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Sample records for alternating tripod gait

  1. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdya, Pavan; Thandiackal, Robin; Cherney, Raphael; Asselborn, Thibault; Benton, Richard; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Floreano, Dario

    2017-02-01

    To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact.

  2. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

    PubMed Central

    Ramdya, Pavan; Thandiackal, Robin; Cherney, Raphael; Asselborn, Thibault; Benton, Richard; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Floreano, Dario

    2017-01-01

    To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact. PMID:28211509

  3. Honeybees Prefer to Steer on a Smooth Wall With Tetrapod Gaits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieliang; Zhu, Fei; Yan, Shaoze

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Insects are well equipped in walking on complex three-dimensional terrain, allowing them to overcome obstacles or catch prey. However, the gait transition for insects steering on a wall remains unexplored. Here, we find that honeybees adopted a tetrapod gait to change direction when climbing a wall. On the contrary to the common tripod gait, honeybees propel their body forward by synchronously stepping with both middle legs and then both front legs. This process ensures the angle of the central axis of the honeybee to be consistent with the crawling direction. Interestingly, when running in an alternating tripod gait, the central axis of honeybee sways around the center of mass under alternating tripod gait to maintain stability. Experimental results show that tripod, tetrapod, and random gaits result in the amazing consensus harmony on the climbing speed and gait stability, whether climbing on a smooth wall or walking on smooth ground. PMID:29722862

  4. Design of a robotic gait trainer using spring over muscle actuators for ankle stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Kartik; Sugar, Thomas G; Koeneman, James B; Koeneman, Edward J

    2005-11-01

    Repetitive task training is an effective form of rehabilitation for people suffering from debilitating injuries of stroke. We present the design and working concept of a robotic gait trainer (RGT), an ankle rehabilitation device for assisting stroke patients during gait. Structurally based on a tripod mechanism, the device is a parallel robot that incorporates two pneumatically powered, double-acting, compliant, spring over muscle actuators as actuation links which move the ankle in dorsiflex ion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion. A unique feature in the tripod design is that the human anatomy is part of the robot, the first fixed link being the patient's leg. The kinematics and workspace of the tripod device have been analyzed determining its range of motion. Experimental gait data from an able-bodied person wearing the working RGT prototype are presented.

  5. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD statement. The TRIPOD Group.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Reitsma, Johannes B; Altman, Douglas G; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-01-13

    Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Quadrupedal gaits in hexapod animals - inter-leg coordination in free-walking adult stick insects.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Martyna; Godlewska, Elzbieta; Schmidt, Joachim; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2012-12-15

    The analysis of inter-leg coordination in insect walking is generally a study of six-legged locomotion. For decades, the stick insect Carausius morosus has been instrumental for unravelling the rules and mechanisms that control leg coordination in hexapeds. We analysed inter-leg coordination in C. morosus that freely walked on straight paths on plane surfaces with different slopes. Consecutive 1.7 s sections were assigned inter-leg coordination patterns (which we call gaits) based on footfall patterns. Regular gaits, i.e. wave, tetrapod or tripod gaits, occurred in different proportions depending on surface slopes. Tetrapod gaits were observed most frequently, wave gaits only occurred on 90 deg inclining slopes and tripod gaits occurred most often on 15 deg declining slopes, i.e. in 40% of the sections. Depending on the slope, 36-66% of the sections were assigned irregular gaits. Irregular gaits were mostly due to multiple stepping by the front legs, which is perhaps probing behaviour, not phase coupled to the middle legs' cycles. In irregular gaits, middle leg and hindleg coordination was regular, related to quadrupedal walk and wave gaits. Apparently, front legs uncouple from and couple to the walking system without compromising middle leg and hindleg coordination. In front leg amputees, the remaining legs were strictly coordinated. In hindleg and middle leg amputees, the front legs continued multiple stepping. The coordination of middle leg amputees was maladapted, with front legs and hindlegs performing multiple steps or ipsilateral legs being in simultaneous swing. Thus, afferent information from middle legs might be necessary for a regular hindleg stepping pattern.

  7. Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD Statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, G S; Reitsma, J B; Altman, D G; Moons, K G M

    2015-02-01

    Prediction models are developed to aid healthcare providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision-making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, healthcare professionals and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. A complete checklist is available at http://www.tripod-statement.org. © 2015 American College of Physicians.

  8. Transparent Reporting of a Multivariable Prediction Model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD): The TRIPOD Statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Reitsma, Johannes B; Altman, Douglas G; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-06-01

    Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations

  9. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, G S; Reitsma, J B; Altman, D G; Moons, K G M

    2015-01-20

    Prediction models are developed to aid health-care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health-care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org).

  10. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD Statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Reitsma, Johannes B; Altman, Douglas G; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-02-01

    Prediction models are developed to aid healthcare providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision-making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, healthcare professionals and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  11. Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Reitsma, Johannes B; Altman, Douglas G; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-01-06

    Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org).

  12. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD): The TRIPOD statement

    PubMed Central

    Collins, G S; Reitsma, J B; Altman, D G; Moons, K G M

    2015-01-01

    Prediction models are developed to aid health-care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health-care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). PMID:25562432

  13. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, G S; Reitsma, J B; Altman, D G; Moons, K G M

    2015-02-01

    Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD Statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Reitsma, Johannes B; Altman, Douglas G; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-01-06

    Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org).

  15. Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, G S; Reitsma, J B; Altman, D G; Moons, K G M

    2015-02-01

    Prediction models are developed to aid healthcare providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision-making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, healthcare professionals and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study, regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). © 2015 Joint copyright. The Authors and Annals of Internal Medicine. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley Ltd. on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  16. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Reitsma, Johannes B; Altman, Douglas G; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-02-01

    Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transparent reporting of a multivariable prediction model for individual prognosis or diagnosis (TRIPOD): the TRIPOD statement.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Reitsma, Johannes B; Altman, Douglas G; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-01-07

    Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web based survey and revised during a three day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org).To encourage dissemination of the TRIPOD Statement, this article is freely accessible on the Annals of Internal Medicine Web site (www.annals.org) and

  18. Synthesis and amino acids complexation of tripodal hexasubstituted benzene chiral receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choksakulporn, Saowanaporn; Punkvang, Auradee; Sritana-anant, Yongsak

    2015-02-01

    The parent 1,3,5-triacetyl-2,4,6-trihydroxybenzene was prepared in up to 91% yield using a one-pot, one step reaction catalyzed by aluminum chloride. Its alkylations with 1,5-dibromopentane generated a symmetric tripodal hexasubstituted benzene precursor in the alternated conformer predicted by a theoretical calculation. Subsequent substitutions and reductions provided the corresponding tris-amine in 59% yield. Aminations of the tripodal precursor with (R)-(+)-1-phenylethylamine obtained a chiral tris-amine ligand in 44% yield. 1H NMR titrations of this ligand with each of three L-amino acid derivatives as guest molecules confirmed the presence of their complexes, in which the complex with alanine derivative displayed the strongest interactions with the ligand. Job plots suggested that all complexes composed of 1:2 ratios of the ligand and these guests. Theoretical calculations additionally revealed the structures and the associated binding parameters of the complexes.

  19. How Load-Carrying Ants Avoid Falling Over: Mechanical Stability during Foraging in Atta vollenweideri Grass-Cutting Ants

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Karin; Roces, Flavio; Federle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Background Foraging workers of grass-cutting ants (Atta vollenweideri) regularly carry grass fragments larger than their own body. Fragment length has been shown to influence the ants’ running speed and thereby the colony’s food intake rate. We investigated whether and how grass-cutting ants maintain stability when carrying fragments of two different lengths but identical mass. Principal Findings Ants carried all fragments in an upright, backwards-tilted position, but held long fragments more vertically than short ones. All carrying ants used an alternating tripod gait, where mechanical stability was increased by overlapping stance phases of consecutive steps. The overlap was greatest for ants carrying long fragments, resulting in more legs contacting the ground simultaneously. For all ants, the projection of the total centre of mass (ant and fragment) was often outside the supporting tripod, i.e. the three feet that would be in stance for a non-overlapping tripod gait. Stability was only achieved through additional legs in ground contact. Tripod stability (quantified as the minimum distance of the centre of mass to the edge of the supporting tripod) was significantly smaller for ants with long fragments. Here, tripod stability was lowest at the beginning of each step, when the center of mass was near the posterior margin of the supporting tripod. By contrast, tripod stability was lowest at the end of each step for ants carrying short fragments. Consistently, ants with long fragments mainly fell backwards, whereas ants carrying short fragments mainly fell forwards or to the side. Assuming that transporting ants adjust neither the fragment angle nor the gait, they would be less stable and more likely to fall over. Conclusions In grass-cutting ants, the need to maintain static stability when carrying long grass fragments has led to multiple kinematic adjustments at the expense of a reduced material transport rate. PMID:23300994

  20. Quantification of gait parameters in freely walking wild type and sensory deprived Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, César S; Bartos, Imre; Akay, Turgay; Márka, Szabolcs; Mann, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated walking in vertebrates and multi-legged invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster requires a complex neural network coupled to sensory feedback. An understanding of this network will benefit from systems such as Drosophila that have the ability to genetically manipulate neural activities. However, the fly's small size makes it challenging to analyze walking in this system. In order to overcome this limitation, we developed an optical method coupled with high-speed imaging that allows the tracking and quantification of gait parameters in freely walking flies with high temporal and spatial resolution. Using this method, we present a comprehensive description of many locomotion parameters, such as gait, tarsal positioning, and intersegmental and left-right coordination for wild type fruit flies. Surprisingly, we find that inactivation of sensory neurons in the fly's legs, to block proprioceptive feedback, led to deficient step precision, but interleg coordination and the ability to execute a tripod gait were unaffected. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00231.001 PMID:23326642

  1. Transparent Reporting of a Multivariable Prediction Model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD)

    PubMed Central

    Reitsma, Johannes B.; Altman, Douglas G.; Moons, Karel G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Prediction models are developed to aid health care providers in estimating the probability or risk that a specific disease or condition is present (diagnostic models) or that a specific event will occur in the future (prognostic models), to inform their decision making. However, the overwhelming evidence shows that the quality of reporting of prediction model studies is poor. Only with full and clear reporting of information on all aspects of a prediction model can risk of bias and potential usefulness of prediction models be adequately assessed. Methods— The Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) Initiative developed a set of recommendations for the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. This article describes how the TRIPOD Statement was developed. An extensive list of items based on a review of the literature was created, which was reduced after a Web-based survey and revised during a 3-day meeting in June 2011 with methodologists, health care professionals, and journal editors. The list was refined during several meetings of the steering group and in e-mail discussions with the wider group of TRIPOD contributors. Results— The resulting TRIPOD Statement is a checklist of 22 items, deemed essential for transparent reporting of a prediction model study. The TRIPOD Statement aims to improve the transparency of the reporting of a prediction model study regardless of the study methods used. The TRIPOD Statement is best used in conjunction with the TRIPOD explanation and elaboration document. Conclusions— To aid the editorial process and readers of prediction model studies, it is recommended that authors include a completed checklist in their submission (also available at www.tripod-statement.org). PMID:25561516

  2. Tripodal penta(p-phenylene) for the biofunctionalization of alkynyl-modified silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Molina, María; Díaz, Amelia; Valpuesta, María; Contreras-Cáceres, Rafael; López-Romero, J. Manuel; López-Ramírez, M. Rosa

    2018-07-01

    Here we report the optimization on the covalent grafting methodology of a tripod-shaped penta(p-phenylene), 1, on alkynyl-terminated silicon surfaces, and the incorporation of an active theophylline derivative, 2, for the specific immobilization of proteins. The tripodal molecule presents azide-terminal groups to be attached onto a silicon surface containing an alkynyl monolayer. Initially, compound 1 has been covalently incorporated on alkynyl-terminated Si wafers, by the copper catalyzed alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, a click reaction). The tripod density on the silicon surface is tuned by performing the CuAAC reaction at different concentrations of 1, as well as under different experimental conditions (T, base, copper source, shaking). Then, tripod 1-modified surface has also been biofunctionalized with 2. The effective preparation of this silicon-modified surface allowed us to study the streptavidin immobilization on the surface. Characterization of the different surfaces has been carried out by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Bright-Field Optical Transmission Microscopy (Confocal) techniques. We also include density functional theory (DFT) analysis of the organic structures to confirm the height-profile and the tripod-surface relative configuration extracted from AFM images.

  3. Effects of conventional overground gait training and a gait trainer with partial body weight support on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of both conventional overground gait training (CGT) and a gait trainer with partial body weight support (GTBWS) on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were alternately assigned to one of two treatment groups, and both groups underwent CGT and GTBWS. [Results] The functional ambulation classification on the affected side improved significantly in the CGT and GTBWS groups. Walking speed also improved significantly in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the GTBWS in company with CGT may be, in part, an effective method of gait training for restoring gait ability in patients after a stroke. PMID:26157272

  4. Effects of conventional overground gait training and a gait trainer with partial body weight support on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of both conventional overground gait training (CGT) and a gait trainer with partial body weight support (GTBWS) on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were alternately assigned to one of two treatment groups, and both groups underwent CGT and GTBWS. [Results] The functional ambulation classification on the affected side improved significantly in the CGT and GTBWS groups. Walking speed also improved significantly in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the GTBWS in company with CGT may be, in part, an effective method of gait training for restoring gait ability in patients after a stroke.

  5. Evaluating alternative gait strategies using evolutionary robotics.

    PubMed

    Sellers, William I; Dennis, Louise A; W -J, Wang; Crompton, Robin H

    2004-05-01

    Evolutionary robotics is a branch of artificial intelligence concerned with the automatic generation of autonomous robots. Usually the form of the robot is predefined and various computational techniques are used to control the machine's behaviour. One aspect is the spontaneous generation of walking in legged robots and this can be used to investigate the mechanical requirements for efficient walking in bipeds. This paper demonstrates a bipedal simulator that spontaneously generates walking and running gaits. The model can be customized to represent a range of hominoid morphologies and used to predict performance parameters such as preferred speed and metabolic energy cost. Because it does not require any motion capture data it is particularly suitable for investigating locomotion in fossil animals. The predictions for modern humans are highly accurate in terms of energy cost for a given speed and thus the values predicted for other bipeds are likely to be good estimates. To illustrate this the cost of transport is calculated for Australopithecus afarensis. The model allows the degree of maximum extension at the knee to be varied causing the model to adopt walking gaits varying from chimpanzee-like to human-like. The energy costs associated with these gait choices can thus be calculated and this information used to evaluate possible locomotor strategies in early hominids.

  6. Tripod self-assembled monolayer on Au(111) prepared by reaction of hydroxyl-terminated alkylthiols with SiCl4.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Andrew S; Lew, Wanda; Allara, David L

    2008-03-18

    Infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), single wavelength ellipsometry, and density functional theory were used to elucidate the structure of a molecular tripod self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on polycrystalline gold{111} substrates. The tripod SAM was formed by the reaction of SiCl4 with a densely packed monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol, 6-mercaptohexanol, and 16-mercaptohexadecanol under inert atmosphere. After reaction with SiCl4, IRS spectra show an intense absorption at approximately 1112 cm(-1) that is attributed to Si-O-C asymmetric stretching vibration of a molecular tripod structure. Harmonic vibrational frequencies computed at the B3LYP/6-311+g** level of theory for the mercaptoethanol tripod SAM closely match the experimental IRS spectra, giving further support for the tripod structure. When rinsed with methanol or water, the Si-Cl-terminated SAM becomes capped with Si-OMe or Si-OH. The silanol-terminated tripod SAM is expected to find use in the preparation of thin zeolite and silica films on gold substrates.

  7. Evaluating alternative gait strategies using evolutionary robotics

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, William I; Dennis, Louise A; Wang, W -J; Crompton, Robin H

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary robotics is a branch of artificial intelligence concerned with the automatic generation of autonomous robots. Usually the form of the robot is predefined and various computational techniques are used to control the machine's behaviour. One aspect is the spontaneous generation of walking in legged robots and this can be used to investigate the mechanical requirements for efficient walking in bipeds. This paper demonstrates a bipedal simulator that spontaneously generates walking and running gaits. The model can be customized to represent a range of hominoid morphologies and used to predict performance parameters such as preferred speed and metabolic energy cost. Because it does not require any motion capture data it is particularly suitable for investigating locomotion in fossil animals. The predictions for modern humans are highly accurate in terms of energy cost for a given speed and thus the values predicted for other bipeds are likely to be good estimates. To illustrate this the cost of transport is calculated for Australopithecus afarensis. The model allows the degree of maximum extension at the knee to be varied causing the model to adopt walking gaits varying from chimpanzee-like to human-like. The energy costs associated with these gait choices can thus be calculated and this information used to evaluate possible locomotor strategies in early hominids. PMID:15198699

  8. Gait performance and foot pressure distribution during wearable robot-assisted gait in elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Hyun; Lee, Hwang-Jae; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Byung-Ok; Lee, Jusuk; Kim, Jeonghun; Ryu, Gyu-Ha; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-11-28

    A robotic exoskeleton device is an intelligent system designed to improve gait performance and quality of life for the wearer. Robotic technology has developed rapidly in recent years, and several robot-assisted gait devices were developed to enhance gait function and activities of daily living in elderly adults and patients with gait disorders. In this study, we investigated the effects of the Gait-enhancing Mechatronic System (GEMS), a new wearable robotic hip-assist device developed by Samsung Electronics Co, Ltd., Korea, on gait performance and foot pressure distribution in elderly adults. Thirty elderly adults who had no neurological or musculoskeletal abnormalities affecting gait participated in this study. A three-dimensional (3D) motion capture system, surface electromyography and the F-Scan system were used to collect data on spatiotemporal gait parameters, muscle activity and foot pressure distribution under three conditions: free gait without robot assistance (FG), robot-assisted gait with zero torque (RAG-Z) and robot-assisted gait (RAG). We found increased gait speed, cadence, stride length and single support time in the RAG condition. Reduced rectus femoris and medial gastrocnemius muscle activity throughout the terminal stance phase and reduced effort of the medial gastrocnemius muscle throughout the pre-swing phase were also observed in the RAG condition. In addition, walking with the assistance of GEMS resulted in a significant increase in foot pressure distribution, specifically in maximum force and peak pressure of the total foot, medial masks, anterior masks and posterior masks. The results of the present study reveal that GEMS may present an alternative way of restoring age-related changes in gait such as gait instability with muscle weakness, reduced step force and lower foot pressure in elderly adults. In addition, GEMS improved gait performance by improving push-off power and walking speed and reducing muscle activity in the lower

  9. Crowd-Sourced Amputee Gait Data: A Feasibility Study Using YouTube Videos of Unilateral Trans-Femoral Gait.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, James; Gunarathne, Nuwan; Howard, David; Kenney, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Collecting large datasets of amputee gait data is notoriously difficult. Additionally, collecting data on less prevalent amputations or on gait activities other than level walking and running on hard surfaces is rarely attempted. However, with the wealth of user-generated content on the Internet, the scope for collecting amputee gait data from alternative sources other than traditional gait labs is intriguing. Here we investigate the potential of YouTube videos to provide gait data on amputee walking. We use an example dataset of trans-femoral amputees level walking at self-selected speeds to collect temporal gait parameters and calculate gait asymmetry. We compare our YouTube data with typical literature values, and show that our methodology produces results that are highly comparable to data collected in a traditional manner. The similarity between the results of our novel methodology and literature values lends confidence to our technique. Nevertheless, clear challenges with the collection and interpretation of crowd-sourced gait data remain, including long term access to datasets, and a lack of validity and reliability studies in this area.

  10. Crowd-Sourced Amputee Gait Data: A Feasibility Study Using YouTube Videos of Unilateral Trans-Femoral Gait

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, James; Gunarathne, Nuwan; Howard, David; Kenney, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Collecting large datasets of amputee gait data is notoriously difficult. Additionally, collecting data on less prevalent amputations or on gait activities other than level walking and running on hard surfaces is rarely attempted. However, with the wealth of user-generated content on the Internet, the scope for collecting amputee gait data from alternative sources other than traditional gait labs is intriguing. Here we investigate the potential of YouTube videos to provide gait data on amputee walking. We use an example dataset of trans-femoral amputees level walking at self-selected speeds to collect temporal gait parameters and calculate gait asymmetry. We compare our YouTube data with typical literature values, and show that our methodology produces results that are highly comparable to data collected in a traditional manner. The similarity between the results of our novel methodology and literature values lends confidence to our technique. Nevertheless, clear challenges with the collection and interpretation of crowd-sourced gait data remain, including long term access to datasets, and a lack of validity and reliability studies in this area. PMID:27764226

  11. Buckling analysis of stiff thin films suspended on a substrate with tripod surface relief structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qingmin; Chen, Furong; Li, Ming; Cheng, Huanyu

    2017-09-01

    A wavy configuration is a simple yet powerful structural design strategy, which has been widely used in flexible and stretchable electronics. A buckled structure created from a prestretch-contact-release process represents an early effort. Substrates with engineered surface relief structures (e.g., rectangular islands or tripod structure) have enabled stretchability to the devices without sacrificing their electric performance (e.g., high areal coverage for LEDs/photovoltaics/batteries/supercapacitors). In particular, the substrate with a tripod surface relief structure allows wrinkled devices to be suspended on a soft tripod substrate. This minimizes the contact area between devices and the deformed substrate, which contributes to a significantly reduced interfacial stress/strain. To uncover the underlying mechanism of such a design, we exploit the energy method to analytically investigate the buckling and postbuckling behaviors of stiff films suspended on a stretchable polymeric substrate with a tripod surface relief structure. Validated by finite element analysis, the predications from such an analytical study elucidate the deformed profile and maximum strain in the buckled and postbuckled stiff thin device films, providing a useful toolkit for future experimental designs.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and theoretical studies of new thiophene-based tripodal ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harit, Tarik; Bellaouchi, Reda; Asehraou, Abdeslam; Rahal, Mahmoud; Bouabdallah, Ibrahim; Malek, Fouad

    2017-04-01

    The synthesis of new thiophene-tripods with different side arms was reported. These compounds were obtained in good yields and their structures were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of these products were screened against Gram positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida pelliculosa). The obtained results showed that tripods containing a hydroxyl group in the side arm inhibited both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, while the tripod with an isopropyl side arm inhibited only the Gram-negative bacteria. DFT calculations with B3LYP/6-31G* level have been used to analyze the electronic and geometric characteristics. The molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS) indicated that the presence of electrophile site in the side arm could be responsible for activities against Gram-positive bacteria.

  13. Fluorinated tripodal receptors for potentiometric chloride detection in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Pankratova, Nadezda; Cuartero, Maria; Jowett, Laura A; Howe, Ethan N W; Gale, Philip A; Bakker, Eric; Crespo, Gastón A

    2018-01-15

    Fluorinated tripodal compounds were recently reported to be efficient transmembrane transporters for a series of inorganic anions. In particular, this class of receptors has been shown to be suitable for the effective complexation of chloride, nitrate, bicarbonate and sulfate anions via hydrogen bonding. The potentiometric properties of urea and thiourea-based fluorinated tripodal receptors are explored here for the first time, in light of the need for reliable sensors for chloride monitoring in undiluted biological fluids. The ion selective electrode (ISE) membranes with tren-based tris-urea bis(CF 3 ) tripodal compound (ionophore I) were found to exhibit the best selectivity for chloride over major lipophilic anions such as salicylate ( [Formula: see text] ) and thiocyanate ( [Formula: see text] ). Ionophore I-based ISEs were successfully applied for chloride determination in undiluted human serum as well as artificial serum sample, the slope of the linear calibration at the relevant background of interfering ions being close to Nernstian (49.8±1.7mV). The results of potentiometric measurements were confirmed by argentometric titration. Moreover, the ionophore I-based ISE membrane was shown to exhibit a very good long-term stability of potentiometric performance over the period of 10 weeks. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations, potentiometric sandwich membrane experiments and density functional theory (DFT) computational studies were performed to determine the binding constants and suggest 1:1 complexation stoichiometry for the ionophore I with chloride as well as salicylate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective oxoanion separation using a tripodal ligand

    DOEpatents

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Rajbanshi, Arbin

    2016-02-16

    The present invention relates to urea-functionalized crystalline capsules self-assembled by sodium or potassium cation coordination and by hydrogen-bonding water bridges to selectively encapsulate tetrahedral divalent oxoanions from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions and methods using this system for selective anion separations from industrial solutions. The method involves competitive crystallizations using a tripodal tris(urea) functionalized ligand and, in particular, provides a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  15. A novel, bounding gait in swimming turtles: implications for aquatic locomotor diversity.

    PubMed

    Mayerl, Christopher J; Blob, Richard W

    2017-10-15

    Turtles are an iconic lineage in studies of animal locomotion, typifying the use of slow, alternating footfalls during walking. Alternating movements of contralateral limbs are also typical during swimming gaits for most freshwater turtles. Here, we report a novel gait in turtles, in which the pleurodire Emydura subglobosa swims using a bounding gait that coordinates bilateral protraction of both forelimbs with bilateral retraction of both hindlimbs. Use of this bounding gait is correlated with increased limb excursion and decreased stride frequency, but not increased velocity when compared with standard swimming strokes. Bounding by E. subglobosa provides a second example of a non-mammalian lineage that can use bounding gaits, and may give insight into the evolution of aquatic flapping. Parallels in limb muscle fascicle properties between bounding turtles and crocodylids suggest a possible musculoskeletal mechanism underlying the use of bounding gaits in particular lineages. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Controlled Redox Chemistry at Cerium within a Tripodal Nitroxide Ligand Framework

    DOE PAGES

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lippincott, Connor A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; ...

    2015-10-27

    Ligand reorganization has been shown to have a profound effect on the outcome of cerium redox chemistry. Through the use of a tethered, tripodal, trianionic nitroxide ligand, [((2-tBuNOH)C 6 H 4 CH 2 ) 3 N] 3- (TriNO x 3- ), controlled redox chemistry at cerium was accomplished, and typically reactive complexes of tetravalent cerium were isolated. These included rare cationic complexes [Ce(TriNO x )thf][BAr F 4 ], in which Ar F =3,5-(CF 3 ) 2 -C 6 H 3 , and [Ce(TriNO x )py][OTf] . A rare complete Ce-halide series, Ce(TriNO x )X, in which X=F - , Clmore » - , Br - , I - , was also synthesized. We explored the solution chemistry of these complexes through detailed solution-phase electrochemistry and 1 H NMR experiments and showed a unique shift in the ratio of species with inner- and outer-sphere anions with size of the anionic X - group. DFT calculations on the series of calculations corroborated the experimental findings. Also, the use of a bulky and strongly donating tethered tripodal nitroxide ligand allowed the controlled redox chemistry at cerium. As a result, rare examples of cationic Ce IV complexes were synthesized and fully characterized. The full Ce-halide series supported by the tripodal ligand framework is also reported (see scheme).« less

  17. The gait disorder in downbeat nystagmus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schniepp, Roman; Wuehr, Max; Huth, Sabrina; Pradhan, Cauchy; Schlick, Cornelia; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Downbeat nystagmus (DBN) is a common form of acquired fixation nystagmus with key symptoms of oscillopsia and gait disturbance. Gait disturbance could be a result of impaired visual feedback due to the involuntary ocular oscillations. Alternatively, a malfunction of cerebellar locomotor control might be involved, since DBN is considered a vestibulocerebellar disorder. Investigation of walking in 50 DBN patients (age 72 ± 11 years, 23 females) and 50 healthy controls (HS) (age 70 ± 11 years, 23 females) using a pressure sensitive carpet (GAITRite). The patient cohort comprised subjects with only ocular motor signs (DBN) and subjects with an additional limb ataxia (DBNCA). Gait investigation comprised different walking speeds and walking with eyes closed. In DBN, gait velocity was reduced (p<0.001) with a reduced stride length (p<0.001), increased base of support (p<0.050), and increased double support (p<0.001). Walking with eyes closed led to significant gait changes in both HS and DBN. These changes were more pronounced in DBN patients (p<0.001). Speed-dependency of gait variability revealed significant differences between the subgroups of DBN and DBNCA (p<0.050). (I) Impaired visual control caused by involuntary ocular oscillations cannot sufficiently explain the gait disorder. (II) The gait of patients with DBN is impaired in a speed dependent manner. (III) Analysis of gait variability allows distinguishing DBN from DBNCA: Patients with pure DBN show a speed dependency of gait variability similar to that of patients with afferent vestibular deficits. In DBNCA, gait variability resembles the pattern found in cerebellar ataxia.

  18. The Gait Disorder in Downbeat Nystagmus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schniepp, Roman; Wuehr, Max; Huth, Sabrina; Pradhan, Cauchy; Schlick, Cornelia; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Downbeat nystagmus (DBN) is a common form of acquired fixation nystagmus with key symptoms of oscillopsia and gait disturbance. Gait disturbance could be a result of impaired visual feedback due to the involuntary ocular oscillations. Alternatively, a malfunction of cerebellar locomotor control might be involved, since DBN is considered a vestibulocerebellar disorder. Methods Investigation of walking in 50 DBN patients (age 72±11 years, 23 females) and 50 healthy controls (HS) (age 70±11 years, 23 females) using a pressure sensitive carpet (GAITRite). The patient cohort comprised subjects with only ocular motor signs (DBN) and subjects with an additional limb ataxia (DBNCA). Gait investigation comprised different walking speeds and walking with eyes closed. Results In DBN, gait velocity was reduced (p<0.001) with a reduced stride length (p<0.001), increased base of support (p<0.050), and increased double support (p<0.001). Walking with eyes closed led to significant gait changes in both HS and DBN. These changes were more pronounced in DBN patients (p<0.001). Speed-dependency of gait variability revealed significant differences between the subgroups of DBN and DBNCA (p<0.050). Conclusions (I) Impaired visual control caused by involuntary ocular oscillations cannot sufficiently explain the gait disorder. (II) The gait of patients with DBN is impaired in a speed dependent manner. (III) Analysis of gait variability allows distinguishing DBN from DBNCA: Patients with pure DBN show a speed dependency of gait variability similar to that of patients with afferent vestibular deficits. In DBNCA, gait variability resembles the pattern found in cerebellar ataxia. PMID:25140517

  19. Gait Recognition Using Wearable Motion Recording Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Snekkenes, Einar

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach, where gait is collected by the sensors attached to the person's body. Such wearable sensors record motion (e.g. acceleration) of the body parts during walking. The recorded motion signals are then investigated for person recognition purposes. We analyzed acceleration signals from the foot, hip, pocket and arm. Applying various methods, the best EER obtained for foot-, pocket-, arm- and hip- based user authentication were 5%, 7%, 10% and 13%, respectively. Furthermore, we present the results of our analysis on security assessment of gait. Studying gait-based user authentication (in case of hip motion) under three attack scenarios, we revealed that a minimal effort mimicking does not help to improve the acceptance chances of impostors. However, impostors who know their closest person in the database or the genders of the users can be a threat to gait-based authentication. We also provide some new insights toward the uniqueness of gait in case of foot motion. In particular, we revealed the following: a sideway motion of the foot provides the most discrimination, compared to an up-down or forward-backward directions; and different segments of the gait cycle provide different level of discrimination.

  20. Global Positioning System Antenna Fixed Height Tripod Adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinardo, Steven J.; Smith, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    An improved Global Positioning em antenna adaptor allows fixed antenna height measurements by removably attaching an adaptor plate to a conventional surveyor's tripod. Antenna height is controlled by an antenna boom which is a fixed length rod. The antenna is attached to one end of the boom. The opposite end of the boom tapers to a point sized to fit into a depression at the center of survey markers. The boom passes through the hollow center of a universal ball joint which is mounted at the center of the adaptor plate so that the point of the rod can be fixed in the marker's central depression. The mountains of the ball joint allow the joint to be moved horizontally in any direction relative to the tripod. When the ball joint is moved horizontally, the angle between the boom and the vertical changes because the boom's position is fixed at its lower end. A spirit level attached to the rod allows an operator to determine when the boom is plumb. The position of the ball joint is adjusted horizontally until the boom is plumb. At that time the antenna is positioned exactly over the center of the monument and the elevation of the antenna is precisely set by the length of the boom.

  1. Supramolecular Assembly of Tripodal Trisamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li

    2010-03-01

    A series of tripodal trisamide compounds have been synthesized from tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) by condensation with different acid chlorides. Gelation of organic solvents with these compounds was investigated as a function of concentration and solvent solubility parameter. Compounds made with linear acid chlorides were poor gelators. A gelator made with 2-ethylbutyryl chloride (TREN-EB) was an excellent gelator for many organic solvents. It was found that the minimum gelation concentration of TREN-EB increased with increasing solubility parameter of the solvent. Thin films samples were prepared by spin-coating mixtures of TREN-EB and a poly(acrylate). Scanning force microscopy measurements showed that TREN-EB formed nanofibrillar network structures. In addition a dependence of the network morphology on the casting solvent was found.

  2. Experimental and operational modal analysis of a laboratory scale model of a tripod support structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak, M. M.; Mucchi, E.; Telega, J.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the research is to develop a vibration-based procedure for the identification of structural failures in a laboratory scale model of a tripod supporting structure of an offshore wind turbine. In particular, this paper presents an experimental campaign on the scale model tested in two stages. Stage one encompassed the model tripod structure tested in air. The second stage was done in water. The tripod model structure allows to investigate the propagation of a circumferential representative crack of a cylindrical upper brace. The in-water test configuration included the tower with three bladed rotor. The response of the structure to the different waves loads were measured with accelerometers. Experimental and operational modal analysis was applied to identify the dynamic properties of the investigated scale model for intact and damaged state with different excitations and wave patterns. A comprehensive test matrix allows to assess the differences in estimated modal parameters due to damage or as potentially introduced by nonlinear structural response. The presented technique proves to be effective for detecting and assessing the presence of representative cracks.

  3. Capability of 2 gait measures for detecting response to gait training in stroke survivors: Gait Assessment and Intervention Tool and the Tinetti Gait Scale.

    PubMed

    Zimbelman, Janice; Daly, Janis J; Roenigk, Kristen L; Butler, Kristi; Burdsall, Richard; Holcomb, John P

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the performance of 2 observational gait measures, the Tinetti Gait Scale (TGS) and the Gait Assessment and Intervention Tool (G.A.I.T.), in identifying improvement in gait in response to gait training. In secondary analysis from a larger study of multimodal gait training for stroke survivors, we measured gait at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment according to G.A.I.T. and TGS, assessing their capability to capture recovery of coordinated gait components. Large medical center. Cohort of stroke survivors (N=44) greater than 6 months after stroke. All subjects received 48 sessions of a multimodal gait-training protocol. Treatment consisted of 1.5 hours per session, 4 sessions per week for 12 weeks, receiving these 3 treatment aspects: (1) coordination exercise, (2) body weight-supported treadmill training, and (3) overground gait training, with 46% of subjects receiving functional electrical stimulation. All subjects were evaluated with the G.A.I.T. and TGS before and after completing the 48-session intervention. An additional evaluation was performed at midtreatment (after session 24). For the total subject sample, there were significant pre-/post-, pre-/mid-, and mid-/posttreatment gains for both the G.A.I.T. and the TGS. According to the G.A.I.T., 40 subjects (91%) showed improved scores, 2 (4%) no change, and 2 (4%) a worsening score. According to the TGS, only 26 subjects (59%) showed improved scores, 16 (36%) no change, and 1 (2%) a worsening score. For 1 treatment group of chronic stroke survivors, the TGS failed to identify a significant treatment response to gait training, whereas the G.A.I.T. measure was successful. The G.A.I.T. is more sensitive than the TGS for individual patients and group treatment response in identifying recovery of volitional control of gait components in response to gait training. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A mechanized gait trainer for restoration of gait.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Uhlenbrock, D

    2000-01-01

    The newly developed gait trainer allows wheel-chair-bound subjects the repetitive practice of a gait-like movement without overstressing therapists. The device simulates the phases of gait, supports the subjects according to their abilities, and controls the center of mass (CoM) in the vertical and horizontal directions. The patterns of sagittal lower limb joint kinematics and of muscle activation for a normal subject were similar when using the mechanized trainer and when walking on a treadmill. A non-ambulatory hemiparetic subject required little help from one therapist on the gait trainer, while two therapists were required to support treadmill walking. Gait movements on the trainer were highly symmetrical, impact free, and less spastic. The vertical displacement of the CoM was bi-phasic instead of mono-phasic during each gait cycle on the new device. Two cases of non-ambulatory patients, who regained their walking ability after 4 weeks of daily training on the gait trainer, are reported.

  5. Semi-closed reduction of tripod fractures of zygoma under intraoperative assessment using ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Kazutaka; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Nozaki, Motohiro; Kitazawa, Yoshihiko; Takeuchi, Masaki; Yamaki, Takashi; Kono, Taro

    2009-04-01

    We conducted semi-closed reduction of isolated tripod fractures of the zygoma through only a brow incision under intraoperative assessment with ultrasonography. Twenty-three patients with unilateral, non-comminuted tripod fractures of zygoma were selected for application of this method at Tokyo Women's Medical University and Tokyo Metropolitan Hiroo General Hospital between April 2002 and April 2006. Patients with orbital floor blowout fractures were excluded. A skin incision was made only at the lateral brow region and the reduction was performed by inserting an elevator beneath the zygomatic arch. The bone alignment was intraoperatively assessed by ultrasonography. When the reduction was accurate, the frontozygomatic suture was immobilised with a mini-plate under direct visualisation and transmaler Kirshner wire fixation was performed. The accuracy of the reduction and postoperative movement were evaluated by computed tomography (CT) scans taken at 1 and 6 months. In five cases, the DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data from the CT were analysed with 3D imaging software (V-works, CyberMed Co., Korea). In all cases, accurate reduction was obtained. The analysis of the 3D imaging data revealed that postoperative movement of bone fragment was minimal. When the accurate reduction was obtained under intraoperative assessment, the semi-closed reduction and one-plate fixation with transmaler Kirshner wire is enough to treat the simple tripod fractures of zygoma. This method is minimally invasive and takes less operative time.

  6. Phenotypic Characterization of Speed-Associated Gait Changes in Mice Reveals Modular Organization of Locomotor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bellardita, Carmelo; Kiehn, Ole

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies of locomotion in mice suggest that circuits controlling the alternating between left and right limbs may have a modular organization with distinct locomotor circuits being recruited at different speeds. It is not clear, however, whether such a modular organization reflects specific behavioral outcomes expressed at different speeds of locomotion. Here, we use detailed kinematic analyses to search for signatures of a modular organization of locomotor circuits in intact and genetically modified mice moving at different speeds of locomotion. We show that wild-type mice display three distinct gaits: two alternating, walk and trot, and one synchronous, bound. Each gait is expressed in distinct ranges of speed with phenotypic inter-limb and intra-limb coordination. A fourth gait, gallop, closely resembled bound in most of the locomotor parameters but expressed diverse inter-limb coordination. Genetic ablation of commissural V0V neurons completely removed the expression of one alternating gait, trot, but left intact walk, gallop, and bound. Ablation of commissural V0V and V0D neurons led to a loss of walk, trot, and gallop, leaving bound as the default gait. Our study provides a benchmark for studies of the neuronal control of locomotion in the full range of speeds. It provides evidence that gait expression depends upon selection of different modules of neuronal ensembles. PMID:25959968

  7. Study of lifting operation of a tripod foundation for offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Li, L.; Ong, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    This study addresses numerical analysis of the installation of a tripod foundation using a heavy lift vessel (HLV). Limiting sea states are firstly predicted in the frequency domain based on crane tip vertical motions using linear transfer functions. Then, numerical modelling and simulations are carried out in the time domain to analyse the coupled dynamic system taking into consideration of the nonlinearities of the system. In time-domain analysis, two lifting phases are brought into focus, i.e., the lift-off and the lowering phases. For the lift-off phase, two scenarios are considered, i.e., lift-off from the own deck of the HLV and lift-off from a transport barge. Moreover, comparative studies using two types of installation vessels, a floating vessel and a Jack-up, are investigated for the lowering process. Critical responses including the motions of the tripod and the lift wire tensions are presented and compared under various environmental and loading conditions.

  8. Reconfigurable Three-Dimensional Gold Nanorod Plasmonic Nanostructures Organized on DNA Origami Tripod.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Pengfei; Dutta, Palash K; Wang, Pengfei; Song, Gang; Dai, Mingjie; Zhao, Shu-Xia; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Yin, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Baoquan; Ke, Yonggang

    2017-02-28

    Distinct electromagnetic properties can emerge from the three-dimensional (3D) configuration of a plasmonic nanostructure. Furthermore, the reconfiguration of a dynamic plasmonic nanostructure, driven by physical or chemical stimuli, may generate a tailored plasmonic response. In this work, we constructed a 3D reconfigurable plasmonic nanostructure with controllable, reversible conformational transformation using bottom-up DNA self-assembly. Three gold nanorods (AuNRs) were positioned onto a reconfigurable DNA origami tripod. The internanorod angle and distance were precisely tuned through operating the origami tripod by toehold-mediated strand displacement. The transduction of conformational change manifested into a controlled shift of the plasmonic resonance peak, which was studied by dark-field microscopy, and agrees well with electrodynamic calculations. This new 3D plasmonic nanostructure not only provides a method to study the plasmonic resonance of AuNRs at prescribed 3D conformations but also demonstrates that DNA origami can serve as a general self-assembly platform for constructing various 3D reconfigurable plasmonic nanostructures with customized optical properties.

  9. Compact piezoelectric tripod manipulator based on a reverse bridge-type amplification mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Tae-Won; Choi, Jun-Ho; Jung, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geon; Han, Jae-Hung; Park, Kwang-Chun; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-09-01

    We report a hierarchical piezoelectric tripod manipulator based on a reverse bridge-type displacement amplifier. The reverse bridge-type amplification mechanism is pre-strained by each piezo-stack actuator up to 60 μm and is cross-stacked in a series arrangement to make a compact and high-stroke manipulator having load-bearing characteristics. The designed manipulator with three degrees of freedom is compact with a height of 56.0 mm, a diameter of 48.6 mm and total weight of 115 g. It achieves a translational stroke of up to 880 μm in heaving motion and a tilting angle of up to 2.0° in rotational motion within the operating voltage and power range of the piezoelectric stack actuator. A key feature of the present design is built-in and pre-strained displacement amplification mechanisms integrated with piezoelectric stacked actuators, resulting in a compact tripod manipulator having exceptionally high stroke and load-bearing capacity.

  10. Challenging Gait Conditions Predict 1-Year Decline in Gait Speed in Older Adults With Apparently Normal Gait

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Subashan; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.; Hile, Elizabeth S.; Wert, David M.; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mobility often is tested under a low challenge condition (ie, over a straight, uncluttered path), which often fails to identify early mobility difficulty. Tests of walking during challenging conditions may uncover mobility difficulty that is not identified with usual gait testing. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether gait during challenging conditions predicts decline in gait speed over 1 year in older people with apparently normal gait (ie, gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s). Design This was a prospective cohort study. Methods Seventy-one older adults (mean age=75.9 years) with a usual gait speed of ≥1.0 m/s participated. Gait was tested at baseline under 4 challenging conditions: (1) narrow walk (15 cm wide), (2) stepping over obstacles (15.24 cm [6 in] and 30.48 cm [12 in]), (3) simple walking while talking (WWT), and (4) complex WWT. Usual gait speed was recorded over a 4-m course at baseline and 1 year later. A 1-year change in gait speed was calculated, and participants were classified as declined (decreased ≥0.10 m/s, n=18), stable (changed <0.10 m/s, n=43), or improved (increased ≥0.10 m/s, n=10). Analysis of variance was used to compare challenging condition cost (usual − challenging condition gait speed difference) among the 3 groups. Results Participants who declined in the ensuing year had a greater narrow walk and obstacle walk cost than those who were stable or who improved in gait speed (narrow walk cost=0.43 versus 0.33 versus 0.22 m/s and obstacle walk cost=0.35 versus 0.26 versus 0.13 m/s). Simple and complex WWT cost did not differ among the groups. Limitations The participants who declined in gait speed over time walked the fastest, and those who improved walked the slowest at baseline; thus, the potential contribution of regression to the mean to the findings should not be overlooked. Conclusions In older adults with apparently normal gait, the assessment of gait during challenging conditions appears to uncover

  11. Toward a low-cost gait analysis system for clinical and free-living assessment.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Cassim; Del Din, Silvia; Nazarpour, Kianoush; Hickey, Aodhan; Morris, Rosie; Catt, Michael; Rochester, Lynn; Godfrey, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Gait is an important clinical assessment tool since changes in gait may reflect changes in general health. Measurement of gait is a complex process which has been restricted to bespoke clinical facilities until recently. The use of inexpensive wearable technologies is an attractive alternative and offers the potential to assess gait in any environment. In this paper we present the development of a low cost analysis gait system built using entirely open source components. The system is used to capture spatio-temporal gait characteristics derived from an existing conceptual model, sensitive to ageing and neurodegenerative pathology (e.g. Parkinson's disease). We demonstrate the system is suitable for use in a clinical unit and will lead to pragmatic use in a free-living (home) environment. The system consists of a wearable (tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope) with a Raspberry Pi module for data storage and analysis. This forms ongoing work to develop gait as a low cost diagnostic in modern healthcare.

  12. Portable tripod-mounted boom sprayer for applying herbicides on tall shrubs

    Treesearch

    Charles A. Graham; Jay R. Bentley

    1975-01-01

    A tripod-supported boom sprayer was developed and used to spray herbicides on shrubs up to 15 feet tall on experimental plots where use of other spray equipment was not feasible. A pneumatic pressurized sprayer with 10 diaphragm nozzles, geometrically spaced along the outer 20 feet (6.1 m) of a 25-foot (7.6-m) boom, distributed the spray uniformly. Brush leaves were...

  13. Backward compared to forward over ground gait retraining have additional benefits for gait in individuals with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Grobbelaar, Roné; Venter, Ranel; Welman, Karen Estelle

    2017-10-01

    Over ground gait retraining in the reverse direction has shown to be beneficial for neurological rehabilitation, but has not yet been investigated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Backwards walking (BW) might be a useful training alternative to improve PD gait and possibly reduce fall risk during complex multi-directional daily activities. The primary aim was to compare the effect of an eight-week forward (FWG) and backwards (BWG) gait retraining program on gait parameters in PD individuals. Twenty-nine participants (aged 71.0±8.8years; UPDRS-III 38.1±12.3; H&Y 2.7±0.5) were randomly assigned to either the control (FWG; n=14) or experimental group (BWG; n=15). Baseline measures included disease severity (UPDRS III), global cognition (MoCA) and depression (PHQ-9). Outcome measures were selected gait variables on the 10m-instrumented-walk-test (i10mWT) assessed before and after the interventions. Both groups improved usual gait speed (FWG: p=0.03, d=0.35; BWG: p<0.01, d=0.35) and height-normalized gait speed (FWG: p=0.04, d=0.35; BWG: p<0.01, d=0.57). Additionally, the BWG demonstrated improved cadence (p<0.01, d=0.67) and stride length (SL; p=0.02, d=0.39). Both interventions were effective to improved gait speed sufficiently to independently navigate in the community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. When Students Grade Their Teachers: A Validity Analysis of the Tripod Student Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhfeld, Megan

    2017-01-01

    This article develops a validity argument for the use of the Tripod student survey of instructional practices to assess teacher effectiveness in summative teacher evaluations and professional development decisions. This paper expands upon previous research in three ways: (a) it draws from current validity thinking to examine the evidence for…

  15. The Effects of Music Salience on the Gait Performance of Young Adults.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Natalie; Kempster, Cody; Doucette, Angelica; Doan, Jon B; Hu, Bin; Brown, Lesley A

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a rhythmic beat in the form of a metronome tone or beat-accentuated original music can modulate gait performance; however, it has yet to be determined whether gait modulation can be achieved using commercially available music. The current study investigated the effects of commercially available music on the walking of healthy young adults. Specific aims were (a) to determine whether commercially available music can be used to influence gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability), (b) to establish the effect of music salience on gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability), and (c) to examine whether music tempi differentially effected gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability). Twenty-five participants walked the length of an unobstructed walkway while listening to music. Music selections differed with respect to the salience or the tempo of the music. The genre of music and artists were self-selected by participants. Listening to music while walking was an enjoyable activity that influenced gait. Specifically, salient music selections increased measures of cadence, velocity, and stride length; in contrast, gait was unaltered by the presence of non-salient music. Music tempo did not differentially affect gait performance (gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability) in these participants. Gait performance was differentially influenced by music salience. These results have implications for clinicians considering the use of commercially available music as an alternative to the traditional rhythmic auditory cues used in rehabilitation programs. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comparison of the Classifier Oriented Gait Score and the Gait Profile Score based on imitated gait impairments.

    PubMed

    Christian, Josef; Kröll, Josef; Schwameder, Hermann

    2017-06-01

    Common summary measures of gait quality such as the Gait Profile Score (GPS) are based on the principle of measuring a distance from the mean pattern of a healthy reference group in a gait pattern vector space. The recently introduced Classifier Oriented Gait Score (COGS) is a pathology specific score that measures this distance in a unique direction, which is indicated by a linear classifier. This approach has potentially improved the discriminatory power to detect subtle changes in gait patterns but does not incorporate a profile of interpretable sub-scores like the GPS. The main aims of this study were to extend the COGS by decomposing it into interpretable sub-scores as realized in the GPS and to compare the discriminative power of the GPS and COGS. Two types of gait impairments were imitated to enable a high level of control of the gait patterns. Imitated impairments were realized by restricting knee extension and inducing leg length discrepancy. The results showed increased discriminatory power of the COGS for differentiating diverse levels of impairment. Comparison of the GPS and COGS sub-scores and their ability to indicate changes in specific variables supports the validity of both scores. The COGS is an overall measure of gait quality with increased power to detect subtle changes in gait patterns and might be well suited for tracing the effect of a therapeutic treatment over time. The newly introduced sub-scores improved the interpretability of the COGS, which is helpful for practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence of Big Five and Aggressive Personalities in Gait Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Liam; Morris, Paul; Mills, Chris; O'Reilly, Liam; Marshman, Paul; Akehurst, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral observation techniques which relate action to personality have long been neglected (Furr and Funder in Handbook of research methods in personality psychology, The Guilford Press, New York, 2007) and, when employed, often use human judges to code behavior. In the current study we used an alternative to human coding (biomechanical research techniques) to investigate how personality traits are manifest in gait. We used motion capture technology to record 29 participants walking on a treadmill at their natural speed. We analyzed their thorax and pelvis movements, as well as speed of gait. Participants completed personality questionnaires, including a Big Five measure and a trait aggression questionnaire. We found that gait related to several of our personality measures. The magnitude of upper body movement, lower body movement, and walking speed, were related to Big Five personality traits and aggression. Here, we present evidence that some gait measures can relate to Big Five and aggressive personalities. We know of no other examples of research where gait has been shown to correlate with self-reported measures of personality and suggest that more research should be conducted between largely automatic movement and personality.

  18. Lithium cation enhances anion binding in a tripodal phosphine oxide-based ditopic receptor†

    PubMed Central

    Gavette, Jesse V.; Lara, Juven; Berryman, Orion B.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Haley, Michael M.; Johnson, Darren W.

    2012-01-01

    A tripodal ditopic receptor presents H-bond donors and a phosphine oxide to potential guests. In the idealized binding conformation, an endohedral P═O functionality provides enhanced halide binding in the presence of lithium with the greatest ΔΔG° observed for bromide, while minimal changes in Ka are observed in the presence of sodium. PMID:21655566

  19. On Gait Analysis Estimation Errors Using Force Sensors on a Smart Rollator

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Joaquin; Urdiales, Cristina; Martinez, Antonio B.; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis can provide valuable information on a person’s condition and rehabilitation progress. Gait is typically captured using external equipment and/or wearable sensors. These tests are largely constrained to specific controlled environments. In addition, gait analysis often requires experts for calibration, operation and/or to place sensors on volunteers. Alternatively, mobility support devices like rollators can be equipped with onboard sensors to monitor gait parameters, while users perform their Activities of Daily Living. Gait analysis in rollators may use odometry and force sensors in the handlebars. However, force based estimation of gait parameters is less accurate than traditional methods, especially when rollators are not properly used. This paper presents an evaluation of force based gait analysis using a smart rollator on different groups of users to determine when this methodology is applicable. In a second stage, the rollator is used in combination with two lab-based gait analysis systems to assess the rollator estimation error. Our results show that: (i) there is an inverse relation between the variance in the force difference between handlebars and support on the handlebars—related to the user condition—and the estimation error; and (ii) this error is lower than 10% when the variation in the force difference is above 7 N. This lower limit was exceeded by the 95.83% of our challenged volunteers. In conclusion, rollators are useful for gait characterization as long as users really need the device for ambulation. PMID:27834911

  20. On Gait Analysis Estimation Errors Using Force Sensors on a Smart Rollator.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Joaquin; Urdiales, Cristina; Martinez, Antonio B; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-11-10

    Gait analysis can provide valuable information on a person's condition and rehabilitation progress. Gait is typically captured using external equipment and/or wearable sensors. These tests are largely constrained to specific controlled environments. In addition, gait analysis often requires experts for calibration, operation and/or to place sensors on volunteers. Alternatively, mobility support devices like rollators can be equipped with onboard sensors to monitor gait parameters, while users perform their Activities of Daily Living. Gait analysis in rollators may use odometry and force sensors in the handlebars. However, force based estimation of gait parameters is less accurate than traditional methods, especially when rollators are not properly used. This paper presents an evaluation of force based gait analysis using a smart rollator on different groups of users to determine when this methodology is applicable. In a second stage, the rollator is used in combination with two lab-based gait analysis systems to assess the rollator estimation error. Our results show that: (i) there is an inverse relation between the variance in the force difference between handlebars and support on the handlebars-related to the user condition-and the estimation error; and (ii) this error is lower than 10% when the variation in the force difference is above 7 N. This lower limit was exceeded by the 95.83% of our challenged volunteers. In conclusion, rollators are useful for gait characterization as long as users really need the device for ambulation.

  1. Tiger beetles pursue prey using a proportional control law with a delay of one half-stride.

    PubMed

    Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Gilbert, Cole; Wang, Z Jane

    2014-06-06

    Tiger beetles are fast diurnal predators capable of chasing prey under closed-loop visual guidance. We investigated this control system using statistical analyses of high-speed digital recordings of beetles chasing a moving prey dummy in a laboratory arena. Correlation analyses reveal that the beetle uses a proportional control law in which the angular position of the prey relative to the beetle's body axis drives the beetle's angular velocity with a delay of about 28 ms. The proportionality coefficient or system gain, 12 s(-1), is just below critical damping. Pursuit simulations using the derived control law predict angular orientation during pursuits with a residual error of about 7°. This is of the same order of magnitude as the oscillation imposed by the beetle's alternating tripod gait, which was not factored into the control law. The system delay of 28 ms equals a half-stride period, i.e. the time between the touch down of alternating tripods. Based on these results, we propose a physical interpretation of the observed control law: to turn towards its prey, the beetle on average exerts a sideways force proportional to the angular position of the prey measured a half-stride earlier.

  2. Energy Expenditure of Trotting Gait Under Different Gait Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian-Bao; Gao, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Robots driven by batteries are clean, quiet, and can work indoors or in space. However, the battery endurance is a great problem. A new gait parameter design energy saving strategy to extend the working hours of the quadruped robot is proposed. A dynamic model of the robot is established to estimate and analyze the energy expenditures during trotting. Given a trotting speed, optimal stride frequency and stride length can minimize the energy expenditure. However, the relationship between the speed and the optimal gait parameters is nonlinear, which is difficult for practical application. Therefore, a simplified gait parameter design method for energy saving is proposed. A critical trotting speed of the quadruped robot is found and can be used to decide the gait parameters. When the robot is travelling lower than this speed, it is better to keep a constant stride length and change the cycle period. When the robot is travelling higher than this speed, it is better to keep a constant cycle period and change the stride length. Simulations and experiments on the quadruped robot show that by using the proposed gait parameter design approach, the energy expenditure can be reduced by about 54% compared with the 100 mm stride length under 500 mm/s speed. In general, an energy expenditure model based on the gait parameter of the quadruped robot is built and the trotting gait parameters design approach for energy saving is proposed.

  3. Guidelines for Assessment of Gait and Reference Values for Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters in Older Adults: The Biomathics and Canadian Gait Consortiums Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Beauchet, Olivier; Allali, Gilles; Sekhon, Harmehr; Verghese, Joe; Guilain, Sylvie; Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Kressig, Reto W.; Barden, John M.; Szturm, Tony; Launay, Cyrille P.; Grenier, Sébastien; Bherer, Louis; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Chester, Vicky L.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Srikanth, Velandai; Léonard, Guillaume; De Cock, Anne-Marie; Sawa, Ryuichi; Duque, Gustavo; Camicioli, Richard; Helbostad, Jorunn L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gait disorders, a highly prevalent condition in older adults, are associated with several adverse health consequences. Gait analysis allows qualitative and quantitative assessments of gait that improves the understanding of mechanisms of gait disorders and the choice of interventions. This manuscript aims (1) to give consensus guidance for clinical and spatiotemporal gait analysis based on the recorded footfalls in older adults aged 65 years and over, and (2) to provide reference values for spatiotemporal gait parameters based on the recorded footfalls in healthy older adults free of cognitive impairment and multi-morbidities. Methods: International experts working in a network of two different consortiums (i.e., Biomathics and Canadian Gait Consortium) participated in this initiative. First, they identified items of standardized information following the usual procedure of formulation of consensus findings. Second, they merged databases including spatiotemporal gait assessments with GAITRite® system and clinical information from the “Gait, cOgnitiOn & Decline” (GOOD) initiative and the Generation 100 (Gen 100) study. Only healthy—free of cognitive impairment and multi-morbidities (i.e., ≤ 3 therapeutics taken daily)—participants aged 65 and older were selected. Age, sex, body mass index, mean values, and coefficients of variation (CoV) of gait parameters were used for the analyses. Results: Standardized systematic assessment of three categories of items, which were demographics and clinical information, and gait characteristics (clinical and spatiotemporal gait analysis based on the recorded footfalls), were selected for the proposed guidelines. Two complementary sets of items were distinguished: a minimal data set and a full data set. In addition, a total of 954 participants (mean age 72.8 ± 4.8 years, 45.8% women) were recruited to establish the reference values. Performance of spatiotemporal gait parameters based on the recorded

  4. Higher heritabilities for gait components than for overall gait scores may improve mobility in ducks.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Brendan M; Rae, Anne M; Clements, Dylan N; Hocking, Paul M

    2017-05-02

    Genetic progress in selection for greater body mass and meat yield in poultry has been associated with an increase in gait problems which are detrimental to productivity and welfare. The incidence of suboptimal gait in breeding flocks is controlled through the use of a visual gait score, which is a subjective assessment of walking ability of each bird. The subjective nature of the visual gait score has led to concerns over its effectiveness in reducing the incidence of suboptimal gait in poultry through breeding. The aims of this study were to assess the reliability of the current visual gait scoring system in ducks and to develop a more objective method to select for better gait. Experienced gait scorers assessed short video clips of walking ducks to estimate the reliability of the current visual gait scoring system. Kendall's coefficients of concordance between and within observers were estimated at 0.49 and 0.75, respectively. In order to develop a more objective scoring system, gait components were visually scored on more than 4000 pedigreed Pekin ducks and genetic parameters were estimated for these components. Gait components, which are a more objective measure, had heritabilities that were as good as, or better than, those of the overall visual gait score. Measurement of gait components is simpler and therefore more objective than the standard visual gait score. The recording of gait components can potentially be automated, which may increase accuracy further and may improve heritability estimates. Genetic correlations were generally low, which suggests that it is possible to use gait components to select for an overall improvement in both economic traits and gait as part of a balanced breeding programme.

  5. To pace or not to pace: a pilot study of four- and five-gaited Icelandic horses homozygous for the DMRT3 'Gait Keeper' mutation.

    PubMed

    Jäderkvist Fegraeus, K; Hirschberg, I; Árnason, T; Andersson, L; Velie, B D; Andersson, L S; Lindgren, G

    2017-12-01

    The Icelandic horse is a breed known mainly for its ability to perform the ambling four-beat gait 'tölt' and the lateral two-beat gait pace. The natural ability of the breed to perform these alternative gaits is highly desired by breeders. Therefore, the discovery that a nonsense mutation (C>A) in the DMRT3 gene was the main genetic factor for horses' ability to perform gaits in addition to walk, trot and canter was of great interest. Although several studies have demonstrated that homozygosity for the DMRT3 mutation is important for the ability to pace, only about 70% of the homozygous mutant (AA) Icelandic horses are reported to pace. The aim of the study was to genetically compare four- and five-gaited (i.e. horses with and without the ability to pace) AA Icelandic horses by performing a genome-wide association (GWA) analysis. All horses (n = 55) were genotyped on the 670K Axiom Equine Genotyping Array, and a GWA analysis was performed using the genabel package in r. No SNP demonstrated genome-wide significance, implying that the ability to pace goes beyond the presence of a single gene variant. Despite its limitations, the current study provides additional information regarding the genetic complexity of pacing ability in horses. However, to fully understand the genetic differences between four- and five-gaited AA horses, additional studies with larger sample materials and consistent phenotyping are needed. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  6. An electromechanical gait trainer for restoration of gait in hemiparetic stroke patients: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Werner, C; Uhlenbrock, D; von Frankenberg, S; Bardeleben, A; Brandl-Hesse, B

    2001-01-01

    Modern concepts of gait rehabilitation after stroke favor a task-specific repetitive approach. In practice, the required physical effort of the therapists limits the realization of this approach. Therefore, a mechanized gait trainer enabling nonambulatory patients to have the repetitive practice of a gait-like movement without overstraining therapists was constructed. This preliminary study investigated whether an additional 4-week daily therapy on the gait trainer could improve gait ability in 14 chronic wheelchair-bound hemiparetic subjects. The 4 weeks of physiotherapy and gait-trainer therapy resulted in a relevant improvement of gait ability in all subjects. Velocity, cadence, and stride length improved significantly (p < 0.01). The kinesiologic electromyogram of selected lower-limb muscles revealed a more physiologic pattern. The confounding influence of spontaneous recovery, the lack of a control group, and the double amount of therapy limit the clinical relevance of this study. Nevertheless, the gait trainer seems feasible as an adjunctive tool in gait rehabilitation after stroke; further studies are needed.

  7. Sulfonamido tripods: tuning redox potentials via ligand modifications

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nathanael; Ziller, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    A series of FeII–OH2 complexes were synthesized with ligands based on the tetradentate sulfonamido tripod N,N',N"-[2,2',2"-nitrilotris(ethane-2,1-diyl)]-tris-({R-Ph}-sulfonamido). These complexes differ by the substituent on the aryl rings and were fully characterized, including their molecular structures via X-ray diffraction methods. All the complexes were five-coordinate with trigonal bipyramidal geometry. A linear correlation was observed between the electronic effects of each ligand, given by the Hammett constants of the para-substituents, and the potential of the FeII/FeIII redox couple, which were determined using cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the range of redox potentials for the complexes spanned approximately 160 mV. PMID:25419035

  8. Sulfonamido tripods: tuning redox potentials via ligand modifications.

    PubMed

    Lau, Nathanael; Ziller, Joseph W; Borovik, A S

    2015-01-08

    A series of Fe II -OH 2 complexes were synthesized with ligands based on the tetradentate sulfonamido tripod N , N ', N "-[2,2',2"-nitrilotris(ethane-2,1-diyl)]-tris-({R-Ph}-sulfonamido). These complexes differ by the substituent on the aryl rings and were fully characterized, including their molecular structures via X-ray diffraction methods. All the complexes were five-coordinate with trigonal bipyramidal geometry. A linear correlation was observed between the electronic effects of each ligand, given by the Hammett constants of the para -substituents, and the potential of the Fe II /Fe III redox couple, which were determined using cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the range of redox potentials for the complexes spanned approximately 160 mV.

  9. Predictive simulation of gait at low gravity reveals skipping as the preferred locomotion strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Marko; van den Bogert, Antonie J.

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of gait strategies at low gravity environments gained momentum recently as manned missions to the Moon and to Mars are reconsidered. Although reports by astronauts of the Apollo missions indicate alternative gait strategies might be favored on the Moon, computational simulations and experimental investigations have been almost exclusively limited to the study of either walking or running, the locomotion modes preferred under Earth's gravity. In order to investigate the gait strategies likely to be favored at low gravity a series of predictive, computational simulations of gait are performed using a physiological model of the musculoskeletal system, without assuming any particular type of gait. A computationally efficient optimization strategy is utilized allowing for multiple simulations. The results reveal skipping as more efficient and less fatiguing than walking or running and suggest the existence of a walk-skip rather than a walk-run transition at low gravity. The results are expected to serve as a background to the design of experimental investigations of gait under simulated low gravity. PMID:22365845

  10. Predictive simulation of gait at low gravity reveals skipping as the preferred locomotion strategy.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Marko; van den Bogert, Antonie J

    2012-04-30

    The investigation of gait strategies at low gravity environments gained momentum recently as manned missions to the Moon and to Mars are reconsidered. Although reports by astronauts of the Apollo missions indicate alternative gait strategies might be favored on the Moon, computational simulations and experimental investigations have been almost exclusively limited to the study of either walking or running, the locomotion modes preferred under Earth's gravity. In order to investigate the gait strategies likely to be favored at low gravity a series of predictive, computational simulations of gait are performed using a physiological model of the musculoskeletal system, without assuming any particular type of gait. A computationally efficient optimization strategy is utilized allowing for multiple simulations. The results reveal skipping as more efficient and less fatiguing than walking or running and suggest the existence of a walk-skip rather than a walk-run transition at low gravity. The results are expected to serve as a background to the design of experimental investigations of gait under simulated low gravity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measuring Gait Quality in Parkinson’s Disease through Real-Time Gait Phase Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Mileti, Ilaria; Germanotta, Marco; Di Sipio, Enrica; Imbimbo, Isabella; Pacilli, Alessandra; Erra, Carmen; Petracca, Martina; Del Prete, Zaccaria; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Padua, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring gait quality in daily activities through wearable sensors has the potential to improve medical assessment in Parkinson’s Disease (PD). In this study, four gait partitioning methods, two based on thresholds and two based on a machine learning approach, considering the four-phase model, were compared. The methods were tested on 26 PD patients, both in OFF and ON levodopa conditions, and 11 healthy subjects, during walking tasks. All subjects were equipped with inertial sensors placed on feet. Force resistive sensors were used to assess reference time sequence of gait phases. Goodness Index (G) was evaluated to assess accuracy in gait phases estimation. A novel synthetic index called Gait Phase Quality Index (GPQI) was proposed for gait quality assessment. Results revealed optimum performance (G < 0.25) for three tested methods and good performance (0.25 < G < 0.70) for one threshold method. The GPQI resulted significantly higher in PD patients than in healthy subjects, showing a moderate correlation with clinical scales score. Furthermore, in patients with severe gait impairment, GPQI was found higher in OFF than in ON state. Our results unveil the possibility of monitoring gait quality in PD through real-time gait partitioning based on wearable sensors. PMID:29558410

  12. Gait Analysis Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  13. Gait recognition based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy image for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Deng-Yuan; Lin, Ta-Wei; Hu, Wu-Chih; Cheng, Chih-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a method for recognizing human identity using gait features based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy images (GEIs). Identity recognition by gait generally involves gait representation, extraction, and classification. In this work, a modified GEI convolved with an ensemble of Gabor wavelets is proposed as a gait feature. Principal component analysis is then used to project the Gabor-wavelet-based gait features into a lower-dimension feature space for subsequent classification. Finally, support vector machine classifiers based on a radial basis function kernel are trained and utilized to recognize human identity. The major contributions of this paper are as follows: (1) the consideration of the shadow effect to yield a more complete segmentation of gait silhouettes; (2) the utilization of motion estimation to track people when walkers overlap; and (3) the derivation of modified GEIs to extract more useful gait information. Extensive performance evaluation shows a great improvement of recognition accuracy due to the use of shadow removal, motion estimation, and gait representation using the modified GEIs and Gabor wavelets.

  14. Synthesis and Reactivity of Tripodal Complexes Containing Pendant Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Blacquiere, Johanna M.; Pegis, Michael L.; Raugei, Simone

    2014-09-02

    The synthesis of a new tripodal ligand family is reported, with tertiary-amine groups in the second-coordination sphere. The ligands are tris(amido)amine derivatives, with the pendant amines attached via a peptide coupling strategy. They were designed to be used in new catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), in which the pendant acid/base group could improve catalyst performance. Two members of the new ligand family were each metallated with Co(II) and Zn(II) to afford trigonal monopyramidal complexes. Reaction of the cobalt complexes, [Co(L)]-, with dioxygen reversibly generates a small amount of a Co(III)-superoxo species, which was characterized by EPR. Protonation ofmore » the zinc complex Zn[N{CH2CH2NC(O)CH2N(CH2Ph)2}3)-– ([Zn(TNBn)]-) with one equivalent of acid occurs with displacement and dissociation of an amide ligand. Addition of excess acid to the any of the complexes [M(L)]- results in complete proteolysis and formation of the ligands H3L. This decomposition limits the use of these complexes as catalysts for the ORR. An alternative ligand with two pyridyl arms was also prepared but could not be metallated. These studies highlight the importance of stability of the primary-coordination sphere of ORR electrocatalysts to both oxidative and acidic conditions. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.« less

  15. Gait Phase Estimation Based on Noncontact Capacitive Sensing and Adaptive Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Enhao; Manca, Silvia; Yan, Tingfang; Parri, Andrea; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel strategy aiming to acquire an accurate and walking-speed-adaptive estimation of the gait phase through noncontact capacitive sensing and adaptive oscillators (AOs). The capacitive sensing system is designed with two sensing cuffs that can measure the leg muscle shape changes during walking. The system can be dressed above the clothes and free human skin from contacting to electrodes. In order to track the capacitance signals, the gait phase estimator is designed based on the AO dynamic system due to its ability of synchronizing with quasi-periodic signals. After the implementation of the whole system, we first evaluated the offline estimation performance by experiments with 12 healthy subjects walking on a treadmill with changing speeds. The strategy achieved an accurate and consistent gait phase estimation with only one channel of capacitance signal. The average root-mean-square errors in one stride were 0.19 rad (3.0% of one gait cycle) for constant walking speeds and 0.31 rad (4.9% of one gait cycle) for speed transitions even after the subjects rewore the sensing cuffs. We then validated our strategy in a real-time gait phase estimation task with three subjects walking with changing speeds. Our study indicates that the strategy based on capacitive sensing and AOs is a promising alternative for the control of exoskeleton/orthosis.

  16. Recognition using gait.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2007-09-01

    Gait or an individual's manner of walking, is one approach for recognizing people at a distance. Studies in psychophysics and medicine indicate that humans can recognize people by their gait and have found twenty-four different components to gait that taken together make it a unique signature. Besides not requiring close sensor contact, gait also does not necessarily require a cooperative subject. Using video data of people walking in different scenarios and environmental conditions we develop and test an algorithm that uses shape and motion to identify people from their gait. The algorithm uses dynamic time warping to match stored templatesmore » against an unknown sequence of silhouettes extracted from a person walking. While results under similar constraints and conditions are very good, the algorithm quickly degrades with varying conditions such as surface and clothing.« less

  17. Phase Helps Find Geometrically Optimal Gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revzen, Shai; Hatton, Ross

    Geometric motion planning describes motions of animals and machines governed by g ˙ = gA (q) q ˙ - a connection A (.) relating shape q and shape velocity q ˙ to body frame velocity g-1 g ˙ ∈ se (3) . Measuring the entire connection over a multidimensional q is often unfeasible with current experimental methods. We show how using a phase estimator can make tractable measuring the local structure of the connection surrounding a periodic motion q (φ) driven by a phase φ ∈S1 . This approach reduces the complexity of the estimation problem by a factor of dimq . The results suggest that phase estimation can be combined with geometric optimization into an iterative gait optimization algorithm usable on experimental systems, or alternatively, to allow the geometric optimality of an observed gait to be detected. ARO W911NF-14-1-0573, NSF 1462555.

  18. Quantifying prosthetic gait deviation using simple outcome measures

    PubMed Central

    Kark, Lauren; Odell, Ross; McIntosh, Andrew S; Simmons, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a subset of simple outcome measures to quantify prosthetic gait deviation without needing three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA). METHODS: Eight unilateral, transfemoral amputees and 12 unilateral, transtibial amputees were recruited. Twenty-eight able-bodied controls were recruited. All participants underwent 3DGA, the timed-up-and-go test and the six-minute walk test (6MWT). The lower-limb amputees also completed the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire. Results from 3DGA were summarised using the gait deviation index (GDI), which was subsequently regressed, using stepwise regression, against the other measures. RESULTS: Step-length (SL), self-selected walking speed (SSWS) and the distance walked during the 6MWT (6MWD) were significantly correlated with GDI. The 6MWD was the strongest, single predictor of the GDI, followed by SL and SSWS. The predictive ability of the regression equations were improved following inclusion of self-report data related to mobility and prosthetic utility. CONCLUSION: This study offers a practicable alternative to quantifying kinematic deviation without the need to conduct complete 3DGA. PMID:27335814

  19. Hardware Development and Locomotion Control Strategy for an Over-Ground Gait Trainer: NaTUre-Gaits.

    PubMed

    Luu, Trieu Phat; Low, Kin Huat; Qu, Xingda; Lim, Hup Boon; Hoon, Kay Hiang

    2014-01-01

    Therapist-assisted body weight supported (TABWS) gait rehabilitation was introduced two decades ago. The benefit of TABWS in functional recovery of walking in spinal cord injury and stroke patients has been demonstrated and reported. However, shortage of therapists, labor-intensiveness, and short duration of training are some limitations of this approach. To overcome these deficiencies, robotic-assisted gait rehabilitation systems have been suggested. These systems have gained attentions from researchers and clinical practitioner in recent years. To achieve the same objective, an over-ground gait rehabilitation system, NaTUre-gaits, was developed at the Nanyang Technological University. The design was based on a clinical approach to provide four main features, which are pelvic motion, body weight support, over-ground walking experience, and lower limb assistance. These features can be achieved by three main modules of NaTUre-gaits: 1) pelvic assistance mechanism, mobile platform, and robotic orthosis. Predefined gait patterns are required for a robotic assisted system to follow. In this paper, the gait pattern planning for NaTUre-gaits was accomplished by an individual-specific gait pattern prediction model. The model generates gait patterns that resemble natural gait patterns of the targeted subjects. The features of NaTUre-gaits have been demonstrated by walking trials with several subjects. The trials have been evaluated by therapists and doctors. The results show that 10-m walking trial with a reduction in manpower. The task-specific repetitive training approach and natural walking gait patterns were also successfully achieved.

  20. The effect of uphill and downhill walking on gait parameters: A self-paced treadmill study.

    PubMed

    Kimel-Naor, Shani; Gottlieb, Amihai; Plotnik, Meir

    2017-07-26

    It has been shown that gait parameters vary systematically with the slope of the surface when walking uphill (UH) or downhill (DH) (Andriacchi et al., 1977; Crowe et al., 1996; Kawamura et al., 1991; Kirtley et al., 1985; McIntosh et al., 2006; Sun et al., 1996). However, gait trials performed on inclined surfaces have been subject to certain technical limitations including using fixed speed treadmills (TMs) or, alternatively, sampling only a few gait cycles on inclined ramps. Further, prior work has not analyzed upper body kinematics. This study aims to investigate effects of slope on gait parameters using a self-paced TM (SPTM) which facilitates more natural walking, including measuring upper body kinematics and gait coordination parameters. Gait of 11 young healthy participants was sampled during walking in steady state speed. Measurements were made at slopes of +10°, 0° and -10°. Force plates and a motion capture system were used to reconstruct twenty spatiotemporal gait parameters. For validation, previously described parameters were compared with the literature, and novel parameters measuring upper body kinematics and bilateral gait coordination were also analyzed. Results showed that most lower and upper body gait parameters were affected by walking slope angle. Specifically, UH walking had a higher impact on gait kinematics than DH walking. However, gait coordination parameters were not affected by walking slope, suggesting that gait asymmetry, left-right coordination and gait variability are robust characteristics of walking. The findings of the study are discussed in reference to a potential combined effect of slope and gait speed. Follow-up studies are needed to explore the relative effects of each of these factors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Multilayer Joint Gait-Pose Manifolds for Human Gait Motion Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Meng; Fan, Guolian

    2015-11-01

    We present new multilayer joint gait-pose manifolds (multilayer JGPMs) for complex human gait motion modeling, where three latent variables are defined jointly in a low-dimensional manifold to represent a variety of body configurations. Specifically, the pose variable (along the pose manifold) denotes a specific stage in a walking cycle; the gait variable (along the gait manifold) represents different walking styles; and the linear scale variable characterizes the maximum stride in a walking cycle. We discuss two kinds of topological priors for coupling the pose and gait manifolds, i.e., cylindrical and toroidal, to examine their effectiveness and suitability for motion modeling. We resort to a topologically-constrained Gaussian process (GP) latent variable model to learn the multilayer JGPMs where two new techniques are introduced to facilitate model learning under limited training data. First is training data diversification that creates a set of simulated motion data with different strides. Second is the topology-aware local learning to speed up model learning by taking advantage of the local topological structure. The experimental results on the Carnegie Mellon University motion capture data demonstrate the advantages of our proposed multilayer models over several existing GP-based motion models in terms of the overall performance of human gait motion modeling.

  2. Real time biometric surveillance with gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Subasish; Swain, Anisha; Das, Manaswini; Mohanty, Subhadarshini

    2018-04-01

    Bio metric surveillance has become indispensable for every system in the recent years. The contribution of bio metric authentication, identification, and screening purposes are widely used in various domains for preventing unauthorized access. A large amount of data needs to be updated, segregated and safeguarded from malicious software and misuse. Bio metrics is the intrinsic characteristics of each individual. Recently fingerprints, iris, passwords, unique keys, and cards are commonly used for authentication purposes. These methods have various issues related to security and confidentiality. These systems are not yet automated to provide the safety and security. The gait recognition system is the alternative for overcoming the drawbacks of the recent bio metric based authentication systems. Gait recognition is newer as it hasn't been implemented in the real-world scenario so far. This is an un-intrusive system that requires no knowledge or co-operation of the subject. Gait is a unique behavioral characteristic of every human being which is hard to imitate. The walking style of an individual teamed with the orientation of joints in the skeletal structure and inclinations between them imparts the unique characteristic. A person can alter one's own external appearance but not skeletal structure. These are real-time, automatic systems that can even process low-resolution images and video frames. In this paper, we have proposed a gait recognition system and compared the performance with conventional bio metric identification systems.

  3. Gait-Event-Based Synchronization Method for Gait Rehabilitation Robots via a Bioinspired Adaptive Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Qi, Peng; Guo, Zhao; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-06-01

    In the field of gait rehabilitation robotics, achieving human-robot synchronization is very important. In this paper, a novel human-robot synchronization method using gait event information is proposed. This method includes two steps. First, seven gait events in one gait cycle are detected in real time with a hidden Markov model; second, an adaptive oscillator is utilized to estimate the stride percentage of human gait using any one of the gait events. Synchronous reference trajectories for the robot are then generated with the estimated stride percentage. This method is based on a bioinspired adaptive oscillator, which is a mathematical tool, first proposed to explain the phenomenon of synchronous flashing among fireflies. The proposed synchronization method is implemented in a portable knee-ankle-foot robot and tested in 15 healthy subjects. This method has the advantages of simple structure, flexible selection of gait events, and fast adaptation. Gait event is the only information needed, and hence the performance of synchronization holds when an abnormal gait pattern is involved. The results of the experiments reveal that our approach is efficient in achieving human-robot synchronization and feasible for rehabilitation robotics application.

  4. Hardware Development and Locomotion Control Strategy for an Over-Ground Gait Trainer: NaTUre-Gaits

    PubMed Central

    Low, Kin Huat; Qu, Xingda; Lim, Hup Boon; Hoon, Kay Hiang

    2014-01-01

    Therapist-assisted body weight supported (TABWS) gait rehabilitation was introduced two decades ago. The benefit of TABWS in functional recovery of walking in spinal cord injury and stroke patients has been demonstrated and reported. However, shortage of therapists, labor-intensiveness, and short duration of training are some limitations of this approach. To overcome these deficiencies, robotic-assisted gait rehabilitation systems have been suggested. These systems have gained attentions from researchers and clinical practitioner in recent years. To achieve the same objective, an over-ground gait rehabilitation system, NaTUre-gaits, was developed at the Nanyang Technological University. The design was based on a clinical approach to provide four main features, which are pelvic motion, body weight support, over-ground walking experience, and lower limb assistance. These features can be achieved by three main modules of NaTUre-gaits: 1) pelvic assistance mechanism, mobile platform, and robotic orthosis. Predefined gait patterns are required for a robotic assisted system to follow. In this paper, the gait pattern planning for NaTUre-gaits was accomplished by an individual-specific gait pattern prediction model. The model generates gait patterns that resemble natural gait patterns of the targeted subjects. The features of NaTUre-gaits have been demonstrated by walking trials with several subjects. The trials have been evaluated by therapists and doctors. The results show that 10-m walking trial with a reduction in manpower. The task-specific repetitive training approach and natural walking gait patterns were also successfully achieved. PMID:27170876

  5. The use of body weight support on ground level: an alternative strategy for gait training of individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Catarina O; Barela, José A; Prado-Medeiros, Christiane L; Salvini, Tania F; Barela, Ana M F

    2009-12-01

    Body weight support (BWS) systems on treadmill have been proposed as a strategy for gait training of subjects with stroke. Considering that ground level is the most common locomotion surface and that there is little information about individuals with stroke walking with BWS on ground level, it is important to investigate the use of BWS on ground level in these individuals as a possible alternative strategy for gait training. Thirteen individuals with chronic stroke (four women and nine men; mean age 54.46 years) were videotaped walking on ground level in three experimental conditions: with no harness, with harness bearing full body weight, and with harness bearing 30% of full body weight. Measurements were recorded for mean walking speed, cadence, stride length, stride speed, durations of initial and terminal double stance, single limb support, swing period, and range of motion of ankle, knee, and hip joints; and foot, shank, thigh, and trunk segments. The use of BWS system leads to changes in stride length and speed, but not in stance and swing period duration. Only the hip joint was influenced by the BWS system in the 30% BWS condition. Shank and thigh segments presented less range of motion in the 30% BWS condition than in the other conditions, and the trunk was held straighter in the 30% BWS condition than in the other conditions. Individuals with stroke using BWS system on ground level walked slower and with shorter stride length than with no harness. BWS also led to reduction of hip, shank, and thigh range of motion. However, this system did not change walking temporal organization and body side asymmetry of individuals with stroke. On the other hand, the BWS system enabled individuals with chronic stroke to walk safely and without physical assistance. In interventions, the physical therapist can watch and correct gait pattern in patients' performance without the need to provide physical assistance.

  6. Disturbances of automatic gait control mechanisms in higher level gait disorder.

    PubMed

    Danoudis, Mary; Ganesvaran, Ganga; Iansek, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The underlying mechanisms responsible for the gait changes in frontal gait disorder (FGD), a form of higher level gait disorders, are poorly understood. We investigated the relationship between stride length and cadence (SLCrel) in people with FGD (n=15) in comparison to healthy older adults (n=21) to improve our understanding of the changes to gait in FGD. Gait data was captured using an electronic walkway system as participants walked at five self-selected speed conditions: preferred, very slow, slow, fast and very fast. Linear regression was used to determine the strength of the relationship (R(2)), slope and intercept. In the FGD group 9 participants had a strong SLCrel (linear group) (R(2)>0.8) and 6 a weak relationship (R(2)<0.8) (nonlinear group). The linear FGD group did not differ to healthy control for slope (p>0.05) but did have a lower intercept (p<0.001). The linear FGD group modulated gait speed by adjusting stride length and cadence similar to controls whereas the nonlinear FGD participants adjusted stride length but not cadence similar to controls. The non-linear FGD group had greater disturbance to their gait, poorer postural control and greater fear of falling compared to the linear FGD group. Investigation of the SLCrel resulted in new insights into the underlying mechanisms responsible for the gait changes found in FGD. The findings suggest stride length regulation was disrupted in milder FGD but as the disorder worsened, cadence control also became disordered resulting in a break down in the relationship between stride length and cadence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Development of a gait trainer with regulated servo-drive for rehabilitation of locomotor disabled patients].

    PubMed

    Uhlenbrock, D; Sarkodie-Gyan, T; Reiter, F; Konrad, M; Hesse, S

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a new gait trainer for the rehabilitation of non-ambulatory patients. For the simulation of the gait phase, we used a commercially available fitness trainer (Fast Track) with two foot plates moving in an alternating fashion and connected to a servo-controlled propulsion system providing the necessary support for the movement depending on the patient's impairment level. To compensate deficient equilibrium reflexes, the patient was suspended in a harness capable of supporting some of his/her weight. Video analysis of gait and the kinesiological EMG were used to assess the pattern of movement and the corresponding muscle activity, which were then evaluated in healthy subjects, spinal cord injured and stroke patients and compared with walking on the flat or on a treadmill. Walking on the gait trainer was characterised by a symmetrical, sinusoidal movement of lower amplitude than in normal gait. The EMG showed a low activity of the tibialis anterior muscle, while the antigravity muscles were clearly activated by the gait trainer during the stance phase. In summary, the new gait trainer generates a symmetrical gait-like movement, promoting weight acceptance in the stance phase, which is important for the restoration of walking ability.

  8. Evidence of end-effector based gait machines in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Schattat, N; Mehrholz, J; Werner, C

    2013-01-01

    A task-specific repetitive approach in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion is well accepted nowadays. To ease the therapists' and patients' physical effort, the past two decades have seen the introduction of gait machines to intensify the amount of gait practice. Two principles have emerged, an exoskeleton- and an endeffector-based approach. Both systems share the harness and the body weight support. With the end-effector-based devices, the patients' feet are positioned on two foot plates, whose movements simulate stance and swing phase. This article provides an overview on the end-effector based machine's effectiveness regarding the restoration of gait. For the electromechanical gait trainer GT I, a meta analysis identified nine controlled trials (RCT) in stroke subjects (n = 568) and were analyzed to detect differences between end-effector-based locomotion + physiotherapy and physiotherapy alone. Patients practising with the machine effected in a superior gait ability (210 out of 319 patients, 65.8% vs. 96 out of 249 patients, 38.6%, respectively, Z = 2.29, p = 0.020), due to a larger training intensity. Only single RCTs have been reported for other devices and etiologies. The introduction of end-effector based gait machines has opened a new succesful chapter in gait rehabilitation after CNS lesion.

  9. Swimming with multiple propulsors: measurement and comparison of swimming gaits in three species of neotropical cichlids.

    PubMed

    Feilich, Kara L

    2017-11-15

    Comparative studies of fish swimming have been limited by the lack of quantitative definitions of fish gaits. Traditionally, steady swimming gaits have been defined categorically by the fin or region of the body that is used as the main propulsor and named after major fish clades (e.g. carangiform, anguilliform, balistiform, labriform). This method of categorization is limited by the lack of explicit measurements, the inability to incorporate contributions of multiple propulsors and the inability to compare gaits across different categories. I propose an alternative framework for the definition and comparison of fish gaits based on the propulsive contribution of each structure (body and/or fin) being used as a propulsor relative to locomotor output, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this framework by comparing three species of neotropical cichlids with different body shapes. This approach is modular with respect to the number of propulsors considered, flexible with respect to the definition of the propulsive inputs and the locomotor output of interest, and designed explicitly to handle combinations of propulsors. Using this approach, gait can be defined as a trajectory through propulsive space, and gait transitions can be defined as discontinuities in the gait trajectory. By measuring and defining gait in this way, patterns of clustering corresponding to existing categorical definitions of gait may emerge, and gaits can be rigorously compared across categories. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. The development and validity of the Salford Gait Tool: an observation-based clinical gait assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Toro, Brigitte; Nester, Christopher J; Farren, Pauline C

    2007-03-01

    To develop the construct, content, and criterion validity of the Salford Gait Tool (SF-GT) and to evaluate agreement between gait observations using the SF-GT and kinematic gait data. Tool development and comparative evaluation. University in the United Kingdom. For designing construct and content validity, convenience samples of 10 children with hemiplegic, diplegic, and quadriplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and 152 physical therapy students and 4 physical therapists were recruited. For developing criterion validity, kinematic gait data of 13 gait clusters containing 56 children with hemiplegic, diplegic, and quadriplegic CP and 11 neurologically intact children was used. For clinical evaluation, a convenience sample of 23 pediatric physical therapists participated. We developed a sagittal plane observational gait assessment tool through a series of design, test, and redesign iterations. The tool's grading system was calibrated using kinematic gait data of 13 gait clusters and was evaluated by comparing the agreement of gait observations using the SF-GT with kinematic gait data. Criterion standard kinematic gait data. There was 58% mean agreement based on grading categories and 80% mean agreement based on degree estimations evaluated with the least significant difference method. The new SF-GT has good concurrent criterion validity.

  11. Quantifying gait deviations in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis using the Gait Deviation Index.

    PubMed

    Esbjörnsson, A-C; Rozumalski, A; Iversen, M D; Schwartz, M H; Wretenberg, P; Broström, E W

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the usability of the Gait Deviation Index (GDI), an index that summarizes the amount of deviation in movement from a standard norm, in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aims of the study were to evaluate the ability of the GDI to identify gait deviations, assess inter-trial repeatability, and examine the relationship between the GDI and walking speed, physical disability, and pain. Sixty-three adults with RA and 59 adults with typical gait patterns were included in this retrospective case-control study. Following a three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA), representative gait cycles were selected and GDI scores calculated. To evaluate the effect of walking speed, GDI scores were calculated using both a free-speed and a speed-matched reference set. Physical disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and subjects rated their pain during walking. Adults with RA had significantly increased gait deviations compared to healthy individuals, as shown by lower GDI scores [87.9 (SD = 8.7) vs. 99.4 (SD = 8.3), p < 0.001]. This difference was also seen when adjusting for walking speed [91.7 (SD = 9.0) vs. 99.9 (SD = 8.6), p < 0.001]. It was estimated that a change of ≥ 5 GDI units was required to account for natural variation in gait. There was no evident relationship between GDI and low/high RA-related physical disability and pain. The GDI seems to useful for identifying and summarizing gait deviations in individuals with RA. Thus, we consider that the GDI provides an overall measure of gait deviation that may reflect lower extremity pathology and may help clinicians to understand the impact of RA on gait dynamics.

  12. Accuracy of the Microsoft Kinect for measuring gait parameters during treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; McGorry, Raymond W; Chou, Li-Shan; Lin, Jia-Hua; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2015-07-01

    The measurement of gait parameters normally requires motion tracking systems combined with force plates, which limits the measurement to laboratory settings. In some recent studies, the possibility of using the portable, low cost, and marker-less Microsoft Kinect sensor to measure gait parameters on over-ground walking has been examined. The current study further examined the accuracy level of the Kinect sensor for assessment of various gait parameters during treadmill walking under different walking speeds. Twenty healthy participants walked on the treadmill and their full body kinematics data were measured by a Kinect sensor and a motion tracking system, concurrently. Spatiotemporal gait parameters and knee and hip joint angles were extracted from the two devices and were compared. The results showed that the accuracy levels when using the Kinect sensor varied across the gait parameters. Average heel strike frame errors were 0.18 and 0.30 frames for the right and left foot, respectively, while average toe off frame errors were -2.25 and -2.61 frames, respectively, across all participants and all walking speeds. The temporal gait parameters based purely on heel strike have less error than the temporal gait parameters based on toe off. The Kinect sensor can follow the trend of the joint trajectories for the knee and hip joints, though there was substantial error in magnitudes. The walking speed was also found to significantly affect the identified timing of toe off. The results of the study suggest that the Kinect sensor may be used as an alternative device to measure some gait parameters for treadmill walking, depending on the desired accuracy level. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A mechanized gait trainer for restoring gait in nonambulatory subjects.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Uhlenbrock, D; Werner, C; Bardeleben, A

    2000-09-01

    To construct an advanced mechanized gait trainer to enable patients the repetitive practice of a gaitlike movement without overstraining therapists. DEVICE: Prototype gait trainer that simulates the phases of gait (by generating a ratio of 40% to 60% between swing and stance phases), supports the subjects according to their ability (lifts the foot during swing phase), and controls the center of mass in the vertical and horizontal directions. Two nonambulatory, hemiparetic patients who regained their walking ability after 4 weeks of daily training on the gait trainer, a 55-year-old woman and a 62-year-old man, both of whom had a first-time ischemic stroke. Four weeks of training, five times a week, each session 20 minutes long. Functional ambulation category (FAC, levels 0-5) to assess gait ability and ground level walking velocity. Rivermead motor assessment score (RMAS, 0-13) to assess gross motor function. Patient 1: At the end of treatment, she was able to walk independently on level ground with use of a walking stick. Her walking velocity had improved from .29m/sec to .59m/sec. Her RMAS score increased from 4 to 10, meaning she could walk at least 40 meters outside, pick up objects from floor, and climb stairs independently. Patient 2: At end of 4-week training, he could walk independently on even surfaces (FAC level 4), using an ankle-foot orthosis and a walking stick. His walking velocity improved from .14m/sec to .63m/sec. His RMAS increased from 3 to 10. The gait trainer enabled severely affected patients the repetitive practice of a gaitlike movement. Future studies may elucidate its value in gait rehabilitation of nonambulatory subjects.

  14. Control of human gait stability through foot placement.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2018-06-01

    During human walking, the centre of mass (CoM) is outside the base of support for most of the time, which poses a challenge to stabilizing the gait pattern. Nevertheless, most of us are able to walk without substantial problems. In this review, we aim to provide an integrative overview of how humans cope with an underactuated gait pattern. A central idea that emerges from the literature is that foot placement is crucial in maintaining a stable gait pattern. In this review, we explore this idea; we first describe mechanical models and concepts that have been used to predict how foot placement can be used to control gait stability. These concepts, such as for instance the extrapolated CoM concept, the foot placement estimator concept and the capture point concept, provide explicit predictions on where to place the foot relative to the body at each step, such that gait is stabilized. Next, we describe empirical findings on foot placement during human gait in unperturbed and perturbed conditions. We conclude that humans show behaviour that is largely in accordance with the aforementioned concepts, with foot placement being actively coordinated to body CoM kinematics during the preceding step. In this section, we also address the requirements for such control in terms of the sensory information and the motor strategies that can implement such control, as well as the parts of the central nervous system that may be involved. We show that visual, vestibular and proprioceptive information contribute to estimation of the state of the CoM. Foot placement is adjusted to variations in CoM state mainly by modulation of hip abductor muscle activity during the swing phase of gait, and this process appears to be under spinal and supraspinal, including cortical, control. We conclude with a description of how control of foot placement can be impaired in humans, using ageing as a primary example and with some reference to pathology, and we address alternative strategies available to

  15. Tiger beetles pursue prey using a proportional control law with a delay of one half-stride

    PubMed Central

    Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Gilbert, Cole; Wang, Z. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Tiger beetles are fast diurnal predators capable of chasing prey under closed-loop visual guidance. We investigated this control system using statistical analyses of high-speed digital recordings of beetles chasing a moving prey dummy in a laboratory arena. Correlation analyses reveal that the beetle uses a proportional control law in which the angular position of the prey relative to the beetle's body axis drives the beetle's angular velocity with a delay of about 28 ms. The proportionality coefficient or system gain, 12 s−1, is just below critical damping. Pursuit simulations using the derived control law predict angular orientation during pursuits with a residual error of about 7°. This is of the same order of magnitude as the oscillation imposed by the beetle's alternating tripod gait, which was not factored into the control law. The system delay of 28 ms equals a half-stride period, i.e. the time between the touch down of alternating tripods. Based on these results, we propose a physical interpretation of the observed control law: to turn towards its prey, the beetle on average exerts a sideways force proportional to the angular position of the prey measured a half-stride earlier. PMID:24718454

  16. Instrumented gait analysis: a measure of gait improvement by a wheeled walker in hospitalized geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Schülein, Samuel; Barth, Jens; Rampp, Alexander; Rupprecht, Roland; Eskofier, Björn M; Winkler, Jürgen; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Klucken, Jochen

    2017-02-27

    In an increasing aging society, reduced mobility is one of the most important factors limiting activities of daily living and overall quality of life. The ability to walk independently contributes to the mobility, but is increasingly restricted by numerous diseases that impair gait and balance. The aim of this cross-sectional observation study was to examine whether spatio-temporal gait parameters derived from mobile instrumented gait analysis can be used to measure the gait stabilizing effects of a wheeled walker (WW) and whether these gait parameters may serve as surrogate marker in hospitalized patients with multifactorial gait and balance impairment. One hundred six patients (ages 68-95) wearing inertial sensor equipped shoes passed an instrumented walkway with and without gait support from a WW. The walkway assessed the risk of falling associated gait parameters velocity, swing time, stride length, stride time- and double support time variability. Inertial sensor-equipped shoes measured heel strike and toe off angles, and foot clearance. The use of a WW improved the risk of spatio-temporal parameters velocity, swing time, stride length and the sagittal plane associated parameters heel strike and toe off angles in all patients. First-time users (FTUs) showed similar gait parameter improvement patterns as frequent WW users (FUs). However, FUs with higher levels of gait impairment improved more in velocity, stride length and toe off angle compared to the FTUs. The impact of a WW can be quantified objectively by instrumented gait assessment. Thus, objective gait parameters may serve as surrogate markers for the use of walking aids in patients with gait and balance impairments.

  17. Lack of maintenance of gait pattern as measured by instrumental methods suggests psychogenic gait.

    PubMed

    Merello, Marcelo; Ballesteros, Diego; Rossi, Malco; Arena, Julieta; Crespo, Marcos; Cervio, Andres; Cuello Oderiz, Carolina; Rivero, Alberto; Cerquetti, Daniel; Risk, Marcelo; Balej, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuation is a common feature of all psychogenic gait disorder (PGD) patterns. Whether this fluctuation involves only the degree of impairment or whether it affects the gait pattern itself remains an interesting question. We hypothesize that, on repeated measurements, both normal and abnormal gait may present quantitative differences while maintaining their basic underlying pattern; conversely, in psychogenic gait, the basic pattern appears not to be preserved. Using an optoelectronic system, data acquired from 19 normal subjects and 66 patients were applied to train a neural network (NN) and subsequently classify gait patterns into four different groups (normal, ataxic, spastic-paraparetic and parkinsonian). Five patients who fulfilled clinical criteria for psychogenic gait and six controls were then prospectively evaluated on two separate occasions, three months apart. Normal controls and ataxic, parkinsonian or spastic patients were correctly identified by the NN, and categorized within the corresponding groups at baseline as well as at a three-month follow-up evaluation. NN analysis showed that after three months, no PGD patient preserved the gait pattern detected at baseline, even though this finding was not clinically apparent. Modification of gait pattern detected by repeated kinematic measurement and NN analysis could suggest the presence of PGD, particularly in difficult-to-diagnose cases.

  18. Bipedal gait model for precise gait recognition and optimal triggering in foot drop stimulator: a proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Muhammad Faraz; Salcic, Zoran; Wang, Kevin I-Kai; Hu, Aiguo Patrick

    2018-03-10

    Electrical stimulators are often prescribed to correct foot drop walking. However, commercial foot drop stimulators trigger inappropriately under certain non-gait scenarios. Past researches addressed this limitation by defining stimulation control based on automaton of a gait cycle executed by foot drop of affected limb/foot only. Since gait is a collaborative activity of both feet, this research highlights the role of normal foot for robust gait detection and stimulation triggering. A novel bipedal gait model is proposed where gait cycle is realized as an automaton based on concurrent gait sub-phases (states) from each foot. The input for state transition is fused information from feet-worn pressure and inertial sensors. Thereafter, a bipedal gait model-based stimulation control algorithm is developed. As a feasibility study, bipedal gait model and stimulation control are evaluated in real-time simulation manner on normal and simulated foot drop gait measurements from 16 able-bodied participants with three speed variations, under inappropriate triggering scenarios and with foot drop rehabilitation exercises. Also, the stimulation control employed in commercial foot drop stimulators and single foot gait-based foot drop stimulators are compared alongside. Gait detection accuracy (98.9%) and precise triggering under all investigations prove bipedal gait model reliability. This infers that gait detection leveraging bipedal periodicity is a promising strategy to rectify prevalent stimulation triggering deficiencies in commercial foot drop stimulators. Graphical abstract Bipedal information-based gait recognition and stimulation triggering.

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency and nonlinear pulse propagation in a combined tripod and Λ atom-light coupling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Ruseckas, J.; Juzeliūnas, G.

    2017-09-01

    We consider propagation of a probe pulse in an atomic medium characterized by a combined tripod and Lambda (Λ) atom-light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by five light fields. It is demonstrated that dark states can be formed for such an atom-light coupling. This is essential for formation of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and slow light. In the limiting cases the scheme reduces to conventional Λ- or N-type atom-light couplings providing the EIT or absorption, respectively. Thus, the atomic system can experience a transition from the EIT to the absorption by changing the amplitudes or phases of control lasers. Subsequently the scheme is employed to analyze the nonlinear pulse propagation using the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations. It is shown that a generation of stable slow light optical solitons is possible in such a five-level combined tripod and Λ atomic system.

  20. Gait and Cognition in Parkinson's Disease: Cognitive Impairment Is Inadequately Reflected by Gait Performance during Dual Task.

    PubMed

    Gaßner, Heiko; Marxreiter, Franz; Steib, Simon; Kohl, Zacharias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Adler, Werner; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Pfeifer, Klaus; Winkler, Jürgen; Klucken, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive and gait deficits are common symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Motor-cognitive dual tasks (DTs) are used to explore the interplay between gait and cognition. However, it is unclear if DT gait performance is indicative for cognitive impairment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if cognitive deficits are reflected by DT costs of spatiotemporal gait parameters. Cognitive function, single task (ST) and DT gait performance were investigated in 67 PD patients. Cognition was assessed by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) followed by a standardized, sensor-based gait test and the identical gait test while subtracting serial 3's. Cognitive impairment was defined by a MoCA score <26. DT costs in gait parameters [(DT - ST)/ST × 100] were calculated as a measure of DT effect on gait. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate the association between MoCA performance and gait parameters. In a linear regression model, DT gait costs and clinical confounders (age, gender, disease duration, motor impairment, medication, and depression) were correlated to cognitive performance. In a subgroup analysis, we compared matched groups of cognitively impaired and unimpaired PD patients regarding differences in ST, DT, and DT gait costs. Correlation analysis revealed weak correlations between MoCA score and DT costs of gait parameters ( r / r Sp  ≤ 0.3). DT costs of stride length, swing time variability, and maximum toe clearance (| r / r Sp | > 0.2) were included in a regression analysis. The parameters only explain 8% of the cognitive variance. In combination with clinical confounders, regression analysis showed that these gait parameters explained 30% of MoCA performance. Group comparison revealed strong DT effects within both groups (large effect sizes), but significant between-group effects in DT gait costs were not observed. These findings suggest that DT gait performance is not indicative for cognitive impairment in PD. DT

  1. Gait characteristics after gait-oriented rehabilitation in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Peurala, Sinikka H; Titianova, Ekaterina B; Mateev, Plamen; Pitkänen, Kauko; Sivenius, Juhani; Tarkka, Ina M

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effects of rehabilitation in thirty-seven ambulatory patients with chronic stroke during three weeks in-patient rehabilitation period. In the intervention group, each patient received 75 min physiotherapy daily every workday including 20 minutes in the electromechanical gait trainer with body-weight support (BWS). In the control group, each patient participated in 45 min conventional physiotherapy daily. Motor ability was assessed with the first five items of the Modified Motor Assessment Scale (MMAS1-5) and ten meters walking speed. Spatio-temporal gait characteristics were recorded with an electrical walkway. The MMAS1-5 (p<0.0005 and p=0.005) and ten meters walking time (p<0.0005 and p=0.006) improved in both groups. The improvements in MMAS1-5 and ten meters walking time did not differ between the groups (p=0.217 and p=0.195). Specific gait characteristics improved only in the intervention group, as seen in increased Functional Ambulation Profile score (p=0.023), velocity (p=0.023), the step lengths (affected side, p=0.011, non-affected side p=0.040), the stride lengths (p=0.018, p=0.006) and decreased step-time differential (p=0.043). Furthermore, all gait characteristics and other motor abilities remained in the discharge level at the six months in the intervention group. It appears that BWS training gives a long-lasting benefit in gait qualities even in chronic stroke patients.

  2. Comparing electro- and mechano-myographic muscle activation patterns in self-paced pediatric gait.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Katherine; Samadani, Ali; Chau, Tom

    2017-10-01

    Electromyography (EMG) is the standard modality for measuring muscle activity. However, the convenience and availability of low-cost accelerometer-based wearables makes mechanomyography (MMG) an increasingly attractive alternative modality for clinical applications. Literature to date has demonstrated a strong association between EMG and MMG temporal alignment in isometric and isokinetic contractions. However, the EMG-MMG relationship has not been studied in gait. In this study, the concurrence of EMG- and MMG-detected contractions in the tibialis anterior, lateral gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris muscles were investigated in children during self-paced gait. Furthermore, the distribution of signal power over the gait cycle was statistically compared between EMG-MMG modalities. With EMG as the reference, muscular contractions were detected based on MMG with balanced accuracies between 88 and 94% for all muscles except the gastrocnemius. MMG signal power differed from that of EMG during certain phases of the gait cycle in all muscles except the biceps femoris. These timing and power distribution differences between the two modalities may in part be related to muscle fascicle length changes that are unique to muscle motion during gait. Our findings suggest that the relationship between EMG and MMG appears to be more complex during gait than in isometric and isokinetic contractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Subliminal gait initiation deficits in REM sleep behavior disorder: a harbinger of freezing of gait?

    PubMed Central

    Alibiglou, L.; Videnovic, A.; Planetta, P.J.; Vaillancourt, D.E.; MacKinnon, C.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Muscle activity during REM sleep is markedly increased in people with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) who have freezing of gait. This study examined if individuals with RBD, who do not have a diagnosis of PD, show abnormalities in gait initiation that resemble the impairments observed in PD and whether there is a relationship between these deficits and the level of REM sleep without atonia. Methods Gait initiation and polysomnography studies were conducted in four groups of 10 subjects each: RBD, PD with and without freezing of gait and control subjects. Results Significant reductions were seen in the posterior shift of the center of pressure during the propulsive phase of gait initiation in the RBD and PD with freezing of gait groups compared with controls and PD non-freezers. These reductions negatively correlated with the amount of REM sleep without atonia. The duration of the initial dorsiflexor muscle burst during gait initiation was significantly reduced in both PD groups and the RBD cohort. Conclusions These results provide evidence that people with RBD, prior to a diagnosis of a degenerative neurologic disorder, show alterations in the coupling of posture and gait similar to those seen in PD. The correlation between increased REM sleep without atonia and deficits in forward propulsion during the push-off phase of gait initiation suggests that abnormities in the regulation of muscle tone during REM sleep may be related to the pathogenesis of freezing of gait. PMID:27250871

  4. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity: A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; den Otter, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS) on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. Methods Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants’ body weight) and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h), while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. Results The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged), but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. Conclusion Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible. PMID:25226302

  5. Balzac and human gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Collado-Vázquez, S; Carrillo, J M

    2015-05-01

    People have been interested in movement analysis in general, and gait analysis in particular, since ancient times. Aristotle, Hippocrates, Galen, Leonardo da Vinci and Honoré de Balzac all used observation to analyse the gait of human beings. The purpose of this study is to compare Honoré de Balzac's writings with a scientific analysis of human gait. Honoré de Balzac's Theory of walking and other works by that author referring to gait. Honoré de Balzac had an interest in gait analysis, as demonstrated by his descriptions of characters which often include references to their way of walking. He also wrote a treatise entitled Theory of walking (Théorie de la demarche) in which he employed his keen observation skills to define gait using a literary style. He stated that the walking process is divided into phases and listed the factors that influence gait, such as personality, mood, height, weight, profession and social class, and also provided a description of the correct way of walking. Balzac considered gait analysis to be very important and this is reflected in both his character descriptions and Theory of walking, his analytical observation of gait. In our own technology-dominated times, this serves as a reminder of the importance of observation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring the feasibility and acceptability of sensor monitoring of gait and falls in the homes of persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Newland, Pamela; Wagner, Joanne M; Salter, Amber; Thomas, Florian P; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2016-09-01

    Gait parameters variability and falls are problems for persons with MS and have not been adequately captured in the home. Our goal was to explore the feasibility and acceptability of monitoring of gait and falls in the homes of persons with MS over a period of 30 days. To test the feasibility of measuring gait and falls for 30days in the home of persons with MS, spatiotemporal gait parameters stride length, stride time, and gait speed were compared. A 3D infrared depth imaging system has been developed to objectively measure gait and falls in the home environment. Participants also completed a 16-foot GaitRite electronic pathway walk to validate spatiotemporal parameters of gait (gait speed (cm/s), stride length (cm), and gait cycle time(s)) during the timed 25 foot walking test (T25FWT). We also documented barriers to feasibility of installing the in-home sensors for these participants. The results of the study suggest that the Kinect sensor may be used as an alternative device to measure gait for persons with MS, depending on the desired accuracy level. Ultimately, using in-home sensors to analyze gait parameters in real time is feasible and could lead to better analysis of gait in persons with MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tris(2-aminoethyl)amine based tripodal urea receptors for oxalate: encapsulation of staggered vs. planar conformers.

    PubMed

    Bose, Purnandhu; Dutta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2013-07-28

    Simple tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) based tripodal urea receptors are investigated for the encapsulation of divalent oxalate (C2O4(2-)) in a semi-aqueous medium. A single crystal X-ray diffraction study shows that the receptor with 3-cyanophenyl functionality captures a staggered conformer whereas the 3-fluorophenyl functionalized receptor encapsulates a less stable planar conformer.

  8. Gait analysis in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Armand, Stéphane; Decoulon, Geraldo; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) children present complex and heterogeneous motor disorders that cause gait deviations.Clinical gait analysis (CGA) is needed to identify, understand and support the management of gait deviations in CP. CGA assesses a large amount of quantitative data concerning patients' gait characteristics, such as video, kinematics, kinetics, electromyography and plantar pressure data.Common gait deviations in CP can be grouped into the gait patterns of spastic hemiplegia (drop foot, equinus with different knee positions) and spastic diplegia (true equinus, jump, apparent equinus and crouch) to facilitate communication. However, gait deviations in CP tend to be a continuum of deviations rather than well delineated groups. To interpret CGA, it is necessary to link gait deviations to clinical impairments and to distinguish primary gait deviations from compensatory strategies.CGA does not tell us how to treat a CP patient, but can provide objective identification of gait deviations and further the understanding of gait deviations. Numerous treatment options are available to manage gait deviations in CP. Generally, treatments strive to limit secondary deformations, re-establish the lever arm function and preserve muscle strength.Additional roles of CGA are to better understand the effects of treatments on gait deviations. Cite this article: Armand S, Decoulon G, Bonnefoy-Mazure A. Gait analysis in children with cerebral palsy. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:448-460. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000052.

  9. General tensor discriminant analysis and gabor features for gait recognition.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    The traditional image representations are not suited to conventional classification methods, such as the linear discriminant analysis (LDA), because of the under sample problem (USP): the dimensionality of the feature space is much higher than the number of training samples. Motivated by the successes of the two dimensional LDA (2DLDA) for face recognition, we develop a general tensor discriminant analysis (GTDA) as a preprocessing step for LDA. The benefits of GTDA compared with existing preprocessing methods, e.g., principal component analysis (PCA) and 2DLDA, include 1) the USP is reduced in subsequent classification by, for example, LDA; 2) the discriminative information in the training tensors is preserved; and 3) GTDA provides stable recognition rates because the alternating projection optimization algorithm to obtain a solution of GTDA converges, while that of 2DLDA does not. We use human gait recognition to validate the proposed GTDA. The averaged gait images are utilized for gait representation. Given the popularity of Gabor function based image decompositions for image understanding and object recognition, we develop three different Gabor function based image representations: 1) the GaborD representation is the sum of Gabor filter responses over directions, 2) GaborS is the sum of Gabor filter responses over scales, and 3) GaborSD is the sum of Gabor filter responses over scales and directions. The GaborD, GaborS and GaborSD representations are applied to the problem of recognizing people from their averaged gait images.A large number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness (recognition rate) of gait recognition based on first obtaining a Gabor, GaborD, GaborS or GaborSD image representation, then using GDTA to extract features and finally using LDA for classification. The proposed methods achieved good performance for gait recognition based on image sequences from the USF HumanID Database. Experimental comparisons are made with nine

  10. Aging effect on step adjustments and stability control in visually perturbed gait initiation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruopeng; Cui, Chuyi; Shea, John B

    2017-10-01

    Gait adaptability is essential for fall avoidance during locomotion. It requires the ability to rapidly inhibit original motor planning, select and execute alternative motor commands, while also maintaining the stability of locomotion. This study investigated the aging effect on gait adaptability and dynamic stability control during a visually perturbed gait initiation task. A novel approach was used such that the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) during gait initiation were used to trigger the unpredictable relocation of a foot-size stepping target. Participants (10 young adults and 10 older adults) completed visually perturbed gait initiation in three adjustment timing conditions (early, intermediate, late; all extracted from the stereotypical APA pattern) and two adjustment direction conditions (medial, lateral). Stepping accuracy, foot rotation at landing, and Margin of Dynamic Stability (MDS) were analyzed and compared across test conditions and groups using a linear mixed model. Stepping accuracy decreased as a function of adjustment timing as well as stepping direction, with older subjects exhibited a significantly greater undershoot in foot placement to late lateral stepping. Late adjustment also elicited a reaching-like movement (i.e. foot rotation prior to landing in order to step on the target), regardless of stepping direction. MDS measures in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior direction revealed both young and older adults exhibited reduced stability in the adjustment step and subsequent steps. However, young adults returned to stable gait faster than older adults. These findings could be useful for future study of screening deficits in gait adaptability and preventing falls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cognitive and motor dual task gait training improve dual task gait performance after stroke - A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ci; Yang, Yea-Ru; Tsai, Yun-An; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2017-06-22

    This study investigated effects of cognitive and motor dual task gait training on dual task gait performance in stroke. Participants (n = 28) were randomly assigned to cognitive dual task gait training (CDTT), motor dual task gait training (MDTT), or conventional physical therapy (CPT) group. Participants in CDTT or MDTT group practiced the cognitive or motor tasks respectively during walking. Participants in CPT group received strengthening, balance, and gait training. The intervention was 30 min/session, 3 sessions/week for 4 weeks. Three test conditions to evaluate the training effects were single walking, walking while performing cognitive task (serial subtraction), and walking while performing motor task (tray-carrying). Parameters included gait speed, dual task cost of gait speed (DTC-speed), cadence, stride time, and stride length. After CDTT, cognitive-motor dual task gait performance (stride length and DTC-speed) was improved (p = 0.021; p = 0.015). After MDTT, motor dual task gait performance (gait speed, stride length, and DTC-speed) was improved (p = 0.008; p = 0.008; p = 0.008 respectively). It seems that CDTT improved cognitive dual task gait performance and MDTT improved motor dual task gait performance although such improvements did not reach significant group difference. Therefore, different types of dual task gait training can be adopted to enhance different dual task gait performance in stroke.

  12. Nonlinear dynamical model of human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Scafetta, Nicola

    2003-05-01

    We present a nonlinear dynamical model of the human gait control system in a variety of gait regimes. The stride-interval time series in normal human gait is characterized by slightly multifractal fluctuations. The fractal nature of the fluctuations becomes more pronounced under both an increase and decrease in the average gait. Moreover, the long-range memory in these fluctuations is lost when the gait is keyed on a metronome. Human locomotion is controlled by a network of neurons capable of producing a correlated syncopated output. The central nervous system is coupled to the motocontrol system, and together they control the locomotion of the gait cycle itself. The metronomic gait is simulated by a forced nonlinear oscillator with a periodic external force associated with the conscious act of walking in a particular way.

  13. Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease: An Overload Problem?

    PubMed

    Beck, Eric N; Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A; Almeida, Quincy J

    2015-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is arguably the most severe symptom associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and often occurs while performing dual tasks or approaching narrowed and cluttered spaces. While it is well known that visual cues alleviate FOG, it is not clear if this effect may be the result of cognitive or sensorimotor mechanisms. Nevertheless, the role of vision may be a critical link that might allow us to disentangle this question. Gaze behaviour has yet to be carefully investigated while freezers approach narrow spaces, thus the overall objective of this study was to explore the interaction between cognitive and sensory-perceptual influences on FOG. In experiment #1, if cognitive load is the underlying factor leading to FOG, then one might expect that a dual-task would elicit FOG episodes even in the presence of visual cues, since the load on attention would interfere with utilization of visual cues. Alternatively, if visual cues alleviate gait despite performance of a dual-task, then it may be more probable that sensory mechanisms are at play. In compliment to this, the aim of experiment#2 was to further challenge the sensory systems, by removing vision of the lower-limbs and thereby forcing participants to rely on other forms of sensory feedback rather than vision while walking toward the narrow space. Spatiotemporal aspects of gait, percentage of gaze fixation frequency and duration, as well as skin conductance levels were measured in freezers and non-freezers across both experiments. Results from experiment#1 indicated that although freezers and non-freezers both walked with worse gait while performing the dual-task, in freezers, gait was relieved by visual cues regardless of whether the cognitive demands of the dual-task were present. At baseline and while dual-tasking, freezers demonstrated a gaze behaviour that neglected the doorway and instead focused primarily on the pathway, a strategy that non-freezers adopted only when performing the dual

  14. Inter- and intraobserver repeatability of the Salford Gait Tool: an observation-based clinical gait assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Toro, Brigitte; Nester, Christopher J; Farren, Pauline C

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the inter- and intraobserver repeatability of the Salford Gait Tool (SF-GT), a new observation-based gait assessment tool for evaluating sagittal plane cerebral palsy (CP) gait. Masked comparative evaluation. University in the United Kingdom. A convenience sample of 23 pediatric physical therapists with varying degrees of clinical experience recruited from the Greater Manchester area. Participants viewed videotapes of the sagittal plane gait of 13 children and used the SF-GT to analyze their 13 different gait styles on 2 occasions. Eleven children had hemiplegic, diplegic, or quadriplegic CP and 2 were neurologically intact. Inter- and intraobserver repeatability of hip, knee, and ankle joint positions at 6 different phases of the gait cycle. The SF-GT demonstrated good interobserver (77%) and intraobserver (75%) repeatability. We have established that the SF-GT is a repeatable clinical assessment tool with which to guide the diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation of interventions by pediatric physical therapists of sagittal plane gait deviations in CP.

  15. Gait-Related Brain Activity in People with Parkinson Disease with Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Daniel S.; Pickett, Kristen A.; Duncan, Ryan; Perlmutter, Joel; Earhart, Gammon M.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of people with Parkinson disease experience freezing of gait, described as a transient inability to produce effective stepping. Complex gait tasks such as turning typically elicit freezing more commonly than simple gait tasks, such as forward walking. Despite the frequency of this debilitating and dangerous symptom, the brain mechanisms underlying freezing remain unclear. Gait imagery during functional magnetic resonance imaging permits investigation of brain activity associated with locomotion. We used this approach to better understand neural function during gait-like tasks in people with Parkinson disease who experience freezing- “FoG+” and people who do not experience freezing- ”FoG−“. Nine FoG+ and nine FoG− imagined complex gait tasks (turning, backward walking), simple gait tasks (forward walking), and quiet standing during measurements of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. Changes in BOLD signal (i.e. beta weights) during imagined walking and imagined standing were analyzed across FoG+ and FoG− groups in locomotor brain regions including supplementary motor area, globus pallidus, putamen, mesencephalic locomotor region, and cerebellar locomotor region. Beta weights in locomotor regions did not differ for complex tasks compared to simple tasks in either group. Across imagined gait tasks, FoG+ demonstrated significantly lower beta weights in the right globus pallidus with respect to FoG−. FoG+ also showed trends toward lower beta weights in other right-hemisphere locomotor regions (supplementary motor area, mesencephalic locomotor region). Finally, during imagined stand, FoG+ exhibited lower beta weights in the cerebellar locomotor region with respect to FoG−. These data support previous results suggesting FoG+ exhibit dysfunction in a number of cortical and subcortical regions, possibly with asymmetric dysfunction towards the right hemisphere. PMID:24595265

  16. Prediction of human gait parameters from temporal measures of foot-ground contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Investigation of the influence of human physical activity on bone functional adaptation requires long-term histories of gait-related ground reaction force (GRF). Towards a simpler portable GRF measurement, we hypothesized that: 1) the reciprocal of foot-ground contact time (1/tc); or 2) the reciprocal of stride-period-normalized contact time (T/tc) predict peak vertical and horizontal GRF, loading rates, and horizontal speed during gait. GRF data were collected from 24 subjects while they walked and ran at a variety of speeds. Linear regression and ANCOVA determined the dependence of gait parameters on 1/tc and T/tc, and prediction SE. All parameters were significantly correlated to 1/tc and T/tc. The closest pooled relationship existed between peak running vertical GRF and T/tc (r2 = 0.896; SE = 3.6%) and improved with subject-specific regression (r2 = 0.970; SE = 2.2%). We conclude that temporal measures can predict force parameters of gait and may represent an alternative to direct GRF measurements for determining daily histories of habitual lower limb loading quantities necessary to quantify a bone remodeling stimulus.

  17. Fault-tolerant locomotion of the hexapod robot.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Kim, J H

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme for fault detection and tolerance of the hexapod robot locomotion on even terrain. The fault stability margin is defined to represent potential stability which a gait can have in case a sudden fault event occurs to one leg. Based on this, the fault-tolerant quadruped periodic gaits of the hexapod walking over perfectly even terrain are derived. It is demonstrated that the derived quadruped gait is the optimal one the hexapod can have maintaining fault stability margin nonnegative and a geometric condition should be satisfied for the optimal locomotion. By this scheme, when one leg is in failure, the hexapod robot has the modified tripod gait to continue the optimal locomotion.

  18. Underwater gait analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Daniele; Pavan, Davide; Morris, Meg; Guiotto, Annamaria; Iansek, Robert; Fortuna, Sofia; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Sawacha, Zimi

    2017-02-01

    Although hydrotherapy is one of the physical therapies adopted to optimize gait rehabilitation in people with Parkinson disease, the quantitative measurement of gait-related outcomes has not been provided yet. This work aims to document the gait improvements in a group of parkinsonians after a hydrotherapy program through 2D and 3D underwater and on land gait analysis. Thirty-four parkinsonians and twenty-two controls were enrolled, divided into two different cohorts. In the first one, 2 groups of patients underwent underwater or land based walking training; controls underwent underwater walking training. Hence pre-treatment 2D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed, together with post-treatment on land gait analysis. Considering that current literature documented a reduced movement amplitude in parkinsonians across all lower limb joints in all movement planes, 3D underwater and on land gait analysis were performed on a second cohort of subjects (10 parkinsonians and 10 controls) who underwent underwater gait training. Baseline land 2D and 3D gait analysis in parkinsonians showed shorter stride length and slower speed than controls, in agreement with previous findings. Comparison between underwater and on land gait analysis showed reduction in stride length, cadence and speed on both parkinsonians and controls. Although patients who underwent underwater treatment exhibited significant changes on spatiotemporal parameters and sagittal plane lower limb kinematics, 3D gait analysis documented a significant (p<0.05) improvement in all movement planes. These data deserve attention for research directions promoting the optimal recovery and maintenance of walking ability. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Terminology and forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy; Young, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The use of appropriate terminology is a fundamental aspect of forensic gait analysis. The language used in forensic gait analysis is an amalgam of that used in clinical practice, podiatric biomechanics and the wider field of biomechanics. The result can often be a lack of consistency in the language used, the definitions used and the clarity of the message given. Examples include the use of 'gait' and 'walking' as synonymous terms, confusion between 'step' and 'stride', the mixing of anatomical, positional and pathological descriptors, and inability to describe appropriately movements of major body segments such as the torso. The purpose of this paper is to share the well-established definitions of the fundamental parameters of gait, common to all professions, and advocate their use in forensic gait analysis to establish commonality. The paper provides guidance on the selection and use of appropriate terminology in the description of gait in the forensic context. This paper considers the established definitions of the terms commonly used, identifies those terms which have the potential to confuse readers, and suggests a framework of terminology which should be utilised in forensic gait analysis. Copyright © 2015 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Wearable Device-Based Gait Recognition Using Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Images and a Convolutional Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongjia; Zhou, Suiping

    2017-02-28

    The widespread installation of inertial sensors in smartphones and other wearable devices provides a valuable opportunity to identify people by analyzing their gait patterns, for either cooperative or non-cooperative circumstances. However, it is still a challenging task to reliably extract discriminative features for gait recognition with noisy and complex data sequences collected from casually worn wearable devices like smartphones. To cope with this problem, we propose a novel image-based gait recognition approach using the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) without the need to manually extract discriminative features. The CNN's input image, which is encoded straightforwardly from the inertial sensor data sequences, is called Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Image (AE-GDI). AE-GDI is a new two-dimensional representation of gait dynamics, which is invariant to rotation and translation. The performance of the proposed approach in gait authentication and gait labeling is evaluated using two datasets: (1) the McGill University dataset, which is collected under realistic conditions; and (2) the Osaka University dataset with the largest number of subjects. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves competitive recognition accuracy over existing approaches and provides an effective parametric solution for identification among a large number of subjects by gait patterns.

  1. Wearable Device-Based Gait Recognition Using Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Images and a Convolutional Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongjia; Zhou, Suiping

    2017-01-01

    The widespread installation of inertial sensors in smartphones and other wearable devices provides a valuable opportunity to identify people by analyzing their gait patterns, for either cooperative or non-cooperative circumstances. However, it is still a challenging task to reliably extract discriminative features for gait recognition with noisy and complex data sequences collected from casually worn wearable devices like smartphones. To cope with this problem, we propose a novel image-based gait recognition approach using the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) without the need to manually extract discriminative features. The CNN’s input image, which is encoded straightforwardly from the inertial sensor data sequences, is called Angle Embedded Gait Dynamic Image (AE-GDI). AE-GDI is a new two-dimensional representation of gait dynamics, which is invariant to rotation and translation. The performance of the proposed approach in gait authentication and gait labeling is evaluated using two datasets: (1) the McGill University dataset, which is collected under realistic conditions; and (2) the Osaka University dataset with the largest number of subjects. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves competitive recognition accuracy over existing approaches and provides an effective parametric solution for identification among a large number of subjects by gait patterns. PMID:28264503

  2. Gait disorders in the elderly and dual task gait analysis: a new approach for identifying motor phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Auvinet, Bernard; Touzard, Claude; Montestruc, François; Delafond, Arnaud; Goeb, Vincent

    2017-01-31

    Gait disorders and gait analysis under single and dual-task conditions are topics of great interest, but very few studies have looked for the relevance of gait analysis under dual-task conditions in elderly people on the basis of a clinical approach. An observational study including 103 patients (mean age 76.3 ± 7.2, women 56%) suffering from gait disorders or memory impairment was conducted. Gait analysis under dual-task conditions was carried out for all patients. Brain MRI was performed in the absence of contra-indications. Three main gait variables were measured: walking speed, stride frequency, and stride regularity. For each gait variable, the dual task cost was computed and a quartile analysis was obtained. Nonparametric tests were used for all the comparisons (Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher or Chi 2 tests). Four clinical subgroups were identified: gait instability (45%), recurrent falls (29%), memory impairment (18%), and cautious gait (8%). The biomechanical severity of these subgroups was ordered according to walking speed and stride regularity under both conditions, from least to most serious as follows: memory impairment, gait instability, recurrent falls, cautious gait (p < 0.01 for walking speed, p = 0.05 for stride regularity). According to the established diagnoses of gait disorders, 5 main pathological subgroups were identified (musculoskeletal diseases (n = 11), vestibular diseases (n = 6), mild cognitive impairment (n = 24), central nervous system pathologies, (n = 51), and without diagnosis (n = 8)). The dual task cost for walking speed, stride frequency and stride regularity were different among these subgroups (p < 0.01). The subgroups mild cognitive impairment and central nervous system pathologies both showed together a higher dual task cost for each variable compared to the other subgroups combined (p = 0.01). The quartile analysis of dual task cost for stride frequency and stride regularity

  3. Gait variability and basal ganglia disorders: stride-to-stride variations of gait cycle timing in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Firtion, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The basal ganglia are thought to play an important role in regulating motor programs involved in gait and in the fluidity and sequencing of movement. We postulated that the ability to maintain a steady gait, with low stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing and its subphases, would be diminished with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). To test this hypothesis, we obtained quantitative measures of stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing in subjects with PD (n = 15), HD (n = 20), and disease-free controls (n = 16). All measures of gait variability were significantly increased in PD and HD. In subjects with PD and HD, gait variability measures were two and three times that observed in control subjects, respectively. The degree of gait variability correlated with disease severity. In contrast, gait speed was significantly lower in PD, but not in HD, and average gait cycle duration and the time spent in many subphases of the gait cycle were similar in control subjects, HD subjects, and PD subjects. These findings are consistent with a differential control of gait variability, speed, and average gait cycle timing that may have implications for understanding the role of the basal ganglia in locomotor control and for quantitatively assessing gait in clinical settings.

  4. [Subjective Gait Stability in the Elderly].

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Theresa; Lampe, Jasmin; Michalk, Katrin; Röder, Lotte; Munsch, Karoline; Marquardt, Jonas

    2017-07-10

    It can be assumed that the feeling of gait stability or gait instability in the elderly may be independent of a possible fear of falling or a history of falling when walking. Up to now, there has been a lack of spatiotemporal gait parameters for older people who subjectively feel secure when walking. The aim of the study is to analyse the distribution of various gait parameters for older people who subjectively feel secure when walking. In a cross-sectional study, the gait parameters stride time, step time, stride length, step length, double support, single support, and walking speed were measured using a Vicon three-dimensional motion capture system (Plug-In Gait Lower-Body Marker Set) in 31 healthy people aged 65 years and older (mean age 72 ± 3.54 years) who subjectively feel secure when walking. There was a homogeneous distribution in the gait parameters examined, with no abnormalities. The mean values have a low variance with narrow confidence intervals. This study provides evidence that people who subjectively feel secure when walking demonstrate similarly objective gait parameters..

  5. Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA): a method to characterize the spatiotemporal pattern of rat gait

    PubMed Central

    Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Pettengill, Travis R.; Turner, Sara M. F.; Streeter, Kristi A.; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J.; Fuller, David D.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2016-01-01

    While rodent gait analysis can quantify the behavioral consequences of disease, significant methodological differences exist between analysis platforms and little validation has been performed to understand or mitigate these sources of variance. By providing the algorithms used to quantify gait, open-source gait analysis software can be validated and used to explore methodological differences. Our group is introducing, for the first time, a fully-automated, open-source method for the characterization of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns, termed Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA). This study describes how AGATHA identifies gait events, validates AGATHA relative to manual digitization methods, and utilizes AGATHA to detect gait compensations in orthopaedic and spinal cord injury models. To validate AGATHA against manual digitization, results from videos of rodent gait, recorded at 1000 frames per second (fps), were compared. To assess one common source of variance (the effects of video frame rate), these 1000 fps videos were re-sampled to mimic several lower fps and compared again. While spatial variables were indistinguishable between AGATHA and manual digitization, low video frame rates resulted in temporal errors for both methods. At frame rates over 125 fps, AGATHA achieved a comparable accuracy and precision to manual digitization for all gait variables. Moreover, AGATHA detected unique gait changes in each injury model. These data demonstrate AGATHA is an accurate and precise platform for the analysis of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns. PMID:27554674

  6. Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA): A Method to Characterize the Spatiotemporal Pattern of Rat Gait.

    PubMed

    Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Pettengill, Travis R; Turner, Sara M F; Streeter, Kristi A; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Fuller, David D; Allen, Kyle D

    2017-03-01

    While rodent gait analysis can quantify the behavioral consequences of disease, significant methodological differences exist between analysis platforms and little validation has been performed to understand or mitigate these sources of variance. By providing the algorithms used to quantify gait, open-source gait analysis software can be validated and used to explore methodological differences. Our group is introducing, for the first time, a fully-automated, open-source method for the characterization of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns, termed Automated Gait Analysis Through Hues and Areas (AGATHA). This study describes how AGATHA identifies gait events, validates AGATHA relative to manual digitization methods, and utilizes AGATHA to detect gait compensations in orthopaedic and spinal cord injury models. To validate AGATHA against manual digitization, results from videos of rodent gait, recorded at 1000 frames per second (fps), were compared. To assess one common source of variance (the effects of video frame rate), these 1000 fps videos were re-sampled to mimic several lower fps and compared again. While spatial variables were indistinguishable between AGATHA and manual digitization, low video frame rates resulted in temporal errors for both methods. At frame rates over 125 fps, AGATHA achieved a comparable accuracy and precision to manual digitization for all gait variables. Moreover, AGATHA detected unique gait changes in each injury model. These data demonstrate AGATHA is an accurate and precise platform for the analysis of rodent spatiotemporal gait patterns.

  7. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  8. DMRT3 is associated with gait type in Mangalarga Marchador horses, but does not control gait ability.

    PubMed

    Patterson, L; Staiger, E A; Brooks, S A

    2015-04-01

    The Mangalarga Marchador (MM) is a Brazilian horse breed known for a uniquely smooth gait. A recent publication described a mutation in the DMRT3 gene that the authors claim controls the ability to perform lateral patterned gaits (Andersson et al. 2012). We tested 81 MM samples for the DMRT3 mutation using extracted DNA from hair bulbs using a novel RFLP. Horses were phenotypically categorized by their gait type (batida or picada), as recorded by the Brazilian Mangalarga Marchador Breeders Association (ABCCMM). Statistical analysis using the plink toolset (Purcell, 2007) revealed significant association between gait type and the DMRT3 mutation (P = 2.3e-22). Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium suggests that selective pressure for gait type is altering allele frequencies in this breed (P = 1.00e-5). These results indicate that this polymorphism may be useful for genotype-assisted selection for gait type within this breed. As both batida and picada MM horses can perform lateral gaits, the DMRT3 mutation is not the only locus responsible for the lateral gait pattern. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  9. Association of Dual-Task Gait With Incident Dementia in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results From the Gait and Brain Study.

    PubMed

    Montero-Odasso, Manuel M; Sarquis-Adamson, Yanina; Speechley, Mark; Borrie, Michael J; Hachinski, Vladimir C; Wells, Jennie; Riccio, Patricia M; Schapira, Marcelo; Sejdic, Ervin; Camicioli, Richard M; Bartha, Robert; McIlroy, William E; Muir-Hunter, Susan

    2017-07-01

    Gait performance is affected by neurodegeneration in aging and has the potential to be used as a clinical marker for progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. A dual-task gait test evaluating the cognitive-motor interface may predict dementia progression in older adults with MCI. To determine whether a dual-task gait test is associated with incident dementia in MCI. The Gait and Brain Study is an ongoing prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older adults that enrolled 112 older adults with MCI. Participants were followed up for 6 years, with biannual visits including neurologic, cognitive, and gait assessments. Data were collected from July 2007 to March 2016. Incident all-cause dementia was the main outcome measure, and single- and dual-task gait velocity and dual-task gait costs were the independent variables. A neuropsychological test battery was used to assess cognition. Gait velocity was recorded under single-task and 3 separate dual-task conditions using an electronic walkway. Dual-task gait cost was defined as the percentage change between single- and dual-task gait velocities: ([single-task gait velocity - dual-task gait velocity]/ single-task gait velocity) × 100. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the association between risk of progression to dementia and the independent variables, adjusted for age, sex, education, comorbidities, and cognition. Among 112 study participants with MCI, mean (SD) age was 76.6 (6.9) years, 55 were women (49.1%), and 27 progressed to dementia (24.1%), with an incidence rate of 121 per 1000 person-years. Slow single-task gait velocity (<0.8 m/second) was not associated with progression to dementia (hazard ratio [HR], 3.41; 95% CI, 0.99-11.71; P = .05)while high dual-task gait cost while counting backward (HR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.57-9.15; P = .003) and naming animals (HR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.04-5.59; P = .04) were associated with dementia progression (incidence rate, 155 per

  10. Does robot-assisted gait training ameliorate gait abnormalities in multiple sclerosis? A pilot randomized-control trial.

    PubMed

    Straudi, S; Benedetti, M G; Venturini, E; Manca, M; Foti, C; Basaglia, N

    2013-01-01

    Gait disorders are common in multiple sclerosis (MS) and lead to a progressive reduction of function and quality of life. Test the effects of robot-assisted gait rehabilitation in MS subjects through a pilot randomized-controlled study. We enrolled MS subjects with Expanded Disability Status Scale scores within 4.5-6.5. The experimental group received 12 robot-assisted gait training sessions over 6 weeks. The control group received the same amount of conventional physiotherapy. Outcomes measures were both biomechanical assessment of gait, including kinematics and spatio-temporal parameters, and clinical test of walking endurance (six-minute walk test) and mobility (Up and Go Test). 16 subjects (n = 8 experimental group, n = 8 control group) were included in the final analysis. At baseline the two groups were similar in all variables, except for step length. Data showed walking endurance, as well as spatio-temporal gait parameters improvements after robot-assisted gait training. Pelvic antiversion and reduced hip extension during terminal stance ameliorated after aforementioned intervention. Robot-assisted gait training seems to be effective in increasing walking competency in MS subjects. Moreover, it could be helpful in restoring the kinematic of the hip and pelvis.

  11. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0870 TITLE: Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool...October 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual Report 3. DATES COVERED 20 Sep 2013 to 19 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training...produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities providing care

  12. Evaluation and management of crouch gait.

    PubMed

    Kedem, Paz; Scher, David M

    2016-02-01

    Crouch gait is defined as excessive ankle dorsiflexion, knee and hip flexion during the stance phase. This gait disorder is common among patients with cerebral palsy. The present article brings an up-to-date literature review on the pathoanatomy, natural history, and treatment of this frequent gait abnormality. Hamstrings are often not shortened in patients with crouch. Patella alta must be addressed if surgery is performed. Surgical correction of joint contractures and lever arm dysfunction can be effectively achieved through a single-event multilevel surgery. Crouch gait is a common gait deviation, often seen among ambulatory diplegic and quadriplegic patients, once they reach the pubertal spurt, when weak muscles can no longer support a toe walking pattern because of rapidly increased weight. This form of gait is highly ineffective and might compromise walking ability over time. The anterior knee is overloaded; pain, extensor mechanism failure, and arthritis might develop. Its progressive nature often requires surgical intervention. The cause of crouch gait is multifactorial, and surgery should be tailored to meet the individual's specific anatomic and physiologic abnormalities.

  13. Self-perceived gait stability modulates the effect of daily life gait quality on prospective falls in older adults.

    PubMed

    Weijer, R H A; Hoozemans, M J M; van Dieën, J H; Pijnappels, M

    2018-05-01

    Quality of gait during daily life activities and perceived gait stability are both independent risk factors for future falls in older adults. We investigated whether perceived gait stability modulates the association between gait quality and falling in older adults. In this prospective cohort study, we used one-week daily-life trunk acceleration data of 272 adults over 65 years of age. Sample entropy (SE) of the 3D acceleration signals was calculated to quantify daily life gait quality. To quantify perceived gait stability, the level of concern about falling was assessed using the Falls Efficacy Scale international (FES-I) questionnaire and step length, estimated from the accelerometer data. A fall calendar was used to record fall incidence during a six-month follow up period. Logistic regression analyses were performed to study the association between falling and SE, step length or FES-I score, and their interactions. High (i.e., poor) SE in vertical direction was significantly associated with falling. FES-I scores significantly modulated this association, whereas step length did not. Subgroup analyses based on FES-I scores showed that high SE in the vertical direction was a risk factor for falls only in older adults who had a high (i.e. poor) FES-I score. In conclusion, perceived gait stability modulates the association between gait quality and falls in older adults such that an association between gait quality and falling is only present when perceived gait stability is poor. The results of the present study indicate that the effectiveness of interventions for fall prevention, aimed at improving gait quality, may be affected by a modulating effect of perceived gait stability. Results indicate that interventions to reduce falls in older adults might sort most effectiveness in populations with both a poor physiological and psychological status. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Freezing of Gait in Parkinson’s Disease: An Overload Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Eric N.; Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A.; Almeida, Quincy J.

    2015-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is arguably the most severe symptom associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and often occurs while performing dual tasks or approaching narrowed and cluttered spaces. While it is well known that visual cues alleviate FOG, it is not clear if this effect may be the result of cognitive or sensorimotor mechanisms. Nevertheless, the role of vision may be a critical link that might allow us to disentangle this question. Gaze behaviour has yet to be carefully investigated while freezers approach narrow spaces, thus the overall objective of this study was to explore the interaction between cognitive and sensory-perceptual influences on FOG. In experiment #1, if cognitive load is the underlying factor leading to FOG, then one might expect that a dual-task would elicit FOG episodes even in the presence of visual cues, since the load on attention would interfere with utilization of visual cues. Alternatively, if visual cues alleviate gait despite performance of a dual-task, then it may be more probable that sensory mechanisms are at play. In compliment to this, the aim of experiment#2 was to further challenge the sensory systems, by removing vision of the lower-limbs and thereby forcing participants to rely on other forms of sensory feedback rather than vision while walking toward the narrow space. Spatiotemporal aspects of gait, percentage of gaze fixation frequency and duration, as well as skin conductance levels were measured in freezers and non-freezers across both experiments. Results from experiment#1 indicated that although freezers and non-freezers both walked with worse gait while performing the dual-task, in freezers, gait was relieved by visual cues regardless of whether the cognitive demands of the dual-task were present. At baseline and while dual-tasking, freezers demonstrated a gaze behaviour that neglected the doorway and instead focused primarily on the pathway, a strategy that non-freezers adopted only when performing the dual

  15. Quantifying Parkinson's disease progression by simulating gait patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, Luisa; Martínez, Fabio; Atehortúa, Angélica; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Modern rehabilitation protocols of most neurodegenerative diseases, in particular the Parkinson Disease, rely on a clinical analysis of gait patterns. Currently, such analysis is highly dependent on both the examiner expertise and the type of evaluation. Development of evaluation methods with objective measures is then crucial. Physical models arise as a powerful alternative to quantify movement patterns and to emulate the progression and performance of specific treatments. This work introduces a novel quantification of the Parkinson disease progression using a physical model that accurately represents the main gait biomarker, the body Center of Gravity (CoG). The model tracks the whole gait cycle by a coupled double inverted pendulum that emulates the leg swinging for the single support phase and by a damper-spring System (SDP) that recreates both legs in contact with the ground for the double phase. The patterns generated by the proposed model are compared with actual ones learned from 24 subjects in stages 2,3, and 4. The evaluation performed demonstrates a better performance of the proposed model when compared with a baseline model(SP) composed of a coupled double pendulum and a mass-spring system. The Frechet distance measured differences between model estimations and real trajectories, showing for stages 2, 3 and 4 distances of 0.137, 0.155, 0.38 for the baseline and 0.07, 0.09, 0.29 for the proposed method.

  16. Teaching retirement financial literacy in an undergraduate gerontology classroom: broadening the concept of the tripod or three-legged stool of retirement income utilizing active learning.

    PubMed

    Baker, Hallie E; Brown, Pamela Pitman

    2015-01-01

    The three-legged stool concept is widely used in gerontological and geriatric education as an explanation on how one should fiscally approach his or her retirement. Financial managers, planners, retirees, business owners, even the Social Security Administration uses this metaphor of fiscal soundness in retirement planning. Gerontologists are moving away from the "tripod of retirement income" and "three-legged stool" term, as more often market work is needed for financial security. This activity focuses on the tripod or three-legged stool concepts of retirement planning using active learning, allowing the students to work collaboratively in a group, reflect upon the activity, and most importantly have fun. The game also allows for an expansion of the tripod concepts into the four pillars of economic security, broaching the use of personal assets and the possible need for longer employment. Game scenarios also emphasize macro- and microlevel forces, such as race, gender, health status, education, or marital status, which can influence timing of retirement or the level of retirement income available. The authors include instructions on how to set up the learning experience including worksheets, as well as reflection questions posed throughout the process.

  17. Spatio-temporal gait disorder and gait fatigue index in a six-minute walk test in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Jimenez, Jose; Latorre-Roman, Pedro; Santos-Campos, Maria; Orantes-Gonzalez, Eva; Soto-Hermoso, Victor M

    2016-03-01

    Gait disorders in fibromyalgia patients affect several gait parameters and different muscle recruitment patterns. The aim of this study was to assess the gait differences observed during a six-minute walk test between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. Forty-eight women with fibromyalgia and 15 healthy women were evaluated. Fibromyalgia patients met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for fibromyalgia selected of an ambulatory care. Both patients and controls had a negative history of musculoskeletal disease, neurological disorders, and gait abnormalities. The 15 controls were healthy women matched to the patients in age, height and body weight. Spatio-temporal gait variables and the rate of perceived exertion during the six-minute walk test (all subjects) and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (fibromyalgia subjects) were evaluated. All walking sets on the GaitRITE were collected and the gait variables were selected at three stages during the six-minute walk test: two sets at the beginning, two sets at 3 min and two sets at the end of the test. In addition, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire was used for the fibromyalgia patients. Fibromyalgia patients showed a significant decrease in all spatio-temporal gait variables at each of the three stages and had a lower walk distance covered in the six-minute walk test and higher rate of perceived exertion. No correlations were found between the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and gait variables. The fibromyalgia and control subjects showed lower gait fatigue indices between the middle and last stages. Gait analysis during a six-minute walk test is a good tool to assess the fatigue and physical symptoms of patients with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Research on gait-based human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youguo

    Gait recognition refers to automatic identification of individual based on his/her style of walking. This paper proposes a gait recognition method based on Continuous Hidden Markov Model with Mixture of Gaussians(G-CHMM). First, we initialize a Gaussian mix model for training image sequence with K-means algorithm, then train the HMM parameters using a Baum-Welch algorithm. These gait feature sequences can be trained and obtain a Continuous HMM for every person, therefore, the 7 key frames and the obtained HMM can represent each person's gait sequence. Finally, the recognition is achieved by Front algorithm. The experiments made on CASIA gait databases obtain comparatively high correction identification ratio and comparatively strong robustness for variety of bodily angle.

  19. Compressive tibiofemoral force during crouch gait.

    PubMed

    Steele, Katherine M; Demers, Matthew S; Schwartz, Michael H; Delp, Scott L

    2012-04-01

    Crouch gait, a common walking pattern in individuals with cerebral palsy, is characterized by excessive flexion of the hip and knee. Many subjects with crouch gait experience knee pain, perhaps because of elevated muscle forces and joint loading. The goal of this study was to examine how muscle forces and compressive tibiofemoral force change with the increasing knee flexion associated with crouch gait. Muscle forces and tibiofemoral force were estimated for three unimpaired children and nine children with cerebral palsy who walked with varying degrees of knee flexion. We scaled a generic musculoskeletal model to each subject and used the model to estimate muscle forces and compressive tibiofemoral forces during walking. Mild crouch gait (minimum knee flexion 20-35°) produced a peak compressive tibiofemoral force similar to unimpaired walking; however, severe crouch gait (minimum knee flexion>50°) increased the peak force to greater than 6 times body-weight, more than double the load experienced during unimpaired gait. This increase in compressive tibiofemoral force was primarily due to increases in quadriceps force during crouch gait, which increased quadratically with average stance phase knee flexion (i.e., crouch severity). Increased quadriceps force contributes to larger tibiofemoral and patellofemoral loading which may contribute to knee pain in individuals with crouch gait. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a novel virtual reality gait intervention.

    PubMed

    Boone, Anna E; Foreman, Matthew H; Engsberg, Jack R

    2017-02-01

    Improving gait speed and kinematics can be a time consuming and tiresome process. We hypothesize that incorporating virtual reality videogame play into variable improvement goals will improve levels of enjoyment and motivation and lead to improved gait performance. To develop a feasible, engaging, VR gait intervention for improving gait variables. Completing this investigation involved four steps: 1) identify gait variables that could be manipulated to improve gait speed and kinematics using the Microsoft Kinect and free software, 2) identify free internet videogames that could successfully manipulate the chosen gait variables, 3) experimentally evaluate the ability of the videogames and software to manipulate the gait variables, and 4) evaluate the enjoyment and motivation from a small sample of persons without disability. The Kinect sensor was able to detect stride length, cadence, and joint angles. FAAST software was able to identify predetermined gait variable thresholds and use the thresholds to play free online videogames. Videogames that involved continuous pressing of a keyboard key were found to be most appropriate for manipulating the gait variables. Five participants without disability evaluated the effectiveness for modifying the gait variables and enjoyment and motivation during play. Participants were able to modify gait variables to permit successful videogame play. Motivation and enjoyment were high. A clinically feasible and engaging virtual intervention for improving gait speed and kinematics has been developed and initially tested. It may provide an engaging avenue for achieving thousands of repetitions necessary for neural plastic changes and improved gait. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Brain Activity during Mental Imagery of Gait Versus Gait-Like Plantar Stimulation: A Novel Combined Functional MRI Paradigm to Better Understand Cerebral Gait Control.

    PubMed

    Labriffe, Matthieu; Annweiler, Cédric; Amirova, Liubov E; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Ter Minassian, Aram; Leiber, Louis-Marie; Beauchet, Olivier; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Dinomais, Mickaël

    2017-01-01

    Human locomotion is a complex sensorimotor behavior whose central control remains difficult to explore using neuroimaging method due to technical constraints, notably the impossibility to walk with a scanner on the head and/or to walk for real inside current scanners. The aim of this functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study was to analyze interactions between two paradigms to investigate the brain gait control network: (1) mental imagery of gait, and (2) passive mechanical stimulation of the plantar surface of the foot with the Korvit boots. The Korvit stimulator was used through two different modes, namely an organized ("gait like") sequence and a destructured (chaotic) pattern. Eighteen right-handed young healthy volunteers were recruited (mean age, 27 ± 4.7 years). Mental imagery activated a broad neuronal network including the supplementary motor area-proper (SMA-proper), pre-SMA, the dorsal premotor cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula, and precuneus/superior parietal areas. The mechanical plantar stimulation activated the primary sensorimotor cortex and secondary somatosensory cortex bilaterally. The paradigms generated statistically common areas of activity, notably bilateral SMA-proper and right pre-SMA, highlighting the potential key role of SMA in gait control. There was no difference between the organized and chaotic Korvit sequences, highlighting the difficulty of developing a walking-specific plantar stimulation paradigm. In conclusion, this combined-fMRI paradigm combining mental imagery and gait-like plantar stimulation provides complementary information regarding gait-related brain activity and appears useful for the assessment of high-level gait control.

  2. Modeling and simulation of normal and hemiparetic gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengas, Lely A.; Camargo, Esperanza; Sanchez, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Gait is the collective term for the two types of bipedal locomotion, walking and running. This paper is focused on walking. The analysis of human gait is of interest to many different disciplines, including biomechanics, human-movement science, rehabilitation and medicine in general. Here we present a new model that is capable of reproducing the properties of walking, normal and pathological. The aim of this paper is to establish the biomechanical principles that underlie human walking by using Lagrange method. The constraint forces of Rayleigh dissipation function, through which to consider the effect on the tissues in the gait, are included. Depending on the value of the factor present in the Rayleigh dissipation function, both normal and pathological gait can be simulated. First of all, we apply it in the normal gait and then in the permanent hemiparetic gait. Anthropometric data of adult person are used by simulation, and it is possible to use anthropometric data for children but is necessary to consider existing table of anthropometric data. Validation of these models includes simulations of passive dynamic gait that walk on level ground. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective of gait analysis, focusing on the kinematics and kinetics of gait. There have been studies and simulations to show normal human gait, but few of them have focused on abnormal, especially hemiparetic gait. Quantitative comparisons of the model predictions with gait measurements show that the model can reproduce the significant characteristics of normal gait.

  3. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  4. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-06

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments.

  5. Gait COP trajectory of left side hip-dislocation and scoliotic patient using ankle-foot orthoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Albert K.; Alrikabi, Redha; Milburn, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Plantar pressure-sensing mats and insole plantar sensor pads are ideal low-cost alternatives to force plates for capturing plantar COP excursion during gait. The acquired COP traces, in the form of pedobarographic images are favored by many clinicians and allied health professionals for evaluation of foot loading and balance in relation to foot biomechanics, foot injury, foot deformation, and foot ulceration. Researchers have recommended the use of COP trace for the biomechanical study of the deformed foot and lower-limb to improve orthosis design and testing. A correctly designed orthoses improves mobility and reduces pain in the foot, lower limb and lower spine region during gait. The research was carried out to evaluate the performance of two types of orthosis, namely: a custom-molded orthosis and an over-the-counter molded orthosis to determine the quality of gait of an adult scoliotic patient. COP trace patterns were compared with those of a healthy adult and showed the design of the custom-molded orthosis resulted in an improved quality of movements and provided enhanced stability for the deformed left foot during gait.

  6. Optics in gait analysis and anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Moreno, Alejandra Alicia

    2013-11-01

    Since antiquity, human gait has been studied to understand human movement, the kind of gait, in some cases, can cause musculoskeletal disorders or other health problems; in addition, also from antiquity, anthropometry has been important for the design of human items such as workspaces, tools, garments, among others. Nowadays, thanks to the development of optics and electronics, more accurate studies of gait and anthropometry can be developed. This work will describe the most important parameters for gait analysis, anthropometry and the optical systems used.

  7. Gait and balance disorders in older adults.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Brooke

    2010-07-01

    Gait and balance disorders are common in older adults and are a major cause of falls in this population. They are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, as well as reduced level of function. Common causes include arthritis and orthostatic hypotension; however, most gait and balance disorders involve multiple contributing factors. Most changes in gait are related to underlying medical conditions and should not be considered an inevitable consequence of aging. Physicians caring for older patients should ask at least annually about falls, and should ask about or examine for difficulties with gait and balance at least once. For older adults who report a fall, physicians should ask about difficulties with gait and balance, and should observe for any gait or balance dysfunctions. The Timed Up and Go test is a fast and reliable diagnostic tool. Persons who have difficulty or demonstrate unsteadiness performing the Timed Up and Go test require further assessment, usually with a physical therapist, to help elucidate gait impairments and related functional limitations. The most effective strategy for falls prevention involves a multifactorial evaluation followed by targeted interventions for identified contributing factors. Evidence on the effectiveness of interventions for gait and balance disorders is limited because of the lack of standardized outcome measures determining gait and balance abilities. However, effective options for patients with gait and balance disorders include exercise and physical therapy. (c) 2010 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  8. Neuromorphic walking gait control.

    PubMed

    Still, Susanne; Hepp, Klaus; Douglas, Rodney J

    2006-03-01

    We present a neuromorphic pattern generator for controlling the walking gaits of four-legged robots which is inspired by central pattern generators found in the nervous system and which is implemented as a very large scale integrated (VLSI) chip. The chip contains oscillator circuits that mimic the output of motor neurons in a strongly simplified way. We show that four coupled oscillators can produce rhythmic patterns with phase relationships that are appropriate to generate all four-legged animal walking gaits. These phase relationships together with frequency and duty cycle of the oscillators determine the walking behavior of a robot driven by the chip, and they depend on a small set of stationary bias voltages. We give analytic expressions for these dependencies. This chip reduces the complex, dynamic inter-leg control problem associated with walking gait generation to the problem of setting a few stationary parameters. It provides a compact and low power solution for walking gait control in robots.

  9. Gait recognition based on integral outline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Guan; Fang, Lv

    2017-02-01

    Biometric identification technology replaces traditional security technology, which has become a trend, and gait recognition also has become a hot spot of research because its feature is difficult to imitate and theft. This paper presents a gait recognition system based on integral outline of human body. The system has three important aspects: the preprocessing of gait image, feature extraction and classification. Finally, using a method of polling to evaluate the performance of the system, and summarizing the problems existing in the gait recognition and the direction of development in the future.

  10. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Role of functional groups and binding geometry on carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Cacciarini, Martina; Nativi, Cristina; Norcini, Martina; Staderini, Samuele; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-02-21

    The contribution from several H-bonding groups and the impact of geometric requirements on the binding ability of benzene-based tripodal receptors toward carbohydrates have been investigated by measuring the affinity of a set of structures toward octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, selected as a representative monosaccharide. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that a judicious choice of correct geometry and appropriate functional groups is critical to achieve the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions required for an effective carbohydrate recognition.

  11. Development of a compact, sealless, tripod supported, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yuhki, A; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a tripod supported sealless centrifugal blood pump was designed and fabricated for implantable application using a specially designed DC brushless motor. The tripod structure consists of 3 ceramic balls mounted at the bottom surface of the impeller moving in a polyethylene groove incorporated at the bottom pump casing. The follower magnet inside the impeller is coupled to the driver magnet of the motor outside the bottom pump casing, thus allowing the impeller to slide-rotate in the polyethylene groove as the motor turns. The pump driver has a weight of 230 g and a diameter of 60 mm. The acrylic pump housing has a weight of 220 g with the priming volume of 25 ml. At the pump rpm of 1,000 to 2,200, the generated head pressure ranged from 30 to 150 mm Hg with the maximum system efficiency being 12%. When the prototype pump was used in the pulsatile mock loop to assist the ventricle from its apex to the aorta, a strong correlation was obtained between the motor current and bypass flow waveforms. The waveform deformation index (WDI), defined as the ratio of the fundamental to the higher order harmonics of the motor current power spectral density, was computed to possibly detect the suction occurring inside the ventricle due to the prototype centrifugal pump. When the WDI was kept under the value of 0.20 by adjusting the motor rpm, it was successful in suppressing the suction due to the centrifugal pump in the ventricle. The prototype sealless, centrifugal pump together with the control method based on the motor current waveform analysis may offer an intermediate support of the failing left or right ventricle bridging to heart transplantation.

  12. Accuracy and reliability of observational gait analysis data: judgments of push-off in gait after stroke.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Jennifer L; Goldie, Patricia A; Greenwood, Kenneth M; Olney, Sandra J

    2003-02-01

    Physical therapists routinely observe gait in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of observational assessments of push-off in gait after stroke. Eighteen physical therapists and 11 subjects with hemiplegia following a stroke participated in the study. Measurements of ankle power generation were obtained from subjects following stroke using a gait analysis system. Concurrent videotaped gait performances were observed by the physical therapists on 2 occasions. Ankle power generation at push-off was scored as either normal or abnormal using two 11-point rating scales. These observational ratings were correlated with the measurements of peak ankle power generation. A high correlation was obtained between the observational ratings and the measurements of ankle power generation (mean Pearson r=.84). Interobserver reliability was moderately high (mean intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC (2,1)]=.76). Intraobserver reliability also was high, with a mean ICC (2,1) of.89 obtained. Physical therapists were able to make accurate and reliable judgments of push-off in videotaped gait of subjects following stroke using observational assessment. Further research is indicated to explore the accuracy and reliability of data obtained with observational gait analysis as it occurs in clinical practice.

  13. Central control of interlimb coordination and speed‐dependent gait expression in quadrupeds

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Simon M.; Wilshin, Simon D.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    D and V0V sub‐types) providing left–right alternation, and conditional V3 CINs promoting left–right synchronization. Fore and hind RGs mutually inhibited each other. We demonstrate that linearly increasing excitatory drives to the RGs and V3 CINs can produce a progressive increase in the locomotor speed accompanied by sequential changes of gaits from walk to trot and to gallop and bound. The model closely reproduces and suggests explanations for the speed‐dependent gait expression observed in vivo in intact mice and in mutants lacking V0V or all V0 CINs. Specifically, trot is not expressed after removal of V0V CINs, and only bound is expressed after removal of all V0 CINs. The model provides important insights into the organization of spinal circuits and neural control of locomotion. PMID:27633893

  14. Anti-Dementia Drugs, Gait Performance and Mental Imagery of Gait: A Non-Randomized Open-Label Trial.

    PubMed

    Beauchet, Olivier; Barden, John; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Chester, Victoria L; Annweiler, Cedric; Szturm, Tony; Grenier, Sébastien; Léonard, Guillaume; Bherer, Louis; Allali, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of anti-dementia drugs (i.e., acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists) on gait performance. Past studies have focused on the stride time (i.e., gait cycle duration) but not on the mental imagery of gait. To compare mental imagery of gait and spatiotemporal gait parameters in patients with dementia [i.e., Alzheimer's disease (AD) and non-AD] before and after the use of anti-dementia drugs (i.e., acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine) and in controls (i.e., patients with dementia who did not take anti-dementia drugs). A total of 112 patients (mean age 82.5 ± 4.2 years, 68.8 % female) with mild-to-moderate AD and non-AD dementia were included in this non-randomized open-label trial (n = 56 in the Intervention group, and n = 56 in the Control group matched for age, sex, and stage and type of dementia) nested in a cohort study (mean follow-up 238.5 ± 79.8 days). Mental imagery of gait was assessed with the actual and imagined Timed Up and Go tests (aTUG and iTUG) and the difference between aTUG and iTUG (i.e., delta-TUG). Spatiotemporal gait parameters were measured with the GAITRite(®) system during normal walking. Participants in the Intervention group had a longer iTUG time (p < 0.001) and a lower delta-TUG value (p = 0.001) at the follow-up compared with those in the Control group. There was a significant increase in iTUG (p = 0.001) and decrease in delta-TUG (p < 0.001) from baseline to the follow-up only in the Intervention group. Multiple linear regression showed that the use of anti-dementia drugs was associated with a longer iTUG time and a lower delta-TUG value (best performance, p < 0.002). Our findings showed an improvement in mental imagery of gait with the use of anti-dementia drugs, but no changes in actual gait performance. NCT01315704.

  15. Effectiveness of surgical and non-surgical management of crouch gait in cerebral palsy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Galey, Scott A; Lerner, Zachary F; Bulea, Thomas C; Zimbler, Seymour; Damiano, Diane L

    2017-05-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a prevalent group of neuromotor disorders caused by early injury to brain regions or pathways that control movement. Patients with CP exhibit a range of functional motor disabilities and pathologic gait patterns. Crouch gait, characterized by increased knee flexion throughout stance, is a common gait pattern in CP that increases energy costs of walking and contributes to ambulatory decline. Our aim was to perform the first systematic literature review on the effectiveness of interventions utilized to ameliorate crouch gait in CP. Comprehensive searches of five medical databases yielded 38 papers with 30 focused on orthopaedic management. Evidence supports the use of initial hamstring lengthenings and rectus femoris transfers, where indicated, for improving objective gait measures with limited data on improving gait speed or gross motor function. In contrast, evidence argues against hamstring transfers and revision hamstring lengthening, with recent interest in more technically demanding corrective procedures. Only eight studies evaluated alternatives to surgery, specifically strength training, botulinum toxin or orthoses, with inconsistent and/or short-lived results. Although crouch in CP is recognized clinically as a complex multi-joint, multi-planar gait disorder, this review largely failed to identify interventions beyond those which directly address sagittal plane knee motion, indicating a major knowledge gap. Quality of existing data was notably weak, with few studies properly controlled or adequately sized. Outcomes from specific procedures are confounded by multilevel surgeries. Successful longer term strategies to prevent worsening of crouch and subsequent functional decline are needed. Systematic review. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Virtual gait training for children with cerebral palsy using the Lokomat gait orthosis.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alexander; Wellner, Mathias; Köneke, Susan; Meyer-Heim, Andreas; Lünenburger, Lars; Riener, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Lokomat gait orthosis was developed in the Spinal Cord Injury Center at the University Hospital Balgrist Zurich and provides automatic gait training for patients with neurological gait impairments, such as Cerebral Palsy (CP). Each patient undergoes a task-oriented Lokomat rehabilitation training program via a virtual reality setup. In four virtual scenarios, the patient is able to exercise tasks such as wading through water, playing soccer, overstepping obstacles or training in a street scenario, each task offering varying levels of difficulty. Patients provided positive feedback in reference to the utilized haptic method, specifically addressing the sufficient degree of realism. In a single case study, we verified the task difficulty.

  17. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Exoskeleton-assisted gait training to improve gait in individuals with spinal cord injury: a pilot randomized study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Afzal, Taimoor; Berliner, Jeffrey; Francisco, Gerard E

    2018-01-01

    Robotic wearable exoskeletons have been utilized as a gait training device in persons with spinal cord injury. This pilot study investigated the feasibility of offering exoskeleton-assisted gait training (EGT) on gait in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) in preparation for a phase III RCT. The objective was to assess treatment reliability and potential efficacy of EGT and conventional physical therapy (CPT). Forty-four individuals were screened, and 13 were eligible to participate in the study. Nine participants consented and were randomly assigned to receive either EGT or CPT with focus on gait. Subjects received EGT or CPT, five sessions a week (1 h/session daily) for 3 weeks. American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS), 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and gait characteristics including stride and step length, cadence and stance, and swing phase durations were assessed at the pre- and immediate post- training. Mean difference estimates with 95% confidence intervals were used to analyze the differences. After training, improvement was observed in the 6MWT for the EGT group. The CPT group showed significant improvement in the TUG test. Both the EGT and the CPT groups showed significant increase in the right step length. EGT group also showed improvement in the stride length. EGT could be applied to individuals with iSCI to facilitate gait recovery. The subjects were able to tolerate the treatment; however, exoskeleton size range may be a limiting factor in recruiting larger cohort of patients. Future studies with larger sample size are needed to investigate the effectiveness and efficacy of exoskeleton-assisted gait training as single gait training and combined with other gait training strategies. Clinicaltrials.org, NCT03011099, retrospectively registered on January 3, 2017.

  19. Inertial Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sprager, Sebastijan; Juric, Matjaz B.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inertial sensors have become widely used in the research of wearable gait analysis due to several factors, such as being easy-to-use and low-cost. Considering the fact that each individual has a unique way of walking, inertial sensors can be applied to the problem of gait recognition where assessed gait can be interpreted as a biometric trait. Thus, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has a great potential to play an important role in many security-related applications. Since inertial sensors are included in smart devices that are nowadays present at every step, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has become very attractive and emerging field of research that has provided many interesting discoveries recently. This paper provides a thorough and systematic review of current state-of-the-art in this field of research. Review procedure has revealed that the latest advanced inertial sensor-based gait recognition approaches are able to sufficiently recognise the users when relying on inertial data obtained during gait by single commercially available smart device in controlled circumstances, including fixed placement and small variations in gait. Furthermore, these approaches have also revealed considerable breakthrough by realistic use in uncontrolled circumstances, showing great potential for their further development and wide applicability. PMID:26340634

  20. Overground robot assisted gait trainer for the treatment of drug-resistant freezing of gait in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Pilleri, Manuela; Weis, Luca; Zabeo, Letizia; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Biundo, Roberta; Facchini, Silvia; Rossi, Simonetta; Masiero, Stefano; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-08-15

    Freezing of Gait (FOG) is a frequent and disabling feature of Parkinson disease (PD). Gait rehabilitation assisted by electromechanical devices, such as training on treadmill associated with sensory cues or assisted by gait orthosis have been shown to improve FOG. Overground robot assisted gait training (RGT) has been recently tested in patients with PD with improvement of several gait parameters. We here evaluated the effectiveness of RGT on FOG severity and gait abnormalities in PD patients. Eighteen patients with FOG resistant to dopaminergic medications were treated with 15 sessions of RGT and underwent an extensive clinical evaluation before and after treatment. The main outcome measures were FOG questionnaire (FOGQ) global score and specific tasks for gait assessment, namely 10 meter walking test (10 MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and 360° narrow turns (360 NT). Balance was also evaluated through Fear of Falling Efficacy Scale (FFES), assessing self perceived stability and Berg Balance Scale (BBS), for objective examination. After treatment, FOGQ score was significantly reduced (P=0.023). We also found a significant reduction of time needed to complete TUG, 10 MWT, and 360 NT (P=0.009, 0.004 and 0.04, respectively). By contrast the number of steps and the number of freezing episodes recorded at each gait task did not change. FFES and BBS scores also improved, with positive repercussions on performance on daily activity and quality of life. Our results indicate that RGT is a useful strategy for the treatment of drug refractory FOG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rugged Walking Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed walking-beam robot simpler and more rugged than articulated-leg walkers. Requires less data processing, and uses power more efficiently. Includes pair of tripods, one nested in other. Inner tripod holds power supplies, communication equipment, computers, instrumentation, sampling arms, and articulated sensor turrets. Outer tripod holds mast on which antennas for communication with remote control site and video cameras for viewing local and distant terrain mounted. Propels itself by raising, translating, and lowering tripods in alternation. Steers itself by rotating raised tripod on turntable.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial study of tripodal tris-(N-benzoylthioureido)ethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Adan, Dalina; Yamin, Bohari; Leng, Ong Wei

    A new tripodal tris-(N-benzoylthiouredoethyl)amine has been successfully synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic technique such as FTIR, ESI MS, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. The microanalysis data is in a good agreement with the expected molecular formula. The {sup 1}H NMR chemical shift for both amide and thioamide proton are at lower field than their normal value indicates the presence of the hydrogen bond between the carbonyl oxygen atom and thioamide hydrogen. This is possible when the benzoyl group adopt a trans configuration againts thione group along the C-N bond. The compound has been tested for antibacterial activity against threemore » selected bacteria namely Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomanas aeroginosa but there is no significant activities observed.« less

  3. Automated classification of neurological disorders of gait using spatio-temporal gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Cauchy; Wuehr, Max; Akrami, Farhoud; Neuhaeusser, Maximilian; Huth, Sabrina; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus; Schniepp, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Automated pattern recognition systems have been used for accurate identification of neurological conditions as well as the evaluation of the treatment outcomes. This study aims to determine the accuracy of diagnoses of (oto-)neurological gait disorders using different types of automated pattern recognition techniques. Clinically confirmed cases of phobic postural vertigo (N = 30), cerebellar ataxia (N = 30), progressive supranuclear palsy (N = 30), bilateral vestibulopathy (N = 30), as well as healthy subjects (N = 30) were recruited for the study. 8 measurements with 136 variables using a GAITRite(®) sensor carpet were obtained from each subject. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (training cases and validation cases). Sensitivity and specificity of k-nearest neighbor (KNN), naive-bayes classifier (NB), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM) in classifying the validation cases were calculated. ANN and SVM had the highest overall sensitivity with 90.6% and 92.0% respectively, followed by NB (76.0%) and KNN (73.3%). SVM and ANN showed high false negative rates for bilateral vestibulopathy cases (20.0% and 26.0%); while KNN and NB had high false negative rates for progressive supranuclear palsy cases (76.7% and 40.0%). Automated pattern recognition systems are able to identify pathological gait patterns and establish clinical diagnosis with good accuracy. SVM and ANN in particular differentiate gait patterns of several distinct oto-neurological disorders of gait with high sensitivity and specificity compared to KNN and NB. Both SVM and ANN appear to be a reliable diagnostic and management tool for disorders of gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Post-construction monitoring of a Core-Loc™ breakwater using tripod-based LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Podoski, Jessica H.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Bond, Sandra; Smith, Thomas D.; Foster, James

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the technology application described herein is to determine whether breakwater monitoring data collected using Tripod (or Terrestrial) Light Detection and Ranging (T-LiDAR) can give insight into processes such as how Core-Loc™ concrete armour units nest following construction, and in turn how settlement affects armour layer stability, concrete cap performance, and armour unit breakage.  A further objective is that this information can then be incorporated into the design of future projects using concrete armour units.  The results of this application of T-LiDAR, including the challenges encountered and the conclusions drawn regarding initial concrete armour unit movement will be presented in this paper.

  5. Spatial parameters of walking gait and footedness.

    PubMed

    Zverev, Y P

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess whether footedness has effects on selected spatial and angular parameters of able-bodied gait by evaluating footprints of young adults. A total of 112 males and 93 females were selected from among students and staff members of the University of Malawi using a simple random sampling method. Footedness of subjects was assessed by the Waterloo Footedness Questionnaire Revised. Gait at natural speed was recorded using the footprint method. The following spatial parameters of gait were derived from the inked footprint sequences of subjects: step and stride lengths, gait angle and base of gait. The anthropometric measurements taken were weight, height, leg and foot length, foot breadth, shoulder width, and hip and waist circumferences. The prevalence of right-, left- and mix-footedness in the whole sample of young Malawian adults was 81%, 8.3% and 10.7%, respectively. One-way analysis of variance did not reveal a statistically significant difference between footedness categories in the mean values of anthropometric measurements (p > 0.05 for all variables). Gender differences in step and stride length values were not statistically significant. Correction of these variables for stature did not change the trend. Males had significantly broader steps than females. Normalized values of base of gait had similar gender difference. The group means of step length and normalized step length of the right and left feet were similar, for males and females. There was a significant side difference in the gait angle in both gender groups of volunteers with higher mean values on the left side compared to the right one (t = 2.64, p < 0.05 for males, and t = 2.78, p < 0.05 for females). One-way analysis of variance did not demonstrate significant difference between footedness categories in the mean values of step length, gait angle, bilateral differences in step length and gait angle, stride length, gait base and normalized gait variables of male

  6. Flexible Piezoelectric Sensor-Based Gait Recognition.

    PubMed

    Cha, Youngsu; Kim, Hojoon; Kim, Doik

    2018-02-05

    Most motion recognition research has required tight-fitting suits for precise sensing. However, tight-suit systems have difficulty adapting to real applications, because people normally wear loose clothes. In this paper, we propose a gait recognition system with flexible piezoelectric sensors in loose clothing. The gait recognition system does not directly sense lower-body angles. It does, however, detect the transition between standing and walking. Specifically, we use the signals from the flexible sensors attached to the knee and hip parts on loose pants. We detect the periodic motion component using the discrete time Fourier series from the signal during walking. We adapt the gait detection method to a real-time patient motion and posture monitoring system. In the monitoring system, the gait recognition operates well. Finally, we test the gait recognition system with 10 subjects, for which the proposed system successfully detects walking with a success rate over 93 %.

  7. Gait parameters associated with responsiveness to treadmill training with body-weight support after stroke: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Mulroy, Sara J; Klassen, Tara; Gronley, JoAnne K; Eberly, Valerie J; Brown, David A; Sullivan, Katherine J

    2010-02-01

    Task-specific training programs after stroke improve walking function, but it is not clear which biomechanical parameters of gait are most associated with improved walking speed. The purpose of this study was to identify gait parameters associated with improved walking speed after a locomotor training program that included body-weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT). A prospective, between-subjects design was used. Fifteen people, ranging from approximately 9 months to 5 years after stroke, completed 1 of 3 different 6-week training regimens. These regimens consisted of 12 sessions of BWSTT alternated with 12 sessions of: lower-extremity resistive cycling; lower-extremity progressive, resistive strengthening; or a sham condition of arm ergometry. Gait analysis was conducted before and after the 6-week intervention program. Kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic (EMG) activity were recorded from the hemiparetic lower extremity while participants walked at a self-selected pace. Changes in gait parameters were compared in participants who showed an increase in self-selected walking speed of greater than 0.08 m/s (high-response group) and in those with less improvement (low-response group). Compared with participants in the low-response group, those in the high-response group displayed greater increases in terminal stance hip extension angle and hip flexion power (product of net joint moment and angular velocity) after the intervention. The intensity of soleus muscle EMG activity during walking also was significantly higher in participants in the high-response group after the intervention. Only sagittal-plane parameters were assessed, and the sample size was small. Task-specific locomotor training alternated with strength training resulted in kinematic, kinetic, and muscle activation adaptations that were strongly associated with improved walking speed. Changes in both hip and ankle biomechanics during late stance were associated with greater increases in

  8. Slip initiation in alternative and slip-resistant footwear.

    PubMed

    Chander, Harish; Wade, Chip; Garner, John C; Knight, Adam C

    2017-12-01

    Slips occur as a result of failure of normal locomotion. The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of alternative footwear (Crocs™, flip-flops) and an industry standard low-top slip-resistant shoe (SRS) under multiple gait trials (normal dry, unexpected slip, alert slip and expected slip) on lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics and muscle activity. Eighteen healthy male participants (age: 22.28 ± 2.2 years; height: 177.66 ± 6.9 cm; mass: 79.27 ± 7.6 kg) completed the study. Kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity variables were analyzed using a 3(footwear) × 4(gait trials) repeated-measures analysis of variance at p = 0.05. Greater plantar flexion angles, lower ground reaction forces and greater muscle activity were seen on slip trials with the alternative footwear. During slip events, SRS closely resembled normal dry biomechanics, suggesting it to be a safer footwear choice compared with alternative footwear.

  9. Relationship of spasticity to knee angular velocity and motion during gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Diane L; Laws, Edward; Carmines, Dave V; Abel, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of spasticity in the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles on gait parameters including temporal spatial measures, knee position, excursion and angular velocity in 25 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) as compared to 17 age-matched peers. While subjects were instructed to relax, an isokinetic device alternately flexed and extended the left knee at one of the three constant velocities 30 degrees/s, 60 degrees/s and 120 degrees/s, while surface electromyography (EMG) electrodes over the biceps femoris and the rectus femoris recorded muscle activity. Patients then participated in 3D gait analysis at a self-selected speed. Results showed that, those with CP who exhibited heightened stretch responses (spasticity) in both muscles, had significantly slower knee angular velocities during the swing phase of gait as compared to those with and without CP who did not exhibit stretch responses at the joint and the tested speeds. The measured amount (torque) of the resistance to passive flexion or extension was not related to gait parameters in subjects with CP; however, the rate of change in resistance torque per unit angle change (stiffness) at the fastest test speed of 120 degrees/s showed weak to moderate relationships with knee angular velocity and motion during gait. For the subset of seven patients with CP who subsequently underwent a selective dorsal rhizotomy, knee angular extension and flexion velocity increased post-operatively, suggesting some degree of causality between spasticity and movement speed.

  10. Wearable sensors objectively measure gait parameters in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Marxreiter, Franz; Gossler, Julia; Kohl, Zacharias; Reinfelder, Samuel; Gassner, Heiko; Aminian, Kamiar; Eskofier, Bjoern M.; Winkler, Jürgen; Klucken, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Distinct gait characteristics like short steps and shuffling gait are prototypical signs commonly observed in Parkinson’s disease. Routinely assessed by observation through clinicians, gait is rated as part of categorical clinical scores. There is an increasing need to provide quantitative measurements of gait, e.g. to provide detailed information about disease progression. Recently, we developed a wearable sensor-based gait analysis system as diagnostic tool that objectively assesses gait parameter in Parkinson’s disease without the need of having a specialized gait laboratory. This system consists of inertial sensor units attached laterally to both shoes. The computed target of measures are spatiotemporal gait parameters including stride length and time, stance phase time, heel-strike and toe-off angle, toe clearance, and inter-stride variation from gait sequences. To translate this prototype into medical care, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 190 Parkinson’s disease patients and 101 age-matched controls and measured gait characteristics during a 4x10 meter walk at the subjects’ preferred speed. To determine intraindividual changes in gait, we monitored the gait characteristics of 63 patients longitudinally. Cross-sectional analysis revealed distinct spatiotemporal gait parameter differences reflecting typical Parkinson’s disease gait characteristics including short steps, shuffling gait, and postural instability specific for different disease stages and levels of motor impairment. The longitudinal analysis revealed that gait parameters were sensitive to changes by mirroring the progressive nature of Parkinson’s disease and corresponded to physician ratings. Taken together, we successfully show that wearable sensor-based gait analysis reaches clinical applicability providing a high biomechanical resolution for gait impairment in Parkinson’s disease. These data demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of objective wearable sensor

  11. Development of an advanced mechanised gait trainer, controlling movement of the centre of mass, for restoring gait in non-ambulant subjects.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Sarkodie-Gyan, T; Uhlenbrock, D

    1999-01-01

    The study aimed at further development of a mechanised gait trainer which would allow non-ambulant people to practice a gait-like motion repeatedly. To simulate normal gait, discrete stance and swing phases, lasting 60% and 40% of the gait cycle respectively, and the control of the movement of the centre of mass were required. A complex gear system provided the gait-like movement of two foot plates with a ratio of 60% to 40% between the stance and swing phases. A controlled propulsion system adjusted its output according to patient's efforts. Two eccenters on the central gear controlled phase-adjusted the vertical and horizontal position of the centre of mass. The patterns of sagittal lower limb joint kinematics and of muscle activation of a normal subject were similar when using the mechanised trainer and when walking on a treadmill. A non-ambulatory hemiparetic subject required little help from one therapist on the gait trainer, while two therapists supported treadmill walking. Gait movements on the trainer were highly symmetrical, impact-free, and less spastic. The weight-bearing muscles were activated in a similar fashion during both conditions. The vertical displacement of the centre of mass was bi-instead of mono-phasic during each gait cycle on the new device. In conclusion, the gait trainer allowed wheelchair-bound subjects the repetitive practice of a gait-like movement without overstraining therapists.

  12. Neurotomy of the rectus femoris nerve: Short-term effectiveness for spastic stiff knee gait: Clinical assessment and quantitative gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Robertson, J; Leboeuf, F; Hamel, O; Brochard, S; Perrouin-Verbe, B

    2017-02-01

    Stiff knee gait is a troublesome gait disturbance related to spastic paresis, frequently associated with overactivity of the rectus femoris muscle in the swing phase of gait. The aim of this study was to assess the short-term effects of rectus femoris neurotomy for the treatment of spastic stiff-knee gait in patients with hemiparesis. An Intervention study (before-after trial) with an observational design was carried out in a university hospital. Seven ambulatory patients with hemiparesis of spinal or cerebral origin and spastic stiff-knee gait, which had previously been improved by botulinum toxin injections, were proposed a selective neurotomy of the rectus femoris muscle. A functional evaluation (Functional Ambulation Classification and maximal walking distance), clinical evaluation (spasticity - Ashworth scale and Duncan-Ely test, muscle strength - Medical Research Council scale), and quantitative gait analysis (spatiotemporal parameters, stiff knee gait-related kinematic and kinetic parameters, and dynamic electromyography of rectus femoris) were performed as outcome measures, before and 3 months after rectus femoris neurotomy. Compared with preoperative values, there was a significant increase in maximal walking distance, gait speed, and stride length at 3 months. All kinematic parameters improved, and the average early swing phase knee extension moment decreased. The duration of the rectus femoris burst decreased post-op. This study is the first to show that rectus femoris neurotomy helps to normalise muscle activity during gait, and results in improvements in kinetic, kinematic, and functional parameters in patients with spastic stiff knee gait. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gait, posture and cognition in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Alessandra Ferreira; Chen, Janini; Freitag, Fernanda; Valente, Debora; Souza, Carolina de Oliveira; Voos, Mariana Callil; Chien, Hsin Fen

    2016-01-01

    Gait disorders and postural instability are the leading causes of falls and disability in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cognition plays an important role in postural control and may interfere with gait and posture assessment and treatment. It is important to recognize gait, posture and balance dysfunctions by choosing proper assessment tools for PD. Patients at higher risk of falling must be referred for rehabilitation as early as possible, because antiparkinsonian drugs and surgery do not improve gait and posture in PD. PMID:29213470

  14. Relative association of processing speed, short-term memory and sustained attention with task on gait speed: a study of community-dwelling people 50 years and older.

    PubMed

    Killane, Isabelle; Donoghue, Orna A; Savva, George M; Cronin, Hilary; Kenny, Rose Anne; Reilly, Richard B

    2014-11-01

    For single gait tasks, associations have been reported between gait speed and cognitive domains. However, few studies have evaluated if this association is altered in dual gait tasks given gait speed changes with complexity and nature of task. We evaluated relative contributions of specific elements of cognitive function (including sustained attention and processing speed) to dual task gait speed in a nationally representative population of community-dwelling adults over 50 years. Gait speed was obtained using the GaitRite walkway during three gait tasks: single, cognitive (alternate letters), and motor (carrying a filled glass). Linear regression models, adjusted for covariates, were constructed to predict the relative contributions of seven neuropsychological tests to gait speed differences and to investigate gait task effects. The mean age and gait speed of the population (n = 4,431, 55% women) was 62.4 years (SD = 8.2) and 135.85 cm/s (SD = 20.20, single task), respectively. Poorer processing speed, short-term memory, and sustained attention were major cognitive contributors to slower gait speed for all gait tasks. Both dual gait tasks were robust to covariate adjustment and had a significant additional executive function element not found for the single gait task. For community-dwelling older adults processing speed, short-term memory and sustained attention were independently associated with gait speed for all gait tasks. Dual gait tasks were found to highlight specific executive function elements. This result forms a baseline value for dual task gait speed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Detecting gait abnormalities after concussion or mild traumatic brain injury: A systematic review of single-task, dual-task, and complex gait.

    PubMed

    Fino, Peter C; Parrington, Lucy; Pitt, Will; Martini, Douglas N; Chesnutt, James C; Chou, Li-Shan; King, Laurie A

    2018-05-01

    While a growing number of studies have investigated the effects of concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) on gait, many studies use different experimental paradigms and outcome measures. The path for translating experimental studies for objective clinical assessments of gait is unclear. This review asked 2 questions: 1) is gait abnormal after concussion/mTBI, and 2) what gait paradigms (single-task, dual-task, complex gait) detect abnormalities after concussion. Data sources included MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) accessed on March 14, 2017. Original research articles reporting gait outcomes in people with concussion or mTBI were included. Studies of moderate, severe, or unspecified TBI, and studies without a comparator were excluded. After screening 233 articles, 38 studies were included and assigned to one or more sections based on the protocol and reported outcomes. Twenty-six articles reported single-task simple gait outcomes, 24 reported dual-task simple gait outcomes, 21 reported single-task complex gait outcomes, and 10 reported dual-task complex gait outcomes. Overall, this review provides evidence for two conclusions: 1) gait is abnormal acutely after concussion/mTBI but generally resolves over time; and 2) the inconsistency of findings, small sample sizes, and small number of studies examining homogenous measures at the same time-period post-concussion highlight the need for replication across independent populations and investigators. Future research should concentrate on dual-task and complex gait tasks, as they showed promise for detecting abnormal locomotor function outside of the acute timeframe. Additionally, studies should provide detailed demographic and clinical characteristics to enable more refined comparisons across studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Variations in Kinematics during Clinical Gait Analysis in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Bonnyaud, Céline; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In addition to changes in spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters, patients with stroke exhibit fear of falling as well as fatigability during gait. These changes could compromise interpretation of data from gait analysis. The aim of this study was to determine if the gait of hemiplegic patients changes significantly over successive gait trials. Forty two stroke patients and twenty healthy subjects performed 9 gait trials during a gait analysis session. The mean and variability of spatio-temporal and kinematic joint parameters were analyzed during 3 groups of consecutive gait trials (1–3, 4–6 and 7–9). Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of variables from the joint kinematic waveforms and to identify the parts of the gait cycle which changed during the gait analysis session. The results showed that i) spontaneous gait velocity and the other spatio-temporal parameters significantly increased, and ii) gait variability decreased, over the last 6 gait trials compared to the first 3, for hemiplegic patients but not healthy subjects. Principal component analysis revealed changes in the sagittal waveforms of the hip, knee and ankle for hemiplegic patients after the first 3 gait trials. These results suggest that at the beginning of the gait analysis session, stroke patients exhibited phase of adaptation,characterized by a “cautious gait” but no fatigue was observed. PMID:23799100

  17. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  18. Enhanced data consistency of a portable gait measurement system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-I; Chiang, Y P

    2013-11-01

    A gait measurement system is a useful tool for rehabilitation applications. Such a system is used to conduct gait experiments in large workplaces such as laboratories where gait measurement equipment can be permanently installed. However, a gait measurement system should be portable if it is to be used in clinics or community centers for aged people. In a portable gait measurement system, the workspace is limited and landmarks on a subject may not be visible to the cameras during experiments. Thus, we propose a virtual-marker function to obtain positions of unseen landmarks for maintaining data consistency. This work develops a portable clinical gait measurement system consisting of lightweight motion capture devices, force plates, and a walkway assembled from plywood boards. We evaluated the portable clinic gait system with 11 normal subjects in three consecutive days in a limited experimental space. Results of gait analysis based on the verification of within-day and between-day coefficients of multiple correlations show that the proposed portable gait system is reliable.

  19. Enhanced data consistency of a portable gait measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-I.; Chiang, Y. P.

    2013-11-01

    A gait measurement system is a useful tool for rehabilitation applications. Such a system is used to conduct gait experiments in large workplaces such as laboratories where gait measurement equipment can be permanently installed. However, a gait measurement system should be portable if it is to be used in clinics or community centers for aged people. In a portable gait measurement system, the workspace is limited and landmarks on a subject may not be visible to the cameras during experiments. Thus, we propose a virtual-marker function to obtain positions of unseen landmarks for maintaining data consistency. This work develops a portable clinical gait measurement system consisting of lightweight motion capture devices, force plates, and a walkway assembled from plywood boards. We evaluated the portable clinic gait system with 11 normal subjects in three consecutive days in a limited experimental space. Results of gait analysis based on the verification of within-day and between-day coefficients of multiple correlations show that the proposed portable gait system is reliable.

  20. Gait impairment precedes clinical symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Lynn; Galna, Brook; Lord, Sue; Mhiripiri, Dadirayi; Eglon, Gail; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2014-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an inherited ataxia with no established treatment. Gait ataxia is a prominent feature causing substantial disability. Understanding the evolution of the gait disturbance is a key step in developing treatment strategies. We studied 9 gait variables in 24 SCA6 (6 presymptomatic; 18 symptomatic) and 24 controls and correlated gait with clinical severity (presymptomatic and symptomatic). Discrete gait characteristics precede symptoms in SCA6 with significantly increased variability of step width and step time, whereas a more global gait deficit was evident in symptomatic individuals. Gait characteristics discriminated between presymptomatic and symptomatic individuals and were selectively associated with disease severity. This is the largest study to include a detailed characterization of gait in SCA6, including presymptomatic subjects, allowing changes across the disease spectrum to be compared. Selective gait disturbance is already present in SCA6 before clinical symptoms appear and gait characteristics are also sensitive to disease progression. Early gait disturbance likely reflects primary pathology distinct from secondary changes. These findings open the opportunity for early evaluation and sensitive measures of therapeutic efficacy using instrumented gait analysis which may have broader relevance for all degenerative ataxias. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Office management of gait disorders in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with an approach to office management of gait disorders in the elderly. Sources of information Ovid MEDLINE was searched from 1950 to July 2010 using subject headings for gait or neurologic gait disorders combined with physical examination. Articles specific to family practice or family physicians were selected. Relevant review articles and original research were used when appropriate and applicable to the elderly. Main message Gait and balance disorders in the elderly are difficult to recognize and diagnose in the family practice setting because they initially present with subtle undifferentiated manifestations, and because causes are usually multifactorial, with multiple diseases developing simultaneously. To further complicate the issue, these manifestations can be camouflaged in elderly patients by the physiologic changes associated with normal aging. A classification of gait disorders based on sensorimotor levels can be useful in the approach to management of this problem. Gait disorders in patients presenting to family physicians in the primary care setting are often related to joint and skeletal problems (lowest-level disturbances), as opposed to patients referred to neurology specialty clinics with sensory ataxia, myelopathy, multiple strokes, and parkinsonism (lowest-, middle-, and highest-level disturbances). The difficulty in diagnosing gait disorders stems from the challenge of addressing early undifferentiated disease caused by multiple disease processes involving all sensorimotor levels. Patients might present with a nonspecific “cautious” gait that is simply an adaptation of the body to disease limitations. This cautious gait has a mildly flexed posture with reduced arm swing and a broadening of the base of support. This article reviews the focused history (including medication review), practical physical examination, investigations, and treatments that are key to office management of gait disorders

  2. Office management of gait disorders in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lam, Robert

    2011-07-01

    To provide family physicians with an approach to office management of gait disorders in the elderly. Ovid MEDLINE was searched from 1950 to July 2010 using subject headings for gait or neurologic gait disorders combined with physical examination. Articles specific to family practice or family physicians were selected. Relevant review articles and original research were used when appropriate and applicable to the elderly. Gait and balance disorders in the elderly are difficult to recognize and diagnose in the family practice setting because they initially present with subtle undifferentiated manifestations, and because causes are usually multifactorial, with multiple diseases developing simultaneously. To further complicate the issue, these manifestations can be camouflaged in elderly patients by the physiologic changes associated with normal aging. A classification of gait disorders based on sensorimotor levels can be useful in the approach to management of this problem. Gait disorders in patients presenting to family physicians in the primary care setting are often related to joint and skeletal problems (lowest-level disturbances), as opposed to patients referred to neurology specialty clinics with sensory ataxia, myelopathy, multiple strokes, and parkinsonism (lowest-, middle-, and highest-level disturbances). The difficulty in diagnosing gait disorders stems from the challenge of addressing early undifferentiated disease caused by multiple disease processes involving all sensorimotor levels. Patients might present with a nonspecific "cautious" gait that is simply an adaptation of the body to disease limitations. This cautious gait has a mildly flexed posture with reduced arm swing and a broadening of the base of support. This article reviews the focused history (including medication review), practical physical examination, investigations, and treatments that are key to office management of gait disorders. Family physicians will find it helpful to classify gait

  3. Quantification and recognition of parkinsonian gait from monocular video imaging using kernel-based principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    installation of the current method provides clinicians and researchers a low cost solution to monitor the progression of and the treatment to PD. In summary, the proposed method provides an alternative to perform gait analysis for patients with PD. PMID:22074315

  4. The evolutionary history of the DMRT3 'Gait keeper' haplotype.

    PubMed

    Staiger, E A; Almén, M S; Promerová, M; Brooks, S; Cothran, E G; Imsland, F; Jäderkvist Fegraeus, K; Lindgren, G; Mehrabani Yeganeh, H; Mikko, S; Vega-Pla, J L; Tozaki, T; Rubin, C J; Andersson, L

    2017-10-01

    A previous study revealed a strong association between the DMRT3:Ser301STOP mutation in horses and alternate gaits as well as performance in harness racing. Several follow-up studies have confirmed a high frequency of the mutation in gaited horse breeds and an effect on gait quality. The aim of this study was to determine when and where the mutation arose, to identify additional potential causal mutations and to determine the coalescence time for contemporary haplotypes carrying the stop mutation. We utilized sequences from 89 horses representing 26 breeds to identify 102 SNPs encompassing the DMRT3 gene that are in strong linkage disequilibrium with the stop mutation. These 102 SNPs were genotyped in an additional 382 horses representing 72 breeds, and we identified 14 unique haplotypes. The results provided conclusive evidence that DMRT3:Ser301STOP is causal, as no other sequence polymorphisms showed an equally strong association to locomotion traits. The low sequence diversity among mutant chromosomes demonstrated that they must have diverged from a common ancestral sequence within the last 10 000 years. Thus, the mutation occurred either just before domestication or more likely some time after domestication and then spread across the world as a result of selection on locomotion traits. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  5. Spectroscopic, potentiometric and theoretical studies on the binding properties of a novel tripodal polycatechol-imine ligand towards iron(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, B. K.; Sahoo, Suban K.; Baral, Minati

    2008-12-01

    A novel multidentate tripodal ligand, cis, cis-1,3,5-tris[(2,3-dihydroxybenzylidene)aminomethyl]cyclohexane (TDBAC, L) containing one catechol unit in each arms of a tripodal amine, cis, cis-1,3,5-tris(aminomethyl)cyclohexane was investigated as a chelator for iron(III) through potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods in an aqueous medium of 0.1N ionic strength and 25 ± 1 °C as well as in ethanol by continuous variation method. From pH metric in water, three protonation constants characterized for the three-hydroxyl groups of the catechol units at ortho were used as input data to evaluate the stability constants of the complexes. Formation of monomeric complexes FeLH 3, FeLH 2, FeLH and FeL were depicted. In ethanol, formation of complexes FeL, Fe 2L and Fe 3L were characterized. Structures of the complexes were explained by using the experimental evidences and predicted through molecular modeling calculations. The ligand showed potential to coordinate iron(III) through three imine nitrogens and three catecholic oxygens at ortho to form a tris(iminocatecholate) type complex.

  6. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  7. A proof-of-concept study for measuring gait speed, steadiness, and dynamic balance under various footwear conditions outside of the gait laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, James S; Edgar, Sarah; Cozzetto, Dana; Maskill, James; Peterson, Paul; Najafi, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the effect of custom and prefabricated foot orthoses on self-selected walking speed, walking speed variability, and dynamic balance in the mediolateral direction. The gait of four healthy participants was analyzed with a body-worn sensor system across a distance of at least 30 m outside of the gait laboratory. Participants walked at their habitual speed in four conditions: barefoot, regular shoes, prefabricated foot orthoses, and custom foot orthoses. In the custom foot orthoses condition, gait speed was improved on average 13.5% over the barefoot condition and 9.8% over the regular shoe condition. The mediolateral range of motion of center of mass was reduced 55% and 56% compared with the shoes alone and prefabricated foot orthoses conditions, respectively. This may suggest better gait efficiency and lower energy cost with custom foot orthoses. This tendency remained after normalizing center of mass by gait speed, suggesting that irrespective of gait speed, custom foot orthoses improve center of mass motion in the mediolateral direction compared with other footwear conditions. Gait intercycle variability, measured by intercycle coefficient of variation of gait speed, was decreased on average by 25% and 19% compared with the barefoot and shoes-alone conditions, respectively. The decrease in gait unsteadiness after wearing custom foot orthoses may suggest improved proprioception from the increased contact area of custom foot orthoses versus the barefoot condition. These findings may open new avenues for objective assessment of the impact of prescribed footwear on dynamic balance and spatiotemporal parameters of gait and assess gait adaptation after use of custom foot orthoses.

  8. Analysis of several methods and inertial sensors locations to assess gait parameters in able-bodied subjects.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Khaireddine; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to determine which types of inertial sensors and which advocated locations should be used for reliable and accurate gait event detection and temporal parameter assessment in normal adults. In addition, we aimed to remove the ambiguity found in the literature of the definition of the initial contact (IC) from the lumbar accelerometer. Acceleration and angular velocity data was gathered from the lumbar region and the distal edge of each shank. This data was evaluated in comparison to an instrumented treadmill and an optoelectronic system during five treadmill speed sessions. The lumbar accelerometer showed that the peak of the anteroposterior component was the most accurate for IC detection. Similarly, the valley that followed the peak of the vertical component was the most precise for terminal contact (TC) detection. Results based on ANOVA and Tukey tests showed that the set of inertial methods was suitable for temporal gait assessment and gait event detection in able-bodied subjects. For gait event detection, an exception was found with the shank accelerometer. The tool was suitable for temporal parameters assessment, despite the high root mean square error on the detection of IC (RMSEIC) and TC (RMSETC). The shank gyroscope was found to be as accurate as the kinematic method since the statistical tests revealed no significant difference between the two techniques for the RMSE off all gait events and temporal parameters. The lumbar and shank accelerometers were the most accurate alternative to the shank gyroscope for gait event detection and temporal parameters assessment, respectively. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Gait patterns comparison of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy to those of control subjects considering the effect of gait velocity.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Gravel, Denis; Nadeau, Sylvie; Houde, Sylvie; Gagnon, Denis

    2010-07-01

    3D analysis of the gait of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was the topic of only a few studies and none of these considered the effect of gait velocity on the gait parameters of children with DMD. Gait parameters of 11 children with DMD were compared to those of 14 control children while considering the effect of gait velocity using 3D biomechanical analysis. Kinematic and kinetic gait parameters were measured using an Optotrak motion analysis system and AMTI force plates embedded in the floor. The data profiles of children with DMD walking at natural gait velocity were compared to those of the control children who walked at both natural and slow gait velocities. When both groups walked at similar velocity, children with DMD had higher cadence and shorter step length. They demonstrated a lower hip extension moment as well as a minimal or absent knee extension moment. At the ankle, a dorsiflexion moment was absent at heel strike due to the anterior location of the center of pressure. The magnitude of the medio-lateral ground reaction force was higher in children with DMD. Despite this increase, the hip abductor moment was lower. Hip power generation was also observed at the mid-stance in DMD children. These results suggest that most of the modifications observed are strategies used by children with DMD to cope with possible muscle weakness in order to provide support, propulsion and balance of the body during gait. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reliability of four models for clinical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Hans; Graham, David; Edwards, Julie; Walsh, Henry P J; Maine, Sheanna; Boyd, Roslyn N; Lloyd, David G; Modenese, Luca; Carty, Christopher P

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) has become a common clinical tool for treatment planning in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Many clinical gait laboratories use the conventional gait analysis model (e.g. Plug-in-Gait model), which uses Direct Kinematics (DK) for joint kinematic calculations, whereas, musculoskeletal models, mainly used for research, use Inverse Kinematics (IK). Musculoskeletal IK models have the advantage of enabling additional analyses which might improve the clinical decision-making in children with CP. Before any new model can be used in a clinical setting, its reliability has to be evaluated and compared to a commonly used clinical gait model (e.g. Plug-in-Gait model) which was the purpose of this study. Two testers performed 3DGA in eleven CP and seven typically developing participants on two occasions. Intra- and inter-tester standard deviations (SD) and standard error of measurement (SEM) were used to compare the reliability of two DK models (Plug-in-Gait and a six degrees-of-freedom model solved using Vicon software) and two IK models (two modifications of 'gait2392' solved using OpenSim). All models showed good reliability (mean SEM of 3.0° over all analysed models and joint angles). Variations in joint kinetics were less in typically developed than in CP participants. The modified 'gait2392' model which included all the joint rotations commonly reported in clinical 3DGA, showed reasonable reliable joint kinematic and kinetic estimates, and allows additional musculoskeletal analysis on surgically adjustable parameters, e.g. muscle-tendon lengths, and, therefore, is a suitable model for clinical gait analysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Vision-based gait impairment analysis for aided diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ortells, Javier; Herrero-Ezquerro, María Trinidad; Mollineda, Ramón A

    2018-02-12

    Gait is a firsthand reflection of health condition. This belief has inspired recent research efforts to automate the analysis of pathological gait, in order to assist physicians in decision-making. However, most of these efforts rely on gait descriptions which are difficult to understand by humans, or on sensing technologies hardly available in ambulatory services. This paper proposes a number of semantic and normalized gait features computed from a single video acquired by a low-cost sensor. Far from being conventional spatio-temporal descriptors, features are aimed at quantifying gait impairment, such as gait asymmetry from several perspectives or falling risk. They were designed to be invariant to frame rate and image size, allowing cross-platform comparisons. Experiments were formulated in terms of two databases. A well-known general-purpose gait dataset is used to establish normal references for features, while a new database, introduced in this work, provides samples under eight different walking styles: one normal and seven impaired patterns. A number of statistical studies were carried out to prove the sensitivity of features at measuring the expected pathologies, providing enough evidence about their accuracy. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract reflecting main contributions of the manuscript: at the top, a robust, semantic and easy-to-interpret feature set to describe impaired gait patterns; at the bottom, a new dataset consisting of video-recordings of a number of volunteers simulating different patterns of pathological gait, where features were statistically assessed.

  12. Generating high-speed dynamic running gaits in a quadruped robot using an evolutionary search.

    PubMed

    Krasny, Darren P; Orin, David E

    2004-08-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been a considerable interest in investigating high-speed dynamic gaits for legged robots. While much research has been published, both in the biomechanics and engineering fields regarding the analysis of these gaits, no single study has adequately characterized the dynamics of high-speed running as can be achieved in a realistic, yet simple, robotic system. The goal of this paper is to find the most energy-efficient, natural, and unconstrained gallop that can be achieved using a simulated quadrupedal robot with articulated legs, asymmetric mass distribution, and compliant legs. For comparison purposes, we also implement the bound and canter. The model used here is planar, although we will show that it captures much of the predominant dynamic characteristics observed in animals. While it is not our goal to prove anything about biological locomotion, the dynamic similarities between the gaits we produce and those found in animals does indicate a similar underlying dynamic mechanism. Thus, we will show that achieving natural, efficient high-speed locomotion is possible even with a fairly simple robotic system. To generate the high-speed gaits, we use an efficient evolutionary algorithm called set-based stochastic optimization. This algorithm finds open-loop control parameters to generate periodic trajectories for the body. Several alternative methods are tested to generate periodic trajectories for the legs. The combined solutions found by the evolutionary search and the periodic-leg methods, over a range of speeds up to 10.0 m/s, reveal "biological" characteristics that are emergent properties of the underlying gaits.

  13. Can biomechanical variables predict improvement in crouch gait?

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.; Schwartz, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Many patients respond positively to treatments for crouch gait, yet surgical outcomes are inconsistent and unpredictable. In this study, we developed a multivariable regression model to determine if biomechanical variables and other subject characteristics measured during a physical exam and gait analysis can predict which subjects with crouch gait will demonstrate improved knee kinematics on a follow-up gait analysis. We formulated the model and tested its performance by retrospectively analyzing 353 limbs of subjects who walked with crouch gait. The regression model was able to predict which subjects would demonstrate ‘improved’ and ‘unimproved’ knee kinematics with over 70% accuracy, and was able to explain approximately 49% of the variance in subjects’ change in knee flexion between gait analyses. We found that improvement in stance phase knee flexion was positively associated with three variables that were drawn from knowledge about the biomechanical contributors to crouch gait: i) adequate hamstrings lengths and velocities, possibly achieved via hamstrings lengthening surgery, ii) normal tibial torsion, possibly achieved via tibial derotation osteotomy, and iii) sufficient muscle strength. PMID:21616666

  14. Ants swimming in pitcher plants: kinematics of aquatic and terrestrial locomotion in Camponotus schmitzi.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Holger Florian; Thornham, Daniel George; Federle, Walter

    2012-06-01

    Camponotus schmitzi ants live in symbiosis with the Bornean pitcher plant Nepenthes bicalcarata. Unique among ants, the workers regularly dive and swim in the pitcher's digestive fluid to forage for food. High-speed motion analysis revealed that C. schmitzi ants swim at the surface with all legs submerged, with an alternating tripod pattern. Compared to running, swimming involves lower stepping frequencies and larger phase delays within the legs of each tripod. Swimming ants move front and middle legs faster and keep them more extended during the power stroke than during the return stroke. Thrust estimates calculated from three-dimensional leg kinematics using a blade-element approach confirmed that forward propulsion is mainly achieved by the front and middle legs. The hind legs move much less, suggesting that they mainly serve for steering. Experiments with tethered C. schmitzi ants showed that characteristic swimming movements can be triggered by submersion in water. This reaction was absent in another Camponotus species investigated. Our study demonstrates how insects can use the same locomotory system and similar gait patterns for moving on land and in water. We discuss insect adaptations for aquatic/amphibious lifestyles and the special adaptations of C. schmitzi to living on an insect-trapping pitcher plant.

  15. Gait training of patients after stroke using an electromechanical gait trainer combined with simultaneous functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Raymond K Y; Ng, Maple F W; Li, Leonard S W; So, Elaine F M

    2006-09-01

    This case report describes the implementation of gait training intervention that used an electromechanical gait trainer with simultaneous functional electrical stimulation (FES) for 2 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Two individuals with post-stroke hemiplegia of less than 6 weeks' duration participated in a 4-week gait training program as an adjunct to physical therapy received at a hospital. After the 4-week intervention, both patients were discharged from the hospital, and they returned after 6 months for a follow-up evaluation. By the end of the 4-week intervention, both patients had shown improvements in scores on the Barthel Index, Berg Balance Scale, Functional Ambulation Categories Scale, 5-m timed walking test, and Motricity Index. In the 6-month follow-up evaluation, both patients continued to have improvements in all outcome measures. This case report shows that, following the use of an electromechanical gait trainer simultaneously with FES, patients after acute stroke had improvements in gait performance, functional activities, balance, and motor control in the long term.

  16. Relationships of stroke patients' gait parameters with fear of falling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin; Yoo, Ingyu

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation of gait parameters with fear of falling in stroke survivors. [Subjects] In total, 12 patients with stroke participated. [Methods] The subjects performed on a Biodex Gait Trainer 2 for 5 min to evaluate characteristic gait parameters. The kinematic gait parameters measured were gait speed, step cycle, step length, and time on each foot (step symmetry). All the subjects also completed a fall anxiety survey. [Results] Correlations between gait parameters and fear of falling scores were calculated. There was a moderate degree of correlation between fear of falling scores and the step cycle item of gait parameters. [Conclusions] According to our results, the step cycle gait parameter may be related to increased fall anxiety.

  17. Designing Tripodal and Triangular Gadolinium Oxide Nanoplates and Self-Assembled Nanofibrils as Potential Multimodal Bioimaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, T; Gordon, TR; Prantner, AM

    2013-03-01

    Here, we report the shape-controlled synthesis of tripodal and triangular gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates. In the presence of lithium ions, the shape of the nanocrystals is readily controlled by tailoring reaction parameters such as temperature and time. We observe that the morphology transforms from an initial tripodal shape to a triangular shape with increasing reaction time or elevated temperatures. Highly uniform Gd2O3 nanoplates are self-assembled into nanofibril-like liquid-crystalline superlattices with long-range orientational and positional order. In addition, shape-directed self-assemblies are investigated by tailoring the aspect ratio of the arms of the Gd2O3 nanoplates. Due to a strong paramagnetic response, Gd2O3more » nanocrystals are excellent candidates for MRI contrast agents and also can be doped with rare-earth ions to form nanophosphors, pointing to their potential in multimodal imaging. In this work, we investigate the MR relaxometry at high magnetic fields (9,4 and 14.1 T) and the optical properties including near-IR to visible upconversion luminescence and X-ray excited optical luminescence of doped Gd2O3 nanoplates. The complex shape of Gd2O3 nanoplates, coupled with their magnetic properties and their ability to phosphoresce under NIR or X-ray excitation which penetrate deep into tissue, makes these nanoplates a promising platform for multimodal imaging in biomedical applications.« less

  18. An Automatic Gait Feature Extraction Method for Identifying Gait Asymmetry Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Vassallo, Michael

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to assess the use of Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) sensors to identify gait asymmetry by extracting automatic gait features. We design and develop an android app to collect real time synchronous IMU data from legs. The results from our method are validated using a Qualisys Motion Capture System. The data are collected from 10 young and 10 older subjects. Each performed a trial in a straight corridor comprising 15 strides of normal walking, a turn around and another 15 strides. We analyse the data for total distance, total time, total velocity, stride, step, cadence, step ratio, stance, and swing. The accuracy of detecting the stride number using the proposed method is 100% for young and 92.67% for older subjects. The accuracy of estimating travelled distance using the proposed method for young subjects is 97.73% and 98.82% for right and left legs; and for the older, is 88.71% and 89.88% for right and left legs. The average travelled distance is 37.77 (95% CI ± 3.57) meters for young subjects and is 22.50 (95% CI ± 2.34) meters for older subjects. The average travelled time for young subjects is 51.85 (95% CI ± 3.08) seconds and for older subjects is 84.02 (95% CI ± 9.98) seconds. The results show that wearable sensors can be used for identifying gait asymmetry without the requirement and expense of an elaborate laboratory setup. This can serve as a tool in diagnosing gait abnormalities in individuals and opens the possibilities for home based self-gait asymmetry assessment. PMID:29495299

  19. The effect of gait training with shoe inserts on the improvement of pain and gait in sacroiliac joint patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Yun; Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current research was to identify how gait training with shoe inserts affects the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly selected and assigned to be either the experimental group (gait training with shoe insert group) or control group. Each group consisted of 15 patients. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale, and foot pressure in a standing position and during gait was measured with a Gateview AFA-50 system (Alpus, Seoul, Republic of Korea). A paired sample t-test was used to compare the pain and gait of the sacroiliac joint before and after the intervention. Correlation between pain and walking after gait training with shoe inserts was examined by Pearson test. The level of significance was set at α=0.05. [Results] It was found that application of the intervention to the experimental group resulted in a significant decrease in sacroiliac joint pain. It was also found that there was a significant correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and dynamic asymmetric index (r= 0.796) and that there was a negative correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and forefoot/rear foot peak pressure ratio (r=-0.728). [Conclusion] The results of our analysis lead us to conclude that the intervention with shoe inserts had a significant influence on the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint patients.

  20. Feature extraction via KPCA for classification of gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianning; Wang, Jue; Liu, Li

    2007-06-01

    Automated recognition of gait pattern change is important in medical diagnostics as well as in the early identification of at-risk gait in the elderly. We evaluated the use of Kernel-based Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) to extract more gait features (i.e., to obtain more significant amounts of information about human movement) and thus to improve the classification of gait patterns. 3D gait data of 24 young and 24 elderly participants were acquired using an OPTOTRAK 3020 motion analysis system during normal walking, and a total of 36 gait spatio-temporal and kinematic variables were extracted from the recorded data. KPCA was used first for nonlinear feature extraction to then evaluate its effect on a subsequent classification in combination with learning algorithms such as support vector machines (SVMs). Cross-validation test results indicated that the proposed technique could allow spreading the information about the gait's kinematic structure into more nonlinear principal components, thus providing additional discriminatory information for the improvement of gait classification performance. The feature extraction ability of KPCA was affected slightly with different kernel functions as polynomial and radial basis function. The combination of KPCA and SVM could identify young-elderly gait patterns with 91% accuracy, resulting in a markedly improved performance compared to the combination of PCA and SVM. These results suggest that nonlinear feature extraction by KPCA improves the classification of young-elderly gait patterns, and holds considerable potential for future applications in direct dimensionality reduction and interpretation of multiple gait signals.

  1. A Wearable Magneto-Inertial System for Gait Analysis (H-Gait): Validation on Normal Weight and Overweight/Obese Young Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gastaldi, Laura; Rosso, Valeria; Knaflitz, Marco; Tadano, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wearable magneto-inertial sensors are being increasingly used to obtain human motion measurements out of the lab, although their performance in applications requiring high accuracy, such as gait analysis, are still a subject of debate. The aim of this work was to validate a gait analysis system (H-Gait) based on magneto-inertial sensors, both in normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (OW) subjects. The validation is performed against a reference multichannel recording system (STEP32), providing direct measurements of gait timings (through foot-switches) and joint angles in the sagittal plane (through electrogoniometers). Methods: Twenty-two young male subjects were recruited for the study (12 NW, 10 OW). After positioning body-fixed sensors of both systems, each subject was asked to walk, at a self-selected speed, over a 14-m straight path for 12 trials. Gait signals were recorded, at the same time, with the two systems. Spatio-temporal parameters, ankle, knee, and hip joint kinematics were extracted analyzing an average of 89 ± 13 gait cycles from each lower limb. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Bland-Altmann plots were used to compare H-Gait and STEP32 measurements. Changes in gait parameters and joint kinematics of OW with respect NW were also evaluated. Results: The two systems were highly consistent for cadence, while a lower agreement was found for the other spatio-temporal parameters. Ankle and knee joint kinematics is overall comparable. Joint ROMs values were slightly lower for H-Gait with respect to STEP32 for the ankle (by 1.9° for NW, and 1.6° for OW) and for the knee (by 4.1° for NW, and 1.8° for OW). More evident differences were found for hip joint, with ROMs values higher for H-Gait (by 6.8° for NW, and 9.5° for OW). NW and OW showed significant differences considering STEP32 (p = 0.0004), but not H-Gait (p = 0.06). In particular, overweight/obese subjects showed a higher cadence (55.0 vs. 52.3 strides/min) and a lower hip

  2. Carbene complexes of rhodium and iridium from tripodal N-heterocyclic carbene ligands: synthesis and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Mas-Marzá, Elena; Poyatos, Macarena; Sanaú, Mercedes; Peris, Eduardo

    2004-03-22

    Two tripodal trisimidazolium ligand precursors have been tested in the synthesis of new N-heterocyclic carbene rhodium and iridium complexes. [Tris(3-methylbenzimidazolium-1-yl)]methane sulfate gave products with coordination of the decomposed precursor. [1,1,1-Tris(3-butylimidazolium-1-yl)methyl]ethane trichloride (TIMEH(3)(Bu)) coordinated to the metal in a chelate and bridged-chelate form, depending on the reaction conditions. The crystal structures of two of the products are described. The compounds resulting from the coordination with TIME(Bu) were tested in the catalytic hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes.

  3. Thrust Force Analysis of Tripod Constant Velocity Joint Using Multibody Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Hideki; Matsunaga, Tsugiharu; Mizutani, Yoshiteru; Ando, Yosei; Kashiwagi, Isashi

    A tripod constant velocity joint is used in the driveshaft of front wheel drive vehicles. Thrust force generated by this joint causes lateral vibration in these vehicles. To analyze the thrust force, a detailed model is constructed based on a multibody dynamics approach. This model includes all principal parts of the joint defined as rigid bodies and all force elements of contact and friction acting among these parts. This model utilizes a new contact modeling method of needle roller bearings for more precise and faster computation. By comparing computational and experimental results, the appropriateness of this model is verified and the principal factors inducing the second and third rotating order components of the thrust force are clarified. This paper also describes the influence of skewed needle rollers on the thrust force and evaluates the contribution of friction forces at each contact region to the thrust force.

  4. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Henning; Werner, Cordula; Bernhardt, Rolf; Hesse, Stefan; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-02-09

    Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill training with partial body weight support and most recently gait machines enabling the repetitive training of even surface gait and even of stair climbing. With treadmill training harness-secured and partially relieved wheelchair-mobilised patients could practise up to 1000 steps per session for the first time. Controlled trials in stroke and SCI patients, however, failed to show a superior result when compared to walking exercise on the floor. Most likely explanation was the effort for the therapists, e.g. manually setting the paretic limbs during the swing phase resulting in a too little gait intensity. The next steps were gait machines, either consisting of a powered exoskeleton and a treadmill (Lokomat, AutoAmbulator) or an electromechanical solution with the harness secured patient placed on movable foot plates (Gait Trainer GT I). For the latter, a large multi-centre trial with 155 non-ambulatory stroke patients (DEGAS) revealed a superior gait ability and competence in basic activities of living in the experimental group. The HapticWalker continued the end effector concept of movable foot plates, now fully programmable and equipped with 6 DOF force sensors. This device for the first time enables training of arbitrary walking situations, hence not only the simulation of floor walking but also for example of stair climbing and perturbations. Locomotor therapy is a fascinating new tool in rehabilitation, which is in line with modern principles of motor relearning promoting a task-specific repetitive

  5. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Henning; Werner, Cordula; Bernhardt, Rolf; Hesse, Stefan; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Background Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill training with partial body weight support and most recently gait machines enabling the repetitive training of even surface gait and even of stair climbing. Results With treadmill training harness-secured and partially relieved wheelchair-mobilised patients could practise up to 1000 steps per session for the first time. Controlled trials in stroke and SCI patients, however, failed to show a superior result when compared to walking exercise on the floor. Most likely explanation was the effort for the therapists, e.g. manually setting the paretic limbs during the swing phase resulting in a too little gait intensity. The next steps were gait machines, either consisting of a powered exoskeleton and a treadmill (Lokomat, AutoAmbulator) or an electromechanical solution with the harness secured patient placed on movable foot plates (Gait Trainer GT I). For the latter, a large multi-centre trial with 155 non-ambulatory stroke patients (DEGAS) revealed a superior gait ability and competence in basic activities of living in the experimental group. The HapticWalker continued the end effector concept of movable foot plates, now fully programmable and equipped with 6 DOF force sensors. This device for the first time enables training of arbitrary walking situations, hence not only the simulation of floor walking but also for example of stair climbing and perturbations. Conclusion Locomotor therapy is a fascinating new tool in rehabilitation, which is in line with modern principles of motor relearning

  6. Gait deviations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-Part 2. Statistical non-parametric mapping to analyze gait deviations in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goudriaan, Marije; Van den Hauwe, Marleen; Simon-Martinez, Cristina; Huenaerts, Catherine; Molenaers, Guy; Goemans, Nathalie; Desloovere, Kaat

    2018-04-30

    Prolonged ambulation is considered important in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, previous studies analyzing DMD gait were sensitive to false positive outcomes, caused by uncorrected multiple comparisons, regional focus bias, and inter-component covariance bias. Also, while muscle weakness is often suggested to be the main cause for the altered gait pattern in DMD, this was never verified. Our research question was twofold: 1) are we able to confirm the sagittal kinematic and kinetic gait alterations described in a previous review with statistical non-parametric mapping (SnPM)? And 2) are these gait deviations related to lower limb weakness? We compared gait kinematics and kinetics of 15 children with DMD and 15 typical developing (TD) children (5-17 years), with a two sample Hotelling's T 2 test and post-hoc two-tailed, two-sample t-test. We used canonical correlation analyses to study the relationship between weakness and altered gait parameters. For all analyses, α-level was corrected for multiple comparisons, resulting in α = 0.005. We only found one of the previously reported kinematic deviations: the children with DMD had an increased knee flexion angle during swing (p = 0.0006). Observed gait deviations that were not reported in the review were an increased hip flexion angle during stance (p = 0.0009) and swing (p = 0.0001), altered combined knee and ankle torques (p = 0.0002), and decreased power absorption during stance (p = 0.0001). No relationships between weakness and these gait deviations were found. We were not able to replicate the gait deviations in DMD previously reported in literature, thus DMD gait remains undefined. Further, weakness does not seem to be linearly related to altered gait features. The progressive nature of the disease requires larger study populations and longitudinal analyses to gain more insight into DMD gait and its underlying causes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Gait biometrics under spoofing attacks: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, Abdenour; Ghahramani, Mohammad; Kellokumpu, Vili; Feng, Xiaoyi; Bustard, John; Nixon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Gait is a relatively biometric modality which has a precious advantage over other modalities, such as iris and voice, in that it can be easily captured from a distance. Although it has recently become a topic of great interest in biometric research, there has been little investigation into gait spoofing attacks where a person tries to imitate the clothing or walking style of someone else. We recently analyzed for the first time the effects of spoofing attacks on silhouette-based gait biometric systems and showed that it was indeed possible to spoof gait biometric systems by clothing impersonation and the deliberate selection of a target that has a similar build to the attacker. To gain deeper insight into the performance of current gait biometric systems under spoofing attacks, we provide a thorough investigation on how clothing can be used to spoof a target and evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art recognition methods on a gait spoofing database recorded at the University of Southampton. Furthermore, we describe and evaluate an initial solution coping with gait spoofing attacks. The obtained results are very promising and point out interesting findings which can be used for future investigations.

  8. Using QuickBird imagery to detect cover and spread of post-fire straw mulch after the 2006 Tripod Fire, Washington, USA

    Treesearch

    Sarah A. Lewis; Peter R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural straw mulch is a commonly applied treatment for protecting resources at risk from runoff and erosion events after wildfires. High-resolution QuickBird satellite imagery was acquired after straw mulch was applied on the 2006 Tripod Fire in Washington. We tested whether the imagery was suitable for remotely assessing the areal coverage of the straw mulch...

  9. Gait pattern of severely disabled hemiparetic subjects on a new controlled gait trainer as compared to assisted treadmill walking with partial body weight support.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Uhlenbrock, D; Sarkodie-Gyan, T

    1999-10-01

    To investigate to what extent and with how much therapeutic effort nonambulatory stroke patients could train a gait-like movement on a newly developed, machine-supported gait trainer. Open study comparing the movement on the gait trainer with assisted walking on the treadmill. Motion analysis laboratory of a rehabilitation centre. Fourteen chronic, nonambulatory hemiparetic patients. Complex gait analysis while training on the gait trainer and while walking on the treadmill. Gait kinematics, kinesiological EMG of several lower limb muscles and the required assistance. Patients could train a gait-like movement on the gait trainer, characterized kinematically by a perfect symmetry, larger hip extension during stance, less knee flexion and less ankle plantar flexion during swing as compared to treadmill walking (p <0.01). The pattern and amount of activation of relevant weight-bearing muscles was comparable with an even larger activation of the M. biceps femoris on the gait trainer (p <0.01). The tibialis anterior muscle of the nonaffected side, however, was less activated during swing (p <0.01). Two therapists assisted walking on the treadmill while only one therapist was necessary to help with weight shifting on the new device. The newly developed gait trainer offered severely disabled hemiparetic subjects the possibility of training a gait-like, highly symmetrical movement with a favourable facilitation of relevant anti-gravity muscles. At the same time, the effort required of the therapists was reduced.

  10. Kinematic Analysis Quantifies Gait Abnormalities Associated with Lameness in Broiler Chickens and Identifies Evolutionary Gait Differences

    PubMed Central

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C.; Nicol, Christine J.; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E.; Weeks, Claire A.; Colborne, G. Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12) and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with

  11. The effect of gait training with shoe inserts on the improvement of pain and gait in sacroiliac joint patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byung-Yun; Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current research was to identify how gait training with shoe inserts affects the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly selected and assigned to be either the experimental group (gait training with shoe insert group) or control group. Each group consisted of 15 patients. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale, and foot pressure in a standing position and during gait was measured with a Gateview AFA-50 system (Alpus, Seoul, Republic of Korea). A paired sample t-test was used to compare the pain and gait of the sacroiliac joint before and after the intervention. Correlation between pain and walking after gait training with shoe inserts was examined by Pearson test. The level of significance was set at α=0.05. [Results] It was found that application of the intervention to the experimental group resulted in a significant decrease in sacroiliac joint pain. It was also found that there was a significant correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and dynamic asymmetric index (r= 0.796) and that there was a negative correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and forefoot/rear foot peak pressure ratio (r=-0.728). [Conclusion] The results of our analysis lead us to conclude that the intervention with shoe inserts had a significant influence on the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint patients. PMID:26357428

  12. Stepping strategies for regulating gait adaptability and stability.

    PubMed

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; Steenbrink, Frans; Mert, Agali; van der Wurff, Peter; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-03-15

    Besides a stable gait pattern, gait in daily life requires the capability to adapt this pattern in response to environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the anticipatory strategies used by able-bodied people to attain an adaptive gait pattern, and how these strategies interact with strategies used to maintain gait stability. Ten healthy subjects walked in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment (CAREN). To provoke an adaptive gait pattern, subjects had to hit virtual targets, with markers guided by their knees, while walking on a self-paced treadmill. The effects of walking with and without this task on walking speed, step length, step frequency, step width and the margins of stability (MoS) were assessed. Furthermore, these trials were performed with and without additional continuous ML platform translations. When an adaptive gait pattern was required, subjects decreased step length (p<0.01), tended to increase step width (p=0.074), and decreased walking speed while maintaining similar step frequency compared to unconstrained walking. These adaptations resulted in the preservation of equal MoS between trials, despite the disturbing influence of the gait adaptability task. When the gait adaptability task was combined with the balance perturbation subjects further decreased step length, as evidenced by a significant interaction between both manipulations (p=0.012). In conclusion, able-bodied people reduce step length and increase step width during walking conditions requiring a high level of both stability and adaptability. Although an increase in step frequency has previously been found to enhance stability, a faster movement, which would coincide with a higher step frequency, hampers accuracy and may consequently limit gait adaptability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Technological Advances in Interventions to Enhance Post-Stroke Gait

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Lynne R.; Chae, John

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article provides a comprehensive review of specific rehabilitation interventions used to enhance hemiparetic gait following stroke. Neurologic rehabilitation interventions may be either therapeutic resulting in enhanced motor recovery or compensatory whereby assistance or substitution for neurological deficits results in improved functional performance. Included in this review are lower extremity functional electrical stimulation (FES), body-weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT), and lower extremity robotic-assisted gait training. These post-stroke gait training therapies are predicated on activity-dependent neuroplasticity which is the concept that cortical reorganization following central nervous system injury may be induced by repetitive, skilled, and cognitively engaging active movement. All three interventions have been trialed extensively in both research and clinical settings to demonstrate a positive effect on various gait parameters and measures of walking performance. However, more evidence is necessary to determine if specific technology-enhanced gait training methods are superior to conventional gait training methods. This review provides an overview of evidence-based research which supports the efficacy of these three interventions to improve gait, as well as provide perspective on future developments to enhance post-stroke gait in neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:23598265

  14. Robot-assisted gait training versus treadmill training in patients with Parkinson's disease: a kinematic evaluation with gait profile score.

    PubMed

    Galli, M; Cimolin, V; De Pandis, M F; Le Pera, D; Sova, I; Albertini, G; Stocchi, F; Franceschini, M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare the effects, on walking performance, of end-effector robotic rehabilitation locomotor training versus intensive training with a treadmill in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty patients with PD were randomly divided into two groups: 25 were assigned to the robot-assisted therapy group (RG) and 25 to the intensive treadmill therapy group (IG). They were evaluated with clinical examination and 3D quantitative gait analysis [gait profile score (GPS) and its constituent gait variable scores (GVSs) were calculated from gait analysis data] at the beginning (T0) and at the end (T1) of the treatment. In the RG no differences were found in the GPS, but there were significant improvements in some GVSs (Pelvic Obl and Hip Ab-Add). The IG showed no statistically significant changes in either GPS or GVSs. The end-effector robotic rehabilitation locomotor training improved gait kinematics and seems to be effective for rehabilitation in patients with mild PD.

  15. Imaging: what can it tell us about parkinsonian gait?

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Jahn, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has provided new tools to study cerebral gait control in Parkinson disease (PD). First, imaging of blood flow functions has identified a supraspinal locomotor network that includes the (frontal) cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem tegmentum and the cerebellum. These studies emphasize also the cognitive and attentional dependency of gait in PD. Furthermore, gait in PD and related syndromes like progressive supranuclear palsy may be associated with dysfunction of the indirect, modulatory prefrontal–subthalamic–pedunculopontine loop of locomotor control. The direct, stereotyped locomotor loop from the primary motor cortex to the spinal cord with rhythmic cerebellar input appears preserved and may contribute to the unflexible gait pattern in parkinsonian gait. Second, neurotransmitter and proteinopathy imaging studies are beginning to unravel novel mechanisms of parkinsonian gait and postural disturbances. Dopamine displacement imaging studies have shown evidence for a mesofrontal dopaminergic shift from a depleted striatum in parkinsonian gait. This may place additional burden on other brain systems mediating attention functions to perform previously automatic motor tasks. For example, our preliminary cholinergic imaging studies suggest significant slowing of gait speed when additional forebrain cholinergic denervation occurs in PD. Cholinergic denervation of the pedunculopontine nucleus and its thalamic projections have been associated with falls and impaired postural control. Deposition of β-amyloid may represent another non-dopaminergic correlate of gait disturbance in PD. These findings illustrate the emergence of dopamine non-responsive gait problems to reflect the transition from a predominantly hypodopaminergic disorder to a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder involving non-dopaminergic locomotor network structures and pathologies. PMID:24132837

  16. Quantitative Gait Measurement With Pulse-Doppler Radar for Passive In-Home Gait Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%–18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  17. Quantitative gait measurement with pulse-Doppler radar for passive in-home gait assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%-18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment.

  18. Gait Profile Score in multiple sclerosis patients with low disability.

    PubMed

    Morel, Eric; Allali, Gilles; Laidet, Magali; Assal, Frédéric; Lalive, Patrice H; Armand, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Gait abnormalities are subtle in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with low disability and need to be better determined. As a biomechanical approach, the Gait Profile Score (GPS) is used to assess gait quality by combining nine gait kinematic variables in one single value. This study aims i) to establish if the GPS can detect gait impairments and ii) to compare GPS with discrete spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters in low-disabled MS patients. Thirty-four relapsing-remitting MS patients with an Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤2 (mean age 36.32±8.72 years; 12 men, 22 women; mean EDSS 1.19±0.8) and twenty-two healthy controls (mean age 36.85±7.87 years; 6 men, 16 women) matched for age, weight, height, body mass index and gender underwent an instrumented gait analysis. No significant difference in GPS values and in spatiotemporal parameters was found between patients and controls. However patients showed a significant alteration at the ankle and pelvis level. GPS fails to identify gait abnormalities in low-disabled MS patients, although kinematic analysis revealed subtle gait alterations. Future studies should investigate other methods to assess gait impairments with a gait score in low-disabled MS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two-dimensional PCA-based human gait identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinyan; Wu, Rongteng

    2012-11-01

    It is very necessary to recognize person through visual surveillance automatically for public security reason. Human gait based identification focus on recognizing human by his walking video automatically using computer vision and image processing approaches. As a potential biometric measure, human gait identification has attracted more and more researchers. Current human gait identification methods can be divided into two categories: model-based methods and motion-based methods. In this paper a two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis and temporal-space analysis based human gait identification method is proposed. Using background estimation and image subtraction we can get a binary images sequence from the surveillance video. By comparing the difference of two adjacent images in the gait images sequence, we can get a difference binary images sequence. Every binary difference image indicates the body moving mode during a person walking. We use the following steps to extract the temporal-space features from the difference binary images sequence: Projecting one difference image to Y axis or X axis we can get two vectors. Project every difference image in the difference binary images sequence to Y axis or X axis difference binary images sequence we can get two matrixes. These two matrixes indicate the styles of one walking. Then Two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis(2DPCA) is used to transform these two matrixes to two vectors while at the same time keep the maximum separability. Finally the similarity of two human gait images is calculated by the Euclidean distance of the two vectors. The performance of our methods is illustrated using the CASIA Gait Database.

  20. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation Using 3D Gait Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08 + 6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23 plus or minus 8.91 years), in…

  1. A Grassmann graph embedding framework for gait analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connie, Tee; Goh, Michael Kah Ong; Teoh, Andrew Beng Jin

    2014-12-01

    Gait recognition is important in a wide range of monitoring and surveillance applications. Gait information has often been used as evidence when other biometrics is indiscernible in the surveillance footage. Building on recent advances of the subspace-based approaches, we consider the problem of gait recognition on the Grassmann manifold. We show that by embedding the manifold into reproducing kernel Hilbert space and applying the mechanics of graph embedding on such manifold, significant performance improvement can be obtained. In this work, the gait recognition problem is studied in a unified way applicable for both supervised and unsupervised configurations. Sparse representation is further incorporated in the learning mechanism to adaptively harness the local structure of the data. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can tolerate variations in appearance for gait identification effectively.

  2. Robotic gait trainer in water: development of an underwater gait-training orthosis.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tasuku; Hiramatsu, Kazuaki; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami

    2008-01-01

    To develop a robotic gait trainer that can be used in water (RGTW) and achieve repetitive physiological gait patterns to improve the movement dysfunctions. The RGTW is a hip-knee-ankle-foot orthosis with pneumatic actuators; the control software was developed on the basis of the angular motions of the hip and knee joint of a healthy subject as he walked in water. Three-dimensional motions and electromyographic (EMG) activities were recorded in nine healthy subjects to evaluate the efficacy of using the RGTW while walking on a treadmill in water. The device could preserve the angular displacement patterns of the hip and knee and foot trajectories under all experimental conditions. The tibialis anterior EMG activities in the late swing phase and the biceps femoris throughout the stance phase were reduced whose joint torques were assisted by the RGTW while walking on a treadmill in water. Using the RGTW could expect not only the effect of the hydrotherapy but also the standard treadmill gait training, in particular, and may be particularly effective for treating individuals with hip joint movement dysfunction.

  3. Syntheses, structures and luminescent properties of a series of 3D lanthanide coordination polymers with tripodal semirigid ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Junsheng; Department of Applied Chemistry, Jilin Institute of Chemical Technology, Jilin 132022; Du Dongying

    2011-02-15

    Reactions of the tripodal bridging ligand 5-(4-carboxy-phenoxy)-isophthalic acid (abbreviated as H{sub 3}cpia) with lanthanide salts lead to the formation of a family of different coordination polymers, that is, [Ln(cpia)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}.nH{sub 2}O (Ln=Ce (1), Pr (2), Nd (3), Sm (4), Eu (5), Gd (6), Dy (7), Er (8), Tm (9) and Y (10)) in the presence of formic acid or diethylamine, which are characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectrum, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), XRPD spectrum and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 1-10 are isostructural and exhibit three-dimensional microporous frameworks. Furthermore, the photoluminescent properties of 4, 5 and 7 have been studiedmore » in detail. -- Graphical abstract: Reactions of the tripodal bridging ligand (H{sub 3}cpia) with lanthanide ions lead to the formation of a series of coordination polymers in the presence of formic acid or diethylamine. Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} Ten new lanthanides-based coordination polymers (1-10) have been synthesized. {yields} 1-10 exhibit 3D (4,8)-connected fluorite topology networks with 1D channel parallel to the b-axis. {yields} Compounds 4, 5 and 7 exhibit characteristic luminescence of Sm{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} ions, respectively.« less

  4. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lünenburger, Lars; Colombo, Gery; Riener, Robert

    2007-01-23

    Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback values to the patients and therapists. The therapists can adapt the

  5. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lünenburger, Lars; Colombo, Gery; Riener, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback values to the patients and

  6. Symmetry in locomotor central pattern generators and animal gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin; Stewart, Ian; Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Collins, J. J.

    1999-10-01

    Animal locomotion is controlled, in part, by a central pattern generator (CPG), which is an intraspinal network of neurons capable of generating a rhythmic output. The spatio-temporal symmetries of the quadrupedal gaits walk, trot and pace lead to plausible assumptions about the symmetries of locomotor CPGs. These assumptions imply that the CPG of a quadruped should consist of eight nominally identical subcircuits, arranged in an essentially unique matter. Here we apply analogous arguments to myriapod CPGs. Analyses based on symmetry applied to these networks lead to testable predictions, including a distinction between primary and secondary gaits, the existence of a new primary gait called `jump', and the occurrence of half-integer wave numbers in myriapod gaits. For bipeds, our analysis also predicts two gaits with the out-of-phase symmetry of the walk and two gaits with the in-phase symmetry of the hop. We present data that support each of these predictions. This work suggests that symmetry can be used to infer a plausible class of CPG network architectures from observed patterns of animal gaits.

  7. Apolipoprotein E4 Allele and Gait Performance in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results From the Gait and Brain Study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Ryota; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2017-11-09

    The apolipoprotein E polymorphism ε4 allele (ApoE4) and gait impairment are both known risk factors for developing cognitive decline and dementia. However, it is unclear the interrelationship between these factors, particularly among older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are considered as prodromal for Alzheimer's disease. This study aimed to determine whether ApoE4 carrier individuals with MCI may experience greater impairment in gait performance. Fifty-six older adults with MCI from the "Gait and Brain Study" who were identified as either ApoE4 carriers (n = 20) or non-ApoE4 carriers (n = 36) with 1 year of follow-up were included. Gait variability, the main outcome variable, was assessed as stride time variability with an electronic walkway. Additional gait variables and cognitive performance (mini-mental state examination [MMSE] and Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA]) were also recorded. Covariates included age, sex, education level, body mass index, and number of comorbidities. Baseline characteristics were similar for both groups. Repeated measures analysis of covariance showed that gait stride time and stride length variabilities significantly increased in ApoE4 carriers but was maintained in the non-ApoE4 carriers. Similarly, ApoE4 carriers showed greater decrease in MMSE score at follow-up. In this sample of older adults with MCI, the presence of at least one copy of ApoE4 was associated with the development of both increased gait variability and cognitive decline during 1 year of follow-up. ApoE4 genotype might be considered as a potential mediator of decline in mobility function in MCI; future studies with larger samples are needed to confirm our preliminary findings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Technology-Based Feedback and Its Efficacy in Improving Gait Parameters in Patients with Abnormal Gait: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Moriana, Gema; Moreno, Antonio José; Sevillano, José Luis

    2018-01-06

    This systematic review synthesized and analyzed clinical findings related to the effectiveness of innovative technological feedback for tackling functional gait recovery. An electronic search of PUBMED, PEDro, WOS, CINAHL, and DIALNET was conducted from January 2011 to December 2016. The main inclusion criteria were: patients with modified or abnormal gait; application of technology-based feedback to deal with functional recovery of gait; any comparison between different kinds of feedback applied by means of technology, or any comparison between technological and non-technological feedback; and randomized controlled trials. Twenty papers were included. The populations were neurological patients (75%), orthopedic and healthy subjects. All participants were adults, bar one. Four studies used exoskeletons, 6 load platforms and 5 pressure sensors. The breakdown of the type of feedback used was as follows: 60% visual, 40% acoustic and 15% haptic. 55% used terminal feedback versus 65% simultaneous feedback. Prescriptive feedback was used in 60% of cases, while 50% used descriptive feedback. 62.5% and 58.33% of the trials showed a significant effect in improving step length and speed, respectively. Efficacy in improving other gait parameters such as balance or range of movement is observed in more than 75% of the studies with significant outcomes. Treatments based on feedback using innovative technology in patients with abnormal gait are mostly effective in improving gait parameters and therefore useful for the functional recovery of patients. The most frequently highlighted types of feedback were immediate visual feedback followed by terminal and immediate acoustic feedback.

  9. Gait-force model and inertial measurement unit-based measurements: A new approach for gait analysis and balance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinan; Xu, Hongyuan; Cheung, Jeffrey T

    2016-12-01

    This work describes a new approach for gait analysis and balance measurement. It uses an inertial measurement unit (IMU) that can either be embedded inside a dynamically unstable platform for balance measurement or mounted on the lower back of a human participant for gait analysis. The acceleration data along three Cartesian coordinates is analyzed by the gait-force model to extract bio-mechanics information in both the dynamic state as in the gait analyzer and the steady state as in the balance scale. For the gait analyzer, the simple, noninvasive and versatile approach makes it appealing to a broad range of applications in clinical diagnosis, rehabilitation monitoring, athletic training, sport-apparel design, and many other areas. For the balance scale, it provides a portable platform to measure the postural deviation and the balance index under visual or vestibular sensory input conditions. Despite its simple construction and operation, excellent agreement has been demonstrated between its performance and the high-cost commercial balance unit over a wide dynamic range. The portable balance scale is an ideal tool for routine monitoring of balance index, fall-risk assessment, and other balance-related health issues for both clinical and household use.

  10. Custom Coordination Environments for Lanthanoids: Tripodal Ligands Achieve Near-Perfect Octahedral Coordination for Two Dysprosium-Based Molecular Nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Soo; Baldoví, José J; Jiang, ShangDa; Koo, Bong Ho; Kang, Dong Won; Lee, Woo Ram; Koh, Eui Kwan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Hong, Chang Seop

    2017-05-01

    Controlling the coordination sphere of lanthanoid complexes is a challenging critical step toward controlling their relaxation properties. Here we present the synthesis of hexacoordinated dysprosium single-molecule magnets, where tripodal ligands achieve a near-perfect octahedral coordination. We perform a complete experimental and theoretical investigation of their magnetic properties, including a full single-crystal magnetic anisotropy analysis. The combination of electrostatic and crystal-field computational tools (SIMPRE and CONDON codes) allows us to explain the static behavior of these systems in detail.

  11. Does a single gait training session performed either overground or on a treadmill induce specific short-term effects on gait parameters in patients with hemiparesis? A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Pradon, Didier; Zory, Raphael; Bensmail, Djamel; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Gait training for patients with hemiparesis is carried out independently overground or on a treadmill. Several studies have shown differences in hemiparetic gait parameters during overground versus treadmill walking. However, few studies have compared the effects of these 2 gait training conditions on gait parameters, and no study has compared the short-term effects of these techniques on all biomechanical gait parameters. To determine whether a gait training session performed overground or on a treadmill induces specific short-term effects on biomechanical gait parameters in patients with hemiparesis. Twenty-six subjects with hemiparesis were randomly assigned to a single session of either overground or treadmill gait training. The short-term effects on spatiotemporal, kinematic, and kinetic gait parameters were assessed using gait analysis before and immediately after the training and after a 20-minute rest. Speed, cadence, percentage of single support phase, peak knee extension, peak propulsion, and braking on the paretic side were significantly increased after the gait training session. However, there were no specific changes dependent on the type of gait training performed (overground or on a treadmill). A gait training session performed by subjects with hemiparesis overground or on a treadmill did not induce specific short-term effects on biomechanical gait parameters. The increase in gait velocity that followed a gait training session seemed to reflect specific modifications of the paretic lower limb and adaptation of the nonparetic lower limb.

  12. Gait bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease: a change in the motor program which controls the synergy of gait.

    PubMed

    Warabi, Tateo; Furuyama, Hiroyasu; Sugai, Eri; Kato, Masamichi; Yanagisawa, Nobuo

    2018-01-01

    This study examined how gait bradykinesia is changed by the motor programming in Parkinson's disease. Thirty-five idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients and nine age-matched healthy subjects participated in this study. After the patients fixated on a visual-fixation target (conditioning-stimulus), the voluntary-gait was triggered by a visual on-stimulus. While the subject walked on a level floor, soleus, tibialis anterior EMG latencies, and the y-axis-vector of the sole-floor reaction force were examined. Three paradigms were used to distinguish between the off-/on-latencies. The gap-task: the visual-fixation target was turned off; 200 ms before the on-stimulus was engaged (resulting in a 200 ms-gap). EMG latency was not influenced by the visual-fixation target. The overlap-task: the on-stimulus was turned on during the visual-fixation target presentation (200 ms-overlap). The no-gap-task: the fixation target was turned off and the on-stimulus was turned on simultaneously. The onset of EMG pause following the tonic soleus EMG was defined as the off-latency of posture (termination). The onset of the tibialis anterior EMG burst was defined as the on-latency of gait (initiation). In the gap-task, the on-latency was unchanged in all of the subjects. In Parkinson's disease, the visual-fixation target prolonged both the off-/on-latencies in the overlap-task. In all tasks, the off-latency was prolonged and the off-/on-latencies were unsynchronized, which changed the synergic movement to a slow, short-step-gait. The synergy of gait was regulated by two independent sensory-motor programs of the off- and on-latency levels. In Parkinson's disease, the delayed gait initiation was due to the difficulty in terminating the sensory-motor program which controls the subject's fixation. The dynamic gait bradykinesia was involved in the difficulty (long off-latency) in terminating the motor program of the prior posture/movement.

  13. Design of patient-specific gait modifications for knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fregly, Benjamin J; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Rooney, Kelly L; Mitchell, Kim H; Chmielewski, Terese L

    2007-09-01

    Abstract-Gait modification is a nonsurgical approach for reducing the external knee adduction torque in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The magnitude of the first adduction torque peak in particular is strongly associated with knee OA progression. While toeing out has been shown to reduce the second peak, no clinically realistic gait modifications have been identified that effectively reduce both peaks simultaneously. This study predicts novel patient-specific gait modifications that achieve this goal without changing the foot path. The modified gait motion was designed for a single patient with knee OA using dynamic optimization of a patient-specific, full-body gait model. The cost function minimized the knee adduction torque subject to constraints limiting how much the new gait motion could deviate from the patient's normal gait motion. The optimizations predicted a "medial-thrust" gait pattern that reduced the first adduction torque peak between 32% and 54% and the second peak between 34% and 56%. The new motion involved three synergistic kinematic changes: slightly decreased pelvis obliquity, slightly increased leg flexion, and slightly increased pelvis axial rotation. After gait retraining, the patient achieved adduction torque reductions of 39% to 50% in the first peak and 37% to 55% in the second one. These reductions are comparable to those reported after high tibial osteotomy surgery. The associated kinematic changes were consistent with the predictions except for pelvis obliquity, which showed little change. This study demonstrates that it is feasible to design novel patient-specific gait modifications with potential clinical benefit using dynamic optimization of patient-specific, full-body gait models. Further investigation is needed to assess the extent to which similar gait modifications may be effective for other patients with knee OA.

  14. Robot-assisted gait training versus treadmill training in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a kinematic evaluation with gait profile score

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; De Pandis, Maria Francesca; Le Pera, Domenica; Sova, Ivan; Albertini, Giorgio; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Franceschini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare the effects, on walking performance, of end-effector robotic rehabilitation locomotor training versus intensive training with a treadmill in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Fifty patients with PD were randomly divided into two groups: 25 were assigned to the robot-assisted therapy group (RG) and 25 to the intensive treadmill therapy group (IG). They were evaluated with clinical examination and 3D quantitative gait analysis [gait profile score (GPS) and its constituent gait variable scores (GVSs) were calculated from gait analysis data] at the beginning (T0) and at the end (T1) of the treatment. In the RG no differences were found in the GPS, but there were significant improvements in some GVSs (Pelvic Obl and Hip Ab-Add). The IG showed no statistically significant changes in either GPS or GVSs. The end-effector robotic rehabilitation locomotor training improved gait kinematics and seems to be effective for rehabilitation in patients with mild PD. PMID:27678210

  15. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Arthritic Disorders: Reviews and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lakes, Emily H.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool to understand behavioral changes in preclinical arthritis models. While observational scoring and spatiotemporal gait parameters are the most widely performed gait analyses in rodents, commercially available systems can now provide quantitative assessments of spatiotemporal patterns. However, inconsistencies remain between testing platforms, and laboratories often select different gait pattern descriptors to report in the literature. Rodent gait can also be described through kinetic and kinematic analyses, but systems to analyze rodent kinetics and kinematics are typically custom made and often require sensitive, custom equipment. While the use of rodent gait analysis rapidly expands, it is important to remember that, while rodent gait analysis is a relatively modern behavioral assay, the study of quadrupedal gait is not new. Nearly all gait parameters are correlated, and a collection of gait parameters is needed to understand a compensatory gait pattern used by the animal. As such, a change in a single gait parameter is unlikely to tell the full biomechanical story; and to effectively use gait analysis, one must consider how multiple different parameters contribute to an altered gait pattern. The goal of this article is to review rodent gait analysis techniques and provide recommendations on how to use these technologies in rodent arthritis models, including discussions on the strengths and limitations of observational scoring, spatiotemporal, kinetic, and kinematic measures. Recognizing rodent gait analysis is an evolving tool, we also provide technical recommendations we hope will improve the utility of these analyses in the future. PMID:26995111

  16. Freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease: the paradoxical interplay between gait and cognition.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Snijders, Anke H; Daniele, Antonio; Quaranta, Davide; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Fasano, Alfonso

    2014-08-01

    Freezing of gait is a disabling episodic gait disturbance common in patients with Parkinson's disease. Recent evidences suggest a complex interplay between gait impairment and executive functions. Aim of our study was to evaluate whether specific motor conditions (sitting or walking) influence cognitive performance in patients with or without different types of freezing. Eight healthy controls, eight patients without freezing, nine patients with levodopa-responsive and nine patients with levodopa-resistant freezing received a clinical and neuropsychological assessment during two randomly performed conditions: at rest and during walking. At rest, patients with levodopa-resistant freezing performed worse than patients without freezing on tests of phonological fluency (p = 0.01). No differences among the four groups were detected during walking. When cognitive performances during walking were compared to the performance at rest, there was a significant decline of verbal episodic memory task (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test) in patients without freezing and with levodopa-responsive freezing. Interestingly, walking improved performance on the phonological fluency task in patients with levodopa-resistant freezing (p = 0.04). Compared to patients without freezing, patients with levodopa-resistant freezing perform worse when tested while seated in tasks of phonological verbal fluency. Surprisingly, gait was associated with a paradoxical improvement of phonological verbal fluency in the patients with levodopa-resistant freezing whilst walking determined a worsening of episodic memory in the other patient groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Autonomous Evolution of Dynamic Gaits with Two Quadruped Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Takamura, Seichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    A challenging task that must be accomplished for every legged robot is creating the walking and running behaviors needed for it to move. In this paper we describe our system for autonomously evolving dynamic gaits on two of Sony's quadruped robots. Our evolutionary algorithm runs on board the robot and uses the robot's sensors to compute the quality of a gait without assistance from the experimenter. First we show the evolution of a pace and trot gait on the OPEN-R prototype robot. With the fastest gait, the robot moves at over 10/min/min., which is more than forty body-lengths/min. While these first gaits are somewhat sensitive to the robot and environment in which they are evolved, we then show the evolution of robust dynamic gaits, one of which is used on the ERS-110, the first consumer version of AIBO.

  18. Gait Deviations in Children With Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type I.

    PubMed

    Garman, Christina R; Graf, Adam; Krzak, Joseph; Caudill, Angela; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2017-08-02

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a congenital connective tissue disorder often characterized by orthopaedic complications that impact normal gait. As such, mobility is of particular interest in the OI population as it is associated with multiple aspects of participation and quality of life. The purpose of the current study was to identify and describe common gait deviations in a large sample of individuals with type I OI and speculate the etiology with a goal of improving function. Gait analysis was performed on 44 subjects with type I (11.7±3.08 y old) and 30 typically developing controls (9.54±3.1 y old ). Spatial temporal, kinematic, and kinetic gait data were calculated from the Vicon Plug-in-Gait Model. Musculoskeletal modeling of the muscle tendon lengths (MTL) was done in OpenSim 3.3 to evaluate the MTL of the gastrocnemius and gluteus maximus. The gait deviation index, a dimensionless parameter that evaluates the deviation of 9 kinematic gait parameters from a control database, was also calculated. Walking speed, single support time, stride, and step length were lower and double support time was higher in the OI group. The gait deviation index score was lower and external hip rotation angle was higher in the OI group. Peak hip flexor, knee extensor and ankle plantarflexor moments, and power generation at the ankle were lower in the OI group. MTL analysis revealed no significant length discrepancies between the OI group and the typically developing group. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive description of gait characteristics among a group of individuals with type I OI. Such data inform clinicians about specific gait deviations in this population allowing clinicians to recommend more focused interventions. Level III-case-control study.

  19. Cognitive Contributions to Gait and Falls: Evidence and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Amboni, Marianna; Barone, Paolo; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Dementia and gait impairments often coexist in older adults and patients with neurodegenerative disease. Both conditions represent independent risk factors for falls. The relationship between cognitive function and gait has recently received increasing attention. Gait is no longer considered merely automated motor activity but rather an activity that requires executive function and attention as well as judgment of external and internal cues. In this review, we intend to: (1) summarize and synthesize the experimental, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging evidence that supports the role played by cognition in the control of gait; and (2) briefly discuss the implications deriving from the interplay between cognition and gait. In recent years, the dual task paradigm has been widely used as an experimental method to explore the interplay between gait and cognition. Several neuropsychological investigations have also demonstrated that walking relies on the use of several cognitive domains, including executive-attentional function, visuospatial abilities, and even memory resources. A number of morphological and functional neuroimaging studies have offered additional evidence supporting the relationship between gait and cognitive resources. Based on the findings from 3 lines of studies, it appears that a growing body of evidence indicates a pivotal role of cognition in gait control and fall prevention. The interplay between higher-order neural function and gait has a number of clinical implications, ranging from integrated assessment tools to possible innovative lines of interventions, including cognitive therapy for falls prevention on one hand and walking program for reducing dementia risk on the other. PMID:24132840

  20. Gait in Parkinson's disease: A visuo-cognitive challenge.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Samuel; Lord, Sue; Hill, Elizabeth; Rochester, Lynn

    2016-03-01

    Vision and cognition have both been related to gait impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) through separate strands of research. The cumulative and interactive effect of both (which we term visuo-cognition) has not been previously investigated and little is known about the influence of cognition on vision with respect to gait. Understanding the role of vision, cognition and visuo-cognition in gait in PD is critical for data interpretation and to infer and test underlying mechanisms. The purpose of this comprehensive narrative review was to examine the interdependent and interactive role of cognition and vision in gait in PD and older adults. Evidence from a broad range of research disciplines was reviewed and summarised. A key finding was that attention appears to play a pivotal role in mediating gait, cognition and vision, and should be considered emphatically in future research in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gait performance of children and adolescents with sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Melo, Renato de Souza

    2017-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that children with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) may exhibit balance disorders, which can compromise the gait performance of this population. Compare the gait performance of normal hearing (NH) children and those with SNHL, considering the sex and age range of the sample, and analyze gait performance according to degrees of hearing loss and etiological factors in the latter group. This is a cross-sectional study that assessed 96 students, 48 NH and 48 with SNHL, aged between 7 and 18 years. The Brazilian version of the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) was used to analyze gait and the Mann-Whitney test for statistical analysis. The group with SNHL obtained lower average gait performance compared to NH subjects (p=0.000). This was also observed when the children were grouped by sex female and male (p=0.000). The same difference occurred when the children were stratified by age group: 7-18 years (p=0.000). The group with severe and profound hearing loss exhibited worse gait performance than those with mild and moderate loss (p=0.048) and children with prematurity as an etiological factor demonstrated the worst gait performance. The children with SNHL showed worse gait performance compared to NH of the same sex and age group. Those with severe and profound hearing loss and prematurity as an etiological factor demonstrated the worst gait performances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Altering length and velocity feedback during a neuro-musculoskeletal simulation of normal gait contributes to hemiparetic gait characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Karen; De Groote, Friedl; Aerts, Wouter; De Schutter, Joris; Duysens, Jacques; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-04-30

    Spasticity is an important complication after stroke, especially in the anti-gravity muscles, i.e. lower limb extensors. However the contribution of hyperexcitable muscle spindle reflex loops to gait impairments after stroke is often disputed. In this study a neuro-musculoskeletal model was developed to investigate the contribution of an increased length and velocity feedback and altered reflex modulation patterns to hemiparetic gait deficits. A musculoskeletal model was extended with a muscle spindle model providing real-time length and velocity feedback of gastrocnemius, soleus, vasti and rectus femoris during a forward dynamic simulation (neural control model). By using a healthy subject's base muscle excitations, in combination with increased feedback gains and altered reflex modulation patterns, the effect on kinematics was simulated. A foot-ground contact model was added to account for the interaction effect between the changed kinematics and the ground. The qualitative effect i.e. the directional effect and the specific gait phases where the effect is present, on the joint kinematics was then compared with hemiparetic gait deviations reported in the literature. Our results show that increased feedback in combination with altered reflex modulation patterns of soleus, vasti and rectus femoris muscle can contribute to excessive ankle plantarflexion/inadequate dorsiflexion, knee hyperextension/inadequate flexion and increased hip extension/inadequate flexion during dedicated gait cycle phases. Increased feedback of gastrocnemius can also contribute to excessive plantarflexion/inadequate dorsiflexion, however in combination with excessive knee and hip flexion. Increased length/velocity feedback can therefore contribute to two types of gait deviations, which are both in accordance with previously reported gait deviations in hemiparetic patients. Furthermore altered modulation patterns, in particular the reduced suppression of the muscle spindle feedback during

  3. Comparison of Gait Aspects According to FES Stimulation Position Applied to Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Byeong-mu; Kim, Tae-ho; Lee, Jin-hwan; Lim, Jin-youg; Seo, Dong-kwon; Lee, Dong-jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study sought to identify the gait aspects according to the FES stimulation position in stroke patients during gait training. [Subjects and Methods] To perform gait analysis, ten stroke patients were grouped based on 4 types of gait conditions: gait without FES stimulation (non-FES), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior (Ta), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and quadriceps (TaQ), and gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius (TaGm). [Results] Based on repeated measures analysis of variance of measurements of gait aspects comprised of gait speed, gait cycle, and step length according to the FES stimulation position, the FES stimulation significantly affected gait aspects. [Conclusion] In conclusion, stimulating the tibialis anterior and quadriceps and stimulating the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius are much more effective than stimulating only the tibialis anterior during gait training in stroke patients using FES. PMID:24764634

  4. Gait Planning and Stability Control of a Quadruped Robot

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junmin; Wang, Jinge; Yang, Simon X.; Zhou, Kedong; Tang, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize smooth gait planning and stability control of a quadruped robot, a new controller algorithm based on CPG-ZMP (central pattern generator-zero moment point) is put forward in this paper. To generate smooth gait and shorten the adjusting time of the model oscillation system, a new CPG model controller and its gait switching strategy based on Wilson-Cowan model are presented in the paper. The control signals of knee-hip joints are obtained by the improved multi-DOF reduced order control theory. To realize stability control, the adaptive speed adjustment and gait switch are completed by the real-time computing of ZMP. Experiment results show that the quadruped robot's gaits are efficiently generated and the gait switch is smooth in the CPG control algorithm. Meanwhile, the stability of robot's movement is improved greatly with the CPG-ZMP algorithm. The algorithm in this paper has good practicability, which lays a foundation for the production of the robot prototype. PMID:27143959

  5. Gait Planning and Stability Control of a Quadruped Robot.

    PubMed

    Li, Junmin; Wang, Jinge; Yang, Simon X; Zhou, Kedong; Tang, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize smooth gait planning and stability control of a quadruped robot, a new controller algorithm based on CPG-ZMP (central pattern generator-zero moment point) is put forward in this paper. To generate smooth gait and shorten the adjusting time of the model oscillation system, a new CPG model controller and its gait switching strategy based on Wilson-Cowan model are presented in the paper. The control signals of knee-hip joints are obtained by the improved multi-DOF reduced order control theory. To realize stability control, the adaptive speed adjustment and gait switch are completed by the real-time computing of ZMP. Experiment results show that the quadruped robot's gaits are efficiently generated and the gait switch is smooth in the CPG control algorithm. Meanwhile, the stability of robot's movement is improved greatly with the CPG-ZMP algorithm. The algorithm in this paper has good practicability, which lays a foundation for the production of the robot prototype.

  6. Technology-Based Feedback and Its Efficacy in Improving Gait Parameters in Patients with Abnormal Gait: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro-Moriana, Gema; Moreno, Antonio José

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review synthesized and analyzed clinical findings related to the effectiveness of innovative technological feedback for tackling functional gait recovery. An electronic search of PUBMED, PEDro, WOS, CINAHL, and DIALNET was conducted from January 2011 to December 2016. The main inclusion criteria were: patients with modified or abnormal gait; application of technology-based feedback to deal with functional recovery of gait; any comparison between different kinds of feedback applied by means of technology, or any comparison between technological and non-technological feedback; and randomized controlled trials. Twenty papers were included. The populations were neurological patients (75%), orthopedic and healthy subjects. All participants were adults, bar one. Four studies used exoskeletons, 6 load platforms and 5 pressure sensors. The breakdown of the type of feedback used was as follows: 60% visual, 40% acoustic and 15% haptic. 55% used terminal feedback versus 65% simultaneous feedback. Prescriptive feedback was used in 60% of cases, while 50% used descriptive feedback. 62.5% and 58.33% of the trials showed a significant effect in improving step length and speed, respectively. Efficacy in improving other gait parameters such as balance or range of movement is observed in more than 75% of the studies with significant outcomes. Conclusion: Treatments based on feedback using innovative technology in patients with abnormal gait are mostly effective in improving gait parameters and therefore useful for the functional recovery of patients. The most frequently highlighted types of feedback were immediate visual feedback followed by terminal and immediate acoustic feedback. PMID:29316645

  7. Altered vision destabilizes gait in older persons.

    PubMed

    Helbostad, Jorunn L; Vereijken, Beatrix; Hesseberg, Karin; Sletvold, Olav

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of dim light and four experimentally induced changes in vision on gait speed and footfall and trunk parameters in older persons walking on level ground. Using a quasi-experimental design, gait characteristics were assessed in full light, dim light, and in dim light combined with manipulations resulting in reduced depth vision, double vision, blurred vision, and tunnel vision, respectively. A convenience sample of 24 home-dwelling older women and men (mean age 78.5 years, SD 3.4) with normal vision for their age and able to walk at least 10 m without assistance participated. Outcome measures were gait speed and spatial and temporal parameters of footfall and trunk acceleration, derived from an electronic gait mat and accelerometers. Dim light alone had no effect. Vision manipulations combined with dim light had effect on most footfall parameters but few trunk parameters. The largest effects were found regarding double and tunnel vision. Men increased and women decreased gait speed following manipulations (p=0.017), with gender differences also in stride velocity variability (p=0.017) and inter-stride medio-lateral trunk acceleration variability (p=0.014). Gender effects were related to differences in body height and physical functioning. Results indicate that visual problems lead to a more cautious and unstable gait pattern even under relatively simple conditions. This points to the importance of assessing vision in older persons and correcting visual impairments where possible.

  8. Turtle mimetic soft robot with two swimming gaits.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Kim, Min-Soo; Rodrigue, Hugo; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Shim, Jae-Eul; Kim, Min-Cheol; Chu, Won-Shik; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-05-04

    This paper presents a biomimetic turtle flipper actuator consisting of a shape memory alloy composite structure for implementation in a turtle-inspired autonomous underwater vehicle. Based on the analysis of the Chelonia mydas, the flipper actuator was divided into three segments containing a scaffold structure fabricated using a 3D printer. According to the filament stacking sequence of the scaffold structure in the actuator, different actuating motions can be realized and three different types of scaffold structures were proposed to replicate the motion of the different segments of the flipper of the Chelonia mydas. This flipper actuator can mimic the continuous deformation of the forelimb of Chelonia mydas which could not be realized in previous motor based robot. This actuator can also produce two distinct motions that correspond to the two different swimming gaits of the Chelonia mydas, which are the routine and vigorous swimming gaits, by changing the applied current sequence of the SMA wires embedded in the flipper actuator. The generated thrust and the swimming efficiency in each swimming gait of the flipper actuator were measured and the results show that the vigorous gait has a higher thrust but a relatively lower swimming efficiency than the routine gait. The flipper actuator was implemented in a biomimetic turtle robot, and its average swimming speed in the routine and vigorous gaits were measured with the vigorous gait being capable of reaching a maximum speed of 11.5 mm s(-1).

  9. Dual gait generative models for human motion estimation from a single camera.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Fan, Guoliang

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a general gait representation framework for video-based human motion estimation. Specifically, we want to estimate the kinematics of an unknown gait from image sequences taken by a single camera. This approach involves two generative models, called the kinematic gait generative model (KGGM) and the visual gait generative model (VGGM), which represent the kinematics and appearances of a gait by a few latent variables, respectively. The concept of gait manifold is proposed to capture the gait variability among different individuals by which KGGM and VGGM can be integrated together, so that a new gait with unknown kinematics can be inferred from gait appearances via KGGM and VGGM. Moreover, a new particle-filtering algorithm is proposed for dynamic gait estimation, which is embedded with a segmental jump-diffusion Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme to accommodate the gait variability in a long observed sequence. The proposed algorithm is trained from the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Mocap data and tested on the Brown University HumanEva data with promising results.

  10. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via…

  11. Effectiveness of gait training using an electromechanical gait trainer, with and without functional electric stimulation, in subacute stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tong, Raymond K; Ng, Maple F; Li, Leonard S

    2006-10-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of conventional gait training (CGT), gait training using an electromechanical gait trainer (EGT), and gait training using an electromechanical gait trainer with functional electric stimulation (EGT-FES) in people with subacute stroke. Nonblinded randomized controlled trial. Rehabilitation hospital for adults. Fifty patients were recruited within 6 weeks after stroke onset; 46 of these completed the 4-week training period. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 gait intervention groups: CGT, EGT, or EGT-FES. The experimental intervention was a 20-minute session per day, 5 days a week (weekdays) for 4 weeks. In addition, all participants received their 40-minute sessions of regular physical therapy every weekday as part of their treatment by the hospital. Five-meter walking speed test, Elderly Mobility Scale (EMS), Berg Balance Scale, Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC), Motricity Index leg subscale, FIM instrument score, and Barthel Index. The EGT and EGT-FES groups had statistically significantly more improvement than the CGT group in the 5-m walking speed test (CGT vs EGT, P=.011; CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.001), Motricity Index (CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.011), EMS (CGT vs EGT, P=.006; CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.009), and FAC (CGT vs EGT, P=.005; CGT vs EGT-FES, P=.002) after the 4 weeks of training. No statistically significant differences were found between the EGT and EGT-FES groups in all outcome measures. In this sample with subacute stroke, participants who trained on the electromechanical gait trainer with body-weight support, with or without FES, had a faster gait, better mobility, and improvement in functional ambulation than participants who underwent conventional gait training. Future studies with assessor blinding and larger sample sizes are warranted.

  12. Is adult gait less susceptible than paediatric gait to hip joint centre regression equation error?

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Hosking, J; O'Brien, T

    2016-03-01

    Hip joint centre (HJC) regression equation error during paediatric gait has recently been shown to have clinical significance. In relation to adult gait, it has been inferred that comparable errors with children in absolute HJC position may in fact result in less significant kinematic and kinetic error. This study investigated the clinical agreement of three commonly used regression equation sets (Bell et al., Davis et al. and Orthotrak) for adult subjects against the equations of Harrington et al. The relationship between HJC position error and subject size was also investigated for the Davis et al. set. Full 3-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 12 healthy adult subjects with data for each set compared to Harrington et al. The Gait Profile Score, Gait Variable Score and GDI-kinetic were used to assess clinical significance while differences in HJC position between the Davis and Harrington sets were compared to leg length and subject height using regression analysis. A number of statistically significant differences were present in absolute HJC position. However, all sets fell below the clinically significant thresholds (GPS <1.6°, GDI-Kinetic <3.6 points). Linear regression revealed a statistically significant relationship for both increasing leg length and increasing subject height with decreasing error in anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions. Results confirm a negligible clinical error for adult subjects suggesting that any of the examined sets could be used interchangeably. Decreasing error with both increasing leg length and increasing subject height suggests that the Davis set should be used cautiously on smaller subjects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Construction of a magnetostrictive hysteresis operator using a tripod-like primitive hopfield neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adly, A. A.; Abd-El-Hafiz, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    It is well known that accurate modeling of magnetostrictive hysteresis is crucial to different industrial applications. Although several magnetostrictive models have been developed in the past, the accuracy-efficiency balance has always been crucial. Recently, the possibility of constructing a primitive vector hysteresis operator using a tri-node Hopfield Neural Network (HNN) was demonstrated. Based upon the fact that mechanical stress along a certain direction results in dimensional deformation, this paper introduces a novel extension to the aforementioned recently developed approach. More specifically, a stress-driven evolution of a tri-node HNN hysteresis operator pair is proposed, thus yielding a tripod-like HNN pair having different input offset values. Model identification, sample simulation results and comparison with experimental measurements are given in the paper.

  14. Gait Deviation Index, Gait Profile Score and Gait Variable Score in children with spastic cerebral palsy: Intra-rater reliability and agreement across two repeated sessions.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg; Pedersen, Niels Wisbech; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-07-01

    The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and Gait Profile Score (GPS) are the most used summary measures of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the reliability and agreement of these indices have not been investigated, limiting their clinimetric quality for research and clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the intra-rater reliability and agreement of summary measures of gait (GDI; GPS; and the Gait Variable Score (GVS) derived from the GPS). The intra-rater reliability and agreement were investigated across two repeated sessions in 18 children aged 5-12 years diagnosed with spastic CP. No systematic bias was observed between the sessions and no heteroscedasticity was observed in Bland-Altman plots. For the GDI and GPS, excellent reliability with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values of 0.8-0.9 was found, while the GVS was found to have fair to good reliability with ICCs of 0.4-0.7. The agreement for the GDI and the logarithmically transformed GPS, in terms of the standard error of measurement as a percentage of the grand mean (SEM%) varied from 4.1 to 6.7%, whilst the smallest detectable change in percent (SDC%) ranged from 11.3 to 18.5%. For the logarithmically transformed GVS, we found a fair to large variation in SEM% from 7 to 29% and in SDC% from 18 to 81%. The GDI and GPS demonstrated excellent reliability and acceptable agreement proving that they can both be used in research and clinical practice. However, the observed large variability for some of the GVS requires cautious consideration when selecting outcome measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gait Phase Recognition for Lower-Limb Exoskeleton with Only Joint Angular Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Du-Xin; Wu, Xinyu; Du, Wenbin; Wang, Can; Xu, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    Gait phase is widely used for gait trajectory generation, gait control and gait evaluation on lower-limb exoskeletons. So far, a variety of methods have been developed to identify the gait phase for lower-limb exoskeletons. Angular sensors on lower-limb exoskeletons are essential for joint closed-loop controlling; however, other types of sensors, such as plantar pressure, attitude or inertial measurement unit, are not indispensable.Therefore, to make full use of existing sensors, we propose a novel gait phase recognition method for lower-limb exoskeletons using only joint angular sensors. The method consists of two procedures. Firstly, the gait deviation distances during walking are calculated and classified by Fisher’s linear discriminant method, and one gait cycle is divided into eight gait phases. The validity of the classification results is also verified based on large gait samples. Secondly, we build a gait phase recognition model based on multilayer perceptron and train it with the phase-labeled gait data. The experimental result of cross-validation shows that the model has a 94.45% average correct rate of set (CRS) and an 87.22% average correct rate of phase (CRP) on the testing set, and it can predict the gait phase accurately. The novel method avoids installing additional sensors on the exoskeleton or human body and simplifies the sensory system of the lower-limb exoskeleton. PMID:27690023

  16. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  17. Neurological Gait Abnormalities And Risk Of Falls In Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Joe; Ambrose, Anne F; Lipton, Richard B; Wang, Cuiling

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the validity of neurological gait evaluations in predicting falls in older adults. Methods We studied 632 adults age 70 and over (mean age 80.6 years, 62% women) enrolled in the Einstein Aging Study whose walking patterns were evaluated by study clinicians using a clinical gait rating scale. Association of neurological gaits and six subtypes (hemiparetic, frontal, Parkinsonian, unsteady, neuropathic, and spastic) with incident falls was studied using generalized estimation equation procedures adjusted for potential confounders, and reported as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Over a mean follow-up of 21 months, 244 (39%) subjects fell. Mean fall rate was 0.47 falls per person year. At baseline, 120 subjects were diagnosed with neurological gaits. Subjects with neurological gaits were at increased risk of falls (risk ratio 1.49, 95% CI 1.11 – 2.00). Unsteady (risk ratio 1.52, 95% CI 1.04 – 2.22), and neuropathic gait (risk ratio 1.94, 95% CI 1.07 – 3.11) were the two gait subtypes that predicted risk of falls. The results remained significant after accounting for disability and cognitive status, and also with injurious falls as the outcome. Conclusions Neurological gaits and subtypes are independent predictors of falls in older adults. Neurological gait assessments will help clinicians identify and institute preventive measures in older adults at high risk for falls. PMID:19784714

  18. A model of free-living gait: A factor analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Rosie; Hickey, Aodhán; Del Din, Silvia; Godfrey, Alan; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn

    2017-02-01

    Gait is a marker of global health, cognition and falls risk. Gait is complex, comprised of multiple characteristics sensitive to survival, age and pathology. Due to covariance amongst characteristics, conceptual gait models have been established to reduce redundancy and aid interpretation. Previous models have been derived from laboratory gait assessments which are costly in equipment and time. Body-worn monitors (BWM) allow for free-living, low-cost and continuous gait measurement and produce similar covariant gait characteristics. A BWM gait model from both controlled and free-living measurement has not yet been established, limiting utility. 103 control and 67 PD participants completed a controlled laboratory assessment; walking for two minutes around a circuit wearing a BWM. 89 control and 58 PD participants were assessed in free-living, completing normal activities for 7 days wearing a BWM. Fourteen gait characteristics were derived from the BWM, selected according to a previous model. Principle component analysis derived factor loadings of gait characteristics. Four gait domains were derived for both groups and conditions; pace, rhythm, variability and asymmetry. Domains totalled 84.84% and 88.43% of variance for controlled and 90.00% and 93.03% of variance in free-living environments for control and PD participants respectively. Gait characteristic loading was unambiguous for all characteristics apart from gait variability which demonstrated cross-loading for both groups and environments. The model was highly congruent with the original model. The conceptual gait models remained stable using a BWM in controlled and free-living environments. The model became more discrete supporting utility of the gait model for free-living gait. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A human quadrupedal gait following poliomyelitis: From the Dercum-Muybridge collaboration (1885).

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2016-03-01

    Beginning in the late 1870s, before the invention of movie cameras or projectors, pioneering English American photographer Eadweard Muybridge photographed iconic image sequences of people and animals in motion using arrays of sequentially triggered single-image cameras. In 1885, Philadelphia neurologist Francis Dercum initiated a collaborative relationship with Muybridge at the University of Pennsylvania to photograph sequential images of patients with various neurologic disorders of movement, including an acquired pathologic quadrupedal gait in a young boy that developed as a consequence of poliomyelitis. This pathologic human quadrupedal gait was compared with other quadrupedal gaits filmed by Muybridge, including a toddler girl and an adult woman crawling on hands and knees, an adult woman bear crawling on hands and feet, and a baboon walking. All of the human quadrupedal gaits were lateral sequence gaits, whereas the baboon's walking gait was a diagonal sequence gait. Modern studies have confirmed the nonpathologic quadrupedal gait sequences of humans and nonhuman primates. Despite Dercum's assertion to the contrary, the limb placement pattern of the boy with a pathologic quadrupedal gait after poliomyelitis was not the typical gait of a primate quadruped, but rather was the typical gait sequence for normal human developmental and volitional quadrupedal gaits. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Real-time feedback to improve gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, Linda; Booth, Adam T C; van de Port, Ingrid; Buizer, Annemieke I; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Krogt, Marjolein M

    2017-02-01

    Real-time feedback may be useful for enhancing information gained from clinical gait analysis of children with cerebral palsy (CP). It may also be effective in functional gait training, however, it is not known if children with CP can adapt gait in response to real-time feedback of kinematic parameters. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (age 6-16; GMFCS I-III), walking with a flexed-knee gait pattern, walked on an instrumented treadmill with virtual reality in three conditions: regular walking without feedback (NF), feedback on hip angle (FH) and feedback on knee angle (FK). Clinically relevant gait parameters were calculated and the gait profile score (GPS) was used as a measure of overall gait changes between conditions. All children, except one, were able to improve hip and/or knee extension during gait in response to feedback, with nine achieving a clinically relevant improvement. Peak hip extension improved significantly by 5.1±5.9° (NF: 8.9±12.8°, FH: 3.8±10.4°, p=0.01). Peak knee extension improved significantly by 7.7±7.1° (NF: 22.2±12.0°, FK: 14.5±12.7°, p<0.01). GPS did not change between conditions due to increased deviations in other gait parameters. Responders to feedback were shown to have worse initial gait as measured by GPS (p=0.005) and functional selectivity score (p=0.049). In conclusion, ambulatory children with CP show adaptability in gait and are able to respond to real-time feedback, resulting in significant and clinically relevant improvements in peak hip and knee extension. These findings show the potential of real-time feedback as a tool for functional gait training and advanced gait analysis in CP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Handwriting Impairments in People With Parkinson's Disease and Freezing of Gait.

    PubMed

    Heremans, Elke; Nackaerts, Evelien; Broeder, Sanne; Vervoort, Griet; Swinnen, Stephan P; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies show that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and freezing of gait (FOG) experience motor problems outside their gait freezing episodes. Because handwriting is also a sequential movement, it may be affected in PD patients with FOG relative to those without. The current study aimed to assess the quality of writing in PD patients with and without FOG in comparison to healthy controls (CTs) during various writing tasks. Handwriting was assessed by the writing of cursive loops on a touch-sensitive writing tablet and by means of the Systematic Screening of Handwriting Difficulties (SOS) test in 30 PD patients with and without freezing and 15 healthy age-matched CTs. The tablet tests were performed at 2 different sizes, either continuously or alternatingly, as indicated by visual target lines. Patients with freezing showed decreased writing amplitudes and increased variability compared with CTs and patients without freezing on the writing tablet tests. Writing problems were present during both tests but were more pronounced during writing at alternating compared with writing at continuous size. Patients with freezing also had a higher total score on the SOS test than patients without freezing and CTs, reflecting more extensive handwriting problems, particularly with writing fluency. Writing is more severely affected in PD patients with FOG than in those without FOG. These results indicate that deficient movement sequencing and adaptation is a generic problem in patients with FOG. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Evaluation of the performance of accelerometer-based gait event detection algorithms in different real-world scenarios using the MAREA gait database.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Siddhartha; Wickström, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Numerous gait event detection (GED) algorithms have been developed using accelerometers as they allow the possibility of long-term gait analysis in everyday life. However, almost all such existing algorithms have been developed and assessed using data collected in controlled indoor experiments with pre-defined paths and walking speeds. On the contrary, human gait is quite dynamic in the real-world, often involving varying gait speeds, changing surfaces and varying surface inclinations. Though portable wearable systems can be used to conduct experiments directly in the real-world, there is a lack of publicly available gait datasets or studies evaluating the performance of existing GED algorithms in various real-world settings. This paper presents a new gait database called MAREA (n=20 healthy subjects) that consists of walking and running in indoor and outdoor environments with accelerometers positioned on waist, wrist and both ankles. The study also evaluates the performance of six state-of-the-art accelerometer-based GED algorithms in different real-world scenarios, using the MAREA gait database. The results reveal that the performance of these algorithms is inconsistent and varies with changing environments and gait speeds. All algorithms demonstrated good performance for the scenario of steady walking in a controlled indoor environment with a combined median F1score of 0.98 for Heel-Strikes and 0.94 for Toe-Offs. However, they exhibited significantly decreased performance when evaluated in other lesser controlled scenarios such as walking and running in an outdoor street, with a combined median F1score of 0.82 for Heel-Strikes and 0.53 for Toe-Offs. Moreover, all GED algorithms displayed better performance for detecting Heel-Strikes as compared to Toe-Offs, when evaluated in different scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Human Odometry Verifies the Symmetry Perspective on Bipedal Gaits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turvey, M. T.; Harrison, Steven J.; Frank, Till D.; Carello, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Bipedal gaits have been classified on the basis of the group symmetry of the minimal network of identical differential equations (alias "cells") required to model them. Primary gaits are characterized by dihedral symmetry, whereas secondary gaits are characterized by a lower, cyclic symmetry. This fact was used in a test of human…

  4. Effects of walking speed on asymmetry and bilateral coordination of gait

    PubMed Central

    Plotnik, Meir; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Zeev, Aviva; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffery M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating the bilateral coordination of gait in humans are largely unknown. Our objective was to study how bilateral coordination changes as a result of gait speed modifications during over ground walking. 15 young adults wore force sensitive insoles that measured vertical forces used to determine the timing of the gait cycle events under three walking conditions (i.e., usual-walking, fast and slow). Ground reaction force impact (GRFI) associated with heel-strikes was also quantified, representing the potential contribution of sensory feedback to the regulation of gait. Gait asymmetry (GA) was quantified based on the differences between right and left swing times and the bilateral coordination of gait was assessed using the phase coordination index (PCI), a metric that quantifies the consistency and accuracy of the anti-phase stepping pattern. GA was preserved in the three different gait speeds. PCI was higher (reduced coordination) in the slow gait condition, compared to usual-walking (3.51% vs. 2.47%, respectively, p=0.002), but was not significantly affected in the fast condition. GRFI values were lower in the slow walking as compared to usual-walking and higher in the fast walking condition (p<0.001). Stepwise regression revealed that slowed gait related changes in PCI were not associated with the slowed gait related changes in GRFI. The present findings suggest that left-right anti-phase stepping is similar in normal and fast walking, but altered during slowed walking. This behavior might reflect a relative increase in attention resources required to regulate a slow gait speed, consistent with the possibility that cortical function and supraspinal input influences the bilateral coordination of gait. PMID:23680424

  5. Treadmill training with partial body weight support and an electromechanical gait trainer for restoration of gait in subacute stroke patients: a randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Von Frankenberg, S; Treig, T; Konrad, M; Hesse, S

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare treadmill and electromechanical gait trainer therapy in subacute, nonambulatory stroke survivors. The gait trainer was designed to provide nonambulatory subjects the repetitive practice of a gait-like movement without overexerting therapists. This was a randomized, controlled study with a crossover design following an A-B-A versus a B-A-B pattern. A consisted of 2 weeks of gait trainer therapy, and B consisted of 2 weeks of treadmill therapy. Thirty nonambulatory hemiparetic patients, 4 to 12 weeks after stroke, were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 groups receiving locomotor therapy every workday for 15 to 20 minutes for 6 weeks. Weekly gait ability (functional ambulation category [FAC]), gait velocity, and the required physical assistance during both kinds of locomotor therapy were the primary outcome measures, and other motor functions (Rivermead motor assessment score) and ankle spasticity (modified Ashworth score) were the secondary outcome measures. Follow-up occurred 6 months later. The groups did not differ at study onset with respect to the clinical characteristics and effector variables. During treatment, the FAC, gait velocity, and Rivermead scores improved in both groups, and ankle spasticity did not change. Median FAC level was 4 (3 to 4) in group A compared with 3 (2 to 3) in group B at the end of treatment (P=0.018), but the difference at 6-month follow up was not significant. The therapeutic effort was less on the gait trainer, with 1 instead of 2 therapists assisting the patient at study onset. All but seven patients preferred the gait trainer. The newly developed gait trainer was at least as effective as treadmill therapy with partial body weight support while requiring less input from the therapist. Further studies are warranted.

  6. Neuroplasticity in post-stroke gait recovery and noninvasive brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Hou, Qing-hua; Russell, Shawn D.; Bennett, Bradford C.; Sellers, Andrew J.; Lin, Qiang; Huang, Dong-feng

    2015-01-01

    Gait disorders drastically affect the quality of life of stroke survivors, making post-stroke rehabilitation an important research focus. Noninvasive brain stimulation has potential in facilitating neuroplasticity and improving post-stroke gait impairment. However, a large inter-individual variability in the response to noninvasive brain stimulation interventions has been increasingly recognized. We first review the neurophysiology of human gait and post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery, and then discuss how noninvasive brain stimulation techniques could be utilized to enhance gait recovery. While post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery is characterized by use-dependent plasticity, it evolves over time, is idiosyncratic, and may develop maladaptive elements. Furthermore, noninvasive brain stimulation has limited reach capability and is facilitative-only in nature. Therefore, we recommend that noninvasive brain stimulation be used adjunctively with rehabilitation training and other concurrent neuroplasticity facilitation techniques. Additionally, when noninvasive brain stimulation is applied for the rehabilitation of gait impairment in stroke survivors, stimulation montages should be customized according to the specific types of neuroplasticity found in each individual. This could be done using multiple mapping techniques. PMID:26889202

  7. Can we improve gait skills in chronic hemiplegics? A randomised control trial with gait trainer.

    PubMed

    Dias, D; Laíns, J; Pereira, A; Nunes, R; Caldas, J; Amaral, C; Pires, S; Costa, A; Alves, P; Moreira, M; Garrido, N; Loureiro, L

    2007-12-01

    Partial body weight support (PBWS) is an accepted treatment for hemiplegic patients. The aim of this study is to compare the efficiency of gait trainer with conventional treatment on the gait management after stroke. Forty chronic post-stroke hemiplegics were part of a prospective research. Inclusion criteria were: first ever stroke in a chronic stage with stabilised motor deficits; age >18 and <80 years; cognitive and communication skills to understand the treatment; absence of cardiac, psychological and orthopedic contraindications. Patients were randomised into two groups: the control group (CG) that used the Bobath method in 40 minutes sessions, 5 times a week, for 5 weeks, and the experimental group (EG) that used the gait trainer, for the same period of time and frequency. Assessment tools: Motricity Index (MI); Toulouse Motor Scale (TMS); modified Ashworth Spasticity Scale (mASS); Berg Balance Scale (BBS); Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI); Fugl-Meyer Stroke Scale (F-MSS); Functional Ambulation Category (FAC); Barthel Index (BI); 10 meters, time up and go (TUG), 6 minutes, and step tests. EG and CG did the assessments before treatment (T(0)), right after treatment (T(1)), and on follow-up, 3 months later (T(2)). CG and EG were homogenous in all the variables at T(0). CG and EG showed improvement in almost all the assessment scales after treatment, although only some with relevant differences. EG showed statistically relevant improvement on T(1) and on T(2) in several of the assessment tools, whereas CG only showed statistically significant improvement after T(1) and only in some of the assessment tools. Both groups of chronic hemiplegic patients improved after either PBWS with gait trainer or Bobath treatment. Only subjects undergoing PBWS with gait trainer maintained functional gain after 3 months.

  8. Quantifying gait patterns in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mónica; Atehortúa, Angélica; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is constituted by a set of motor symptoms, namely tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, which are usually described but not quantified. This work proposes an objective characterization of PD gait patterns by approximating the single stance phase a single grounded pendulum. This model estimates the force generated by the gait during the single support from gait data. This force describes the motion pattern for different stages of the disease. The model was validated using recorded videos of 8 young control subjects, 10 old control subjects and 10 subjects with Parkinson's disease in different stages. The estimated force showed differences among stages of Parkinson disease, observing a decrease of the estimated force for the advanced stages of this illness.

  9. Gait termination in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roeing, Kathleen L; Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of gait impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information concerning the control of gait termination in individuals with MS. The purpose of this investigation was to examine planned gait termination in individuals with MS and healthy controls with and without cognitive distractors. Individuals with MS and age matched controls completed a series of gait termination tasks over a pressure sensitive walkway under non-distracting and cognitively distracting conditions. As expected the MS group had a lower velocity (89.9±33.3 cm/s) than controls (142.8±22.4 cm/s) and there was a significant reduction in velocity in both groups under the cognitive distracting conditions (MS: 73.9±30.7 cm/s; control: 120.0±25.9 cm/s). Although individuals with MS walked slower, there was no difference between groups in the rate a participant failed to stop at the target (i.e. failure rate). Overall failure rate had a 10-fold increase in the cognitively distracting condition across groups. Individuals with MS were more unstable during termination. Future research examining the neuromuscular mechanisms contributing to gait termination is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gait Characteristics in Adolescents With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalron, Alon; Frid, Lior; Menascu, Shay

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. A presentation of multiple sclerosis before age18 years has traditionally been thought to be rare. However, during the past decade, more cases have been reported. We examined gait characteristics in 24 adolescents with multiple sclerosis (12 girls, 12 boys). Mean disease duration was 20.4 (S.D. = 24.9) months and mean age was 15.5 (S.D. = 1.1) years. The mean expanded disability status scale score was 1.7 (S.D. = 0.7) indicating minimal disability. Outcomes were compared with gait and the gait variability index value of healthy age-matched adolescents. Adolescents with multiple sclerosis walked slower with a wider base of support compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. Moreover, the gait variability index was lower in the multiple sclerosis group compared with the values in the healthy adolescents: 85.4 (S.D. = 8.1) versus 96.5 (S.D. = 7.4). We present gait parameters of adolescents with multiple sclerosis. From a clinical standpoint, our data could improve management of walking dysfunction in this relatively young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, ‘scrunching’, which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  12. Gait Training Interventions for Lower Extremity Amputees: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Highsmith, M. Jason; Andrews, Casey R.; Millman, Claire; Fuller, Ashley; Kahle, Jason T.; Klenow, Tyler D.; Lewis, Katherine L.; Bradley, Rachel C.; Orriola, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity (LE) amputation patients who use prostheses have gait asymmetries and altered limb loading and movement strategies when ambulating. Subsequent secondary conditions are believed to be associated with gait deviations and lead to long-term complications that impact function and quality of life as a result. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine the strength of evidence supporting gait training interventions and to formulate evidence statements to guide practice and research related to therapeutic gait training for lower extremity amputees. A systematic review of three databases was conducted followed by evaluation of evidence and synthesis of empirical evidence statements (EES). Eighteen manuscripts were included in the review, which covered two areas of gait training interventions: 1) overground and 2) treadmill-based. Eight EESs were synthesized. Four addressed overground gait training, one covered treadmill training, and three statements addressed both forms of therapy. Due to the gait asymmetries, altered biomechanics, and related secondary consequences associated with LE amputation, gait training interventions are needed along with study of their efficacy. Overground training with verbal or other auditory, manual, and psychological awareness interventions was found to be effective at improving gait. Similarly, treadmill-based training was found to be effective: 1) as a supplement to overground training; 2) independently when augmented with visual feedback and/or body weight support; or 3) as part of a home exercise plan. Gait training approaches studied improved multiple areas of gait, including sagittal and coronal biomechanics, spatiotemporal measures, and distance walked. PMID:28066520

  13. Skeletal and Clinical Effects of Exoskeleton-Assisted Gait

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0611 TITLE: Skeletal and Clinical Effects of Exoskeleton -Assisted Gait PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paolo Bonato, PhD...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Skeletal and Clinical Effects of Exoskeleton -Assisted Gait 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0611 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...purpose of this project is to study the effects on bone health of exoskeleton -assisted gait in individuals with a complete spinal cord injury. Advanced

  14. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  15. Analysis of foot load during ballet dancers' gait.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Marketa; Tepla, Lucie; Svoboda, Zdenek; Janura, Miroslav; Cieslarová, Miloslava

    2014-01-01

    Ballet is an art that puts extreme demands on the dancer's musculoskeletal system and therefore significantly affects motor behavior of the dancers. The aim of our research was to compare plantar pressure distribution during stance phase of gait between a group of professional ballet dancers and non-dancers. Thirteen professional dancers (5 men, 8 women; mean age of 24.1 ± 3.8 years) and 13 nondancers (5 men, 8 women; mean age of 26.1 ± 5.3 years) participated in this study. Foot pressure analysis during gait was collected using a 2 m pressure plate. The participants were instructed to walk across the platform at a self-selected pace barefoot. Three gait cycles were necessary for the data analysis. The results revealed higher (p < 0.05) pressure peaks in medial edge of forefoot during gait for dancers in comparison with nondancers. Furthermore, differences in total foot loading and foot loading duration of rearfoot was higher (p < 0.05) in dancers as well. We can attribute these differences to long-term and intensive dancing exercises that can change the dancer's gait stereotype.

  16. Gait analysis in demented subjects: Interests and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Beauchet, Olivier; Allali, Gilles; Berrut, Gilles; Hommet, Caroline; Dubost, Véronique; Assal, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Gait disorders are more prevalent in dementia than in normal aging and are related to the severity of cognitive decline. Dementia-related gait changes (DRGC) mainly include decrease in walking speed provoked by a decrease in stride length and an increase in support phase. More recently, dual-task related changes in gait were found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and non-Alzheimer dementia, even at an early stage. An increase in stride-to-stride variability while usual walking and dual-tasking has been shown to be more specific and sensitive than any change in mean value in subjects with dementia. Those data show that DRGC are not only associated to motor disorders but also to problem with central processing of information and highlight that dysfunction of temporal and frontal lobe may in part explain gait impairment among demented subjects. Gait assessment, and more particularly dual-task analysis, is therefore crucial in early diagnosis of dementia and/or related syndromes in the elderly. Moreover, dual-task disturbances could be a specific marker of falling at a pre-dementia stage. PMID:18728766

  17. View-invariant gait recognition method by three-dimensional convolutional neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Weiwei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Shunli

    2018-01-01

    Gait as an important biometric feature can identify a human at a long distance. View change is one of the most challenging factors for gait recognition. To address the cross view issues in gait recognition, we propose a view-invariant gait recognition method by three-dimensional (3-D) convolutional neural network. First, 3-D convolutional neural network (3DCNN) is introduced to learn view-invariant feature, which can capture the spatial information and temporal information simultaneously on normalized silhouette sequences. Second, a network training method based on cross-domain transfer learning is proposed to solve the problem of the limited gait training samples. We choose the C3D as the basic model, which is pretrained on the Sports-1M and then fine-tune C3D model to adapt gait recognition. In the recognition stage, we use the fine-tuned model to extract gait features and use Euclidean distance to measure the similarity of gait sequences. Sufficient experiments are carried out on the CASIA-B dataset and the experimental results demonstrate that our method outperforms many other methods.

  18. Anti-HIV-1 activity of a tripodal receptor that recognizes mannose oligomers.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Carrero, Paula; Casanova, Elena; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Madrona, Andrés; Quesada, Ernesto; Peréz-Pérez, María Jesús; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María José; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp120 of the HIV-1 viral envelope has a high content in mannose residues, particularly α-1,2-mannose oligomers. Compounds that interact with these high-mannose type glycans may disturb the interaction between gp120 and its (co)receptors and are considered potential anti-HIV agents. Previously, we demonstrated that a tripodal receptor (1), with a central scaffold of 1,3,5-triethylbenzene substituted with three 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoyl groups, selectively recognizes α-1,2-mannose polysaccharides. Here we present additional studies to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity and the mechanism of antiviral activity of this compound. Our studies indicate that 1 shows anti-HIV-1 activity in the low micromolar range and has pronounced gp120 binding and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory capacity. However, gp120 binding rather than integrase inhibition seems to be the primary mechanism of antiviral activity of 1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Quadrupedal rodent gait compensations in a low dose monoiodoacetate model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Allen, Kyle D

    2018-06-01

    Rodent gait analysis provides robust, quantitative results for preclinical musculoskeletal and neurological models. In prior work, surgical models of osteoarthritis have been found to result in a hind limb shuffle-stepping gait compensation, while a high dose monoiodoacetate (MIA, 3 mg) model resulted in a hind limb antalgic gait. However, it is unknown whether the antalgic gait caused by MIA is associated with severity of degeneration from the high dosage or the whole-joint degeneration associated with glycolysis inhibition. This study evaluates rodent gait changes resulting from a low dose, 1 mg unilateral intra-articular injection of MIA compared to saline injected and naïve rats. Spatiotemporal and dynamic gait parameters were collected from a total of 42 male Lewis rats spread across 3 time points: 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-injection. To provide a detailed analysis of this low dose MIA model, gait analysis was used to uniquely quantify both fore and hind limb gait parameters. Our data indicate that 1 mg of MIA caused relatively minor degeneration and a shuffle-step gait compensation, similar to the compensation observed in prior surgical models. These data from a 1 mg MIA model show a different gait compensation compared to a previously studied 3 mg model. This 1 mg MIA model resulted in gait compensations more similar to a previously studied surgical model of osteoarthritis. Additionally, this study provides detailed 4 limb analysis of rodent gait that includes spatiotemporal and dynamic data from the same gait trial. These data highlight the importance of measuring dynamic data in combination with spatiotemporal data, since compensatory gait patterns may not be captured by spatial, temporal, or dynamic characterizations alone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Probabilistic Gait Classification in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Bayesian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gestel, Leen; De Laet, Tinne; Di Lello, Enrico; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; Van Campenhout, Anja; Aertbelien, Erwin; Schwartz, Mike; Wambacq, Hans; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) generates a wealth of highly variable data. Gait classifications help to reduce, simplify and interpret this vast amount of 3DGA data and thereby assist and facilitate clinical decision making in the treatment of CP. CP gait is often a mix of several clinically accepted distinct gait patterns. Therefore,…

  1. Design of a gait training device for control of pelvic obliquity.

    PubMed

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Severini, Giacomo; Cajigas, Iahn; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Bonato, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of a novel device for the control of pelvic obliquity during gait. The device, called the Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer, consists of a single actuator system designed to target secondary gait deviations, such as hip-hiking, affecting the movement of the pelvis. Secondary gait deviations affecting the pelvis are generated in response to primary gait deviations (e.g. limited knee flexion during the swing phase) in stroke survivors and contribute to the overall asymmetrical gait pattern often observed in these patients. The proposed device generates a force field able to affect the obliquity of the pelvis (i.e. the rotation of the pelvis around the anteroposterior axis) by using an impedance controlled single linear actuator acting on a hip orthosis. Tests showed that the RGR Trainer is able to induce changes in pelvic obliquity trajectories (hip-hiking) in healthy subjects. These results suggest that the RGR Trainer is suitable to test the hypothesis that has motivated our efforts toward developing the system, namely that addressing both primary and secondary gait deviations during robotic-assisted gait training may help promote a physiologically-sound gait behavior more effectively than when only primary deviations are addressed.

  2. Quadrupedal locomotor simulation: producing more realistic gaits using dual-objective optimization

    PubMed Central

    Hirasaki, Eishi

    2018-01-01

    In evolutionary biomechanics it is often considered that gaits should evolve to minimize the energetic cost of travelling a given distance. In gait simulation this goal often leads to convincing gait generation. However, as the musculoskeletal models used get increasingly sophisticated, it becomes apparent that such a single goal can lead to extremely unrealistic gait patterns. In this paper, we explore the effects of requiring adequate lateral stability and show how this increases both energetic cost and the realism of the generated walking gait in a high biofidelity chimpanzee musculoskeletal model. We also explore the effects of changing the footfall sequences in the simulation so it mimics both the diagonal sequence walking gaits that primates typically use and also the lateral sequence walking gaits that are much more widespread among mammals. It is apparent that adding a lateral stability criterion has an important effect on the footfall phase relationship, suggesting that lateral stability may be one of the key drivers behind the observed footfall sequences in quadrupedal gaits. The observation that single optimization goals are no longer adequate for generating gait in current models has important implications for the use of biomimetic virtual robots to predict the locomotor patterns in fossil animals. PMID:29657790

  3. An Ambulatory Method of Identifying Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Matthew R.; Delahunt, Eamonn; Sweeney, Kevin T.; Caulfield, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist. PMID:24451464

  4. Freezing of gait in PD: prospective assessment in the DATATOP cohort.

    PubMed

    Giladi, N; McDermott, M P; Fahn, S; Przedborski, S; Jankovic, J; Stern, M; Tanner, C

    2001-06-26

    To study the development of freezing of gait in PD. Freezing of gait is a common, disabling, and poorly understood symptom in PD. The authors analyzed data from 800 patients with early PD from the Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism (DATATOP) clinical trial who were assigned either placebo, deprenyl, tocopherol, or the combination of deprenyl and tocopherol. The primary outcome measure was the time from randomization until the freezing of gait score on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) became positive. Fifty-seven patients (7.1%) had freezing of gait at study entry and 193 (26%) of the remaining patients experienced the symptom by the end of the follow-up period. Those with freezing of gait at baseline had significantly more advanced disease than those without the symptom, as measured by total UPDRS and Hoehn and Yahr stage. High baseline risk factors for developing freezing of gait during the follow-up period were the onset of PD with a gait disorder; higher scores of rigidity, postural instability, bradykinesia and speech; and longer disease duration. In contrast, tremor was strongly associated with a decreased risk for freezing of gait. At the end of follow-up, the signs most strongly associated with the freezing phenomenon were gait, balance, and speech disorders, not rigidity or bradykinesia. Deprenyl treatment was strongly associated with a decreased risk for developing freezing of gait; tocopherol had no effect. Freezing of gait is directly related to duration of PD. Risk factors at onset of disease are the absence of tremor and PD beginning as a gait disorder. The development of freezing of gait in the course of the illness is strongly associated with the development of balance and speech problems, less so with the worsening of bradykinesia, and is not associated with the progression of rigidity. These results support the concept that the freezing phenomenon is distinct from bradykinesia. Deprenyl, in the absence

  5. Effect of arm swing strategy on local dynamic stability of human gait.

    PubMed

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Wittink, Harriet; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-02-01

    Falling causes long term disability and can even lead to death. Most falls occur during gait. Therefore improving gait stability might be beneficial for people at risk of falling. Recently arm swing has been shown to influence gait stability. However at present it remains unknown which mode of arm swing creates the most stable gait. To examine how different modes of arm swing affect gait stability. Ten healthy young male subjects volunteered for this study. All subjects walked with four different arm swing instructions at seven different gait speeds. The Xsens motion capture suit was used to capture gait kinematics. Basic gait parameters, variability and stability measures were calculated. We found an increased stability in the medio-lateral direction with excessive arm swing in comparison to normal arm swing at all gait speeds. Moreover, excessive arm swing increased stability in the anterior-posterior and vertical direction at low gait speeds. Ipsilateral and inphase arm swing did not differ compared to a normal arm swing. Excessive arm swing is a promising gait manipulation to improve local dynamic stability. For excessive arm swing in the ML direction there appears to be converging evidence. The effect of excessive arm swing on more clinically relevant groups like the more fall prone elderly or stroke survivors is worth further investigating. Excessive arm swing significantly increases local dynamic stability of human gait. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A perceptual map for gait symmetry quantification and pathology detection.

    PubMed

    Moevus, Antoine; Mignotte, Max; de Guise, Jacques A; Meunier, Jean

    2015-10-29

    The gait movement is an essential process of the human activity and the result of collaborative interactions between the neurological, articular and musculoskeletal systems, working efficiently together. This explains why gait analysis is important and increasingly used nowadays for the diagnosis of many different types (neurological, muscular, orthopedic, etc.) of diseases. This paper introduces a novel method to quickly visualize the different parts of the body related to an asymmetric movement in the human gait of a patient for daily clinical usage. The proposed gait analysis algorithm relies on the fact that the healthy walk has (temporally shift-invariant) symmetry properties in the coronal plane. The goal is to provide an inexpensive and easy-to-use method, exploiting an affordable consumer depth sensor, the Kinect, to measure the gait asymmetry and display results in a perceptual way. We propose a multi-dimensional scaling mapping using a temporally shift invariant distance, allowing us to efficiently visualize (in terms of perceptual color difference) the asymmetric body parts of the gait cycle of a subject. We also propose an index computed from this map and which quantifies locally and globally the degree of asymmetry. The proposed index is proved to be statistically significant and this new, inexpensive, marker-less, non-invasive, easy to set up, gait analysis system offers a readable and flexible tool for clinicians to analyze gait characteristics and to provide a fast diagnostic. This system, which estimates a perceptual color map providing a quick overview of asymmetry existing in the gait cycle of a subject, can be easily exploited for disease progression, recovery cues from post-operative surgery (e.g., to check the healing process or the effect of a treatment or a prosthesis) or might be used for other pathologies where gait asymmetry might be a symptom.

  7. Improved walking ability and reduced therapeutic stress with an electromechanical gait device.

    PubMed

    Freivogel, Susanna; Schmalohr, Dieter; Mehrholz, Jan

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of repetitive locomotor training using a newly developed electromechanical gait device compared with treadmill training/gait training with respect to patient's ambulatory motor outcome, necessary personnel resources, and discomfort experienced by therapists and patients. Randomized, controlled, cross-over trial. Sixteen non-ambulatory patients after stroke, severe brain or spinal cord injury sequentially received 2 kinds of gait training. Study intervention A: 20 treatments of locomotor training with an electromechanical gait device; control intervention B: 20 treatments of locomotor training with treadmill or task-oriented gait training. The primary variable was walking ability (Functional Ambulation Category). Secondary variables included gait velocity, Motricity-Index, Rivermead-Mobility-Index, number of therapists needed, and discomfort and effort of patients and therapists during training. Gait ability and the other motor outcome related parameters improved for all patients, but without significant difference between intervention types. However, during intervention A, significantly fewer therapists were needed, and they reported less discomfort and a lower level of effort during training sessions. Locomotor training with or without an electromechanical gait trainer leads to improved gait ability; however, using the electromechanical gait trainer requires less therapeutic assistance, and therapist discomfort is reduced.

  8. The value of the NDT-Bobath method in post-stroke gait training.

    PubMed

    Mikołajewska, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is perceived a major cause of disability, including gait disorders. Looking for more effective methods of gait reeducation in post-stroke survivors is one of the most important issues in contemporary neurorehabilitation. Following a stroke, patients suffer from gait disorders. The aim of this paper is to present the outcomes of a study of post-stroke gait reeducation using the NeuroDevelopmental Treatment-Bobath (NDT-Bobath) method. The research was conducted among 60 adult patients who had undergone ischemic stroke. These patients were treated using the NDT-Bobath method. These patients' gait reeducation was assessed using spatio-temporal gait parameters (gait velocity, cadence and stride length). Measurements of these parameters were conducted by the same therapist twice: on admission, and after the tenth session of gait reeducation. Among the 60 patients involved in the study, the results were as follows: in terms of gait velocity, recovery was observed in 39 cases (65%), in terms of cadence, recovery was observed in 39 cases (65%), in terms of stride length, recovery was observed in 50 cases (83.33%). Benefits were observed after short-term therapy, reflected by measurable statistically significant changes in the patients' gait parameters.

  9. Effect of Interpersonal Interaction on Festinating Gait Rehabilitation in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Ken-Ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Wada, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Although human walking gait rhythms are generated by native individual gait dynamics, these gait dynamics change during interactions between humans. A typical phenomenon is synchronization of gait rhythms during cooperative walking. Our previous research revealed that fluctuation characteristics in stride interval of subjects with Parkinson's disease changed from random to 1/f fluctuation as fractal characteristics during cooperative walking with the gait assist system Walk-Mate, which emulates a human interaction using interactive rhythmic cues. Moreover, gait dynamics were relearned through Walk-Mate gait training. However, the system's clinical efficacy was unclear because the previous studies did not focus on specific gait rhythm disorder symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Walk-Mate on festinating gait among subjects with Parkinson's disease. Three within-subject experimental conditions were used: (1) preinteraction condition, (2) interaction condition, and (3) postinteraction condition. The only difference between conditions was the interactive rhythmic cues generated by Walk-Mate. Because subjects with festinating gait gradually and involuntarily decreased their stride interval, the regression slope of stride interval as an index of severity of preinteraction festinating gait was elevated. The regression slope in the interaction condition was more gradual than during the preinteraction condition, indicating that the interactive rhythmic cues contributed to relieving festinating gait and stabilizing gait dynamics. Moreover, the gradual regression slope was carried over to the postinteraction condition, indicating that subjects with festinating gait have the potential to relearn stable gait dynamics. These results suggest that disordered gait dynamics are clinically restored through interactive rhythmic cues and that Walk-Mate may have the potential to assist therapists in more effective rehabilitation. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry

  10. Gait Implications of Visual Field Damage from Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Swenor, Bonnielin K; Friedman, David S; West, Sheila K; Gitlin, Laura N; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate fall-relevant gait features in older glaucoma patients. The GAITRite Electronic Walkway was used to define fall-related gait parameters in 239 patients with suspected or manifest glaucoma under normal usual-pace walking conditions and while carrying a cup or tray. Multiple linear regression models assessed the association between gait parameters and integrated visual field (IVF) sensitivity after controlling for age, race, sex, medications, and comorbid illness. Under normal walking conditions, worse IVF sensitivity was associated with a wider base of support (β = 0.60 cm/5 dB IVF sensitivity decrement, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.12-1.09, P = 0.016). Worse IVF sensitivity was not associated with slower gait speed, shorter step or stride length, or greater left-right drift under normal walking conditions ( P > 0.05 for all), but was during cup and/or tray carrying conditions ( P < 0.05 for all). Worse IVF sensitivity was positively associated with greater stride-to-stride variability in step length, stride length, and stride velocity ( P < 0.005 for all). Inferior and superior IVF sensitivity demonstrated associations with each of the above gait parameters as well, though these associations were consistently similar to, or weaker than, the associations noted for overall IVF sensitivity. Glaucoma severity was associated with several gait parameters predictive of higher fall risk in prior studies, particularly measures of stride-to-stride variability. Gait may be useful in identifying glaucoma patients at higher risk of falls, and in designing and testing interventions to prevent falls in this high-risk group. These findings could serve to inform the development of the interventions for falls prevention in glaucoma patients.

  11. The gait standard deviation, a single measure of kinematic variability.

    PubMed

    Sangeux, Morgan; Passmore, Elyse; Graham, H Kerr; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of gait kinematic variability provides relevant clinical information in certain conditions affecting the neuromotor control of movement. In this article, we present a measure of overall gait kinematic variability, GaitSD, based on combination of waveforms' standard deviation. The waveform standard deviation is the common numerator in established indices of variability such as Kadaba's coefficient of multiple correlation or Winter's waveform coefficient of variation. Gait data were collected on typically developing children aged 6-17 years. Large number of strides was captured for each child, average 45 (SD: 11) for kinematics and 19 (SD: 5) for kinetics. We used a bootstrap procedure to determine the precision of GaitSD as a function of the number of strides processed. We compared the within-subject, stride-to-stride, variability with the, between-subject, variability of the normative pattern. Finally, we investigated the correlation between age and gait kinematic, kinetic and spatio-temporal variability. In typically developing children, the relative precision of GaitSD was 10% as soon as 6 strides were captured. As a comparison, spatio-temporal parameters required 30 strides to reach the same relative precision. The ratio stride-to-stride divided by normative pattern variability was smaller in kinematic variables (the smallest for pelvic tilt, 28%) than in kinetic and spatio-temporal variables (the largest for normalised stride length, 95%). GaitSD had a strong, negative correlation with age. We show that gait consistency may stabilise only at, or after, skeletal maturity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tai Chi and vestibular rehabilitation improve vestibulopathic gait via different neuromuscular mechanisms: Preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    McGibbon, Chris A; Krebs, David E; Parker, Stephen W; Scarborough, Donna M; Wayne, Peter M; Wolf, Steven L

    2005-01-01

    Background Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a well-accepted exercise program intended to remedy balance impairment caused by damage to the peripheral vestibular system. Alternative therapies, such as Tai Chi (TC), have recently gained popularity as a treatment for balance impairment. Although VR and TC can benefit people with vestibulopathy, the degree to which gait improvements may be related to neuromuscular adaptations of the lower extremities for the two different therapies are unknown. Methods We examined the relationship between lower extremity neuromuscular function and trunk control in 36 older adults with vestibulopathy, randomized to 10 weeks of either VR or TC exercise. Time-distance measures (gait speed, step length, stance duration and step width), lower extremity sagittal plane mechanical energy expenditures (MEE), and trunk sagittal and frontal plane kinematics (peak and range of linear and angular velocity), were measured. Results Although gait time-distance measures were improved in both groups following treatment, no significant between-groups differences were observed for the MEE and trunk kinematic measures. Significant within groups changes, however, were observed. The TC group significantly increased ankle MEE contribution and decreased hip MEE contribution to total leg MEE, while no significant changes were found within the VR group. The TC group exhibited a positive relationship between change in leg MEE and change in trunk velocity peak and range, while the VR group exhibited a negative relationship. Conclusion Gait function improved in both groups consistent with expectations of the interventions. Differences in each group's response to therapy appear to suggest that improved gait function may be due to different neuromuscular adaptations resulting from the different interventions. The TC group's improvements were associated with reorganized lower extremity neuromuscular patterns, which appear to promote a faster gait and reduced

  13. Reliability of videotaped observational gait analysis in patients with orthopedic impairments

    PubMed Central

    Brunnekreef, Jaap J; van Uden, Caro JT; van Moorsel, Steven; Kooloos, Jan GM

    2005-01-01

    Background In clinical practice, visual gait observation is often used to determine gait disorders and to evaluate treatment. Several reliability studies on observational gait analysis have been described in the literature and generally showed moderate reliability. However, patients with orthopedic disorders have received little attention. The objective of this study is to determine the reliability levels of visual observation of gait in patients with orthopedic disorders. Methods The gait of thirty patients referred to a physical therapist for gait treatment was videotaped. Ten raters, 4 experienced, 4 inexperienced and 2 experts, individually evaluated these videotaped gait patterns of the patients twice, by using a structured gait analysis form. Reliability levels were established by calculating the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), using a two-way random design and based on absolute agreement. Results The inter-rater reliability among experienced raters (ICC = 0.42; 95%CI: 0.38–0.46) was comparable to that of the inexperienced raters (ICC = 0.40; 95%CI: 0.36–0.44). The expert raters reached a higher inter-rater reliability level (ICC = 0.54; 95%CI: 0.48–0.60). The average intra-rater reliability of the experienced raters was 0.63 (ICCs ranging from 0.57 to 0.70). The inexperienced raters reached an average intra-rater reliability of 0.57 (ICCs ranging from 0.52 to 0.62). The two expert raters attained ICC values of 0.70 and 0.74 respectively. Conclusion Structured visual gait observation by use of a gait analysis form as described in this study was found to be moderately reliable. Clinical experience appears to increase the reliability of visual gait analysis. PMID:15774012

  14. Management of apraxic gait in a stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Jantra, P; Monga, T N; Press, J M; Gervais, B J

    1992-01-01

    There is little information available regarding management of apraxic gait. We present a 61-year-old man with a five-year history of right-sided cerebrovascular accident, apraxic gait, difficulty in walking, and frequent falls. A CT head scan revealed moderate cerebral atrophy, a small lacunar infarction. The patient was unable to initiate walking, was bed ridden and housebound. Traditional gait training and balance exercises failed to improve his gait. Two straight canes were modified by fixing florescent horizontal projections approximately two inches up from the tip of the cane. The patient was instructed to step over the horizontal projected portion, making use of visual cues from the florescent painted projections. The patient became independent with safe ambulation after practicing for approximately three weeks and was discharged home.

  15. Computational evaluation of load carriage effects on gait balance stability.

    PubMed

    Mummolo, Carlotta; Park, Sukyung; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the effects of load carriage on gait balance stability is important in various applications. However, their quantification has not been rigorously addressed in the current literature, partially due to the lack of relevant computational indices. The novel Dynamic Gait Measure (DGM) characterizes gait balance stability by quantifying the relative effects of inertia in terms of zero-moment point, ground projection of center of mass, and time-varying foot support region. In this study, the DGM is formulated in terms of the gait parameters that explicitly reflect the gait strategy of a given walking pattern and is used for computational evaluation of the distinct balance stability of loaded walking. The observed gait adaptations caused by load carriage (decreased single support duration, inertia effects, and step length) result in decreased DGM values (p < 0.0001), which indicate that loaded walking motions are more statically stable compared with the unloaded normal walking. Comparison of the DGM with other common gait stability indices (the maximum Floquet multiplier and the margin of stability) validates the unique characterization capability of the DGM, which is consistently informative of the presence of the added load.

  16. Effects of using the nintendo wii fit plus platform in the sensorimotor training of gait disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Giovanna Barros; Leite, Marco Antônio A; Orsini, Marco; Pereira, João Santos

    2014-01-17

    The use of the Nintendo Wii has been considered a good alternative in the motor rehabilitation of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD), requiring simultaneous interaction to develop strategies for physical, visual, auditory, cognitive, psychological and social activities in the performing of virtual activities, resulting in improvement in functional performance and gait. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of virtual sensorimotor activity on gait disorders in people with PD. Fifteen subjects with a clinical diagnosis of PD were submitted to the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (SE), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and biomechanical gait analysis using digital images taken with a video camera before and after the treatment program. The activities with the Nintendo Wii virtual platform were standardized into three categories: aerobics, balance and Wii plus exercises. Participants carried out separate virtual exercises for 40 min, twice a week, for a total of 14 sessions. The program improved sensorimotor performance in PD gait, with an increase in stride length and gait speed, in addition to a reduction in motor impairment, especially in items of rigidity and flexibility of the lower limbs evaluated by UPDRS III, and greater functional independence, as evidenced in the SE and FIM scales. Improvements in items related to locomotion and stair climbing were also observed. The training was effective in motor recovery in chronic neurodegenerative diseases, showing improvement in motor performance and functional independence in individuals with PD.

  17. Optimality Principles for Model-Based Prediction of Human Gait

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Marko; van den Bogert, Antonie J.

    2010-01-01

    Although humans have a large repertoire of potential movements, gait patterns tend to be stereotypical and appear to be selected according to optimality principles such as minimal energy. When applied to dynamic musculoskeletal models such optimality principles might be used to predict how a patient’s gait adapts to mechanical interventions such as prosthetic devices or surgery. In this paper we study the effects of different performance criteria on predicted gait patterns using a 2D musculoskeletal model. The associated optimal control problem for a family of different cost functions was solved utilizing the direct collocation method. It was found that fatigue-like cost functions produced realistic gait, with stance phase knee flexion, as opposed to energy-related cost functions which avoided knee flexion during the stance phase. We conclude that fatigue minimization may be one of the primary optimality principles governing human gait. PMID:20074736

  18. Ground reaction forces and plantar pressure distribution during occasional loaded gait.

    PubMed

    Castro, Marcelo; Abreu, Sofia; Sousa, Helena; Machado, Leandro; Santos, Rubim; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2013-05-01

    This study compared the ground reaction forces (GRF) and plantar pressures between unloaded and occasional loaded gait. The GRF and plantar pressures of 60 participants were recorded during unloaded gait and occasional loaded gait (wearing a backpack that raised their body mass index to 30); this load criterion was adopted because is considered potentially harmful in permanent loaded gait (obese people). The results indicate an overall increase (absolute values) of GRF and plantar pressures during occasional loaded gait (p < 0.05); also, higher normalized (by total weight) values in the medial midfoot and toes, and lower values in the lateral rearfoot region were observed. During loaded gait the magnitude of the vertical GRF (impact and thrust maximum) decreased and the shear forces increased more than did the proportion of the load (normalized values). These data suggest a different pattern of GRF and plantar pressure distribution during occasional loaded compared to unloaded gait. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Real-Time Gait Cycle Parameter Recognition Using a Wearable Accelerometry System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Che-Chang; Hsu, Yeh-Liang; Shih, Kao-Shang; Lu, Jun-Ming

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wearable accelerometry system for real-time gait cycle parameter recognition. Using a tri-axial accelerometer, the wearable motion detector is a single waist-mounted device to measure trunk accelerations during walking. Several gait cycle parameters, including cadence, step regularity, stride regularity and step symmetry can be estimated in real-time by using autocorrelation procedure. For validation purposes, five Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients and five young healthy adults were recruited in an experiment. The gait cycle parameters among the two subject groups of different mobility can be quantified and distinguished by the system. Practical considerations and limitations for implementing the autocorrelation procedure in such a real-time system are also discussed. This study can be extended to the future attempts in real-time detection of disabling gaits, such as festinating or freezing of gait in PD patients. Ambulatory rehabilitation, gait assessment and personal telecare for people with gait disorders are also possible applications. PMID:22164019

  20. Music and metronome cues produce different effects on gait spatiotemporal measures but not gait variability in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Joanne E; Webster, Kate E; Hill, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Rhythmic auditory cues including music and metronome beats have been used, sometimes interchangeably, to improve disordered gait arising from a range of clinical conditions. There has been limited investigation into whether there are optimal cue types. Different cue types have produced inconsistent effects across groups which differed in both age and clinical condition. The possible effect of normal ageing on response to different cue types has not been reported for gait. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of both rhythmic music and metronome cues on gait spatiotemporal measures (including variability) in healthy older people. Twelve women and seven men (>65 years) walked on an instrumented walkway at comfortable pace and then in time to each of rhythmic music and metronome cues at comfortable pace stepping frequency. Music but not metronome cues produced a significant increase in group mean gait velocity of 4.6 cm/s, due mostly to a significant increase in group mean stride length of 3.1cm. Both cue types produced a significant but small increase in cadence of 1 step/min. Mean spatio-temporal variability was low at baseline and did not increase with either cue type suggesting cues did not disrupt gait timing. Study findings suggest music and metronome cues may not be used interchangeably and cue type as well as frequency should be considered when evaluating effects of rhythmic auditory cueing on gait. Further work is required to determine whether optimal cue types and frequencies to improve walking in different clinical groups can be identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Crystal structures of two mononuclear complexes of terbium(III) nitrate with the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane.

    PubMed

    Gregório, Thaiane; Giese, Siddhartha O K; Nunes, Giovana G; Soares, Jaísa F; Hughes, David L

    2017-02-01

    Two new mononuclear cationic complexes in which the Tb III ion is bis-chelated by the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane (H 3 L Et , C 6 H 14 O 3 ) were prepared from Tb(NO 3 ) 3 ·5H 2 O and had their crystal and mol-ecular structures solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis after data collection at 100 K. Both products were isolated in reasonable yields from the same reaction mixture by using different crystallization conditions. The higher-symmetry complex dinitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) nitrate di-meth-oxy-ethane hemisolvate, [Tb(NO 3 ) 2 (H 3 L Et ) 2 ]NO 3 ·0.5C 4 H 10 O 2 , 1 , in which the lanthanide ion is 10-coordinate and adopts an s -bicapped square-anti-prismatic coordination geometry, contains two bidentate nitrate ions bound to the metal atom; another nitrate ion functions as a counter-ion and a half-mol-ecule of di-meth-oxy-ethane (completed by a crystallographic twofold rotation axis) is also present. In product aqua-nitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) dinitrate, [Tb(NO 3 )(H 3 L Et ) 2 (H 2 O)](NO 3 ) 2 , 2 , one bidentate nitrate ion and one water mol-ecule are bound to the nine-coordinate terbium(III) centre, while two free nitrate ions contribute to charge balance outside the tricapped trigonal-prismatic coordination polyhedron. No free water mol-ecule was found in either of the crystal structures and, only in the case of 1 , di-meth-oxy-ethane acts as a crystallizing solvent. In both mol-ecular structures, the two tripodal ligands are bent to one side of the coordination sphere, leaving room for the anionic and water ligands. In complex 2 , the methyl group of one of the H 3 L Et ligands is disordered over two alternative orientations. Strong hydrogen bonds, both intra- and inter-molecular, are found in the crystal structures due to the number of different donor and acceptor groups present.

  2. Three-dimensional lumbar segment movement characteristics during paediatric cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Malone, A; O'Brien, T; Simms, C K

    2017-03-01

    Kinematic analysis of the trunk during cerebral palsy (CP) gait has been well described. In contrast, movement of the lumbar spine is generally ignored. This is most likely due to the complex nature of the spine. As an alternative to using complex sensor protocols, this study modelled the lumbar region as a single segment and investigated characteristic patterns of movement during CP gait. In addition, the impact of functional level of impairment and the relationship with lower lumbar spinal loading were examined. Fifty-two children with CP (26 GMFCS I and 26 GMFCS II) and 26 controls were recruited. A full barefoot 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis were conducted. Lumbar segment movement demonstrated increased forward flexion for CP children. This movement became more pronounced according to GMFCS level with GMFCS II children demonstrating increases of up to 8°. In addition, a moderate correlation was present between lumbar flexion/extension and L5/S1 sagittal moments (r=0.427 in the global frame and r=0.448 with respect to the pelvis, p<0.01). Children with CP demonstrated increased movement of the lumbar region compared to TD, with movement becoming more excessive as GMFCS level increased. Excessive forward flexion and loading at the lumbar spine were linked. However, the moderate correlation suggests other contributors to increased loading were present. In conclusion, this study is a first step at identifying how lumbar segment movement is altered during CP gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gait Characteristic Analysis and Identification Based on the iPhone's Accelerometer and Gyrometer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Yang; Banda, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Gait identification is a valuable approach to identify humans at a distance. In this paper, gait characteristics are analyzed based on an iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer, and a new approach is proposed for gait identification. Specifically, gait datasets are collected by the triaxial accelerometer and gyrometer embedded in an iPhone. Then, the datasets are processed to extract gait characteristic parameters which include gait frequency, symmetry coefficient, dynamic range and similarity coefficient of characteristic curves. Finally, a weighted voting scheme dependent upon the gait characteristic parameters is proposed for gait identification. Four experiments are implemented to validate the proposed scheme. The attitude and acceleration solutions are verified by simulation. Then the gait characteristics are analyzed by comparing two sets of actual data, and the performance of the weighted voting identification scheme is verified by 40 datasets of 10 subjects. PMID:25222034

  4. Estimation of Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Wearable Microphone-Sensor-Based System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xiangdong; Long, Zhou; Yuan, Jing; Qian, Yueliang; Li, Jintao

    2016-01-01

    Most existing wearable gait analysis methods focus on the analysis of data obtained from inertial sensors. This paper proposes a novel, low-cost, wireless and wearable gait analysis system which uses microphone sensors to collect footstep sound signals during walking. This is the first time a microphone sensor is used as a wearable gait analysis device as far as we know. Based on this system, a gait analysis algorithm for estimating the temporal parameters of gait is presented. The algorithm fully uses the fusion of two feet footstep sound signals and includes three stages: footstep detection, heel-strike event and toe-on event detection, and calculation of gait temporal parameters. Experimental results show that with a total of 240 data sequences and 1732 steps collected using three different gait data collection strategies from 15 healthy subjects, the proposed system achieves an average 0.955 F1-measure for footstep detection, an average 94.52% accuracy rate for heel-strike detection and 94.25% accuracy rate for toe-on detection. Using these detection results, nine temporal related gait parameters are calculated and these parameters are consistent with their corresponding normal gait temporal parameters and labeled data calculation results. The results verify the effectiveness of our proposed system and algorithm for temporal gait parameter estimation. PMID:27999321

  5. Towards more effective robotic gait training for stroke rehabilitation: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is the most common cause of disability in the developed world and can severely degrade walking function. Robot-driven gait therapy can provide assistance to patients during training and offers a number of advantages over other forms of therapy. These potential benefits do not, however, seem to have been fully realised as of yet in clinical practice. Objectives This review determines ways in which robot-driven gait technology could be improved in order to achieve better outcomes in gait rehabilitation. Methods The literature on gait impairments caused by stroke is reviewed, followed by research detailing the different pathways to recovery. The outcomes of clinical trials investigating robot-driven gait therapy are then examined. Finally, an analysis of the literature focused on the technical features of the robot-based devices is presented. This review thus combines both clinical and technical aspects in order to determine the routes by which robot-driven gait therapy could be further developed. Conclusions Active subject participation in robot-driven gait therapy is vital to many of the potential recovery pathways and is therefore an important feature of gait training. Higher levels of subject participation and challenge could be promoted through designs with a high emphasis on robotic transparency and sufficient degrees of freedom to allow other aspects of gait such as balance to be incorporated. PMID:22953989

  6. Systematic review of quantitative clinical gait analysis in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, M B; Hoefsloot, W; Munneke, M; Bloem, B R; Olde Rikkert, M G M

    2004-02-01

    Diminished mobility often accompanies dementia and has a great impact on independence and quality of life. New treatment strategies for dementia are emerging, but the effects on gait remains to be studied objectively. In this review we address the general effects of dementia on gait as revealed by quantitative gait analysis. A systematic literature search with the (MESH) terms: 'dementia' and 'gait disorders' in Medline, CC, Psychlit and CinaHL between 1980-2002. Main inclusion criteria: controlled studies; patients with dementia; quantitative gait data. Seven publications met the inclusion criteria. All compared gait in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) with healthy elderly controls; one also assessed gait in Vascular Dementia (VaD). The methodology used was inconsistent and often had many shortcomings. However, there were several consistent findings: walking velocity decreased in dementia compared to healthy controls and decreased further with progressing severity of dementia. VaD was associated with a significant decrease in walking velocity compared to AD subjects. Dementia was associated with a shortened step length, an increased double support time and step to step variability. Gait in dementia is hardly analyzed in a well-designed manner. Despite this, the literature suggests that quantitative gait analysis can be sufficiently reliable and responsive to measure decline in walking velocity between subjects with and without dementia. More research is required to assess, both on an individual and a group level, how the minimal clinically relevant changes in gait in elderly demented patients should be defined and what would be the most responsive method to measure these changes.

  7. Biomechanical mechanism of lateral trunk lean gait for knee osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kazuki; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Sawada, Tomonori; Tanimoto, Kenji; Kito, Nobuhiro; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2018-01-03

    The biomechanical mechanism of lateral trunk lean gait employed to reduce external knee adduction moment (KAM) for knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients is not well known. This mechanism may relate to the center of mass (COM) motion. Moreover, lateral trunk lean gait may affect motor control of the COM displacement. Uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis is an evaluation index used to understand motor control and variability of the motor task. Here we aimed to clarify the biomechanical mechanism to reduce KAM during lateral trunk lean gait and how motor variability controls the COM displacement. Twenty knee OA patients walked under two conditions: normal and lateral trunk lean gait conditions. UCM analysis was performed with respect to the COM displacement in the frontal plane. We also determined how the variability is structured with regards to the COM displacement as a performance variable. The peak KAM under lateral trunk lean gait was lower than that under normal gait. The reduced peak KAM observed was accompanied by medially shifted knee joint center, shortened distance of the center of pressure to knee joint center, and shortened distance of the knee-ground reaction force lever arm during the stance phase. Knee OA patients with lateral trunk lean gait could maintain kinematic synergy by utilizing greater segmental configuration variance to the performance variable. However, the COM displacement variability of lateral trunk lean gait was larger than that of normal gait. Our findings may provide clinical insights to effectively evaluate and prescribe gait modification training for knee OA patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interpreting sources of variation in clinical gait analysis: A case study.

    PubMed

    King, Stephanie L; Barton, Gabor J; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R

    2017-02-01

    To illustrate and discuss sources of gait deviations (experimental, genuine and intentional) during a gait analysis and how these deviations inform clinical decision making. A case study of a 24-year old male diagnosed with Alkaptonuria undergoing a routine gait analysis. A 3D motion capture with the Helen-Hayes marker set was used to quantify lower-limb joint kinematics during barefoot walking along a 10m walkway at a self-selected pace. Additional 2D video data were recorded in the sagittal and frontal plane. The patient reported no aches or pains in any joint and described his lifestyle as active. Temporal-spatial parameters were within normal ranges for his age and sex. Three sources of gait deviations were identified; the posteriorly rotated pelvis was due to an experimental error and marker misplacement, the increased rotation of the pelvis in the horizontal plane was genuine and observed in both 3D gait curves and in 2D video analysis, finally the inconsistency in knee flexion/extension combined with a seemingly innocuous interest in the consequences of abnormal gait suggested an intentional gait deviation. Gait analysis is an important analytical tool in the management of a variety of conditions that negatively impact on movement. Experienced gait analysts have the ability to recognise genuine gait adaptations that forms part of the decision-making process for that patient. However, their role also necessitates the ability to identify and correct for experimental errors and critically evaluate when a deviation may not be genuine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Artificial Walking Technologies to Improve Gait in Cerebral Palsy: Multichannel Neuromuscular Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jessica; Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Butler, Erin E

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common childhood motor disability and often results in debilitating walking abnormalities, such as flexed-knee and stiff-knee gait. Current medical and surgical treatments are only partially effective in improving gait abnormalities and may cause significant muscle weakness. However, emerging artificial walking technologies, such as step-initiated, multichannel neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), can substantially improve gait patterns and promote muscle strength in children with spastic CP. NMES may also be applied to specific lumbar-sacral sensory roots to reduce spasticity. Development of tablet computer-based multichannel NMES can leverage lightweight, wearable wireless stimulators, advanced control design, and surface electrodes to activate lower-limb muscles. Musculoskeletal models have been used to characterize muscle contributions to unimpaired gait and identify high muscle demands, which can help guide multichannel NMES-assisted gait protocols. In addition, patient-specific NMES-assisted gait protocols based on 3D gait analysis can facilitate the appropriate activation of lower-limb muscles to achieve a more functional gait: stance-phase hip and knee extension and swing-phase sequence of hip and knee flexion followed by rapid knee extension. NMES-assisted gait treatment can be conducted as either clinic-based or home-based programs. Rigorous testing of multichannel NMES-assisted gait training protocols will determine optimal treatment dosage for future clinical trials. Evidence-based outcome evaluation using 3D kinematics or temporal-spatial gait parameters will help determine immediate neuroprosthetic effects and longer term neurotherapeutic effects of step-initiated, multichannel NMES-assisted gait in children with spastic CP. Multichannel NMES is a promising assistive technology to help children with spastic CP achieve a more upright, functional gait. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and

  10. Knock knee and the gait of six-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Pretkiewicz-Abacjew, E

    2003-06-01

    Knock knee (genu valgum) interferes with the locomotive and supporting function of the lower limb. In static conditions the load-bearing axis of the valgus limb is displaced laterally in relation to the middle of the joint, causing the knee joint, the ankle joint, and the foot as a whole to be weighted in the wrong way. The purpose of this work is to examine the influence of knock knee on gait kinematics. The gait of twenty-two 6-year-old children of both sexes in whom knock knee had been medically diagnosed was compared with the gait of 33 children of the same age whose knee joints conformed to the norm in formation and position. Gait was recorded separately for the sagittal and the frontal planes, using a video-computer system. The results of the examination indicated statistically significant differences in the gait of the two groups of children. These differences related mainly to the time features of gait and to data on the angles in the knee and ankle joints. Although the results obtained for other features of gait did not reveal statistical differences, these did indicate that the children with knock knee walked more slowly and with a lower cadence. The results indicate that knock knee in 6-year-old children has an adverse impact on the mechanics of the lower limb joints in gait and causes a deterioration in gait quality. Thus knock knee in children should not be treated merely as a superficial defect but should be subject to therapy and, more importantly, taken into account when introducing children to early sports training.

  11. Gait parameter control timing with dynamic manual contact or visual cues.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Ely; Shi, Peter; Werner, William

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the timing of gait parameter changes (stride length, peak toe velocity, and double-, single-support, and complete step duration) to control gait speed. Eleven healthy participants adjusted their gait speed on a treadmill to maintain a constant distance between them and a fore-aft oscillating cue (a place on a conveyor belt surface). The experimental design balanced conditions of cue modality (vision: eyes-open; manual contact: eyes-closed while touching the cue); treadmill speed (0.2, 0.4, 0.85, and 1.3 m/s); and cue motion (none, ±10 cm at 0.09, 0.11, and 0.18 Hz). Correlation analyses revealed a number of temporal relationships between gait parameters and cue speed. The results suggest that neural control ranged from feedforward to feedback. Specifically, step length preceded cue velocity during double-support duration suggesting anticipatory control. Peak toe velocity nearly coincided with its most-correlated cue velocity during single-support duration. The toe-off concluding step and double-support durations followed their most-correlated cue velocity, suggesting feedback control. Cue-tracking accuracy and cue velocity correlations with timing parameters were higher with the manual contact cue than visual cue. The cue/gait timing relationships generalized across cue modalities, albeit with greater delays of step-cycle events relative to manual contact cue velocity. We conclude that individual kinematic parameters of gait are controlled to achieve a desired velocity at different specific times during the gait cycle. The overall timing pattern of instantaneous cue velocities associated with different gait parameters is conserved across cues that afford different performance accuracies. This timing pattern may be temporally shifted to optimize control. Different cue/gait parameter latencies in our nonadaptation paradigm provide general-case evidence of the independent control of gait parameters previously demonstrated in gait adaptation paradigms

  12. Gait parameter control timing with dynamic manual contact or visual cues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peter; Werner, William

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the timing of gait parameter changes (stride length, peak toe velocity, and double-, single-support, and complete step duration) to control gait speed. Eleven healthy participants adjusted their gait speed on a treadmill to maintain a constant distance between them and a fore-aft oscillating cue (a place on a conveyor belt surface). The experimental design balanced conditions of cue modality (vision: eyes-open; manual contact: eyes-closed while touching the cue); treadmill speed (0.2, 0.4, 0.85, and 1.3 m/s); and cue motion (none, ±10 cm at 0.09, 0.11, and 0.18 Hz). Correlation analyses revealed a number of temporal relationships between gait parameters and cue speed. The results suggest that neural control ranged from feedforward to feedback. Specifically, step length preceded cue velocity during double-support duration suggesting anticipatory control. Peak toe velocity nearly coincided with its most-correlated cue velocity during single-support duration. The toe-off concluding step and double-support durations followed their most-correlated cue velocity, suggesting feedback control. Cue-tracking accuracy and cue velocity correlations with timing parameters were higher with the manual contact cue than visual cue. The cue/gait timing relationships generalized across cue modalities, albeit with greater delays of step-cycle events relative to manual contact cue velocity. We conclude that individual kinematic parameters of gait are controlled to achieve a desired velocity at different specific times during the gait cycle. The overall timing pattern of instantaneous cue velocities associated with different gait parameters is conserved across cues that afford different performance accuracies. This timing pattern may be temporally shifted to optimize control. Different cue/gait parameter latencies in our nonadaptation paradigm provide general-case evidence of the independent control of gait parameters previously demonstrated in gait adaptation paradigms

  13. [Gait disorders in geriatric patients. Classification and therapy].

    PubMed

    Jahn, K; Heinze, C; Selge, C; Heßelbarth, K; Schniepp, R

    2015-04-01

    Slow walking with reduced body dynamics is a characteristic feature of locomotion in the elderly. Impaired mobility and falls associated with gait disorders significantly contribute to a reduced quality of life in the elderly. A gait disorder is not an inevitable consequence of aging. This article shows that it is worth recognizing specific deficits and differentiating specific aspects in multifactorial disorders because many causes can be well treated. Also provided are the bases for clinical classification and therapeutic principles. Review of recent literature and clinical review based on own experience and own scientific results. Common causes of disturbed gait in the elderly are neurological deficits, including sensory deficits (e.g. peripheral neuropathy and vestibulopathy), neurodegeneration (e.g. cerebellar ataxia and parkinsonian syndromes, cognitive impairment (e.g. degenerative dementia), degeneration of joints (e.g. coxarthrosis) and general loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia). Furthermore, a fear of falling also contributes to the gait disorder. Multimodal therapies are often necessary and the principles are presented. Identification of deficits is a prerequisite for specific therapy. As physical activity protects against cognitive impairment, reduces the risk of falling and improves overall quality of life, a structured assessment of causes for gait impairment is crucial.

  14. The feasibility of singing to improve gait in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elinor C.; McNeely, Marie E.; Earhart, Gammon M.

    2017-01-01

    Brain regions important for controlling movement are also responsible for rhythmic processing. In Parkinson disease (PD), defective internal timing within the brain has been linked to impaired beat discrimination, and may contribute to a loss of ability to maintain a steady gait rhythm. Less rhythmic gait is inherently less efficient, and this may lead to gait impairment including reduced speed, cadence, and stride length, as well as increased variability. While external rhythmic auditory stimulation (e.g. a metronome beat) is well-established as an effective tool to stabilize gait in PD, little is known about whether self-generated cues such as singing have the same beneficial effect on gait in PD. Thus, we compared gait patterns of 23 people with mild to moderate PD under five cued conditions: uncued, music only, singing only, singing with music, and a verbal dual-task condition. In our single session study, singing while walking did not significantly alter velocity, cadence, or stride length, indicating that it was not excessively demanding for people with PD. In addition, walking was less variable when singing than during other cued conditions. This was further supported by the comparison between singing trials and a verbal dual-task condition. In contrast to singing, the verbal dual-task negatively affected gait performance. These findings suggest that singing holds promise as an effective cueing technique that may be as good as or better than traditional cueing techniques for improving gait among people with PD. PMID:28226309

  15. Pendulum test measure correlates with gait parameters in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lotfian, M; Mirbagheri, M M; Kharazi, M R; Dadashi, F; Nourian, R; Irani, A; Mirbagheri, A

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) usually suffer from different impairments including gait impairment and spasticity. Spastic hypertonia is a defining feature of spasticity and manifests as a mechanical abnormality. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between spastic hypertonia and gait impairments in spastic children with CP, addressing an important controversial issue. Spastic hypertonia was quantified using the pendulum test. The gait impairments were evaluated using the motion capture system in a gait laboratory. Our results showed significant correlations among gait parameters; i.e. walking speed, step length, and the pendulum test measures. This indicates that neuromuscular abnormalities are associated with spasticity and may contribute to gait impairments. The clinical implication is that the impaired gait in children with CP may be improved with the treatment of neuromuscular abnormalities.

  16. A versatile tripodal amide receptor for the encapsulation of anions or hydrated anions via formation of dimeric capsules.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, M; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2010-02-01

    A bowl-shaped tripodal receptor with an appropriately positioned amide functionality on the benzene platform and electron-withdrawing p-nitrophenyl terminals (L(1)) has been designed, synthesized, and studied for the anion binding properties. The single-crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis on crystals of L(1) with tetrabutylammonium salts of nitrate (1), acetate (2), fluoride (3), and chloride (4) obtained in moist dioxane medium showed encapsulation of two NO(3)(-), [(AcO)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](2-), [F(2)(H(2)O)(6)](2-), and [Cl(2)(H(2)O)(4)](2-) respectively as the anionic guests inside the staggered dimeric capsular assembly of L(1). The p-nitro substitution in the aryl terminals assisted the formation of dimeric capsular assembly of L(1) exclusively upon binding/encapsulating above different guests. Though L(1) demonstrates capsule formation upon anion or hydrated anion complexation for all of the anions studied here, its positional isomer with the o-nitro-substituted tripodal triamide receptor L(2) selectively formed the dimeric capsular assembly upon encapsulation of [F(2)(H(2)O)(6)](2-) and noncapsular aggregates in the cases of other anions such as Cl(-), NO(3)(-), and AcO(-). Interestingly, structural investigations upon anion exchange of the complexes revealed that both isomers have selectivity toward the formation of a [F(2)(H(2)O)(6)](2-) encapsulated dimeric capsule. In contrast, solution-state (1)H NMR titration studies of L(1) and L(2) in DMSO-d(6) with AcO(-) indicated 1:3 (host:guest) binding.

  17. Gait post-stroke: Pathophysiology and rehabilitation strategies.

    PubMed

    Beyaert, C; Vasa, R; Frykberg, G E

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed neural control and biomechanical description of gait in both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects. In addition, we reviewed most of the gait rehabilitation strategies currently in use or in development and observed their principles in relation to recent pathophysiology of post-stroke gait. In both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects, motor control is organized on a task-oriented basis using a common set of a few muscle modules to simultaneously achieve body support, balance control, and forward progression during gait. Hemiparesis following stroke is due to disruption of descending neural pathways, usually with no direct lesion of the brainstem and cerebellar structures involved in motor automatic processes. Post-stroke, improvements of motor activities including standing and locomotion are variable but are typically characterized by a common postural behaviour which involves the unaffected side more for body support and balance control, likely in response to initial muscle weakness of the affected side. Various rehabilitation strategies are regularly used or in development, targeting muscle activity, postural and gait tasks, using more or less high-technology equipment. Reduced walking speed often improves with time and with various rehabilitation strategies, but asymmetric postural behaviour during standing and walking is often reinforced, maintained, or only transitorily decreased. This asymmetric compensatory postural behaviour appears to be robust, driven by support and balance tasks maintaining the predominant use of the unaffected side over the initially impaired affected side. Based on these elements, stroke rehabilitation including affected muscle strengthening and often stretching would first need to correct the postural asymmetric pattern by exploiting postural automatic processes in various particular motor tasks secondarily beneficial to gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [The present state and progress of researches on gait recognition].

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhaojun; Jin, Jingna; Ming, Dong; Wan, Baikun

    2008-10-01

    Recognition by gait is a new field for the biometric recognition technology. Its aim is to recognize people and detect physiological, pathological and mental characters by their walk style. The use of gait as a biometric for human identification is promising. The technique of gait recognition, as an attractive research area of biomedical information detection, attracts more and more attention. In this paper is introduced a survey of the basic theory, existing gait recognition methods and potential prospects. The latest progress and key factors of research difficulties are analyzed, and future researches are envisaged.

  19. Gray matter volume and dual-task gait performance in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Blumen, Helena M.; Verghese, Joe; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Makizako, Hyuma; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Suzuki, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Dual-task gait performance is impaired in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, but the brain substrates associated with dual-task gait performance are not well-established. The relationship between gray matter and gait speed under single-task and dual-task conditions (walking while counting backward) was examined in 560 seniors with mild cognitive impairment (non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment: n = 270; mean age = 72.4 yrs., 63.6 % women; amnestic mild cognitive impairment: n = 290; mean age = 73.4 yrs., 45.4 % women). Multivariate covariance-based analyses of magnetic resonance imaging data, adjusted for potential confounders including single-task gait speed, were performed to identify gray matter patterns associated with dual-task gait speed. There were no differences in gait speed or cognitive performance during dual-task gait between individuals with non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment and amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Overall, increased dual-task gait speed was associated with a gray matter pattern of increased volume in medial frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, cingulate, precuneus, fusiform gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. The relationship between dual-task gait speed and brain substrates also differed by mild cognitive impairment subtype. Our study revealed a pattern of gray matter regions associated with dual-task performance. Although dual-task gait performance was similar in amnestic and non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment, the gray matter patterns associated with dual-task gait performance differed by mild cognitive impairment subtype. These findings suggest that the brain substrates supporting dual-task gait performance in amnestic and non-amnestic subtypes are different, and consequently may respond differently to interventions, or require different interventions. PMID:27392792

  20. Spatiotemporal Gait Characteristics Associated with Cognitive Impairment: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study, the Intercontinental "Gait, cOgnitiOn & Decline" Initiative.

    PubMed

    Beauchet, Olivier; Blumen, Helena M; Callisaya, Michele L; De Cock, Anne-Marie; Kressig, Reto W; Srikanth, Velandai; Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Verghese, Joe; Allali, Gilles

    2018-01-23

    The study aims to determine the spatiotemporal gait parameters and/or their combination(s) that best differentiate between cognitively healthy individuals (CHI), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and those with mild and moderate dementia, regardless of the etiology of cognitive impairment. A total of 2099 participants (1015 CHI, 478 patients with MCI, 331 patients with mild dementia and 275 with moderate dementia) were selected from the intercontinental "Gait, cOgnitiOn & Decline" (GOOD) initiative, which merged different databases from seven cross-sectional studies. Mean values and coefficients of variation (CoV) of spatiotemporal gait parameters were recorded during usual walking with the GAITRite® system. The severity of cognitive impairment was associated with worse performance on all gait parameters. Stride velocity had the strongest association with cognitive impairment, regardless of cognitive status. High mean value and CoV of stride length characterized moderate dementia, whereas increased CoV of stride time was specific to MCI status. The findings support the existence of specific cognitive impairment-related gait disturbances with differences related to stages of cognitive impairment, which may be used to screen individuals with cognitive impairment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. The effects of smartphone multitasking on gait and dynamic balance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeon Hyeong; Lee, Myoung Hee

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to analyze the influence of smartphone multitasking on gait and dynamic balance. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 19 male and 20 female university students. There were 4 types of gait tasks: General Gait (walking without a task), Task Gait 1 (walking while writing a message), Task Gait 2 (walking while writing a message and listening to music), Task Gait 3 (walking while writing a message and having a conversation). To exclude the learning effect, the order of tasks was randomized. The Zebris FDM-T treadmill system (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany) was used to measure left and right step length and width, and a 10 m walking test (10MWT) was conducted for gait velocity. In addition, a Timed Up and Go test (TUG) was used to measure dynamic balance. All the tasks were performed 3 times, and the mean of the measured values was analyzed. [Results] There were no statistically significant differences in step length and width. There were statistically significant differences in the 10MWT and TUG tests. [Conclusion] Using a smartphone while walking decreases a person’s dynamic balance and walking ability. It is considered that accident rates are higher when using a smartphone. PMID:29545698

  2. The effects of smartphone multitasking on gait and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeon Hyeong; Lee, Myoung Hee

    2018-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to analyze the influence of smartphone multitasking on gait and dynamic balance. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 19 male and 20 female university students. There were 4 types of gait tasks: General Gait (walking without a task), Task Gait 1 (walking while writing a message), Task Gait 2 (walking while writing a message and listening to music), Task Gait 3 (walking while writing a message and having a conversation). To exclude the learning effect, the order of tasks was randomized. The Zebris FDM-T treadmill system (Zebris Medical GmbH, Germany) was used to measure left and right step length and width, and a 10 m walking test (10MWT) was conducted for gait velocity. In addition, a Timed Up and Go test (TUG) was used to measure dynamic balance. All the tasks were performed 3 times, and the mean of the measured values was analyzed. [Results] There were no statistically significant differences in step length and width. There were statistically significant differences in the 10MWT and TUG tests. [Conclusion] Using a smartphone while walking decreases a person's dynamic balance and walking ability. It is considered that accident rates are higher when using a smartphone.

  3. Pathological gait in children with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease and proposal for gait modification to decrease the hip joint loading.

    PubMed

    Svehlík, Martin; Kraus, Tanja; Steinwender, Gerhard; Zwick, Ernst B; Linhart, Wolfgang E

    2012-06-01

    Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCP) severely limits the range of hip motion and hinders a normal gait. Loading of the hip joint is a major consideration in LCP treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate gait patterns in LCP and identify gait modifications to decrease the load on the affected hip. Forty children with unilateral LCP were divided into three groups based on the time base integral of the hip abductor moments during single stance on the affected side acquired during instrumented 3D gait analysis. X-rays of the affected hip were classified according to Herring and Catterall. Children in the "unloading" group spontaneously adopted a Duchenne-like gait with pelvis elevation, hip abduction and external rotation during single support phase. The "normal-loading" group showed pelvis elevation with a neutral hip position in the frontal plane. In the "overloading" group the pelvis dropped to the swinging limb at the beginning of stance accompanied by prolonged hip adduction. The time base integral of the hip abductor moments during single stance correlated positively with the X-ray classifications of Herring and Catterall, hip abduction angle and age. Older children preferred to walk in hip adduction during single stance, had more impaired hips and tended to overload them. The hip overloading pattern should be avoided in children with LCP. Gait training to unload the hip might become an integral component of conservative treatment in children with LCP.

  4. Gait patterns in hemiplegic patients with equinus foot deformity.

    PubMed

    Manca, M; Ferraresi, G; Cosma, M; Cavazzuti, L; Morelli, M; Benedetti, M G

    2014-01-01

    Equinus deformity of the foot is a common feature of hemiplegia, which impairs the gait pattern of patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of ankle-foot deformity in gait impairment. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to classify the gait patterns of 49 chronic hemiplegic patients with equinus deformity of the foot, based on temporal-distance parameters and joint kinematic measures obtained by an innovative protocol for motion assessment in the sagittal, frontal, and transverse planes, synthesized by parametrical analysis. Cluster analysis identified five subgroups of patients with homogenous levels of dysfunction during gait. Specific joint kinematic abnormalities were found, according to the speed of progression in each cluster. Patients with faster walking were those with less ankle-foot complex impairment or with reduced range of motion of ankle-foot complex, that is with a stiff ankle-foot complex. Slow walking was typical of patients with ankle-foot complex instability (i.e., larger motion in all the planes), severe equinus and hip internal rotation pattern, and patients with hip external rotation pattern. Clustering of gait patterns in these patients is helpful for a better understanding of dysfunction during gait and delivering more targeted treatment.

  5. Shedding light on walking in the dark: the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a higher-level gait disorder and controls.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Anat; Leibovich, Gregory; Herman, Talia; Gruendlinger, Leor; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2005-08-28

    To study the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a high level gait disorder (HLGD) and to compare their response to that of healthy elderly controls. 22 patients with a HLGD and 20 age-matched healthy controls were studied under usual lighting conditions (1000 lumens) and in near darkness (5 lumens). Gait speed and gait dynamics were measured under both conditions. Cognitive function, co-morbidities, depressive symptoms, and vision were also evaluated. Under usual lighting conditions, patients walked more slowly, with reduced swing times, and increased stride-to-stride variability, compared to controls. When walking under near darkness conditions, both groups slowed their gait. All other measures of gait were not affected by lighting in the controls. In contrast, patients further reduced their swing times and increased their stride-to-stride variability, both stride time variability and swing time variability. The unique response of the patients was not explained by vision, mental status, co-morbidities, or the values of walking under usual lighting conditions. Walking with reduced lighting does not affect the gait of healthy elderly subjects, except for a reduction in speed. On the other hand, the gait of older adults with a HLGD becomes more variable and unsteady when they walk in near darkness, despite adapting a slow and cautious gait. Further work is needed to identify the causes of the maladaptive response among patients with a HLGD and the potential connection between this behavior and the increased fall risk observed in these patients.

  6. New Lower-Limb Gait Asymmetry Indices Based on a Depth Camera

    PubMed Central

    Auvinet, Edouard; Multon, Franck; Meunier, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various asymmetry indices have been proposed to compare the spatiotemporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters of lower limbs during the gait cycle. However, these indices rely on gait measurement systems that are costly and generally require manual examination, calibration procedures and the precise placement of sensors/markers on the body of the patient. Methods: To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a new asymmetry index, which uses an inexpensive, easy-to-use and markerless depth camera (Microsoft Kinect™) output. This asymmetry index directly uses depth images provided by the Kinect™ without requiring joint localization. It is based on the longitudinal spatial difference between lower-limb movements during the gait cycle. To evaluate the relevance of this index, fifteen healthy subjects were tested on a treadmill walking normally and then via an artificially-induced gait asymmetry with a thick sole placed under one shoe. The gait movement was simultaneously recorded using a Kinect™ placed in front of the subject and a motion capture system. Results: The proposed longitudinal index distinguished asymmetrical gait (p < 0.001), while other symmetry indices based on spatiotemporal gait parameters failed using such Kinect™ skeleton measurements. Moreover, the correlation coefficient between this index measured by Kinect™ and the ground truth of this index measured by motion capture is 0.968. Conclusion: This gait asymmetry index measured with a Kinect™ is low cost, easy to use and is a promising development for clinical gait analysis. PMID:25719863

  7. Trunk lean gait decreases multi-segmental coordination in the vertical direction.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kazuki; Anan, Masaya; Sawada, Tomonori; Tanimoto, Kenji; Takeda, Takuya; Ogata, Yuta; Takahashi, Makoto; Kito, Nobuhiro; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2017-11-01

    [Purpose] The strategy of trunk lean gait to reduce external knee adduction moment (KAM) may affect multi-segmental synergy control of center of mass (COM) displacement. Uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis is an evaluation index to understand motor variability. The purpose of this study was to investigate how motor variability is affected by using UCM analysis on adjustment of the trunk lean angle. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy young adults walked at their preferred speed under two conditions: normal and trunk lean gait. UCM analysis was performed with respect to the COM displacement during the stance phase. The KAM data were analyzed at the points of the first KAM peak during the stance phase. [Results] The KAM during trunk lean gait was smaller than during normal gait. Despite a greater segmental configuration variance with respect to mediolateral COM displacement during trunk lean gait, the synergy index was not significantly different between the two conditions. The synergy index with respect to vertical COM displacement during trunk lean gait was smaller than that during normal gait. [Conclusion] These results suggest that trunk lean gait is effective in reducing KAM; however, it may decrease multi-segmental movement coordination of COM control in the vertical direction.

  8. Variability of gait, bilateral coordination, and asymmetry in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Jimenez, J; Orantes-Gonzalez, E; Soto-Hermoso, V M

    2016-03-01

    To analyze how fibromyalgia affected the variability, asymmetry, and bilateral coordination of gait walking at comfortable and fast speeds. 65 fibromyalgia (FM) patients and 50 healthy women were analyzed. Gait analysis was performed using an instrumented walkway (GAITRite system). Average walking speed, coefficient of variation (CV) of stride length, swing time, and step width data were obtained and bilateral coordination and gait asymmetry were analyzed. FM patients presented significantly lower speeds than the healthy group. FM patients obtained significantly higher values of CV_StrideLength (p=0.04; p<0.001), CV_SwingTime (p<0.001; p<0.001), CV_StepWidth (p=0.004; p<0.001), phase coordination index (p=0.01; p=0.03), and p_CV (p<0.001; p=0.001) than the control group, walking at comfortable or fast speeds. Gait asymmetry only showed significant differences in the fast condition. FM patients walked more slowly and presented a greater variability of gait and worse bilateral coordination than healthy subjects. Gait asymmetry only showed differences in the fast condition. The variability and the bilateral coordination were particularly affected by FM in women. Therefore, variability and bilateral coordination of gait could be analyzed to complement the gait evaluation of FM patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identity Recognition Algorithm Using Improved Gabor Feature Selection of Gait Energy Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, LIANG; Ling-yao, JIA; Dong-cheng, SHI

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an effective gait recognition approach based on Gabor features of gait energy image. In this paper, the kernel Fisher analysis combined with kernel matrix is proposed to select dominant features. The nearest neighbor classifier based on whitened cosine distance is used to discriminate different gait patterns. The approach proposed is tested on the CASIA and USF gait databases. The results show that our approach outperforms other state of gait recognition approaches in terms of recognition accuracy and robustness.

  10. Laboratory review: the role of gait analysis in seniors' mobility and fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Kressig, Reto W

    2011-01-01

    Walking is a complex motor task generally performed automatically by healthy adults. Yet, by the elderly, walking is often no longer performed automatically. Older adults require more attention for motor control while walking than younger adults. Falls, often with serious consequences, can be the result. Gait impairments are one of the biggest risk factors for falls. Several studies have identified changes in certain gait parameters as independent predictors of fall risk. Such gait changes are often too discrete to be detected by clinical observation alone. At the Basel Mobility Center, we employ the GAITRite electronic walkway system for spatial-temporal gait analysis. Although we have a large range of indications for gait analyses and several areas of clinical research, our focus is on the association between gait and cognition. Gait analysis with walking as a single-task condition alone is often insufficient to reveal underlying gait disorders present during normal, everyday activities. We use a dual-task paradigm, walking while simultaneously performing a second cognitive task, to assess the effects of divided attention on motor performance and gait control. Objective quantification of such clinically relevant gait changes is necessary to determine fall risk. Early detection of gait disorders and fall risk permits early intervention and, in the best-case scenario, fall prevention. We and others have shown that rhythmic movement training such as Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics, tai chi and social dancing can improve gait regularity and automaticity, thus increasing gait safety and reducing fall risk. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Visual analysis of the effects of load carriage on gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, Michael G.; Ward, James M.; Flynn, Patrick J.

    2005-03-01

    As early as the 1970's it was determined that gait, or the "manner of walking" is an identifying feature of a human being. Since then, extensive research has been done in the field of computer vision to determine how accurately a subject can be identified by gait characteristics. This has necessarily led to the study of how various data collection conditions, such as terrain type, varying camera angles, or a carried briefcase, may affect the identifying features of gait. However, little or no research has been done to question whether such conditions may be inferred from gait analysis. For example, is it possible to determine characteristics of the walking surface simply by looking at statistics derived from the subject's gait? The question to be addressed is whether significant concealed weight distributed on the subject's torso can be discovered through analysis of his gait. Individual trends in subjects in response to increasing concealed weight will be explored, with the objective of finding universal trends that would have obvious security purposes.

  12. Reliability and comparison of Kinect-based methods for estimating spatiotemporal gait parameters of healthy and post-stroke individuals.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Jorge; Llorens, Roberto; Colomer, Carolina; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2018-04-27

    Different studies have analyzed the potential of the off-the-shelf Microsoft Kinect, in its different versions, to estimate spatiotemporal gait parameters as a portable markerless low-cost alternative to laboratory grade systems. However, variability in populations, measures, and methodologies prevents accurate comparison of the results. The objective of this study was to determine and compare the reliability of the existing Kinect-based methods to estimate spatiotemporal gait parameters in healthy and post-stroke adults. Forty-five healthy individuals and thirty-eight stroke survivors participated in this study. Participants walked five meters at a comfortable speed and their spatiotemporal gait parameters were estimated from the data retrieved by a Kinect v2, using the most common methods in the literature, and by visual inspection of the videotaped performance. Errors between both estimations were computed. For both healthy and post-stroke participants, highest accuracy was obtained when using the speed of the ankles to estimate gait speed (3.6-5.5 cm/s), stride length (2.5-5.5 cm), and stride time (about 45 ms), and when using the distance between the sacrum and the ankles and toes to estimate double support time (about 65 ms) and swing time (60-90 ms). Although the accuracy of these methods is limited, these measures could occasionally complement traditional tools. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gray matter volume and dual-task gait performance in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takehiko; Blumen, Helena M; Verghese, Joe; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Makizako, Hyuma; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Suzuki, Takao

    2017-06-01

    Dual-task gait performance is impaired in older adults with mild cognitive impairment, but the brain substrates associated with dual-task gait performance are not well-established. The relationship between gray matter and gait speed under single-task and dual-task conditions (walking while counting backward) was examined in 560 seniors with mild cognitive impairment (non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment: n = 270; mean age = 72.4 yrs., 63.6 % women; amnestic mild cognitive impairment: n = 290; mean age = 73.4 yrs., 45.4 % women). Multivariate covariance-based analyses of magnetic resonance imaging data, adjusted for potential confounders including single-task gait speed, were performed to identify gray matter patterns associated with dual-task gait speed. There were no differences in gait speed or cognitive performance during dual-task gait between individuals with non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment and amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Overall, increased dual-task gait speed was associated with a gray matter pattern of increased volume in medial frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, cingulate, precuneus, fusiform gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. The relationship between dual-task gait speed and brain substrates also differed by mild cognitive impairment subtype. Our study revealed a pattern of gray matter regions associated with dual-task performance. Although dual-task gait performance was similar in amnestic and non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment, the gray matter patterns associated with dual-task gait performance differed by mild cognitive impairment subtype. These findings suggest that the brain substrates supporting dual-task gait performance in amnestic and non-amnestic subtypes are different, and consequently may respond differently to interventions, or require different interventions.

  14. Kinematic Mechanisms of How Power Training Improves Healthy Old Adults' Gait Velocity.

    PubMed

    Beijersbergen, Chantal M I; Granacher, Urs; Gäbler, Martijn; Devita, Paul; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    Slow gait predicts many adverse clinical outcomes in old adults, but the mechanisms of how power training can minimize the age-related loss of gait velocity is unclear. We examined the effects of 10 wk of lower extremity power training and detraining on healthy old adults' lower extremity muscle power and gait kinematics. As part of the Potsdam Gait Study, participants started with 10 wk of power training followed by 10 wk of detraining (n = 16), and participants started with a 10-wk control period followed by 10 wk of power training (n = 16). We measured gait kinematics (stride characteristic and joint kinematics) and isokinetic power of the ankle plantarflexor (20°·s, 40°·s, and 60°·s) and knee extensor and flexor (60°·s, 120°·s, and 180°·s) muscles at weeks 0, 10, and 20. Power training improved isokinetic muscle power by ~30% (P ≤ 0.001) and fast (5.9%, P < 0.05) but not habitual gait velocity. Ankle plantarflexor velocity measured during gait at fast pace decreased by 7.9% (P < 0.05). The changes isokinetic muscle power and joint kinematics did not correlate with increases in fast gait velocity. The mechanisms that increased fast gait velocity involved higher cadence (r = 0.86, P ≤ 0.001) rather than longer strides (r = 0.49, P = 0.066). Detraining did not reverse the training-induced increases in muscle power and fast gait velocity. Because increases in muscle power and modifications in joint kinematics did not correlate with increases in fast gait velocity, kinematic mechanisms seem to play a minor role in improving healthy old adults' fast gait velocity after power training.

  15. Walking while talking: Young adults flexibly allocate resources between speech and gait.

    PubMed

    Raffegeau, Tiphanie E; Haddad, Jeffrey M; Huber, Jessica E; Rietdyk, Shirley

    2018-05-26

    Walking while talking is an ideal multitask behavior to assess how young healthy adults manage concurrent tasks as it is well-practiced, cognitively demanding, and has real consequences for impaired performance in either task. Since the association between cognitive tasks and gait appears stronger when the gait task is more challenging, gait challenge was systematically manipulated in this study. To understand how young adults accomplish the multitask behavior of walking while talking as the gait challenge was systematically manipulated. Sixteen young adults (21 ± 1.6 years, 9 males) performed three gait tasks with and without speech: unobstructed gait (easy), obstacle crossing (moderate), obstacle crossing and tray carrying (difficult). Participants also provided a speech sample while seated for a baseline indicator of speech. The speech task was to speak extemporaneously about a topic (e.g. first car). Gait speed and the duration of silent pauses during speaking were determined. Silent pauses reflect cognitive processes involved in speech production and language planning. When speaking and walking without obstacles, gait speed decreased (relative to walking without speaking) but silent pause duration did not change (relative to seated speech). These changes are consistent with the idea that, in the easy gait task, participants placed greater value on speech pauses than on gait speed, likely due to the negative social consequences of impaired speech. In the moderate and difficult gait tasks both parameters changed: gait speed decreased and silent pauses increased. Walking while talking is a cognitively demanding task for healthy young adults, despite being a well-practiced habitual activity. These findings are consistent with the integrated model of task prioritization from Yogev-Seligmann et al., [1]. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gait pattern in myotonic dystrophy (Steinert disease): a kinematic, kinetic and EMG evaluation using 3D gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Crugnola, Veronica; Priano, Lorenzo; Menegoni, Francesco; Trotti, Claudio; Milano, Eva; Mauro, Alessandro

    2012-03-15

    We investigated the gait pattern of 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy (Steinert disease; 4 females, 6 males; age: 41.5+7.6 years), compared to 20 healthy controls, through manual muscle test and gait analysis, in terms of kinematic, kinetic and EMG data. In most of patients (80%) distal muscle groups were weaker than proximal ones. Weakness at lower limbs was in general moderate to severe and MRC values evidenced a significant correlation between tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis (R=0.91). An overall observation of gait pattern in patients when compared to controls showed that most spatio-temporal parameters (velocity, step length and cadence) were significantly different. As concerns kinematics, patients' pelvic tilt was globally in a higher position than control group, with reduced hip extension ability in stance phase and limited range of motion; 60% of the limbs revealed knee hyperextension during midstance and ankle joints showed a quite physiological position at initial contact and higher dorsiflexion during stance phase if compared to healthy individuals. Kinetic plots evidenced higher hip power during loading response and lower ankle power generation in terminal stance. The main EMG abnormalities were seen in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis muscles. In this study gait analysis gives objective and quantitative information about the gait pattern and the deviations due to the muscular situation of these patients; these results are important from a clinical point of view and suggest that rehabilitation programs for them should take these findings into account. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reliability and validity of gait analysis by android-based smartphone.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Shu; Yamada, Minoru; Nagai, Koutatsu; Mori, Shuhei; Kajiwara, Yuu; Sonoda, Takuya; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hiromu; Okamoto, Kazuya; Ito, Tatsuaki; Muto, Shinyo; Ishihara, Tatsuya; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2012-05-01

    Smartphones are very common devices in daily life that have a built-in tri-axial accelerometer. Similar to previously developed accelerometers, smartphones can be used to assess gait patterns. However, few gait analyses have been performed using smartphones, and their reliability and validity have not been evaluated yet. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a smartphone accelerometer. Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. They walked 20 m at their preferred speeds, and their trunk accelerations were measured using a smartphone and a tri-axial accelerometer that was secured over the L3 spinous process. We developed a gait analysis application and installed it in the smartphone to measure the acceleration. After signal processing, we calculated the gait parameters of each measurement terminal: peak frequency (PF), root mean square (RMS), autocorrelation peak (AC), and coefficient of variance (CV) of the acceleration peak intervals. Remarkable consistency was observed in the test-retest reliability of all the gait parameter results obtained by the smartphone (p<0.001). All the gait parameter results obtained by the smartphone showed statistically significant and considerable correlations with the same parameter results obtained by the tri-axial accelerometer (PF r=0.99, RMS r=0.89, AC r=0.85, CV r=0.82; p<0.01). Our study indicates that the smartphone with gait analysis application used in this study has the capacity to quantify gait parameters with a degree of accuracy that is comparable to that of the tri-axial accelerometer.

  18. The feasibility of singing to improve gait in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elinor C; McNeely, Marie E; Earhart, Gammon M

    2017-03-01

    Brain regions important for controlling movement are also responsible for rhythmic processing. In Parkinson disease (PD), defective internal timing within the brain has been linked to impaired beat discrimination, and may contribute to a loss of ability to maintain a steady gait rhythm. Less rhythmic gait is inherently less efficient, and this may lead to gait impairment including reduced speed, cadence, and stride length, as well as increased variability. While external rhythmic auditory stimulation (e.g. a metronome beat) is well-established as an effective tool to stabilize gait in PD, little is known about whether self-generated cues such as singing have the same beneficial effect on gait in PD. Thus, we compared gait patterns of 23 people with mild to moderate PD under five cued conditions: uncued, music only, singing only, singing with music, and a verbal dual-task condition. In our single-session study, singing while walking did not significantly alter velocity, cadence, or stride length, indicating that it was not excessively demanding for people with PD. In addition, walking was less variable when singing than during other cued conditions. This was further supported by the comparison between singing trials and a verbal dual-task condition. In contrast to singing, the verbal dual-task negatively affected gait performance. These findings suggest that singing holds promise as an effective cueing technique that may be as good as or better than traditional cueing techniques for improving gait among people with PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The developmental dynamics of gait maturation with a focus on spatiotemporal measures.

    PubMed

    Kraan, C M; Tan, A H J; Cornish, K M

    2017-01-01

    Gait analysis is recognised as a powerful clinical tool for studying relationships between motor control and brain function. By drawing on the literature investigating gait in individuals with neurological disorders, this review provides insight into the neural processes that contribute to and regulate specific spatiotemporal sub-components of gait and how they may mature across early to late childhood. This review also discusses the roles of changing anthropomorphic characteristics, and maturing sensory and higher-order cognitive processes in differentiating the developmental trajectories of the sub-components of gait. Importantly, although studies have shown that cognitive-gait interference is larger in children compared to adults, the contributing neurocognitive mechanisms may vary across age groups who have different types of attentional or cognitive vulnerabilities. These findings have implications for current models of gait maturation by highlighting the need for a dynamic model that focuses on the integration of various factors that contribute to gait though experience and practice. This is essential to elucidating why gait and other motor deficits are often contiguous with cognitive neurodevelopmental disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Simulation of Tripod Gaits for a Hexapod Underwater Walking Machine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    AquarobotBody class H/ Subclass of RigidBody class fl 170 #iid~dKAQUAROBOTBODY # defint HAQUAROBOTBODY #include <stdio.h> #include *Lia*1.H" #include "AbRis4H...nulU&A4g parameters enuk heme returm (arcsegmnww flag); HI smuit finction ends here i/REVISED: .... /r.71TLE: seito i/INPUT: (x~y)body coordinates of a...kttacqt - foot[1D; d - (x ._inssrq* - fbot(On’x gusrcept - focttI~); todigace= -sqr(c + Y HI orientation we and heme II lieSep=*t izusectionto ten as

  1. Flexed-knee gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Church, C; Ge, J; Hager, S; Haumont, T; Lennon, N; Niiler, T; Hulbert, R; Miller, F

    2018-04-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of adolescents with cerebral palsy who have undergone single-event multilevel surgery for a flexed-knee gait, followed into young adulthood using 3D motion analysis. Patients and Methods A total of 59 young adults with spastic cerebral palsy, with a mean age of 26 years (sd 3), were enrolled into the study in which their gait was compared with an evaluation that had taken place a mean of 12 years (sd 2) previously. At their visits during adolescence, the children walked with excessive flexion of the knee at initial contact and surgical or therapeutic interventions were not controlled between visits. Results Based on the change in flexed-knee gait over approximately ten years, improvements were seen in increased Gait Deviation Index (p < 0.001) and decreased flexion of the knee at initial contact (p < 0.001). Greater popliteal angle (p < 0.001), reduced Gross Motor Function Measure section D (p = 0.006), and reduced speed of gait (p = 0.007) suggested a mild decline in function. Quality-of-life measures showed that these patients fell within normal limits compared with typical young adults in areas other than physical function. Conclusion While some small significant changes were noted, little clinically significant change was seen in function and gait, with gross motor function maintained between adolescence and young adulthood. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:549-56.

  2. Is body-weight-supported treadmill training or robotic-assisted gait training superior to overground gait training and other forms of physiotherapy in people with spinal cord injury? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mehrholz, J; Harvey, L A; Thomas, S; Elsner, B

    2017-08-01

    Systematic review about randomised trials comparing different training strategies to improve gait in people with spinal cord injuries (SCI). The aim of this systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of body-weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robotic-assisted gait training with overground gait training and other forms of physiotherapy in people with traumatic SCI. Systematic review conducted by researchers from Germany and Australia. An extensive search was conducted for randomised controlled trials involving people with traumatic SCI that compared either BWSTT or robotic-assisted gait training with overground gait training and other forms of physiotherapy. The two outcomes of interest were walking speed (m s -1 ) and walking distance (m). BWSTT and robotic-assisted gait training were analysed separately, and data were pooled across trials to derive mean between-group differences using a random-effects model. Thirteen randomised controlled trials involving 586 people were identified. Ten trials involving 462 participants compared BWSTT to overground gait training and other forms of physiotherapy, but only nine trials provided useable data. The pooled mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) between-group differences for walking speed and walking distance were -0.03 m s -1 (-0.10 to 0.04) and -7 m (-45 to 31), respectively, favouring overground gait training. Five trials involving 344 participants compared robotic-assisted gait training to overground gait training and other forms of physiotherapy but only three provided useable data. The pooled mean (95% CI) between-group differences for walking speed and walking distance were -0.04 m s -1 (95% CI -0.21 to 0.13) and -6 m (95% CI -86 to 74), respectively, favouring overground gait training. BWSTT and robotic-assisted gait training do not increase walking speed more than overground gait training and other forms of physiotherapy do, but their effects on walking distance are not clear.

  3. Model Predictive Control-based gait pattern generation for wearable exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Letian; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; van der Kooij, Herman

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for controlling wearable exoskeletons that do not need predefined joint trajectories. Instead, it only needs basic gait descriptors such as step length, swing duration, and walking speed. End point Model Predictive Control (MPC) is used to generate the online joint trajectories based on these gait parameters. Real-time ability and control performance of the method during the swing phase of gait cycle is studied in this paper. Experiments are performed by helping a human subject swing his leg with different patterns in the LOPES gait trainer. Results show that the method is able to assist subjects to make steps with different step length and step duration without predefined joint trajectories and is fast enough for real-time implementation. Future study of the method will focus on controlling the exoskeletons in the entire gait cycle. © 2011 IEEE

  4. Single-task and dual-task tandem gait test performance after concussion.

    PubMed

    Howell, David R; Osternig, Louis R; Chou, Li-Shan

    2017-07-01

    To compare single-task and dual-task tandem gait test performance between athletes after concussion with controls on observer-timed, spatio-temporal, and center-of-mass (COM) balance control measurements. Ten participants (19.0±5.5years) were prospectively identified and completed a tandem gait test protocol within 72h of concussion and again 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 2 months post-injury. Seven uninjured controls (20.0±4.5years) completed the same protocol in similar time increments. Tandem gait test trials were performed with (dual-task) and without (single-task) concurrently performing a cognitive test as whole-body motion analysis was performed. Outcome variables included test completion time, average tandem gait velocity, cadence, and whole-body COM frontal plane displacement. Concussion participants took significantly longer to complete the dual-task tandem gait test than controls throughout the first 2 weeks post-injury (mean time=16.4 [95% CI: 13.4-19.4] vs. 10.1 [95% CI: 6.4-13.7] seconds; p=0.03). Single-task tandem gait times were significantly lower 72h post-injury (p=0.04). Dual-task cadence was significantly lower for concussion participants than controls (89.5 [95% CI: 68.6-110.4] vs. 127.0 [95% CI: 97.4-156.6] steps/minute; p=0.04). Moderately-high to high correlations between tandem gait test time and whole-body COM medial-lateral displacement were detected at each time point during dual-task gait (r s =0.70-0.93; p=0.03-0.001). Adding a cognitive task during the tandem gait test resulted in longer detectable deficits post-concussion compared to the traditional single-task tandem gait test. As a clinical tool to assess dynamic motor function, tandem gait may assist with return to sport decisions after concussion. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stability in skipping gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrada, Emanuel; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier.

  6. Gait alterations to effectively reduce hip contact forces.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Meyer, Christophe; Corten, Kristoff; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Patients with hip pathology present alterations in gait which have an effect on joint moments and loading. In knee osteoarthritic patients, the relation between medial knee contact forces and the knee adduction moment are currently being exploited to define gait retraining strategies to effectively reduce pain and disease progression. However, the relation between hip contact forces and joint moments has not been clearly established. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the effect of changes in hip and pelvis kinematics during gait on internal hip moments and contact forces which is calculated using muscle driven simulations. The results showed that frontal plane kinetics have the largest effect on hip contact forces. Given the high correlation between the change in hip adduction moment and contact force at initial stance (R(2)  = 0.87), this parameter can be used to alter kinematics and predict changes in contact force. At terminal stance the hip adduction and flexion moment can be used to predict changes in contact force (R(2)  = 0.76). Therefore, gait training that focuses on decreasing hip adduction moments, a wide base gait pattern, has the largest potential to reduce hip contact forces. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Identification of mouse gaits using a novel force-sensing exercise wheel.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin J H; Cullingford, Lottie; Usherwood, James R

    2015-09-15

    The gaits that animals use can provide information on neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, as well as the biomechanics of locomotion. Mice are a common research model in many fields; however, there is no consensus in the literature on how (and if) mouse gaits vary with speed. One of the challenges in studying mouse gaits is that mice tend to run intermittently on treadmills or overground; this paper attempts to overcome this issue with a novel exercise wheel that measures vertical ground reaction forces. Unlike previous instrumented wheels, this wheel is able to measure forces continuously and can therefore record data from consecutive strides. By concatenating the maximum limb force at each time point, a force trace can be constructed to quantify and identify gaits. The wheel was three dimensionally printed, allowing the design to be shared with other researchers. The kinematic parameters measured by the wheel were evaluated using high-speed video. Gaits were classified using a metric called "3S" (stride signal symmetry), which quantifies the half wave symmetry of the force trace peaks. Although mice are capable of using both symmetric and asymmetric gaits throughout their speed range, the continuum of gaits can be divided into regions based on the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric gaits; these divisions are further supported by the fact that mice run less frequently at speeds near the boundaries between regions. The boundary speeds correspond to gait transition speeds predicted by the hypothesis that mice move in a dynamically similar fashion to other legged animals. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Identification of mouse gaits using a novel force-sensing exercise wheel

    PubMed Central

    Cullingford, Lottie; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The gaits that animals use can provide information on neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, as well as the biomechanics of locomotion. Mice are a common research model in many fields; however, there is no consensus in the literature on how (and if) mouse gaits vary with speed. One of the challenges in studying mouse gaits is that mice tend to run intermittently on treadmills or overground; this paper attempts to overcome this issue with a novel exercise wheel that measures vertical ground reaction forces. Unlike previous instrumented wheels, this wheel is able to measure forces continuously and can therefore record data from consecutive strides. By concatenating the maximum limb force at each time point, a force trace can be constructed to quantify and identify gaits. The wheel was three dimensionally printed, allowing the design to be shared with other researchers. The kinematic parameters measured by the wheel were evaluated using high-speed video. Gaits were classified using a metric called “3S” (stride signal symmetry), which quantifies the half wave symmetry of the force trace peaks. Although mice are capable of using both symmetric and asymmetric gaits throughout their speed range, the continuum of gaits can be divided into regions based on the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric gaits; these divisions are further supported by the fact that mice run less frequently at speeds near the boundaries between regions. The boundary speeds correspond to gait transition speeds predicted by the hypothesis that mice move in a dynamically similar fashion to other legged animals. PMID:26139220

  9. Kinematics gait disorder in men with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Jimenez, Jose M; Soto-Hermoso, Victor M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the kinematics disorder of gait in men with fibromyalgia. We studied 12 male with fibromyalgia and 14 healthy men. Each participant of the study walked five trials along a 18.6-m walkway. Fibromyalgia patients completed a Spanish version of Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. Significant differences between fibromyalgia and control groups were found in velocity, stride length, and cadence. Gait parameters of men affected by fibromyalgia were impaired when compared to those of healthy group due to bradykinesia. According to previous studies to assess gait variables in female patients, the male with fibromyalgia also showed lower values of velocity, cadence, and stride length than healthy group but not reported significant differences in swing, stance, single, or double support phase.

  10. Effect of Interpersonal Interaction on Festinating Gait Rehabilitation in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Wada, Yoshiaki; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Although human walking gait rhythms are generated by native individual gait dynamics, these gait dynamics change during interactions between humans. A typical phenomenon is synchronization of gait rhythms during cooperative walking. Our previous research revealed that fluctuation characteristics in stride interval of subjects with Parkinson’s disease changed from random to 1/f fluctuation as fractal characteristics during cooperative walking with the gait assist system Walk-Mate, which emulates a human interaction using interactive rhythmic cues. Moreover, gait dynamics were relearned through Walk-Mate gait training. However, the system’s clinical efficacy was unclear because the previous studies did not focus on specific gait rhythm disorder symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Walk-Mate on festinating gait among subjects with Parkinson’s disease. Three within-subject experimental conditions were used: (1) preinteraction condition, (2) interaction condition, and (3) postinteraction condition. The only difference between conditions was the interactive rhythmic cues generated by Walk-Mate. Because subjects with festinating gait gradually and involuntarily decreased their stride interval, the regression slope of stride interval as an index of severity of preinteraction festinating gait was elevated. The regression slope in the interaction condition was more gradual than during the preinteraction condition, indicating that the interactive rhythmic cues contributed to relieving festinating gait and stabilizing gait dynamics. Moreover, the gradual regression slope was carried over to the postinteraction condition, indicating that subjects with festinating gait have the potential to relearn stable gait dynamics. These results suggest that disordered gait dynamics are clinically restored through interactive rhythmic cues and that Walk-Mate may have the potential to assist therapists in more effective rehabilitation. Trial Registration

  11. Feasibility of combining gait robot and multichannel functional electrical stimulation with intramuscular electrodes.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Jessica P; Dohring, Mark E; Marsolais, E Byron; Rogers, Jean; Burdsall, Richard; Roenigk, Kristen; Pundik, Svetlana; Daly, Janis J

    2008-01-01

    After stroke rehabilitation, many survivors of stroke exhibit persistent gait deficits. In previous work, we demonstrated significant gains in gait kinematics for survivors of chronic stroke using multichannel functional electrical stimulation with intramuscular electrodes (FES-IM). For this study, we tested the feasibility of combining FES-IM and gait robot technologies for treating persistent gait deficits after stroke. Six subjects, >or= 6 months after stroke, received 30-minute intervention sessions of combined FES-IM and gait robotics 4 days a week for 12 weeks. Feasibility was assessed according to three factors: (1) performance of the interface of the two technologies during intervention sessions, (2) clinicians' success in using two technologies simultaneously, and (3) subject satisfaction. FES-IM system hardware and software design features combined with the gait robot technology proved feasible to use. Each technology alone provided unique advantages and disadvantages of gait practice characteristics. Because of the unique advantages and disadvantages of each technology, gait deficits need to be accurately identified and a judicious treatment plan properly targeted before FES-IM, a gait robot, or both combined are selected.

  12. Automatic identification of gait events using an instrumented sock

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Textile-based transducers are an emerging technology in which piezo-resistive properties of materials are used to measure an applied strain. By incorporating these sensors into a sock, this technology offers the potential to detect critical events during the stance phase of the gait cycle. This could prove useful in several applications, such as functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems to assist gait. Methods We investigated the output of a knitted resistive strain sensor during walking and sought to determine the degree of similarity between the sensor output and the ankle angle in the sagittal plane. In addition, we investigated whether it would be possible to predict three key gait events, heel strike, heel lift and toe off, with a relatively straight-forward algorithm. This worked by predicting gait events to occur at fixed time offsets from specific peaks in the sensor signal. Results Our results showed that, for all subjects, the sensor output exhibited the same general characteristics as the ankle joint angle. However, there were large between-subjects differences in the degree of similarity between the two curves. Despite this variability, it was possible to accurately predict gait events using a simple algorithm. This algorithm displayed high levels of trial-to-trial repeatability. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of using textile-based transducers in future devices that provide active gait assistance. PMID:21619570

  13. Synthetic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Pyrrole, a hydrogen bonding partner for saccharidic hydroxyls.

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Oscar; Gentili, Matteo; Roelens, Stefano

    2012-09-07

    The carbohydrate recognition properties of synthetic tripodal receptors relying on H-bonding interactions have highlighted the crucial role played by the functional groups matching saccharidic hydroxyls. Herein, pyrrole and pyridine, which emerged as two of the most effective H-bonding groups, were quantitatively compared through their isostructural substitution within the architecture of a shape-persistent bicyclic cage receptor. NMR and ITC binding studies gave for the pyrrolic receptor a 20-fold larger affinity toward octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside in CDCl(3), demonstrating the superior recognition properties of pyrrole under conditions in which differences would depend on the intrinsic binding ability of the two groups. The three-dimensional structures of the two glucoside complexes in solution were elucidated by combined NMR and molecular mechanics computational techniques, showing that the origin of the stability difference between the two closely similar complex structures resides in the ability of pyrrole to establish shorter/stronger H-bonds with the glucosidic ligand compared to pyridine.

  14. The effect of frame rate on the ability of experienced gait analysts to identify characteristics of gait from closed circuit television footage.

    PubMed

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Burrow, Gordon; Walker, Jeremy

    2014-03-01

    Forensic gait analysis is increasingly being used as part of criminal investigations. A major issue is the quality of the closed circuit television (CCTV) footage used, particularly the frame rate which can vary from 25 frames per second to one frame every 4s. To date, no study has investigated the effect of frame rate on forensic gait analysis. A single subject was fitted with an ankle foot orthosis and recorded walking at 25 frames per second. 3D motion data were also collected, providing an absolute assessment of the gait characteristics. The CCTV footage was then edited to produce a set of eight additional pieces of footage, at various frame rates. Practitioners with knowledge of forensic gait analysis were recruited and instructed to record their observations regarding the characteristics of the subject's gait from the footage. They were sequentially sent web links to the nine pieces of footage, lowest frame rate first, and a simple observation recording form, over a period of 8 months. A sample-based Pearson product-moment correlation analysis of the results demonstrated a significant positive relationship between frame rate and scores (r=0.868, p=0.002). The results of this study show that frame rate affects the ability of experienced practitioners to identify characteristics of gait captured on CCTV footage. Every effort should therefore be made to ensure that CCTV footage likely to be used in criminal proceedings is captured at as high a frame rate as possible. © 2013.

  15. Balance and gait of adults with very mild Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gras, Laura Z; Kanaan, Saddam F; McDowd, Joan M; Colgrove, Yvonne M; Burns, Jeffrey; Pohl, Patricia S

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that adults with Alzheimer disease (AD) have gait and balance deficits; however, the focus has been on those with mild to severe disease. The purpose of this study was to determine whether balance and gait deficits are present in those with very mild AD. Thirteen adults (72.9±4.7 years old) with very mild AD and 13 age-matched (72.6±4.6 years old) and sex-matched (10 males and 3 females) participants in a control group without AD performed balance and gait tests. All participants were living in the community and independent in community ambulation. Participants with very mild AD had shorter times in tandem stance with eyes open (P<0.001) and with eyes closed (P=0.007) compared with participants in the control group. Those with AD also took longer to complete the Timed "Up & Go" Test (P<0.001). Gait deficits were found for those with AD as demonstrated by slower velocities in the 10-m walk at a comfortable pace (P=0.029) and on an instrumented walkway (P<0.001). Stance times were longer for those with AD (P<0.001) and step length was shorter (P=0.001). There were no group differences in the 10-m walk at a fast pace. The gait velocity of participants in the control group was faster on the instrumented walkway than in the 10-m walk at a comfortable pace (P=0.031). In contrast, the gait velocity of those with AD was significantly slower on the instrumented walkway than in the 10-m walk at a comfortable pace (P=0.024). Balance and gait deficits may be present in those in the very early stages of AD. Novel surfaces may affect gait speed in those with very mild AD. Identifying mobility deficits early in the progression of AD may provide an opportunity for early physical therapy intervention, thus promoting continued functional independence. Adults in the very early stages of AD may show signs of balance and gait deficits. Recognition of these problems early with subsequent physical therapy may slow the progression of further balance and gait

  16. A fault tolerant gait for a hexapod robot over uneven terrain.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Kim, J H

    2000-01-01

    The fault tolerant gait of legged robots in static walking is a gait which maintains its stability against a fault event preventing a leg from having the support state. In this paper, a fault tolerant quadruped gait is proposed for a hexapod traversing uneven terrain with forbidden regions, which do not offer viable footholds but can be stepped over. By comparing performance of straight-line motion and crab walking over even terrain, it is shown that the proposed gait has better mobility and terrain adaptability than previously developed gaits. Based on the proposed gait, we present a method for the generation of the fault tolerant locomotion of a hexapod over uneven terrain with forbidden regions. The proposed method minimizes the number of legs on the ground during walking, and foot adjustment algorithm is used for avoiding steps on forbidden regions. The effectiveness of the proposed strategy over uneven terrain is demonstrated with a computer simulation.

  17. Low Power Shoe Integrated Intelligent Wireless Gait Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.; Bakar, N. A.; Anuar, A. F.; Zainol, M. Z.; Hamzah, F.

    2014-04-01

    Gait analysis measurement is a method to assess and identify gait events and the measurements of dynamic, motion and pressure parameters involving the lowest part of the body. This significant analysis is widely used in sports, rehabilitation as well as other health diagnostic towards improving the quality of life. This paper presents a new system empowered by Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU), ultrasonic sensors, piezoceramic sensors array, XBee wireless modules and Arduino processing unit. This research focuses on the design and development of a low power ultra-portable shoe integrated wireless intelligent gait measurement using MEMS and recent microelectronic devices for foot clearance, orientation, error correction, gait events and pressure measurement system. It is developed to be cheap, low power, wireless, real time and suitable for real life in-door and out-door environment.

  18. Why is walker-assisted gait metabolically expensive?

    PubMed

    Priebe, Jonathon R; Kram, Rodger

    2011-06-01

    Walker-assisted gait is reported to be ∼200% more metabolically expensive than normal bipedal walking. However, previous studies compared different walking speeds. Here, we compared the metabolic power consumption and basic stride temporal-spatial parameters for 10 young, healthy adults walking without assistance and using 2-wheeled (2W), 4-wheeled (4W) and 4-footed (4F) walker devices, all at the same speed, 0.30m/s. We also measured the metabolic power demand for walking without any assistive device using a step-to gait at 0.30m/s, walking normally at 1.25m/s, and for repeated lifting of the 4F walker mimicking the lifting pattern used during 4F walker-assisted gait. Similar to previous studies, we found that the cost per distance walked was 217% greater with a 4F walker at 0.30m/s compared to unassisted, bipedal walking at 1.25m/s. Compared at the same speed, 0.30m/s, using a 4F walker was still 82%, 74%, and 55% energetically more expensive than walking unassisted, with a 4W walker and a 2W walker respectively. The sum of the metabolic cost of step-to walking plus the cost of lifting itself was equivalent to the cost of walking with a 4F walker. Thus, we deduce that the high cost of 4F walker assisted gait is due to three factors: the slow walking speed, the step-to gait pattern and the repeated lifting of the walker. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Learning Efficient Spatial-Temporal Gait Features with Deep Learning for Human Identification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Huadong; Li, Shuangqun

    2018-02-06

    The integration of the latest breakthroughs in bioinformatics technology from one side and artificial intelligence from another side, enables remarkable advances in the fields of intelligent security guard computational biology, healthcare, and so on. Among them, biometrics based automatic human identification is one of the most fundamental and significant research topic. Human gait, which is a biometric features with the unique capability, has gained significant attentions as the remarkable characteristics of remote accessed, robust and security in the biometrics based human identification. However, the existed methods cannot well handle the indistinctive inter-class differences and large intra-class variations of human gait in real-world situation. In this paper, we have developed an efficient spatial-temporal gait features with deep learning for human identification. First of all, we proposed a gait energy image (GEI) based Siamese neural network to automatically extract robust and discriminative spatial gait features for human identification. Furthermore, we exploit the deep 3-dimensional convolutional networks to learn the human gait convolutional 3D (C3D) as the temporal gait features. Finally, the GEI and C3D gait features are embedded into the null space by the Null Foley-Sammon Transform (NFST). In the new space, the spatial-temporal features are sufficiently combined with distance metric learning to drive the similarity metric to be small for pairs of gait from the same person, and large for pairs from different persons. Consequently, the experiments on the world's largest gait database show our framework impressively outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS.

  1. Clinical gait evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Liu, Yancheng; Yan, Songhua; Cao, Guanglei; Wang, Shasha; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2017-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is the most common osteoarthritis in lower limbs, and gait measurement is important to evaluate walking function of KOA patients before and after treatment. The third generation Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA3) is a portable gait analysis system to evaluate gaits. This study is to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of IDEEA3 for gait measurement of KOA patients. Meanwhile, gait differences between KOA patients and healthy subjects are examined. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited for measurement comparison of gait cycle (GC), cadence, step length, velocity and step counts between a motion analysis system and a high-speed camera (GoPro Hero3). Twenty-three KOA patients were recruited for measurement comparison of former five parameters between GoPro Hero3 and IDEEA3. Paired t-test, Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC) and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were used for data analysis. All p-values of paired t-tests for GC, cadence, step length and velocity were greater than 0.05 while all CCC and ICC results were above 0.95. The measurements of GC, cadence, step length, velocity and step counts by motion analysis system are highly consistent with the measurements by GoPro Hero3. The measurements of former parameters by GoPro Hero3 are not statistically different from the measurements by IDEEA3. IDEEA3 can be effectively used for the measurement of GC, cadence, step length, velocity and step counts in KOA patients. The KOA patients walk with longer GC, lower cadence, shorter step length and slower speed compared with healthy subjects in natural speed with flat shoes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Unplanned gait termination in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roeing, Kathleen L; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2017-03-01

    Despite the pervasive nature of gait impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information concerning the control of gait termination in individuals with MS. The purpose of this investigation was to examine unplanned gait termination with and without cognitive distractors in individuals with MS compared to healthy controls. Thirty-one individuals with MS and 14 healthy controls completed a series of unplanned gait termination tasks over a pressure sensitive walkway under distracting and non-distracting conditions. Individuals with MS were further broken down into groups based on assistive device use: (no assistive device (MS noAD ) n=18; and assistive device (MS AD ) n=13). Individuals with MS who walked with an assistive device (MS AD : 67.8±15.1cm/s) walked slower than individuals without an assistive device (MS noAD : 110.4±32.3cm/s, p<0.01) and controls (120.0±30.0cm/s; p<0.01). There was a significant reduction in velocity in the cognitively distracting condition (93.4±32.1cm/s) compared to the normal condition [108.8±36.2cm/s; F(1,43)=3.4, p=0.04]. All participants took longer to stop during the distracting condition (1.7±0.6s) than the non-distracting condition (1.4±0.4s; U=673.0 p<0.01). After controlling for gait velocity, post-hoc analysis revealed the MS AD group took significantly longer to stop compared to the control group (p=0.05). Further research investigating the control of unplanned gait termination in MS is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Wearable Sensor-Based Balance and Gait Training on Balance, Gait, and Functional Performance in Healthy and Patient Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Gordt, Katharina; Gerhardy, Thomas; Najafi, Bijan; Schwenk, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Wearable sensors (WS) can accurately measure body motion and provide interactive feedback for supporting motor learning. This review aims to summarize current evidence for the effectiveness of WS training for improving balance, gait and functional performance. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, and CINAHL. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using a WS exercise program were included. Study quality was examined by the PEDro scale. Meta-analyses were conducted to estimate the effects of WS balance training on the most frequently reported outcome parameters. Eight RCTs were included (Parkinson n = 2, stroke n = 1, Parkinson/stroke n = 1, peripheral neuropathy n = 2, frail older adults n = 1, healthy older adults n = 1). The sample size ranged from n = 20 to 40. Three types of training paradigms were used: (1) static steady-state balance training, (2) dynamic steady-state balance training, which includes gait training, and (3) proactive balance training. RCTs either used one type of training paradigm (type 2: n = 1, type 3: n = 3) or combined different types of training paradigms within their intervention (type 1 and 2: n = 2; all types: n = 2). The meta-analyses revealed significant overall effects of WS training on static steady-state balance outcomes including mediolateral (eyes open: Hedges' g = 0.82, CI: 0.43-1.21; eyes closed: g = 0.57, CI: 0.14-0.99) and anterior-posterior sway (eyes open: g = 0.55, CI: 0.01-1.10; eyes closed: g = 0.44, CI: 0.02-0.86). No effects on habitual gait speed were found in the meta-analysis (g = -0.19, CI: -0.68 to 0.29). Two RCTs reported significant improvements for selected gait variables including single support time, and fast gait speed. One study identified effects on proactive balance (Alternate Step Test), but no effects were found for the Timed Up and Go test and the Berg Balance Scale. Two studies reported positive results on feasibility and usability. Only one study was

  4. Health Monitors for Chronic Disease by Gait Analysis with Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Juen, Joshua; Cheng, Qian; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Krishnan, Jerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have developed GaitTrack, a phone application to detect health status while the smartphone is carried normally. GaitTrack software monitors walking patterns, using only accelerometers embedded in phones to record spatiotemporal motion, without the need for sensors external to the phone. Our software transforms smartphones into health monitors, using eight parameters of phone motion transformed into body motion by the gait model. GaitTrack is designed to detect health status while the smartphone is carried during normal activities, namely, free-living walking. The current method for assessing free-living walking is medical accelerometers, so we present evidence that mobile phones running our software are more accurate. We then show our gait model is more accurate than medical pedometers for counting steps of patients with chronic disease. Our gait model was evaluated in a pilot study involving 30 patients with chronic lung disease. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is a major assessment for chronic heart and lung disease, including congestive heart failure and especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), affecting millions of persons. The 6MWT consists of walking back and forth along a measured distance for 6 minutes. The gait model using linear regression performed with 94.13% accuracy in measuring walk distance, compared with the established standard of direct observation. We also evaluated a different statistical model using the same gait parameters to predict health status through lung function. This gait model has high accuracy when applied to demographic cohorts, for example, 89.22% accuracy testing the cohort of 12 female patients with ages 50–64 years. PMID:24694291

  5. Locomotor training through a novel robotic platform for gait rehabilitation in pediatric population: short report.

    PubMed

    Bayón, C; Lerma, S; Ramírez, O; Serrano, J I; Del Castillo, M D; Raya, R; Belda-Lois, J M; Martínez, I; Rocon, E

    2016-11-14

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a disorder of posture and movement due to a defect in the immature brain. The use of robotic devices as alternative treatment to improve the gait function in patients with CP has increased. Nevertheless, current gait trainers are focused on controlling complete joint trajectories, avoiding postural control and the adaptation of the therapy to a specific patient. This paper presents the applicability of a new robotic platform called CPWalker in children with spastic diplegia. CPWalker consists of a smart walker with body weight and autonomous locomotion support and an exoskeleton for joint motion support. Likewise, CPWalker enables strategies to improve postural control during walking. The integrated robotic platform provides means for testing novel gait rehabilitation therapies in subjects with CP and similar motor disorders. Patient-tailored therapies were programmed in the device for its evaluation in three children with spastic diplegia for 5 weeks. After ten sessions of personalized training with CPWalker, the children improved the mean velocity (51.94 ± 41.97 %), cadence (29.19 ± 33.36 %) and step length (26.49 ± 19.58 %) in each leg. Post-3D gait assessments provided kinematic outcomes closer to normal values than Pre-3D assessments. The results show the potential of the novel robotic platform to serve as a rehabilitation tool. The autonomous locomotion and impedance control enhanced the children's participation during therapies. Moreover, participants' postural control was substantially improved, which indicates the usefulness of the approach based on promoting the patient's trunk control while the locomotion therapy is executed. Although results are promising, further studies with bigger sample size are required.

  6. Class Energy Image Analysis for Video Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhuowen; Xing, Xianglei; Wang, Kejun; Guan, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    Gait is a unique perceptible biometric feature at larger distances, and the gait representation approach plays a key role in a video sensor-based gait recognition system. Class Energy Image is one of the most important gait representation methods based on appearance, which has received lots of attentions. In this paper, we reviewed the expressions and meanings of various Class Energy Image approaches, and analyzed the information in the Class Energy Images. Furthermore, the effectiveness and robustness of these approaches were compared on the benchmark gait databases. We outlined the research challenges and provided promising future directions for the field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review that focuses on Class Energy Image. It can provide a useful reference in the literature of video sensor-based gait representation approach. PMID:25574935

  7. Computerized visual feedback: an adjunct to robotic-assisted gait training.

    PubMed

    Banz, Raphael; Bolliger, Marc; Colombo, Gery; Dietz, Volker; Lünenburger, Lars

    2008-10-01

    Robotic devices for walking rehabilitation allow new possibilities for providing performance-related information to patients during gait training. Based on motor learning principles, augmented feedback during robotic-assisted gait training might improve the rehabilitation process used to regain walking function. This report presents a method to provide visual feedback implemented in a driven gait orthosis (DGO). The purpose of the study was to compare the immediate effect on motor output in subjects during robotic-assisted gait training when they used computerized visual feedback and when they followed verbal instructions of a physical therapist. Twelve people with neurological gait disorders due to incomplete spinal cord injury participated. Subjects were instructed to walk within the DGO in 2 different conditions. They were asked to increase their motor output by following the instructions of a therapist and by observing visual feedback. In addition, the subjects' opinions about using visual feedback were investigated by a questionnaire. Computerized visual feedback and verbal instructions by the therapist were observed to result in a similar change in motor output in subjects when walking within the DGO. Subjects reported that they were more motivated and concentrated on their movements when using computerized visual feedback compared with when no form of feedback was provided. Computerized visual feedback is a valuable adjunct to robotic-assisted gait training. It represents a relevant tool to increase patients' motor output, involvement, and motivation during gait training, similar to verbal instructions by a therapist.

  8. Upper limb movement analysis during gait in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Elsworth-Edelsten, Charlotte; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Laidet, Magali; Armand, Stephane; Assal, Frederic; Lalive, Patrice; Allali, Gilles

    2017-08-01

    Gait disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS) are well studied; however, no previous study has described upper limb movements during gait. However, upper limb movements have an important role during locomotion and can be altered in MS patients due to direct MS lesions or mechanisms of compensation. The aim of this study was to describe the arm movements during gait in a population of MS patients with low disability compared with a healthy control group. In this observational study we analyzed the arm movements during gait in 52 outpatients (mean age: 39.7±9.6years, female: 40%) with relapsing-remitting MS with low disability (mean EDSS: 2±1) and 25 healthy age-matched controls using a 3-dimension gait analysis. MS patients walked slower, with increased mean elbow flexion and decreased amplitude of elbow flexion (ROM) compared to the control group, whereas shoulder and hand movements were similar to controls. These differences were not explained by age or disability. Upper limb alterations in movement during gait in MS patients with low disability can be characterized by an increase in mean elbow flexion and a decrease in amplitude (ROM) for elbow flexion/extension. This upper limb movement pattern should be considered as a new component of gait disorders in MS and may reflect subtle motor deficits or the use of compensatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantifying Variation in Gait Features from Wearable Inertial Sensors Using Mixed Effects Models

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Kellen Garrison; Shin, Yongyun; Chen, Shanshan

    2017-01-01

    The emerging technology of wearable inertial sensors has shown its advantages in collecting continuous longitudinal gait data outside laboratories. This freedom also presents challenges in collecting high-fidelity gait data. In the free-living environment, without constant supervision from researchers, sensor-based gait features are susceptible to variation from confounding factors such as gait speed and mounting uncertainty, which are challenging to control or estimate. This paper is one of the first attempts in the field to tackle such challenges using statistical modeling. By accepting the uncertainties and variation associated with wearable sensor-based gait data, we shift our efforts from detecting and correcting those variations to modeling them statistically. From gait data collected on one healthy, non-elderly subject during 48 full-factorial trials, we identified four major sources of variation, and quantified their impact on one gait outcome—range per cycle—using a random effects model and a fixed effects model. The methodology developed in this paper lays the groundwork for a statistical framework to account for sources of variation in wearable gait data, thus facilitating informative statistical inference for free-living gait analysis. PMID:28245602

  10. Ratiometric detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in water and real-time monitoring of apyrase activity with a tripodal zinc complex.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen J

    2014-11-24

    Two tripodal fluorescent probes Zn⋅L(1,2) have been synthesised, and their anion-binding capabilities were examined by using fluorescence spectroscopy. Probe Zn⋅L(1) allows the selective and ratiometric detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) at physiological pH, even in the presence of several competing anions, such as ADP, phosphate and bicarbonate. The probe was applied to the real-time monitoring of the apyrase-catalysed hydrolysis of ATP, in a medium that mimics an extracellular fluid. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Periodic gaits for the CMU ambler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Swaminathan; Dwivedi, Suren N.

    1989-01-01

    The configuration of the Carnegie Mellon University Ambler, a six legged autonomous walking vehicle for exploring Mars, enables the recovery of a trailing leg past the leading leg to reduce the energy expenditure in terrain interactions. Gaits developed for this unprecedented configuration are described. A stability criterion was developed which ensures stability of the vehicle in the event of failure of any one of the supporting legs. Periodic gaits developed for the Ambler utilize the Ambler's unique abilities, and continuously satisfy the stability criterion.

  12. Use of hippotherapy in gait training for hemiparetic post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Beinotti, Fernanda; Correia, Nilzete; Christofoletti, Gustavo; Borges, Guilherme

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the hippotherapy influence on gait training in post-stroke hemiparetic individuals. The study was constituted of 20 individuals divided into two groups. Group A performed the conventional treatment while group B the conventional treatment along with hippotherapy during 16 weeks. The patients were evaluated by using the Functional Ambulation Category Scale, Fugl-Meyer Scale, only the lower limbs and balance sub items, Berg Balance Scale, and functional assessment of gait (cadence) in the beginning and end of the treatment. Significant improvements were observed in the experimental group including motor impairment in lower limbs (p=0.004), balance, over time (p=0.007) but a significant trend between groups (p=0.056). The gait independence, cadence and speed were not significantly in both groups (p=0.93, 0.69 and 0.44). Hippotherapy associated with conventional physical therapy demonstrates a positive influence in gait training, besides bringing the patients' gait standard closer to normality than the control group.

  13. The Novel Quantitative Technique for Assessment of Gait Symmetry Using Advanced Statistical Learning Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianning; Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The accurate identification of gait asymmetry is very beneficial to the assessment of at-risk gait in the clinical applications. This paper investigated the application of classification method based on statistical learning algorithm to quantify gait symmetry based on the assumption that the degree of intrinsic change in dynamical system of gait is associated with the different statistical distributions between gait variables from left-right side of lower limbs; that is, the discrimination of small difference of similarity between lower limbs is considered the reorganization of their different probability distribution. The kinetic gait data of 60 participants were recorded using a strain gauge force platform during normal walking. The classification method is designed based on advanced statistical learning algorithm such as support vector machine algorithm for binary classification and is adopted to quantitatively evaluate gait symmetry. The experiment results showed that the proposed method could capture more intrinsic dynamic information hidden in gait variables and recognize the right-left gait patterns with superior generalization performance. Moreover, our proposed techniques could identify the small significant difference between lower limbs when compared to the traditional symmetry index method for gait. The proposed algorithm would become an effective tool for early identification of the elderly gait asymmetry in the clinical diagnosis. PMID:25705672

  14. The novel quantitative technique for assessment of gait symmetry using advanced statistical learning algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianning; Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The accurate identification of gait asymmetry is very beneficial to the assessment of at-risk gait in the clinical applications. This paper investigated the application of classification method based on statistical learning algorithm to quantify gait symmetry based on the assumption that the degree of intrinsic change in dynamical system of gait is associated with the different statistical distributions between gait variables from left-right side of lower limbs; that is, the discrimination of small difference of similarity between lower limbs is considered the reorganization of their different probability distribution. The kinetic gait data of 60 participants were recorded using a strain gauge force platform during normal walking. The classification method is designed based on advanced statistical learning algorithm such as support vector machine algorithm for binary classification and is adopted to quantitatively evaluate gait symmetry. The experiment results showed that the proposed method could capture more intrinsic dynamic information hidden in gait variables and recognize the right-left gait patterns with superior generalization performance. Moreover, our proposed techniques could identify the small significant difference between lower limbs when compared to the traditional symmetry index method for gait. The proposed algorithm would become an effective tool for early identification of the elderly gait asymmetry in the clinical diagnosis.

  15. Meaningful improvement in gait speed in hip fracture recovery.

    PubMed

    Alley, Dawn E; Hicks, Gregory E; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William; Miller, Ram; Craik, Rebecca L; Mangione, Kathleen K; Orwig, Denise; Hochberg, Marc; Resnick, Barbara; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-09-01

    To estimate meaningful improvements in gait speed observed during recovery from hip fracture and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of gait speed changes in detecting change in self-reported mobility. Secondary longitudinal data analysis from two randomized controlled trials Twelve hospitals in the Baltimore, Maryland, area. Two hundred seventeen women admitted with hip fracture. Usual gait speed and self-reported mobility (ability to walk 1 block and climb 1 flight of stairs) measured 2 and 12 months after fracture. Effect size-based estimates of meaningful differences were 0.03 for small differences and 0.09 for substantial differences. Depending on the anchor (stairs vs walking) and method (mean difference vs regression), anchor-based estimates ranged from 0.10 to 0.17 m/s for small meaningful improvements and 0.17 to 0.26 m/s for substantial meaningful improvement. Optimal gait speed cutpoints yielded low sensitivity (0.39-0.62) and specificity (0.57-0.76) for improvements in self-reported mobility. Results from this sample of women recovering from hip fracture provide only limited support for the 0.10-m/s cut point for substantial meaningful change previously identified in community-dwelling older adults experiencing declines in walking abilities. Anchor-based estimates and cut points derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggest that greater improvements in gait speed may be required for substantial perceived mobility improvement in female hip fracture patients. Furthermore, gait speed change performed poorly in discriminating change in self-reported mobility. Estimates of meaningful change in gait speed may differ based on the direction of change (improvement vs decline) or between patient populations. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Meaningful Improvement in Gait Speed in Hip Fracture Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Dawn E.; Hicks, Gregory E.; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William; Miller, Ram; Craik, Rebecca L.; Mangione, Kathleen K.; Orwig, Denise; Hochberg, Marc; Resnick, Barbara; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To estimate meaningful improvements in gait speed observed during recovery from hip fracture and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of gait speed changes in detecting change in self-reported mobility. DESIGN Secondary longitudinal data analysis from two randomized controlled trials SETTING Twelve hospitals in the Baltimore, Maryland, area. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred seventeen women admitted with hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS Usual gait speed and self-reported mobility (ability to walk 1 block and climb 1 flight of stairs) measured 2 and 12 months after fracture. RESULTS Effect size–based estimates of meaningful differences were 0.03 for small differences and 0.09 for substantial differences. Depending on the anchor (stairs vs walking) and method (mean difference vs regression), anchor-based estimates ranged from 0.10 to 0.17 m/s for small meaningful improvements and 0.17 to 0.26 m/s for substantial meaningful improvement. Optimal gait speed cut-points yielded low sensitivity (0.39–0.62) and specificity (0.57–0.76) for improvements in self-reported mobility. CONCLUSION Results from this sample of women recovering from hip fracture provide only limited support for the 0.10-m/s cut point for substantial meaningful change previously identified in community-dwelling older adults experiencing declines in walking abilities. Anchor-based estimates and cut points derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggest that greater improvements in gait speed may be required for substantial perceived mobility improvement in female hip fracture patients. Furthermore, gait speed change performed poorly in discriminating change in self-reported mobility. Estimates of meaningful change in gait speed may differ based on the direction of change (improvement vs decline) or between patient populations. PMID:21883109

  17. Does Anxiety Cause Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A.; Ellard, Colin G.; Almeida, Quincy J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers) and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers) were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i) across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW), (ii) across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH). Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state). Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p<0.001) and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p<0.001). Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p = 0.013) and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p = 0.005) when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD. PMID:25250691

  18. Does anxiety cause freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A; Ellard, Colin G; Almeida, Quincy J

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers) and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers) were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i) across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW), (ii) across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH). Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state). Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p < 0.001) and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p < 0.001). Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p = 0.013) and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p = 0.005) when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD.

  19. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baitong; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Tam, Wing-Kin; Tung, Anthony K H; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment.

  20. Clinical Gait Evaluation of Patients with Lumbar Spine Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Yan, Song-Hua; Wang, Sha-Sha; Lester, D Kevin; Zeng, Ji-Zhou; Miao, Jun; Zhang, Kuan

    2018-02-01

    The third generation Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA3, MiniSun, CA) has been developed for clinical gait evaluation, and this study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of IDEEA3 for the gait measurement of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) patients. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited to compare gait cycle, cadence, step length, velocity, and number of steps between a motion analysis system and a high-speed video camera. Twenty hospitalized LSS patients were recruited for the comparison of the five parameters between the IDEEA3 and GoPro camera. Paired t-test, intraclass correlation coefficient, concordance correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman plots were used for the data analysis. The ratios of GoPro camera results to motion analysis system results, and the ratios of IDEEA3 results to GoPro camera results were all around 1.00. All P-values of paired t-tests for gait cycle, cadence, step length, and velocity were greater than 0.05, while all the ICC and CCC results were above 0.950 with P < 0.001. The measurements for gait cycle, cadence, step length, velocity, and number of steps with the GoPro camera are highly consistent with the measurements with the motion analysis system. The measurements for IDEEA3 are consistent with those for the GoPro camera. IDEEA3 can be effectively used in the gait measurement of LSS patients. © 2018 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Improved gait after repetitive locomotor training in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Smania, Nicola; Bonetti, Paola; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Cosentino, Alessandro; Waldner, Andreas; Hesse, Stefan; Werner, Cordula; Bisoffi, Giulia; Geroin, Christian; Munari, Daniele

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of repetitive locomotor training with an electromechanical gait trainer in children with cerebral palsy. In this randomized controlled trial, 18 ambulatory children with diplegic or tetraplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group received 30 mins of repetitive locomotor training with an applied technology (Gait Trainer GT I) plus 10 mins of passive joint mobilization and stretching exercises. The control group received 40 mins of conventional physiotherapy. Each subject underwent a total of 10 treatment sessions over a 2-wk period. Performance on the 10-m walk test, 6-min walk test, WeeFIM scale, and gait analysis was evaluated by a blinded rater before and after treatment and at 1-mo follow-up. The experimental group showed significant posttreatment improvement on the 10-m walk test, 6-min walk test, hip kinematics, gait speed, and step length, all of which were maintained at the 1-mo follow-up assessment. No significant changes in performance parameters were observed in the control group. Repetitive locomotor training with an electromechanical gait trainer may improve gait velocity, endurance, spatiotemporal, and kinematic gait parameters in patients with cerebral palsy.

  2. Emotional state affects gait initiation in individuals with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Chris J.; Bowers, Dawn; Janelle, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the impact of manipulating emotional state on gait initiation in persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and healthy older adults. Following the presentation of pictures that are known to elicit specific emotional responses, participants initiated gait and continued to walk for several steps at their normal pace. Reaction time, the displacement and velocity of the center of pressure (COP) trajectory during the preparatory postural adjustments, and length and velocity of the first two steps were measured. Analysis of the gait initiation measures revealed that exposure to (1) threatening pictures, relative to all other pictures, speeded the initiation of gait for PD patients and healthy older adults; (2) approach-oriented emotional pictures (erotic and happy people), relative to withdrawal-oriented pictures, facilitated the anticipatory postural adjustments of gait initiation for PD patients and healthy older adults, as evidenced by greater displacement and velocity of the COP movement; and (3) emotional pictures modulated gait initiation parameters in PD patients to the same degree as in healthy older adults. Collectively, these findings hold significant implications for understanding the circuitry underlying the manner by which emotions modulate movement and for the development of emotion-based interventions designed to maximize improvements in gait initiation for individuals with PD. PMID:22194236

  3. Secure and Privacy Enhanced Gait Authentication on Smart Phone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deokjai

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits. PMID:24955403

  4. Spatial-temporal parameters of gait in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Heredia Jiménez, José María; Aparicio García-Molina, Virginia A; Porres Foulquie, Jesús M; Delgado Fernández, Manuel; Soto Hermoso, Victor M

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if there are differences in such parameters among patients affected by fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy subjects and whether the degree of affectation by FM can decrease the gait parameters. We studied 55 women with FM and 44 controls. Gait analysis was performed using an instrumented walkway for measurement of the kinematic parameters of gait (GAITRite system), and patients completed a Spanish version of Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Significant differences (p < 0.001) between FM and control groups were found in velocity, stride length, cadence, single support ratio, double support ratio, stance phase ratio, and swing phase ratio. There were significant inverse correlations between FIQ and velocity, stride length, swing phase, and single support, whereas significant direct correlations were found with stance phase and double support. Gait parameters of women affected by FM were severely impaired when compared to those of healthy women. Different factors such as lack of physical activity, bradikinesia, overweight, fatigue, and pain together with a lower isometric force in the legs can be responsible for the alterations in gait and poorer life quality of women with FM.

  5. Entorhinal Cortex Volume Is Associated With Dual-Task Gait Cost Among Older Adults With MCI: Results From the Gait and Brain Study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Ryota; Bartha, Robert; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2018-05-15

    Low dual-task gait performance (the slowing of gait speed while performing a demanding cognitive task) is associated with low cognitive performance and an increased risk of progression to dementia in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. However, the reason for this remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the relationship between dual-task cost and regional brain volume, focusing on the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, entorhinal cortex, and motor and lateral frontal cortices in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Forty older adults with mild cognitive impairment from the "Gait and Brain Study" were included in this study. Gait velocity was measured during single-task (ie, walking alone) and dual-task (ie, counting backwards, subtracting serial sevens, and naming animals, in addition to walking) conditions, using an electronic walkway. Regional brain volumes were derived by automated segmentation, using 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Partial rank correlation analyses demonstrated that a smaller volume of the left entorhinal cortex was associated with higher dual-task costs in counting backwards and subtracting serial sevens conditions. Subsequent logistic regression analyses demonstrated that a smaller volume of the left entorhinal cortex was independently associated with higher dual-task cost (slowing down >20% when performing cognitive task) in these two conditions. There were no other significant associations. Our results show that lower dual-task gait performance is associated with volume reduction in the entorhinal cortex. Cognitive and motor dysfunction in older adults with mild cognitive impairment may reflect a shared pathogenic mechanism, and dual-task-related gait changes might be a surrogate motor marker for Alzheimer's disease pathology.

  6. Effects of Using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus Platform in the Sensorimotor Training of Gait Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Giovanna Barros; Leite, Marco Antônio A.; Orsini, Marco; Pereira, João Santos

    2014-01-01

    The use of the Nintendo Wii has been considered a good alternative in the motor rehabilitation of individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD), requiring simultaneous interaction to develop strategies for physical, visual, auditory, cognitive, psychological and social activities in the performing of virtual activities, resulting in improvement in functional performance and gait. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of virtual sensorimotor activity on gait disorders in people with PD. Fifteen subjects with a clinical diagnosis of PD were submitted to the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (SE), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and biomechanical gait analysis using digital images taken with a video camera before and after the treatment program. The activities with the Nintendo Wii virtual platform were standardized into three categories: aerobics, balance and Wii plus exercises. Participants carried out separate virtual exercises for 40 min, twice a week, for a total of 14 sessions. The program improved sensorimotor performance in PD gait, with an increase in stride length and gait speed, in addition to a reduction in motor impairment, especially in items of rigidity and flexibility of the lower limbs evaluated by UPDRS III, and greater functional independence, as evidenced in the SE and FIM scales. Improvements in items related to locomotion and stair climbing were also observed. The training was effective in motor recovery in chronic neurodegenerative diseases, showing improvement in motor performance and functional independence in individuals with PD. PMID:24744845

  7. GaitaBase: Web-based repository system for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Oren; Baker, Richard; McGinley, Jenny

    2010-02-01

    The need to share gait analysis data to improve clinical decision support has been recognised since the early 1990s. GaitaBase has been established to provide a web-accessible repository system of gait analysis data to improve the sharing of data across local and international clinical and research community. It is used by several clinical and research groups across the world providing cross-group access permissions to retrieve and analyse the data. The system is useful for bench-marking and quality assurance, clinical consultation, and collaborative research. It has the capacity to increase the population sample size and improve the quality of 'normative' gait data. In addition the accumulated stored data may facilitate clinicians in comparing their own gait data with others, and give a valuable insight into how effective specific interventions have been for others. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Alpha oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus correlate with gait performance in parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Pogosyan, Alek; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Jenkinson, Ned; Foltynie, Tom; Limousin, Patricia; Bogdanovic, Marko; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu Z.

    2012-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus, a component of the reticular formation, is topographically organized in animal models and implicated in locomotor control. In Parkinson's disease, pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation is an emerging treatment for gait freezing. Local field potentials recorded from pedunculopontine nucleus electrodes in such patients have demonstrated oscillations in the alpha and beta frequency bands, reactive to self-paced movement. Whether these oscillations are topographically organized or relevant to locomotion is unknown. Here, we recorded local field potentials from the pedunculopontine nucleus in parkinsonian patients during rest and unconstrained walking. Relative gait speed was assessed with trunk accelerometry. Peaks of alpha power were present at rest and during gait, when they correlated with gait speed. Gait freezing was associated with attenuation of alpha activity. Beta peaks were less consistently observed across rest and gait, and did not correlate with gait speed. Alpha power was maximal in the caudal pedunculopontine nucleus region and beta power was maximal rostrally. These results indicate a topographic distribution of neuronal activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus region and concur with animal data suggesting that the caudal subregion has particular relevance to gait. Alpha synchronization, proposed to suppress ‘task irrelevant’ distraction, has previously been demonstrated to correlate with performance of cognitive tasks. Here, we demonstrate a correlation between alpha oscillations and improved gait performance. The results raise the possibility that stimulation of caudal and rostral pedunculopontine nucleus regions may differ in their clinical effects. PMID:22232591

  9. Alternate rhythmic vibratory stimulation of trunk muscles affects walking cadence and velocity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Alessandro M; Grasso, Margherita; Nardone, Antonio; Godi, Marco; Schieppati, Marco

    2010-02-01

    During the administration of timed bilateral alternate vibration to homonymous leg or trunk muscles during quiet upright stance, Parkinsonian (PD) patients undergo cyclic antero-posterior and medio-lateral transfers of the centre of foot pressure. This event might be potentially exploited for improving gait in these patients. Here, we tested this hypothesis by applying alternate muscle vibration during walking in PD. Fifteen patients and 15 healthy subjects walked on an instrumented walkway under four conditions: no vibration (no-Vib), and vibration of tibialis anterior (TA-Vib), soleus (Sol-Vib) and erector spinae (ES-Vib) muscles of both sides. Trains of vibration (internal frequency 100 Hz) were delivered to right and left side at alternating frequency of 10% above preferred step cadence. During vibration, stride length, cadence and velocity increased in both patients and healthy subjects, significantly so for ES-Vib. Stance and swing time tended to decrease. Width of support base increased with Sol-Vib or TA-Vib, but was unaffected by ES-Vib. Alternate ES vibration enhances gait velocity in PD. The stronger effect of ES over leg muscle vibration might depend on the relevance of the proprioceptive inflow from the trunk muscles and on the absence of adverse effects on the support base width. Trunk control is defective in PD. The effect of timed vibratory stimulation on gait suggests the potential use of trunk proprioceptive stimulation for tuning the central pattern generators for locomotion in PD. Copyright (c) 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Validity of the Kinect for Gait Assessment: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Shmuel; Yogev Seligmann, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis may enhance clinical practice. However, its use is limited due to the need for expensive equipment which is not always available in clinical settings. Recent evidence suggests that Microsoft Kinect may provide a low cost gait analysis method. The purpose of this report is to critically evaluate the literature describing the concurrent validity of using the Kinect as a gait analysis instrument. An online search of PubMed, CINAHL, and ProQuest databases was performed. Included were studies in which walking was assessed with the Kinect and another gold standard device, and consisted of at least one numerical finding of spatiotemporal or kinematic measures. Our search identified 366 papers, from which 12 relevant studies were retrieved. The results demonstrate that the Kinect is valid only for some spatiotemporal gait parameters. Although the kinematic parameters measured by the Kinect followed the trend of the joint trajectories, they showed poor validity and large errors. In conclusion, the Kinect may have the potential to be used as a tool for measuring spatiotemporal aspects of gait, yet standardized methods should be established, and future examinations with both healthy subjects and clinical participants are required in order to integrate the Kinect as a clinical gait analysis tool. PMID:26861323

  11. Outcomes following kinesthetic feedback for gait training in a direct access environment: a case report on social wellness in relation to gait impairment.

    PubMed

    Blievernicht, Jessica; Sullivan, Kate; Erickson, Mark R

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe the outcomes following the use of kinesthetic feedback as a primary intervention strategy for gait training. The plan of care for this 22-year-old female addressed the patient's social wellness goal of "walking more normally," using motor learning principles. At initial examination, the patient demonstrated asymmetries for gait kinematics between the left and right lower extremity (analyzed using video motion analysis), pattern of force distribution at the foot, and activation of specific lower extremity muscles (as measured by surface electromyography). Interventions for this patient consisted of neuromuscular and body awareness training, with an emphasis on kinesthetic feedback. Weekly sessions lasted 30-60 minutes over 4 weeks. The patient was prescribed a home program of walking 30-60 minutes three times/week at a comfortable pace while concentrating on gait correction through kinesthetic awareness of specific deviations. Following intervention, the patient's gait improved across all objective measures. She reported receiving positive comments from others regarding improved gait and a twofold increase in her walking confidence. Outcomes support a broadened scope of practice that incorporates previously unreported integration of a patient's social wellness goals into patient management.

  12. Influence of altered gait patterns on the hip joint contact forces.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Alessandra; Zavatsky, Amy; Stebbins, Julie; Theologis, Tim; Lenaerts, Gerlinde; Jonkers, Ilse; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-01-01

    Children who exhibit gait deviations often present a range of bone deformities, particularly at the proximal femur. Altered gait may affect bone growth and lead to deformities by exerting abnormal stresses on the developing bones. The objective of this study was to calculate variations in the hip joint contact forces with different gait patterns. Muscle and hip joint contact forces of four children with different walking characteristics were calculated using an inverse dynamic analysis and a static optimisation algorithm. Kinematic and kinetic analyses were based on a generic musculoskeletal model scaled down to accommodate the dimensions of each child. Results showed that for all the children with altered gaits both the orientation and magnitude of the hip joint contact force deviated from normal. The child with the most severe gait deviations had hip joint contact forces 30% greater than normal, most likely due to the increase in muscle forces required to sustain his crouched stance. Determining how altered gait affects joint loading may help in planning treatment strategies to preserve correct loading on the bone from a young age.

  13. Periodic gaits for the CMU Ambler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Suren N.; Mahalingam, Swaminathan

    1992-02-01

    The configuration of the Carnegie-Mellon University Ambler, a six-legged autonomous walking vehicle for exploring Mars, enables the recovery of a trailing leg past the leading leg to reduce the energy expenditure in terrain interactions. In this article, gaits developed for this unprecedented configuration are described. A stability criterion has been developed that ensures stability of the vehicle in the event of failure of any one of the supporting legs. Periodic gaits developed for the Ambler utilize the Ambler's unique abilities and continuously satisfy the stability criterion.

  14. Gait analysis in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vismara, Luca; Vimercati, Sara Laura; Precilios, Helmer; Cattani, Laila; Fabris De Souza, Shirley; Petroni, Maria Letizia; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2013-09-13

    Anorexia (AN) and Bulimia Nervosa (BN) are two common eating disorders, which appear to share some reduced motor capacities, such as a reduced balance. The presence and the extent of other motor disorders have not been investigated in a comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to quantify gait pattern in AN and BN individuals in order to ascertain possible differences from the normality range and provide novel data for developing some evidence-based rehabilitation strategies. Nineteen AN patients (age 30.16+9.73) and 20 BN patients (age 26.8+8.41) were assessed with quantitative 3D computerized Gait Analysis. Results were compared with a group of healthy controls (CG; 30.7+5.6). AN and BN patients were characterized by different gait strategies compared to CG. Spatio-temporal parameters indicated shorter step length, with AN showing the shortest values. AN walked slower than BN and CG. As for kinematics, AN and BN showed a nonphysiologic pattern at pelvis and hip level on the sagittal and frontal plane, with BN yielding the most abnormal values. Both AN and BN patients were characterized by high ankle plantar flexion capacity at toe-off when compared to CG. As for ankle kinetics, both AN and BN showed physiologic patterns. Stiffness at hip level was close to CG in both pathologic groups; at the ankle level, stiffness was significantly decreased in both groups, with AN displaying lower values. Both AN and BN were characterized by an altered gait pattern compared to CG. Biomechanical differences were evident mainly at pelvis and hip level. Loss of lean mass may lead to musculoskeletal adaptation, ultimately causing alterations in the gait pattern.

  15. A time-frequency classifier for human gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasseri, Bijan G.; Amin, Moeness G.

    2009-05-01

    Radar has established itself as an effective all-weather, day or night sensor. Radar signals can penetrate walls and provide information on moving targets. Recently, radar has been used as an effective biometric sensor for classification of gait. The return from a coherent radar system contains a frequency offset in the carrier frequency, known as the Doppler Effect. The movements of arms and legs give rise to micro Doppler which can be clearly detailed in the time-frequency domain using traditional or modern time-frequency signal representation. In this paper we propose a gait classifier based on subspace learning using principal components analysis(PCA). The training set consists of feature vectors defined as either time or frequency snapshots taken from the spectrogram of radar backscatter. We show that gait signature is captured effectively in feature vectors. Feature vectors are then used in training a minimum distance classifier based on Mahalanobis distance metric. Results show that gait classification with high accuracy and short observation window is achievable using the proposed classifier.

  16. Interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis assessments.

    PubMed

    Eastlack, M E; Arvidson, J; Snyder-Mackler, L; Danoff, J V; McGarvey, C L

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis (VOGA) assessments. Fifty-four licensed physical therapists with varying amounts of clinical experience served as raters. Three patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated an abnormal gait pattern served as subjects for the videotape. The raters analyzed each patient's most severely involved knee during the four subphases of stance for the kinematic variables of knee flexion and genu valgum. Raters were asked to determine whether these variables were inadequate, normal, or excessive. The temporospatial variables analyzed throughout the entire gait cycle were cadence, step length, stride length, stance time, and step width. Generalized kappa coefficients ranged from .11 to .52. Intraclass correlation coefficients (2,1) and (3,1) were slightly higher. Our results indicate that physical therapists' VOGA assessments are only slightly to moderately reliable and that improved interrater reliability of the assessments of physical therapists utilizing this technique is needed. Our data suggest that there is a need for greater standardization of gait-analysis training.

  17. Combined effects of speed and directional change on postural adjustments during gait initiation.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, Philippe; Anaka, Evelyn

    2011-10-01

    The study of gait initiation (GI) has primarily focused on gait initiated in a forward direction, however, in everyday life, GI is often combined with a directional change. Ten young adults initiated gait with their right foot in four directions (to the left: -15°, straight ahead: 0°, to the right: 15° and 30°) at self-selected and fast gait speeds. The relationship between starting direction of GI and the lateral center of foot pressure displacement for normal (r(2)=0.57) and fast gait speed (r(2)=0.75) indicated that the lateral component plays an important role with regards to controlling the desired direction of gait. At the first step of the swing limb, the progression velocity of the center of mass (CM) remained slower for the 30° condition only, whereas no difference was found between directions for CM velocity perpendicular to the intended direction. These results suggest that postural adjustments are scaled to initiate gait in a predetermined direction. By the first step, the orientation of CM is toward the intended direction of gait, however, when gait is initiated in combination with a large change in direction, additional adjustments may be required to reach the intended progression velocity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modelling gait transition in two-legged animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carla M. A.; Santos, Alexandra P.

    2011-12-01

    The study of locomotor patterns has been a major research goal in the last decades. Understanding how intralimb and interlimb coordination works out so well in animals' locomotion is a hard and challenging task. Many models have been proposed to model animal's rhythms. These models have also been applied to the control of rhythmic movements of adaptive legged robots, namely biped, quadruped and other designs. In this paper we study gait transition in a central pattern generator (CPG) model for bipeds, the 4-cells model. This model is proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins and is studied further by Pinto and Golubitsky. We briefly resume the work done by Pinto and Golubitsky. We compute numerically gait transition in the 4-cells CPG model for bipeds. We use Morris-Lecar equations and Wilson-Cowan equations as the internal dynamics for each cell. We also consider two types of coupling between the cells: diffusive and synaptic. We obtain secondary gaits by bifurcation of primary gaits, by varying the coupling strengths. Nevertheless, some bifurcating branches could not be obtained, emphasizing the fact that despite analytically those bifurcations exist, finding them is a hard task and requires variation of other parameters of the equations. We note that the type of coupling did not influence the results.

  19. Validity and repeatability of inertial measurement units for measuring gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Washabaugh, Edward P; Kalyanaraman, Tarun; Adamczyk, Peter G; Claflin, Edward S; Krishnan, Chandramouli

    2017-06-01

    Inertial measurement units (IMUs) are small wearable sensors that have tremendous potential to be applied to clinical gait analysis. They allow objective evaluation of gait and movement disorders outside the clinic and research laboratory, and permit evaluation on large numbers of steps. However, repeatability and validity data of these systems are sparse for gait metrics. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and between-day repeatability of spatiotemporal metrics (gait speed, stance percent, swing percent, gait cycle time, stride length, cadence, and step duration) as measured with the APDM Opal IMUs and Mobility Lab system. We collected data on 39 healthy subjects. Subjects were tested over two days while walking on a standard treadmill, split-belt treadmill, or overground, with IMUs placed in two locations: both feet and both ankles. The spatiotemporal measurements taken with the IMU system were validated against data from an instrumented treadmill, or using standard clinical procedures. Repeatability and minimally detectable change (MDC) of the system was calculated between days. IMUs displayed high to moderate validity when measuring most of the gait metrics tested. Additionally, these measurements appear to be repeatable when used on the treadmill and overground. The foot configuration of the IMUs appeared to better measure gait parameters; however, both the foot and ankle configurations demonstrated good repeatability. In conclusion, the IMU system in this study appears to be both accurate and repeatable for measuring spatiotemporal gait parameters in healthy young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Differences in trunk control between early and late pregnancy during gait.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Ryuichi; Doi, Takehiko; Asai, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Kaori; Taniguchi, Takeshi; Ono, Rei

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare gait characteristics, including the functional ability of the trunk, between women before and during the third trimester of pregnancy. Gait measurements were performed on 27 pregnant women, who were divided into two groups using the threshold of 28 gestational weeks. The subjects were instructed to walk at their preferred speed. In addition to stride-time coefficient of variation, root mean square (RMS) and autocorrelation coefficient, coefficient of attenuation (CoA) of acceleration was computed as an index to assess the functional ability of the trunk. Differences of gait characteristics between the groups were determined by the Mann-Whitney U test. Gait characteristics that showed a significant difference between the groups were further analyzed with adjustment by age, height, weight and gait velocity by using multiple regression analysis. Women during the third trimester of pregnancy showed significantly smaller RMS in the anteroposterior direction at the lower trunk than those before the third trimester of pregnancy, even after adjusting for age, height, weight and gait velocity [β=0.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.25]. CoA in the anteroposterior direction was also significantly lower in women during the third trimester of pregnancy than in those before the third trimester of pregnancy after adjustment by age, height, weight and gait velocity (β=0.44; 95% CI 0.39-18.52). The present cross-sectional study suggests the possibility that the functional ability of the trunk during gait declines in late pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. View-Invariant Gait Recognition Through Genetic Template Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, Ebenezer R. H. P.; Elias, Susan; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Easwarakumar, K. S.

    2017-08-01

    Template-based model-free approach provides by far the most successful solution to the gait recognition problem in literature. Recent work discusses how isolating the head and leg portion of the template increase the performance of a gait recognition system making it robust against covariates like clothing and carrying conditions. However, most involve a manual definition of the boundaries. The method we propose, the genetic template segmentation (GTS), employs the genetic algorithm to automate the boundary selection process. This method was tested on the GEI, GEnI and AEI templates. GEI seems to exhibit the best result when segmented with our approach. Experimental results depict that our approach significantly outperforms the existing implementations of view-invariant gait recognition.

  2. Does footwear type impact the number of steps required to reach gait steady state?: an innovative look at the impact of foot orthoses on gait initiation.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Bijan; Miller, Daniel; Jarrett, Beth D; Wrobel, James S

    2010-05-01

    Many studies have attempted to better elucidate the effect of foot orthoses on gait dynamics. To our knowledge, most previous studies exclude the first few steps of gait and begin analysis at steady state walking. These unanalyzed steps of gait may contain important information about the dynamic and complex processes required to achieve equilibrium for a given gait velocity. The purpose of this study was to quantify gait initiation and determine how many steps were required to reach steady state walking under three footwear conditions: barefoot, habitual shoes, and habitual shoes with a prefabricated foot orthoses. Fifteen healthy subjects walked 50m at habitual speed in each condition. Wearing habitual shoes with the prefabricated orthoses enabled subjects to reach steady state walking in fewer steps (3.5 steps+/-2.0) compared to the barefoot condition (5.2 steps+/-3.0; p=0.02) as well as compared to the habitual shoes condition (4.7 steps+/-1.6; p=0.05). Interestingly, the subjects' dynamic medial-lateral balance was significantly improved (22%, p<0.05) by using foot orthoses compared to other footwear conditions. These findings suggest that foot orthoses may help individuals reach steady state more quickly and with a better dynamic balance in the medial-lateral direction, independent of foot type. The findings of this pilot study may open new avenues for objectively assessing the impact of prescription footwear on dynamic balance and spatio-temporal parameters of gait. Further work to better assess the impact of foot orthoses on gait initiation in patients suffering from gait and instability pathologies may be warranted. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors associated with gait speed recovery after total knee arthroplasty: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Pua, Yong-Hao; Seah, Felicia Jie-Ting; Clark, Ross Allan; Lian-Li Poon, Cheryl; Tan, John Wei-Ming; Chong, Hwei-Chi

    2017-04-01

    Gait speed limitations can remain significant issues after a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) but their associated factors are not well understood. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with acute gait speed recovery post-TKA. We performed a prospective longitudinal study of 1765 patients who underwent primary TKA between July 2013 and July 2015. At 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postsurgery, fast gait speed was measured. The factors associated with gait speed over time since TKA were identified using multivariable generalized least squares modeling. Lower postoperative quadriceps strength and knee flexion range of motion were closely associated with lower gait speed over time (0.084m/s, 0.064m/s, and 0.055m/s change in gait speed per interquartile range change in ipsilateral quadriceps strength, contralateral quadriceps strength, and knee flexion range of motion, respectively). Additional strong predictors of lower gait speed included older age (0.11m/s), lower levels of preoperative Short Form 36 physical function (0.066m/s), greater body mass (0.046m/s), and the preoperative use of a walking aid (overall P < 0.001). Patients who reported that they limited their daily activities due to a fear of falling also had poorer gait speed (0.033m/s and 0.054m/s slower gait speed for "Occasional" and "Often" categories, respectively, vs. "None"). Gait speed recovery post-TKA is driven by both physical and psychological factors, suggesting that identifying and treating the underlying physical and cognitive causes of gait speed limitations may be crucial to optimize functional recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Examination of sustained gait speed during extended walking in individuals with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Altenburger, Peter A; Dierks, Tracy A; Miller, Kristine K; Combs, Stephanie A; Van Puymbroeck, Marieke; Schmid, Arlene A

    2013-12-01

    To determine if individuals with chronic stroke were able to sustain their peak gait speed during the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and to explore this sustainability across community ambulation potential subgroups. Prospective cross-sectional study. University-based research laboratory, hospitals, and stroke support groups. A sample of individuals with chronic stroke (N=48) completed a series of questionnaires and physical outcome measures, including gait mat assessment, during a single visit. Not applicable; 1-time cross-sectional data collection. During the 6MWT, we measured peak gait speed and end gait speed to assess sustainability, along with beginning gait speed, total distance walked, and rating of perceived exertion. We also assessed maximum gait speed during the 10-meter walk test (10MWT). Finally, we examined these gait outcomes across the subgroups. During the 6MWT, peak gait speed declined from .89m/s (SD=.38) to an end speed of .82m/s (SD=.36), whereas perceived exertion increased from 7.7 (SD=2.6) to 11.8 (SD=3.6). This peak gait speed was slower than the 10MWT maximum speed of 1.06m/s (SD=.51), but faster than the 6MWT beginning speed of .81m/s (SD=.34). The unlimited community ambulator subgroup was the primary contributor to sustainability differences. Predicting community ambulation potential based on the discrete gait speed from the 10MWT and endurance based on the average from the 6MWT might be incomplete if gait speed sustainability is not also assessed. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early presentation of gait impairment in Wolfram Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Classically characterized by early onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, diabetes insipidus, and neurological abnormalities, Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is also associated with atypical brainstem and cerebellar findings in the first decade of life. As such, we hypothesized that gait differences between individuals with WFS and typically developing (TD) individuals may be detectable across the course of the disease. Methods Gait was assessed for 13 individuals with WFS (min 6.4 yrs, max 25.8 yrs) and 29 age-matched, typically developing individuals (min 5.6 yrs, max 28.5 yrs) using a GAITRite ® walkway system. Velocity, cadence, step length, base of support and double support time were compared between groups. Results Across all tasks, individuals with WFS walked slower (p = 0.03), took shorter (p ≤ 0.001) and wider (p ≤ 0.001) steps and spent a greater proportion of the gait cycle in double support (p = 0.03) compared to TD individuals. Cadence did not differ between groups (p = 0.62). Across all tasks, age was significantly correlated with cadence and double support time in the TD group but only double support time was correlated with age in the WFS group and only during preferred pace forward (rs= 0.564, p = 0.045) and dual task forward walking (rs= 0.720, p = 0.006) tasks. Individuals with WFS also had a greater number of missteps during tandem walking (p ≤ 0.001). Within the WFS group, spatiotemporal measures of gait did not correlate with measures of visual acuity. Balance measures negatively correlated with normalized gait velocity during fast forward walking (rs = −0.59, p = 0.03) and percent of gait cycle in double support during backward walking (rs = −0.64, p = 0.03). Conclusions Quantifiable gait impairments can be detected in individuals with WFS earlier than previous clinical observations suggested. These impairments are not fully accounted for by the visual or balance deficits associated with WFS

  6. Evaluation of a Gait Assessment Module Using 3D Motion Capture Technology

    PubMed Central

    Baskwill, Amanda J.; Belli, Patricia; Kelleher, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Background Gait analysis is the study of human locomotion. In massage therapy, this observation is part of an assessment process that informs treatment planning. Massage therapy students must apply the theory of gait assessment to simulated patients. At Humber College, the gait assessment module traditionally consists of a textbook reading and a three-hour, in-class session in which students perform gait assessment on each other. In 2015, Humber College acquired a three-dimensional motion capture system. Purpose The purpose was to evaluate the use of 3D motion capture in a gait assessment module compared to the traditional gait assessment module. Participants Semester 2 massage therapy students who were enrolled in Massage Theory 2 (n = 38). Research Design Quasi-experimental, wait-list comparison study. Intervention The intervention group participated in an in-class session with a Qualisys motion capture system. Main Outcome Measure(s) The outcomes included knowledge and application of gait assessment theory as measured by quizzes, and students’ satisfaction as measured through a questionnaire. Results There were no statistically significant differences in baseline and post-module knowledge between both groups (pre-module: p = .46; post-module: p = .63). There was also no difference between groups on the final application question (p = .13). The intervention group enjoyed the in-class session because they could visualize the content, whereas the comparison group enjoyed the interactivity of the session. The intervention group recommended adding the assessment of gait on their classmates to their experience. Both groups noted more time was needed for the gait assessment module. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the gait assessment module combine both the traditional in-class session and the 3D motion capture system. PMID:28293329

  7. An Ambulatory System for Gait Monitoring Based on Wireless Sensorized Insoles

    PubMed Central

    González, Iván; Fontecha, Jesús; Hervás, Ramón; Bravo, José

    2015-01-01

    A new gait phase detection system for continuous monitoring based on wireless sensorized insoles is presented. The system can be used in gait analysis mobile applications, and it is designed for real-time demarcation of gait phases. The system employs pressure sensors to assess the force exerted by each foot during walking. A fuzzy rule-based inference algorithm is implemented on a smartphone and used to detect each of the gait phases based on the sensor signals. Additionally, to provide a solution that is insensitive to perturbations caused by non-walking activities, a probabilistic classifier is employed to discriminate walking forward from other low-level activities, such as turning, walking backwards, lateral walking, etc. The combination of these two algorithms constitutes the first approach towards a continuous gait assessment system, by means of the avoidance of non-walking influences. PMID:26184199

  8. An Ambulatory System for Gait Monitoring Based on Wireless Sensorized Insoles.

    PubMed

    González, Iván; Fontecha, Jesús; Hervás, Ramón; Bravo, José

    2015-07-09

    A new gait phase detection system for continuous monitoring based on wireless sensorized insoles is presented. The system can be used in gait analysis mobile applications, and it is designed for real-time demarcation of gait phases. The system employs pressure sensors to assess the force exerted by each foot during walking. A fuzzy rule-based inference algorithm is implemented on a smartphone and used to detect each of the gait phases based on the sensor signals. Additionally, to provide a solution that is insensitive to perturbations caused by non-walking activities, a probabilistic classifier is employed to discriminate walking forward from other low-level activities, such as turning, walking backwards, lateral walking, etc. The combination of these two algorithms constitutes the first approach towards a continuous gait assessment system, by means of the avoidance of non-walking influences.

  9. Visual assessment of hemiplegic gait following stroke: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hughes, K A; Bell, F

    1994-10-01

    A form that will guide clinicians through a reliable and valid visual assessment of hemiplegic gait was designed. Six hemiplegic patients were filmed walking along an instrumented walkway. These films were shown to three physiotherapists who used the form to rate the patients' gait. Each physiotherapist rated the six patients at both stages of recovery, repeating this a further two times. This resulted in 108 completed forms. Within-rater reliability is statistically significant for some raters and some individual form sections. Between-rater reliability is significant for some sections. Detailed analysis has shown that parts of the form have caused reduced reliability. These are mainly sections that ask for severity judgments or are duplicated. Some indication of normal gait should be included on the form. To test validity fully the form should be tested on a group of patients who all have significant changes in each objective gait measurement.

  10. Gait parameters extraction by using mobile robot equipped with Kinect v2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Ami; Mita, Akira; Yorozu, Ayanori; Takahashi, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    The needs for monitoring systems to be used in houses are getting stronger because of the increase of the single household population due to the low birth rate and longevity. Among others, gait parameters are under the spotlight to be examined as the relations with several diseases have been reported. It is known that the gait parameters obtained at a walk test are different from those obtained under the daily life. Thus, the system which can measure the gait parameters in the real living environment is needed. Generally, gait abilities are evaluated by a measurement test, such as Timed Up and Go test and 6-minute walking test. However, these methods need measurers, so the accuracy depends on them and the lack of objectivity is pointed out. Although, a precise motion capture system is used for more objective measurement, it is hard to be used in daily measurement, because the subjects have to put the markers on their body. To solve this problem, marker less sensors, such as Kinect, are developed and used for gait information acquisition. When they are attached to a mobile robot, there is no limitation of distance. However, they still have challenges of calibration for gait parameters, and the important gait parameters to be acquired are not well examined. Therefore, in this study, we extract the important parameters for gait analysis, which have correlations with diseases and age differences, and suggest the gait parameters extraction from depth data by Kinect v2 which is mounted on a mobile robot aiming at applying to the living environment.

  11. Robot-assisted gait training in multiple sclerosis patients: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Isabella; Sajin, Anna; Moreh, Elior; Fisher, Iris; Neeb, Martin; Forest, Adina; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Karusis, Dimitrios; Meiner, Zeev

    2012-06-01

    Preservation of locomotor activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is of utmost importance. Robotic-assisted body weight-supported treadmill training is a promising method to improve gait functions in neurologically impaired patients, although its effectiveness in MS patients is still unknown. To compare the effectiveness of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) with that of conventional walking treatment (CWT) on gait and generalized functions in a group of stable MS patients. A prospective randomized controlled trial of 12 sessions of RAGT or CWT in MS patients of EDSS score 5-7. Primary outcome measures were gait parameters and the secondary outcomes were functional and quality of life parameters. All tests were performed at baseline, 3 and 6 months post-treatment by a blinded rater. Fifteen and 17 patients were randomly allocated to RAGT and CWT, respectively. Both groups were comparable at baseline in all parameters. As compared with baseline, although some gait parameters improved significantly following the treatment at each time point there was no difference between the groups. Both FIM and EDSS scores improved significantly post-treatment with no difference between the groups. At 6 months, most gait and functional parameters had returned to baseline. Robot-assisted gait training is feasible and safe and may be an effective additional therapeutic option in MS patients with severe walking disabilities.

  12. Effects of novel tubing gait on neuromuscular imbalance in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoon Kyum; Lee, Dong Ryul; Kim, Do Hyun; Lee, Jae Jin; You, Sung Joshua Hyun; Yi, Chung Hwi; Jeon, Hye Seon

    2014-01-01

    Gait impairments from a neuromuscular imbalance are crucial issues in cerebral palsy. The purpose of our study was to compare the effects of the assistive tubing gait (ATG) and assistive-resistive tubing gait (ARTG) on improving the vasti and hamstring muscle imbalance during the initial contact to mid-stance phases in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Fourteen age-matched individuals including seven normal individuals (11.7 years) and seven individuals with CP (12.9 years) were recruited. All participants underwent electromyography (EMG) measurement of the unilateral vasti and hamstring muscle activity during the three gait training conditions of no-tubing gait (NTG), ATG, and ARTG. A statistical one-way repeated-measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine differences in the vasti and hamstring activity, the vasti/hamstring ratio, and the knee joint angle across the three gait training conditions for each group. The initial vasti and hamstring muscle imbalance in CP was significantly improved by applying the ARTG compared with the ATG. The vasti/hamstring ratio during the ARTG was compatible with the ratio value obtained from the NTG of normal individuals. The knee joint angle in CP was not improved in this short-term intervention. The ARTG proportionately increased the vasti activation and reciprocally inhibited the hamstring activity, subsequently improving the neuromuscular imbalance associated with the flexed-knee gait in individuals with spastic diplegic CP.

  13. Effect of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Hemiplegic Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Chong, Hyun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on both kinematic and temporospatial gait patterns in patients with hemiplegia. Materials and Methods Eighteen hemiplegic patients diagnosed with either cerebral palsy or stroke participated in this study. All participants underwent the 4-week gait training with RAS. The treatment was performed for 30 minutes per each session, three sessions per week. RAS was provided with rhythmic beats using a chord progression on a keyboard. Kinematic and temporospatial data were collected and analyzed using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Results Gait training with RAS significantly improved both proximal and distal joint kinematic patterns in hip adduction, knee flexion, and ankle plantar flexion, enhancing the gait deviation index (GDI) as well as ameliorating temporal asymmetry of the stance and swing phases in patients with hemiplegia. Stroke patients with previous walking experience demonstrated significant kinematic improvement in knee flexion in mid-swing and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance. Among stroke patients, subacute patients showed a significantly increased GDI score compared with chronic patients. In addition, household ambulators showed a significant effect on reducing anterior tilt of the pelvis with an enhanced GDI score, while community ambulators significantly increased knee flexion in mid-swing phase and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance phase. Conclusion Gait training with RAS has beneficial effects on both kinematic and temporospatial patterns in patients with hemiplegia, providing not only clinical implications of locomotor rehabilitation with goal-oriented external feedback using RAS but also differential effects according to ambulatory function. PMID:26446657

  14. Effect of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Hemiplegic Gait Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Chong, Hyun Ju; Kim, Soo Ji; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on both kinematic and temporospatial gait patterns in patients with hemiplegia. Eighteen hemiplegic patients diagnosed with either cerebral palsy or stroke participated in this study. All participants underwent the 4-week gait training with RAS. The treatment was performed for 30 minutes per each session, three sessions per week. RAS was provided with rhythmic beats using a chord progression on a keyboard. Kinematic and temporospatial data were collected and analyzed using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Gait training with RAS significantly improved both proximal and distal joint kinematic patterns in hip adduction, knee flexion, and ankle plantar flexion, enhancing the gait deviation index (GDI) as well as ameliorating temporal asymmetry of the stance and swing phases in patients with hemiplegia. Stroke patients with previous walking experience demonstrated significant kinematic improvement in knee flexion in mid-swing and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance. Among stroke patients, subacute patients showed a significantly increased GDI score compared with chronic patients. In addition, household ambulators showed a significant effect on reducing anterior tilt of the pelvis with an enhanced GDI score, while community ambulators significantly increased knee flexion in mid-swing phase and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance phase. Gait training with RAS has beneficial effects on both kinematic and temporospatial patterns in patients with hemiplegia, providing not only clinical implications of locomotor rehabilitation with goal-oriented external feedback using RAS but also differential effects according to ambulatory function.

  15. Dynamic Simulation of Human Gait Model With Predictive Capability.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinming; Wu, Shaoli; Voglewede, Philip A

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, it is proposed that the central nervous system (CNS) controls human gait using a predictive control approach in conjunction with classical feedback control instead of exclusive classical feedback control theory that controls based on past error. To validate this proposition, a dynamic model of human gait is developed using a novel predictive approach to investigate the principles of the CNS. The model developed includes two parts: a plant model that represents the dynamics of human gait and a controller that represents the CNS. The plant model is a seven-segment, six-joint model that has nine degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The plant model is validated using data collected from able-bodied human subjects. The proposed controller utilizes model predictive control (MPC). MPC uses an internal model to predict the output in advance, compare the predicted output to the reference, and optimize the control input so that the predicted error is minimal. To decrease the complexity of the model, two joints are controlled using a proportional-derivative (PD) controller. The developed predictive human gait model is validated by simulating able-bodied human gait. The simulation results show that the developed model is able to simulate the kinematic output close to experimental data.

  16. Analysis of gait symmetry during over-ground walking in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Jeffrey D; Harry, John R; Hickman, Robbin A; Dufek, Janet S

    2017-06-01

    Gait symmetry is utilized as an indicator of neurologic function. Healthy gait often exhibits minimal asymmetries, while pathological gait exhibits exaggerated asymmetries. The purpose of this study was to examine symmetry of mechanical gait parameters during over-ground walking in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Kinematic and kinetic data were obtained from 10 children (aged 5-12 years) with ASD. The Model Statistic procedure (α=0.05) was used to compare gait related parameters between limbs. Analysis revealed children with ASD exhibit significant lower extremity joint position and ground reaction force asymmetries throughout the gait cycle. The observed asymmetries were unique for each subject. These data do not support previous research relative to gait symmetry in children with ASD. Many individuals with ASD do not receive physical therapy interventions, however, precision medicine based interventions emphasizing lower extremity asymmetries may improve gait function and improve performance during activities of daily living. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Objective Biomarkers of Balance and Gait for Parkinson’s Disease using Body-worn Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Horak, Fay B; Mancini, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Balance and gait impairments characterize progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD), predict fall risk, and are important contributors to reduced quality of life. Advances in technology of small, body-worn inertial sensors have made it possible to develop quick, objective measures of balance and gait impairments in the clinic for research trials and clinical practice. Objective balance and gait metrics may eventually provide useful biomarkers for PD. In fact, objective balance and gait measures are already being used as surrogate end-points for demonstrating clinical efficacy of new treatments, in place of counting falls from diaries, using stop-watch measures of gait speed, or clinical balance rating scales. This review summarizes the types of objective measures available from body-worn sensors. We organize the metrics based on the neural control system for mobility affected by PD: postural stability in stance, postural responses, gait initiation, gait (temporal-spatial lower and upper body coordination and dynamic equilibrium), postural transitions, and freezing of gait. However, the explosion of metrics derived by wearable sensors during prescribed balance and gait tasks that are abnormal in people with PD do not yet qualify as behavioral biomarkers because many balance and gait impairments observed in PD are not specific to the disease, nor shown to be related to specific pathophysiologic biomarkers. In the future, the most useful balance and gait biomarkers for PD will be those that are sensitive and specific for early PD and related to the underlying disease process. PMID:24132842

  18. Design and Pilot Study of a Gait Enhancing Mobile Shoe.

    PubMed

    Handzic, Ismet; Barno, Eileen M; Vasudevan, Erin V; Reed, Kyle B

    2011-12-01

    Hemiparesis is a frequent and disabling consequence of stroke and can lead to asymmetric and inefficient walking patterns. Training on a split-belt treadmill, which has two separate treads driving each leg at a different speed, can correct such asymmetries post-stroke. However, the effects of split-belt treadmill training only partially transfer to everyday walking over ground and extended training sessions are required to achieve long-lasting effects. Our aim is to develop an alternative device, the Gait Enhancing Mobile Shoe (GEMS), that mimics the actions of the split-belt treadmill, but can be used during overground walking and in one's own home, thus enabling long-term training. The GEMS does not require any external power and is completely passive; all necessary forces are redirected from the natural forces present during walking. Three healthy subjects walked on the shoes for twenty minutes during which one GEMS generated a backward motion and the other GEMS generated a forward motion. Our preliminary experiments suggest that wearing the GEMS did cause subjects to modify coordination between the legs and these changes persisted when subjects returned to normal over-ground walking. The largest effects were observed in measures of temporal coordination (e.g., duration of double-support). These results suggest that the GEMS is capable of altering overground walking coordination in healthy controls and could potentially be used to correct gait asymmetries post-stroke.

  19. Quantifying dynamic characteristics of human walking for comprehensive gait cycle.

    PubMed

    Mummolo, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2013-09-01

    Normal human walking typically consists of phases during which the body is statically unbalanced while maintaining dynamic stability. Quantifying the dynamic characteristics of human walking can provide better understanding of gait principles. We introduce a novel quantitative index, the dynamic gait measure (DGM), for comprehensive gait cycle. The DGM quantifies the effects of inertia and the static balance instability in terms of zero-moment point and ground projection of center of mass and incorporates the time-varying foot support region (FSR) and the threshold between static and dynamic walking. Also, a framework of determining the DGM from experimental data is introduced, in which the gait cycle segmentation is further refined. A multisegmental foot model is integrated into a biped system to reconstruct the walking motion from experiments, which demonstrates the time-varying FSR for different subphases. The proof-of-concept results of the DGM from a gait experiment are demonstrated. The DGM results are analyzed along with other established features and indices of normal human walking. The DGM provides a measure of static balance instability of biped walking during each (sub)phase as well as the entire gait cycle. The DGM of normal human walking has the potential to provide some scientific insights in understanding biped walking principles, which can also be useful for their engineering and clinical applications.

  20. Altered spatiotemporal characteristics of gait in older adults with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Gregory E; Sions, J Megan; Coyle, Peter C; Pohlig, Ryan T

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies in older adults have identified that chronic low back pain (CLBP) is associated with slower gait speed. Given that slower gait speed is a predictor of greater morbidity and mortality among older adults, it is important to understand the underlying spatiotemporal characteristics of gait among older adults with CLBP. The purposes of this study were to determine (1) if there are differences in spatiotemporal parameters of gait between older adults with and without CLBP during self-selected and fast walking and (2) whether any of these gait characteristics are correlated with performance of a challenging walking task, e.g. stair negotiation. Spatiotemporal characteristics of gait were evaluated using a computerized walkway in 54 community-dwelling older adults with CLBP and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Older adults with CLBP walked slower than their pain-free peers during self-selected and fast walking. After controlling for body mass index and gait speed, step width was significantly greater in the CLBP group during the fast walking condition. Within the CLBP group, step width and double limb support time are significantly correlated with stair ascent/descent times. From a clinical perspective, these gait characteristics, which may be indicative of balance performance, may need to be addressed to improve overall gait speed, as well as stair-climbing performance. Future longitudinal studies confirming our findings are needed, as well as investigations focused on developing interventions to improve gait speed and decrease subsequent risk of mobility decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Balance and gait of adults with very mild Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gras, LZ; Kanaan, SF; McDowd, JM; Colgrove, YM; Burns, J; Pohl, PS

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Studies have shown that adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have gait and balance deficits, however the focus has been on those with mild to severe disease. The purpose of this study was to determine if balance and gait deficits are present in those with very mild AD. Methods Thirteen adults (72.9 ± 4.7 years old) with very mild AD and thirteen age (72.6 ± 4.6 years old) and gender-matched (10 males, 3 females) participants in a control group without AD performed balance and gait tests. All participants were living in the community and independent in community ambulation. Results Participants with very mild AD had shorter times in the sharpened Romberg tests with eyes open (p<0.001) and with eyes closed (p=0.007) compared to participants in the control group. Those with AD also took longer to complete the Timed “Up & Go” Test (TUG), (p< 0.001). Gait deficits were found for those with AD as demonstrated by slower velocities in the 10-meter walk at a comfortable pace (p=0.029) and on an instrumented walkway (p<0.001). Stance times were longer for those with AD (p<0.001) and step length was shorter (p=0.001). There were no group differences in the 10-meter walk at a fast pace. The gait velocity of participants in the control group was faster on the instrumented walkway than in the 10-meter walk at a comfortable pace (p=0.031). In contrast, the gait velocity of those with AD was significantly slower on the instrumented walkway than in the 10-meter walk at a comfortable pace, (p=0.024). Discussion Balance and gait deficits may be present in those in the very early stages of AD. Novel surfaces may affect gait speed in those with very mild AD. Identifying mobility deficits early in the progression of AD may provide an opportunity for early physical therapy intervention, thus promoting continued functional independence. Conclusions Adults in the very early stages of AD may show signs of balance and gait deficits. Recognition of these

  2. Neurologic Correlates of Gait Abnormalities in Cerebral Palsy: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Joanne; Butler, Erin E.; Rose, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common movement disorder in children. A diagnosis of CP is often made based on abnormal muscle tone or posture, a delay in reaching motor milestones, or the presence of gait abnormalities in young children. Neuroimaging of high-risk neonates and of children diagnosed with CP have identified patterns of neurologic injury associated with CP, however, the neural underpinnings of common gait abnormalities remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we review the nature of the brain injury in CP, as well as the neuromuscular deficits and subsequent gait abnormalities common among children with CP. We first discuss brain injury in terms of mechanism, pattern, and time of injury during the prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal period in preterm and term-born children. Second, we outline neuromuscular deficits of CP with a focus on spastic CP, characterized by muscle weakness, shortened muscle-tendon unit, spasticity, and impaired selective motor control, on both a microscopic and functional level. Third, we examine the influence of neuromuscular deficits on gait abnormalities in CP, while considering emerging information on neural correlates of gait abnormalities and the implications for strategic treatment. This review of the neural basis of gait abnormalities in CP discusses what is known about links between the location and extent of brain injury and the type and severity of CP, in relation to the associated neuromuscular deficits, and subsequent gait abnormalities. Targeted treatment opportunities are identified that may improve functional outcomes for children with CP. By providing this context on the neural basis of gait abnormalities in CP, we hope to highlight areas of further research that can reduce the long-term, debilitating effects of CP. PMID:28367118

  3. Non-MTC gait cycles: An adaptive toe trajectory control strategy in older adults.

    PubMed

    Santhiranayagam, Braveena K; Sparrow, W A; Lai, Daniel T H; Begg, Rezaul K

    2017-03-01

    Minimum-toe-clearance (MTC) above the walking surface is a critical representation of toe-trajectory control due to its association with tripping risk. Not all gait cycles exhibit a clearly defined MTC within the swing phase but there have been few previous accounts of the biomechanical characteristics of non-MTC gait cycles. The present report investigated the within-subject non-MTC gait cycle characteristics of 15 older adults (mean 73.1 years) and 15 young controls (mean 26.1 years). Participants performed the following tasks on a motorized treadmill: preferred speed walking, dual task walking (carrying a glass of water) and a dual-task speed-matched control. Toe position-time coordinates were acquired using a 3 dimensional motion capture system. When MTC was present, toe height at MTC (MTC height ) was extracted. The proportion of non-MTC gait cycles was computed for the age groups and individuals. For non-MTC gait cycles an 'indicative' toe height at the individual's average swing phase time (MTC time ) for observed MTC cycles was averaged across multiple non-MTC gait cycles. In preferred-speed walking Young demonstrated 2.9% non-MTC gait cycles and Older 18.7%. In constrained walking conditions both groups increased non-MTC gait cycles and some older adults revealed over 90%, confirming non-MTC gait cycles as an ageing-related phenomenon in lower limb trajectory control. For all participants median indicative toe-height on non-MTC gait cycles was greater than median MTC height . This result suggests that eliminating the biomechanically hazardous MTC event by adopting more of the higher-clearance non-MTC gait cycles, is adaptive in reducing the likelihood of toe-ground contact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiscale entropy analysis of human gait dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M.; Peng, C.-K.; L. Goldberger, Ary; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2003-12-01

    We compare the complexity of human gait time series from healthy subjects under different conditions. Using the recently developed multiscale entropy algorithm, which provides a way to measure complexity over a range of scales, we observe that normal spontaneous walking has the highest complexity when compared to slow and fast walking and also to walking paced by a metronome. These findings have implications for modeling locomotor control and for quantifying gait dynamics in physiologic and pathologic states.

  5. Quantitative Gait Markers and Incident Fall Risk in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Holtzer, Roee; Lipton, Richard B.; Wang, Cuiling

    2009-01-01

    Background Identifying quantitative gait markers of falls in older adults may improve diagnostic assessments and suggest novel intervention targets. Methods We studied 597 adults aged 70 and older (mean age 80.5 years, 62% women) enrolled in an aging study who received quantitative gait assessments at baseline. Association of speed and six other gait markers (cadence, stride length, swing, double support, stride length variability, and swing time variability) with incident fall rate was studied using generalized estimation equation procedures adjusted for age, sex, education, falls, chronic illnesses, medications, cognition, disability as well as traditional clinical tests of gait and balance. Results Over a mean follow-up period of 20 months, 226 (38%) of the 597 participants fell. Mean fall rate was 0.44 per person-year. Slower gait speed (risk ratio [RR] per 10 cm/s decrease 1.069, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.001–1.142) was associated with higher risk of falls in the fully adjusted models. Among six other markers, worse performance on swing (RR 1.406, 95% CI 1.027–1.926), double-support phase (RR 1.165, 95% CI 1.026–1.321), swing time variability (RR 1.007, 95% CI 1.004–1.010), and stride length variability (RR 1.076, 95% CI 1.030–1.111) predicted fall risk. The associations remained significant even after accounting for cognitive impairment and disability. Conclusions Quantitative gait markers are independent predictors of falls in older adults. Gait speed and other markers, especially variability, should be further studied to improve current fall risk assessments and to develop new interventions. PMID:19349593

  6. The interest of gait markers in the identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Auvinet, Bernard; Chaleil, Denis; Cabane, Jean; Dumolard, Anne; Hatron, Pierre; Juvin, Robert; Lanteri-Minet, Michel; Mainguy, Yves; Negre-Pages, Laurence; Pillard, Fabien; Riviere, Daniel; Maugars, Yves-Michel

    2011-11-11

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a heterogeneous syndrome and its classification into subgroups calls for broad-based discussion. FM subgrouping, which aims to adapt treatment according to different subgroups, relies in part, on psychological and cognitive dysfunctions. Since motor control of gait is closely related to cognitive function, we hypothesized that gait markers could be of interest in the identification of FM patients' subgroups. This controlled study aimed at characterizing gait disorders in FM, and subgrouping FM patients according to gait markers such as stride frequency (SF), stride regularity (SR), and cranio-caudal power (CCP) which measures kinesia. A multicentre, observational open trial enrolled patients with primary FM (44.1 ± 8.1 y), and matched controls (44.1 ± 7.3 y). Outcome measurements and gait analyses were available for 52 pairs. A 3-step statistical analysis was carried out. A preliminary single blind analysis using k-means cluster was performed as an initial validation of gait markers. Then in order to quantify FM patients according to psychometric and gait variables an open descriptive analysis comparing patients and controls were made, and correlations between gait variables and main outcomes were calculated. Finally using cluster analysis, we described subgroups for each gait variable and looked for significant differences in self-reported assessments. SF was the most discriminating gait variable (73% of patients and controls). SF, SR, and CCP were different between patients and controls. There was a non-significant association between SF, FIQ and physical components from Short-Form 36 (p = 0.06). SR was correlated to FIQ (p = 0.01) and catastrophizing (p = 0.05) while CCP was correlated to pain (p = 0.01). The SF cluster identified 3 subgroups with a particular one characterized by normal SF, low pain, high activity and hyperkinesia. The SR cluster identified 2 distinct subgroups: the one with a reduced SR was distinguished by high FIQ

  7. The interest of gait markers in the identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a heterogeneous syndrome and its classification into subgroups calls for broad-based discussion. FM subgrouping, which aims to adapt treatment according to different subgroups, relies in part, on psychological and cognitive dysfunctions. Since motor control of gait is closely related to cognitive function, we hypothesized that gait markers could be of interest in the identification of FM patients' subgroups. This controlled study aimed at characterizing gait disorders in FM, and subgrouping FM patients according to gait markers such as stride frequency (SF), stride regularity (SR), and cranio-caudal power (CCP) which measures kinesia. Methods A multicentre, observational open trial enrolled patients with primary FM (44.1 ± 8.1 y), and matched controls (44.1 ± 7.3 y). Outcome measurements and gait analyses were available for 52 pairs. A 3-step statistical analysis was carried out. A preliminary single blind analysis using k-means cluster was performed as an initial validation of gait markers. Then in order to quantify FM patients according to psychometric and gait variables an open descriptive analysis comparing patients and controls were made, and correlations between gait variables and main outcomes were calculated. Finally using cluster analysis, we described subgroups for each gait variable and looked for significant differences in self-reported assessments. Results SF was the most discriminating gait variable (73% of patients and controls). SF, SR, and CCP were different between patients and controls. There was a non-significant association between SF, FIQ and physical components from Short-Form 36 (p = 0.06). SR was correlated to FIQ (p = 0.01) and catastrophizing (p = 0.05) while CCP was correlated to pain (p = 0.01). The SF cluster identified 3 subgroups with a particular one characterized by normal SF, low pain, high activity and hyperkinesia. The SR cluster identified 2 distinct subgroups: the one with a reduced SR was

  8. Cellular Telephone Dialing Influences Kinematic and Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Kelly M; Higginson, Christopher I; DeGoede, Kurt M; Bifano, Morgan K; Orr, Rachel; Higginson, Jill S

    2016-01-01

    Gait speed is typically reduced when individuals simultaneously perform other tasks. However, the impact of dual tasking on kinetic and kinematic gait parameters is unclear because these vary with gait speed. The objective of this study was to identify whether dual tasking impacts gait in healthy adults when speed is constant. Twenty-two healthy adults dialed a cell phone during treadmill walking at a self-selected speed while kinetic, kinematic, and spatial parameters were recorded. Results indicated that dual tasking did not impact phone dialing speed, but increased stride width, peak knee flexion during stance, and peak plantarflexion, and decreased knee and ankle range of motion. Dual tasking appears to influence kinematic gait variables in a manner consistent with promotion of stability.

  9. Longitudinal quasi-static stability predicts changes in dog gait on rough terrain

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Michelle A.; Haynes, G. Clark; Revzen, Shai; Koditschek, Daniel E.; Spence, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legged animals utilize gait selection to move effectively and must recover from environmental perturbations. We show that on rough terrain, domestic dogs, Canis lupus familiaris, spend more time in longitudinal quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Here, longitudinal refers to the rostro-caudal axis. We used an existing model in the literature to quantify the longitudinal quasi-static stability of gaits neighbouring the walk, and found that trot-like gaits are more stable. We thus hypothesized that when perturbed, the rate of return to a stable gait would depend on the direction of perturbation, such that perturbations towards less quasi-statically stable patterns of movement would be more rapid than those towards more stable patterns of movement. The net result of this would be greater time spent in longitudinally quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Limb movement patterns in which diagonal limbs were more synchronized (those more like a trot) have higher longitudinal quasi-static stability. We therefore predicted that as dogs explored possible limb configurations on rough terrain at walking speeds, the walk would shift towards trot. We gathered experimental data quantifying dog gait when perturbed by rough terrain and confirmed this prediction using GPS and inertial sensors (n=6, P<0.05). By formulating gaits as trajectories on the n-torus we are able to make tractable the analysis of gait similarity. These methods can be applied in a comparative study of gait control which will inform the ultimate role of the constraints and costs impacting locomotion, and have applications in diagnostic procedures for gait abnormalities, and in the development of agile legged robots. PMID:28264903

  10. Longitudinal quasi-static stability predicts changes in dog gait on rough terrain.

    PubMed

    Wilshin, Simon; Reeve, Michelle A; Haynes, G Clark; Revzen, Shai; Koditschek, Daniel E; Spence, Andrew J

    2017-05-15

    Legged animals utilize gait selection to move effectively and must recover from environmental perturbations. We show that on rough terrain, domestic dogs, Canis lupus familiaris , spend more time in longitudinal quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Here, longitudinal refers to the rostro-caudal axis. We used an existing model in the literature to quantify the longitudinal quasi-static stability of gaits neighbouring the walk, and found that trot-like gaits are more stable. We thus hypothesized that when perturbed, the rate of return to a stable gait would depend on the direction of perturbation, such that perturbations towards less quasi-statically stable patterns of movement would be more rapid than those towards more stable patterns of movement. The net result of this would be greater time spent in longitudinally quasi-statically stable patterns of movement. Limb movement patterns in which diagonal limbs were more synchronized (those more like a trot) have higher longitudinal quasi-static stability. We therefore predicted that as dogs explored possible limb configurations on rough terrain at walking speeds, the walk would shift towards trot. We gathered experimental data quantifying dog gait when perturbed by rough terrain and confirmed this prediction using GPS and inertial sensors ( n =6, P <0.05). By formulating gaits as trajectories on the n -torus we are able to make tractable the analysis of gait similarity. These methods can be applied in a comparative study of gait control which will inform the ultimate role of the constraints and costs impacting locomotion, and have applications in diagnostic procedures for gait abnormalities, and in the development of agile legged robots. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Pathways linking regional hyperintensities in the brain and slower gait.

    PubMed

    Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Aizenstein, Howard; Harris, Tamara; Launer, Lenore; Yaffe, Kristine; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Newman, Anne; Rosano, Caterina

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are involved in the evolution of impaired mobility and executive functions. Executive functions and mobility are also associated. Thus, WMHs may impair mobility directly, by disrupting mobility-related circuits, or indirectly, by disrupting circuits responsible for executive functions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying impaired mobility in late life will increase our capacity to develop effective interventions. To identify regional WMHs most related to slower gait and to examine whether these regional WMHs directly impact mobility, or indirectly by executive functions. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-one WMH variables (i.e., total WMH volume and WMHs in 20 tracts), gait speed, global cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Examination; 3MS), and executive functions and processing speed (Digit-Symbol Substitution Test; DSST) were assessed. An L1-L2 regularized regression (i.e., Elastic Net model) identified the WMH variables most related to slower gait. Multivariable linear regression models quantified the association between these WMH variables and gait speed. Formal tests of mediation were also conducted. Community-based sample. Two hundred fifty-three adults (mean age: 83years, 58% women, 41% black). Gait speed. In older adults with an average gait speed of 0.91m/sec, total WMH volume, WMHs located in the right anterior thalamic radiation (ATRR) and frontal corpuscallosum (CCF) were most associated with slower gait. There was a >10% slower gait for each standard deviation of WMH in CCF, ATRR or total brain (standardized beta in m/sec [p value]: -0.11 [p=0.046], -0.15 [p=0.007] and -0.14 [p=0.010], respectively). These associations were substantially and significantly attenuated after adjustment for DSST. This effect was stronger for WMH in CCF than for ATRR or total WMH (standardized beta in m/sec [p value]: -0.07 [p=0.190], -0.12 [p=0.024] and -0.10 [p=0.049], respectively). Adjustment for 3MS did not change these

  12. Parkinsonian gait ameliorated with a moving handrail, not with a banister.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Ely; Demin, Aleksandr; Pirrotta, Stefania; Chen, Jason; Patel, Hemal; Bhambri, Ankur; Noyola, Estella; Lackner, James R; DiZio, Paul; DiFrancisco-Donoghue, Joanne; Werner, William

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether haptic (touch and proprioception) cues from touching a moving handrail while walking can ameliorate the gait symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), such as slowness and small stride length. Nonrandomized, controlled before-after trial. Physical therapy clinic. People with PD (n=16) and healthy age-matched control subjects (n=16) with no neurologic disorders volunteered. No participants withdrew. We compared gait using a moving handrail as a novel assistive aid (speed self-selected) versus a banister and unassisted walking. Participants with PD were tested on and off dopaminergic medication. Mean gait speed, stride length, stride duration, double-support duration, and medial-lateral excursion. With the moving handrail, participants with PD increased gait speed relative to unassisted gait by 16% (.166m/s, P=.009, d=.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], .054-.278m/s) and increased stride length by 10% (.053m, P=.022, d=.37; 95% CI, .009-.097m) without significantly changing stride or double-support duration. The banister reduced speed versus unassisted gait by 11% (-.097m/s, P=.040, d=.40; 95% CI, .002-.193m/s) and reduced stride length by 8% (.32m, P=.004, d=.26; 95% CI, .010-.054m), whereas it increased stride duration by 3% (.023s, P=.022, d=.21; 95% CI, .004-.041s) and double-support duration by 35% (.044s, P=.031, d=.58; 95% CI, .005-.083s). All medication × condition interactions were P>.05. Using haptic speed cues from the moving handrail, people with PD walked faster by spontaneously (ie, without specific instruction) increasing stride length without altering cadence; banisters slowed gait. Haptic cues from the moving handrail can be used by people with PD to engage biomechanical and neural mechanisms for interpreting tactile and proprioception changes related to gait speed to control gait better than static cues afforded by banisters. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymmetric pedunculopontine network connectivity in parkinsonian patients with freezing of gait

    PubMed Central

    Fling, Brett W.; Cohen, Rajal G.; Mancini, Martina; Nutt, John G.; Fair, Damian A.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing of gait is one of the most debilitating symptoms in Parkinson’s disease as it causes falls and reduces mobility and quality of life. The pedunculopontine nucleus is one of the major nuclei of the mesencephalic locomotor region and has neurons related to anticipatory postural adjustments preceding step initiation as well as to the step itself, thus it may be critical for coupling posture and gait to avoid freezing. Because freezing of gait and postural impairments have been related to frontal lesions and frontal dysfunction such as executive function, we hypothesized that freezing is associated with disrupted connectivity between midbrain locomotor regions and medial frontal cortex. We used diffusion tensor imaging to quantify structural connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus in patients with Parkinson’s disease with freezing of gait, without freezing, and healthy age-matched controls. We also included behavioural tasks to gauge severity of freezing of gait, quantify gait metrics, and assess executive cognitive functions to determine whether between-group differences in executive dysfunction were related to pedunculopontine nucleus structural network connectivity. Using seed regions from the pedunculopontine nucleus, we were able to delineate white matter connections between the spinal cord, cerebellum, pedunculopontine nucleus, subcortical and frontal/prefrontal cortical regions. The current study is the first to demonstrate differences in structural connectivity of the identified locomotor pathway in patients with freezing of gait. We report reduced connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus with the cerebellum, thalamus and multiple regions of the frontal cortex. Moreover, these structural differences were observed solely in the right hemisphere of patients with freezing of gait. Finally, we show that the more left hemisphere-lateralized the pedunculopontine nucleus tract volume, the poorer the performance on cognitive tasks requiring the

  14. Rising Energetic Cost of Walking Predicts Gait Speed Decline With Aging.

    PubMed

    Schrack, Jennifer A; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Studenski, Stephanie; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Slow gait is a robust biomarker of health and a predictor of functional decline and death in older adults, yet factors contributing to the decline in gait speed with aging are not well understood. Previous research suggests that the energetic cost of walking at preferred speed is inversely associated with gait speed, but whether individuals with a rising energetic cost of walking experience a steeper rate of gait speed decline has not been investigated. In participants of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, the energetic cost of overground walking at preferred speed (mL/kg/m) was assessed between 2007 and 2014 using a portable indirect calorimeter. The longitudinal association between the energetic cost of walking and usual gait speed over 6 meters (m/s) was assessed with multivariate linear regression models, and the risk of slow gait (<1.0 m/s) was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models. The study population consisted of 457 participants aged 40 and older who contributed 1,121 person-visits to the analysis. In fully adjusted models, increases in the energetic cost of walking predicted the rate of gait speed decline in those older than 65 years (β = -0.008 m/s, p < .001). Moreover, those with a higher energetic cost of walking (>0.17mL/kg/m) had a 57% greater risk of developing slow gait compared with a normal energetic cost of walking (≤0.17mL/kg/m; adjusted hazard ratio = 1.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-2.46). These findings suggest that strategies to maintain walking efficiency hold significant implications for maintaining mobility in late life. Efforts to curb threats to walking efficiency should focus on therapies to treat gait and balance impairments, and reduce clinical disease burden. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    PubMed Central

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling. PMID:28122432

  16. Functional asymmetry of