma-Materials Interaction (PMI) and High Heat Flux (HHF) issues for alternative fusion concepts (AFCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.N.

    1986-03-01

    A number of approaches to fusion energy are being pursued as alternative fusion concepts (AFCs). The goal of these systems is to provide a more desirable method of producing fusion energy than the mainline programs. Some of the AFCs have both a Low Power Density (LPD) option and a High Power Density (HPD) option. A summary of representative AFC programs and their associated PMI and HHF issues is followed by the technical assessment of the critical issues. These requirements are discussed relative to the mainline and/or HPD components. The HPD options are contrasted with a tabulation of the characteristics of components for the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), which is representative of the HPD concept.

  17. A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

    2006-08-01

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create

  18. Osteogenic potential of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) as an alternative to rhBMP-2 in a mouse spinal fusion model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Ju; Arai, Yoshie; Park, Eun-Mi; Park, Sunghyun; Bello, Alvin Bacero; Han, In-Bo; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2017-08-21

    The non-union rate following lumbar spinal fusion is potentially as high as 48%. To support efficient bone regeneration, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is commonly used as it is regarded as the most potent bone inducing molecule. However recently, there have been increasing concerns on the use of rhMBMP-2 such as serious complications including seroma and heterotopic ossification and the low quality of bone at the center of fusion mass. Thus, many studies were conducted to find and to develop a potential alternative to rhBMP-2. In this study, we investigated the osteogenic potential of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) in mouse fusion model and compared its effects with rhBMP-2. Twenty-four mice underwent bilateral posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion bone formation at L4-L5. Collagen sponge infused with either saline, TUDCA, or rhBMP-2 were implanted at the fusion area. Two (2) and four (4) weeks post-implantation, bone formation and tissue regeneration were evaluated via micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. Compared to TUDCA treated group, the rhBMP-2 treatment produced higher amount of bone fusion formation after 2 weeks but also showed higher resorption of the centralized bone after 4 weeks. Interestingly, TUDCA treated group developed higher trabecular thickness compared to rhBMP-2 after 4 weeks. Moreover, TUDCA treatment showed distinct angiogenic activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as confirmed by in vitro tube formation assay. Our findings suggest that TUDCA is comparable to rhBMP-2 in supporting bone regeneration and spinal bone formationfusion by increasing trabecular thickness and promoting angiogenesis. Finally, our results indicate that TUDCA can be utilized as a potential alternative to rhBMP-2.

  19. Dust dynamics and diagnostic applications in quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catalin M.; Si, Jiahe; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Gianni; Wurden, Glen

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about dust dynamics in highly ionized quasi-neutral plasmas with ca. 1.0 e+20 per cubic meter density and ion temperature at a few eV and above, including in magnetic fusion. For example, dust motion in fusion, better known as UFO's, has been observed since 1980's but not explained. Solid understanding of dust dynamics is also important to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) because of concerns about safety and dust contamination of fusion core. Compared with well studied strongly-coupled dusty plasma regime, new physics may arise in the higher density quasi-neutral plasma regime because of at least four orders of magnitude higher density and two orders of magnitude hotter ion temperature. Our recent laboratory experiments showed that plasma-flow drag force dominates over other forces in a quasi-neutral flowing plasma. In contrast, delicate balance among different forces in dusty plasma has led to many unique phenomena, in particular, the formation of dust crystal. Based on our experiments, we argue that 1) dust crystal will not form in the highly ionized plasmas with flows; 2) the UFO's are moving dust dragged by plasma flows; 3) dust can be used to measure plasma flow. Two diagnostic applications using dust for laboratory quasi-neutral plasmas and magnetic fusion will also be presented.

  20. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  1. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    L. Grisham and J.W. Kwan

    2008-08-12

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1] could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  2. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy,and Related Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Kwan, J. W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons - can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion - ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  3. Stark broadening of hydrogen lines in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a Stark line shape model for the diagnostic of tokamak edge plasmas. In specific scenarios, plasma discharges are carried out at high density regimes, sufficiently so that the spectral lines emitted by the neutral atoms present in the edge and in the divertor region are affected by the plasma microscopic electric field (Stark broadening). We present new line shape calculations, carried out for diagnostic purposes in the context of the MST1 (Medium Sized Tokamak) European campaign. The role of the magnetic field (Zeeman effect) on line spectra is discussed.

  4. Intense ion beam applications to magnetic confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R N

    1980-08-18

    The ion ring project objective is to trap a ring of high energy, axis-encircling ions in a magnetic mirror. The number of ring ions should be such as to produce deltaB/B on the ring axis of order 10%. The second experiment, LONGSHOT, is directed to producing a long pulse ion beam source so that the total number of protons required for an ion ring can be provided a lower diode power and, hence, at much less cost than that of 100 nsec pulsed power generators like the NRL GAMBLE II. A detailed report of the progress on IREX and LONGSHOT is given. (MOW)

  5. Development of a hybrid kinetic-fluid model for line radiation transport in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Reiter, D.; Stamm, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a transport model for the Lyman line radiation in optically thick divertor plasma conditions encountered in exhaust systems in magnetic fusion devices. The model is designed to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions and to the spectral range. A kinetic treatment is retained for photons with a large mean free path (line wings), whereas a continuum description of the radiation field is invoked in highly absorbing or scattering regions (core photons). Prototypical calculations of this so-called δf Monte Carlo type of the Lyman α photo-excitation rate in slab geometry are performed as an illustration. The hybrid method is suggested as a candidate for speeding up the kinetic transport codes currently involved in magnetic fusion research for ITER and DEMO divertor (power and particle exhaust system) design.

  6. Rheological behavior and cryogenic properties of cyanate ester/epoxy insulation material for fusion superconducting magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Li, L. F.; Li, J. W.; Tan, R.; Tu, Y. P.

    2014-01-27

    In a Tokamak fusion reactor device like ITER, insulation materials for superconducting magnets are usually fabricated by a vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) process. Thus these insulation materials must exhibit low viscosity, long working life as well as good radiation resistance. Previous studies have indicated that cyanate ester (CE) blended with epoxy has an excellent resistance against neutron irradiation which is expected to be a candidate insulation material for a fusion magnet. In this work, the rheological behavior of a CE/epoxy (CE/EP) blend containing 40% CE was investigated with non-isothermal and isothermal viscosity experiments. Furthermore, the cryogenic mechanical and electrical properties of the composite were evaluated in terms of interlaminar shear strength and electrical breakdown strength. The results showed that CE/epoxy blend had a very low viscosity and an exceptionally long processing life of about 4 days at 60 °C.

  7. Analyzing large data sets from XGC1 magnetic fusion simulations using apache spark

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, R. Michael

    2016-11-21

    Apache Spark is explored as a tool for analyzing large data sets from the magnetic fusion simulation code XGCI. Implementation details of Apache Spark on the NERSC Edison supercomputer are discussed, including binary file reading, and parameter setup. Here, an unsupervised machine learning algorithm, k-means clustering, is applied to XGCI particle distribution function data, showing that highly turbulent spatial regions do not have common coherent structures, but rather broad, ring-like structures in velocity space.

  8. Improved Guided Image Fusion for Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Improved guided image fusion for magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging is proposed. Existing guided filtering scheme uses Gaussian filter and two-level weight maps due to which the scheme has limited performance for images having noise. Different modifications in filter (based on linear minimum mean square error estimator) and weight maps (with different levels) are proposed to overcome these limitations. Simulation results based on visual and quantitative analysis show the significance of proposed scheme. PMID:24695586

  9. High field superconducting magnets (12 T and greater) for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1986-07-09

    The technology for producing high fields in large superconducting magnets has increased greatly in recent years, but must increase still more in the future. In this paper, we examine the present state of the art vis-a-vis the needs of a next-generation fusion machine and outline a program to provide for those needs. We also highlight recent developments that suggest the program goals are within reach.

  10. Deuterium uptake in magnetic-fusion devices with lithium-conditioned carbon walls.

    PubMed

    Krstic, P S; Allain, J P; Taylor, C N; Dadras, J; Maeda, S; Morokuma, K; Jakowski, J; Allouche, A; Skinner, C H

    2013-03-08

    Lithium wall conditioning has lowered hydrogenic recycling and dramatically improved plasma performance in many magnetic-fusion devices. In this Letter, we report quantum-classical atomistic simulations and laboratory experiments that elucidate the roles of lithium and oxygen in the uptake of hydrogen in amorphous carbon. Surprisingly, we show that lithium creates a high oxygen concentration on a carbon surface when bombarded by deuterium. Furthermore, surface oxygen, rather than lithium, plays the key role in trapping hydrogen.

  11. Soldered joints—an essential component of demountable high temperature superconducting fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Yeekin; Surrey, Elizabeth; Hampshire, Damian

    2016-07-01

    Demountable superconducting magnet coils would offer significant benefits to commercial nuclear fusion power plants. Whether large pressed joints or large soldered joints provide the solution for demountable fusion magnets, a critical component or building block for both will be the many, smaller-scale joints that enable the supercurrent to leave the superconducting layer, cross the superconducting tape and pass into the solder that lies between the tape and the conductor that eventually provides one of the demountable surfaces. This paper considers the electrical and thermal properties of this essential component part of demountable high temperature superconducting (HTS) joints by considering the fabrication and properties of jointed HTSs consisting of a thin layer of solder (In52Sn48 or Pb38Sn62) sandwiched between two rare-earth-Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO) second generation HTS coated conductors (CCs). The HTS joints are analysed using numerical modelling, critical current and resistivity measurements on the joints from 300 to 4.2 K in applied magnetic fields up to 12 T, as well as scanning electron microscopy studies. Our results show that the copper/silver layers significantly reduce the heating in the joints to less than a few hundred mK. When the REBCO alone is superconducting, the joint resistivity (R J) predominantly has two sources, the solder layer and an interfacial resistivity at the REBCO/silver interface (∼25 nΩ cm2) in the as-supplied CCs which together have a very weak magnetoresistance in fields up to 12 T. We achieved excellent reproducibility in the R J of the In52Sn48 soldered joints of better than 10% at temperatures below T c of the REBCO layer which can be compared to variations of more than two orders of magnitude in the literature. We also show that demountable joints in fusion energy magnets are viable and need only add a few percent to the total cryogenic cost for a fusion tokamak.

  12. Highly charged ions in magnetic fusion plasmas: research opportunities and diagnostic necessities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    2015-07-01

    Highly charged ions play a crucial role in magnetic fusion plasmas. These plasmas are excellent sources for producing highly charged ions and copious amounts of radiation for studying their atomic properties. These studies include calibration of density diagnostics, x-ray production by charge exchange, line identifications and accurate wavelength measurements, and benchmark data for ionization balance calculations. Studies of magnetic fusion plasmas also consume a large amount of atomic data, especially in order to develop new spectral diagnostics. Examples we give are the need for highly accurate wavelengths as references for measurements of bulk plasma motion, the need for accurate line excitation rates that encompass both electron-impact excitation and indirect line formation processes, for accurate position and resonance strength information of dielectronic recombination satellite lines that may broaden or shift diagnostic lines or that may provide electron temperature information, and the need for accurate ionization balance calculations. We show that the highly charged ions of several elements are of special current interest to magnetic fusion, notably highly charged ions of argon, iron, krypton, xenon, and foremost of tungsten. The electron temperatures thought to be achievable in the near future may produce W70+ ions and possibly ions with even higher charge states. This means that all but a few of the most highly charged ions are of potential interest as plasma diagnostics or are available for basic research.

  13. Design and testing of the magnetic quadrupole for the Heavy Ion Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Benjegerdes, R.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Stuart, M.

    1995-04-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Program at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is conducting experiments in the transport and acceleration of ``driverlike`` beams. The single beam coming from the four-to-one beam combiner will be transported in a lattice of pulsed magnetic quadrupoles. The present beam transport consists of high field, short aspect ratio magnetic quadrupoles to maximize the transportable current. This design could also be converted to be superconducting for future uses in a driver. The pulsed quadrupole will develop a maximum field of two Tesla and will be housed within the induction accelerator cells at the appropriate lattice period. Hardware implementation of the physics requirements and full parameter testing is described.

  14. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-27

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ~34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  15. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-15

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ∼34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  16. ELF alternating magnetic field decreases reproduction by DNA damage induction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Karabarbounis, Andreas; Lioliousis, Constantinos

    2013-11-01

    In the present experiments, the effect of 50-Hz alternating magnetic field on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction was studied. Newly eclosed insects were separated into identical groups of ten males and ten females and exposed to three different intensities of the ELF magnetic field (1, 11, and 21 G) continuously during the first 5 days of their adult lives. The reproductive capacity was assessed by the number of F1 pupae according to a well-defined protocol of ours. The magnetic field was found to decrease reproduction by up to 4.3%. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The decline in reproductive capacity was found to be due to severe DNA damage (DNA fragmentation) and consequent cell death induction in the reproductive cells as determined by the TUNEL assay applied during early and mid-oogenesis (from germarium to stage 10) where physiological apoptosis does not occur. The increase in DNA damage was more significant than the corresponding decrease in reproductive capacity (up to ~7.5%). The TUNEL-positive signal denoting DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages of oogenesis: the early and mid-oogenesis checkpoints (i.e. region 2a/2b of the germarium and stages 7-8 just before the onset of vitellogenesis)-in contrast to exposure to microwave radiation of earlier work of ours in which the DNA fragmentation was induced at all developmental stages of early and mid-oogenesis. Moreover, the TUNEL-positive signal was observed in all three types of egg chamber cells, mainly in the nurse and follicle cells and also in the oocyte, in agreement with the microwave exposure of our earlier works. According to previous reports, cell death induction in the oocyte was observed only in the case of microwave exposure and not after exposure to other stress factors as toxic chemicals or food deprivation. Now it is also observed for the first time after ELF magnetic field exposure. Finally, in contrast to microwave

  17. Rbfox2-coordinated alternative splicing of Mef2d and Rock2 controls myoblast fusion during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Christopher S.; Kalsotra, Auinash; Scavuzzo, Marissa A.; Curk, Tomaz; Ule, Jernej; Li, Wei; Cooper, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Alternative splicing plays important regulatory roles during periods of physiological change. During development a large number of genes coordinately express protein isoform transitions regulated by alternative splicing, however, the mechanisms that coordinate splicing and the functional integration of the resultant tissue-specific protein isoforms are typically unknown. Here we show that the conserved Rbfox2 RNA binding protein regulates 30% of the splicing transitions observed during myogenesis and is required for the specific step of myoblast fusion. Integration of Rbfox2-dependent splicing outcomes from RNA-seq with Rbfox2 iCLIP data identified Mef2d and Rock2 as Rbfox2 splicing targets. Restored activities of Mef2d and Rock2 rescued myoblast fusion in Rbfox2 depleted cultures demonstrating functional cooperation of protein isoforms generated by coordinated alterative splicing. The results demonstrate that coordinated alternative splicing by a single RNA binding protein modulates transcription (Mef2d) and cell signaling (Rock2) programs to drive tissue-specific functions (cell fusion) to promote a developmental transition. PMID:25087874

  18. Alternative explanation for intermediate--wavelength magnetic anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Shure, L.; Parker, R.L.

    1981-12-10

    Harrison and Carle and others have examined very long profiles of the magnetic field and have calculated one-dimensional power spectra. In these they expect to see, but do not find, a minimum in power at intermediate wavelengths, between 65 and 150 km. Conventional one-dimensional models of the field predict very little power in this band, which lies between the spectral peaks arising from sources in the crust and the core. Mantle sources or high-intensity, long-wavelength magnetizations have been proposed to account for the observations. An alternative, more plausible explanation is that one-dimensional spectra of two-dimensional fields contain contributions from wavenumbers in the perpendicular (i.e., nonsampled) direction. Unless the seafloor spreading anomalies are perfectly lineated at right angles to the profile, some low-wavenumber energy must be attributed to this effect; we propose that such directional aliasing is a major factor in the power spectra. To support this idea we discuss theoretical models and analyze a large-scale marine survey.

  19. Current-carrying element based on second-generation high-temperature superconductor for the magnet system of a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, M. S. Ivanov, D. P. E-mail: denis.ivanov30@mail.ru; Novikov, S. I. Shuvaev, S. A. E-mail: sergey.shuvaev@phystech.edu

    2015-12-15

    Application of current-carrying elements (CCEs) made of second-generation high-temperature superconductor (2G HTS) in magnet systems of a fusion neutron source (FNS) and other fusion devices will allow their magnetic field and thermodynamic stability to be increased substantially in comparison with those of low-temperature superconductor (LTS) magnets. For a toroidal magnet of the FNS, a design of a helical (partially transposed) CCE made of 2G HTS is under development with forced-flow cooling by helium gas, a current of 20–30 kA, an operating temperature of 10–20 K, and a magnetic field on the winding of 12–15 T (prospectively ∼20 T). Short-sized samples of the helical flexible heavy-current CCE are being fabricated and investigated; a pilot-line unit for production of long-sized CCE pieces is under construction. The applied fabrication technique allows the CCE to be produced which combines a high operating current, thermal and mechanical stability, manufacturability, and low losses in the alternating modes. The possibility of fabricating the CCE with the outer dimensions and values of the operating parameter required for the FNS (and with a significant margin) using already available serial 2G HTS tapes is substantiated. The maximum field of toroidal magnets with CCEs made of 2G HTS will be limited only by mechanical properties of the magnet’s casing and structure, while the thermal stability will be approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of toroidal magnets with LTS-based CCEs. The helical CCE made of 2G HTS is very promising for fusion and hybrid electric power plants, and its design and technologies of production, as well as the prototype coils made of it for the FNS and other tokamaks, are worth developing now.

  20. An Alternative Method for Identifying Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-Gonzalez, A.; Mendes, O.; Calzadilla, A.; Domingues, M. O.; Prestes, A.; Klausner, V.

    2017-03-01

    Spatio-temporal entropy (STE) analysis is used as an alternative mathematical tool to identify possible magnetic cloud (MC) candidates. We analyze Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) data using a time interval of only 10 days. We select a convenient data interval of 2500 records moving forward by 200 record steps until the end of the time series. For every data segment, the STE is calculated at each step. During an MC event, the STE reaches values close to zero. This extremely low value of STE is due to MC structure features. However, not all of the magnetic components in MCs have STE values close to zero at the same time. For this reason, we create a standardization index (the so-called Interplanetary Entropy, IE, index). This index is a worthwhile effort to develop new tools to help diagnose ICME structures. The IE was calculated using a time window of one year (1999), and it has a success rate of 70% over other identifiers of MCs. The unsuccessful cases (30%) are caused by small and weak MCs. The results show that the IE methodology identified 9 of 13 MCs, and emitted nine false alarm cases. In 1999, a total of 788 windows of 2500 values existed, meaning that the percentage of false alarms was 1.14%, which can be considered a good result. In addition, four time windows, each of 10 days, are studied, where the IE method was effective in finding MC candidates. As a novel result, two new MCs are identified in these time windows.

  1. Electronic measurements in an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for studying magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Z.; Hussein, Z. A.; Hartzell, S.

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a promising cancer treatment in which magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a tumor and then exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). This process releases heat and damages tumor cells, but the exact mechanisms behind the effectiveness of this therapy are still unclear. Accurate sensors are required to monitor the temperature and, potentially, other parameters such as magnetic field or mechanical stress during clinical therapy or lab research. Often, optical rather than electronic temperature sensors are used to avoid eddy current self-heating in conducting parts in the AMF. However, eddy current heating is strongly dependent on the size and geometry of the conducting part, thus micro- and nano-scale electronics are a promising possibility for further exploration into magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. This presentation quantitatively discusses the eddy current self-heating of thin wires (thermocouples) and will also present a proof of concept thin film resistive thermometer and magnetic field sensor along with measurements of their eddy current self-heating. The results show that electronic measurements are feasible in an AMF with both thin wires and patterned thin film sensors under certain conditions.

  2. Imaging Single Retrovirus Entry through Alternative Receptor Isoforms and Intermediates of Virus-Endosome Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Naveen K.; Latinovic, Olga; Martin, Erik; Novitskiy, Gennadiy; Marin, Mariana; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Naughton, John; Young, John A. T.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    A large group of viruses rely on low pH to activate their fusion proteins that merge the viral envelope with an endosomal membrane, releasing the viral nucleocapsid. A critical barrier to understanding these events has been the lack of approaches to study virus-cell membrane fusion within acidic endosomes, the natural sites of virus nucleocapsid capsid entry into the cytosol. Here we have investigated these events using the highly tractable subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoprotein (EnvA)-TVA receptor system. Through labeling EnvA pseudotyped viruses with a pH-sensitive fluorescent marker, we imaged their entry into mildly acidic compartments. We found that cells expressing the transmembrane receptor (TVA950) internalized the virus much faster than those expressing the GPI-anchored receptor isoform (TVA800). Surprisingly, TVA800 did not accelerate virus uptake compared to cells lacking the receptor. Subsequent steps of virus entry were visualized by incorporating a small viral content marker that was released into the cytosol as a result of fusion. EnvA-dependent fusion with TVA800-expressing cells occurred shortly after endocytosis and delivery into acidic endosomes, whereas fusion of viruses internalized through TVA950 was delayed. In the latter case, a relatively stable hemifusion-like intermediate preceded the fusion pore opening. The apparent size and stability of nascent fusion pores depended on the TVA isoforms and their expression levels, with TVA950 supporting more robust pores and a higher efficiency of infection compared to TVA800. These results demonstrate that surface receptor density and the intracellular trafficking pathway used are important determinants of efficient EnvA-mediated membrane fusion, and suggest that early fusion intermediates play a critical role in establishing low pH-dependent virus entry from within acidic endosomes. PMID:21283788

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles with High Specific Absorption Rate at Low Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Kekalo, K.; Baker, I.; Meyers, R.; Shyong, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a new type of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) for use in the hyperthermia treatment of tumors. These particles consist of 2–4 nm crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 gathered in 20–40 nm aggregates with a coating of carboxymethyl-dextran, producing a zetasize of 110–120 nm. Despite their very low saturation magnetization (1.5–6.5 emu/g), the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the nanoparticles is 22–200 W/g at applied alternating magnetic field (AMF) with strengths of 100–500 Oe at a frequency of 160 kHz. PMID:26884816

  4. Summary of the report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Holdren, J.P.; Berwald, D.H.; Budnitz, R.J.; Crocker, J.G.; Delene, J.G.; Endicott, R.D.; Kazimi, M.S.; Krakowski, R.A.; Logan, B.G.; Schultz, K.R.

    1987-09-10

    The Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM) has assessed magnetic fusion energy's prospects for providing energy with economic, environmental, and safety characteristics that would be attractive compared with other energy sources (mainly fission) available in the year 2015 and beyond. ESECOM gives particular attention to the interaction of environmental, safety, and economic characteristics of a variety of magnetic fusion reactors, and compares them with a variety of fission cases. Eight fusion cases, two fusion-fission hybrid cases, and four fission cases are examined, using consistent economic and safety models. These models permit exploration of the environmental, safety, and economic potential of fusion concepts using a wide range of possible materials choices, power densities, power conversion schemes, and fuel cycles. The ESECOM analysis indicates that magnetic fusion energy systems have the potential to achieve costs-of-electricity comparable to those of present and future fission systems, coupled with significant safety and environmental advantages. 75 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Design of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for controlled release of doxorubicin under an alternative magnetic field in athermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffete, N.; Fresnais, J.; Espinosa, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Bée, A.; Ménager, C.

    2015-11-01

    An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium.An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06133d

  6. The Progress of Research Project for Magnetized Target Fusion in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xian-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of magnetized plasma called Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a hot research area recently. It may significantly reduce the cost and size. Great progress has been achieved in past decades around the world. Five years ago, China initiated the MTF project and has gotten some progress as follows: 1. Verifying the feasibility of ignition of MTF by means of first principle and MHD simulation; 2. Generating the magnetic field over 1400 Tesla, which can be suppress the heat conduction from charged particles, deposit the energy of alpha particle to promote the ignition process, and produce the stable magnetized plasma for the target of ignition; 3. The imploding facility of FP-1 can put several Mega Joule energy to the solid liner of about ten gram in the range of microsecond risen time, while the simulating tool has been developed for design and analysis of the process; 4. The target of FRC can be generated by ``YG 1 facility'' while some simulating tools have be developed. Next five years, the above theoretical work and the experiments of MTF may be integrated to step up as the National project, which may make my term play an important lead role and be supposed to achieve farther progress in China. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11175028.

  7. Assessing the Performance of Sensor Fusion Methods: Application to Magnetic-Inertial-Based Human Body Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Pasciuto, Ilaria; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2016-01-01

    Information from complementary and redundant sensors are often combined within sensor fusion algorithms to obtain a single accurate observation of the system at hand. However, measurements from each sensor are characterized by uncertainties. When multiple data are fused, it is often unclear how all these uncertainties interact and influence the overall performance of the sensor fusion algorithm. To address this issue, a benchmarking procedure is presented, where simulated and real data are combined in different scenarios in order to quantify how each sensor’s uncertainties influence the accuracy of the final result. The proposed procedure was applied to the estimation of the pelvis orientation using a waist-worn magnetic-inertial measurement unit. Ground-truth data were obtained from a stereophotogrammetric system and used to obtain simulated data. Two Kalman-based sensor fusion algorithms were submitted to the proposed benchmarking procedure. For the considered application, gyroscope uncertainties proved to be the main error source in orientation estimation accuracy for both tested algorithms. Moreover, although different performances were obtained using simulated data, these differences became negligible when real data were considered. The outcome of this evaluation may be useful both to improve the design of new sensor fusion methods and to drive the algorithm tuning process. PMID:26821027

  8. Assessing the Performance of Sensor Fusion Methods: Application to Magnetic-Inertial-Based Human Body Tracking.

    PubMed

    Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Pasciuto, Ilaria; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2016-01-26

    Information from complementary and redundant sensors are often combined within sensor fusion algorithms to obtain a single accurate observation of the system at hand. However, measurements from each sensor are characterized by uncertainties. When multiple data are fused, it is often unclear how all these uncertainties interact and influence the overall performance of the sensor fusion algorithm. To address this issue, a benchmarking procedure is presented, where simulated and real data are combined in different scenarios in order to quantify how each sensor's uncertainties influence the accuracy of the final result. The proposed procedure was applied to the estimation of the pelvis orientation using a waist-worn magnetic-inertial measurement unit. Ground-truth data were obtained from a stereophotogrammetric system and used to obtain simulated data. Two Kalman-based sensor fusion algorithms were submitted to the proposed benchmarking procedure. For the considered application, gyroscope uncertainties proved to be the main error source in orientation estimation accuracy for both tested algorithms. Moreover, although different performances were obtained using simulated data, these differences became negligible when real data were considered. The outcome of this evaluation may be useful both to improve the design of new sensor fusion methods and to drive the algorithm tuning process.

  9. Sensory data fusion of pressure mattress and wireless inertial magnetic measurement units.

    PubMed

    Rihar, Andraž; Mihelj, Matjaž; Kolar, Janko; Pašič, Jure; Munih, Marko

    2015-02-01

    Head movement of infants is an important parameter for analysing infant motor patterns. Despite its importance, this field has received little sensory-based research in the past years. Therefore, we present a sensory-supported data fusion model for head movement analysis of infants in supine position. The sensory system comprises a pressure mattress and two wireless inertial magnetic measurement units, rendering precise, objective and non-intrusive information on pressure distribution and 3D trunk orientation, respectively. Algorithms first perform pressure data pre-processing and calculate image moments to acquire 2D trunk orientation. Afterwards, unscented Kalman filter is used for sensory data fusion. After additional data processing, head and trunk coordinates are calculated along with head displacement distance. The sensory system was tested on experimental measurements, performed in eight normally developing infants aged from 1 to 5 months. Results of several algorithm combinations were compared to referential video recordings in terms of head lifts. Combination of algorithms, incorporating head tracking and sensory data fusion provides completely accurate results in comparison to normative data. Statistical data analysis and referential optoelectronic measurements were performed to evaluate accuracy of the sensory fusion model. Suitability of the proposed sensory system for head movement analysis of infants in supine position was verified.

  10. Integrated Design For Magnetically-Driven Liner Inertial Fusion of Preheated and Magnetized Fuel on the Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Vesey, R. A.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetically-driven implosions of metal liners containing magnetized and preheated fuel may enable significant ICF yields to be obtained on pulsed-power accelerators. Simulations of dense (ρ = 1-5 mg/cc), axially-magnetized (Bz = 3-30 T), and preheated (Ti = 200-500 eV) DT fuel, driven by a pulsed-power accelerator similar to the Z machine (Imax = 25-60 MA in 100-300 ns), indicate Gbar pressures and high yields (Efus = 100s kJ-10s MJ) may be feasible. Reduced heat conduction losses and alpha particle trapping can be provided by Bz flux compression, and the fuel ρ R ignition requirement is replaced by one for Bz R. Preheating the fuel prior to compression permits access to ignition temperatures without large convergence ratios or implosion velocities. Integrated simulations allow realistic designs for Z experiments (Imax = 27 MA) with fuel preheat provided by the ZBL laser (Elas = 2-6 kJ). Physics issues include laser deposition timing, evolution of thermal energy and Bz field, magneto-RT instability growth, electrode and laser entrance hole end effects, and anisotropic conductivity and fusion burn in the Bz field. Fusion yields on the order of the absorbed target energy may be possible on Z + ZBL, and high-gain designs using Imax = 60 MA are studied.

  11. The Science and Technology Challenges of the Plasma-Material Interface for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2013-09-01

    The boundary plasma and plasma-material interactions of magnetic fusion devices are reviewed. The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the high-temperature, collisionless pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces and the nearby cold high-density collisional plasmas, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. Due to fundamental limits of material response the boundary will largely define the viability of future large MFE experiments (ITER) and reactors (e.g. ARIES designs). The fusion community faces an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices, and even ITER, towards fusion devices typical of that required for efficient energy production. This deficit will be bridged by improving our fundamental science understanding of this complex interface region. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on establishing the use dimensionless parameters to understand this complex system. Proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the PMI/boundary challenges will be examined. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060 and cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang Xianzhu

    2012-08-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the {nabla}n{sub e} Multiplication-Sign {nabla}T{sub e} term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  13. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-08-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇ne×∇Te term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  14. Generomak: Fusion physics, engineering and costing model

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.

    1988-06-01

    A generic fusion physics, engineering and economics model (Generomak) was developed as a means of performing consistent analysis of the economic viability of alternative magnetic fusion reactors. The original Generomak model developed at Oak Ridge by Sheffield was expanded for the analyses of the Senior Committee on Environmental Safety and Economics of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM). This report describes the Generomak code as used by ESECOM. The input data used for each of the ten ESECOM fusion plants and the Generomak code output for each case is given. 14 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Prostate Cancer Diagnosis on Repeat Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Biopsy of Benign Lesions: Recommendations for Repeat Sampling.

    PubMed

    Chelluri, Raju; Kilchevsky, Amichai; George, Arvin K; Sidana, Abhinav; Frye, Thomas P; Su, Daniel; Fascelli, Michele; Ho, Richard; Abboud, Steven F; Turkbey, Baris; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Urologists face a dilemma when a lesion identified on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is benign on image guided fusion biopsy. We investigated the detection rate of prostate cancer on repeat fusion biopsy in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging lesions initially found to be pathologically benign on fusion biopsy. We reviewed the records of all patients from 2007 to 2014 who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and image guided fusion biopsy. We identified men who underwent rebiopsy of the same discrete lesion after initial fusion biopsy results were benign. Data were documented on a per lesion basis. We manually reviewed UroNav system (Invivo, Gainesville, Florida) needle tracking to verify accurate image registration. Multivariate analysis was used to identify clinical and imaging factors predictive of prostate cancer detection at repeat fusion biopsy. A total of 131 unique lesions were rebiopsied in 90 patients. Of these 131 resampled lesions 21 (16%) showed prostate cancer, which in 13 (61.9%) was Gleason 3 + 3. On multivariate analysis only lesion growth on repeat multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was significantly associated with prostate cancer detection at repeat biopsy (HR 3.274, 95% CI 1.205-8.896, p = 0.02). Pathologically benign multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging lesions on initial image guided fusion biopsy are rarely found to harbor clinically significant prostate cancer on repeat biopsy. When prostate cancer was identified, most disease was low risk. An increase in lesion diameter was an independent predictor of prostate cancer detection. While these data are retrospective, they may provide some confidence in the reliability of negative initial image guided fusion biopsies despite a positive multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging finding. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laser fusion reactor concept with magnetically guided Li flow /SENRI-I/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, S.; Imasaki, K.; Izawa, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Matoba, M.; Mima, K.; Nakai, S.; Nishihara, K.; Norimatsu, T.; Yabe, T.

    1981-03-01

    A concept of a D-T fusion laser reactor (SENRI-I) with magnetically guided inner Li flow is presented. It is assumed that input laser energy is about 1-5 MJ and pellet gain is about 1000-200. The scaling law of pellet gain is examined theoretically and by simulations. The design of the inner Li flow blanket and the cooling system is presented. The inner Li flow is used as a first wall protector, a coolant and a tritium breeder. The flow of liquid lithium controlled by magnetic field is examined in both theory and computer simulations, and it is found that flow shape and velocity are well controlled and the disassembling is suppressed by magnetic field pressure. Li temperature at outlet from a reactor cavity is assumed to be about 580 C.

  17. Magnet design with 100-kA HTS STARS conductors for the helical fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, N.; Terazaki, Y.; Ito, S.; Tamura, H.; Hamaguchi, S.; Mito, T.; Hashizume, H.; Sagara, A.

    2016-12-01

    The high-temperature superconducting (HTS) option is employed for the conceptual design of the LHD-type helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1. The 100-kA-class STARS (Stacked Tapes Assembled in Rigid Structure) conductor is used for the magnet system including the continuously wound helical coils. Protection of the magnet system in case of a quench is a crucial issue and the hot-spot temperature during an emergency discharge is estimated based on the zero-dimensional and one-dimensional analyses. The number of division of the coil winding package is examined to limit the voltage generation. For cooling the HTS magnet, helium gas flow is considered and its feasibility is examined by simple analysis as a first step.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Review of Technology, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kongnyuy, Michael; George, Arvin K.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided (12–14 core) systematic biopsy of the prostate is the recommended standard for patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). Advances in imaging have led to the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of PCa with subsequent development of software-based co-registration allowing for the integration of MRI with real-time TRUS during prostate biopsy. A number of fusion-guided methods and platforms are now commercially available with common elements in image and analysis and planning. Implementation of fusion-guided prostate biopsy has now been proven to improve the detection of clinically significant PCa in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26902626

  19. The Potential Use of Ultrasound-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fusion Applications in Musculoskeletal Intervention.

    PubMed

    Burke, Christopher J; Bencardino, Jenny; Adler, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    We sought to assess the potential use of an application allowing real-time ultrasound spatial registration with previously acquired magnetic resonance imaging in musculoskeletal procedures. The ultrasound fusion application was used to perform a range of outpatient procedures including piriformis, sacroiliac joint, pudendal and intercostal nerve perineurial injections, hamstring-origin calcific tendonopathy barbotage, and 2 soft tissue biopsies at our institution in 2015. The application was used in a total of 7 procedures in 7 patients, all of which were technically successful. The ages of patients ranged from 19 to 86 years. Particular use of the fusion application compared to sonography alone was noted in the biopsy of certain soft tissue lesions and in perineurial therapeutic injections. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging Te and ne fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ˜60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  1. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Lai, J; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T(e) and n(e) fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ~60,000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60,000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  2. Bifurcation theory for the L-H transition in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weymiens, W.; Blank, H. J. de; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Valenca, J. C. de

    2012-07-15

    The mathematical field of bifurcation theory is extended to be applicable to 1-dimensionally resolved systems of nonlinear partial differential equations, aimed at the determination of a certain specific bifurcation. This extension is needed to be able to properly analyze the bifurcations of the radial transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. This is of special interest when describing the transition from the low-energy-confinement state to the high-energy-confinement state of the radial transport in fusion plasmas (i.e., the L-H transition), because the nonlinear dynamical behavior during the transition corresponds to the dynamical behavior of a system containing such a specific bifurcation. This bifurcation determines how the three types (sharp, smooth, and oscillating) of observed L-H transitions are organized as function of all the parameters contained in the model.

  3. Fusion of structural and functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging data for studying ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Magtibay, K; Beheshti, M; Foomany, F H; Balasundaram, K; Masse, S; Lai, P; Asta, J; Zamiri, N; Jaffray, D A; Nanthakumar, K; Krishnan, S; Umapathy, K

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques such as Current Density Imaging (CDI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) provide a complementing set of imaging data that can describe both the functional and structural states of biological tissues. This paper presents a Joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) based fusion approach which can be utilized to fuse CDI and DTI data to quantify the differences between two cardiac states: Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) and Asystolic/Normal (AS/NM). Such an approach could lead to a better insight on the mechanism of VF. Fusing CDI and DTI data from 8 data sets from 6 beating porcine hearts, in effect, detects the differences between two cardiac states, qualitatively and quantitatively. This initial study demonstrates the applicability of MRI-based imaging techniques and jICA-based fusion approach in studying cardiac arrhythmias.

  4. Evaluation of easy-axis dynamics in a magnetic fluid by measurement and analysis of the magnetization curve in an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Satoshi; Takemura, Yasushi

    2017-08-01

    An understanding of the magnetic relaxation mechanism is critical to the medical application of magnetic nanoparticles. The temporal change in magnetization caused by an applied field can be evaluated by measuring the magnetization curves in the alternating fields. When magnetic nanoparticles are dispersed in a liquid, owing to magnetic torque, the Brownian relaxation influences the magnetization dynamics, in addition to the Néel relaxation. In this study, by evaluating the magnetization curve obtained by subtracting the magnetization curve corresponding to the solid from that of the liquid, the dynamics of the easy axis are observed with respect to the superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

  5. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  6. Missing the Mark: Prostate Cancer Upgrading by Systematic Biopsy over Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Muthigi, Akhil; George, Arvin K; Sidana, Abhinav; Kongnyuy, Michael; Simon, Richard; Moreno, Vanessa; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion biopsy detect more high risk prostate cancer and less low risk prostate cancer than systematic biopsy. However, there remains a small subset of patients in whom systematic biopsy captures higher grade disease than fusion biopsy. We sought to identify potential mechanisms of the failure of fusion biopsy in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging followed by fusion biopsy and systematic biopsy from 2007 to 2014. In patients in whom disease was upgraded to clinically significant disease (Gleason 7 or greater) by systematic biopsy over fusion biopsy, independent re-review of magnetic resonance imaging, archived biopsy imaging and whole mount pathology as well as needle coordinate mapping were performed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done to determine predictors of upgrading by systematic biopsy. Disease was upgraded based on systematic biopsy over fusion biopsy in 135 of 1,003 patients (13.5%), of whom only 62 (6.2%) were upgraded to intermediate (Gleason 7) and high risk (Gleason 8 or greater) prostate cancer (51 or 5.1% and 11 or 1.1%, respectively). On multivariate analysis lower prostate specific antigen (p <0.001), higher magnetic resonance imaging prostate volume (p <0.001) and a lower number of target cores (p = 0.001) were predictors of upgrading by systematic biopsy. Main mechanisms of under grading by fusion biopsy included multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging reader oversight, presence of magnetic resonance imaging invisible cancer, fusion biopsy technique error and intralesion Gleason heterogeneity. Magnetic resonance imaging and fusion biopsy rarely missed clinically significant prostate cancer as only 62 of 1,003 cases (6.2%) were upgraded to clinically significant disease by systematic biopsy. Imaging and biopsy techniques are continually refined

  7. Alternating magnetic field optimization for IONP hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Elliot J.; Reeves, Russell; Bennett, William; Misra, Aditi; Petryk, Jim D.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) have therapeutic potential to deliver a thermal dose to tumors when activated in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Through various targeting methods such as antibody labeling or injection site choice, delivery of IONPs to tumors yields enhanced treatment accuracy and efficacy. Despite this advantage, delivery an AMF, which is sufficient to result in clinically relevant IONP heating, can result in nonspecific tissue heating via the generation of eddy currents and tissue permeated by local electric fields (joule heating). The production of eddy current heating is a function of tissue size, geometry and composition as well as coil design and operation. The purpose of this research is to increase the level of energy deposited into the IONPs versus the non-target tissue (power ratio/PR)1 in order to improve target heating and reduce nonspecific tissue damage. We propose to improve the PR using two primary concepts: (1) reduce power deposition into non-target tissue by manipulating the fields and eddy current flow and (2) enhance heat removal from non-target tissue. We have shown that controlling tissue placement within the AMF field, accounting for tissue geometry, utilizing external cooling devices, and modifying the field properties can decrease non-target heating by more than 50%, at clinically relevant AMF levels, thereby allowing for an increase in thermal dose to the tumor and increasing the therapeutic ratio.

  8. On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, P. B.

    2008-06-15

    A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a 'plasma liner' that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., 'Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers', Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M=liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as {rho}{approx}1/r{sup 2}, for any constant adiabatic index {gamma}=d ln p/d ln {rho}. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A{approx}C{sup 2}, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C=r{sub m}/R, where r{sub m}(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A=compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity {approx}100 km/s and {gamma}=5/3, need to be hypersonic M{approx}60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A{approx}10{sup 4} necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T<2 eV, n>10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A=1.6x10{sup 4} can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M{approx_equal}12.7({gamma}-0.3){sup 4.86}, valid in the range (10fusion {alpha}-particle heating of the collapsed liner indicates that 'spark' ignition of the DT liner fuel does not appear to be

  9. On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.

    2008-06-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a "plasma liner" that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., "Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers," Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M =liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as ρ ˜1/r2, for any constant adiabatic index γ =dlnp/dlnρ. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A ˜C2, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C =rm/R, where rm(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A =compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity ˜100km/s and γ =5/3, need to be hypersonic M ˜60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A ˜104 necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T <2eV, n >1019-1020cm-3, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A =1.6×104 can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M ≈12.7(γ-0.3)4.86, valid in the range (10fusion α-particle heating of the collapsed liner indicates that "spark" ignition of the DT liner fuel does not appear to be possible for magnetized fusion targets with typical threshold values of areal density ρR <0.02gcm-2.

  10. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2−10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  11. Development of a cryogenically cooled platform for the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) Program.

    PubMed

    Awe, T J; Shelton, K P; Sefkow, A B; Lamppa, D C; Baker, J L; Rovang, D C; Robertson, G K

    2017-09-01

    A cryogenically cooled hardware platform has been developed and commissioned on the Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in support of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) Program. MagLIF is a magneto-inertial fusion concept that employs a magnetically imploded metallic tube (liner) to compress and inertially confine premagnetized and preheated fusion fuel. The fuel is preheated using a ∼2 kJ laser that must pass through a ∼1.5-3.5-μm-thick polyimide "window" at the target's laser entrance hole (LEH). As the terawatt-class laser interacts with the dense window, laser plasma instabilities (LPIs) can develop, which reduce the preheat energy delivered to the fuel, initiate fuel contamination, and degrade target performance. Cryogenically cooled targets increase the parameter space accessible to MagLIF target designs by allowing nearly 10 times thinner windows to be used for any accessible gas density. Thinner LEH windows reduce the deleterious effects of difficult to model LPIs. The Z Facility's cryogenic infrastructure has been significantly altered to enable compatibility with the premagnetization and fuel preheat stages of MagLIF. The MagLIF cryostat brings the liquid helium coolant directly to the target via an electrically resistive conduit. This design maximizes cooling power while allowing rapid diffusion of the axial magnetic field supplied by external Helmholtz-like coils. A variety of techniques have been developed to mitigate the accumulation of ice from vacuum chamber contaminants on the cooled LEH window, as even a few hundred nanometers of ice would impact laser energy coupling to the fuel region. The MagLIF cryostat has demonstrated compatibility with the premagnetization and preheat stages of MagLIF and the ability to cool targets to liquid deuterium temperatures in approximately 5 min.

  12. The in-situ diagnosis of plasma-wall interactions on magnetic fusion devices with accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary

    2013-10-01

    We present the first in-situ, time-resolved measurements of low-Z isotope composition and deuterium retention over a large plasma-facing component (PFC) surface area in a magnetic fusion device. These critical measurements were made using a novel diagnostic technique based on the analysis of induced nuclear reactions from PFC surfaces on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Achieving an integrated understanding of plasma physics and materials science in magnetic fusion devices is severely hindered by a dearth of in-situ PFC surface diagnosis. Plasma-wall interactions, such as the erosion/redeposition of PFC material, the evolution of PFC surface isotope composition, and fusion fuel retention present significant plasma physics and materials science challenges for long pulse or steady-state devices. Our diagnostic uses a compact (~1 meter), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject ~1 MeV deuterons into the vacuum vessel. We control the tokamak's magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to PFC surfaces, where they induce high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes in the first ~10 microns of material. Analysis of the induced gamma and neutron energy spectra provides quantitative reconstruction of PFC surface conditions. This nondestructive, in-situ technique achieves PFC surface composition measurements with plasma shot-to-shot time resolution and 1 centimeter spatial resolution over large PFC areas. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-94ER54235 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  13. Development of a cryogenically cooled platform for the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awe, T. J.; Shelton, K. P.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Baker, J. L.; Rovang, D. C.; Robertson, G. K.

    2017-09-01

    A cryogenically cooled hardware platform has been developed and commissioned on the Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in support of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) Program. MagLIF is a magneto-inertial fusion concept that employs a magnetically imploded metallic tube (liner) to compress and inertially confine premagnetized and preheated fusion fuel. The fuel is preheated using a ˜2 kJ laser that must pass through a ˜1.5-3.5-μm-thick polyimide "window" at the target's laser entrance hole (LEH). As the terawatt-class laser interacts with the dense window, laser plasma instabilities (LPIs) can develop, which reduce the preheat energy delivered to the fuel, initiate fuel contamination, and degrade target performance. Cryogenically cooled targets increase the parameter space accessible to MagLIF target designs by allowing nearly 10 times thinner windows to be used for any accessible gas density. Thinner LEH windows reduce the deleterious effects of difficult to model LPIs. The Z Facility's cryogenic infrastructure has been significantly altered to enable compatibility with the premagnetization and fuel preheat stages of MagLIF. The MagLIF cryostat brings the liquid helium coolant directly to the target via an electrically resistive conduit. This design maximizes cooling power while allowing rapid diffusion of the axial magnetic field supplied by external Helmholtz-like coils. A variety of techniques have been developed to mitigate the accumulation of ice from vacuum chamber contaminants on the cooled LEH window, as even a few hundred nanometers of ice would impact laser energy coupling to the fuel region. The MagLIF cryostat has demonstrated compatibility with the premagnetization and preheat stages of MagLIF and the ability to cool targets to liquid deuterium temperatures in approximately 5 min.

  14. Application of broadband alternating current magnetic susceptibility to the characterization of magnetic nanoparticles in natural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    A new method is proposed for characterizing magnetic particles by measuring low-field alternating current magnetic susceptibility at a number of frequency steps spanning four orders of magnitude, from 125 Hz to 512 kHz. This method was tested using natural samples with various grain size distributions, including basalt (Kilauea, Hawaii), loess and paleosol (Luochuan, China), tuff (Yucca Mountain, Nevada), granite (Minnesota Valley, Minnesota), and andesite (Sakurajima, Japan). The resulting frequency spectrum of magnetic susceptibility (FSMS) of the basalt, loess/paleosol, and tuff decreases with increasing frequency, but at different rates of decrease. The FSMS of the basalt is characterized by a monotonic decrease with increasing frequency over the entire range. The FSMS of the loess/paleosol and the tuff decreases more markedly than that of the basalt, which agrees with previous results showing that superparamagnetic particles are dominant in such material. Quantitative estimates using FSMSs allow reconstruction of characteristic grain size distributions and clearly identify differences in the distribution of superparamagnetic particles. The multidomain granite sample has no distinct frequency dependence, which is probably due to the smooth displacement of domain walls in the presence of the external field. In contrast, the FSMSs of the andesite samples exhibit maxima over a limited frequency range, between 16 and 128 kHz. This behavior, together with low-temperature measurements, can be accounted for by magnetic resonance of domain walls in the multidomain phenocrysts.

  15. 1995 IEEE 16. symposium on fusion engineering. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Elliott, C.

    1995-12-31

    The papers in this volume are divided into the following sections: DIII-D; MFE (Magnetic Fusion Energy) subsystem development; MFE materials, activation, and safety; MFE toroidal experiments; MFE reactor studies; IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility)/materials irradiation; TPX design; alternative confinement; spherical configurations; magnet technology; fusion economics; heating and fueling; and anomalous reactions in solids. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  16. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Honig, J.

    1984-09-01

    Design, construction, testing, and performance evaluation of a small-bore plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun system are described. The railgun system, which is intended for injecting high-velocity hydrogen pellets into the magnetic fusion devices for the purpose of refueling, has two acceleration stages. One consists of a gas gun preaccelerator and the other a railgun booster accelerator. The plasma-arc armature is formed behind the pellet by electrically discharging the propellant gas following the pellet into the railgun from the gas gun.

  17. Pellet acceleration study with a railgun for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J.; Kim, K.

    1984-04-01

    Design, construction, and preliminary testing of a two-stage pellet injection system capable of achieving hydrogen pellet velocities of 5--10 km/s are described. The system, which is intended for the refueling of magnetic fusion devices, combines a gas gun with a small-bore, plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun. The gas gun uses hydrogen gas as the propellant and injects a medium-velocity pellet into the railgun. Once inside the railgun, the propellant gas following the pellet is electrically broken down forming a plasma arc armature. The propulsive force of this plasma arc armature further accelerates the pellet to higher velocities.

  18. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications. Progress report, September 15, 1991--July 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report encompasses work on two separate projects, both related to developing sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetic fusion plasmas. The report is therefore divided into two parts as follows: Free electron laser with small period wigglers; and theory and modeling of high frequency, high power gryotron operation. Task A is experimental and eventually aims at developing continuously tunable, cw sources for ECRH with power per unit as high as 5 megawatts. Task B provides gryotron theory and modeling in support of the gryotron development programs at MIT and Varian.

  19. IEFIT - An Interactive Approach to High Temperature Fusion Plasma Magnetic Equilibrium Fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Schissel, D.P.; Lao, L.L.

    1999-06-01

    An interactive IDL based wrapper, IEFIT, has been created for the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT written in FORTRAN. It allows high temperature fusion physicists to rapidly optimize a plasma equilibrium reconstruction by eliminating the unnecessarily repeated initialization in the conventional approach along with the immediate display of the fitting results of each input variation. It uses a new IDL based graphics package, GaPlotObj, developed in cooperation with Fanning Software Consulting, that provides a unified interface with great flexibility in presenting and analyzing scientific data. The overall interactivity reduces the process to minutes from the usual hours.

  20. Transmutation analysis of realistic low-activation steels for magnetic fusion reactors and IFMIF

    SciTech Connect

    Cabellos, O; Sanz, J; Garc?a-Herranz, N; D?az, S; Reyes, S; Piedloup, S

    2005-11-22

    A comprehensive transmutation study for steels considered in the selection of structural materials for magnetic and inertial fusion reactors has been performed in the IFMIF neutron irradiation scenario, as well as in the ITER and DEMO ones for comparison purposes. An element-by-element transmutation approach is used in the study, addressing the generation of: (1) H and He and (2) solid transmutants. The IEAF-2001 activation library and the activation code ACAB were applied to the IFMIF transmutation analysis, after proving the applicability of ACAB for transmutation calculations of this kind of intermediate energy systems.

  1. Fast Ignition Thermonuclear Fusion: Enhancement of the Pellet Gain by the Colossal-Magnetic-Field Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The fast ignition fusion pellet gain can be enhanced by a laser generated B-field shell. The B-field shell, (similar to Earth's B-field, but with the alternating B-poles), follows the pellet compression in a frozen-in B-field regime. A properly designed laser-pellet coupling can lead to the generation of a B-field shell, (up to 100 MG), which inhibits electron thermal transport and confines the alpha-particles. In principle, a pellet gain of few-100s can be achieved in this manner. Supported in part by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University, 1010 Pearl, La Jolla, CA 92038-1007.

  2. Adaptability of optimization concept in the context of cryogenic distribution for superconducting magnets of fusion machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Biswanath; Bhattacharya, Ritendra Nath; Vaghela, Hitensinh; Shah, Nitin Dineshkumar; Choukekar, Ketan; Badgujar, Satish

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic distribution system (CDS) plays a vital role for reliable operation of largescale fusion machines in a Tokamak configuration. Managing dynamic heat loads from the superconducting magnets, namely, toroidal field, poloidal field, central solenoid and supporting structure is the most important function of the CDS along with the static heat loads. Two concepts are foreseen for the configuration of the CDS: singular distribution and collective distribution. In the first concept, each magnet is assigned with one distribution box having its own sub-cooler bath. In the collective concept, it is possible to share one common bath for more than one magnet system. The case study has been performed with an identical dynamic heat load profile applied to both concepts in the same time domain. The choices of a combined system from the magnets are also part of the study without compromising the system functionality. Process modeling and detailed simulations have been performed for both the options using Aspen HYSYS®. Multiple plasma pulses per day have been considered to verify the residual energy deposited in the superconducting magnets at the end of the plasma pulse. Preliminary 3D modeling using CATIA® has been performed along with the first level of component sizing.

  3. Calculations of alpha particle loss for reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; White, R.B.; Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    Hamiltonian coordinate, guiding center code calculations of the toroidal field ripple loss of alpha particles from a reversed shear plasma predict both total alpha losses and ripple diffusion losses to be greater than those from a comparable non-reversed magnetic shear plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. High central q is found to increase alpha ripple losses as well as first orbit losses of alphas in the reversed shear simulations. A simple ripple loss model, benchmarked against the guiding center code, is found to work satisfactorily in transport analysis modelling of reversed and monotonic shear scenarios. Alpha ripple transport on TFTR affects ions within r/a=0.5, not at the plasma edge. The entire plasma is above threshold for stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles at birth energy in the reversed shear case simulated, so that all trapped 3.5 MeV alphas are lost stochastically or through prompt losses. The 40% alpha particle loss predictions for TFTR suggest that reduction of toroidal field ripple will be a critical issue in the design of a reversed shear fusion reactor.

  4. Tgermonuclear Ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Comparison with Magnetic Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Chang, P.Y.; Spears, B.K.; Anderson, K.S.; Edwards, J.; Fatenejad, M.; Lindl, J.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Nora, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2010-04-23

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptau ~ 1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptau ~ 1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (T ~ 2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chi ~ 0.02–0.03 is ~5X lower than in JET (chi ~ 0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  5. Position control of active magnetic levitation using sphere-shaped HTS bulk for inertial nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, K.; Riku, K.; Agatsuma, K.; Ueda, H.; Ishiyama, A.

    2008-02-01

    We have developed an active magnetic levitation system that comprises a field-cooled disk-shaped or sphere-shaped HTS bulk and multiple ring-shaped electromagnets. In this system, the levitation height of HTS bulk can be controlled by adjusting the operating current of each electromagnet individually. Further, the application of the vertical noncontact levitation system is expected due to its levitation stability without mechanical supports. We assume that this system is applied to inertial nuclear fusion. However, one of the important issues is to achieve position control with high accuracy of the fusion fuel in order to illuminate the target evenly over the entire surface. Therefore, this system is applied to the levitation and position control of a sphere-shaped superconducting capsule containing nuclear fusion fuel. In this study, we designed and constructed a position control system for the sphere-shaped HTS bulk with a diameter of 5 mm by using numerical simulation based on hybrid finite element and boundary element analysis. We then carried out the experiment of levitation height and position control characteristics of the HTS bulk in this system. With regard to position control, accuracies within 59 ?m are obtained.

  6. Evaluation of multiatlas label fusion for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging orbital segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J.; Khare, Shweta P.; Thompson, Lindsey; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Multiatlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. We evaluate seven statistical and voting-based label fusion algorithms (and six additional variants) to segment the optic nerves, eye globes, and chiasm. For nonlocal simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), we evaluate different intensity similarity measures (including mean square difference, locally normalized cross-correlation, and a hybrid approach). Each algorithm is evaluated in terms of the Dice overlap and symmetric surface distance metrics. Finally, we evaluate refinement of label fusion results using a learning-based correction method for consistent bias correction and Markov random field regularization. The multiatlas labeling pipelines were evaluated on a cohort of 35 subjects including both healthy controls and patients. Across all three structures, nonlocal spatial STAPLE (NLSS) with a mixed weighting type provided the most consistent results; for the optic nerve NLSS resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.81, mean surface distance of 0.41 mm, and Hausdorff distance 2.18 mm for the optic nerves. Joint label fusion resulted in slightly superior median performance for the optic nerves (0.82, 0.39 mm, and 2.15 mm), but slightly worse on the globes. The fully automated multiatlas labeling approach provides robust segmentations of orbital structures on magnetic resonance imaging even in patients for whom significant atrophy (optic nerve head drusen) or inflammation (multiple sclerosis) is present. PMID:25558466

  7. Alternative material study for heat assisted magnetic recording transducer application

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, B. X. Cen, Z. H.; Hu, J. F.; Tsai, J. W. H.

    2015-05-07

    In heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), optical near field transducer (NFT) is a key component. Au is currently used as NFT material because of its strong surface plasmon effect. Due to the soft property of Au material, reliability of Au NFT becomes a key issue for realizing HAMR production. In this paper, the possibility of alternative materials, including transition metal nitrides (TMNs) and transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) to replace Au is studied. The results show that all of the listed TMN and TCO materials can meet the mechanical requirements at room temperature in terms of hardness and thermal expansion. An optical model, which includes optical waveguide, NFT and FePt media, is used to simulate NFT performances. The results indicate that the resonant wavelengths for NFT with TCO materials are longer than 1500 nm, which is not suitable for HAMR application. TMN materials are suitable for NFT application at wavelength band of around 800 nm. But the NFT efficiency is very low. ZrN is the best material among TMN materials and the efficiency of ZrN NFT is only 13% of the Au NFT's efficiency. Reducing refractive index (n) and increasing extinction coefficient (k) will both lead to efficiency increase. Increasing k contributes more in the efficiency increase, while reducing n has a relatively low NFT absorption. For materials with the same figure of merit, the NFT with larger k material has higher efficiency. Doping materials to increase the material conduction electron density and growing film with larger size grain may be the way to increase k and reduce n.

  8. Exploring magnetized liner inertial fusion with a semi-analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R. D.; Slutz, S. A.; Vesey, R. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Rovang, D. C.; Hahn, K. D.; Martin, M. R.; Cochrane, K. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Rochau, G. A.; Porter, J. L.; and others

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we explore magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] using a semi-analytic model [R. D. McBride and S. A. Slutz, Phys. Plasmas 22, 052708 (2015)]. Specifically, we present simulation results from this model that: (a) illustrate the parameter space, energetics, and overall system efficiencies of MagLIF; (b) demonstrate the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated; (c) explore some of the recent experimental results of the MagLIF program at Sandia National Laboratories [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)]; (d) highlight the experimental challenges presently facing the MagLIF program; and (e) demonstrate how increases to the preheat energy, fuel density, axial magnetic field, and drive current could affect future MagLIF performance.

  9. Exploring magnetized liner inertial fusion with a semi-analytic model

    DOE PAGES

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger A.; ...

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] using a semi-analytic model [R. D. McBride and S. A. Slutz, Phys. Plasmas 22, 052708 (2015)]. Specifically, we present simulation results from this model that: (a) illustrate the parameter space, energetics, and overall system efficiencies of MagLIF; (b) demonstrate the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated; (c) explore some of the recent experimental results of the MagLIF program at Sandia National Laboratories [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113,more » 155003 (2014)]; (d) highlight the experimental challenges presently facing the MagLIF program; and (e) demonstrate how increases to the preheat energy, fuel density, axial magnetic field, and drive current could affect future MagLIF performance.« less

  10. Need for development of higher strength cryogenic structural materials for fusion magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Arata

    2014-01-27

    A prototype fusion reactor is targeted as a beyond ITER project which is so called DEMO. Several conceptual designs have been carried out. Recently, in order to recognize practical aspects on maintenance of the prototype reactor, the replacement procedure of in-vessel components was focused and “sector process” was proposed. The process is that the reactor consists of sectors and all sectors will be drowned and replaced in a short time. The slim coil which generated higher magnetic field is required to realize the sector process. From the point of coil design, the occupancy of the structural material on the cross section of the coil increases with an increase of magnetic field. To realize the slim coil, the cryogenic structural material with higher yield strength and the proper toughness is desired.

  11. Exploring magnetized liner inertial fusion with a semi-analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Ryan D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger A.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Harding, Eric C.; Awe, Thomas James; Rovang, Dean C.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Martin, Matthew R.; Cochrane, Kyle R.; Peterson, Kyle J.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Porter, John L.; Stygar, William A.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Nakhleh, Charles W.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Sinars, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] using a semi-analytic model [R. D. McBride and S. A. Slutz, Phys. Plasmas 22, 052708 (2015)]. Specifically, we present simulation results from this model that: (a) illustrate the parameter space, energetics, and overall system efficiencies of MagLIF; (b) demonstrate the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated; (c) explore some of the recent experimental results of the MagLIF program at Sandia National Laboratories [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)]; (d) highlight the experimental challenges presently facing the MagLIF program; and (e) demonstrate how increases to the preheat energy, fuel density, axial magnetic field, and drive current could affect future MagLIF performance.

  12. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of the Structural Topology and Lipid Interactions of a Viral Fusion Protein Chimera Containing the Fusion Peptide and Transmembrane Domain.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Myungwoon; Liao, Shu-Yu; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-13

    The fusion peptide (FP) and transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins play important roles during virus-cell membrane fusion, by inducing membrane curvature and transient dehydration. The structure of the water-soluble ectodomain of viral fusion proteins has been extensively studied crystallographically, but the structures of the FP and TMD bound to phospholipid membranes are not well understood. We recently investigated the conformations and lipid interactions of the separate FP and TMD peptides of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein F using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. These studies provide structural information about the two domains when they are spatially well separated in the fusion process. To investigate how these two domains are structured relative to each other in the postfusion state, when the ectodomain forms a six-helix bundle that is thought to force the FP and TMD together in the membrane, we have now expressed and purified a chimera of the FP and TMD, connected by a Gly-Lys linker, and measured the chemical shifts and interdomain contacts of the protein in several lipid membranes. The FP-TMD chimera exhibits α-helical chemical shifts in all the membranes examined and does not cause strong curvature of lamellar membranes or membranes with negative spontaneous curvature. These properties differ qualitatively from those of the separate peptides, indicating that the FP and TMD interact with each other in the lipid membrane. However, no (13)C-(13)C cross peaks are observed in two-dimensional correlation spectra, suggesting that the two helices are not tightly associated. These results suggest that the ectodomain six-helix bundle does not propagate into the membrane to the two hydrophobic termini. However, the loosely associated FP and TMD helices are found to generate significant negative Gaussian curvature to membranes that possess spontaneous positive curvature, consistent with the notion that the FP-TMD assembly may

  13. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited).

    PubMed

    Smith, Roger J

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B(pol) diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T(e), n(e), and B(parallel) along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n(e)B(parallel) product and higher n(e) and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  14. Shear Strengths of Copper/Insulation Interfaces for Fusion Magnet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Codell, D. E.; Lizotte, M. J.

    2006-03-01

    Magnet insulation materials in many Next-Step Option fusion research devices will be subjected to high shear stresses at both cryogenic and elevated temperatures. The low shear strength and poor adhesion of the insulation to copper conductors can be limiting design factors in these systems. While cyanate ester resins have been shown to provide the necessary electrical and mechanical properties for fusion magnet insulation applications, the adhesion of the resin to copper at temperatures ranging from 77 to 373 K is a critical aspect of long-term operational performance. This work compares the shear strengths of copper/cyanate-ester-insulation interfaces prepared using various copper surface treatments, including grit blasting, alkaline cleaners, oxidizers, and primers. The shear strengths of the copper/cyanate-ester-insulation interface were measured using a novel specimen design in which thin copper foils were treated and embedded in laminate structures. Short-beam-shear tests were conducted at 76, 293, and 373 K to assess the performance of the various surface treatments. The results of this investigation indicate that the adhesive shear strengths of copper/cyanate-ester-insulation interfaces can be improved by as much as 50% by treating the copper surfaces prior to impregnation with the cyanate ester resin.

  15. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  16. A Novel Method of Localization for Moving Objects with an Alternating Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Yan, Shenggang; Li, Bin

    2017-04-21

    Magnetic detection technology has wide applications in the fields of geological exploration, biomedical treatment, wreck removal and localization of unexploded ordinance. A large number of methods have been developed to locate targets with static magnetic fields, however, the relation between the problem of localization of moving objectives with alternating magnetic fields and the localization with a static magnetic field is rarely studied. A novel method of target localization based on coherent demodulation was proposed in this paper. The problem of localization of moving objects with an alternating magnetic field was transformed into the localization with a static magnetic field. The Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) algorithm was applied to calculate the position of the target with magnetic field data measured by a single three-component magnetic sensor. Theoretical simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. A Novel Method of Localization for Moving Objects with an Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Yan, Shenggang; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic detection technology has wide applications in the fields of geological exploration, biomedical treatment, wreck removal and localization of unexploded ordinance. A large number of methods have been developed to locate targets with static magnetic fields, however, the relation between the problem of localization of moving objectives with alternating magnetic fields and the localization with a static magnetic field is rarely studied. A novel method of target localization based on coherent demodulation was proposed in this paper. The problem of localization of moving objects with an alternating magnetic field was transformed into the localization with a static magnetic field. The Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) algorithm was applied to calculate the position of the target with magnetic field data measured by a single three-component magnetic sensor. Theoretical simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28430153

  18. Prompt photon yield and elliptic flow from gluon fusion induced by magnetic fields in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Castaño-Yepes, Jorge David; Dominguez, C. A.; Hernández, L. A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Saúl; Tejeda-Yeomans, María Elena

    2017-07-01

    We compute photon production at early times in semicentral relativistic heavy-ion collisions from nonequilibrium gluon fusion induced by a magnetic field. The calculation accounts for the main features of the collision at these early times, namely, the intense magnetic field and the high gluon occupation number. The gluon fusion channel is made possible by the magnetic field and would otherwise be forbidden due to charge conjugation invariance. Thus, the photon yield from this process is an excess over calculations without magnetic field effects. We compare this excess to the difference between PHENIX data and recent hydrodynamic calculations for the photon transverse momentum distribution and elliptic flow coefficient v2 . We show that with reasonable values for the saturation scale and magnetic field strength, the calculation helps us better describe the experimental results obtained at RHIC energies for the lowest part of the transverse photon momentum.

  19. Magnetic mirror fusion-fission early history and applicability to other systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R

    2009-08-24

    In the mid 1970s to mid 1980s the mirror program was stuck with a concept, the Standard Mirror that was Q {approx} 1 where Q=P{sub fusion}/P{sub injection}. Heroic efforts were put into hybridizing thinking added energy and fuel sales would make a commercial product. At the same time the tokamak was thought to allow ignition and ultrahigh Q values of 20 or even higher. There was an effort to use neutral beams to drive the tokamak just like the mirror machines were driven in which case the Q value plunged to a few, however this was thought to be achievable decades earlier than the high Q versions. Meanwhile current drive and other features of the tokamak have seen the projected Q values come down to the range of 10. Meanwhile the mirror program got Q enhancement into high gear and various tandem mirrors projected Q values up towards 10 and with advanced features over 10 with axi-symmetric magnets (See R. F. Post papers), however the experimental program is all but non-existent. Meanwhile, the gas dynamic trap mirror system which is present day state-of-the-art can with low risk produce Q of {approx}0.1 useful for a low risk, low cost neutron source for materials development useful for the development of materials for all fusion concepts (see Simonen white paper: 'A Physics-Based Strategy to Develop a Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid' and D.D. Ryutov, 'Axisymmetric MHD-stable mirror as a neutron source and a driver for a fusion-fission hybrid'). Many early hybrid designs with multi-disciplinary teams were carried out in great detail for the mirror system with its axi-symmetric blanket modules. It is recognized that most of these designs are adaptable to tokamak or inertial fusion geometry. When Q is low (1 to 2) economics gives a large economic penalty for high recirculating power. These early studies covered the three design types: Power production, fuel production and waste burning. All three had their place but power production fell away because every study showed

  20. Kinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Degenerative Cervical Spine: Changes after Anterior Decompression and Cage Fusion.

    PubMed

    Obradov, Marina; Bénard, Menno R; Janssen, Michiel M A; Anderson, Patricia G; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Spruit, Maarten

    2016-11-01

    Study Design A prospective cohort study. Objective Decompression and fusion of cervical vertebrae is a combined procedure that has a high success rate in relieving radicular symptoms and stabilizing or improving cervical myelopathy. However, fusion may lead to increased motion of the adjacent vertebrae and cervical deformity. Both have been postulated to lead to adjacent segment pathology (ASP). Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly used to evaluate range of motion (ROM) of the cervical spine and ASP. Our objective was to measure ASP, cervical curvature, and ROM of individual segments of the cervical spine using kinematic MRI before and 24 months after monosegmental cage fusion. Methods Eighteen patients who had single-level interbody fusion were included. ROM (using kinematic MRI) and degeneration, spinal stenosis, and cervical curvature were measured preoperatively and 24 months postoperatively. Results Using kinematic MRI, segmental motion of the cervical segments was measured with a precision of less than 3 degrees. The cervical fusion did not affect the ROM of adjacent levels. However, pre- and postoperative ROM was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to the fusion level compared with those further away. In addition, at 24 months postoperatively, the number of cases with ASP was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to fusion level. Conclusions Using kinematic MRI, ROM after spinal fusion can be measured with high precision. Kinematic MRI can be used not only in clinical practice, but also to study intervention and its effect on postoperative biomechanics and ASP of cervical vertebrae.

  1. [An alternative dorsal fusion technique after transoral dens resection in basilar impression with atlas assimilation].

    PubMed

    Kaden, B; Schramm, J; Koch, W; Solymosi, L

    1998-01-01

    Current therapy of basilar impression includes transoral dens resection. The essential disadvantage of this procedure is the instability of C1/C2 due to loss of the transverse ligament. We describe two patients in whom this instability was treated by modified screwing. Using MAGERL-screws between C0-C2 an interposition of an iliac graft between the occiput and the arc of C2 was made. Neurological symptoms improved in both patients postoperatively. In both cases stable fusion C0/C2 was achieved with an additional treatment with a HALO-fixateur for eight weeks. In our opinion the combined transoral/dorsal procedure is most suitable and efficient in treatment of basilar impressions. By this approach both, decompression of the myelon as well as stable fusion C0/C2, is achieved.

  2. Modulation of Plants Roots Gravitropic Reaction by Means of Static, Alternative, Combined Magnetic Fields and Their Magnetic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadiia

    It was shown that gravitropic reaction of cress roots depended on the magnitude of static magnetic field and on the amplitude of alternative magnetic field under the conditions of shielding of static component of field. The thresholds for both static and alternative fields are approximately of one and the same order. Their induction magnitude was equal to 1 -2 μT. The absence of magnetic field leaded to the essential inhibition of gravitropic reaction. Combined magnetic field tuned to the cyclotron frequency of some biologically active ions on the contrary leaded to decreasing of gravitropic reaction. Combined magnetic field tuned to the cyclotron frequency of Ca ions changed even the sign of roots gravitropic reaction. The grathitropic reaction velocity effects depended on the magnetic noise level.

  3. The potential of imposed magnetic fields for enhancing ignition probability and fusion energy yield in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. J.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Rhodes, M. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Blackfield, D. T.; Hawkins, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the potential that imposed magnetic fields of tens of Tesla that increase to greater than 10 kT (100 MGauss) under implosion compression may relax the conditions required for ignition and propagating burn in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. This may allow the attainment of ignition, or at least significant fusion energy yields, in presently performing ICF targets on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) that today are sub-marginal for thermonuclear burn through adverse hydrodynamic conditions at stagnation [Doeppner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055001 (2015)]. Results of detailed two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic-burn simulations applied to NIF capsule implosions with low-mode shape perturbations and residual kinetic energy loss indicate that such compressed fields may increase the probability for ignition through range reduction of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction, and potential stabilization of higher-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Optimum initial applied fields are found to be around 50 T. Given that the full plasma structure at capsule stagnation may be governed by three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamics, the formation of closed magnetic field lines might further augment ignition prospects. Experiments are now required to further assess the potential of applied magnetic fields to ICF ignition and burn on NIF.

  4. High-field, high-current-density, stable superconducting magnets for fusion machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Designs for large fusion machines require high-performance superconducting magnets to reduce cost or increase machine performance. By employing force-flow cooling, cable-in-conduit conductor configuration, and NbTi superconductor, it is now possible to design superconducting magnets that operate a high fields (8-12 T) with high current densities (5-15 kA/cm/sup 2/ over the winding pack) in a stable manner. High current density leads to smaller, lighter, and thus less expensive coils. The force-flow cooling provides confined helium, full conductor insulation, and a rigid winding pack for better load distribution. The cable-in-conduit conductor configuration ensures a high stability margin for the magnet. The NbTi superconductor has reached a good engineering material standard. Its strain-insensitive critical parameters are particularly suitable for complex coil windings of a stellarator machine. The optimization procedure for such a conductor design, developed over the past decade, is summarized here. If desired a magnet built on the principles outlines in this paper can be extended to a field higher than the design value without degrading its stability by simply lowering the operating temperature below 4.2 K. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Role of Lorentz-Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in magnetized plasmas: Applications to magnetic fusion and solar physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Eugene

    2015-05-01

    Broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in plasmas is an important diagnostic tool for many applications (here and below by "hydrogen atoms" and "hydrogen spectral lines" we mean atoms and spectral lines of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium). In magnetized plasmas radiating hydrogen atoms moving with the velocity v across the magnetic field B experience a Lorentz electric field EL=v×B/c in addition to other electric fields. Since the velocity v has a distribution, so does the Lorentz field, thus making an additional contribution to the broadening of spectral lines. Compared to previous studies of this contribution, we cover the following new aspects. First, we consider the Lorentz-Doppler broadening of highly-excited hydrogen lines and produce new analytical results for arbitrary strength of the magnetic field B. We show for the first time that in the high-B case, the π-components of hydrogen lines are significantly suppressed compared to the σ-components. Second, we derive analytically Lorentz-broadened profiles of highly-excited hydrogen lines. We obtain expressions for the principal quantum number nmax of the last observable hydrogen line in the spectral series. These expressions differ very significantly from the corresponding Inglis-Teller result and constitute a new diagnostic method allowing to measure the product T1/2B, where T is the atomic temperature. Third, we consider magnetized plasmas containing a low-frequency electrostatic turbulence. This kind of turbulence causes anomalous transport phenomena (e.g., the anomalous resistivity) and is therefore very important to be diagnosed. We derive analytically distributions of the total electric field and the corresponding Stark profiles of hydrogen lines. We demonstrate that our findings lead to a significantly revised interpretation of the previous and future experimental data in magnetic fusion and the observational data in solar physics.

  6. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  7. Excitation of stable Alfven eigenmodes by application of alternating magnetic field perturbations in the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Toi, K.; Isobe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Akiyama, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Minami, T.; Nishimura, S.; Okamura, S.; Shimizu, A.; Suzuki, C.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takahashi, C.; Matsunaga, G.

    2009-09-15

    Stable toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) with low toroidal mode number (n=1 and n=2) were excited by application of alternating magnetic field perturbations generated with a set of electrodes inserted into the edge region of neutral beam injection heated plasmas on the Compact Helical System [K. Nishimura, K. Matsuoka, M. Fujiwara et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 86 (1990)]. The gap locations of TAEs excited by the electrodes are in the plasma peripheral region of {rho}>0.7 ({rho} is the normalized minor radius) where energetic ion drive is negligibly small, while some AEs are excited by energetic ions in the plasma core region of {rho}<0.4. The damping rate of these stable TAEs derived from plasma responses to applied perturbations is fairly large, that is, {approx}9% to {approx}12% of the angular eigenfrequency. This large damping rate is thought to be dominantly caused by continuum damping and radiative damping.

  8. Excitation of stable Alfvén eigenmodes by application of alternating magnetic field perturbations in the Compact Helical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Toi, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Isobe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Akiyama, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Minami, T.; Nishimura, S.; Okamura, S.; Shimizu, A.; Suzuki, C.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takahashi, C.; Chs Experimental Group

    2009-09-01

    Stable toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) with low toroidal mode number (n =1 and n =2) were excited by application of alternating magnetic field perturbations generated with a set of electrodes inserted into the edge region of neutral beam injection heated plasmas on the Compact Helical System [K. Nishimura, K. Matsuoka, M. Fujiwara et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 86 (1990)]. The gap locations of TAEs excited by the electrodes are in the plasma peripheral region of ρ >0.7 (ρ is the normalized minor radius) where energetic ion drive is negligibly small, while some AEs are excited by energetic ions in the plasma core region of ρ <0.4. The damping rate of these stable TAEs derived from plasma responses to applied perturbations is fairly large, that is, ˜9% to ˜12% of the angular eigenfrequency. This large damping rate is thought to be dominantly caused by continuum damping and radiative damping.

  9. Laser-Plasma Interaction in Presence of an Obliquely External Magnetic Field: Application to Laser Fusion without Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobaraki, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear interaction of ultra-high power laser beam with fusion plasma at relativistic regime in the presence of obliquely external magnetic Geld has been studied. Imposing an external magnetic Geld on plasma can modify the density profile of the plasma so that the thermal conductivity of electrons reduces which is considered to be the decrease of the threshold energy for ignition. To achieve the fusion of Hydrogen-Boron (HB) fuel, the block acceleration model of plasma is employed. Energy production by HB isotopes can be of interest, since its reaction does not generate radioactive tritium. By using the inhibit factor in the block model acceleration of plasma and Maxwell's as well as the momentum transfer equations, the electron density distribution and dielectric permittivity of the plasma medium are obtained. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the intensity of the external magnetic field, the oscillation of the laser magnetic field decreases, while the dielectric permittivity increases. Moreover, the amplitude of the electron density becomes highly peaked and the plasma electrons are strongly bunched with increasing the intensity of external magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetized plasma can act as a positive focusing lens to enhance the fusion process. Besides, we find that with increasing θ-angle (from oblique external magnetic field) between 0 and 90°, the dielectric permittivity increases, while for θ between 90° and 180°, the dielectric permittivity decreases with increasing θ.

  10. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  11. Advanced fission and fossil plant economics-implications for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Delene, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    In order for fusion energy to be a viable option for electric power generation, it must either directly compete with future alternatives or serve as a reasonable backup if the alternatives become unacceptable. This paper discusses projected costs for the most likely competitors with fusion power for baseload electric capacity and what these costs imply for fusion economics. The competitors examined include advanced nuclear fission and advanced fossil-fired plants. The projected costs and their basis are discussed. The estimates for these technologies are compared with cost estimates for magnetic and inertial confinement fusion plants. The conclusion of the analysis is that fusion faces formidable economic competition. Although the cost level for fusion appears greater than that for fission or fossil, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion`s potential competitiveness.

  12. Ultra-high speed permanent magnet axial gap alternator with multiple stators

    DOEpatents

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Bailey, J. Milton

    1991-01-01

    An ultra-high speed, axial gap alternator that can provide an output to a plurality of loads, the alternator providing magnetic isolation such that operating conditions in one load will not affect operating conditions of another load. This improved alternator uses a rotor member disposed between a pair of stator members, with magnets disposed in each of the rotor member surfaces facing the stator members. The magnets in one surface of the rotor member, which alternate in polarity, are isolated from the magnets in the other surface of the rotor member by a disk of magnetic material disposed between the two sets of magents. In the preferred embodiment, this disk of magnetic material is laminated between two layers of non-magnetic material that support the magnets, and the magnetic material has a peripheral rim that extends to both surfaces of the rotor member to enhance the structural integrity. The stator members are substantially conventional in construction in that equally-spaced and radially-oriented slots are provided, and winding members are laid in these slots. A unit with multiple rotor members and stator members is also described.

  13. Picosecond-petawatt laser-block ignition for avalanche fusion of boron by ultrahigh acceleration and ultrahigh magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Lalousis, P.; Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.; Eliezer, S.; Miley, G. H.; Moustaizis, S.; Mourou, G.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion energy from reacting hydrogen (protons) with the boron isotope 11 (HB11) resulting in three stable helium nuclei, is without problem of nuclear radiation in contrast to DT fusion. But the HB11 reaction driven by nanosecond laser pulses with thermal compression and ignition by lasers is extremely difficult. This changed radically when irradiation with picosecond laser pulses produces a non-thermal plasma block ignition with ultrahigh acceleration. This uses the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force to surprizingly resulting in same thresholds as DT fusion even under pessimistic assumption of binary reactions. After evaluation of reactions trapped cylindrically by kilotesla magnetic fields and using the measured highly increased HB11 fusion gains for the proof of an avalanche of the three alphas in secondary reactions, possibilities for an absolutely clean energy source at comptitive costs were concluded.

  14. Preparation of magnetic ferrofluids in alternative carrier liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensweig, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrofluids are made by grinding magnetic particles together with a polar surfactant and a nonpolar solvent. The surfactant is adsorbed on the particle surfaces and acts as a coupling agent between the particles and the solvent.

  15. Compatibility of alternative refrigerants with varnished magnet wire

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.

    1993-10-01

    The compatibility of 24 motor materials with 11 pure refrigerators and 17 refrigerant-lubricant combinations was determined. This is summary of the effect of refrigerants on varnished magnet wire. Of the refrigerants tested, exposure to HCFC-22 produced the most deleterious effects on the magnet wire insulation and varnishes. Since many of the materials tested have excellent reliability with HCFC-22 in current applications, these materials are expected to be reliable when used with new refrigerants.

  16. Materials studies for magnetic fusion energy applications at low temperatures, 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Simon, N. J.

    1984-05-01

    Work leading toward development of strong, tough structural alloys for use in superconducting magnets of magnetic fusion power plants is reported. Low temperature studies were conducted to assess the quantitative dependence of the yield strength, density, and elastic constants of AISI 304 stainless steels upon carbon and nitrogen concentration. Tensile property measurements of developmental austenitic steels confirmed the dependence of yield strength upon temperature. Evidence is presented to show that the flow strength and austenite stability of stainless steels are not significantly affected by 8-T fields at 4 K. Instrumentation developed for low temperature testing included a computer assisted apparatus used to measure threshold fatigue. Low temperature welding research involved an investigation of the weld reinforcement effect on the weld joint strength and measurements of the 4 K fracture toughness of magnesium-chromium steel weldments and electroodes. In the area of non-metallics, a standardized test specimen was devised to aid in screening radiation-resistant composites for magnet insulation. Mechanical properties of concrete mortar and polyurethane foam at 4 K are reported.

  17. Acceleration of solid hydrogen pellet using augmented railgun for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Kim, K.; King, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    A 1.2-m long electromagnetic railgun with separate augmentation was designed, fabricated, and tested for the purpose of injecting hypervelocity hydrogen pellets into magnetic fusion devices for refueling. A compact configuration of two pairs of coaxial rails insulated by thin Kapton film was employed. Two pulse-forming networks were used to separately control the duration, amplitude, and overlap of the current pulses. Copper sulfate resistors were employed as impedance-matching resistors and bank short resistors. The magnetic field inside the gun bore was boosted by the high current on the augmentation rails, which in turn increased the J x B force without increasing the armature current, resulting in less ablation of the gun bore and pellet. Higher acceleration was achieved due to reduced inertial and viscous frag. Using a 1.2-m augmented railgun, hydrogen pellet velocities in excess of 2.5 km/s were achieved. Hydrogen pellet accelerations as high as 4.4 {times} 10{sup 6} m/s{sup 2} were achieved at a railgun current of 13.5 kA while the acceleration obtained on a conventional railgun was 2.2 {times} 10{sup 6} m/s{sup 2} at 14.1 kA. Computer simulations have been performed using the finite element code MSC/EMAS to analyze the current density, magnetic field, Lorentz force, and inductance gradient of the conventional and augmented railguns.

  18. Alternatives to Rare Earth Permanent Magnets for Energy Harvesting Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazdozian, Helena; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Direct-drive permanent magnet generators (DDPMGs) offer increased reliability and efficiency over the more commonly used geared doubly-fed induction generator, yet are only employed in less than 1 percent of utility scale wind turbines in the U.S. One major barrier to increased deployment of DDPMGs in the U.S. wind industry is NdFeB permanent magnets (PMs), which contain critical rare earth elements Nd and Dy. To allow for the use of rare earth free PMs, the magnetic loading, defined as the average magnetic flux density over the rotor surface, must be maintained. Halbach cylinders are employed in 3.5kW Halbach PMGs (HPMGs) of varying slot-to-pole ratio to concentrate the magnetic flux output by a lower energy density PM over the rotor surface. We found that for high pole and slot number, the increase in magnetic loading is sufficient to allow for the use of strontium iron oxide hard ferrite PMs and achieved rated performance. Joule losses in the stator windings were found to increase for the hard ferrite PMs due to increased inductance in the stator windings. However, for scaling of the HPMG designs to 3MW, rated performance and high efficiency were achieved, demonstrating the potential for elimination for rare earth PMs in commercial scale wind turbines. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1069283 and a Barbara and James Palmer Endowment at Iowa State University.

  19. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror Magnetic Fusion Energy Power Plant with Thick Liquid-Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W; Rognlien, T D

    2006-04-26

    A fusion power plant is described that utilizes a new version of the tandem mirror device including spinning liquid walls. The magnetic configuration is evaluated with an axisymmetric equilibrium code predicting an average beta of 60%. The geometry allows a flowing molten salt, (flibe-Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), which protects the walls and structures from damage arising from neutrons and plasma particles. The free surface between the liquid and the burning plasma is heated by bremsstrahlung radiation, line radiation, and by neutrons. The temperature of the free surface of the liquid is calculated, and then the evaporation rate is estimated from vapor-pressure data. The allowed impurity concentration in the burning plasma is taken as 1% fluorine, which gives a 17% reduction in the fusion power owing to D/T fuel dilution, with F line-radiation causing minor power degradation. The end leakage power density of 0.6 MW/m{sup 2} is readily handled by liquid jets. The tritium breeding is adequate with natural lithium. A number of problem areas are identified that need further study to make the design more self-consistent and workable; however, the simple geometry and the use of liquid walls promise the cost of power competitive with that from fission and coal.

  20. Alpha Particles Play a Relatively Minor Role in Magnetized Target Fusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2002-03-15

    Two problems related to alpha particle physics in magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems are briefly discussed. First, we evaluate the pressure and density of alpha particles under the assumption that they are perfectly confined and have a classical slowing-down distribution. It turns out that because of a comparatively low plasma temperature in MTF systems, the relative pressure and density of alpha particles are more than an order of magnitude less than in fusion reactors based on ITER-type tokamaks. Therefore, one may expect that even in the extreme case of a perfect confinement of alpha particles, their presence will have a much weaker (than in the case of tokamaks) effect on plasma stability and transport. Second, we discuss the kinetics of plasma burn under the opposite extreme assumption that all the alpha particles are instantaneously lost, without leaving any energy in a plasma. It turns out that even in this case, the plasma energy yield in batch-burn systems is only weakly affected by burnout effects.

  1. Avalanche boron fusion by laser picosecond block ignition with magnetic trapping for clean and economic reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Hora, H.; Korn, G.; Eliezer, S.; ...

    2016-10-11

    Measured highly elevated gains of proton–boron (HB11) fusion (Picciottoet al., Phys. Rev. X4, 031030 (2014)) confirmed the exceptional avalanche reaction process (Lalousiset al., Laser Part. Beams 32, 409 (2014); Horaet al., Laser Part. Beams33, 607 (2015)) for the combination of the non-thermal block ignition using ultrahigh intensity laser pulses of picoseconds duration. The ultrahigh accelerationabovemore » $$10^{20}~\\text{cm}~\\text{s}^{-2}$$ for plasma blocks was theoretically and numerically predicted since 1978 (Hora,Physics of Laser Driven Plasmas(Wiley, 1981), pp. 178 and 179) and measured (Sauerbrey, Phys. Plasmas3, 4712 (1996)) in exact agreement (Horaet al., Phys. Plasmas14, 072701 (2007)) when the dominating force was overcoming thermal processes. This is based on Maxwell’s stress tensor by the dielectric properties of plasma leading to the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force $$f_{\\text{NL}}$$ resulting in ultra-fast expanding plasma blocks by a dielectric explosion. Combining this with measured ultrahigh magnetic fields and the avalanche process opens an option for an environmentally absolute clean and economic boron fusion power reactor. Finally, this is supported also by other experiments with very high HB11 reactions under different conditions (Labauneet al., Nature Commun.4, 2506 (2013)).« less

  2. Progress in theory and simulation of ion cyclotron emission from magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Chapman, Ben; Chapman, Sandra; Cook, James; Reman, Bernard; McClements, Ken; Carbajal, Leopoldo

    2016-10-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is detected from all large tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Its frequency spectrum has narrow peaks at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population (fusion-born or neutral beam-injected) at the outer edge of the plasma. ICE was the first collective radiative instability driven by confined fusion-born ions observed in deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR, and the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability is the most likely emission mechanism. Contemporary ICE measurements are taken at very high sampling rates from the LHD stellarator and from the conventional aspect ratio KSTAR tokamak. A correspondingly advanced modelling capability for the ICE emission mechanism has been developed using 1D3V PIC and hybrid-PIC codes, supplemented by analytical theory. These kinetic codes simulate the self-consistent full orbit dynamics of energetic and thermal ions, together with the electric and magnetic fields and the electrons. We report recent progress in theory and simulation that addresses: the scaling of ICE intensity with energetic particle density; the transition between super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes for the collectively radiating particles; and the rapid time evolution that is seen for some ICE measurements. This work was supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/I501045] and by Euratom.

  3. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ∼60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates compartmental muscle mechanisms of human vertical fusional vergence

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical fusional vergence (VFV) normally compensates for slight vertical heterophorias. We employed magnetic resonance imaging to clarify extraocular muscle contributions to VFV induced by monocular two-prism diopter (1.15°) base-up prism in 14 normal adults. Fusion during prism viewing requires monocular infraduction. Scans were repeated without prism, and with prism shifted contralaterally. Contractility indicated by morphometric indexes was separately analyzed in medial and lateral vertical rectus and superior oblique (SO) putative compartments, and superior and inferior horizontal rectus extraocular muscle putative compartments, but in the whole inferior oblique (IO). Images confirmed appropriate VFV that was implemented by the inferior rectus (IR) medial compartment contracting ipsilateral and relaxing contralateral to prism. There was no significant contractility in the IR lateral compartment. The superior but not inferior lateral rectus (LR) compartment contracted significantly in the prism viewing eye, but not contralateral to prism. The IO contracted ipsilateral but not contralateral to the prism. In the infraducting eye, the SO medial compartment relaxed significantly, while the lateral compartment was unchanged; contralateral to prism, the SO lateral compartment contracted, while the medial compartment was unchanged. There was no contractility in the superior or medial rectus muscles in either eye. There was no globe retraction. We conclude that the vertical component of VFV is primarily implemented by IR medial compartment contraction. Since appropriate vertical rotation is not directly implemented, or is opposed, by associated differential LR and SO compartmental activity, and IO contraction, these actions probably implement a torsional component of VFV. PMID:25589593

  5. Improved fusion performance in low-q, low triangularity plasmas with negative central magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E.J.; Casper, T.N.; Chu, M.S.

    1996-07-01

    Fusion performance in DIII-D low-q single-null divertor discharges has doubled as a result of improved confinement and stability, achieved through modification of pressure and current density profiles. These discharges extend the regime of neoclassical core confinement associated with negative or weak central magnetic shear to plasmas with the low safety factor (q{sub 95}{approximately}3) and triangularity ({delta}{approximately}0.3) anticipated in future tokamaks such as ITER. Energy confinement times exceed the ITER-89P L- mode scaling law by up to a factor of 4, and are almost twice as large as in previous single-null cases with 3{le}q{sub 95}{le}4. The normalized beta [{beta}(aB/I)] reaches values as high as 4, comparable to the best previous single-null discharges. Although high triangularity allows a larger plasma current, the fusion gain in these low triangularity plasmas is similar to that of high triangularity double-null plasmas at the same plasma current. These results are encouraging for advanced performance operation in ITER and for D-T experiments in JET.

  6. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    SciTech Connect

    Siemon, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations (FRC's that contain purely poloidal field).

  7. 'Optical' soft x-ray arrays for fluctuation diagnostics in magnetic fusion energy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.; Johnson, D.; Majeski, R.

    2004-10-01

    We are developing large pixel count, fast ({>=}100 kHz) and continuously sampling soft x-ray (SXR) array for the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and turbulent fluctuations in magnetic fusion energy plasmas. The arrays are based on efficient scintillators, high thoughput multiclad fiber optics, and multichannel light amplification and integration. Compared to conventional x-ray diode arrays, such systems can provide vastly increased spatial coverage, and access to difficult locations with small neutron noise and damage. An eight-channel array has been built using columnar CsI:Tl as an SXR converter and a multianode photomultiplier tube as photoamplifier. The overall system efficiency is measured using laboratory SXR sources, while the time response and signal-to-noise performance have been evaluated by recording MHD activity from the spherical tori (ST) Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade and National Spherical Torus Experiment, both at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  8. Geodesic least squares regression for scaling studies in magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoolaege, Geert

    2015-01-01

    In regression analyses for deriving scaling laws that occur in various scientific disciplines, usually standard regression methods have been applied, of which ordinary least squares (OLS) is the most popular. However, concerns have been raised with respect to several assumptions underlying OLS in its application to scaling laws. We here discuss a new regression method that is robust in the presence of significant uncertainty on both the data and the regression model. The method, which we call geodesic least squares regression (GLS), is based on minimization of the Rao geodesic distance on a probabilistic manifold. We demonstrate the superiority of the method using synthetic data and we present an application to the scaling law for the power threshold for the transition to the high confinement regime in magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  9. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  10. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; ...

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metalmore » contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.« less

  11. Verification of a Multiphysics Toolkit against the Magnetized Target Fusion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Scott; Perrell, Eric; Liron, Caroline; Chiroux, Robert; Cassibry, Jason; Adams, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    In the spring of 2004 the Advanced Concepts team at MSFC embarked on an ambitious project to develop a suite of modeling routines that would interact with one another. The tools would each numerically model a portion of any advanced propulsion system. The tools were divided by physics categories, hence the name multiphysics toolset. Currently most of the anticipated modeling tools have been created and integrated. Results are given in this paper for both a quarter nozzle with chemically reacting flow and the interaction of two plasma jets representative of a Magnetized Target Fusion device. The results have not been calibrated against real data as of yet, but this paper demonstrates the current capability of the multiphysics tool and planned future enhancements

  12. Invited Review Article: Gas puff imaging diagnostics of edge plasma turbulence in magnetic fusion devices

    DOE PAGES

    Zweben, S. J.; Terry, J. L.; Stotler, D. P.; ...

    2017-04-27

    Gas puff imaging (GPI) is a diagnostic of plasma turbulence which uses a puff of neutral gas at the plasma edge to increase the local visible light emission for improved space-time resolution of plasma fluctuations. This paper reviews gas puff imaging diagnostics of edge plasma turbulence in magnetic fusion research, with a focus on the instrumentation, diagnostic cross-checks, and interpretation issues. The gas puff imaging hardware, optics, and detectors are described for about 10 GPI systems implemented over the past similar to 15 years. Comparison of GPI results with other edge turbulence diagnostic results is described, and many common featuresmore » are observed. Here, several issues in the interpretation of GPI measurements are discussed, and potential improvements in hardware and modeling are suggested.« less

  13. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited).

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Maddox, J; Pablant, N; Hill, K; Bitter, M; Rice, J E; Granetz, R; Hubbard, A; Irby, J; Greenwald, M; Marmar, E; Tritz, K; Stutman, D; Stratton, B; Efthimion, P

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  14. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  15. Outgassing tests on materials used in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Holtrop, K.L.; Hansink, M.; Kellman, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    In order to achieve high performance plasma discharges in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak, impurity levels must be carefully controlled. Since first wall materials can desorb volatile impurities during these discharges, it is important to characterize and control the outgassing of these materials. An outgassing chamber was built to measure the outgassing properties of various materials used in the DIII-D vessel. The results of pump-down tests performed on ATJ graphite, thin Grafoil {reg_sign} gaskets, and MgO coaxial cables will be presented. In addition to pumpdown tests it was desired to study the behavior of the materials at temperatures up to 400 C, which is the maximum temperature to which the DIII-D vessel is baked. The station was modified to include independent heating control of the sample and a simple load-lock chamber.

  16. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  17. Atomic and Molecular Collisional Radiative Modeling for Spectroscopy of Low Temperature and Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D.

    2011-05-11

    The quantitative analysis of spectroscopic data from low temperature plasmas is strongly supported from collisional radiative (CR) modeling. Low pressure plasmas for basic research in the lab and for industrial use have several aspects in common with the cold edge of magnetic fusion plasmas. On the basis of applications of CR modeling for atomic and molecular hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and diatomic radicals such as CH and C{sub 2}, the relevance of individual processes for data interpretation is demonstrated for ionizing and recombining plasmas. Examples of such processes are opacity, dissociative excitation, dissociative recombination, mutual neutralization, and energy pooling. It is shown that the benchmark of CR modeling with experimental data can be used to identify problems in the ingoing data set of cross sections and rate coefficients. Using the flexible solver Yacora, the capability of CR modeling of low temperature plasmas is highlighted.

  18. Evidence for Critical Energy for Ion Confinement in Magnetic Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Hester, Tim; Scott, Dan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    It is shown here that fusion test reactors could not ignite for half-a-century because trials were conducted at thermonuclear ion energies 10-30 KeV, an order of magnitude lower than critical energy, Ec ~ 200 KeV. At subcritical energies, plasma is destroyed by neutralization of ions via overlooked atomic (non-nuclear) charge transfer collisions with giant cross-section, 109 barns, 100 times greater than that for ionization collisions that counters neutralization. Neutral injection sets limit on ion magnetic confinement time <10-6 s vs. >1 s required for ignition. In contrast, at energies above Ec, ionization prevails; near ~ 1 MeV, stable confinement of 20 s was routinely observed with charged injection. - To render ITER viable, ion energy must be increased to >/ = 1 MeV; neutral radioactive DT fuel replaced with charged, nonradioactive deuterium, giving rise to compact aneutronicreactor with direct conversion into RF power.

  19. Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawan, M. E.; Ghoniem, N. M.; Snead, L.; Katoh, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation damage parameters in SiC/SiC composite structures are determined in both magnetic (MFE) and inertial (IFE) confinement fusion systems. Variations in the geometry, neutron energy spectrum, and pulsed nature of neutron production result in significant differences in damage parameters between the two systems. With the same neutron wall loading, the displacement damage rate in the first wall in an IFE system is ˜10% lower than in an MFE system, while gas production and burnup rates are a factor of 2 lower. Self-cooled LiPb and Flibe blankets were analyzed. While using LiPb results in higher displacement damage, Flibe yields higher gas production and burnup rates. The effects of displacement damage and helium production on defect accumulation in SiC/SiC composites are also discussed.

  20. Efficacy of Combined Magnetic Field Treatment on Spinal Fusion: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mark; Drew, Brian; Sprague, Sheila; Aleem, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures place significant burdens on patients, caregivers, and the healthcare system at large. Nonunion is a frequent complication following vertebral fracture treatment, often resulting in significant patient pain and morbidity. Bone growth stimulators are an adjunct treatment modality proposed to increase rates of fracture healing. Combined magnetic field (CMF) bone growth stimulators have specifically been shown to increase union rates in patients with vertebral fractures. Certain populations, such as the elderly, postmenopausal women, and smokers, have demonstrated a preferentially greater response to CMF treatment. The present review focuses on the mechanism of action, efficacy, cost effectiveness, indications, contraindications, and safety of CMF treatment as an adjunct treatment for vertebral fractures. Future large high-quality investigations of adjunct CMF treatment for spine fusion patients focusing on patient-important outcomes are warranted.

  1. Geodesic least squares regression for scaling studies in magnetic confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Verdoolaege, Geert

    2015-01-13

    In regression analyses for deriving scaling laws that occur in various scientific disciplines, usually standard regression methods have been applied, of which ordinary least squares (OLS) is the most popular. However, concerns have been raised with respect to several assumptions underlying OLS in its application to scaling laws. We here discuss a new regression method that is robust in the presence of significant uncertainty on both the data and the regression model. The method, which we call geodesic least squares regression (GLS), is based on minimization of the Rao geodesic distance on a probabilistic manifold. We demonstrate the superiority of the method using synthetic data and we present an application to the scaling law for the power threshold for the transition to the high confinement regime in magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  2. BCR/ABL1 fusion transcripts generated from alternative splicing: implications for future targeted therapies in Ph+ leukaemias.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, P; Summa, V; De Santis, S; Signori, E; Picardi, E; Pesole, G; Saglio, G; Fazio, V M

    2012-06-01

    Philadelphia (Ph+) positive leukaemias are an example of haematological malignant diseases where different chromosomal rearrangements involving both BCR and ABL1 genes generate a variety of chimeric proteins (BCR/ABL1 p210, p190 and p230) which are considered pathological "biomarkers". In addition to these three, there is a variety of fusion transcripts whose origin may depend either on diverse genetic rearrangement or on alternative/atypical splicing of the main mRNAs or on the occurrence of single-point mutations. Although the therapy of Ph+ leukaemias based on Imatinib represents a triumph of medicine, not all patients benefit from such drug and may show resistance and intolerance. Furthermore, interruption of Imatinib administration is often followed by clinical relapse, suggesting a failure in the eradication of residual leukaemic stem cells. Therefore, while the targeted therapy is searching for new and implemented pharmacological inhibitors covering all the possible mutations in the kinase domain, there is urge to identify alternative molecular targets to develop other specific and effective therapeutic approaches. In this review we discuss the importance of recent advances based on the discovery of novel BCR/ABL1 variants and their potential role as new targets/biomarkers of Ph+ leukaemias in the light of the current therapeutic trends. The limits of the pharmacological inhibitors used for treating the disease can be overcome by considering other targets than the kinase enzyme. Our evaluations highlight the potential of alternative perspectives in the therapy of Ph+ leukaemias.

  3. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Stygar, William A.; Gomez, Matthew R.; ...

    2016-02-04

    In this study, the MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion–relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values:more » i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.« less

  4. CECE alternative for upgrading/detritiation in heavy water nuclear reactors and for tritium recovery in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, D.A.; Miller, A.I.

    1995-10-01

    The Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process, utilizing AECL`s wetproofed catalyst, is ideally suited for extracting tritium from water because of its high isotopic separation factor and near-ambient operating conditions. Several CECE options are compared with the more conventional DW-VPCE arrangements for heavy water upgrading and detritiation of CANDU nuclear reactors and for detritiation of fusion facilities such as ITER. For both applications, CECE offers a more economical alternative over conventional technology. Experimental data on catalyst activity and lifetime are also presented and past commercial applications of the AECL catalyst are reviewed. AECL has recently committed to assembly of a CECE upgrading/detritiation demonstration facility. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Fusion connection: contributions to industry, defense, and basic science resulting from scientific advances made in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, T.; Woo, J.; Temkin, R.; Anderson, D.; Anderson, J.; Barbosa, D.; Briggs, R.; Callen, J.; Colgate, S.; Cowles, J.

    1985-10-01

    Fusion research has led to significant contributions in many different areas of industry, defense, and basic science. This diversity is represented visually in the introductory figure which shows both a radio galaxy, and a microchip produced by plasma etching. Some of these spin-off technologies are discussed.

  6. The Inverse Z-Pinch as a Physics Test Bed, and a Possible Target Plasma for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, Irvin; Bauer, Bruno; Fuelling, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Ronald; Makhin, Volodymyr; Presura, Radu; Sheehey, Peter; Siemon, Richard

    2002-12-01

    From an overall fusion system perspective, there remains an untested and interesting possibility of compressing a magnetized target plasma with beta greater than unity by a magnetically driven imploding liner, or other target pusher driver. This approach, known as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), operates in an intermediate density regime and time scale between magnetic and inertial fusion, which are separated by twelve orders of magnitude. Even if magnetized plasma transport is Bohm-like, fusion gain in the MTF parameter space appears accessible with existing drivers, which means MTF does not require a major financial investment in driver technology. The physics of plasma confinement by material walls, and the thermal transport of magnetized high-beta plasma in the MTF regime, has received relatively little study theoretically, computationally, or experimentally. This paper describes a proposed experiment to test wall confinement in a regime of plasma parameters relevant to MTF. The geometry being considered is an inverse pinch designed to heat plasma to 100-eV temperatures. By using a current crowbar, the plasma formed in the pinch can be held against an outer wall (the return conductor) and the rate of cooling can be measured and compared with predictions from theory and numerical models. The well-benchmarked two-dimensional radiation-MHD code MHRDR is being used to guide the design activity. The existing 2-terawatt Zebra generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility is the power supply under consideration. Results from the code show adequate heating, formation of a quasi-static magnetic equilibrium, and a near-classical cooling rate to a room temperature boundary, even in the presence of substantial plasma convection.

  7. Hand Pose Estimation by Fusion of Inertial and Magnetic Sensing Aided by a Permanent Magnet.

    PubMed

    Kortier, Henk G; Antonsson, Jacob; Schepers, H Martin; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Veltink, Peter H

    2015-09-01

    Tracking human body motions using inertial sensors has become a well-accepted method in ambulatory applications since the subject is not confined to a lab-bounded volume. However, a major drawback is the inability to estimate relative body positions over time because inertial sensor information only allows position tracking through strapdown integration, but does not provide any information about relative positions. In addition, strapdown integration inherently results in drift of the estimated position over time. We propose a novel method in which a permanent magnet combined with 3-D magnetometers and 3-D inertial sensors are used to estimate the global trunk orientation and relative pose of the hand with respect to the trunk. An Extended Kalman Filter is presented to fuse estimates obtained from inertial sensors with magnetic updates such that the position and orientation between the human hand and trunk as well as the global trunk orientation can be estimated robustly. This has been demonstrated in multiple experiments in which various hand tasks were performed. The most complex task in which simultaneous movements of both trunk and hand were performed resulted in an average rms position difference with an optical reference system of 19.7±2.2 mm whereas the relative trunk-hand and global trunk orientation error was 2.3±0.9 and 8.6±8.7 deg respectively.

  8. The economic effect of using magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance ultrasound fusion biopsy for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ryan C; Costa, Daniel N; Lotan, Yair

    2016-07-01

    Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a maturing imaging modality that has been used to improve detection and staging of prostate cancer. The goal of this review is to evaluate the economic effect of the use of MRI and MRI fusion in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. A literature review was used to identify articles regarding efficacy and cost of MRI and MRI-guided biopsies. There are currently a limited number of studies evaluating cost of incorporating MRI into clinical practice. These studies are primarily models projecting cost estimates based on meta-analyses of the literature. There is considerable variance in the effectiveness of MRI-guided biopsies, both cognitive and fusion, based on user experience, type of MRI (3T vs. 1.5T), use of endorectal coil and type of scoring system for abnormalities such that there is still potential for improvement in accuracy. There is also variability in assumed costs of incorporating MRI into clinical practice. The addition of MRI to the diagnostic algorithm for prostate cancer has caused a shift in how we understand the disease and in what tumors are found on initial and repeat biopsies. Further risk stratification may allow more men to pursue noncurative therapy, which in and of itself is cost-effective in properly selected men. As prostate cancer care comes under increasing scrutiny on a national level, there is pressure on providers to be more accurate in their diagnoses. This in turn can lead to additional testing including Multiparametric MRI, which adds upfront cost. Whether the additional cost of prostate MRI is warranted in detection of prostate cancer is an area of intense research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimating Orientation Using Magnetic and Inertial Sensors and Different Sensor Fusion Approaches: Accuracy Assessment in Manual and Locomotion Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bergamini, Elena; Ligorio, Gabriele; Summa, Aurora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units are an emerging technology to obtain 3D orientation of body segments in human movement analysis. In this respect, sensor fusion is used to limit the drift errors resulting from the gyroscope data integration by exploiting accelerometer and magnetic aiding sensors. The present study aims at investigating the effectiveness of sensor fusion methods under different experimental conditions. Manual and locomotion tasks, differing in time duration, measurement volume, presence/absence of static phases, and out-of-plane movements, were performed by six subjects, and recorded by one unit located on the forearm or the lower trunk, respectively. Two sensor fusion methods, representative of the stochastic (Extended Kalman Filter) and complementary (Non-linear observer) filtering, were selected, and their accuracy was assessed in terms of attitude (pitch and roll angles) and heading (yaw angle) errors using stereophotogrammetric data as a reference. The sensor fusion approaches provided significantly more accurate results than gyroscope data integration. Accuracy improved mostly for heading and when the movement exhibited stationary phases, evenly distributed 3D rotations, it occurred in a small volume, and its duration was greater than approximately 20 s. These results were independent from the specific sensor fusion method used. Practice guidelines for improving the outcome accuracy are provided. PMID:25302810

  10. How To Create Alternative, Magnet, and Charter Schools That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Robert D.; Parrett, William H.

    In the early 1970s, pessimism about public education in the United States was on the rise. To counter this outlook, researchers held a conference to identify public schools that were humane, caring, and effective, and from this conference arose a heightened awareness of alternative schools and their place in education. Subsequent years of…

  11. The Status of Research Regarding Magnetic Mirrors as a Fusion Neutron Source or Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T

    2008-12-23

    experiments have confirmed the physics of effluent plasma stabilization predicted by theory. The plasma had a mean ion energy of 10 keV and a density of 5e19m-3. If successful, the axisymmetric tandem mirror extension of the GDT idea could lead to a Q {approx} 10 power plant of modest size and would yield important applications at lower Q. In addition to the GDT method, there are four other ways to augment stability that have been demonstrated; including: plasma rotation (MCX), diverter coils (Tara), pondermotive (Phaedrus & Tara), and end wall funnel shape (Nizhni Novgorod). There are also 5 stabilization techniques predicted, but not yet demonstrated: expander kinetic pressure (KSTM-Post), Pulsed ECH Dynamic Stabilization (Post), wall stabilization (Berk), non-paraxial end mirrors (Ryutov), and cusp ends (Kesner). While these options should be examined further together with conceptual engineering designs. Physics issues that need further analysis include: electron confinement, MHD and trapped particle modes, analysis of micro stability, radial transport, evaluation and optimization of Q, and the plasma density needed to bridge to the expansion-region. While promising all should be examined through increased theory effort, university-scale experiments, and through increased international collaboration with the substantial facilities in Russia and Japan The conventional wisdom of magnetic mirrors was that they would never work as a fusion concept for a number of reasons. This conventional wisdom is most probably all wrong or not applicable, especially for applications such as low Q (DT Neutron Source) aimed at materials testing or for a Q {approx} 3-5 fusion neutron source applied to destroying actinides in fission waste and breeding of fissile fuel.

  12. Economic potential of inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1984-04-01

    Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

  13. The role of mix in inhibiting ignition in inertial confinement fusion schemes driven by either X-ray ablation or magnetized liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittenden, J.; Appelbe, B.; Niasse, N.; Pecover, J.; Taylor, S.

    2013-10-01

    We report on investigations into how mix can prevent the ignition of hotspot fuel in ICF schemes. In the mainstream approach using X-ray driven ablation, surface defects can be amplified by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability during ablation leading to feed-through of the ablator material which contaminates the hotspot material leading to radiative losses. Even without this feed through, asymmetries arising at the interface between the hotspot and the cold dense fuel layer are amplified by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability during the deceleration phase, leading to mixing of the dense cold fuel layer into the hotspot. This pulls material with low specific enthalpy into the hotpot, lowering the average hotspot temperature and quenching the burn. An alternative approach to achieving ignition is the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion scheme, where the fuel is rapidly compressed within a metallic liner using the magnetic pressure generated by a current of several mega-amps. Here the growth of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability can generate asymmetries in the target which promote the mix of the metallic liner with the fuel or mix of the cold dense regions of fuel with the central hotspot. In this talk we make use of large scale 3D radiation hydrodynamics and MHD models of X-ray driven and liner driven fusion schemes to highlight the roles played by mix in each case. We show that thermal conduction sets characteristic spatial scales, below which mix of the cold fuel with the hotspot becomes increasingly important.

  14. LDRD final report on confinement of cluster fusion plasmas with magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, Jeffrey W.; Kellogg, Jeffrey W.; Headley, Daniel Ignacio; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Waugh, Caleb J.; Lewis, Sean M.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Wisher, Matthew; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Bengtson, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Two versions of a current driver for single-turn, single-use 1-cm diameter magnetic field coils have been built and tested at the Sandia National Laboratories for use with cluster fusion experiments at the University of Texas in Austin. These coils are used to provide axial magnetic fields to slow radial loss of electrons from laser-produced deuterium plasmas. Typical peak field strength achievable for the two-capacitor system is 50 T, and 200 T for the ten-capacitor system. Current rise time for both systems is about 1.7 {mu}s, with peak current of 500 kA and 2 MA, respectively. Because the coil must be brought to the laser, the driver needs to be portable and drive currents in vacuum. The drivers are complete but laser-plasma experiments are still in progress. Therefore, in this report, we focus on system design, initial tests, and performance characteristics of the two-capacitor and ten-capacitors systems. The questions of whether a 200 T magnetic field can retard the breakup of a cluster-fusion plasma, and whether this field can enhance neutron production have not yet been answered. However, tools have been developed that will enable producing the magnetic fields needed to answer these questions. These are a two-capacitor, 400-kA system that was delivered to the University of Texas in 2010, and a 2-MA ten-capacitor system delivered this year. The first system allowed initial testing, and the second system will be able to produce the 200 T magnetic fields needed for cluster fusion experiments with a petawatt laser. The prototype 400-kA magnetic field driver system was designed and built to test the design concept for the system, and to verify that a portable driver system could be built that delivers current to a magnetic field coil in vacuum. This system was built copying a design from a fixed-facility, high-field machine at LANL, but made to be portable and to use a Z-machine-like vacuum insulator and vacuum transmission line. This system was sent to the

  15. Study of laser preheat in magnetic liner inertial fusion using the AMR code FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Marissa; Jennings, Christopher; Slutz, Stephen; Peterson, Kyle; Gourdain, Pierre-Alexandre; University of Rochester; Sandia National Laboratories Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) on the Z Pulsed Power Accelerator involves three processes: magnetization, preheat, and compression. An issue with this scheme is the development of instabilities during laser preheat, where the Z-Beamlet laser system may not deposit energy into deuterium fuel uniformly. This study explores potential mixing between liner and fuel, and inner imprinting of seeds on a beryllium liner that may generate late instability growth and shear, using the Eulerian AMR code FLASH. We further investigate potential instability implications of an additional layer of deuterium-tritium ice, as has been proposed and assess the sensitivity of MagLIF implosions to axial variations in fuel preheat; meanwhile testing the expediency of FLASH for these scenarios. FLASH was developed in part by the DOE NNSA ASC and DOE Office of Science ASCR-supported Flash Center at the University of Chicago. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin comapny, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Classification of brain disease in magnetic resonance images using two-stage local feature fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Li, Wu; Yang, Yehui

    2017-01-01

    Background Many classification methods have been proposed based on magnetic resonance images. Most methods rely on measures such as volume, the cerebral cortical thickness and grey matter density. These measures are susceptible to the performance of registration and limited in representation of anatomical structure. This paper proposes a two-stage local feature fusion method, in which deformable registration is not desired and anatomical information is represented from moderate scale. Methods Keypoints are firstly extracted from scale-space to represent anatomical structure. Then, two kinds of local features are calculated around the keypoints, one for correspondence and the other for representation. Scores are assigned for keypoints to quantify their effect in classification. The sum of scores for all effective keypoints is used to determine which group the test subject belongs to. Results We apply this method to magnetic resonance images of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. The advantage of local feature in correspondence and representation contributes to the final classification. With the help of local feature (Scale Invariant Feature Transform, SIFT) in correspondence, the performance becomes better. Local feature (Histogram of Oriented Gradient, HOG) extracted from 16×16 cell block obtains better results compared with 4×4 and 8×8 cell block. Discussion This paper presents a method which combines the effect of SIFT descriptor in correspondence and the representation ability of HOG descriptor in anatomical structure. This method has the potential in distinguishing patients with brain disease from controls. PMID:28207873

  17. Modification of stagnation conditions in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion via thick dielectric coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E. C.; Peterson, K. J.; Awe, T. J.; Ampleford, D. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Weis, M. R.; Chandler, G. A.; Hahn, K. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Rochau, G. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Yu, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories use approximately 20 MA of current to implode a metal cylinder, which contains axially-magnetized, laser-heated deuterium fuel. MagLIF experiments have demonstrated primary DD neutron yields up to 3e12 with burn averaged ion temperatures of 2.5 keV. X-ray emission at stagnation, recorded with a spherically-bent crystal imager, shows a weakly-helical structure with axial variations in intensity. Previously, the application of a thick dielectric coating to the exterior of an imploding cylinder has shown improved stability of the cylinder throughout the implosion. We recently demonstrated that adding a dielectric coating to a MagLIF target produces a cylindrical, rather than helical, stagnation column with reduced axial variations in intensity. There are also indications of decreased late-time mix in the x-ray spectra. This is consistent with a more uniform, stable stagnation column. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Development of effective power supply using electric double layer capacitor for static magnetic field coils in fusion plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, M; Abe, K; Yamada, T; Kuwahata, A; Kamio, S; Cao, Q H; Sakumura, M; Suzuki, N; Watanabe, T; Ono, Y

    2011-02-01

    A cost-effective power supply for static magnetic field coils used in fusion plasma experiments has been developed by application of an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). A prototype EDLC power supply system was constructed in the form of a series LCR circuit. Coil current of 100 A with flat-top longer than 1 s was successfully supplied to an equilibrium field coil of a fusion plasma experimental apparatus by a single EDLC module with capacitance of 30 F. The present EDLC power supply has revealed sufficient performance for plasma confinement experiments whose discharge duration times are an order of several seconds.

  19. Use of fusion images of I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine, SPECT, and magnetic resonance studies to identify a malignant pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Fujita, A; Hyodoh, H; Kawamura, Y; Kanegae, K; Furuse, M; Kanazawa, K

    2000-06-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a chromaffin tumor in which 10% are extra-adrenal and 10% are malignant. I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy has an important role in the identification of these tumors and investigation of metastatic lesions. The authors describe a 36-year-old woman who underwent resection of a malignant left adrenal pheochromocytoma who was thought to have metastases in the liver and para-aortic lymph nodes. Fusion images of I-131 MIBG SPECT and magnetic resonance studies were obtained to properly identify the metastatic lesions. These fusion images helped greatly in subsequent surgery.

  20. SOLVING THE STAND-OFF PROBLEM FOR MAGNETIZED TARGET FUSION: PLASMA STREAMS AS DISPOSABLE ELECTRODES, PLUS A LOCAL SPHERICAL BLANKET

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Thio, Y F

    2006-03-21

    In a fusion reactor based on the Magnetized Target Fusion approach, the permanent power supply has to deliver currents up to a few mega-amperes to the target dropped into the reaction chamber. All the structures situated around the target will be destroyed after every pulse and have to be replaced at a frequency of 1 to 10 Hz. In this paper, an approach based on the use of spherical blanket surrounding the target, and pulsed plasma electrodes connecting the target to the power supply, is discussed. A brief physic analysis of the processes associated with creation of plasma electrodes is discussed.

  1. Separation of two attractive ferromagnetic ellipsoidal particles by hydrodynamic interactions under alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Micheline; Bossis, Georges

    2017-06-01

    In applications where magnetic particles are used to detect and dose targeted molecules, it is of major importance to prevent particle clustering and aggregation during the capture stage in order to maximize the capture rate. Elongated ferromagnetic particles can be more interesting than spherical ones due to their large magnetic moment, which facilitates their separation by magnets or the detection by optical measurement of their orientation relaxation time. Under alternating magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of elongated ferromagnetic particles results from the balance between magnetic torque that tends to align the particle axis with the field direction and viscous torque. As for their translational motion, it results from a competition between direct magnetic particle-particle interactions and solvent-flow-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. Due to particle anisotropy, this may lead to intricate translation-rotation couplings. Using numerical simulations and theoretical modeling of the system, we show that two ellipsoidal magnetic particles, initially in a head-to-tail attractive configuration resulting from their remnant magnetization, can repel each other due to hydrodynamic interactions when alternating field is operated. The separation takes place in a range of low frequencies fc 1magnetic field to particle magnetization strength, whereas fc 1 tends to zero when this ratio increases.

  2. Magnetic domain observation of FeCo thin films fabricated by alternate monoatomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsuki, T. Kotsugi, M.; Ohkochi, T.; Kojima, T.; Mizuguchi, M.; Takanashi, K.

    2014-01-28

    FeCo thin films are fabricated by alternate monoatomic layer deposition method on a Cu{sub 3}Au buffer layer, which in-plane lattice constant is very close to the predicted value to obtain a large magnetic anisotropy constant. The variation of the in-plane lattice constant during the deposition process is investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The magnetic domain images are also observed by a photoelectron emission microscope in order to microscopically understand the magnetic structure. As a result, element-specific magnetic domain images show that Fe and Co magnetic moments align parallel. A series of images obtained with various azimuth reveal that the FeCo thin films show fourfold in-plane magnetic anisotropy along 〈110〉 direction, and that the magnetic domain structure is composed only of 90∘ wall.

  3. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Selvanathan, Saravana P; Graham, Garrett T; Erkizan, Hayriye V; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Mats E; Wu, Cathy H; Lawlor, Elizabeth R; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron-exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of γ-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4-279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4-279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code.

  4. The interaction of the near-field plasma with antennas used in magnetic fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, John

    2015-09-01

    Plasma heating and current drive using antennas in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) are important elements for the success of magnetic fusion. The antennas must operate in a harsh environment, where local plasma densities can be >1018/m3, magnetic fields can range from 0.2-5 Tesla, and antenna operating voltages can be >40 kV. This environment creates operational issues due to the interaction of the near-field of the antenna with the local plasma. In addition to parasitic losses in this plasma region, voltage and current distributions on the antenna structure lead to the formation of high electric fields and RF plasma sheaths, which can lead to enhanced particle and energy fluxes on the antenna and on surfaces intersected by magnetic field lines connected to or passing near the antenna. These issues are being studied using a simple electrode structure and a single-strap antenna on the Prototype Materials Plasma EXperiment (Proto-MPEX) at ORNL, which is a linear plasma device that uses an electron Bernstein wave heated helicon plasma source to create a high-density plasma suitable for use in a plasma-material interaction test stand. Several diagnostics are being used to characterize the near-field interactions, including double-Langmuir probes, a retarding field energy analyzer, and optical emission spectroscopy. The RF electric field is being studied utilizing Dynamic Stark Effect spectroscopy and Doppler-Free Saturation Spectroscopy. Recent experimental results and future plans will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  5. Local arrangement of particles in magnetic fluids due to the measurement alternating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Marin, C. N.; Malaescu, I.; Raj, K.; Popoiu, C.

    2017-09-01

    Changes in the magnetic susceptibility spectrum of ferrofluids, χ(ω), due to the nanoparticle agglomeration are common when a static magnetic field is superimposed on the measuring field, but here we report on changes which occur in the absence of a static magnetic field, solely in the presence of the measuring field, over the frequency range of 50 Hz-13 MHz and irrespective of the colloidal stability of samples. The result is explained in terms of local rearrangement of particles within ferrofluids subjected to low frequency alternating magnetic field.

  6. Fully automated prostate magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound fusion via a probabilistic registration metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Rachel; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Feleppa, Ernest; Barratt, Dean; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we present a novel, automated, registration method to fuse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate. Our methodology consists of: (1) delineating the prostate on MRI, (2) building a probabilistic model of prostate location on TRUS, and (3) aligning the MRI prostate segmentation to the TRUS probabilistic model. TRUS-guided needle biopsy is the current gold standard for prostate cancer (CaP) diagnosis. Up to 40% of CaP lesions appear isoechoic on TRUS, hence TRUS-guided biopsy cannot reliably target CaP lesions and is associated with a high false negative rate. MRI is better able to distinguish CaP from benign prostatic tissue, but requires special equipment and training. MRI-TRUS fusion, whereby MRI is acquired pre-operatively and aligned to TRUS during the biopsy procedure, allows for information from both modalities to be used to help guide the biopsy. The use of MRI and TRUS in combination to guide biopsy at least doubles the yield of positive biopsies. Previous work on MRI-TRUS fusion has involved aligning manually determined fiducials or prostate surfaces to achieve image registration. The accuracy of these methods is dependent on the reader's ability to determine fiducials or prostate surfaces with minimal error, which is a difficult and time-consuming task. Our novel, fully automated MRI-TRUS fusion method represents a significant advance over the current state-of-the-art because it does not require manual intervention after TRUS acquisition. All necessary preprocessing steps (i.e. delineation of the prostate on MRI) can be performed offline prior to the biopsy procedure. We evaluated our method on seven patient studies, with B-mode TRUS and a 1.5 T surface coil MRI. Our method has a root mean square error (RMSE) for expertly selected fiducials (consisting of the urethra, calcifications, and the centroids of CaP nodules) of 3.39 +/- 0.85 mm.

  7. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.; Hora, H.; Kirchhoff, G.

    2016-05-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  8. Short-Term Aging of NeFeB Magnets for Stirling Linear Alternator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Schwarze, Gene E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NeFeB type magnets have been proposed for use in free piston Stirling engine driven, linear alternators to generate electric power during long duration space missions. These type of materials provide the highest energy product commercial magnets, thus minimizing alternator size or mass, but do not provide the high temperature stability of magnetic properties found in the SmCo type magnets. Therefore, to apply the NeFeB type magnets at elevated temperatures to multiyear space missions, their long-term aging characteristics must be determined. This report presents 200 hr aging data for six types of NeFeB magnets selected from three manufacturers. Aging was performed under vacuum at 150 C, with a steady demagnetizing field of 5 kOe applied. From the data produced by this short-term aging run, candidate magnet types were selected for a planned 12,000 hr long-term run. Depending on the manufacturer's magnet type, remanence losses observed ranged from 0 to 7%, when measured at 120 C on an established recoil line. Also, intrinsic coercivity losses up to about 4% were observed for the M-H curve at 120 C. In some cases, these coercivity losses were not recoverable by recharge of the magnet, indicating a structural change of the material.

  9. "Polarized" Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieck, Hans Paetz Gen.

    Increasing energy demand in view of limited supply, as well as environmental and nuclear-safety concerns leading to increased emphasis on renewable energy sources such as solar or wind energy are expected to focus public and scientific interest increasingly also on fusion energy. With the decision to build ITER (low-density magnetic confinement) and also continuing research on (high-density) inertial-confinement fusion (cf. the inauguration of the laser fusion facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) prospects of fusion energy have probably entered a new era.

  10. A 3-D Magnetic Analysis of a Stirling Convertor Linear Alternator Under Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.; Regan, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Stirling Technology Company (STC) are developing Stirling convertors for Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (SRPS) to provide electrical power for future NASA deep space missions. STC is developing the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) under contract to DOE. Of critical importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor for space power applications is the development of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. This paper presents a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach for evaluating Stirling convertor linear alternators. The model extends a magnetostatic analysis previously reported at the 35th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC) to include the effects of the load current. STC's 55-We linear alternator design was selected to validate the model. Spatial plots of magnetic field strength (H) are presented in the region of the exciting permanent magnets. The margin for permanent magnet demagnetization is calculated at the expected magnet operating temperature for the near earth environment and for various average magnet temperatures. These thermal conditions were selected to represent a worst-case condition for the planned deep space missions. This paper presents plots that identify regions of high H where the potential to alter the magnetic moment of the magnets exists.

  11. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-15

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion–relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and B{sub z} = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  12. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 1, Magnetic confinement Fusion Plasma Theory. Annual progress report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on few tokamak plasma confinement issues: applications of our new Chapman-Enskog-like approach for developing hybrid fluid/kinetic descriptions of tokamak plasmas; multi-faceted studies as part of our development of a new interacting island paradigm for the tokamak equilibrium`` and transport; investigations of the resolution power of BES and ECE diagnostics for measuring core plasma fluctuations; and studies of net transport in the presence of fluctuating surfaces. Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the NERSC node and the fusion theory workstations are summarized briefly in this report.

  13. Magnetic field sensing based on magnetic-fluid-clad fiber-optic structure with taper-like and lateral-offset fusion splicing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shaohua; Pu, Shengli; Wang, Haotian

    2014-08-11

    A kind of magnetic field sensor composed of magnetic fluid surrounding a segment of singlemode fiber is proposed. The taper-like and lateral-offset fusion splicing techniques are employed. The sensing principle is based on cladding mode interference. The interference valley wavelength or transmission loss of the sensing structure is sensitive to the external magnetic field, which is utilized for magnetic field sensing. The linear response regions are obtained in the range of 38-225 Oe and 250-475 Oe. For the valley-wavelength-shift-type sensing, the sensitivities are 14.1 pm/Oe and 26 pm/Oe at low and high field ranges, respectively. For the transmission-loss-variation-type sensing, the sensitivity of -0.024 dB/Oe is achieved for the magnetic field strength ranging from 250 to 475 Oe.

  14. Alternating Magnetic Field Forces for Satellite Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stnaley O.

    2012-01-01

    Selected future space missions, such as large aperture telescopes and multi-component interferometers, will require the precise positioning of a number of isolated satellites, yet many of the suggested approaches for providing satellites positioning forces have serious limitations. In this paper we propose a new approach, capable of providing both position and orientation forces, that resolves or alleviates many of these problems. We show that by using alternating fields and currents that finely-controlled forces can be induced on the satellites, which can be individually selected through frequency allocation. We also show, through analysis and experiment, that near field operation is feasible and can provide sufficient force and the necessary degrees of freedom to accurately position and orient small satellites relative to one another. In particular, the case of a telescope with a large number of free mirrors is developed to provide an example of the concept. We. also discuss the far field extension of this concept.

  15. The Effects of Weak Combined Magnetic Field on Cell Wall Regeneration and Frequency of Plant Protoplasts Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, Olena

    The major purpose of these experiments was to investigate plant protoplast fusion frequency and regeneration of a cell wall by protoplasts at weak combined magnetic field (CMF) with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The protoplasts were isolated from Nicotiana lumbaginifolia and N. silvestris leaf mesophyll and from callus tissues (Nicotiana tabacum and Glycine max). The special extra apparatus with ferromagnetic shield was used for estimate of CMF with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The fusion of protoplasts is realized by using of parent protoplasts isolated from one plant species, as well as from various plant species. Control samples were situated near the apparatus with CMF. The laser confocal microscopy was used for study of cell wall regeneration by single and fused protoplasts. The cytochemical methods with DAPI and calcofluor dye were also applied as the detectors for protoplast fusion and regeneration of cell wall. We have been established that CMF with frequency adjusted to the cyclotron frequency Mg2+ ions have shown the most positive influence on regeneration of cell wall by protoplasts. CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of K+ ions very weakly affected on the frequency of protoplast fusion. Largest frequency of protoplasts fusion is noted in the CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ in comparison with the control samples.

  16. The Fusion Energy Option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.

    2004-06-01

    Presentations from a Fusion Power Associates symposium, The Fusion Energy Option, are summarized. The topics include perspectives on fossil fuel reserves, fusion as a source for hydrogen production, status and plans for the development of inertial fusion, planning for the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, status and promise of alternate approaches to fusion and the need for R&D now on fusion technologies.

  17. A 3-D Magnetic Analysis of a Linear Alternator For a Stirling Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing advanced radioisotope Stirling convertors, under contract with Stirling Technology Company (STC), for space applications. Of critical importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor for space power applications is the development of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. This paper presents a 3-D finite element method (FEM) approach for evaluating Stirling convertor linear alternators. Preliminary correlations with open-circuit voltage measurements provide an encouraging level of confidence in the model. Spatial plots of magnetic field strength (H) are presented in the region of the exciting permanent magnets. These plots identify regions of high H, where at elevated temperature and under electrical load, the potential to alter the magnetic moment of the magnets exists. This implies the need for further testing and analysis.

  18. Different Relative Orientation of Static and Alternative Magnetic Fields and Cress Roots Direction of Growth Changes Their Gravitropic Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadiia; Bogatina, Nina

    The following variants of roots location relatively to static and alternative components of magnetic field were studied. At first variant the static magnetic field was directed parallel to the gravitation vector, the alternative magnetic field was directed perpendicular to static one; roots were directed perpendicular to both two fields’ components and gravitation vector. At the variant the negative gravitropysm for cress roots was observed. At second variant the static magnetic field was directed parallel to the gravitation vector, the alternative magnetic field was directed perpendicular to static one; roots were directed parallel to alternative magnetic field. At third variant the alternative magnetic field was directed parallel to the gravitation vector, the static magnetic field was directed perpendicular to the gravitation vector, roots were directed perpendicular to both two fields components and gravitation vector; At forth variant the alternative magnetic field was directed parallel to the gravitation vector, the static magnetic field was directed perpendicular to the gravitation vector, roots were directed parallel to static magnetic field. In all cases studied the alternative magnetic field frequency was equal to Ca ions cyclotron frequency. In 2, 3 and 4 variants gravitropism was positive. But the gravitropic reaction speeds were different. In second and forth variants the gravitropic reaction speed in error limits coincided with the gravitropic reaction speed under Earth’s conditions. At third variant the gravitropic reaction speed was slowed essentially.

  19. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their role in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath ('scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital role in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei via

  20. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  1. CoNi Films with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Prepared by Alternate Monoatomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Shunsuke; Sato, Hideo; Yamanouchi, Michihiko; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of CoNi and CoPt films prepared by an alternate monoatomic layer deposition and discuss the possible existence of a metastable superlattice structure. We find that, as has been reported for the CoPt and CoPd films, the CoNi film also exhibits a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy when the monoatomic Co and Ni layers are stacked alternately, suggesting the possible formation of superlattice structure. Since the CoNi film contains neither noble nor rare-earth metals, it should be an attractive material system for applications.

  2. ER-associated retrograde SNAREs and the Dsl1 complex mediate an alternative, Sey1p-independent homotypic ER fusion pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jason V.; McMahon, Conor; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Hughson, Frederick M.; Rose, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network is dynamically maintained by homotypic (ER–ER) fusion. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the dynamin-like GTPase Sey1p can mediate ER–ER fusion, but sey1Δ cells have no growth defect and only slightly perturbed ER structure. Recent work suggested that ER-localized soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) mediate a Sey1p-independent ER–ER fusion pathway. However, an alternative explanation—that the observed phenotypes arose from perturbed vesicle trafficking—could not be ruled out. In this study, we used candidate and synthetic genetic array (SGA) approaches to more fully characterize SNARE-mediated ER–ER fusion. We found that Dsl1 complex mutations in sey1Δ cells cause strong synthetic growth and ER structure defects and delayed ER–ER fusion in vivo, additionally implicating the Dsl1 complex in SNARE-mediated ER–ER fusion. In contrast, cytosolic coat protein I (COPI) vesicle coat mutations in sey1Δ cells caused no synthetic defects, excluding perturbed retrograde trafficking as a cause for the previously observed synthetic defects. Finally, deleting the reticulons that help maintain ER architecture in cells disrupted for both ER–ER fusion pathways caused almost complete inviability. We conclude that the ER SNAREs and the Dsl1 complex directly mediate Sey1p-independent ER–ER fusion and that, in the absence of both pathways, cell viability depends upon membrane curvature–promoting reticulons. PMID:25187651

  3. The Threshold of Cress Roots Gravitropic Reaction Sensitivity for Static and Alternative Magnetic and Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadiia; Bogatina, Nina

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of cress roots gravitropic reaction on the inductance of the static magnetic field in the region of its values from 1µT until 500 µT ( the alternative magnetic field was absent) has been investigated. There was the threshold in the dependence at the inductance value 1 - 2 µT. The dependence of cress roots gravitropic reaction on the amplitude of alternative magnetic field for different frequencies (the static magnetic field was absent) has been investigated/ It was shown that the dependence had the threshold character. The threshold had the value 1 - 2 µT. The gravitropic reaction dependence on amplitude did not depend on frequency and it was the same for Schuman's frequencies as for any other ones. The same experiments have been fulfilled for static and alternative electric fields in the regin of values 0 until 2000 V/m. It was shown that neither static nor alternative electric field had influence on the gravitropic reaction while (the magnetic field was absent).

  4. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  5. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyekyoon

    1987-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of a railgun accelerator to inject hydrogen pellets into a magnetic fusion reactor for refueling purposes. Specific studies in this paper include: 1.5 mm-diameter two-stage fuseless plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun, construction and testing of a 3.2 mm-diameter two-stage railgun and a theoretical analysis of the behavior of a railgun plasma-arc armature inside a railgun. (LSP)

  6. Two dimensional impinging jet cooling of high heat flux surface in magnetic confinement fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, A.; Tanno, T.; Takahashi, M.

    1994-12-31

    Divertor surface of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor is exposed to strong radiation heating by high flux charged particles. According to standard design of the ITER, the heat flux of the divertor surface becomes average 15MW/m{sup 2} or more. In this study, a cooling by a two dimensional impinging jet flow is proposed to cool such high heat flux surface. For an impinging jet flow to flat heated surface, such as CHF is obtained only in the limited surface region where the jet flow hits directly. Apart from the region, the CHF decreases abruptly with the distance from the center. The main reason is that the pressure decreases abruptly as apart from the center region and the liquid flow is spread away from the heated surface region by the strong boiling. To overcome these difficulties, the authors propose that the impinging jet is applied to the heat transfer wall with a concave surface, because the pressure change becomes mild by the centrifugal force along the curved surface. The increase of the radial pressure gradient in the vertical direction to the curved surface promotes the departure of vapor bubbles near the wall region. It is expected that this mechanism as well as keeping high pressure along the flow works to enhance the CHF. To obtain the high heat flux in the wide region, a use of a two-dimensional impinging jet is suitable instead of a round jet.

  7. Test of 60 kA coated conductor cable prototypes for fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglietti, D.; Bykovsky, N.; Sedlak, K.; Stepanov, B.; Wesche, R.; Bruzzone, P.

    2015-12-01

    Coated conductors could be promising materials for the fabrication of the large magnet systems of future fusion devices. Two prototype conductors (flat cables in steel conduits), each about 2 m long, were manufactured using coated conductor tapes (4 mm wide) from Super Power and SuperOx, with a total tape length of 1.6 km. Each flat cable is assembled from 20 strands, each strand consisting of a stack of 16 tapes surrounded by two half circular copper profiles, twisted and soldered. The tapes were measured at 12 T and 4.2 K and the results of the measurements were used for the assessment of the conductor electromagnetic properties at low temperature and high field. The two conductors were assembled together in a sample that was tested in the European Dipole (EDIPO) facility. The current sharing temperatures of the two conductors were measured at background fields from 8 T up to 12 T and for currents from 30 kA up to 70 kA: the measured values are within a few percent of the values expected from the measurements on tapes (short samples). After electromagnetic cycling, T cs at 12 T and 50 kA decreased from about 12 K to 11 K (about 10%), corresponding to less than 3% of I c.

  8. Development of advanced compact railguns for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets into magnetic fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Kim, K.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; King, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have designed, fabricated, and tested a number of compact railguns utilizing a variety of gun geometries, augmentation schemes, and state-of-the-art rail and insulator materials in order to develop an injector that can accelerate pellets of hydrogen isotopes to very high velocities ({approximately}10 km/s) continuously and at high repetition rates for refueling magnetically confined fusion plasmas. These advanced guns are designed to achieve two goals: to minimize or eliminate gunwall erosion and to produce the maximum possible pellet acceleration. These closely related goals assure long gun lifetimes. Using an advanced transaugmented compact gun with an acceleration length of only 45-cm, they have recently achieved hydrogen pellet velocities as high as 2.2 km/s with a time-averaged pellet acceleration of 4.7 {times} 10{sup 6} m/s{sup 2} at a modest rail current of 10 kA. This paper includes a brief overview of the railgun control and diagnostic systems and discusses recent results of the railgun experiments using both plexiglass and cryogenic hydrogen pellets.

  9. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Wei, M. S.; ...

    2016-11-02

    Here, we report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with n e / n c r i t ~ 0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0 × 10 14 to 2.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 and pulsemore » widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity ( I = 1.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 ) beams can efficiently couple energy ( ~ 82 % of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The heating efficiency we demonstrate is significantly higher than it was thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014)].« less

  10. Parallel mesh support for particle-in-cell methods in magnetic fusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Eisung; Shephard, Mark S.; Seol, E. Seegyoung; Kalyanaraman, Kaushik; Ibanez, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    As supercomputing power continues to increase Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are being widely adopted for transport simulations of magnetic fusion devices. Current implementations place a copy of the entire continuum mesh and its fields used in the PIC calculations on every node. This is in general not a scalable solution as computational power continues to grow faster than node level memory. To address this scalability issue, while still maintaining sufficient mesh per node to control costly inter-node communication, a new unstructured mesh distribution methods and associated mesh based PIC calculation procedure is being developed building on the parallel unstructured mesh infrastructure (PUMI). Key components to be outlined in the presentation include (i) the mesh distribution strategy, (ii) how the particles are tracked during a push cycle taking advantage of the unstructured mesh adjacency structures and searches based on that structure, and (iii) how the field solve steps and particle migration are controlled. Performance comparisons to the current approach will also be presented.

  11. A thermo-electric-driven flowing liquid lithium limiter/divertor for magnetic confined fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Xu, Wenyu; Curreli, Davide; Andruczyk, Daniel; Mui, Travis

    2012-10-01

    The concept of using a liquid metal, especially liquid lithium, as the plasma facing surface may provide the best path forward toward reactor designs. A liquid PFC can effectively eliminate the erosion and thermal stress problems compared to the solid PFC while transferring heat and prolong the lifetime limit of the PFCs. A liquid lithium surface can also suppress the hydrogen isotopes recycling and getter the impurities in fusion reactor. The Lithium/metal infused trench (LiMIT) concept successfully proved that the thermoelectric effect can induce electric currents inside liquid lithium and an external magnetic field can drive liquid lithium to flow within metallic open trenches. IR camera and thermocouple measurements prove the strong heat transfer ability of this concept. A new flowing lithium system with active control of the temperature gradient inside the lithium trenches and back flow channels has been designed. TEMHD driven liquid lithium run steady state and pulsed for a few seconds of high heat flux (˜15MW/m^2) has been used to investigate the transient reaction of the flowing lithium. A similar tray is scheduled to be tested in HT-7, Hefei, China as a limiter in Sept. 2012. Related movies and analysis will be shown.

  12. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  13. Accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance image fusion for assessing deep brain stimulation electrodes.

    PubMed

    Thani, Nova B; Bala, Arul; Swann, Gary B; Lind, Christopher R P

    2011-07-01

    Knowledge of the anatomic location of the deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode in the brain is essential in quality control and judicious selection of stimulation parameters. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) imaging coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used to document the electrode location safely. The accuracy of this method, however, depends on many factors, including the quality of the source images, the area of signal artifact created by the DBS lead, and the fusion algorithm. To calculate the accuracy of determining the location of active contacts of the DBS electrode by coregistering postoperative CT image to intraoperative MRI. Intraoperative MRI with a surrogate marker (carbothane stylette) was digitally coregistered with postoperative CT with DBS electrodes in 8 consecutive patients. The location of the active contact of the DBS electrode was calculated in the stereotactic frame space, and the discrepancy between the 2 images was assessed. The carbothane stylette significantly reduces the signal void on the MRI to a mean diameter of 1.4 ± 0.1 mm. The discrepancy between the CT and MRI coregistration in assessing the active contact location of the DBS lead is 1.6 ± 0.2 mm, P < .001 with iPlan (BrainLab AG, Erlangen, Germany) and 1.5 ± 0.2 mm, P < .001 with Framelink (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) software. CT/MRI coregistration is an acceptable method of identifying the anatomic location of DBS electrode and active contacts.

  14. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Wei, M. S.; Nagayama, T.; Campbell, E. M.; Blue, B. E.; Heeter, R. F.; Koning, J. M.; Peterson, K. J.; Schmitt, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with ne/nc r i t˜0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0 ×1014 to 2.5 ×1014W /c m2 and pulse widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity (I =1.5 ×1014W /c m2 ) beams can efficiently couple energy (˜82 % of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The demonstrated heating efficiency is significantly higher than is thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014), 10.1063/1.4890298].

  15. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Harvey-Thompson, A J; Sefkow, A B; Wei, M S; Nagayama, T; Campbell, E M; Blue, B E; Heeter, R F; Koning, J M; Peterson, K J; Schmitt, A

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with n_{e}/n_{crit}∼0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0×10^{14} to 2.5×10^{14}W/cm^{2} and pulse widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity (I=1.5×10^{14}W/cm^{2}) beams can efficiently couple energy (∼82% of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The demonstrated heating efficiency is significantly higher than is thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014)10.1063/1.4890298].

  16. Exploring magnetized liner inertial fusion with a semi-analytic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, R. D.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Sefkow, A. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Cochrane, K. R.; Schmit, P. F.; Knapp, P. F.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Martin, M. R.; Awe, T. J.; Rovang, D. C.; Lamppa, D. C.; Peterson, K. J.; Rochau, G. A.; Porter, J. L.; Stygar, W. A.; Cuneo, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this presentation, we explore magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) using a semi-analytic model. Specifically, we present simulation results from this model that: (a) illustrate the parameter space, energetics, and overall system efficiencies of MagLIF; (b) demonstrate the dependence of radiative loss rates on the radial fraction of the fuel that is preheated; (c) explore some of the recent experimental results of the MagLIF program at Sandia National Laboratories; (d) highlight the experimental challenges presently facing the MagLIF program (as MagLIF is first being tested using the infrastructure presently available at the Z pulsed-power facility); and (e) demonstrate how these challenges could change as various system upgrades are made to the Z facility over the next three to five years and beyond. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Towards a better understanding of honeycomb alternating magnetic networks.

    PubMed

    Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Lloret, Francesc; Cano, Joan; Julve, Miguel

    2015-06-28

    Two new two-dimensional homometallic compounds {[M2(bpm)(ox)2]n·5nH2O} with M = Co(II) (1) and Zn(II) (2) and the mononuclear nickel(II) complex [Ni(bpm)2(ox)]·2H2O (3) [bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine and ox = oxalate] have been prepared and structurally characterized. 1 and 2 are isostructural compounds whose structures are made up of oxalate-bridged M(II) cations cross-linked by bis-bidentate bpm molecules to afford a honeycomb layered network extending in the crystallographic ab plane. The layers are eclipsed along the crystallographic c axis and show graphitic-like interactions between the bpm rings. The three-dimensional supramolecular network deriving from such interactions is characterized by hexagonal-shaped channels extending in the same direction. Each M(II) ion in 1 and 2 is tris-chelated with four oxygen atoms from two oxalate groups and two bpm-nitrogen atoms building a distorted octahedral surrounding. The reduced values of the angles subtended by the bis-chelating bpm [77.69(8) (1) and 76.59(8)° (2)] and oxalate [79.69(6) (1) and 80.01(5)° (2)] are the main factors accounting for this distortion. The values of the metal-metal separation through bridging bpm are 5.6956(7) (1) and 5.7572(9) Å (2), whereas those across the bis-bidentate oxalate are 5.4306(4) (1) and 5.4058(5) Å (2). 3 is a neutral mononuclear nickel(II) complex where each metal ion is six-coordinate with four nitrogen atoms from two bpm ligands in a cis arrangement and two oxalate-oxygen atoms building a somewhat distorted octahedral surrounding. The values of the angles subtended at the nickel(II) ion by bpm and oxalate are 78.14(4) and 80.95(5)°, respectively. The magnetic properties of 1 have been investigated in the temperature range 1.9-295 K. They are typical of an overall antiferromagnetic coupling with a maximum of the magnetic susceptibility at 22.0 K. The analysis of the susceptibility data of 1 through an effective spin Hamiltonian allowed a satisfactory simulation in the

  18. Plasma fusion and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hideo, Kozima

    1996-12-31

    Fundamental problems of plasma fusion (controlled thermonuclear fusion) due to the contradicting demands of the magnetic confinement of plasma and suppression of instabilities occurring on and in plasma are surveyed in contrast with problems of cold fusion. Problems in cold fusion due to the complicated constituents and types of force are explained. Typical cold fusion events are explained by a model based on the presence of trapped neutrons in cold fusion materials. The events include Pons-Fleishmann effect, tritium anomaly, helium 4 production, and nuclear transmutation. Fundamental hypothesis of the model is an effectiveness of a new concept--neutron affinity of elements. The neutron affinity is defined and some bases supporting it are explained. Possible justification of the concept by statistical approach is given.

  19. Effect of tapered magnetic field on expanding laser-produced plasma for heavy-ion inertial fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shunsuke

    2016-12-20

    A laser ion source is a promising candidate as an ion source for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), where a pulsed ultra-intense and low-charged heavy ion beam is required. It is a key development for a laser ion source to transport laser-produced plasma with a magnetic field to achieve a high current beam. The effect of a tapered magnetic field on laser produced plasma is demonstrated by comparing the results with a straight solenoid magnet. The magnetic field of interest is a wider aperture on a target side and narrower aperture on an extraction side. Furthermore, based on the experimentallymore » obtained results, the performance of a scaled laser ion source for HIF was estimated.« less

  20. Effect of tapered magnetic field on expanding laser-produced plasma for heavy-ion inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shunsuke

    2016-12-20

    A laser ion source is a promising candidate as an ion source for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), where a pulsed ultra-intense and low-charged heavy ion beam is required. It is a key development for a laser ion source to transport laser-produced plasma with a magnetic field to achieve a high current beam. The effect of a tapered magnetic field on laser produced plasma is demonstrated by comparing the results with a straight solenoid magnet. The magnetic field of interest is a wider aperture on a target side and narrower aperture on an extraction side. Furthermore, based on the experimentally obtained results, the performance of a scaled laser ion source for HIF was estimated.

  1. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  2. Evolution of polarization of an electromagnetic wave propagating in magnetized plasma: Comparison between two alternative formalisms

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, S. E.; Zanza, V.

    2011-09-15

    Two alternative formalisms for the analysis of the evolution of electromagnetic wave polarization in a magnetized plasma are considered: the coupled wave formalism and the Stokes vector formalism. The first formalism is developed and extended to more general magnetic field configurations than considered hitherto, thus obtaining a new polarization evolution equation. The two formalisms are compared and their relative merits and limitations are described. In particular, it is shown that the equations for polarization evolution are valid for arbitrarily strong anisotropy induced by the magnetic field and that these equations treat implicitly the effect of coupling between the characteristic waves.

  3. Alternating magnetic field heat behaviors of PVDF fibrous mats filled with iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinu; Choi, Jung-Su; Yang, Heejae; Ko, Frank K.; Kim, Ki Hyeon

    2016-05-01

    To study the magnetic heat behaviors, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous mats filled with IONPs were prepared by using coprecipitaion method and the electrospinning technique. The synthesized IONPs exhibited a magnetization of about 72 emu/g with average diameter of about 10 nm. The magnetizations of PVDF fibrous mats filled with IONPs showed 2.6 emu/g, 5.5 emu/g and 9.9 emu/g for 5 wt.%, 10 wt.% and 20 wt.% IONPs concentration, respectively. The heat of the magnetic fibrous mats were measured under various alternating magnetic fields (90, 128, and 167 Oe), frequencies (190, 250 and 355 kHz). The maximum saturated temperature showed up to 62 °C for 20 wt.% IONPs filled in PVDF fibrous mat under 167 Oe and 355 kHz.

  4. Multiattribute probabilistic prostate elastic registration (MAPPER): Application to fusion of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Rachel Barratt, Dean; Nicolas Bloch, B.; Feleppa, Ernest; Moses, Daniel; Ponsky, Lee; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided needle biopsy is the current gold standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. However, up to 40% of prostate cancer lesions appears isoechoic on TRUS. Hence, TRUS-guided biopsy has a high false negative rate for prostate cancer diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is better able to distinguish prostate cancer from benign tissue. However, MRI-guided biopsy requires special equipment and training and a longer procedure time. MRI-TRUS fusion, where MRI is acquired preoperatively and then aligned to TRUS, allows for advantages of both modalities to be leveraged during biopsy. MRI-TRUS-guided biopsy increases the yield of cancer positive biopsies. In this work, the authors present multiattribute probabilistic postate elastic registration (MAPPER) to align prostate MRI and TRUS imagery. Methods: MAPPER involves (1) segmenting the prostate on MRI, (2) calculating a multiattribute probabilistic map of prostate location on TRUS, and (3) maximizing overlap between the prostate segmentation on MRI and the multiattribute probabilistic map on TRUS, thereby driving registration of MRI onto TRUS. MAPPER represents a significant advancement over the current state-of-the-art as it requires no user interaction during the biopsy procedure by leveraging texture and spatial information to determine the prostate location on TRUS. Although MAPPER requires manual interaction to segment the prostate on MRI, this step is performed prior to biopsy and will not substantially increase biopsy procedure time. Results: MAPPER was evaluated on 13 patient studies from two independent datasets—Dataset 1 has 6 studies acquired with a side-firing TRUS probe and a 1.5 T pelvic phased-array coil MRI; Dataset 2 has 7 studies acquired with a volumetric end-firing TRUS probe and a 3.0 T endorectal coil MRI. MAPPER has a root-mean-square error (RMSE) for expert selected fiducials of 3.36 ± 1.10 mm for Dataset 1 and 3.14 ± 0.75 mm for Dataset 2. State

  5. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, Alla

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  6. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  7. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (˜1 m), high-current (˜1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ˜5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  8. Some features of bulk melt-textured high-temperature superconductors subjected to alternating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbemden, P.; Molenberg, I.; Simeonova, P.; Lovchinov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Monolithic, large grain, (RE)Ba2Cu3O7 high-temperature superconductors (where RE denotes a rare-earth ion) are known to be able to trap fields in excess of several teslas and represent thus an extremely promising competing technology for permanent magnet in several applications, e.g. in motors and generators. In any rotating machine, however, the superconducting permanent magnet is subjected to variable (transient, or alternating) parasitic magnetic fields. These magnetic fields interact with the superconductor, which yields a reduction of the remnant magnetization. In the present work we quantify these effects by analysing selected experimental data on bulk melt-textured superconductors subjected to AC fields. Our results indicate that the non-uniformity of superconducting properties in rather large samples might lead to unusual features and need to be taken into account to analyse the experimental data. We also investigate the evolution of the DC remnant magnetization of the bulk sample when it is subjected to a large number of AC magnetic field cycles, and investigate the experimental errors that result from a misorientation of the sample or a mispositioning of the Hall probe. The time-dependence of the remnant magnetization over 100000 cycles of the AC field is shown to display distinct regimes which all differ strongly from the usual decay due to magnetic relaxation.

  9. [Possibilities of using magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, V V

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) can be fused, by applying an external bobbin with transrectal ultrasound imaging. The author has studied whether imaging fusion can be used to select a targeted needle biopsy (NB) portion if the development of recurrent prostate cancer (PC) is suspected after radical prostatectomy (RP). MRI-TRUS fusion was performed in 11 patients in different periods after RP. All the patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and then MRI-TRUS fusion during TRUS studies (TRUSS). MRI-TRUS fusion-guided NBs of suspected portions in the vesicourethral anastomotic area were carried out in 7 patients. A control group comprised 18 patients, of whom 12 patients underwent isolated TRUS-guided NB. The use of the fusion technology was shown to make a simultaneous assessment of the MRI and TRUS images of a vesicourethral anastomotic area in post-RP patients. At the same time, the high accuracy of comparison of MRI and TRUS images ensures the steady position of portions with early intensive accumulation of a MRI contrast agent during real-time TRUSS. Thus, morphologically relevant materials could be obtained in 6 of the 7 patients in the MRI-TRUS-guided NB group and only in 3 of the 12 control patients. Therefore, the use of MRI-TRUS fusion enhances the efficiency of NB in post-RP patients suspected of having recurrent PC. The criterion for selecting a target portion is the abnormal accumulation of a MRI contrast agent.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties of an alternating manganese chain

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos Silva, Manuela . E-mail: manuela@pollux.fis.uc.pt; Matos Beja, Ana; Antonio Paixao, Jose; Martin-Gil, Jesus

    2006-07-15

    A new 1D complex has been prepared and characterized. X-ray single crystal structure confirms that the Mn(II) ions assemble in alternating chains with Mn-Mn distances of 3.8432(13) and 4.4428(14) A. A 3D network of hydrogen bonds links the chains together. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility reveals that this compound undergoes a magnetic transition and exhibits an antiferromagnetic interaction in the low-temperature phase with two alternating exchange interactions of -2.32(1) and -5.55(1) cm{sup -1}. - Graphical abstract: Portion of the dimeric manganese chain showing the two alternating exchange interactions paths.

  11. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Larson, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-12-02

    The effects of an imposed, axial magnetic field $B_{z0}$ on hydrodynamics and energetic electrons in inertial confinement fusion indirect-drive hohlraums are studied. We present simulations from the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA of a low-adiabat ignition design for the National Ignition Facility, with and without $B_{z0}=70~\\text{T}$. The field’s main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or ‘hot’, electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium–tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. Furthermore, the effect of the field on deuterium–tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.

  12. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    DOE PAGES

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; ...

    2015-12-02

    The effects of an imposed, axial magnetic fieldmore » $$B_{z0}$$ on hydrodynamics and energetic electrons in inertial confinement fusion indirect-drive hohlraums are studied. We present simulations from the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA of a low-adiabat ignition design for the National Ignition Facility, with and without $$B_{z0}=70~\\text{T}$$. The field’s main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or ‘hot’, electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium–tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. Furthermore, the effect of the field on deuterium–tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.« less

  13. Programming in C at NMFECC (National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center): A practical guide

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, S.W.; Crotinger, J.A.

    1989-07-26

    Despite its popularity elsewhere, C has not been extensively used for scientific programming on supercomputers. There are a number of reasons for this but perhaps the most compelling has been the lack of C compilers. However, this situation has recently begun to change at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) where two C development platforms --- the Hybrid C Compiler (HCC) written at the Livermore Computer Center and the Portable C Compiler (CC version 4.1) distributed by Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) --- have become available for use. These compilers produce object code for all of the Cray models at NMFECC and, in addition, possess good scalar optimization capabilities along with rudimentary vectorization capabilities. With the advent of the Cray C compilers, it is possible to consider physics code development in C at NMFECC. However, when one actually attempts to pursue this goal, one is quickly faced with a number of practical problems. For instance, How do I compile, link, and debug C codes What special features of C are useful to me as a scientific programmer Are there things I currently can't do in C programs How do I interface my C program to existing Fortran code Can I make use of the Basis code development system from C Over the last three years we have incorporated C into numerous physics codes written at NMFECC and, in the course of this work, we have had to develop solutions to all of the above problems. This turned out to be a surprisingly frustrating and time-consuming venture requiring some rather subtle techniques and hacks. This guide is an attempt to document these techniques.

  14. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Wei, M. S.; Nagayama, T.; Campbell, E. M.; Blue, B. E.; Heeter, R. F.; Koning, J. M.; Peterson, K. J.; Schmitt, A.

    2016-11-02

    Here, we report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with n e / n c r i t ~ 0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0 × 10 14 to 2.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 and pulse widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity ( I = 1.5 × 10 14 W / c m 2 ) beams can efficiently couple energy ( ~ 82 % of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The heating efficiency we demonstrate is significantly higher than it was thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014)].

  15. Results of the international large coil task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresner, L.; Fietz, W. A.; Gauss, S.; Haubenreich, P. N.; Jakob, B.; Kato, T.; Komarek, P.; Lubell, M. S.; Lue, J. W.; Luton, J. N.; Maurer, W.; Okuno, K.; Schwenterly, S. W.; Shimamoto, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Ulbricht, A.; Vécsey, G.; Wüchner, F.; Zichy, J. A.

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an outstanding international development effort during more than ten years of cooperation within an IEA agreement. Parties were the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. The ORNL acted for DOE as the LCT operating agent, building and operating the required test facility. The US also provided three test coils; the other three participants one coil each. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. After facility shakedown operations and preliminary coil tests, the full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. At the time of International Experimental Reactor (ITER) activities, it might be worthwhile to mention that LCT demonstrated an effective multinational collaboration in an advanced technology project, involving large scale hardware produced in several countries then assembled and operated as a tightly integrated system.

  16. Could Advanced Fusion Fuels Be Used with Today's Technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarius, J. F.; Kulcinski, G. L.; El-Guebaly, L. A.; Khater, H. Y.

    1998-03-01

    Could today's technology suffice for engineering advanced-fuel, magnetic-fusion power plants, thus making fusion development primarily a physics problem? Such a path would almost certainly cost far less than the present D-T development program, which is driven by daunting engineering challenges as well as physics questions. Advanced fusion fuels, in contrast to D-T fuel, produce a smaller fraction of the fusion power as neutrons but have lower fusion reactivity, leading to a trade-off between engineering and physics. This paper examines the critical fusion engineering issues and related technologies with an eye to their application in tokamak and alternate-concept D-3He power plants. These issues include plasma power balance, magnets, surface heat flux, input power, fuel source, radiation damage, radioactive waste disposal, and nuclear proliferation.

  17. Enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by compressive strain in alternately layered FeNi thin films.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, M; Amemiya, K

    2014-04-23

    The effect of the lattice strain on magnetic anisotropy of alternately layered FeNi ultrathin films grown on a substrate, Cu(tCu = 0-70 ML)/Ni(48)Cu(52)(124 ML)/Cu(0 0 1) single crystal, is systematically studied by means of in situ x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) analyses. To investigate the magnetic anisotropy of the FeNi layer itself, a non-magnetic substrate is adopted. From the RHEED analysis, the in-plane lattice constant, ain, of the substrate is found to shrink by 0.8% and 0.5% at tCu = 0 and 10 ML as compared to that of bulk Cu, respectively. Fe L-edge XMCD analysis is performed for n ML FeNi films grown on various ain, and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is observed at n = 3 and 5, whereas the film with n = 7 shows in-plane magnetic anisotropy. Moreover, it is found that PMA is enhanced with decreasing ain, in the case where a Cu spacer layer is inserted. We suppose that magnetic anisotropy in the FeNi films is mainly carried by Fe, and the delocalization of the in-plane orbitals near the Fermi level increases the perpendicular orbital magnetic moment, which leads to the enhancement of PMA.

  18. Centrifugally confined plasmas for magnetic fusion energy. Final technical report for period March 15, 1998 - September 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Richard F.

    2001-07-16

    The purpose of the research funded under this study grant was to investigate the feasibility of a small scale experiment to test the concept of centrifugal confinement as a magnetic fusion energy scheme and to develop conceptual designs for important components of such an experiment. This work falls in the category of Innovative Confinement Concepts, as defined by the Office of Fusion Energy. The results of the funded work were very successful in that various studies were conducted which showed the concept to be viable and these studies led to design improvements. In addition, the major components of an experiment were identified and designed at least to the conceptual stage. In September, 2000 the Maryland Centrifugal Torus was funded for construction, in no small part because of the progress made during the time period reported here. The centrifugal confinement concept for fusion is based on three principles: (1) centrifugal forces from supersonic plasma rotation perpendicular to a strong magnetic field can provide effective confinement along the field; (2) the concomitant large velocity shear will suppress even macro-MHD instabilities; and (3) the sheared rotation will heat the plasma via viscous dissipation. Technical progress was made in clarifying and quantifying these concepts and designing a cost effective experiment. They briefly describe each area of progress and the implications for the MCT project.

  19. Single-domain magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field as mediators of local deformation of the surrounding macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yu. I.; Gribanovskii, S. L.; Golovin, D. Yu.; Klyachko, N. L.; Kabanov, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    The forces, deformations, and stresses generated in macromolecules attached to single-domain magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of a low-frequency (nonheating) magnetic field have been analyzed analytically and numerically. It has been shown that, in bioactive macromolecules, an alternating magnetic field with an induction of 0.1-1.0 T and a circular frequency of ≲104 s-1 can induce forces up to several hundred piconewtons, absolute deformations up to a few tens of nanometers, as well as compressive and shear stresses exceeding 107 Pa. These mechanical stimuli are sufficient for a significant change of interatomic distances in active centers, conformation of macromolecules, and even a breaking of some bonds, which makes it possible to develop a new technological platform for targeted delivery of drugs, remote control of their activity, and cancer-cell destruction.

  20. Demonstration of Ion Kinetic Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions and Investigation of Magnetic Reconnection Using Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shock-driven laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions have demonstrated the presence of ion kinetic effects in ICF implosions and also have been used as a proton source to probe the strongly driven reconnection of MG magnetic fields in laser-generated plasmas. Ion kinetic effects arise during the shock-convergence phase of ICF implosions when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions (λii) approaches the size of the hot-fuel region (Rfuel) and may impact hot-spot formation and the possibility of ignition. To isolate and study ion kinetic effects, the ratio of N - K =λii /Rfuel was varied in D3He-filled, shock-driven implosions at the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility, from hydrodynamic-like conditions (NK 0.01) to strongly kinetic conditions (NK 10). A strong trend of decreasing fusion yields relative to the predictions of hydrodynamic models is observed as NK increases from 0.1 to 10. Hydrodynamics simulations that include basic models of the kinetic effects that are likely to be present in these experiments-namely, ion diffusion and Knudsen-layer reduction of the fusion reactivity-are better able to capture the experimental results. This type of implosion has also been used as a source of monoenergetic 15-MeV protons to image magnetic fields driven to reconnect in laser-produced plasmas at conditions similar to those encountered at the Earth's magnetopause. These experiments demonstrate that for both symmetric and asymmetric magnetic-reconnection configurations, when plasma flows are much stronger than the nominal Alfvén speed, the rate of magnetic-flux annihilation is determined by the flow velocity and is largely insensitive to initial plasma conditions. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Number DENA0001857.

  1. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R. [Associação Euratom Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-15

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  2. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Alves, D; Coelho, R

    2013-08-01

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  3. First experimental observations of the magnetic field effects on the nonlocal electron energy transport at the inertial fusion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolai, Philippe; Schurtz, Guy; Feugeaus, Jean-Luc; Fourment, Claude; Breil, Jerome; Maire, Pierre-Henri; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Chenais-Popovics, Claude; Hullin, Sebatien; Gary, Sylvie; Reverdin, Charles; Durut, F.

    2006-10-01

    A correct modelling of the electron energy transport is essential for the simulation of laser-matter interaction and for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target design. The classical Spitzer-H"arm model does not reproduce experimental results. The nonlocality of the electron transport combined with the self-generated magnetic fields is often suggested as an appropriate model. In the recent experiment carried out on the LIL facility, the prototype of the Laser Mega Joule under construction in France, the effects of nonlocal transport combined with the self-generated magnetic fields were observed for the first time for the ICF conditions. The experimental results are interpreted by 2D numerical simulations including our new electron transport model [1]. We show that the model correctly reproduces the experimental results and affirms the role of the magnetic field on the nonlocal transport. [1] Ph. Nicola"i, J.-L. Feugeas and G. Schurtz, Phys. Plasmas 13, 032701 (2006)

  4. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-01

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  5. Towards nanomedicines of the future: Remote magneto-mechanical actuation of nanomedicines by alternating magnetic fields☆

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Gribanovsky, Sergey L.; Golovin, Dmitry Y.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Master, Alyssa M.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the concept of magneto-mechanical actuation of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in super-low and low frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) and its possible use for remote control of nanomedicines and drug delivery systems. The applications of this approach for remote actuation of drug release as well as effects on biomacromolecules, biomembranes, subcellular structures and cells are discussed in comparison to conventional strategies employing magnetic hyperthermia in a radio frequency (RF) AMF. Several quantitative models describing interaction of functionalized MNPs with single macromolecules, lipid membranes, and proteins (e.g. cell membrane receptors, ion channels) are presented. The optimal characteristics of the MNPs and an AMF for effective magneto-mechanical actuation of single molecule responses in biological and bio-inspired systems are discussed. Altogether, the described studies and phenomena offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics both alone and in combination with magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26407671

  6. Element Specific Magnetic Anisotropy Energy of Alternately Layered FeNi Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, Masako; Amemiya, Kenta

    2011-07-01

    The element specific magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of alternately layered FeNi thin films grown on Ni (4-20 MLs)/Cu(001) is investigated by means of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). Although surface Fe is known to show strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, the Ni-sandwiched Fe layer has a tiny MAE of 10+/-40 µeV. On the other hand, the Fe-sandwiched Ni layer has a positive MAE of 60+/-30 µeV. The total MAE simulated from the XMCD analysis shows good agreement with the MOKE result. We demonstrate that in-situ analysis of the element specific MAE gives a possible strategy for manipulating the magnetic anisotropy of multilayers.

  7. Towards nanomedicines of the future: Remote magneto-mechanical actuation of nanomedicines by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Yuri I; Gribanovsky, Sergey L; Golovin, Dmitry Y; Klyachko, Natalia L; Majouga, Alexander G; Master, Аlyssa M; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2015-12-10

    The paper describes the concept of magneto-mechanical actuation of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in super-low and low frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) and its possible use for remote control of nanomedicines and drug delivery systems. The applications of this approach for remote actuation of drug release as well as effects on biomacromolecules, biomembranes, subcellular structures and cells are discussed in comparison to conventional strategies employing magnetic hyperthermia in a radio frequency (RF) AMF. Several quantitative models describing interaction of functionalized MNPs with single macromolecules, lipid membranes, and proteins (e.g. cell membrane receptors, ion channels) are presented. The optimal characteristics of the MNPs and an AMF for effective magneto-mechanical actuation of single molecule responses in biological and bio-inspired systems are discussed. Altogether, the described studies and phenomena offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics both alone and in combination with magnetic hyperthermia.

  8. Effect of different tritium fractions on some plasma parameters in deuterium-tritium magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Mohsenpour, T.; Dashtban, N.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all reactor projects have considered deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion. The cross section of D-T reaction is larger than those of other fusion reactions, thus it is considered to be a more favorable reaction. The mix of fuel can vary. In this work, a comparison between the effects of different mixture of D-T fuel on the plasma parameters is made. A time dependence calculation of the fusion process is performed using the zero-dimensional model based on a coupled set of particle and energy balance equations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The time evolution of plasma parameters is also analyzed numerically.

  9. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-08

    Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a

  10. Alternate applications of fusion power: development of a high-temperature blanket for synthetic-fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.A.; Mattas, R.F.; Krajcinovic, D.; DePaz, J.; Gohar, Y.

    1981-11-01

    This study has shown that utilization of the unique features of a fusion reactor can result in a novel and potentially economical method of decomposing steam into hydrogen and oxygen. Most of the power of fusion reactors is in the form of energetic neutrons. If this power could be used to produce high temperature uncontaminated steam, a large fraction of the energy needed to decomposee the steam could be supplied as thermal energy by the fusion reaction. Proposed high temperature electrolysis processes require steam temperature in excess of 1000/sup 0/C for high efficiency. The design put forth in this study details a system that can accomplish that end.

  11. Prostate cancer detection with magnetic resonance-ultrasound fusion biopsy: The role of systematic and targeted biopsies.

    PubMed

    Filson, Christopher P; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J A; Huang, Jiaoti; Lieu, Patricia; Dorey, Frederick J; Reiter, Robert E; Marks, Leonard S

    2016-03-15

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the performance of magnetic resonance (MR)-ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy in diagnosing clinically significant prostate cancer (csCaP). A total of 1042 men underwent multiparametric MR imaging (mpMRI) and fusion biopsy consecutively in a prospective trial (2009-2014). An expert reader graded mpMRI regions of interest (ROIs) as 1 to 5 using published protocols. The fusion biopsy device was used to obtain targeted cores from ROIs (when present) followed by a fusion image-guided, 12-core systematic biopsy in all men, even if no suspicious ROI was noted. The primary endpoint of the study was the detection of csCaP (ie, Gleason score ≥ 7). Among 825 men with ≥ 1 suspicious ROI of ≥ grade 3, 289 (35%) were found to have csCaP. Powerful predictors of csCaP were ROI grade (grade 5 vs grade 3: odds ratio, 6.5 [P<.01]) and prostate-specific antigen density (each increase of 0.05 ng/mL/cc: odds ratio, 1.4 [P<.01]). Combining systematic and targeted biopsies resulted in the detection of more patients with csCaP (289 patients) than targeting (229 patients) or systematic (199 patients) biopsy alone. Among patients with no suspicious ROI, 35 (16%) were found to have csCaP on systematic biopsy. In this prospective trial, MR-ultrasound fusion biopsy allowed for the detection of csCaP, with a direct relationship noted with ROI grade and prostate-specific antigen density. The combination of targeted and systematic biopsy detected more csCaP than either modality alone; systematic biopsies revealed csCaP in 16% of men with no suspicious MRI target. The advantages of this new biopsy method are apparent, but issues of cost, training, and reliability await resolution before its widespread adoption. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    DOE PAGES

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; ...

    2015-10-23

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equationsmore » of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.« less

  13. Alternating-gradient canted cosine theta superconducting magnets for future compact proton gantries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weishi; Brouwer, Lucas; Caspi, Shlomo; Prestemon, Soren; Gerbershagen, Alexander; Schippers, Jacobus Maarten; Robin, David

    2015-10-01

    We present a design of superconducting magnets, optimized for application in a gantry for proton therapy. We have introduced a new magnet design concept, called an alternating-gradient canted cosine theta (AG-CCT) concept, which is compatible with an achromatic layout. This layout allows a large momentum acceptance. The 15 cm radius of the bore aperture enables the application of pencil beam scanning in front of the SC-magnet. The optical and dynamic performance of a gantry based on these magnets has been analyzed using the fields derived (via Biot-Savart law) from the actual windings of the AG-CCT combined with the full equations of motion. The results show that with appropriate higher order correction, a large 3D volume can be rapidly scanned with little beam shape distortion. A very big advantage is that all this can be done while keeping the AG-CCT fields fixed. This reduces the need for fast field ramping of the superconducting magnets between the successive beam energies used for the scanning in depth and it is important for medical application since this reduces the technical risk (e.g., a quench) associated with fast field changes in superconducting magnets. For proton gantries the corresponding superconducting magnet system holds promise of dramatic reduction in weight. For heavier ion gantries there may furthermore be a significant reduction in size.

  14. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Thrust Chamber System for Laser Fusion Rocket Considering the Creation Process of Laser-Produced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Kajimura, Yoshihiro; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoji; Yasunaga, Masato; Hinaga, Tomoyuki; Hanaya, Tomonari; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Mori, Yoshitaka; Nakashima, Hideki

    The plasma behavior in a magnetic thrust chamber system for a laser fusion rocket is numerically simulated using a three-dimensional (3D) hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) code and a one-dimensional (1D) radiation hydrodynamic code. The magnetic thrust chamber and an applied magnetic field with a suitable geometry generate an impulse from the interaction between the diamagnetic current in the laser-produced plasma and the magnetic field generated by a magnetic coil. A 1D radiation hydrodynamics code is used to compute the hydrodynamic evolution of a radiating plasma heated by laser beams or external radiation sources. By combining this code and a 3D hybrid PIC code, a series of numerical simulations are performed to investigate high-energy laser injection onto a fuel target and the ablated plasma behavior of the system. A thrust energy of 0.37 J and an impulse bit of 31.6 μNs are obtained for an incident laser energy of 4.0 J. This impulse bit could mostly be generated by interactions between a slowly expanding plasma (expansion velocity of ~20 km/s) and a magnetic field. To optimize this system, it is important to reduce the expansion velocity of the laser-produced plasma.

  15. Replicating magneto-inertial fusion compression by colliding a magnetized plasma jet with a heavy gas cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Amelia; Bellan, Paul; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The Caltech plasma jet experiment is arranged to have a neutral gas cloud in the path of a magnetized plasma jet. When a hydrogen jet collides with an argon gas cloud, the jet is compressed as argon is much heavier than hydrogen. The compression is equivalent to the Magnetized Inertial Fusion situation of a heavy liner compressing a low-density, magnetized plasma, providing an inexpensive analog for non-destructive studies of the plasma compression physics. The strategy is to measure density, magnetic field and temperature in and around the compression region over a range of parameters both with and without the neutral gas cloud in the path of the jet, with the ultimate goal of determining an equation of state characterizing the observed behavior. Initial density and magnetic field measurements have been made and temperature measurements are about to begin. To complement the experimental measurements, 3D numerical MHD simulation is being performed based on a code used previously to model the magnetized plasma jet experiment. In addition, plans are underway to do modeling using a hybrid code.

  16. Spontaneously Fluctuating Motor Cortex Excitability in Alter