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Sample records for alternative complement activation

  1. Alternative complement pathway: activity levels in allogeneic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brai, M; Tolone, G; Magro, A; Waks, H; Brai, M

    1976-12-15

    Classical and alternative complement pathway activities have been evaluated in sera of women in progressive stages of gestation and in pregnant mice belonging to outbred or inbred matings, as compared to suitable controls. While classical C pathway was found to be unmodified, the alternative one attained in pregnancy significantly higher activity levels. Results are discussed in the light of mother-conceptus relationships.

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps can activate alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, C; Zhao, M-H; Chen, M

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between neutrophils and activation of alternative complement pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs activate primed neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which have recently gathered increasing attention in the development of AAV. The relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway has not been elucidated. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway. Detection of components of alternative complement pathway on NETs in vitro was assessed by immunostain and confocal microscopy. Complement deposition on NETs were detected after incubation with magnesium salt ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid (Mg-EGTA)-treated human serum. After incubation of serum with supernatants enriched in ANCA-induced NETs, levels of complement components in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Complement factor B (Bb) and properdin deposited on NETs in vitro. The deposition of C3b and C5b-9 on NETs incubated with heat-inactivated normal human serum (Hi-NHS) or EGTA-treated Hi-NHS (Mg-EGTA-Hi-NHS) were significantly less than that on NETs incubated with NHS or EGTA-treated NHS (Mg-EGTA-NHS). NETs induced by ANCA could activate the alternative complement cascade in the serum. In the presence of EGTA, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 concentration decreased from 800·42 ± 244·81 ng/ml, 7·68 ± 1·50 ng/ml, 382·15 ± 159·75 ng/ml in the supernatants enriched in ANCA induced NETs to 479·07 ± 156·2 ng/ml, 4·86 ± 1·26 ng/ml, 212·65 ± 44·40 ng/ml in the supernatants of DNase I-degraded NETs (P < 0·001, P = 0·008, P < 0·001, respectively). NETs could activate the alternative complement pathway, and might thus participate in the pathogenesis of AAV. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps can activate alternative complement pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Wang, C; Zhao, M-H; Chen, M

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between neutrophils and activation of alternative complement pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs activate primed neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which have recently gathered increasing attention in the development of AAV. The relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway has not been elucidated. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway. Detection of components of alternative complement pathway on NETs in vitro was assessed by immunostain and confocal microscopy. Complement deposition on NETs were detected after incubation with magnesium salt ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid (Mg-EGTA)-treated human serum. After incubation of serum with supernatants enriched in ANCA-induced NETs, levels of complement components in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Complement factor B (Bb) and properdin deposited on NETs in vitro. The deposition of C3b and C5b-9 on NETs incubated with heat-inactivated normal human serum (Hi-NHS) or EGTA-treated Hi-NHS (Mg-EGTA-Hi-NHS) were significantly less than that on NETs incubated with NHS or EGTA-treated NHS (Mg-EGTA-NHS). NETs induced by ANCA could activate the alternative complement cascade in the serum. In the presence of EGTA, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 concentration decreased from 800·42 ± 244·81 ng/ml, 7·68 ± 1·50 ng/ml, 382·15 ± 159·75 ng/ml in the supernatants enriched in ANCA induced NETs to 479·07 ± 156·2 ng/ml, 4·86 ± 1·26 ng/ml, 212·65 ± 44·40 ng/ml in the supernatants of DNase I-degraded NETs (P < 0·001, P = 0·008, P < 0·001, respectively). NETs could activate the alternative complement pathway, and might thus participate in the pathogenesis of AAV PMID:25963026

  4. Activation of the Alternative Complement Pathway by Fungal Melanins

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Á. L.; MacGill, R. S.; Nosanchuk, J. D.; Kozel, T. R.; Casadevall, A.

    2002-01-01

    Melanins are complex biological pigments formed by the oxidative polymerization of phenolic and/or indolic compounds. These pigments have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some microbial infections, malignancies, degenerative disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that melanins have antigenic and anti-inflammatory properties. These findings led us to further explore the interaction of melanins with the immune system. Melanin particles (“ghosts”) were isolated from in vitro-melanized Cryptococcus neoformans cells and Aspergillus niger conidia and then incubated in normal human serum containing 125I-labeled complement C3. The results demonstrated deposition of C3 fragments onto the melanin ghosts as early as 1 min after incubation, with maximum deposition occurring after 12 min for C. neoformans-derived melanin ghosts and after 25 min for A. niger-derived melanin ghosts. The blocking of classical pathway activation did not affect the kinetics or total deposition of C3 onto the melanin ghosts, indicating that melanins activate complement through the alternative pathway. Immunofluorescence analysis of lungs from BALB/c mice injected intratracheally with C. neoformans-derived melanin ghosts demonstrated deposition of C3 fragments onto the ghosts. Small granulomas were also observed surrounding the ghosts. However, melanization of the C. neoformans cell wall did not alter the kinetics or total deposition of C3 fragments onto the fungal cells. The finding that melanin surfaces can activate the complement system suggests a potential mechanism for the pathogenesis of some degenerative and/or autoimmune processes that involve melanized cells as well as another potential role for melanin in the virulence of melanin-producing microorganisms. PMID:11777844

  5. Cigarette smoke can activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro by modifying the third component of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, R R; Ghebrehiwet, B; Janoff, A

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with significant increases in the number of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes and neutrophils. A potent chemoattractant for these cells is C5a, a peptide generated during complement (C) activation. We, therefore, investigated the possibility that cigarette smoke could activate the complement system in vitro. Our results show that factor(s) (mol wt less than 1,000) present in an aqueous solution of whole, unfiltered cigarette smoke can deplete the hemolytic capacity of whole human serum in a dose-dependent manner. The particle-free, filtered gas phase of cigarette smoke is inactive. The smoke factor(s) do not activate serum C1, but do deplete serum C4 activity. Treatment of purified human C3 with whole smoke solution modifies the molecule such that its subsequent addition to serum (containing Mg/EGTA to block the classical pathway) results in consumption of hemolytic complement by activation of the alternative pathway. Smoke-modified C3 shows increased anodal migration in agarose electrophoresis, but this is not due to proteolytic cleavage of the molecule as evidenced by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In contrast to methylamine-treated C3, C3 treated with smoke is only partially susceptible to the action of the complement regulatory proteins Factors H and I. In addition, smoke-modified C3 has diminished binding to Factor H as compared with methylamine-treated C3. Finally, smoke-modified C3 incorporates [14C]methylamine which suggests that the thiolester bond may be intact. These data indicate that aqueous whole cigarette smoke solution can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement, perhaps by a previously unrecognized mechanism. Should this occur in vivo, complement activation might partly account for the extensive pulmonary leukocyte recruitment observed in smokers. Images PMID:3156879

  6. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  7. Aluminum Hydroxide Adjuvant Differentially Activates the Three Complement Pathways with Major Involvement of the Alternative Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Esin; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Al(OH)3 is the most common adjuvant in human vaccines, but its mode of action remains poorly understood. Complement involvement in the adjuvant properties of Al(OH)3 has been suggested in several reports together with a depot effect. It is here confirmed that Al(OH)3 treatment of serum depletes complement components and activates the complement system. We show that complement activation by Al(OH)3 involves the three major pathways by monitoring complement components in Al(OH)3-treated serum and in Al(OH)3-containing precipitates. Al(OH)3 activation of complement results in deposition of C3 cleavage products and membrane attack complex (MAC) and in generation of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Complement activation was time dependent and inhibited by chelation with EDTA but not EGTA+Mg2+. We thus confirm that Al(OH)3 activates the complement system and show that the alternative pathway is of major importance. PMID:24040248

  8. Alternative complement pathway activation increases mortality in a model of burn injury in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, J A; Donelan, M; Hawiger, A; Burke, J F

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the role of the complement system in burn injury in an experimental model in mice. A 25% body surface area, full-thickness scald wound was produced in anesthetized animals. Massive activation of the alternative complement pathway, but not the classical pathway, was seen. This activation was associated with the generation of neutrophil aggregating activity in the plasma, neutrophil aggregates in the lungs, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and increased lung edema formation. Decomplementation with cobra venom factor (CVF) or genetic C5 deficiency diminished these pathologic changes, and CVF pretreatment substantially reduced burn mortality in the first 24 h. Preliminary data show that human burn patients have a similar pattern of complement activation involving predominantly the alternative pathway, indicating the possible relevance of the murine model to human disease. Images PMID:7174787

  9. Activation of the alternative complement pathway in canine normal serum by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, A.A.C.; Petroni, T.F.; Fedatto, P.F.; Bianchini, R.R.; Venancio, E.J.; Itano, E.N.; Ono, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a human granulomatous disease. Recently the first case of natural disease in dogs was reported. The complement system is an important effector component of humoral immunity against infectious agents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activation of the dog alternative complement pathway by P. brasiliensis. Initially, the ability of erythrocytes of guinea pig, rabbit, sheep, chicken and swine to activate the dog alternative pathway was evaluated. The guinea pig erythrocytes showed the greatest capacity to activate dog alternative pathway. The alternative (AH50) hemolytic activity was evaluated in 27 serum samples from healthy dogs and the mean values were 87.2 AH50/ml. No significant differences were observed in relation to sex and age. The alternative pathway activation by P. brasiliensis was higher in serum samples from adult dogs when compared to puppies and aged dogs (p ≤ 0.05). This is the first report of dog alternative complement pathway activation by P. brasiliensis and suggests that it may play a protective role in canine paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24031350

  10. Evidence for intrathecal synthesis of alternative pathway complement activation proteins in experimental meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, P. F.; Frei, K.; Fontana, A.; Eugster, H. P.; Ault, B. H.; Barnum, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Complement has been shown to contribute to intrathecal inflammation in bacterial meningitis. However, the cellular source of complement in the infected central nervous system has not been determined. In this study, we analyzed protein and mRNA expression of two alternative pathway complement activation proteins, C3 and factor B, in the brains of mice with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis. Complement protein levels were found elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of infected mice, compared with mock-infected animals. In the course of the disease, enhanced C3 and factor B mRNA expression was detected on pyramidal neurons and Purkinje cells within 6 hours, peaking at 12 hours and then gradually decreasing by 72 hours after infection. In addition, leukocytes infiltrating the subarachnoid space, within 12 to 24 hours, expressed mRNA for C3 and factor B. The cellular infiltration increased dramatically up to 72 hours. Intraperitoneal injection of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha up-regulated C3 and factor B mRNA expression on neurons in normal mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha may represent one cytokine regulating complement expression in this model of bacterial meningitis. However, additional mediators may be involved in regulation of intrathecal complement expression, as infected mice deficient of TNF/lymphotoxin-alpha genes did not demonstrate attenuated complement expression in the brain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9327721

  11. Demonstration of alternative and classical complement pathway activity in colostrum from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Matheswaran, K; Dhinakar Raj, G; Nachimuthu, K

    2003-09-01

    Buffalo colostrum caused lysis of unsensitized red blood cells (RBC) from sheep, goats, rabbits and chickens. RBC from cattle and buffalo were resistant to lysis. That lysis was due to the presence of natural antibodies to these RBC was ruled out since there was no reduction in haemolytic titres even after adsorption with the respective RBC. The addition of EGTA to the diluent had no effect on the haemolytic activity. These findings indicate the presence of alternative complement pathway (ACP) activity in buffalo colostrum. The haemolytic activity of buffalo complement for unsensitized rabbit RBC was reduced to very low levels by heating at 50 degrees C for 45 min. Treatment with zymosan also inhibited the haemolytic activity, while inulin had no effect. The maximum activity of ACP occurred in the presence of 4 mmol/L Mg(2+) in the diluent. The range of ACP activities in colostrum from buffaloes varied from 4.06 to 8.48 CH50 units/ml. Using a standard system for titrating the classical complement pathway and rabbit red blood cells sensitized with goat haemolysin, the range of complement activity in buffalo colostrum was 4.81-6.77 CH50/ml.

  12. Alternative complement pathway activation during invasive coronary procedures in acute myocardial infarction and stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsófia; Csuka, Dorottya; Vargova, Katarina; Kovács, Andrea; Leé, Sarolta; Varga, Lilian; Préda, István; Tóth Zsámboki, Emese; Prohászka, Zoltán; Kiss, Róbert Gábor

    2016-12-01

    The effect of invasive percutaneous coronary procedures on complement activation has not been elucidated. We enrolled stable angina patients with elective percutaneous coronary intervention (SA-PCI, n=24), diagnostic coronary angiography (CA, n=52) and 23 patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and primary PCI (STEMI-PCI). Complement activation products (C1rC1sC1inh, C3bBbP and SC5b-9) were measured on admission, 6 and 24h after coronary procedures. The alternative pathway product, C3bBbP significantly and reversibly increased 6h after elective PCI (baseline: 7.81AU/ml, 6h: 16.09AU/ml, 24h: 4.27AU/ml, p<0.01, n=23) and diagnostic angiography (baseline: 6.13AU/ml, 6h: 12.08AU/ml, 24h: 5.4AU/ml, p<0.01, n=52). Six hour C3bBbP values correlated with post-procedural CK, creatinine level and the applied contrast material volume (r=0.41, r=0.4, r=0.3, p<0.05, respectively). In STEMI-PCI, baseline C3bBbP level was higher, compared to SA-PCI or CA patients (11.33AU/ml vs. 7.81AU/ml or 6.13AU/ml, p<0.001). Similarly, the terminal complex (SC5b-9) level was already elevated at baseline compared to SA-PCI group (3.49AU/ml vs. 1.87AU/ml, p=0.011). Complement pathway products did not increase further after primary PCI. Elective coronary procedures induced transient alternative complement pathway activation, influenced by the applied contrast volume. In STEMI, the alternative complement pathway is promptly activated during the atherothrombotic event and PCI itself had no further detectable effect.

  13. Complement haemolytic activity (classical and alternative pathways), C3, C4 and factor B titres in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Ferriani, V P; Barbosa, J E; de Carvalho, I F

    1999-10-01

    Values of complement lytic activity of classical and alternative pathways, assessed by measuring the time required to lyse 50% of target red blood cells, and the concentration of complement components C3, C4 and factor B were estimated in the sera of 103 healthy children aged 3 to 14 y. Age-dependent variations were seen in the C3 and factor B concentrations, but not in C4, with the highest values found among 5-6-y-old children. Variations in classical and alternative lytic activity were not detected in this group of children, although the values are significantly different from our previously published data on adults, using the same kinetic assay (1). We also evaluated the relationship between the lytic activity of the classical (CPT) and alternative pathways (APT) and the levels of complement components. There were significant correlations between: APT and factor B, APT and C3, C3 and C4, C3 and factor B, and C4 and factor B concentrations. The normal ranges measured here can be used in the initial screening of Brazilian children presenting diseases involving the complement system. This study also contributes to a better understanding of the complement system ontogeny.

  14. Alternative Pathway Dysregulation and the Conundrum of Complement Activation by IgG4 Immune Complexes in Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), a major cause of nephrotic syndrome, is a non-inflammatory immune kidney disease mediated by IgG antibodies that form glomerular subepithelial immune complexes. In primary MN, autoantibodies target proteins expressed on the podocyte surface, often phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1). Pathology is driven by complement activation, leading to podocyte injury and proteinuria. This article overviews the mechanisms of complement activation and regulation in MN, addressing the paradox that anti-PLA2R1 and other antibodies causing primary MN are predominantly (but not exclusively) IgG4, an IgG subclass that does not fix complement. Besides immune complexes, alterations of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in MN may lead to impaired regulation of the alternative pathway (AP). The AP amplifies complement activation on surfaces insufficiently protected by complement regulatory proteins. Whereas podocytes are protected by cell-bound regulators, the GBM must recruit plasma factor H, which inhibits the AP on host surfaces carrying certain polyanions, such as heparan sulfate (HS) chains. Because HS chains present in the normal GBM are lost in MN, we posit that the local complement regulation by factor H may be impaired as a result. Thus, the loss of GBM HS in MN creates a micro-environment that promotes local amplification of complement activation, which in turn may be initiated via the classical or lectin pathways by subsets of IgG in immune complexes. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of complement activation and dysregulation in MN is important for designing more effective therapies. PMID:27199983

  15. Multiple activities of LigB potentiate virulence of Leptospira interrogans: inhibition of alternative and classical pathways of complement.

    PubMed

    Choy, Henry A

    2012-01-01

    Microbial pathogens acquire the immediate imperative to avoid or counteract the formidable defense of innate immunity as soon as they overcome the initial physical barriers of the host. Many have adopted the strategy of directly disrupting the complement system through the capture of its components, using proteins on the pathogen's surface. In leptospirosis, pathogenic Leptospira spp. are resistant to complement-mediated killing, in contrast to the highly vulnerable non-pathogenic strains. Pathogenic L. interrogans uses LenA/LfhA and LcpA to respectively sequester and commandeer the function of two regulators, factor H and C4BP, which in turn bind C3b or C4b to interrupt the alternative or classical pathways of complement activation. LigB, another surface-proximal protein originally characterized as an adhesin binding multiple host proteins, has other activities suggesting its importance early in infection, including binding extracellular matrix, plasma, and cutaneous repair proteins and inhibiting hemostasis. In this study, we used a recent model of ectopic expression of LigB in the saprophyte, L. biflexa, to test the hypothesis that LigB also interacts with complement proteins C3b and C4b to promote the virulence of L. interrogans. The surface expression of LigB partially rescued the non-pathogen from killing by 5% normal human serum, showing 1.3- to 48-fold greater survival 4 to 6 d following exposure to complement than cultures of the non-expressing parental strain. Recombinant LigB7'-12 comprising the LigB-specific immunoglobulin repeats binds directly to human complement proteins, C3b and C4b, with respective K(d)s of 43±26 nM and 69±18 nM. Repeats 9 to 11, previously shown to contain the binding domain for fibronectin and fibrinogen, are also important in LigB-complement interactions, which interfere with the alternative and classical pathways measured by complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes. Thus, LigB is an adaptable interface for L. interrogans

  16. Complement activation by PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes is independent of C1q and alternative pathway turnover

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Islam; Hunter, A. Christy; Rutt, Kenneth J.; Liu, Zhuang; Dai, Hongjie; Moghimi, S. Moein

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between long circulating poly(ethylene glycol)-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the complement system. Aminopoly(ethylene glycol)5000–distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (aminoPEG5000–DSPE) and methoxyPEG5000–DSPE coated as-grown HIPco SWNTs activated complement in undiluted normal human serum as reflected in significant rises in C4d and SC5b-9 levels, but not the alternative pathway split-product Bb, thus indicating activation exclusively through C4 cleavage. Studies in C2-depleted serum confirmed that PEGylated nanotube-mediated elevation of SC5b-9 was C4b2a convertase-dependent. With the aid of monoclonal antibodies against C1s and human serum depleted from C1q, nanotube-mediated complement activation in C1q-depleted serum was also shown to be independent of classical pathway. Nanotube-mediated C4d elevation in C1q-depleted serum, however, was inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine, Futhan (a broad-spectrum serine protease inhibitor capable of preventing complement activation through all three pathways) and anti-MASP-2 antibodies; this strongly suggests a role for activation of MASP-2 in subsequent C4 cleavage and assembly of C4b2a covertases. Intravenous injection of PEGylated nanotubes in some rats was associated with a significant rise in plasma thromboxane B2 levels, indicative of in vivo nanotube-mediated complement activation. The clinical implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:18602161

  17. Curdlan, a (1----3)-beta-D-glucan from Alcaligenes faecalis var. myxogenes IFO13140, activates the alternative complement pathway by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, M

    1990-10-01

    From the results of consumption experiments of guinea pig complement, Curdlan, a (1----3)-beta-D-glucan obtained from Alcaligenes faecalis var. myxogenes IFO13140, has been found to lack the ability to activate complement when unheated or preheated at either 40 degrees C or 50 degrees C. However, Curdlan heated at or above 60 degrees C increased complement consumption. This activation, dependent on the temperature of the Curdlan, was via the alternative complement pathway as assessed by cleavage of factor B into Ba and Bb fragments. These results suggest a substantial change must occur in Curdlan with heat treatment for alternative pathway activation.

  18. Complement activation by sulfonated poly(ethylene glycol)-acrylate copolymers through alternative pathway.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hong Seok; Ryu, Kyu Eun; Ahn, Woong Shick; Chun, Heung Jae; Dal Park, Hyung; Park, Ki Dong; Kim, Young Ha

    2006-07-01

    Previously, novel poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and sulfonated PEG acrylate (PEG-SO(3)A/OA) copolymers were prepared as coating and/or blending materials for biomedical applications. Surfaces modified with copolymers exhibited increased anti-coagulation properties and decreased plasma adsorption level due to increased hydrophilic properties and reorientation characteristics of PEG/PEG-SO(3)A chains in water phase. As continuation study, anti-complement effects of PEG-SO(3)/OA copolymers were investigated in vitro, and compared with those of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and PEG/OA. C3 activation by PEG-SO(3)/OA samples was lower than that by PEG/OA samples, which was attributed to decreased surface nucleophile level of samples. PEG-SO(3)/OA samples increased inhibition of Bb production, resulting in decreased C5 activation. Owing to reduced activations of C3 and C5, PEG-SO(3)/OA samples markedly decreased SC5b-9 levels in plasma.

  19. FRAGMENT Bb: EVIDENCE FOR ACTIVATION OF THE ALTERNATIVE PATHWAY OF THE COMPLEMENT SYSTEM IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH ACUTE PYELONEPHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Eleazar; Romero, Roberto; Vaisbuch, Edi; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Dong, Zhong; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Yeo, Lami; Mittal, Pooja; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pyelonephritis during pregnancy is associated with a more severe course than in the non-pregnant state. This has been attributed to an increased susceptibility of pregnant women to microbial products. The complement system is part of innate immunity and its alternative pathway is activated mainly by microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to determine if activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system (determined by maternal fragment Bb concentrations) occurs in pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis. METHODS This cross-sectional study included the following groups: 1) normal pregnant women (n=62); and 2) pregnant women with pyelonephritis (n=38). Maternal plasma Fragment Bb concentrations were determined by ELISA. Non-parametric statistics were used for analyses. RESULTS 1) Pregnant women with pyelonephritis had a higher median plasma concentration of fragment Bb than those with a normal pregnancy (1.3 μg/ml, IQR: 1.1-1.9 vs. 0.8 μg/m, IQR: 0.7-0.9; p<0.001); 2) No significant differences were observed in the median maternal plasma concentration of fragment Bb between pregnant women with pyelonephritis who had a positive blood culture and those with a negative blood culture (1.4 μg/ml, IQR: 1.1-3.5 vs. 1.3 μg/ml, IQR: 1.1-1.9; p=0.2). CONCLUSIONS Pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis have evidence of activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, regardless of the presence or absence of a positive blood culture. PMID:20218820

  20. Influence of surface modulations by enzymes and monoclonal antibodies on alternative complement pathway activation by Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, E; Brade, V

    1989-01-01

    Effector mechanisms resulting from alternative complement pathway (ACP) activation cannot act efficiently against Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O3, as indicated by poor C3 to C9 consumption and by survival in EGTA (ethyleneglycoldiaminetetraacetic acid) Mg-serum. These results were not influenced by the lack or presence of plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with different amounts of side chains or by treatment of the bacteria with pronase or neuraminidase. Surface modulation of Y. enterocolitica with polyclonal immunoglobulin G or the immunoglobulin G fragments F(ab')2 and Fab always converted Y. enterocolitica to a high ACP activator, with strong C3 to C9 consumption and surface deposition of activated C3. Killing of Y. enterocolitica as a result of antibody-mediated ACP activation was observed only with bacteria grown at 22 degrees C but not with bacteria from 37 degrees C cultures. The expression of complement resistance in Y. enterocolitica grown at 37 degrees C was not influenced by the presence or absence of plasmids. Using different monoclonal antibodies (MAb), we found that MAb with LPS specificity mediated ACP activation, whereas MAb specific for different plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins were ineffective, despite surface binding. These results suggest a major inhibitory role of LPS on ACP activation which was neutralized by LPS-specific antibodies. PMID:2731980

  1. Activation of the Alternative Pathway of Complement is a Feature of Preterm Parturition but Not of Spontaneous Labor at Term

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Soto, Eleazar; Dong, Zhong; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kim, Sun Kwon; Ogge, Giovanna; Pacora, Percy; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Plasma concentrations of fragment Bb (FBb) are a marker for activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system. High concentrations of FBb in maternal blood, as early as the first trimester, are associated with subsequent spontaneous preterm delivery <34 weeks of gestation. The study aim was to determine whether spontaneous preterm labor with intact membranes (PTL), intra-amniotic infection/inflammation (IAI) or labor at term are associated with alterations in circulating maternal FBb concentrations. Method of Study This cross-sectional study included women in the following groups: 1) non-pregnant (n=40); 2) normal pregnancy (gestational age range 20-36 6/7 weeks, n=63); 2) women at term not in labor (n=70); 3) women at term in spontaneous labor (n=59); 4) patients with an episode of PTL who delivered at term (n=62); 5) PTL without IAI who delivered preterm (n=30); and 6) PTL with IAI who delivered preterm (n=67). Maternal plasma FBb concentrations were determined by ELISA. Results 1) Among patients with PTL, those who had a preterm delivery either with IAI (1.21 μg/ml, IQR 0.77-2.16) or without IAI (1.13 μg/ml, IQR 0.92-2.08;) had a higher median maternal plasma FBb concentration than those who delivered at term (0.86 μg/ml, IQR 0.64-1.57; p=0.007 and p=0.026, respectively); 2) there was no difference in the median plasma FBb concentration between patients with and without IAI who delivered preterm (p=0.9); 3) in contrast, spontaneous labor at term was not associated with a significant change in the maternal plasma FBb concentration (p=0.8); 4) maternal plasma concentration of FBb did not differ significantly between normal pregnant women and the non-pregnant controls (p=0.8) and were not correlated with advancing gestational age (r −0.28, p=0.8). Conclusions 1) Preterm parturition is associated with activation of the alternative complement pathway in maternal circulation; 2) such activation is not detectable in spontaneous labor at term

  2. Shiga Toxin Promotes Podocyte Injury in Experimental Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome via Activation of the Alternative Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Monica; Buelli, Simona; Pezzotta, Anna; Corna, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Conti, Debora; Thurman, Joshua M.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli is the offending agent of postdiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of glomerular ischemic damage and widespread microvascular thrombosis. We previously documented that Stx induces glomerular complement activation, generating C3a responsible for microvascular thrombosis in experimental HUS. Here, we show that the presence of C3 deposits on podocytes is associated with podocyte damage and loss in HUS mice generated by the coinjection of Stx2 and LPS. Because podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is mediated by integrins, the relevance of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signals in podocyte dysfunction was evaluated. Podocyte expression of ILK increased after the injection of Stx2/LPS and preceded the upregulation of Snail and downregulation of nephrin and α-actinin-4. Factor B deficiency or pretreatment with an inhibitory antibody to factor B protected mice against Stx2/LPS-induced podocyte dysregulation. Similarly, pretreatment with a C3a receptor antagonist limited podocyte loss and changes in ILK, Snail, and α-actinin-4 expression. In cultured podocytes, treatment with C3a reduced α-actinin-4 expression and promoted ILK-dependent nuclear expression of Snail and cell motility. These results suggest that Stx-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement and generation of C3a promotes ILK signaling, leading to podocyte dysfunction and loss in Stx-HUS. PMID:24578132

  3. Considerations for the Characterization and Interpretation of Results Related to Alternative Complement Activation in Monkeys Associated with Oligonucleotide-Based Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Henry, Scott P; Seguin, Rosanne; Cavagnaro, Joy; Berman, Cindy; Tepper, Jeff; Kornbrust, Douglas

    2016-08-01

    This article provides an overview of the discussions held by the Immunomodulatory Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group on complement activation induced by oligonucleotides, most notably the phosphorothioate-containing oligonucleotides. Alternative complement pathway activation in monkeys is a common effect of single-stranded phosphorothioate backbone oligonucleotides in toxicology studies. This article discusses the mechanism for activation, general investigational strategy, and the impact of various chemical modifications. The goal is to provide the best practice approach to characterizing this effect, understanding the implication of the species specificity, and the interpretation of clinical relevance.

  4. MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-factor D activator in resting blood: the lectin and the alternative complement pathways are fundamentally linked

    PubMed Central

    Dobó, József; Szakács, Dávid; Oroszlán, Gábor; Kortvely, Elod; Kiss, Bence; Boros, Eszter; Szász, Róbert; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Pál, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    MASP-3 was discovered 15 years ago as the third mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease of the complement lectin pathway. Lacking any verified substrate its role remained ambiguous. MASP-3 was shown to compete with a key lectin pathway enzyme MASP-2 for MBL binding, and was therefore considered to be a negative complement regulator. Later, knock-out mice experiments suggested that MASP-1 and/or MASP-3 play important roles in complement pro-factor D (pro-FD) maturation. However, studies on a MASP-1/MASP-3-deficient human patient produced contradicting results. In normal resting blood unperturbed by ongoing coagulation or complement activation, factor D is present predominantly in its active form, suggesting that resting blood contains at least one pro-FD activating proteinase that is not a direct initiator of coagulation or complement activation. We have recently showed that all three MASPs can activate pro-FD in vitro. In resting blood, however, using our previously evolved MASP-1 and MASP-2 inhibitors we proved that neither MASP-1 nor MASP-2 activates pro-FD. Other plasma proteinases, particularly MASP-3, remained candidates for that function. For this study we evolved a specific MASP-3 inhibitor and unambiguously proved that activated MASP-3 is the exclusive pro-FD activator in resting blood, which demonstrates a fundamental link between the lectin and alternative pathways. PMID:27535802

  5. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  6. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection. PMID

  7. Activation of complement during apheresis.

    PubMed Central

    Hetland, G; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    1991-01-01

    C3 activation products and the terminal complement complex (TCC) were examined in plasma during plasmapheresis of patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), Waldenström's syndrome (n = 4), and hypercholesterolaemia (n = 1), or during cytapheresis of platelet (n = 10) and granulocyte (n = 2) donors. Blood specimens were taken before, during and after the procedures. There was a significant activation of complement after apheresis in the GBS patients and one of the patients with Waldenström's syndrome, but not in the other patients. There were no significant differences in complement activation products before compared with after cytapheresis in the healthy donors. This demonstrates the biocompatibility with respect to complement activation of the materials used. The observed complement activation in some of the patients during plasma exchange is probably caused by activation products in the replacement plasma. PMID:1904328

  8. Properdin in Complement Activation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lesher, AM; B, Nilsson; Song, W-C

    2013-01-01

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: 1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, 2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and 3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases. PMID:23816404

  9. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  10. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  11. Complement activation in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, L E; De Villiers, D; Markham, D; Whaley, K; Thomas, H C

    1982-01-01

    Patients with HBsAg positive chronic active liver disease (CALD) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) exhibit increased C3d concentrations and changes in the serum concentrations of the complement components consistent with activation of the classical and alternative pathways. In these patients the concentrations of the regulatory proteins, C3b inactivator (C3bINA) and beta IH globulin, are normal. Patients with HBsAg negative CALD and alcohol induced liver disease (ALD) exhibit no evidence of an increased level of complement system activation. In these patients diminished serum concentrations of complement components appear to be related to diminished hepatic synthetic function. C4 synthesis may be specifically reduced in autoimmune chronic active liver disease. PMID:7083631

  12. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is a feature of pre-term parturition but not of spontaneous labor at term.

    PubMed

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Soto, Eleazar; Dong, Zhong; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kim, Sun Kwon; Ogge, Giovanna; Pacora, Percy; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2010-04-01

    Plasma concentrations of fragment Bb (FBb) are a marker for activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system. High concentrations of FBb in maternal blood, as early as the first trimester, are associated with subsequent spontaneous pre-term delivery <34 weeks of gestation. The aim of this study was to determine whether spontaneous pre-term labor (PTL) with intact membranes, intra-amniotic infection/inflammation (IAI) or labor at term are associated with alterations in circulating maternal FBb concentrations. This cross-sectional study included women in the following groups: (i) non-pregnant (n = 40); (ii) normal pregnancy (gestational age range 20-36, 6/7 weeks, n = 63); (iii) women at term not in labor (n = 70); (iv) women at term in spontaneous labor (n = 59); (v) patients with an episode of PTL who delivered at term (n = 62); (vi) PTL without IAI who delivered pre-term (n = 30); and (vii) PTL with IAI who delivered pre-term (n = 67). Maternal plasma FBb concentrations were determined by ELISA. (i) Among patients with PTL, those who had a pre-term delivery either with IAI (1.21 microg/mL, IQR 0.77-2.16) or without IAI (1.13 microg/mL, IQR 0.92-2.08) had a higher median maternal plasma FBb concentration than those who delivered at term (0.86 microg/mL, IQR 0.64-1.57; P = 0.007 and P = 0.026, respectively); (ii) there was no difference in the median plasma FBb concentration between patients with and without IAI who delivered pre-term (P = 0.9); (iii) in contrast, spontaneous labor at term was not associated with a significant change in the maternal plasma FBb concentration (P = 0.8); (iv) maternal plasma concentration of FBb did not differ significantly between normal pregnant women and the non-pregnant controls (P = 0.8) and were not correlated with advancing gestational age (r = -0.28, P = 0.8). (i) Pre-term parturition is associated with activation of the alternative complement pathway in maternal circulation; (ii) such activation is not detectable

  13. Therapeutic inhibition of the alternative complement pathway attenuates chronic EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M; Schoeb, Trent R; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited.

  14. Therapeutic Inhibition of the Alternative Complement Pathway Attenuates Chronic EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.; Schoeb, Trent R.; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory using complement-mutant mice demonstrated that the alternative pathway is the dominant activation pathway responsible for complement-mediated pathology in demyelinating disease. Using a well-characterized inhibitory monoclonal antibody (mAb 1379) directed against mouse factor B, we assessed the therapeutic value of inhibiting the alternative complement pathway in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Administration of anti-factor B antibody to mice prior to the onset of clinical signs of active EAE had no affect on the onset or acute phase of disease, but significantly attenuated the chronic phase of disease resulting in reduced cellular infiltration, inflammation and demyelination in antibody-treated mice. Attenuation of the chronic phase of disease was long lasting even though antibody administration was terminated shortly after disease onset. Chronic disease was also attenuated in transferred EAE when anti-factor B antibody was administered before or after disease onset. Similar levels of disease attenuation were observed in transferred EAE using MOG-specific encephalitogenic T cells. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential for inhibition of factor B in the chronic phase of demyelinating disease, where treatment options are limited. PMID:23337717

  15. Humanized recombinant vaccinia virus complement control protein (hrVCP) with three amino acid changes, H98Y, E102K, and E120K creating an additional putative heparin binding site, is 100-fold more active than rVCP in blocking both classical and alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Odunuga, Odutayo O; Janse, Kristen; Kotwal, Girish J

    2005-11-01

    Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) is able to modulate the host complement system by regulating both pathways of complement activation. Efficient downregulation of complement activation depends on the ability of the regulatory protein to effectively bind the activated third (C3b) and fourth (C4b) complement components. Based on native crystallographic structure, molecular modeling, and sequence alignment with other Orthopoxviral complement control proteins (CCPs) and their host homologs, putative sites have been found on VCP as contact points for C3b/C4b. Here, we report that using site-directed mutagenesis, modified proteins have been generated. In addition, we report that the generated modified proteins with postulated contact point substitutions have shown greater ability to regulate both the classical and the alternative pathways of complement activation than the recombinant Western Reserve VCP, with one modified protein showing nearly 100-fold more potency in regulating both complement activation pathways independently. The augmented in vitro inhibitory activity of the modified protein together with the newly created putative heparin binding site suggests its promising potential as a competent therapeutic agent in modulating various complement-mediated ailments, for example, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, reperfusion injury, and xenorejection.

  16. Detection of complement activation by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE).

    PubMed

    Arroyave, C M; Tan, E M

    1976-01-01

    Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was used as a method of detecting activation of the third component of the complement system (C3). Highly purified C3, normal human serum (NHS), EDTA-treated plasma and serum activated with aggregated human immunoglobulin (agg-IgG) or inulin were used as sources of C3 and/or C3 split products. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement was assayed in the presence of EGTA (10 mM) and MgCl2 (0.3 mM), conditions which block activation of the classical pathway. When purified native C3, fresh NHS and fresh EDTA-plasma were tested in CIE against either antisera to whole C3 or to C3 split products, only one precipitin line was found, which was identified as native C3. However, when serum activated with agg-IgG or inulin were tested against the same reagents, two precipitin lines were seen. The first, with more cathodal mobility was identical to that of native C3. The second line had a more anodal mobility, was distinctly separated from the first and contained C3c and C3d as shown immunochemically with specific antisera. Native C3 and split products of C3 were identified by this CIE method in patients showing evidence of activated complement by having subnormal total complement (CH50) levels. When C3 split products were identified, the C3c-C3d precipitin line could always be distinguished from native C3 by its different electrophoretic mobility, even when C3 concentrations in serum varied from 0.25 mg/ml to 1.5 mg/ml. The sensitivity of CIE was compared to that of CH50 by asssaying at different time intervals after agg-IgG was added to fresh NHS. C3c-C3d split products were detected by CIE before any fall in CH50 and at all times when a significant decrease in CH50 was present. This study shows that the CIE technique is a highly sensitive, specific and rapid method for detecting activation of the complement system via classical or alternative pathways in human disease.

  17. Activation of vertebrate complement by Helix pomatia haemolymph.

    PubMed

    Koch, C; Nielsen, H E

    1984-01-01

    Haemolymph plasma from the pulmonate snail Helix pomatia contains a constituent, not yet identified, which causes activation of vertebrate complement via the alternative complement pathway in fluid phase. The activation of vertebrate complement by snail plasma is closely analogous to the activation caused by cobra venom factor (CVF), the snake's C3b, with one notable exception; the snail factor requires vertebrate C3 for the formation of C3 convertase which cobra venom factor does not. Our results do not allow any definite conclusion on the exact mechanism but we favour the idea that the haemolymph contains a complement-like protein which functions as an opsonin in the snail, and which can interact with vertebrate alternative complement pathway components.

  18. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  19. Non-specific adsorption of complement proteins affects complement activation pathways of gold nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Quach, Quang Huy; Kah, James Chen Yong

    2017-04-01

    The complement system is a key humoral component of innate immunity, serving as the first line of defense against intruders, including foreign synthetic nanomaterials. Although gold nanomaterials (AuNMs) are widely used in nanomedicine, their immunological response is not well understood. Using AuNMs of three shapes commonly used in biomedical applications: spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanostars and gold nanorods, we demonstrated that AuNMs activated whole complement system, leading to the formation of SC5b-9 complex. All three complement pathways were simultaneously activated by all the AuNMs. Recognition molecules of the complement system interacted with all AuNMs in vitro, except for l-ficolin, but the correlation between these interactions and corresponding complement pathway activation was only observed in the classical and alternative pathways. We also observed the mediating role of complement activation in cellular uptake of all AuNMs by human U937 promonocytic cells, which expresses complement receptors. Taken together, our results highlighted the potential immunological challenges for clinical applications of AuNMs that were often overlooked.

  20. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001), were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  1. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  2. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  3. Human monocyte spreading induced by factor Bb of the alternative pathway of complement activation. A possible role for C5 in monocyte spreading

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The central serine esterase of the alternative pathway of complement (APC) activation, activated factor B (Bb), has been shown recently to induce murine macrophages and human monocytes to become spread on a glass substrata. It has also been established that to induce the spreading reaction, the catalytic site of the Bb enzyme must be structurally intact since treatment of Bb with heat (56 degrees C for 30 min) or diisopropylfluorophosphate (10(-3) M) destroyed both enzymatic and spreading activities. In the C3b,Bb complex, Bb exhibits restricted substrate specificity for C3 and C5. With this in mind, the role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction was explored in the present study. Expression of C3 and C5 on the surface of human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated by the direct fluorescent antibody technique employing fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti- C3 or C5 F(ab')2 antibody fragments. It was found that C3 and C5 were present on 6 +/- 7% of freshly prepared monocytes and that expression of C5, but not C3, increased to 70 +/- 6% when monocytes were incubated for 3 d in serum-free medium. Biosynthesis of C5 was indicated when it was found that under serum-free conditions, monocytes incorporated [3H]leucine into immunoprecipitable C5 with an apparent mol wt of 180,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction induced by factor Bb was explored by testing for the ability of anti-C3 and anti- C5 Fab' antibody fragments to block monocyte spreading. It was found that anti-C5 Fab' inhibited by up to 100% the 3-h human monocyte spreading reaction induced by Bb; in contrast, anti-C3 Fab' or anti-C4 Fab' inhibited by less than 10%. That the inhibitory effect of anti-C5 Fab' was exerted directly on the monocyte was established when it was found that the 3-h monocyte spreading reaction was significantly inhibited by pretreating monocytes with anti-C5 Fab' for 20 min and then

  4. Target pattern recognition by complement proteins of the classical and alternative pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Hoi; Tan, Lee Aun; Carroll, Maria V; Gentle, Madeleine E; Sim, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is a major component of the innate defence of animals against invading microorganisms, and is also essential for the recognition and clearance of damaged or structurally-altered host cells or macromolecules. The system is activated by three different pathways, each of which responds, using different recognition molecules, to a very wide range of activators. The recognition protein of the complement classical pathway, C1q is described in detail here, with comparisons to the alternative pathway.

  5. Complement activation in pemphigus vulgaris blister fluid*

    PubMed Central

    Jordon, R. E.; Day, N. K.; Luckasen, J. R.; Good, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Total haemolytic complement was reduced in blister fluids of four pemphigus vulgaris patients when compared to serum complement levels and other serum and blister fluid proteins. Complement levels in most control blister fluids, on the other hand, more closely approached their corresponding serum levels. Haemolytic C1, C4, C2, C3 and C5, measured in two pemphigus sera and blister fluids, were not measurable in one blister fluid and were extremely low in the second patient. C3 proactivator (C3PA) was absent from both of these blister fluids. Three of the blister fluids exhibited anti-complementary activity when tested with normal human serum. By adding one blister fluid to normal human serum, inhibition of haemolytic C1, C2, C3 and C5 with conversion of C3 and C3PA occurred. Activation of complement locally in pemphigus blister fluids would suggest a pathogenetic role for complement in this disease. PMID:4765721

  6. In vitro C3 deposition on Cryptococcus capsule occurs via multiple complement activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Mershon-Shier, Kileen L; Vasuthasawat, Alex; Takahashi, Kazue; Morrison, Sherie L; Beenhouwer, David O

    2011-09-01

    Complement can be activated via three pathways: classical, alternative, and lectin. Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans are closely related fungal pathogens possessing a polysaccharide capsule composed mainly of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), which serves as a site for complement activation and deposition of complement components. We determined C3 deposition on Cryptococcus spp. by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy after incubation with serum from C57BL/6J mice as well as mice deficient in complement components C4, C3, factor B, and mannose binding lectin (MBL). C. gattii and C. neoformans activate complement in EGTA-treated serum indicating that they can activate the alternative pathway. However, complement activation was seen with factor B(-/-) serum suggesting activation could also take place in the absence of a functional alternative pathway. Furthermore, we uncovered a role for C4 in the alternative pathway activation by Cryptococcus spp. We also identified an unexpected and complex role for MBL in complement activation by Cryptococcus spp. No complement activation occurred in the absence of MBL-A and -C proteins although activation took place when the lectin binding activity of MBL was disrupted by calcium chelation. In addition, alternative pathway activation by C. neoformans required both MBL-A and -C, while either MBL-A or -C was sufficient for alternative pathway activation by C. gattii. Thus, complement activation by Cryptococcus spp. can take place through multiple pathways and complement activation via the alternative pathway requires the presence of C4 and MBL proteins. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  8. Complement activity and pharmacological inhibition in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Pierre; Martel, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    While complement is the most important component of humoral autoimmunity, and inflammation plays a key role in atherosclerosis, relatively few studies have looked at complement implications in atherosclerosis and its complications. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation and is also involved in atherosclerosis; it activates complement and colocalizes with activated complement proteins within the infarcting myocardium and the active atherosclerotic plaques. As new agents capable of modulating complement activity are being developed, new targets for the management of atherosclerosis are emerging that are related to autoimmunity and inflammation. The present paper reviews the putative roles of the various complement activation pathways in the development of atherosclerosis, in ST segment elevation and non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, and in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. It also provides a perspective on new therapeutic interventions being developed to modulate complement activity. These interventions include the C1 esterase inhibitor, which may be consumed in some inflammatory states resulting in the loss of one of the mechanisms inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways; TP10, a recombinant protein of the soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which inhibits the C3 and C5 convertases of the common pathway by binding C3b and C4b; a truncated version of the soluble complement receptor type 1 CRI lacking the C4b binding site which selectively inhibits the alternative pathway; and pexelizumab, a monoclonal antibody selectively blocking C5 to prevent the activation of the terminal pathway that is involved in excessive inflammation and autoimmune responses. PMID:16498508

  9. Alternative Complement Pathway Deficiency Ameliorates Chronic Smoke-Induced Functional and Morphological Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Casey, Sarah; Williamson, Tucker; Ferrell, W. Drew; Atkinson, Carl; Jones, Bryan W.; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a complex disease involving genetic variants and environmental insults, is among the leading causes of blindness in Western populations. Genetic and histologic evidence implicate the complement system in AMD pathogenesis; and smoking is the major environmental risk factor associated with increased disease risk. Although previous studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure (CE) causes retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) defects in mice, and smoking leads to complement activation in patients, it is unknown whether complement activation is causative in the development of CE pathology; and if so, which complement pathway is required. Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or clean, filtered air for 6 months. The effects of CE were analyzed in wildtype (WT) mice or mice without a functional complement alternative pathway (AP; CFB−/−) using molecular, histological, electrophysiological, and behavioral outcomes. Results CE in WT mice exhibited a significant reduction in function of both rods and cones as determined by electroretinography and contrast sensitivity measurements, concomitant with a thinning of the nuclear layers as measured by SD-OCT imaging and histology. Gene expression analyses suggested that alterations in both photoreceptors and RPE/choroid might contribute to the observed loss of function, and visualization of complement C3d deposition implies the RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) complex as the target of AP activity. RPE/BrM alterations include an increase in mitochondrial size concomitant with an apical shift in mitochondrial distribution within the RPE and a thickening of BrM. CFB−/− mice were protected from developing these CE-mediated alterations. Conclusions Taken together, these findings provide clear evidence that ocular pathology generated in CE mice is dependent on complement activation and requires the AP. Identifying animal models with RPE/BrM damage and verifying which

  10. Saliva of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) inhibits classical and alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Silva, Naylene C S; Vale, Vladimir F; Franco, Paula F; Gontijo, Nelder F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Rodrigues, Daniel S; Lima, Walter S; Fux, Blima; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2016-08-11

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is the main ectoparasite affecting livestock worldwide. For a successful parasitism, ticks need to evade several immune responses of their hosts, including the activation of the complement system. In spite of the importance of R. microplus, previous work only identified one salivary molecule that blocks the complement system. The current study describes complement inhibitory activities induced by R. microplus salivary components and mechanisms elicited by putative salivary proteins on both classical and alternative complement pathways. We found that R. microplus saliva from fully- and partially engorged females was able to inhibit both pathways. Saliva acts strongly at the initial steps of both complement activation pathways. In the classical pathway, the saliva blocked C4 cleavage, and hence, deposition of C4b on the activation surface, suggesting that the inhibition occurs at some point between C1q and C4. In the alternative pathway, saliva acts by binding to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and reducing C3b production and deposition as well as cleavage of factor B. Saliva has no effect on formation or decay of the C6 to C8 components of the membrane attack complex. The saliva of R. microplus is able to inhibit the early steps of classical and alternative pathways of the complement system. Saliva acts by blocking C4 cleavage and deposition of C4b on the classical pathway activation surface and, in the alternative pathway, saliva bind to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and the production and deposition of additional C3b.

  11. Complement activation by Coccidioides immitis: in vitro and clinical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Galgiani, J N; Yam, P; Petz, L D; Williams, P L; Stevens, D A

    1980-01-01

    Mycelial- or spherule-phase derivatives of Coccidioides immitis caused a decrease in vitro of total hemolytic complement in serum from a nonsensitized person. Activation involved both classic and alternative pathways as shown by deprssion of hemolytic C4 and by generation of products of activation of components C3, C4, and factor B. In addition, functional complement activity or immunoreactive levels of complement components or both were measured in 23 patients with self-limited or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. Low total hemolytic complement was found in nine, usually during the early phase of primary illness, and was transient. Hemolytic C4 was low, and the effect of inulin to decrease complement levels was blunted, suggested both classic and alternative pathways may be deficient. However, associated depression of immunoreactive levels of components assayed (C3, C4, C5, factor B, and properdin) was not consistently found. This disparity raises the possibility of enhanced in vitro inactivation analogous to activation by immune complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6901703

  12. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  13. AMD and the alternative complement pathway: genetics and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Perciliz L; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-06-21

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular neurodegenerative disorder and is the leading cause of legal blindness in Western societies, with a prevalence of up to 8 % over the age of 60, which continues to increase with age. AMD is characterized by the progressive breakdown of the macula (the central region of the retina), resulting in the loss of central vision including visual acuity. While its molecular etiology remains unclear, advances in genetics and genomics have illuminated the genetic architecture of the disease and have generated attractive pathomechanistic hypotheses. Here, we review the genetic architecture of AMD, considering the contribution of both common and rare alleles to susceptibility, and we explore the possible mechanistic links between photoreceptor degeneration and the alternative complement pathway, a cascade that has emerged as the most potent genetic driver of this disorder.

  14. Complement activation in diseases presenting with thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Meri, Seppo

    2013-09-01

    The complement system contains a great deal of biological "energy". This is demonstrated by the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), which is a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) characterized by endothelial and blood cell damage and thrombotic vascular occlusions. Kidneys and often also other organs (brain, lungs and gastrointestinal tract) are affected. A principal pathophysiological feature in aHUS is a complement attack against endothelial cells and blood cells. This leads to platelet activation and aggregation, hemolysis, prothrombotic and inflammatory changes. The attacks can be triggered by infections, pregnancy, drugs or trauma. Complement-mediated aHUS is distinct from bacterial shiga-toxin (produced e.g. by E. coli O:157 or O:104 serotypes) induced "typical" HUS, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) associated with ADAMTS13 (an adamalysin enzyme) dysfunction and from a recently described disease related to mutations in intracellular diacylglycerol kinase ε (DGKE). Mutations in proteins that regulate complement (factor H, factor I, MCP/CD46, thrombomodulin) or promote (C3, factor B) amplification of its alternative pathway or anti-factor H antibodies predispose to aHUS. The fundamental defect in aHUS is an excessive complement attack against cellular surfaces. This can be due to 1) an inability to regulate complement on self cell surfaces, 2) hyperactive C3 convertases or 3) complement activation and coagulation promoting changes on cell surfaces. The most common genetic cause is in factor H, where aHUS mutations disrupt its ability to recognize protective polyanions on surfaces where C3b has become attached. Most TMAs are thus characterized by misdirected complement activation affecting endothelial cell and platelet integrity. Copyright © 2013 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae), comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s) present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process. PMID:22248157

  16. The alternative complement pathway is dysregulated in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Negar; Michelsen, Annika E.; Nilsson, Per H.; Ekholt, Karin; Gullestad, Lars; Broch, Kaspar; Dahl, Christen P.; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Yndestad, Arne; Louwe, Mieke C.

    2017-01-01

    The complement system, an important arm of the innate immune system, is activated in heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that HF patients are characterized by an imbalance of alternative amplification loop components; including properdin and complement factor D and the alternative pathway inhibitor factor H. These components and the activation product, terminal complement complex (TCC), were measured in plasma from 188 HF patients and 67 age- and sex- matched healthy controls by enzyme immunoassay. Our main findings were: (i) Compared to controls, patients with HF had significantly increased levels of factor D and TCC, and decreased levels of properdin, particularly patients with advanced clinical disorder (i.e., NYHA functional class IV), (ii) Levels of factor D and properdin in HF patients were correlated with measures of systemic inflammation (i.e., C-reactive protein), neurohormonal deterioration (i.e., Nt-proBNP), cardiac function, and deteriorated diastolic function, (iii) Low levels of factor H and properdin were associated with adverse outcome in univariate analysis and for factor H, this was also seen in an adjusted model. Our results indicate that dysregulation of circulating components of the alternative pathway explain the increased degree of complement activation and is related to disease severity in HF patients. PMID:28195242

  17. The alternative complement pathway is dysregulated in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shahini, Negar; Michelsen, Annika E; Nilsson, Per H; Ekholt, Karin; Gullestad, Lars; Broch, Kaspar; Dahl, Christen P; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Yndestad, Arne; Louwe, Mieke C

    2017-02-14

    The complement system, an important arm of the innate immune system, is activated in heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that HF patients are characterized by an imbalance of alternative amplification loop components; including properdin and complement factor D and the alternative pathway inhibitor factor H. These components and the activation product, terminal complement complex (TCC), were measured in plasma from 188 HF patients and 67 age- and sex- matched healthy controls by enzyme immunoassay. Our main findings were: (i) Compared to controls, patients with HF had significantly increased levels of factor D and TCC, and decreased levels of properdin, particularly patients with advanced clinical disorder (i.e., NYHA functional class IV), (ii) Levels of factor D and properdin in HF patients were correlated with measures of systemic inflammation (i.e., C-reactive protein), neurohormonal deterioration (i.e., Nt-proBNP), cardiac function, and deteriorated diastolic function, (iii) Low levels of factor H and properdin were associated with adverse outcome in univariate analysis and for factor H, this was also seen in an adjusted model. Our results indicate that dysregulation of circulating components of the alternative pathway explain the increased degree of complement activation and is related to disease severity in HF patients.

  18. Complement activation in chromosome 13 dementias. Similarities with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Agueda; Revesz, Tamas; Lashley, Tammaryn; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Magnotti, Laura; Braendgaard, Hans; Plant, Gordon; Bojsen-Møller, Marie; Holton, Janice; Frangione, Blas; Ghiso, Jorge

    2002-12-20

    Chromosome 13 dementias, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular amyloidosis, with striking neuropathological similarities to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite the structural differences among the amyloid subunits (ABri in FBD, ADan in FDD, and Abeta in AD), these disorders are all characterized by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits co-localizing with markers of glial activation, suggestive of local inflammation. Proteins of the complement system and their pro-inflammatory activation products are among the inflammation markers associated with AD lesions. Immunohistochemistry of FBD and FDD brain sections demonstrated the presence of complement activation components of the classical and alternative pathways as well as the neo-epitope of the membrane attack complex. Hemolytic experiments and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for the activation products iC3b, C4d, Bb, and C5b-9 indicated that ABri and ADan are able to fully activate the complement cascade at levels comparable to those generated by Abeta1-42. ABri and ADan specifically bound C1q with high affinity and formed stable complexes in physiological conditions. Activation proceeds approximately 70-75% through the classical pathway while only approximately 25-30% seems to occur through the alternative pathway. The data suggest that the chronic inflammatory response generated by the amyloid peptides in vivo might be a contributing factor for the pathogenesis of FBD and FDD and, in more general terms, to other neurodegenerative conditions.

  19. Cercarial glycocalyx of Schistosoma mansoni activates human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, J C; Caulfield, J P

    1986-01-01

    Human complement activation by cercariae and schistosomula of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni was studied in vitro. Cercariae are composed of tails which are shed after infection of the host and bodies which transform into the larvae or schistosomula after infection. After incubation in fresh normal human serum (NHS), cercarial tails bound more anti-C3 antibodies than did cercarial bodies (CB), and the tails were rapidly lysed, while the attached CB remained intact. Complement activation by cercariae was dependent on the alternative pathway but was independent of antibody, as shown by C3 deposition by hypogammaglobulinemic human sera. By transmission microscopy, the fibrillar glycocalyx on both CB and tails was stained by NHS but not by heat-inactivated serum (HI-NHS). The glycocalyx was labeled with periodate and tritiated borohydride, and parasites were incubated in NHS and HI-NHS. After solubilization, the labeled glycocalyx on organisms incubated in NHS but not HI-NHS bound anti-C3 antibodies. Of the CB incubated with eserine sulfate to prevent transformation, 78% +/- 10% were dead after culture for 24 h in NHS. In contrast, 21% +/- 12% of the CB were dead after culture in HI-NHS. Schistosomula incubated in NHS bound 37% of the amount of anti-C3 antibodies bound by cercariae but were not killed by NHS. In conclusion, the cercarial glycocalyx activated human complement, and schistosomula were less susceptible to killing than cercariae because they had less glycocalyx and activated less complement. Images PMID:3940995

  20. Small-molecule factor D inhibitors targeting the alternative complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Maibaum, Jürgen; Liao, Sha-Mei; Vulpetti, Anna; Ostermann, Nils; Randl, Stefan; Rüdisser, Simon; Lorthiois, Edwige; Erbel, Paul; Kinzel, Bernd; Kolb, Fabrice A; Barbieri, Samuel; Wagner, Julia; Durand, Corinne; Fettis, Kamal; Dussauge, Solene; Hughes, Nicola; Delgado, Omar; Hommel, Ulrich; Gould, Ty; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Gerhartz, Bernd; Cumin, Frederic; Flohr, Stefanie; Schubart, Anna; Jaffee, Bruce; Harrison, Richard; Risitano, Antonio Maria; Eder, Jörg; Anderson, Karen

    2016-12-01

    Complement is a key component of the innate immune system, recognizing pathogens and promoting their elimination. Complement component 3 (C3) is the central component of the system. Activation of C3 can be initiated by three distinct routes-the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathways-with the alternative pathway also acting as an amplification loop for the other two pathways. The protease factor D (FD) is essential for this amplification process, which, when dysregulated, predisposes individuals to diverse disorders including age-related macular degeneration and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). Here we describe the identification of potent and selective small-molecule inhibitors of FD. These inhibitors efficiently block alternative pathway (AP) activation and prevent both C3 deposition onto, and lysis of, PNH erythrocytes. Their oral administration inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced AP activation in FD-humanized mice. These data demonstrate the feasibility of inhibiting the AP with small-molecule antagonists and support the development of FD inhibitors for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases.

  1. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fungal infections and some parasitic infections such as malaria . Normal Results Total blood complement level: 41 to ... Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis Malaria Protein in diet Rheumatoid arthritis Septicemia Shock Systemic ...

  2. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Pallera, Haree K.; Kumar, Parvathi S.; Mauriello, Clifford T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Phelps, Cody A.; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M.; Pascal, Stephen M.; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  3. Relationships between the haemolytic activities of the human complement system and complement components.

    PubMed Central

    Takada, A; Imamura, Y; Takada, Y

    1979-01-01

    The relationships between the haemolytic activities of complement and its components were studied. The activities studied included CH50 (classical pathway), AP50 (alternative pathway), CV50 (early part of alternative pathway) and C(3--9)H50 ((the late part of both pathways). The components included C3, C4, C5, C9, B and D. There was a good correlation between CH50 and AP50. AP50 had a good correlation with B and CV50. There was no correlation between AP50 and C(3--9)H50, and none between C(3--9)H50 and C5 or C9. AP50 may primarily represent changes in the early part of the alternative pathway. C(3--9)H50 is not influenced by respective changes in the amounts of C5 or C9. Since cell lesion is now considered to be caused by a unit of C5b to C9, a change in each component of C5 to C9 may not influence haemolytic activity. PMID:436337

  4. Human L-ficolin, a Recognition Molecule of the Lectin Activation Pathway of Complement, Activates Complement by Binding to Pneumolysin, the Major Toxin of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Youssif M.; Kenawy, Hany I.; Muhammad, Adnan; Sim, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is an essential component of the immune response, providing a critical line of defense against different pathogens including S. pneumoniae. Complement is activated via three distinct pathways: the classical (CP), the alternative (AP) and the lectin pathway (LP). The role of Pneumolysin (PLY), a bacterial toxin released by S. pneumoniae, in triggering complement activation has been studied in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in both human and mouse sera complement was activated via the CP, initiated by direct binding of even non-specific IgM and IgG3 to PLY. Absence of CP activity in C1q−/− mouse serum completely abolished any C3 deposition. However, C1q depleted human serum strongly opsonized PLY through abundant deposition of C3 activation products, indicating that the LP may have a vital role in activating the human complement system on PLY. We identified that human L-ficolin is the critical LP recognition molecule that drives LP activation on PLY, while all of the murine LP recognition components fail to bind and activate complement on PLY. This work elucidates the detailed interactions between PLY and complement and shows for the first time a specific role of the LP in PLY-mediated complement activation in human serum. PMID:24349316

  5. The alternative complement pathway propagates inflammation and injury in murine ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Elvington, Andrew; Atkinson, Carl; Zhu, Hong; Yu, Jin; Takahashi, Kazue; Stahl, Gregory L.; Kindy, Mark S; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    There is mounting evidence indicating an important role for complement in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury, or ischemic stroke. The role of the alternative complement pathway in ischemic stroke has not been investigated, and there is conflicting data on the role of the terminal pathway. Here we show that compared to wild type mice, mice deficient in the alternative pathway protein factor B, or mice treated with the alternative pathway inhibitor CR2-fH, have improved outcomes after 60 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and 24 hours reperfusion. Factor B-deficient or CR2-fH treated mice were protected in terms of improved neurological function and reduced cerebral infarct, demyelination, P-selectin expression, neutrophil infiltration and microthrombi formation. Mice deficient in both the classical and lectin pathways (C1q/MBL deficient) were also protected from cerebral IRI, and there was no detectable C3d deposition in the ipsilateral brain of these mice. These data demonstrate that alternative pathway is not alone sufficient to initiate complement activation, and indicate the alternative pathway propagates cerebral injury via amplification of the cascade. Deficiency of C6, a component of the terminal cytolytic membrane attack complex (MAC), had no effect on outcome after ischemic stroke, indicating the MAC is not involved in mediating injury in this model. We additionally show that the protective effect of fB deficiency and CR2-fH treatment is sustained in the sub-acute stage of infarct development, adding to the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:23028050

  6. Complement activation in very early Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, H; Finch, C E; Kemper, C; Atkinson, J; McKeel, D; Morris, J C; Price, J L

    2005-01-01

    The activation of the classical complement (C)-system in early-stage Alzheimer disease (AD) and nondemented aging was examined with immunohistochemistry in subjects assessed by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). Activation (staining for C3 and C4 fragments) was found in all brains with amyloid deposits, including all nondemented (CDR 0) cases, with either small numbers of diffuse plaques or with sufficient plaques and tangles to indicate preclinical AD. Staining for C3 and C4 increased in parallel with plaque density in very mild to severe clinical AD. A subset of very mild AD (CDR 0.5) cases also showed C1q (on plaques) and C5b-9 (on neuritic plaques and tangles), whereas these C-fragments were consistently found in severe AD (CDR 3). Mirror section (split-face) analysis showed that C1q, C3, and apoJ (clusterin) occurred on the same plaques. However, C-system regulators CD59, CR1, DAF, and MCP were not detected on plaques or tangles at any stage, indicating that C-activation related to AD is incompletely controlled.

  7. Alternative Pathway of Complement in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Marians, Russell; Emlen, Woodruff; Wood, Susan; Smith, Christopher; Akana, Hillary; Holers, V. Michael; Lesser, Martin; Kline, Myriam; Hoffman, Cathy; Christen, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a common cause of acute kidney injury in children. Mutations in alternative pathway (AP) complement regulatory proteins have been identified in severe cases of thrombotic microangiopathy, but the role of the AP in D+HUS has not been studied. Therefore, we determined whether plasma levels of markers of activation of the AP are increased in D+HUS and are biomarkers of the severity of renal injury that predict the need for dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Patients were randomly selected from among participants in the HUS-SYNSORB Pk trial. Plasma samples were collected on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after enrollment and day 28 after discharge from the hospital. Levels of two complement pathway products, Bb and SC5b-9, were determined by ELISA. Results: Seventeen children (6 boys and 11 girls; age, 5.4 ± 3.5 yr) were studied. Eight (47%) required dialysis support, and two had serious extrarenal events. On the day of enrollment, plasma levels of Bb and SC5b-9 were significantly increased in all patients compared with healthy controls (P < 0.01). The elevated concentrations normalized by day 28 after discharge. Circulating levels of complement pathway fragments did not correlate with severity of renal injury or occurrence of complications. Conclusions: Patients with acute-onset D+HUS manifest activation of the AP of complement that is temporally related to the onset of disease and that resolves within 1 mo. Therapies to inhibit the AP of complement may be useful in attenuating the severity of renal injury and extrarenal complications. PMID:19820137

  8. Can Cell Bound Complement Activation Products Predict Inherited Complement Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the classical pathway complement system has long been implicated in stimulating immune complex mediated tissue destruction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C3 and C4 complement levels are utilized as part of SLE diagnosis and monitoring criteria. Recently, cell bound complement activation products (CBCAPs) have shown increased sensitivity in diagnosing and monitoring lupus activity, compared to traditional markers. CBCAPs are increasingly utilized in rheumatology practice as additional serological markers in evaluating SLE patients. We report a case of a patient diagnosed with SLE that had chronically low C3 and C4, along with negative CBCAPs. We surmise that the patient has an inherited complement deficiency as the etiology of her SLE and that CBCAPs could be used to predict such deficiency. PMID:28074166

  9. A Novel Antibody against Human Properdin Inhibits the Alternative Complement System and Specifically Detects Properdin from Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Diana; Nagel, Benedikt M.; Reinders, Jörg; Killian, Tobias; Wulf, Matthias; Ackermann, Susanne; Ehrenstein, Boris; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine; Weber, Bernhard H. F.

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is an essential part of the innate immune system by acting as a first line of defense which is stabilized by properdin, the sole known positive regulator of the alternative complement pathway. Dysregulation of complement can promote a diversity of human inflammatory diseases which are treated by complement inhibitors. Here, we generated a novel blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) against properdin and devised a new diagnostic assay for this important complement regulator. Mouse mAb 1340 specifically detected native properdin from human samples with high avidity. MAb 1340 inhibited specifically the alternative complement mediated cell lysis within a concentration range of 1–10 µg/mL. Thus, in vitro anti-properdin mAb 1340 was up to fifteen times more efficient in blocking the complement system as compared to anti-C5 or anti-Ba antibodies. Computer-assisted modelling suggested a three-dimensional binding epitope in a properdin-C3(H2O)-clusterin complex to be responsible for the inhibition. Recovery of properdin in a newly established sandwich ELISA using mAb 1340 was determined at 80–125% for blood sample dilutions above 1∶50. Reproducibility assays showed a variation below 25% at dilutions less than 1∶1,000. Systemic properdin concentrations of healthy controls and patients with age-related macular degeneration or rheumatic diseases were all in the range of 13–30 µg/mL and did not reveal significant differences. These initial results encourage further investigation into the functional role of properdin in the development, progression and treatment of diseases related to the alternative complement pathway. Thus, mAb 1340 represents a potent properdin inhibitor suitable for further research to understand the exact mechanisms how properdin activates the complement C3-convertase and to determine quantitative levels of properdin in biological samples. PMID:24797388

  10. A novel antibody against human properdin inhibits the alternative complement system and specifically detects properdin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Diana; Nagel, Benedikt M; Reinders, Jörg; Killian, Tobias; Wulf, Matthias; Ackermann, Susanne; Ehrenstein, Boris; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is an essential part of the innate immune system by acting as a first line of defense which is stabilized by properdin, the sole known positive regulator of the alternative complement pathway. Dysregulation of complement can promote a diversity of human inflammatory diseases which are treated by complement inhibitors. Here, we generated a novel blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) against properdin and devised a new diagnostic assay for this important complement regulator. Mouse mAb 1340 specifically detected native properdin from human samples with high avidity. MAb 1340 inhibited specifically the alternative complement mediated cell lysis within a concentration range of 1-10 µg/mL. Thus, in vitro anti-properdin mAb 1340 was up to fifteen times more efficient in blocking the complement system as compared to anti-C5 or anti-Ba antibodies. Computer-assisted modelling suggested a three-dimensional binding epitope in a properdin-C3(H2O)-clusterin complex to be responsible for the inhibition. Recovery of properdin in a newly established sandwich ELISA using mAb 1340 was determined at 80-125% for blood sample dilutions above 1∶50. Reproducibility assays showed a variation below 25% at dilutions less than 1∶1,000. Systemic properdin concentrations of healthy controls and patients with age-related macular degeneration or rheumatic diseases were all in the range of 13-30 µg/mL and did not reveal significant differences. These initial results encourage further investigation into the functional role of properdin in the development, progression and treatment of diseases related to the alternative complement pathway. Thus, mAb 1340 represents a potent properdin inhibitor suitable for further research to understand the exact mechanisms how properdin activates the complement C3-convertase and to determine quantitative levels of properdin in biological samples.

  11. Vitronectin-binding staphylococci enhance surface-associated complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, F; Lea, T; Ljungh, A

    1997-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci are well recognized in medical device-associated infections. Complement activation is known to occur at the biomaterial surface, resulting in unspecific inflammation around the biomaterial. The human serum protein vitronectin (Vn), a potent inhibitor of complement activation by formation of an inactive terminal complement complex, adsorbs to biomaterial surfaces in contact with blood. In this report, we discuss the possibility that surface-immobilized Vn inhibits complement activation and the effect of Vn-binding staphylococci on complement activation on surfaces precoated with Vn. The extent of complement activation was measured with a rabbit anti-human C3c antibody and a mouse anti-human C9 antibody, raised against the neoepitope of C9. Our data show that Vn immobilized on a biomaterial surface retains its ability to inhibit complement activation. The additive complement activation-inhibitory effect of Vn on a heparinized surface is very small. In the presence of Vn-binding strain, Staphylococcus hemolyticus SM131, complement activation on a surface precoated with Vn occurred as it did in the absence of Vn precoating. For S. epidermidis 3380, which does not express binding of Vn, complement activation on a Vn-precoated surface was significantly decreased. The results could be repeated on heparinized surfaces. These data suggest that Vn adsorbed to a biomaterial surface may serve to protect against surface-associated complement activation. Furthermore, Vn-binding staphylococcal cells may enhance surface-associated complement activation by blocking the inhibitory effect of preadsorbed Vn. PMID:9038294

  12. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway preserves photoreceptors after retinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Sweigard, J. Harry; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Smith, Kaylee E.; Kim, Leo A.; Paschalis, Eleftherios I.; Okonuki, Yoko; Castillejos, Alexandra; Kataoka, Keiko; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Yanai, Ryoji; Husain, Deeba; Lambris, John D.; Vavvas, Demetrios; Miller, Joan W.; Connor, Kip M.

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of photoreceptors is a primary cause of vision loss worldwide, making the underlying mechanisms surrounding photoreceptor cell death critical to developing new treatment strategies. Retinal detachment, characterized by the separation of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium, is a sight-threatening event that can happen in a number of retinal diseases. The detached photoreceptors undergo apoptosis and programmed necrosis. Given that photoreceptors are nondividing cells, their loss leads to irreversible visual impairment even after successful retinal reattachment surgery. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms, we analyzed innate immune system regulators in the vitreous of human patients with retinal detachment and correlated the results with findings in a mouse model of retinal detachment. We identified the alternative complement pathway as promoting early photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Photoreceptors down-regulate membrane-bound inhibitors of complement, allowing for selective targeting by the alternative complement pathway. When photoreceptors in the detached retina were removed from the primary source of oxygen and nutrients (choroidal vascular bed), the retina became hypoxic, leading to an up-regulation of complement factor B, a key mediator of the alternative pathway. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway in knockout mice or through pharmacological means ameliorated photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Our current study begins to outline the mechanism by which the alternative complement pathway facilitates photoreceptor cell death in the damaged retina. PMID:26203084

  13. Complement activation associated with polysorbate 80 in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shidong; Liu, Zhaohua; Hou, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Hong; Du, Wu; Wang, Wenfang; Qin, Yizhuo; Liu, Zhaoping

    2013-01-01

    Polysorbate 80 (Tween® 80) is the most extensively used surfactant in parenteral drug formulation. Its application as an adjunct for intravenous drug administration is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. However, severe hypersensitive reactions, which are typical non-immune anaphylactic reactions (pseudoallergy) characterized by the release of histamine and unvaried IgE antibodies, have been associated with Tween® 80. In order to explore the non-immune anaphylactic mechanisms of Tween® 80, we performed in vivo experiments to assess the changes in physiological and hematologic indicators after intravenous injection of Tween® 80 into dogs. Tween® 80 induced the release of histamine, and a 2-fold increase in SC5b-9, 2.5-fold increase in C4d, 1.3-fold increase in Bb, while IgE remained unchanged. It also produced changes in pulmonary pressure, systemic pressure and ECG. In in vitro experiments, Tween® 80 was incubated with dog serum in the presence of an inhibitor of complement activation (EGTA/Mg(2+)). Under these conditions, Tween® 80 increased the contents of C4d and Bb. The results of this study reveal that Tween® 80 can cause cardiopulmonary distress in dogs and activate the complement system through classical and alternative pathways as indicated in both in vivo and in vitro preparations. Moreover, they demonstrate the utility of the beagle dog as an animal model for the study of complement activation-related pseudoallergy. These findings raise concerns with regard to the indiscriminate use of Tween® 80 in clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Physicochemical signatures of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Tardiff, Mark F.; Xu, Zhixiang; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Pham, Christine T. N.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are potentially powerful therapeutic tools that have the capacity to target drug payloads and imaging agents. However, some nanoparticles can activate complement, a branch of the innate immune system, and cause adverse side-effects. Recently, we employed an in vitro hemolysis assay to measure the serum complement activity of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles that differed by size, surface charge, and surface chemistry, quantifying the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity using a metric called Residual Hemolytic Activity (RHA). In the present work, we have used a decision tree learning algorithm to derive the rules for estimating nanoparticle-dependent complement response based on the data generated from the hemolytic assay studies. Our results indicate that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, namely, size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and mole percentage of the active surface ligand of a nanoparticle, can serve as good descriptors for prediction of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation in the decision tree modeling framework.

  15. Characterization of a Factor H Mutation That Perturbs the Alternative Pathway of Complement in a Family with Membranoproliferative GN

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edwin K.S.; Anderson, Holly E.; Herbert, Andrew P.; Challis, Rachel C.; Brown, Paul; Reis, Geisilaine S.; Tellez, James O.; Strain, Lisa; Fluck, Nicholas; Humphrey, Ann; Macleod, Alison; Richards, Anna; Ahlert, Daniel; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Barlow, Paul N.; Marchbank, Kevin J.; Harris, Claire L.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Complement C3 activation is a characteristic finding in membranoproliferative GN (MPGN). This activation can be caused by immune complex deposition or an acquired or inherited defect in complement regulation. Deficiency of complement factor H has long been associated with MPGN. More recently, heterozygous genetic variants have been reported in sporadic cases of MPGN, although their functional significance has not been assessed. We describe a family with MPGN and acquired partial lipodystrophy. Although C3 nephritic factor was shown in family members with acquired partial lipodystrophy, it did not segregate with the renal phenotype. Genetic analysis revealed a novel heterozygous mutation in complement factor H (R83S) in addition to known risk polymorphisms carried by individuals with MPGN. Patients with MPGN had normal levels of factor H, and structural analysis of the mutant revealed only subtle alterations. However, functional analysis revealed profoundly reduced C3b binding, cofactor activity, and decay accelerating activity leading to loss of regulation of the alternative pathway. In summary, this family showed a confluence of common and rare functionally significant genetic risk factors causing disease. Data from our analysis of these factors highlight the role of the alternative pathway of complement in MPGN. PMID:24722444

  16. Protein ultrastructure and the nanoscience of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Boesen, Thomas

    2011-09-16

    The complement system constitutes an important barrier to infection of the human body. Over more than four decades structural properties of the proteins of the complement system have been investigated with X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, small-angle scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Here, we review the accumulated evidence that the nm-scaled dimensions and conformational changes of these proteins support functions of the complement system with regard to tissue distribution, molecular crowding effects, avidity binding, and conformational regulation of complement activation. In the targeting of complement activation to the surfaces of nanoparticulate material, such as engineered nanoparticles or fragments of the microbial cell wall, these processes play intimately together. This way the complement system is an excellent example where nanoscience may serve to unravel the molecular biology of the immune response.

  17. Cholesterol crystals induce complement-dependent inflammasome activation and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Samstad, Eivind O; Niyonzima, Nathalie; Nymo, Stig; Aune, Marie H; Ryan, Liv; Bakke, Siril S; Lappegård, Knut T; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Lambris, John D; Damås, Jan K; Latz, Eicke; Mollnes, Tom E; Espevik, Terje

    2014-03-15

    Inflammation is associated with development of atherosclerosis, and cholesterol crystals (CC) have long been recognized as a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions. CC appear early in the atheroma development and trigger inflammation by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In this study we hypothesized whether CC employ the complement system to activate inflammasome/caspase-1, leading to release of mature IL-1β, and whether complement activation regulates CC-induced cytokine production. In this study we describe that CC activated both the classical and alternative complement pathways, and C1q was found to be crucial for the activation. CC employed C5a in the release of a number of cytokines in whole blood, including IL-1β and TNF. CC induced minimal amounts of cytokines in C5-deficient whole blood, until reconstituted with C5. Furthermore, C5a and TNF in combination acted as a potent primer for CC-induced IL-1β release by increasing IL-1β transcripts. CC-induced complement activation resulted in upregulation of complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18), leading to phagocytosis of CC. Also, CC mounted a complement-dependent production of reactive oxygen species and active caspase-1. We conclude that CC employ the complement system to induce cytokines and activate the inflammasome/caspase-1 by regulating several cellular responses in human monocytes. In light of this, complement inhibition might be an interesting therapeutic approach for treatment of atherosclerosis.

  18. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  19. Complement System Part I – Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Church, Sarah Elizabeth; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here, we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical, and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins, and the membrane-attack-complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure–function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly, we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors. PMID:26082779

  20. Soluble complement receptor 1 inhibits both complement and granulocyte activation during ex vivo hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Himmelfarb, J; McMonagle, E; Holbrook, D; Toth, C

    1995-10-01

    Hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes results in both complement and granulocyte activation. We investigated the effects of soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), a potent complement inhibitor, on both complement and granulocyte activation in an ex vivo model of dialysis. Measurements were made of complement activation (radioimmunoassay for C3a desArg) as well as granulocyte activation (flow cytometric measurements of reactive oxygen species production, granulocyte CD11b/CD18 (MAC-1) expression and CD62L (L-selectin) expression). sCR1 completely abolished the generation of plasma C3a desArg during ex vivo hemodialysis. Without sCR1, C3a desArg levels rose from 968 +/- 373 ng/ml to 4961 +/- 40 ng/ml by the end of the ex vivo procedure (p < 0.001). sCR1 also completely inhibited MAC-1 upregulation and L-selectin shedding from granulocytes during ex vivo hemodialysis. With sCR1 there was still a statistically significant increase in granulocyte reactive oxygen species production (from 2.42 +/- 0.1 fluorescence channels to 6.47 +/- 0.7 fluorescence channels, p < 0.01) but a 50% inhibition when compared with experiments without sCR1 (3.15 +/- 0.5 to 11.2 +/- 1.9, p < 0.01). We conclude that sCR1 completely abolishes complement activation and changes in granulocyte cell adhesion molecules during ex vivo hemodialysis with cellulosic membranes. sCR1 partially inhibits granulocyte reactive oxygen species formation.

  1. Activation of complement pathways after contusion-induced spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Aileen J; Robert, Stephanie; Huang, Wencheng; Young, Wise; Cotman, Carl W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cellular inflammatory response is initiated, and inflammatory cytokines are synthesized, following experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the complement cascade, a major component of both the innate and adaptive immune response, is also activated following experimental SCI. We investigated the pathways, cellular localization, timecourse, and degree of complement activation in rat spinal cord following acute contusion-induced SCI using the New York University (NYU) weight drop impactor. Mild and severe injuries (12.5 and 50 mm drop heights) at 1, 7, and 42 days post injury time points were evaluated. Classical (C1q and C4), alternative (Factor B) and terminal (C5b-9) complement pathways were strongly activated within 1 day of SCI. Complement protein immunoreactivity was predominantly found in cell types vulnerable to degeneration, neurons and oligodendrocytes, and was not generally observed in inflammatory or astroglial cells. Surprisingly, immunoreactivity for complement proteins was also evident 6 weeks after injury, and complement activation was observed as far as 20 mm rostral to the site of injury. Axonal staining by C1q and Factor B was also observed, suggesting a potential role for the complement cascade in demyelination or axonal degeneration. These data support the hypothesis that complement activation plays a role in SCI.

  2. A Targeted Inhibitor of the Alternative Complement Pathway Accelerates Recovery From Smoke-Induced Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Jones, Bryan W.; Williamson, Tucker; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Tomlinson, Stephen; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Morphologic and genetic evidence exists that an overactive complement system driven by the complement alternative pathway (AP) is involved in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Smoking is the only modifiable risk factor for AMD. As we have shown that smoke-related ocular pathology can be prevented in mice that lack an essential activator of AP, we ask here whether this pathology can be reversed by increasing inhibition in AP. Methods Mice were exposed to either cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (6 hours/day, 5 days/week, 6 months). Smoke-exposed animals were then treated with the AP inhibitor (CR2-fH) or vehicle control (PBS) for the following 3 months. Spatial frequency and contrast sensitivity were assessed by optokinetic response paradigms at 6 and 9 months; additional readouts included assessment of retinal morphology by electron microscopy (EM) and gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The CS mice treated with CR2-fH showed significant improvement in contrast threshold compared to PBS-treated mice, whereas spatial frequency was unaffected by CS or pharmacologic intervention. Treatment with CR2-fH in CS animals reversed thinning of the retina observed in PBS-treated mice as analyzed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and reversed most morphologic changes in RPE and Bruch's membrane seen in CS animals by EM. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that AP inhibitors not only prevent, but have the potential to accelerate the clearance of complement-mediated ocular injury. Improving our understanding of the regulation of the AP is paramount to developing novel treatment approaches for AMD. PMID:27064393

  3. The role of specific antibody in alternative complement pathway- mediated opsonophagocytosis of type III, group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The native capsular polysaccharide antigen of type III, group B Streptococcus contains a terminal sialic acid residue on each repeating unit that masks all end-group galactopyranose residues and prevents alternative pathway complement activation by adult human sera in the absence of type-specific antibody. The critical role of the sialic acid residues in allowing the organism to evade activating the alternative complement pathway was shown when neuraminidase treatment of the organism converted the bacteria to activators of the alternative pathway as assessed in agammaglobulinemic serum. The requirement for specific antibody in permitting alternative pathway activation by the fully sialated bacteria was shown when sera that contained low levels of specific antibody failed to activate this pathway, and when prior absorption of serum that contained higher type-specific antibody levels with the capsular antigen failed to activate this pathway. The use of C2-deficient sera showed that the calssical pathway was not required for antibody-dependent alternative pathway activation. The use of isotonic, pH 7.5, veronal-NaCl buffer that contained 1% gelatin and that was supplemented to 4 mM Mg++ and 16 mM EGTA and adjusted to pH 7.5 (MgEGTA) ruled out the participation of the C1-bypass pathway. The presence of sialic acid on the bacterial surface is one means of evading an important mechanism of natural immunity, namely activation of complement by the alternative pathway. Only specific antibody, i.e., acquired immunity, can overcome this virulence factor. PMID:6989947

  4. Functional and structural insight into properdin control of complement alternative pathway amplification.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Dennis V; Roumenina, Lubka; Jensen, Rasmus K; Gadeberg, Trine Af; Marinozzi, Chiara; Picard, Capucine; Rybkine, Tania; Thiel, Steffen; Sørensen, Uffe Bs; Stover, Cordula; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Andersen, Gregers R

    2017-03-06

    Properdin (FP) is an essential positive regulator of the complement alternative pathway (AP) providing stabilization of the C3 and C5 convertases, but its oligomeric nature challenges structural analysis. We describe here a novel FP deficiency (E244K) caused by a single point mutation which results in a very low level of AP activity. Recombinant FP E244K is monomeric, fails to support bacteriolysis, and binds weakly to C3 products. We compare this to a monomeric unit excised from oligomeric FP, which is also dysfunctional in bacteriolysis but binds the AP proconvertase, C3 convertase, C3 products and partially stabilizes the convertase. The crystal structure of such a FP-convertase complex suggests that the major contact between FP and the AP convertase is mediated by a single FP thrombospondin repeat and a small region in C3b. Small angle X-ray scattering indicates that FP E244K is trapped in a compact conformation preventing its oligomerization. Our studies demonstrate an essential role of FP oligomerization in vivo while our monomers enable detailed structural insight paving the way for novel modulators of complement.

  5. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  6. Effect of tricainemethanesulfonate (MS222), clove oil and electro-anaesthesia on respiratory burst activity in whole blood and serum alternative complement response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), during the narcosis stage.

    PubMed

    Kanani, H Gholipour; Soltani, M; Mirzargar, S S

    2013-02-01

    There is a little available information on the suppressive effect of anaesthesia on immune response in fish, especially electro-anaesthesia. In the present study, two anaesthetics, MS222 (50 ppm), clove oil (25 ppm), and electro-anaesthesia were tested in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during the narcosis stage in order to observe their effects on the innate immune system. The results showed that electro-anaesthesia reduces light emission in chemiluminescence assay both 1 and 24 h post anaesthesia. Clove oil and MS222 decreased light emission 24 h post anaesthesia. In addition, clove oil, MS222 and electro-anaesthesia had no effect on alternative complement (ACH50) response. From the perspective of aquaculture practice, these data show that the type of anaesthesia should be taken into account to avoid possible immunosuppression in rainbow trout.

  7. Role of Complement Activation in Obliterative Bronchiolitis Post Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidemi; Lasbury, Mark E.; Fan, Lin; Vittal, Ragini; Mickler, Elizabeth A.; Benson, Heather L.; Shilling, Rebecca; Wu, Qiang; Weber, Daniel J.; Wagner, Sarah R.; Lasaro, Melissa; Devore, Denise; Wang, Yi; Sandusky, George E.; Lipking, Kelsey; Pandya, Pankita; Reynolds, John; Love, Robert; Wozniak, Thomas; Gu, Hongmei; Brown, Krista M.; Wilkes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) post lung transplantation involves IL-17 regulated autoimmunity to type V collagen and alloimmunity, which could be enhanced by complement activation. However, the specific role of complement activation in lung allograft pathology, IL-17 production, and OB are unknown. The current study examines the role of complement activation in OB. Complement regulatory protein (CRP) (CD55, CD46, Crry/CD46) expression was down regulated in human and murine OB; and C3a, a marker of complement activation, was up regulated locally. IL-17 differentially suppressed Crry expression in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Neutralizing IL-17 recovered CRP expression in murine lung allografts and decreased local C3a production. Exogenous C3a enhanced IL-17 production from alloantigen or autoantigen (type V collagen) reactive lymphocytes. Systemically neutralizing C5 abrogated the development of OB, reduced acute rejection severity, lowered systemic and local levels of C3a and C5a, recovered CRP expression, and diminished systemic IL-17 and IL-6 levels. These data indicated that OB induction is in part complement dependent due to IL-17 mediated down regulation of CRPs on airway epithelium. C3a and IL-17 are part of a feed forward loop that may enhance CRP down regulation, suggesting that complement blockade could be a therapeutic strategy for OB. PMID:24043901

  8. Complement is activated in progressive multiple sclerosis cortical grey matter lesions.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Lewis M; Neal, James W; Loveless, Sam; Michailidou, Iliana; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rees, Mark I; Reynolds, Richard; Robertson, Neil P; Morgan, B Paul; Howell, Owain W

    2016-06-22

    The symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) are caused by damage to myelin and nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Inflammation is tightly linked with neurodegeneration, and it is the accumulation of neurodegeneration that underlies increasing neurological disability in progressive MS. Determining pathological mechanisms at play in MS grey matter is therefore a key to our understanding of disease progression. We analysed complement expression and activation by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridisation in frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded post-mortem tissue blocks from 22 progressive MS cases and made comparisons to inflammatory central nervous system disease and non-neurological disease controls. Expression of the transcript for C1qA was noted in neurons and the activation fragment and opsonin C3b-labelled neurons and glia in the MS cortical and deep grey matter. The density of immunostained cells positive for the classical complement pathway protein C1q and the alternative complement pathway activation fragment Bb was significantly increased in cortical grey matter lesions in comparison to control grey matter. The number of cells immunostained for the membrane attack complex was elevated in cortical lesions, indicating complement activation to completion. The numbers of classical (C1-inhibitor) and alternative (factor H) pathway regulator-positive cells were unchanged between MS and controls, whilst complement anaphylatoxin receptor-bearing microglia in the MS cortex were found closely apposed to cortical neurons. Complement immunopositive neurons displayed an altered nuclear morphology, indicative of cell stress/damage, supporting our finding of significant neurodegeneration in cortical grey matter lesions. Complement is activated in the MS cortical grey matter lesions in areas of elevated numbers of complement receptor-positive microglia and suggests that complement over-activation may contribute to the worsening pathology that underlies the

  9. Complement Activation in Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Rohit; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    Overdose with acetaminophen (APAP) results in acute liver failure in humans and experimental animals. Complement comprises more than 30 proteins that can participate in tissue injury and/or repair, but the role of complement activation in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity has not been evaluated. Treatment of male, C57BL6J mice with APAP (200–400 mg/kg) resulted in liver injury as evidenced by increased activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in plasma and hepatocellular necrosis. Plasma concentration of the complement component C3 was significantly reduced 6 h after treatment with APAP, indicating complement activation, and C3b (detected by immunostaining) accumulated in the centrilobular areas of liver lobules. Pretreatment with cobra venom factor (CVF; 15 U/mouse) to deplete complement components abolished APAP-mediated C3b accumulation, and this was accompanied by reductions in plasma ALT activity, hepatocellular necrosis, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of inflammatory genes (interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and plasminogen activation inhibitor-1) at 24 h after APAP treatment. Loss of hepatocellular GSH was similar in APAP-treated mice pretreated with either saline or CVF, suggesting that CVF pretreatment did not affect APAP bioactivation. Mice with a genetic deficiency in C3 had reduced ALT activity 6 and 12 h after APAP administration compared with wild-type animals. These results reveal a key role for complement activation in hepatic inflammation and progression of injury during the pathogenesis of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:22319198

  10. Incomplete inhibition by eculizumab: mechanistic evidence for residual C5 activity during strong complement activation.

    PubMed

    Harder, Markus J; Kuhn, Nadine; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Höchsmann, Britta; von Zabern, Inge; Weinstock, Christof; Simmet, Thomas; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Skerra, Arne; Anliker, Markus; Schmidt, Christoph Q

    2017-02-23

    Eculizumab inhibits the terminal, lytic pathway of complement by blocking the activation of the complement protein C5 and shows remarkable clinical benefits in certain complement-mediated diseases. However, several reports suggest that activation of C5 is not always completely suppressed in patients even under excess of eculizumab over C5, indicating that residual C5 activity may derogate the drug's therapeutic benefit under certain conditions. By using eculizumab and the tick-derived C5 inhibitor coversin, we determined conditions ex vivo in which C5 inhibition is incomplete. The degree of such residual lytic activity depended on the strength of the complement activator and the resulting surface density of the complement activation product C3b, which autoamplifies via the alternative pathway (AP) amplification loop. We show that at high C3b densities required for binding and activation of C5, both inhibitors reduce but do not abolish this interaction. The decrease of C5 binding to C3b clusters in the presence of C5 inhibitors correlated with the levels of residual hemolysis. However, by employing different C5 inhibitors simultaneously, residual hemolytic activity could be abolished. The importance of AP-produced C3b clusters for C5 activation in the presence of eculizumab was corroborated by the finding that residual hemolysis after forceful activation of the classical pathway could be reduced by blocking the AP. By providing insights into C5 activation and inhibition, our study delivers the rationale for the clinically observed phenomenon of residual terminal pathway activity under eculizumab treatment with important implications for anti-C5 therapy in general.

  11. Purification of a human alternative complement pathway inhibitor from hemolymph of larval fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda).

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, O J; Day, N K

    1984-08-16

    Larval Spodoptera frugiperda hemolymph contains a specific inhibitor of the alternative pathway of human complement. This inhibitor was purified from larval hemolymph (HL) by 50% (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and sequential gel-filtration on Bio-Gel 1.5m, 0.5m and Sephacryl S-200. Purified HL protein (Mr = 110,000) was composed of two Mr 55,000 polypeptide chains. Addition of purified HL protein to human complement resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of RaRBC lysis and clumping of cells. The protein inhibitor provides a new tool for investigating the regulation of human alternative complement pathway.

  12. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: A link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Arthur J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of pre-eclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we used a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to analyze sera of women with classic or atypical HELLP syndrome, pre-eclampsia with severe features, normal pregnancies, and healthy nonpregnant women. Sera were also evaluated using levels of the terminal product of complement activation (C5b-9). We tested the in vitro ability of eculizumab to inhibit complement activation in HELLP serum. Increased complement activation was observed in participants with classic or atypical HELLP compared with those with normal pregnancies and nonpregnant controls. Mixing HELLP serum with eculizumab-containing serum resulted in a significant decrease in cell killing compared with HELLP serum alone. We found that HELLP syndrome is associated with increased complement activation as assessed with the modified Ham test. This assay may aid in the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome and could confirm that its pathophysiology is related to that of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  13. Glomeruli of Dense Deposit Disease contain components of the alternative and terminal complement pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Gamez, Jeffrey D.; Vrana, Julie A.; Theis, Jason D.; Bergen, H. Robert; Zipfel, Peter F.; Dogan, Ahmet; Smith, Richard J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Dense Deposit Disease (DDD), or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II, is a rare renal disease characterized by dense deposits in the mesangium and along the glomerular basement membranes that can be seen by electron microscopy. Although these deposits contain complement factor C3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy, their precise composition remains unknown. To address this question, we used mass spectrometry to identify the proteins in laser microdissected glomeruli isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue of eight confirmed cases of DDD. Compared to glomeruli from five control patients, we found that all of the glomeruli from patients with DDD contain components of the alternative pathway and terminal complement complex. Factor C9 was uniformly present as well as the two fluid-phase regulators of terminal complement complex clusterin and vitronectin. In contrast, in nine patients with immune complex–mediated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, glomerular samples contained mainly immunoglobulins and complement factors C3 and C4. Our study shows that in addition to fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative pathway, soluble components of the terminal complement complex contribute to glomerular lesions found in DDD. PMID:19177158

  14. Complement activation and interleukin response in major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kvarnström, A L; Sarbinowski, R T; Bengtson, J-P; Jacobsson, L M; Bengtsson, A L

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether major abdominal surgery leads to complement activation and interleukin response and whether the kind of anaesthesia influence complement activation and the release of inflammatory interleukins. The study design was prospective and randomised. Fifty patients undergoing open major colorectal surgery due to cancer disease or inflammatory bowel disease were studied. Twenty-five patients were given total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil, and 25 patients were given inhalational anaesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl. To determine complement activation (C3a and SC5b-9) and the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins (tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a)), interleukin-1b (IL-1b), IL-6, IL-8, IL-4 and IL-10), blood samples were drawn preoperatively, 60 minutes after start of surgery, 30 minutes after end of surgery and 24 hours postoperatively. Complement was activated and pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8) and anti-inflammatory interleukins (IL-10) were released during major colorectal surgery. There was no significant difference between TIVA and inhalational anaesthesia regarding complement activation and cytokine release. Major colorectal surgery leads to activation of the complement cascade and the release of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. There are no significant differences between total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil and inhalational anaesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl regarding complement activation and the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  15. Complement activation by antibodies to Sm in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, U K; Fong, S; Hoch, S; Cook, R D; Vaughan, J H; Curd, J G

    1983-02-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantitate antibodies to Sm (anti-Sm) and to measure complement activation by anti-Sm in vitro. Anti-Sm in plasma of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were bound to purified Sm bound to polyvinyl chloride microtitre plates and assayed for bound IgG or IgM using enzyme linked anti-gamma or anti-mu. The activation of C4 by anti-Sm was measured by adding diluted normal human serum (complement) to the wells and quantitating the amount of C4 bound to the well surface using (Fab')2 goat anti-C4 followed by enzyme linked rabbit anti-goat IgG. The plasmas of 12 of 36 patients with SLE contained anti-Sm and all 12 activated complement (complement activating anti-Sm). Twenty-eight plasmas containing anti-Sm from 12 patients with SLE were studied. Ten of the 12 patients had anti-Sm of the IgG class whereas two had anti-Sm of both IgG and IgM classes. The amount of C4 activating anti-Sm correlated significantly with the in vivo activation of C4 measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis for C4d and C4, suggesting that complement activation by anti-Sm is important in vivo.

  16. Anopheles Midgut Epithelium Evades Human Complement Activity by Capturing Factor H from the Blood Meal

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ayman; Barroso, Marta; Miettinen, Tiera; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood. PMID:25679788

  17. Physicochemical signatures of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Tardiff, Mark F.; Xu, Zhixiang; Hourcade, Dennis; Pham, Christine; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-03-21

    Nanoparticles are potentially powerful therapeutic tools that have the capacity to target drug payloads and imaging agents. However, some nanoparticles can activate complement, a branch of the innate immune system, and cause adverse side-effects. Recently, we developed an in vitro hemolytic assay protocol for measuring the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity of serum samples and applied this protocol to several nanoparticle formulations that differed in size, surface charge, and surface chemistry; quantifying the nanoparticle-dependent complement activity using a metric called Residual Hemolytic Activity (RHA). In the present work, we have used a decision tree learning algorithm to derive the rules for estimating nanoparticle-dependent complement response based on the data generated from the hemolytic assay studies. Our results indicate that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, namely, size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and mole percentage of the active surface ligand of a nanoparticle, can serve as good descriptors for prediction of nanoparticle-dependent complement activation in the decision tree modeling framework. The robustness and predictability of the model can be improved by training the model with additional data points that are uniformly distributed in the RHA/physicochemical descriptor space and by incorporating instability effects on nanoparticle physicochemical properties into the model.

  18. Biomedical polymers differ in their capacity to activate complement.

    PubMed

    Janatova, J; Cheung, A K; Parker, C J

    1991-01-01

    Conventionally, complement activation by biomedical polymers has been evaluated by determining the C3a concentration in the fluid phase only. According to this criterion, biomaterials such as hemodialysis membranes made from cellulosic or various synthetic polymers were classified as activators or nonactivators of complement. Since certain membranes bind large quantities of C3a from the fluid phase, classification based on fluid-phase C3a concentration has in some instances been inaccurate. As follows from the comparison of complement activation by cuprophane and polyacrylonitrile membranes, the capacity of a biomedical polymer to activate complement is not determined by the number of potential covalent binding sites on its surface. Biomaterial itself may lack hydroxyl and/or amino groups, and yet it may activate C3 in human serum very efficiently. Some of the biomaterials may also bind unactivated/unfragmented C3 whether in the absence or presence of other serum proteins. In addition, binding of factor B (a promotor of C3 activation) and binding of factor H (an inhibitor of C3 activation) to certain biomaterials have been found to be independent of complement activation and unaffected by the presence or absence of C3. Thus, it is becoming apparent that the requirements for the formation and stability of the C3 convertase on artificial surfaces differ from those on biological membranes, and that the relative magnitude of binding of factor B and factor H to the surface per se cannot be used as a reliable indicator of the capacity of the biomaterial to activate complement. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of C3 and C5 activation on the surfaces of biomedical polymers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Anti-complement activity of the Ixodes scapularis salivary protein Salp20

    PubMed Central

    Hourcade, Dennis E.; Akk, Antonina M.; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Zhou, Hui-fang; Hauhart, Richard; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2015-01-01

    Complement, a major component of innate immunity, presents a rapid and robust defense of the intravascular space. While regulatory proteins protect host cells from complement attack, when these measures fail, unrestrained complement activation may trigger self-tissue injury, leading to pathologic conditions. Of the three complement activation pathways, the alternative pathway (AP) in particular has been implicated in numerous disease and injury states. Consequently, the AP components represent attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. The common hard-bodied ticks from the family Ixodidae derive nourishment from the blood of their mammalian hosts. During its blood meal the tick is exposed to host immune effectors, including the complement system. In defense, the tick produces salivary proteins that can inhibit host immune functions. The Salp20 salivary protein of Ixodes scapularis inhibits the host AP pathway by binding properdin and dissociating C3bBbP, the active C3 convertase. In these studies we examined Salp20 activity in various complement-mediated pathologies. Our results indicate that Salp20 can inhibit AP-dependent pathogenesis in the mouse. Its efficacy may be part in due to synergic effects it provides with the endogenous AP regulator, factor H. While Salp20 itself would be expected to be highly immunogenic and therefore inappropriate for therapeutic use, its emergence speaks for the potential development of a non-immunogenic Salp20 mimic that replicates its anti-properdin activity. PMID:26675068

  20. A soluble deletion mutant of the human complement receptor type 1, which lacks the C4b binding site, is a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Scesney, S M; Makrides, S C; Gosselin, M L; Ford, P J; Andrews, B M; Hayman, E G; Marsh, H C

    1996-08-01

    The human complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35), is a single-chain glycoprotein consisting of 30 repeating homologous protein domains known as short consensus repeats (SCR) followed by transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The SCR themselves, considered in groups of seven, form long homologous repeats (LHR) which have been designated LHR-A, -B, -C, and -D for the most common human allotype of CR1. A soluble deletion mutant of CR1 which lacks the first seven N-terminal SCR (LHR-A) as well as the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains was produced and characterized. The resulting protein, designated sCR1[desLHR-A], lacks the C4b binding site found in LHR-A, but retains the two C3b binding sites found in LHR-B and -C, respectively. The functional activities of sCR1[desLHR-A] were quantitatively compared in vitro to those of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which has been shown to retain all known functions of the native cell surface receptor. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 competed equally for the binding of dimeric C3b to erythrocyte CR1. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were similar in their capacity to serve as a cofactor in the factor I-mediated degradation of the C3b and C4b alpha chains. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were comparable in their capacity to inhibit erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production mediated by the alternative complement pathway. sCR1[desLHR-A], however, was significantly less effective an inhibitor of erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production than sCR1 under conditions which allow classical pathway activation. These results demonstrate sCR1[desLHR-A] to be a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in vitro.

  1. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Loeven, Markus A; Rops, Angelique L; Lehtinen, Markus J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daha, Mohamed R; Smith, Richard J; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H; Rabelink, Ton J; Jokiranta, T Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-03-04

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19-20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19-20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19-20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19-20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19-20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19-20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19-20 mutants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  2. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Loeven, Markus A.; Rops, Angelique L.; Lehtinen, Markus J.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Smith, Richard J.; Bakker, Marinka; Berden, Jo H.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense deposit disease and the ocular disease age-related macular degeneration. Although FH systemically controls complement activation, clinical phenotypes selectively manifest in kidneys and eyes, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific determinants of disease development. Recent results imply the importance of tissue-specifically expressed, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), like HS, in determining FH binding to and activity on host tissues. Therefore, we investigated which GAGs mediate human FH and recombinant human FH complement control proteins domains 19 and 20 (FH19–20) binding to mouse glomerular endothelial cells (mGEnCs) in ELISA. Furthermore, we evaluated the functional defects of FH19–20 mutants during complement activation by measuring C3b deposition on mGEnCs using flow cytometry. FH and FH19–20 bound dose-dependently to mGEnCs and TNF-α treatment increased binding of both proteins, whereas heparinase digestion and competition with heparin/HS inhibited binding. Furthermore, 2-O-, and 6-O-, but not N-desulfation of heparin, significantly increased the inhibitory effect on FH19–20 binding to mGEnCs. Compared with wild type FH19–20, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated mutants were less able to compete with FH in normal human serum during complement activation on mGEnCs, confirming their potential glomerular pathogenicity. In conclusion, our study shows that FH and FH19–20 binding to glomerular endothelial cells is differentially mediated by HS but not other GAGs. Furthermore, we describe a novel, patient serum-independent competition assay for pathogenicity screening of FH19–20 mutants. PMID:26728463

  3. Manipulating the mediator: modulation of the alternative complement pathway C3 convertase in health, disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    The complement network is increasingly recognized as an important triage system that is able to differentiate between healthy host cells, microbial intruders, cellular debris and immune complexes, and tailor its actions accordingly. At the center of this triage mechanism is the alternative pathway C3 convertase (C3bBb), a potent enzymatic protein complex capable of rapidly converting the inert yet abundant component C3 into powerful effector fragments (C3a and C3b), thereby amplifying the initial response on unprotected surfaces and inducing a variety of effector functions. A fascinating molecular mechanism of convertase assembly and intrinsic regulation, as well as the interplay with a panel of cell surface-bound and soluble inhibitors are essential for directing complement attack to intruders and protecting healthy host cells. While efficiently keeping immune surveillance and homeostasis on track, the reliance on an intricate cascade of interaction and conversion steps also renders the C3 convertase vulnerable to derail. On the one hand, tissue damage, accumulation of debris, or polymorphisms in complement genes may unfavorably shift the balance between activation and regulation, thereby contributing to a variety of clinical conditions. On the other hand, pathogens developed powerful evasion strategies to avoid complement attack by targeting the convertase. Finally, we increasingly challenge our bodies with foreign materials such as biomaterial implants or drug delivery vehicles that may induce adverse effects that are at least partially caused by complement activation and amplification via the alternative pathway. The involvement of the C3 convertase in a range of pathological conditions put this complex into the spotlight of complement-targeted drug discovery efforts. Fortunately, the physiological regulation and microbial evasion approaches provide a rich source of inspiration for the development of powerful treatment options. This review provides insight into

  4. The design of cellulosic based membranes that do not activate complement.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R J

    1989-01-01

    Complement is a principal mediator of the acute inflammatory response that works by nonspecific recognition mechanisms to eliminate foreign substances from the body. Because of the non-selective nature of complement, extracorporeal therapies employing hydrophilic cellulosic based materials can result in significant complement activation and systemic exposure to large amounts of C5a which in turn may lead to a variety of pathological sequelae. Several approaches have been identified to produce materials with a limited potential to activate complement. Activation proceeds on a material following the covalent attachment of C3b to surface nucleophiles which leads to the formation of C3 and C5 convertase enzymes. Interference with these enzymes may be achieved at several levels. Surfaces that contain fewer nucleophilic sites bind less C3b and thus generate lower levels of convertase activity. This is exemplified by the Cellulose Triacetate membrane that is produced by exhaustive acetylation of surface hydroxyl groups. This membrane binds only a third of the amount of C3b that a cuprophan membrane will bind. An alternative means of affecting convertase activity can occur by facilitating the regulatory activity of Factors H and I. Evidence is presented here that suggests that Hemophan appears to limit activation by augmenting regulation of bound-C3b. Finally we have begun studies on a new type of modification using dicarboxylic acid anhydrides that produce materials with a very limited potential to activate complement.

  5. Complement and contact activation in term neonates after fetal acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, J.; Wagner, M.; Strauss, E.; Obladen, M.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate complement and contact activation after fetal acidosis.
METHODS—Fifteen term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy after umbilical arterial pH < 7.10 were compared with 15 healthy neonates with umbilical arterial pH > 7.20. Determinations of the complement function and C1-inhibitor activity were performed as kinetic tests 22-28 hours after birth. C1q, C1-inhibitor, and factor B concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion and those of C3a, C5a, and factor XIIa by enzyme immunoabsorbent assay.
RESULTS—Median complement function (46 vs 73 %), C1q (4.3 vs 9.1 mg/dl), and factor B (5.2 vs 7.7 mg/dl) decreased after fetal acidosis. The activated split products C3a (260 vs 185 µg/l), C5a (5.0 vs 0.6 µg/l), and factor XIIa (3.2 vs 1.3 µg/l) increased in the neonates after fetal acidosis. No differences were found in the concentration and activity of C1-inhibitor.
CONCLUSIONS—Complement and contact activation occurred in the newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Activation of these systems generates mediators which can trigger inflammation and tissue injury.

 PMID:9577283

  6. Complement activation in leprosy: a retrospective study shows elevated circulating terminal complement complex in reactional leprosy.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, N; Hakobyan, S; Ramaglia, V; Geluk, A; Morgan, B Paul; Das, P Kumar; Baas, F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection gives rise to the immunologically and histopathologically classified spectrum of leprosy. At present, several tools for the stratification of patients are based on acquired immunity markers. However, the role of innate immunity, particularly the complement system, is largely unexplored. The present retrospective study was undertaken to explore whether the systemic levels of complement activation components and regulators can stratify leprosy patients, particularly in reference to the reactional state of the disease. Serum samples from two cohorts were analysed. The cohort from Bangladesh included multi-bacillary (MB) patients with (n = 12) or without (n = 46) reaction (R) at intake and endemic controls (n = 20). The cohort from Ethiopia included pauci-bacillary (PB) (n = 7) and MB (n = 23) patients without reaction and MB (n = 15) patients with reaction. The results showed that the activation products terminal complement complex (TCC) (P ≤ 0·01), C4d (P ≤ 0·05) and iC3b (P ≤ 0·05) were specifically elevated in Bangladeshi patients with reaction at intake compared to endemic controls. In addition, levels of the regulator clusterin (P ≤ 0·001 without R; P < 0·05 with R) were also elevated in MB patients, irrespective of a reaction. Similar analysis of the Ethiopian cohort confirmed that, irrespective of a reaction, serum TCC levels were increased significantly in patients with reactions compared to patients without reactions (P ≤ 0·05). Our findings suggests that serum TCC levels may prove to be a valuable tool in diagnosing patients at risk of developing reactions. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  7. A novel 2-stage approach that detects complement activation in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rand, Jacob H; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Wolgast, Lucia R; Lei, Victor; Conway, Edward M

    2017-08-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is marked by autoantibodies that recognize anionic phospholipids in a cofactor-dependent manner. A role for complement has been implicated in the pathophysiology, however, elevations of complement activation markers have not been consistently demonstrated in clinical studies. We therefore designed a proof-of-principle study to determine whether complement activation might be detectable in APS by first exposing plasmas to phospholipid vesicles. We examined complement activation markers in patients with APS, non-APS thrombosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, cancer, patients with antiphospholipid antibodies without thrombosis (APL) and healthy controls. Direct measurements of plasma C5a and sC5b-9 levels were compared to levels that were generated in normal serum by phospholipid vesicles that had been pre-incubated with the same plasmas. We then determined the effects of the C5 inhibitor, eculizumab, examined the complement pathways involved, and determined whether the effects could be reproduced with purified IgGs and β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI). Plasma levels of C5a and sC5b-9 were higher, but not significantly increased in APS patients compared to healthy controls. In contrast, phospholipid vesicles pre-incubated with APS plasmas generated significantly higher levels than healthy controls and the other groups, except for APL patients. Complement activation was abrogated by addition of eculizumab. The results with substrate sera indicated that the alternative and classical/lectin pathways were involved. The results were reproducible with purified IgGs and β2GPI. This proof-of-principle study confirms a role for complement in APS and opens the possibility of monitoring complement activation by including phospholipid vesicles in assay systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the third component of complement (C3) after activation by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Kew, R.R.; Ghebrehiwet, B.; Janoff, A.

    1987-08-01

    Activation of lung complement by tobacco smoke may be an important pathogenetic factor in the development of pulmonary emphysema in smokers. We previously showed that cigarette smoke can modify C3 and activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro. However, the mechanism of C3 activation was not fully delineated in these earlier studies. In the present report, we show that smoke-treated C3 induces cleavage of the alternative pathway protein, Factor B, when added to serum containing Mg-EGTA. This effect of cigarette smoke is specific for C3 since smoke-treated C4, when added to Mg-EGTA-treated serum, fails to activate the alternative pathway and fails to induce Factor B cleavage. Smoke-modified C3 no longer binds significant amounts of (/sup 14/C)methylamine (as does native C3), and relatively little (/sup 14/C)methylamine is incorporated into its alpha-chain. Thus, prior internal thiolester bond cleavage appears to have occurred in C3 activated by cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke components also induce formation of noncovalently associated, soluble C3 multimers, with a Mr ranging from 1 to 10 million. However, prior cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 with methylamine prevents the subsequent formation of these smoke-induced aggregates. These data indicate that cigarette smoke activates the alternative pathway of complement by specifically modifying C3 and that these modifications include cleavage of the thiolester bond in C3 and formation of noncovalently linked C3 multimers.

  9. Complement activation and effect of eculizumab in scleroderma renal crisis

    PubMed Central

    Devresse, Arnaud; Aydin, Selda; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Demoulin, Nathalie; Stordeur, Patrick; Lambert, Catherine; Gastoldi, Sara; Pirson, Yves; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a life-threatening complication of systemic sclerosis characterized by abrupt onset of hypertension, thrombotic microangiopathy, and kidney injury. The mechanisms of the disease remain ill-defined, but a growing body of evidence suggests that activation of the complement system may be involved. Methods: Here, we report the case of a patient presenting with severe SRC and strong evidence of complement activation, both in serum and in the kidney, in the absence of genetic defect of the complement system. Results: Immunofluorescence studies on kidney biopsy showed significant deposits of C1q and C4d in the endothelium of renal arterioles, pointing toward activation of the classical pathway. Because of the dramatic clinical and histological severity, and the lack of response to early treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and plasma exchange, the patient was treated with the specific C5 blocker eculizumab. Contrarily to conventional treatment, eculizumab efficiently blocked C5b-9 deposition ex vivo and maintained hematological remission. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure a few weeks later. Postmortem examination of the heart showed diffuse patchy interstitial fibrosis, the typical lesion of systemic sclerosis-related cardiomyopathy, but normal coronary arteries and myocardial microvasculature. Conclusion: SRC may lead to complement system activation through the classical pathway. Early administration of C5 inhibitor eculizumab may have therapeutic potential in patients with life-threatening SRC refractory to conventional treatment using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:27472742

  10. Isolation and characterization of a complement-activating lipid extracted from human atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The major characteristics of human atherosclerotic lesions are similar to those of a chronic inflammatory reaction, namely fibrosis, mesenchymal cell proliferation, the presence of resident macrophages, and cell necrosis. Atherosclerosis exhibits in addition the feature of lipid (mainly cholesterol) accumulation. The results of the present report demonstrate that a specific cholesterol-containing lipid particle present in human atherosclerotic lesions activates the complement system to completion. Thus, lipid could represent a stimulatory factor for the inflammatory reaction, whose underlying mechanistic basis may be, at least in part, complement activation. The complement-activating lipid was purified from saline extracts of aortic atherosclerotic lesions by sucrose density gradient centrifugation followed by molecular sieve chromatography on Sepharose 2B. It contained little protein other than albumin, was 100-500 nm in size, exhibited an unesterified to total cholesterol ratio of 0.58 and an unesterified cholesterol to phospholipid ratio of 1.2. The lipid, termed lesion lipid complement (LCA), activated the alternative pathway of complement in a dose-dependent manner. Lesion-extracted low density lipoprotein (LDL) obtained during the purification procedure failed to activate complement. Specific generation of C3a desArg and C5b-9 by LCA indicated C3/C5 convertase formation with activation proceeding to completion. Biochemical and electron microscopic evaluations revealed that much of the C5b-9 present in atherosclerotic lesions is membraneous, rather than fluid phase SC5b-9. The observations reported herein establish a link between lipid insudation and inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions via the mechanism of complement activation. PMID:2373993

  11. Complement activation of electrogenic ion transport in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    McCole, D F; Otti, B; Newsholme, P; Baird, A W

    1997-11-15

    The complement cascade is an important component in many immune and inflammatory reactions and may contribute to both the diarrhoea and inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Isolated rat colonic mucosae were voltage clamped in Ussing chambers. Basolateral addition of zymosan-activated whole human serum (ZAS) induced a rapid onset, transient inward short circuit current (SCC). This response was concentration dependent and was significantly attenuated by pre-heating ZAS at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Depletion of complement from normal human serum with cobra venom factor (CVF) significantly lowered SCC responses. Chloride was the primary charge carrying ion as responses to ZAS were abolished in the presence of the loop diuretic bumetanide. The complement component C3a stimulated ion transport but not to the same extent as whole serum. Exogenous C5 was without effect. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam significantly attenuated the response to ZAS. These findings support the possibility that complement activation may contribute to the pathophysiology of secretory diarrhoea since activation of electrogenic chloride secretion converts intestinal epithelia to a state of net fluid secretion.

  12. Selective inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by sCR1[desLHR-A] protects the rabbit isolated heart from human complement-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Gralinski, M R; Wiater, B C; Assenmacher, A N; Lucchesi, B R

    1996-09-01

    Evidence is presented that treatment with a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, sCR1[desLHR-A], protects the ex vivo perfused rabbit heart from human complement-mediated injury. Hearts from male New Zealand white rabbits were perfused in the Langendorff mode. After equilibration, normal human plasma was added to the perfusate as a source of complement. Concomitant with the addition of human plasma, vehicle (n = 13), soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) (n = 10), or sCR1[desLHR-A], a truncated version of sCR1 that lacks the C4b binding region (n = 10) was included in the perfusate. Hemodynamic variables were obtained for all groups before (baseline) and after the addition of human plasma. Compared to vehicle-treated hearts, variables recorded during perfusion with human plasma including coronary perfusion pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, and left ventricular end diastolic pressure, along with a reduction of creatine kinase efflux, were improved in hearts perfused with either complement inhibitor. In addition, in vitro hemolysis assays were utilized to discriminate between the classical and alternative pathways. The addition of sCR1 to human serum prevented both the classical and alternative pathway-mediated hemolysis while sCR1[desLHR-A] prevented only the alternative pathway-mediated lysis. This study indicates that deletion of the C4b-binding site from sCR1 results in a new pharmacological moiety, sCR1[desLHR-A], that primarily inhibits the alternative pathway of human complement.

  13. Complement Alternative Pathway Deficiency in Recipients Protects Kidney Allograft From Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Alloreactive T Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, F; Azzollini, N; Todeschini, M; Fiori, S; Cavinato, R A; Cassis, P; Solini, S; Pezzuto, F; Mister, M; Thurman, J M; Benigni, A; Remuzzi, G; Noris, M

    2017-09-01

    Despite the introduction of novel and more targeted immunosuppressive drugs, the long-term survival of kidney transplants has not improved satisfactorily. Early antigen-independent intragraft inflammation plays a critical role in the initiation of the alloimmune response and impacts long-term graft function. Complement activation is a key player both in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) as well as in adaptive antigraft immune response after kidney transplantation. Since the alternative pathway (AP) amplifies complement activation regardless of the initiation pathways and renal IR injured cells undergo uncontrolled complement activation, we speculated whether selective blockade of AP could be a strategy for prolonging kidney graft survival. Here we showed that Balb/c kidneys transplanted in factor b deficient C57 mice underwent reduced IRI and diminished T cell-mediated rejection. In in vitro studies, we found that fb deficiency in T cells and dendritic cells conferred intrinsic impaired alloreactive/allostimulatory functions, respectively, both in direct and indirect pathways of alloantigen presentation. By administering anti-fB antibody to C57 wt recipients in the early post Balb/c kidney transplant phases, we documented that inhibition of AP during both ischemia/reperfusion and early adaptive immune response is necessary for prolonging graft survival. These findings may have implication for the use of AP inhibitors in clinical kidney transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  14. Alternative functions of the complement protein C1q at embryo implantation site.

    PubMed

    Agostinis, Chiara; Tedesco, Francesco; Bulla, Roberta

    2017-02-01

    Complement component C1q is one of the recognition molecules of the complement system which can serve several functions unrelated to complement activation. This molecule is produced at foeto-maternal interface by macrophages as wells as by decidual endothelial cells and invading trophoblast. Foetal trophoblast cells migrating through the decidua in the early stages of pregnancy synthesize and express C1q on their surface, which is actively involved in promoting trophoblast endovascular and interstitial invasion of the decidua. These functions are mediated by two cell surface receptors, gC1qR and α4β1 integrin, which promote trophoblast adhesion and migration through the activation of ERK1/2 MAPKs. C1q(-/-) mice manifest increased frequency of foetal resorption, reduced foetal weight, and smaller litter size when compared to their wild-type counterparts, suggesting that defective local production of C1q may be involved in pregnancy disorders, such as pre-eclampsia. C1q acts also as a strong angiogenic factor and promotes neovascularization. These studies suggest novel and unexpected roles of this complement component in physiological and pathological pregnancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Complement activation by polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide: an important virulence determinant of salmonellae.

    PubMed Central

    Liang-Takasaki, C J; Saxén, H; Mäkelä, P H; Leive, L

    1983-01-01

    Salmonellae with differences only in the O-antigenic polysaccharide of their lipopolysaccharide were previously shown to differentially activate complement via the alternative pathway, causing them to be ingested at different rates by the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774. We now show that this mechanism could explain the different virulence of these strains in vivo. Mouse peritoneal macrophages (thioglycolate induced) ingest these salmonellae at rates that are inversely proportional to the known virulence of the organisms and virtually identical to the rates observed with J774. As with J774, complement is required for this differential uptake, since serum was required and heating (56 degrees C for 30 min) or zymosan treatment of the serum destroyed activity. The known receptor for nonreducing terminal mannose-, fucose-, N-acetylglucosamine, and glucose-containing glyco-proteins did not participate, since uptake was not inhibited by high concentrations of mannan. When clearance of bacteria from the bloodstream of mice was measured, the least virulent organism was cleared very much faster than the most virulent organism, in confirmation of earlier data. When complement in the mice was destroyed by pretreatment with cobra venom factor, the clearance of the least virulent strain was greatly reduced, whereas the very slow clearance of the most virulent strain was unaffected. These data strongly support the hypothesis that when bacteria have polysaccharide in lipopolysaccharide that activates complement efficiently, the bacteria will be phagocytosed, whereas if the polysaccharide activates complement poorly, the bacteria escape ingestion and may cause disease. PMID:6347890

  16. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  17. The alternative complement pathway control protein H binds to immune complexes and serves their detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nydegger, U.E.; Corvetta, A.; Spaeth, P.J.; Spycher, M.

    1983-01-01

    During solubilization of immune complexes C3b becomes fixed to the immunoglobulin part and serves as a receptor for the alternative complement pathway control protein H. The H-C3b immune complex interaction can be made detectable using 4% polyethyleneglycol to separate free from bound /sup 125/I-H. Tetanus toxoid (Te)/anti-Te complexes kept soluble with fresh serum and containing 125 IU of specific antibody bound 18% of /sup 125/I-H; when fresh serum was chelated with 10 mM EDTA, /sup 125/I-H binding was only 5%. On sucrose density gradients, the H-binding material sedimented in the range of 12 to 30 S. In 36 serum samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and in 12 serum samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), /sup 125/I-H binding was significantly elevated to 9.5 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- 1 SD) and 13.3 +/- 5.6%, respectively, while /sup 125/I-H binding by 36 normal human sera was 4 +/- 2%. RA samples (17/36, 47%) and SLE samples (9/12, 75%) had H-binding values increased by more than 2 SD above the normal mean. The serum samples were also assessed for conglutinin- and C1q-binding activities; a significant correlation between H and C1q binding was observed (P less than 0.001); there was no correlation between H and conglutinin binding. Although binding to immune complexes through its interaction with C3b, H clearly detects a population of complexes other than conglutinin, thus expanding the possibilities of further characterizing pathological complexes.

  18. Complement activation in Ghanaian children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Helegbe, Gideon K; Goka, Bamenla Q; Kurtzhals, Joergen AL; Addae, Michael M; Ollaga, Edwin; Tetteh, John KA; Dodoo, Daniel; Ofori, Michael F; Obeng-Adjei, George; Hirayama, Kenji; Awandare, Gordon A; Akanmori, Bartholomew D

    2007-01-01

    Background Severe anaemia (SA), intravascular haemolysis (IVH) and respiratory distress (RD) are severe forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, with RD reported to be of prognostic importance in African children with malarial anaemia. Complement factors have been implicated in the mechanism leading to excess anaemia in acute P. falciparum infection. Methods The direct Coombs test (DCT) and flow cytometry were used to investigate the mean levels of RBC-bound complement fragments (C3d and C3bαβ) and the regulatory proteins [complement receptor 1 (CD35) and decay accelerating factor (CD55)] in children with discrete clinical forms of P. falciparum malaria. The relationship between the findings and clinical parameters including coma, haemoglobin (Hb) levels and RD were investigated. Results Of the 484 samples tested, 131(27%) were positive in DCT, out of which 115/131 (87.8%) were positive for C3d alone while 16/131 (12.2%) were positive for either IgG alone or both. 67.4% of the study population were below 5 years of age and DCT positivity was more common in this age group relative to children who were 5 years or older (Odds ratio, OR = 3.8; 95%CI, 2.2–6.7, p < 0.001). DCT correlated significantly with RD (β = -304, p = 0.006), but multiple regression analysis revealed that, Hb (β = -0.341, p = 0.012) and coma (β = -0.256, p = 0.034) were stronger predictors of RD than DCT (β = 0.228, p = 0.061). DCT was also not associated with IVH, p = 0.19, while spleen size was inversely correlated with Hb (r = -402, p = 0.001). Flow cytometry showed similar mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) values of CD35, CD55 and C3bαβ levels on the surfaces of RBC in patients and asymptomatic controls (AC). However, binding of C3bαβ correlated significantly with CD35 or CD55 (p < 0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that complement activation contributed to anaemia in acute childhood P. falciparum malaria, possibly through induction of erythrophagocytosis and haemolysis. In

  19. Formation of prostanoids during intravascular complement activation in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Bult, H.; Herman, A. G.; Laekeman, G. M.; Rampart, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-oxo-PGF1 alpha) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) were measured by radioimmunoassay in arterial blood before and after injections of the complement activator, cobra venom factor (CVF). During the control period, the concentration of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha, which gives the sum of prostacyclin plus 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha, and TXB2 were, respectively, less than 20 pg ml-1 and 70 +/- 15 pg ml-1. Intravenous injections of CVF induced dose-dependent, reversible elevations in the plasma levels of both prostanoids. The time courses for the increases of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and TXB2 paralleled the arterial hypotension and thrombocytopenia, suggesting the existence of a causal relationship between these parameters. The results further support our hypothesis that complement-dependent formation of arachidonic acid metabolites contributes to some of the haemodynamic and haematological changes occurring during endotoxin shock. PMID:3884074

  20. Complement and the Alternative Pathway Play an Important Role in LPS/D-GalN-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Xiaojun; Li, Junfeng; Hu, Jingya; Yu, Hong; Chen, Yu; Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Xu, Guilian; Yang, Fei; Wu, Yuzhang; Tomlinson, Stephen; Duan, Zhongping; Zhou, Yusen

    2011-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a clinically severe type of liver injury with an extremely high mortality rate. Although the pathological mechanisms of FHF are not well understood, evidence suggests that the complement system is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders. In the present study, to investigate the role of complement in FHF, we examined groups of mice following intraperitoneal injection of LPS/D-GalN: wild-type C57BL/6 mice, wild-type mice treated with a C3aR antagonist, C5aR monoclonal antibody (C5aRmAb) or CR2-Factor H (CR2-fH, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway), and C3 deficient mice (C3−/− mice). The animals were euthanized and samples analyzed at specific times after LPS/D-GalN injection. The results show that intraperitoneal administration of LPS/D-GalN activated the complement pathway, as evidenced by the hepatic deposition of C3 and C5b-9 and elevated serum levels of the complement activation product C3a, the level of which was associated with the severity of the liver damage. C3a receptor (C3aR) and C5a receptor (C5aR) expression was also upregulated. Compared with wild-type mice, C3−/− mice survived significantly longer and displayed reduced liver inflammation and attenuated pathological damage following LPS/D-GalN injection. Similar levels of protection were seen in mice treated with C3aR antagonist,C5aRmAb or CR2-fH. These data indicate an important role for the C3a and C5a generated by the alternative pathway in LPS/D-GalN-induced FHF. The data further suggest that complement inhibition may be an effective strategy for the adjunctive treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:22069473

  1. Small-molecule factor D inhibitors selectively block the alternative pathway of complement in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xuan; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Thanassi, Jane A; Yang, Guangwei; Baines, Andrea C; Podos, Steven D; Huang, Yongqing; Huang, Mingjun; Brodsky, Robert A

    2017-03-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome are diseases of excess activation of the alternative pathway of complement that are treated with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the terminal complement component C5. Eculizumab must be administered intravenously, and moreover some patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria on eculizumab have symptomatic extravascular hemolysis, indicating an unmet need for additional therapeutic approaches. We report the activity of two novel small-molecule inhibitors of the alternative pathway component Factor D using in vitro correlates of both paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Both compounds bind human Factor D with high affinity and effectively inhibit its proteolytic activity against purified Factor B in complex with C3b. When tested using the traditional Ham test with cells from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients, the Factor D inhibitors significantly reduced complement-mediated hemolysis at concentrations as low as 0.01 μM. Additionally the compound ACH-4471 significantly decreased C3 fragment deposition on paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria erythrocytes, indicating a reduced potential relative to eculizumab for extravascular hemolysis. Using the recently described modified Ham test with serum from patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, the compounds reduced the alternative pathway-mediated killing of PIGA-null reagent cells, thus establishing their potential utility for this disease of alternative pathway of complement dysregulation and validating the modified Ham test as a system for pre-clinical drug development for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, ACH-4471 blocked alternative pathway activity when administered orally to cynomolgus monkeys. In conclusion, the small-molecule Factor D inhibitors show potential as oral therapeutics for human diseases driven by the alternative pathway of complement

  2. Flavonol glycosides and other phenolic compounds from Viola tianshanica and their anti-complement activities.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yan; Wen, Quan; Cao, Jie; Yin, Chengle; Chen, Daofeng; Cheng, Zhihong

    2016-07-01

    Viola tianshanica Maxim. (Violaceae) is a perennial herb distributed in Central Asia, especially in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (XUAR) of China. Preliminary study showed that the ethanol extract of the herb exhibited the anti-complement activity against the classical pathway, but the active components responsible for this capacity remain unknown and are yet to be studied. The objective of this study was the isolation and identification of the anti-complement constituents of V. tianshanica. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions from the ethanol extract of V. tianshanica were purified. The structures of the isolates were identified by spectroscopic methods, and comparing their spectral data with those reported in the literature. All the isolates (0.02-2.50 mg/mL) were evaluated for their anti-complement activity against the classical and alternative pathways. Twenty-one phenolic compounds including 15 flavonol O-glycosides (1-15), one flavone 6,8-di-C-glycoside (16), one flavone aglycone (17), and four phenolic acid derivatives (18-21) were isolated and identified. Bioassay showed that 11 compounds inhibited the classical pathway and the alternative pathway with CH50 and AP50 values of 0.113-1.210 mM and 0.120-1.579 mM, respectively. Preliminary mechanistic study using complement-depleted sera demonstrated that 1 acted on C1q, C2, C4, and C9 components, 16 on C1q, C4, and C5, and 21 on C1q, C3, C4, and C9. All isolated compounds except 1 and 10 were reported for the first time from V. tianshanica. Compound 16 is the first flavone C-glycoside isolated from the herb. Flavonol O-glycosides and phenolic acids contributed the anti-complement activity of the herb.

  3. Early Intra-Articular Complement Activation in Ankle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Salzmann, Gian M.; Niemeyer, Philipp; Guo, Renfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine regulation possibly influences long term outcome following ankle fractures, but little is known about synovial fracture biochemistry. Eight patients with an ankle dislocation fracture were included in a prospective case series and matched with patients suffering from grade 2 osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture and collection of effusion were only significantly associated with synovial aggrecan and C5b-9 levels (P < 0.001). Furthermore, synovial expressions of both proteins correlated with each other (P < 0.001). Although IL-1β expression was relatively low, intra-articular levels correlated with C5a (P < 0.01) and serological C-reactive protein concentrations 2 days after surgery (P < 0.05). Joint effusions were initially dominated by neutrophils, but the portion of monocytes constantly increased reaching 50% at day 6 after fracture (P < 0.02). Whereas aggrecan and IL-1β concentrations were not different in fracture and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P < 0.01). Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures. PMID:24967368

  4. Complement expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells is modulated by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chang; Zhao, Jiawu; Madden, Angelina; Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2013-07-01

    Complement activation is involved in a variety of retinal diseases. We have shown previously that a number of complement components and regulators can be produced locally in the eye, and that retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are the major source of complement expression at the retina-choroidal interface. The expression of complement components by RPE cells is regulated by inflammatory cytokines. Under aging or inflammatory conditions, microglia and macrophages accumulate in the subretinal space, where they are in close contact with RPE cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of activated macrophages on complement expression by RPE cells. Mouse RPE cells were treated with the supernatants from un-activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BM-DMs), the classically activated BM-DMs (M1) and different types of the alternatively activated BM-DMs (M2a by IL-4, M2b by immune complex and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), M2c by IL-10). The expression of inflammatory cytokines and complement genes by RPE cells were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The protein expression of CFB, C3, C1INH, and C1r was examined by Western blot. Our results show that un-stimulated RPE cells express a variety of complement-related genes, and that the expression levels of complement regulators, including C1r, factor H (CFH), DAF1, CD59, C1INH, Crry, and C4BP genes are significantly higher than those of complement component genes (C2, C4, CFB, C3, and C5). Macrophage supernatants increased inflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS), chemokine (CCL2) and complement expression in RPE cells. The supernatants from M0, M2a and M2c macrophages mildly up-regulated (2-3.5-fold) CFB, CFH and C3 gene expression in RPE cells, whereas the supernatants from M1 and M2b macrophages massively increased (10-30-fold) CFB and C3 gene expression in RPE cells. The expression of other genes, including C1r, C2, C4, CFH, Masp1, C1INH, and C4BP in RPE cells was also increased by the supernatants of M1 and M2b

  5. Differences in Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide structure influence assembly of alternative complement pathway C3 convertase on fungal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Washburn, R G; Bryant-Varela, B J; Julian, N C; Bennett, J E

    1991-01-01

    Binding of complement component C3 and Factor B to Cryptococcus neoformans serotypes A through D via the alternative complement pathway was measured in a system containing fresh nonimmune human serum. Serotypes B and C (C. neoformans var. gattii) bound approximately half as many molecules of both complement components as serotypes A and D (C. neoformans var. neoformans). In contrast, removal of xylosyl and glucuronyl side chains from the mannan main chain of capsular polysaccharide by the Smith degradation procedure resulted in binding of similar quantities of C3 to each of the four serotypes. We conclude that the relatively high degree of side chain substitution of capsular polysaccharide from C. neoformans variety gattii contributes to inefficient surface assembly of the alternative pathway C3 convertase. Inefficient binding of alternative pathway complement components to serotypes B and C may contribute to the relative difficulty in successfully treating infections caused by these organisms.

  6. Annexin A2 Enhances Complement Activation by Inhibiting Factor H1

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Brandon; Tong, Hua Hua; Laskowski, Jennifer; Jonscher, Karen; Goetz, Lindsey; Woolaver, Rachel; Hannan, Jonathan; Li, Yong Xing; Hourcade, Dennis; Pickering, Matthew C.; Holers, V. Michael; Thurman, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H is a circulating protein that regulates activation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement. Mutations and genetic variations of factor H are associated with several AP-mediated diseases, highlighting the critical role of factor H in AP regulation. AP-mediated inflammation is typically triggered by illness or tissue injury, however, and tissue injury can trigger AP activation in individuals with fully functional factor H. This suggests that factor H function is affected by local conditions within tissues. We hypothesized that inducible proteins impair the ability of factor H to locally control the AP, thereby increasing AP activation. We used purified murine factor H to immunoprecipitate binding partners from mouse kidneys. Using immunoaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry we then identified annexin A2 as a factor H binding partner. Further experiments showed that annexin A2 reduces the binding of factor H to cell surfaces. Recombinant annexin A2 impaired complement regulation by factor H, and increased complement activation on renal cell surfaces in vitro and in vivo. In a murine model of acute pneumococcal otitis media the administration of annexin A2 increased AP-mediated bacterial opsonization and clearance. In conclusion, the local production of annexin A2 within tissues suppresses regulation of the AP by factor H. Annexin A2 can contribute to AP-mediated tissue inflammation by locally impairing factor H function, but annexin A2 can also improve complement-mediated bacterial clearance. PMID:26729803

  7. Nasal Reshaping with Hyaluronic Acid: An Alternative or Complement to Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rhinoplasty has traditionally been preferred for correction of nasal defects. Long-term clinical experience with hyaluronic acid (HA) injection as an alternative or complement to rhinoplasty is presented. Methods: A retrospective review of the author’s clinical experience with HA gel for nasal reshaping from 1997 to 2012 was conducted, with treatments performed during 1998, 2005, and 2012 selected for detailed review. Results: More than 250 patients were treated for nasal reshaping with HA since 1997. In addition to being a complement to surgery, HA injection successfully addressed nasal defects that would have been difficult to correct surgically. The effect persisted for >1 year in most patients (>5 y in some patients), with individual variations. No serious complications occurred. When comparing the 3 years reviewed in detail, new indications for nasal reshaping with HA gel became evident over time, which was also reflected by the increase in number of patients treated (1998: n = 2; 2005: n = 22; 2012: n = 51). Of these patients, 55 (73%) received HA injection instead of rhinoplasty, 20 (27%) received HA injection after rhinoplasty, and 5 (7%) underwent rhinoplasty after HA injection. The mean injection volume was 0.4 mL HA gel/treatment. All patients were satisfied with the primary outcome of treatment. Retreatment was performed in 32 patients (43%). Conclusions: Injection of HA gel is a valuable tool for nasal reshaping. It can also be used for correction of minor postrhinoplasty defects in appropriate patients. PMID:27975025

  8. Nasal Reshaping with Hyaluronic Acid: An Alternative or Complement to Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hedén, Per

    2016-11-01

    Rhinoplasty has traditionally been preferred for correction of nasal defects. Long-term clinical experience with hyaluronic acid (HA) injection as an alternative or complement to rhinoplasty is presented. A retrospective review of the author's clinical experience with HA gel for nasal reshaping from 1997 to 2012 was conducted, with treatments performed during 1998, 2005, and 2012 selected for detailed review. More than 250 patients were treated for nasal reshaping with HA since 1997. In addition to being a complement to surgery, HA injection successfully addressed nasal defects that would have been difficult to correct surgically. The effect persisted for >1 year in most patients (>5 y in some patients), with individual variations. No serious complications occurred. When comparing the 3 years reviewed in detail, new indications for nasal reshaping with HA gel became evident over time, which was also reflected by the increase in number of patients treated (1998: n = 2; 2005: n = 22; 2012: n = 51). Of these patients, 55 (73%) received HA injection instead of rhinoplasty, 20 (27%) received HA injection after rhinoplasty, and 5 (7%) underwent rhinoplasty after HA injection. The mean injection volume was 0.4 mL HA gel/treatment. All patients were satisfied with the primary outcome of treatment. Retreatment was performed in 32 patients (43%). Injection of HA gel is a valuable tool for nasal reshaping. It can also be used for correction of minor postrhinoplasty defects in appropriate patients.

  9. Complement receptor 2 polymorphisms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus modulate alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Katherine B.; Windels, Daniel C.; Zhao, Jian; Gadeliya, Agnessa V.; Wu, Hui; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Harley, John B.; Merrill, Joan; Kimberly, Robert P.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; James, Judith A.; Moser, Kathy L.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Ulgiati, Daniela; Tsao, Betty P.; Boackle, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic factors influence susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A recent family-based analysis in Caucasian and Chinese populations provided evidence for association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) gene with SLE. Here we confirmed this result in a case-control analysis of an independent European-derived population including 2084 patients with SLE and 2853 healthy controls. A haplotype formed by the minor alleles of three CR2 SNPs (rs1048971, rs17615, rs4308977) showed significant association with decreased risk of SLE (30.4% in cases vs. 32.6% in controls, P = 0.016, OR = 0.90 [0.82-0.98]). Two of these SNPs are in exon 10, directly 5′ of an alternatively spliced exon preferentially expressed in follicular dendritic cells (FDC), and the third is in the alternatively spliced exon. Effects of these SNPs as well as a fourth SNP in exon 11 (rs17616) on alternative splicing were evaluated. We found that the minor alleles of these SNPs decreased splicing efficiency of exon 11 both in vitro and ex vivo. These findings further implicate CR2 in the pathogenesis of SLE and suggest that CR2 variants alter the maintenance of tolerance and autoantibody production in the secondary lymphoid tissues where B cells and FDCs interact. PMID:19387458

  10. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  11. Smoke exposure causes endoplasmic reticulum stress and lipid accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium through oxidative stress and complement activation.

    PubMed

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-05-23

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  12. Bypass-activation of the complement system starting with C3

    PubMed Central

    Bitter-Suermann, D.; Dierich, M.; König, W.; Hadding, U.

    1972-01-01

    Antibody independent activation of the complement system starting with C3 can be achieved by means of a purified factor from cobra venom (VF), which interacts with a purified serum factor (SF). The latter is a normal constituent of guinea-pig and human serum (C3-proactivator). The interaction between VF and SF is Mg+ + dependent and leads to the formation of a complex. Immunological analysis reveals that both VF- and SF-antigens are contained in the complex. The VF—SF complex activates enzymatically isolated C3, which in the presence of the subsequent components yields all effects of the normal complement sequence. Purified C5 is not affected by the complex. Its activation is mediated by activated C3. The VF—SF system represents a model for direct activation of C3 to C9 independent of antibody, C1, C4 and C2. An analogous pathway of alternate complement activation might be used by other substances, e.g. endotoxin, guinea-pig γ1-immune aggregates and zymosan. The corresponding serum factors are under investigation. ImagesFIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4214761

  13. Complement activation on poly(ethylene oxide)-like RFGD-deposited surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Szott, Luisa Mayorga; Stein, M. Jeanette; Ratner, Buddy D.; Horbett, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Non-specific protein adsorption, particularly fibrinogen (Fg), is thought to be an initiating step in the foreign body response (FBR) to biomaterials by promoting phagocyte attachment. In previous studies, we therefore prepared radio frequency glow discharge (RFGD) polyethylene oxide (PEO)-like tetraglyme coatings (CH3O(CH2CH2O)4CH3) adsorbing less than 10 ng/cm2 Fg and showed that they had the expected low monocyte adhesion in vitro. However, when these were implanted in vivo, many adherent inflammatory cells and a fibrous capsule were found, suggesting the role of alternative proteins, such as activated complement proteins, in the FBR to these materials. We therefore investigated complement interactions with the tetraglyme surfaces. First, because of its well known role in complement C3 activation, we measured the hydroxyl group (-OH) content of tetraglyme, but found it to be very low. Second, we measured C3 adsorption to tetraglyme from plasma. Low amounts of C3 adsorbed on tetraglyme, though it displayed higher binding strength than the control surfaces. Finally, complement activation was determined by measuring C3a and SC5b-9 levels in serum after incubating with tetraglyme, as well as other surfaces that served as positive and negative controls, namely poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels, Silastic sheeting, and poly(ethylene glycol) self-assembled monolayers with different end groups. Despite displaying low hydroxyl group concentration, relatively high C3a and SC5b-9 levels were found in serum exposed to tetraglyme, similar to the values due to our positive control, PVA. Our results support the conclusion that complement activation by tetraglyme is a possible mechanism involved in the FBR to these biomaterials. PMID:21105163

  14. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and Its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway-specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases*

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here, we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. We analyzed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The small angle x-ray scattering-derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared with that established for the alternative pathway proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar to the crystal structure of the alternative pathway C3 convertase C3bBb, which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5. PMID:27252379

  15. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and Its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway-specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan K; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-08-05

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here, we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. We analyzed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The small angle x-ray scattering-derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared with that established for the alternative pathway proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar to the crystal structure of the alternative pathway C3 convertase C3bBb, which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Persistent complement activation on tumor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, F.; Rus, H. G.; Retegan, M.; Vlaicu, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neoantigens of the C5b-9 complement complex, IgG, C3, C4, S-protein/vitronectin, fibronectin, and macrophages were localized on 17 samples of breast cancer and on 6 samples of benign breast tumors using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. All the tissue samples with carcinoma in each the TNM stages presented C5b-9 deposits on the membranes of tumor cells, thin granules on cell remnants, and diffuse deposits in the necrotic areas. When chemotherapy and radiation therapy preceded surgery, C5b-9 deposits were more intense and extended. The C5b-9 deposits were absent in all the samples with benign lesions. S-protein/vitronectin was present as fibrillar deposits in the connective tissue matrix and as diffuse deposits around the tumor cells, less intense and extended than fibronectin. IgG, C3, and C4 deposits were present only in carcinoma samples. The presence of C5b-9 deposits is indicative of complement activation and its subsequent pathogenetic effects in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374587

  17. Anti-Mouse Properdin TSR 5/6 Monoclonal Antibodies Block Complement Alternative Pathway-dependent Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Paula; Akk, Antonina M.; Zhou, Hui-fang; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2015-01-01

    The complement alternative pathway (AP) is a major contributor to a broad and growing spectrum of diseases that includes age-related macular degeneration, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and preeclampsia. As a result, there is much interest in the therapeutic disruption of AP activity. Properdin, the only positive regulator of the AP, is a particularly promising AP target. Several issues need to be clarified before the potential for properdin-directed therapy can be realized. In this report we use a portion of the mouse properdin protein, expressed in a bacterial system, to raise rabbit polyclonal and hamster monoclonal antibodies that block properdin-dependent pathogenesis. These antibodies, when employed with AP-dependent mouse disease models, can help evaluate the feasibility of properdin-directed therapy. PMID:25723276

  18. Complement factor B activation in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Ivan; Dalloul, Mudar; Wong, Karen A; Bakare, Olufunke; Schweis, Franz; Garala, Maya; Alam, Amit; Medranda, Giorgio; Lekovic, Jovana; Shuaib, Waqas; Tedjasukmana, Andreas; Little, Perry; Hanono, Daniel; Wijetilaka, Ruvini; Weedon, Jeremy; Lin, Jun; Toledano, Roulhac d'Arby; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Bb, the active fragment of complement factor B (fB), has been reported to be a predictor of preeclampsia. However, conflicting results have been found by some investigators. We hypothesized that the disagreement in findings may be due to the racial/ethnic differences among various study groups, and that fB activation is significant in women of an ethnic minority with preeclampsia. We investigated the maternal and fetal levels of Bb (the activated fB fragment) in pregnant women of an ethnic minority with or without preeclampsia. We enrolled 291 pregnant women (96% of an ethnic minority, including 78% African-American). Thirteen percent of these were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Maternal venous blood was collected from all participants together with fetal umbilical cord blood samples from 154 deliveries in the 291 women. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate analyses. Maternal Bb levels were significantly higher in the preeclamptic group than in the nonpreeclamptic group. Levels of Bb in fetal cord blood were similar in both groups. Subgroup analyses of African-American patients' results confirmed the study hypothesis that there would be a significant increase in Bb in the maternal blood of the preeclamptic group and no increase in Bb in the fetal cord blood of this group. These results suggest that a maternal immune response through complement fB might play a role in the development of preeclampsia, particularly in African-American patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. C4, BF, C3 allele distribution and complement activity in healthy aged people and centenarians.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, D; Fradà, G; Di Franco, P; Feo, S; Franceschi, C; Sansoni, P; Brai, M

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the complement system and the distribution of some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class III alleles (C4, BF) in healthy aged people (77 centenarians and 89 elderly subjects). We have also studied the alleles of C3, a complement component genetically unrelated to HLA, the immunochemical levels of C4 and C3 and serum functional hemolytic activity for classical (CH50) and alternative (AP50) complement pathway. The levels of C3 and C4 and the CH50 and AP50 were found to be within the normal range. The frequencies of C3, BF, and C4A alleles were similar in the cohorts that have been studied. For C4B null allele (C4BQ0) a trend toward an increase in the older cohort was observed, although the differences were not significant after statistical correction. Our data suggest that the complement system is well preserved in centenarians and elderly subjects and class III HLA antigens are equally distributed in aged cohorts and in young healthy individuals.

  20. Potassium humate inhibits complement activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Naude, P.J.

    2009-08-15

    The effects of brown coal derived potassium humate on lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and complement activation were investigated in vitro. Potassium humate increased lymphocyte proliferation of phytohaemaglutinin A (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated mononuclear lymphocytes (MNL) in vitro from concentrations of 20 to 80 {mu} g/ml, in a dose dependant manner. On the other hand potassium humate, at 40 {mu} g/ml, significantly inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 by PHA stimulated MNL. Regarding complement activation it was found that potassium humate inhibits the activation of both the alternative and classical pathways without affecting the stability of the red blood cell membranes. These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory potential of potassium humate could be partially due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for the initiation of these reactions as well as inhibition of complement activation. The increased lymphocyte proliferation observed, might be due to increased IL-2 production as previously been documented.

  1. Significance of complement components C1q and C4 bound to circulating immune complexes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: support for classical complement pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Brooke E; Reed, Melinda R; Chauhan, Anil K; Dehlendorf, Amanda B; Moore, Terry L

    2011-01-01

    Immune complexes (ICs) from sera of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients show increased complement opsonisation; however, a definitive role for involvement of the classical or alternative pathway is not entirely clear. To delineate the role of these pathways, we measured activated complement products bound to circulating IC (CICs) in the sera of JIA patients. Sera from 100 JIA patients and 22 healthy children were collected. C1q, C4, C3, C3d, and membrane attack complex (MAC) bound to CICs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data was compared to IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgG anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels. Mean levels of C1q, C4, and MAC bound to CICs were significantly elevated in JIA patients compared to healthy children. C1q correlated significantly with C4 and MAC bound to CICs and C4 and MAC also demonstrated significant correlation. No significant differences were noted in complement components bound to CICs when evaluating IgM RF, anti-CCP antibody, and CRP positivity. A significant correlation was noted between MAC bound to CICs and ESR. C1q and MAC bound to CICs mean levels were significantly higher in patients with an elevated ESR compared to those with a normal ESR level. JIA patients have elevated levels of complement components bound to CICs, particularly from the classical pathway. Moreover, classical pathway components were associated with ESR, a marker of disease activity. MAC bound to CICs also correlated significantly with ESR, further supporting the notion of complement-mediated tissue injury that is triggered by IC-mediated classical pathway activation.

  2. Activation of Human Complement System by Dextran-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Is Not Affected by Dextran/Fe Ratio, Hydroxyl Modifications, and Crosslinking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guankui; Chen, Fangfang; Banda, Nirmal K.; Holers, V. Michael; Wu, LinPing; Moghimi, S. Moein; Simberg, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    While having tremendous potential as therapeutic and imaging tools, the clinical use of engineered nanoparticles has been associated with serious safety concerns. Activation of the complement cascade and the release of proinflammatory factors C3a and C5a may contribute to infusion-related reactions, whereas opsonization with C3 fragments promotes rapid recognition and clearance of nanomaterials by mononuclear phagocytes. We used dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO), which are potent activators of the complement system, to study the role of nanoparticle surface chemistry in inciting complement in human serum. Using complement inhibitors and measuring levels of fluid phase markers (sC5b-9, C5a, and Bb), we found that the majority of human complement activation by SPIO is through the alternative pathways (AP). SPIO prepared with high dextran/iron ratio showed some complement activation via calcium-sensitive pathways, but the AP was responsible for the bulk of complement activation and amplification. Activation via the AP required properdin, the positive regulator of the alternative C3bBb convertase. Modification of sugar alcohols of dextran with alkylating, acylating, or crosslinking agents did not overcome complement activation and C3 opsonization. These data demonstrate that human complement activation is independent of dextran modification of SPIO and suggest a crucial role of the AP in immune recognition of nano-assemblies in human serum. PMID:27777575

  3. Elastase and metalloproteinase activities regulate soluble complement receptor 1 release.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Hess, C; Miot, S; Spertini, O; Lutz, H; Schifferli, J A

    1999-11-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is cleaved from the surface of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the membrane-proximal region to yield a soluble fragment (sCR1) that contains the functional domains. The enzymes involved in this cleavage are produced by the PMN itself, since in vitro stimulation of purified PMN is followed by sCR1 release. Purified human neutrophil elastase (HNE) cleaved CR1 from erythrocytes and urinary vesicles originating from podocytes and enhanced tenfold the cleavage of CR1 from activated PMN. The largest fragment released from PMN by HNE was identical in size to CR1 shed spontaneously. The CR1 fragments cleaved from erythrocytes were functional. The shedding of sCR1 by activated PMN was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (80 +/- 10%), alpha1-antiprotease (50 +/- 5%) and elafin (60 +/- 5%). Furthermore the cleavage was blocked by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (70 +/- 6 %) as well as by a monoclonal antibody against human neutrophil collagenase MMP8 (40 +/- 10%). Maximal inhibition of sCR1 shedding was obtained by a combination of 1,10-phenanthroline with elafin (86 +/- 6%). These inhibitors had no effect on L-selectin shedding, indicating that the cleavage of CR1 was specific. In conclusion, elastase or elastase-like activity may be responsible for the shedding of functional sCR1 in vivo, and this activity is controlled by the local release of PMN metalloproteases and alpha1antiprotease.

  4. The terminal pathway of the complement system is activated in focal penetrating but not in mild diffuse traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Elham; Davidsson, Johan; Gyorgy, Andrea; Agoston, Denes V; Risling, Mårten; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2013-12-01

    The complement system plays an important role in the inflammatory response activated by many central nervous system disorders. However, its significance in traumatic diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is not fully known. Here we analyze the complement activity in two rat models of traumatic brain injury (TBI); a focal penetration injury (pen-TBI) and a rotational acceleration injury (rot-TBI) that leads to a mild TAI. We used in situ hybridization to examine the distribution of mRNA for C1q and C3 and immunohistochemistry to examine the presence of the C3 protein and C5b-9 complex at 1-5 days after injury. We found a time-dependent complement activity in both models. However, the responses caused by the two models were different. We detected C5b-9 surrounding the cavity in pen-TBI, but C5b-9 was not found in the rot-TBI. Our findings suggest that the terminal complement pathway is progressed to the formation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex only in the penetrating TBI but not in isolated TAI model. This indicates that the complement activation does not lead to membrane-damaging effects and a subsequent secondary axotomy in TAI by the terminal complex C5b-9. The role of complement activation in TAI is unclear, but might indicate an alternative function following rot-TBI, such as opsonizing the synapses for elimination.

  5. Variants in Complement Factor H and Complement Factor H-Related Protein Genes, CFHR3 and CFHR1, Affect Complement Activation in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Zhai, Ya-Ling; Wang, Feng-Mei; Hou, Ping; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Xu, Da-Min; Shi, Su-Fang; Liu, Li-Jun; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Novak, Jan; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation is common in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and associated with disease severity. Our recent genome-wide association study of IgAN identified susceptibility loci on 1q32 containing the complement regulatory protein-encoding genes CFH and CFHR1–5, with rs6677604 in CFH as the top single-nucleotide polymorphism and CFHR3–1 deletion (CFHR3–1∆) as the top signal for copy number variation. In this study, to explore the clinical effects of variation in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 on IgAN susceptibility and progression, we enrolled two populations. Group 1 included 1178 subjects with IgAN and available genome-wide association study data. Group 2 included 365 subjects with IgAN and available clinical follow-up data. In group 1, rs6677604 was associated with mesangial C3 deposition by genotype–phenotype correlation analysis. In group 2, we detected a linkage between the rs6677604-A allele and CFHR3–1∆ and found that the rs6677604-A allele was associated with higher serum levels of CFH and lower levels of the complement activation split product C3a. Furthermore, CFH levels were positively associated with circulating C3 levels and negatively associated with mesangial C3 deposition. Moreover, serum levels of the pathogenic galactose-deficient glycoform of IgA1 were also associated with the degree of mesangial C3 deposition in patients with IgAN. Our findings suggest that genetic variants in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 affect complement activation and thereby, predispose patients to develop IgAN. PMID:25205734

  6. Characterization of serum complement activity of saltwater (Crocodylus porosus) and freshwater (Crocodylus johnstoni) crocodiles.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Mark; Britton, Adam

    2006-04-01

    We employed a spectroscopic assay, based on the hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBCs), to assess the innate immune function of saltwater and freshwater crocodiles in vitro. Incubation of serum from freshwater and saltwater crocodiles with SRBCs resulted in concentration-dependent increases in SRBC hemolysis. The hemolytic activity occurred rapidly, with detectable activity within 2 min and maximum activity at 20 min. These activities, in both crocodilian species, were heat sensitive, unaffected by 20 mM methylamine, and completely inhibited by low concentrations of EDTA, suggesting that the alternative serum complement cascade is responsible for the observed effects. The hemolytic activities of the sera were inhibited by other chelators of divalent metal ions, such as phosphate and citrate. The inhibition of SRBC hemolysis by EDTA could be completely restored by the addition of 10 mM Ca2+ or Mg2+, but not Ba2+, Cu2+ or Fe2+, indicating specificity for these metal ions. The serum complement activities of both crocodilians were temperature-dependent, with peak activities occurring at 25-30 degrees C and reduced activities below 25 degrees C and above 35 degrees C.

  7. A teleost complement factor Ba possesses antimicrobial activity and inhibits bacterial infection in fish.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Peng; Sun, Li

    2017-01-24

    Complement factor B (Bf) is a component of the complement system. Following activation of the alternative pathway of the complement system, factor B is cleaved into Ba and Bb fragments. In fish, the Bf of rainbow trout is known to act as a C3 convertase, but the function of the Ba fragment is essentially unknown. In this study, we examined the expression patterns of tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis Bf (named CsBf) and the biological activity of the Ba fragment of CsBf (named CsBa). CsBf possesses the conserved domains of Bf and shares 39.9%-56.4% sequence identities with other fish Bf. CsBf expression was high in liver, muscle, and heart, and low in intestine, blood, and kidney. Bacterial infection significantly induced CsBf expression in kidney, spleen, and liver in a time-dependent manner. Recombinant CsBa (rCsBa) exhibited apparent binding capacities to bacteria and tongue sole peripheral blood leukocytes, and binding of rCsBa to bacteria inhibited bacterial growth. When overexpressed in tongue sole, CsBa significantly reduced bacterial dissemination in fish tissues. Together these results indicate for the first time that a fish Ba possesses antibacterial effect as well as immune cell-binding capacity, and thus probably plays a role in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

  8. Recombinant glycoproteins that inhibit complement activation and also bind the selectin adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Rittershaus, C W; Thomas, L J; Miller, D P; Picard, M D; Geoghegan-Barek, K M; Scesney, S M; Henry, L D; Sen, A C; Bertino, A M; Hannig, G; Adari, H; Mealey, R A; Gosselin, M L; Couto, M; Hayman, E G; Levin, J L; Reinhold, V N; Marsh, H C

    1999-04-16

    Soluble human complement receptor type 1 (sCR1, TP10) has been expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) DUKX-B11 cells and shown to inhibit the classical and alternative complement pathways in vitro and in vivo. A truncated version of sCR1 lacking the long homologous repeat-A domain (LHR-A) containing the C4b binding site has similarly been expressed and designated sCR1[desLHR-A]. sCR1[desLHR-A] was shown to be a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in vitro and to function in vivo. In this study, sCR1 and sCR1[desLHR-A] were expressed in CHO LEC11 cells with an active alpha(1,3)-fucosyltransferase, which makes possible the biosynthesis of the sialyl-Lewisx (sLex) tetrasaccharide (NeuNAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc) during post-translational glycosylation. The resulting glycoproteins, designated sCR1sLex and sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex, respectively, retained the complement regulatory activities of their DUKX B11 counterparts, which lack alpha(1-3)-fucose. Carbohydrate analysis of purified sCR1sLex and sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex indicated an average incorporation of 10 and 8 mol of sLex/mol of glycoprotein, respectively. sLex is a carbohydrate ligand for the selectin adhesion molecules. sCR1sLex was shown to specifically bind CHO cells expressing cell surface E-selectin. sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex inhibited the binding of the monocytic cell line U937 to human aortic endothelial cells, which had been activated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha to up-regulate the expression of E-selectin. sCR1sLex inhibited the binding of U937 cells to surface-adsorbed P-selectin-IgG. sCR1sLex and sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex have thus demonstrated both complement regulatory activity and the capacity to bind selectins and to inhibit selectin-mediated cell adhesion in vitro.

  9. In vivo Bactericidal Activity of Mouse Complement Against Esch. coli

    PubMed Central

    Medhurst, Fiona A.; Glynn, A. A.

    1970-01-01

    Live Escherichia coli of complement sensitive and resistant strains were labelled with 14C and injected i.v. into normal mice and into a co-isogenic strain deficient in C′5. The fate of the bacteria was followed by determining total and viable counts in blood samples taken at intervals over a 30 min. period and in homogenates of the liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys taken at the end of the experiment. The results show that sensitive bacteria can be killed by mouse complement within the circulation and suggest that complement may also play a part in the intracellular killing of Esch. coli in some organs. PMID:4923650

  10. A novel anti-inflammatory activity of lysozyme: modulation of serum complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ogundele, M O

    1998-01-01

    Lysozyme is an ubiquitous enzyme found in most biological secretions and leukocytes. This study was aimed at investigating its interaction with other inflammatory mediators on mucosa surfaces, particularly the complement system. Lysozyme has been shown in our present study, to inhibit the haemolytic activity of serum complement in a dose-dependent fashion, when tested within the levels present in normal and inflamed breast-milk samples, and other mucosal secretions. This represents a new anti-inflammatory action of lysozyme in relation to the serum complement, and the exact mode of the interaction need further studies. PMID:9883972

  11. The paralogous salivary anti-complement proteins IRAC I and IRAC II encoded by Ixodes ricinus ticks have broad and complementary inhibitory activities against the complement of different host species.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Hélène; Daix, Virginie; Gillet, Laurent; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2007-02-01

    Several observations suggest that inhibition of the host complement alternative pathway by Ixodes tick saliva is crucial to achieve blood feeding. We recently described two paralogous anti-complement proteins called Ixodes ricinus anti-complement (IRAC) proteins I and II co-expressed in I. ricinus salivary glands. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that these sequences were diversifying by a process of positive Darwinian selection, possibly leading to molecules with different biological properties. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that each paralogue may have different inhibitory activities against the complement of different natural host species, thereby contributing to broaden the host range of I. ricinus ticks. IRAC I and IRAC II were tested against the complement of eight I. ricinus natural host species (six mammals and two birds). The results demonstrate that IRAC I and IRAC II have broad and complementary inhibition activities against the complement of different host species. This report is the first description of paralogous anti-complement molecules encoded by a pathogen with broad and complementary inhibitory activities against the complement of different host species.

  12. Immunologic injury of cultured cells infected with measles virus. I. role of IfG antibody and the alternative complement pathway

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    In these studies, a number of human cell lines including epithelial, neural, glial, and lymphoid cells infected with several strains of measles virus were found to be lysed upon incubation with fresh sera from humans containing antibody measles virus. In all instances, the cytolytic event was mediated by alternative complement (C) pathway without a significant contribution from classical pathway. In contrast, isolated measles virus in conjunction with antibody was found to selectively activate the classical C pathway. Measles antibodies of the IgG class, but not the IgA class, possessed cytolytic potential against cells infected with measles virus. Human IgG antibodies could directly activate the alternative C pathway. No defect was found in cytolytic measles antibody in sera or cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, nor was the alternative C pathway impaired in sera from these patients. Sera from newborn humans exhibited a functional alternative C pathway. PMID:1092789

  13. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Clifford; Smith, Kaylee E.; Castillejos, Alexandra; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Connor, Kip M.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathic diseases often progress in 2 phases: initial regression of retinal vasculature (phase 1) followed by subsequent neovascularization (NV) (phase 2). The immune system has been shown to aid in vascular pruning in such retinopathies; however, little is known about the role of the alternative complement pathway in the initial vascular regression phase. Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), we observed that alternative complement pathway–deficient mice (Fb−/−) exhibited a mild decrease in vascular loss at postnatal day (P)8 compared with age- and strain-matched controls (P = 0.035). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the retinal blood vessels. Expression of the complement inhibitors Cd55 and Cd59 was significantly decreased in blood vessels isolated from hyperoxic retinas compared with those from normoxic control mice. Vegf expression was measured at P8 and found to be significantly lower in OIR mice than in normoxic control mice (P = 0.0048). Further examination of specific Vegf isoform expression revealed a significant decrease in Vegf120 (P = 0.00032) and Vegf188 (P = 0.0092). In conjunction with the major modulating effects of Vegf during early retinal vascular development, our data suggest a modest involvement of the alternative complement pathway in targeting vessels for regression in the initial vaso-obliteration stage of OIR.—Kim, C., Smith, K. E., Castillejos, A., Diaz-Aguilar, D., Saint-Geniez, M., Connor, K. M. The alternative complement pathway aids in vascular regression during the early stages of a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. PMID:26631482

  14. Plasma Complement Components and Activation Fragments: Associations with Age-Related Macular Degeneration Genotypes and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Robyn; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth; Atkinson, John P.; Giclas, Patricia C.; Rosner, Bernard; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several genes encoding complement system components and fragments are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study was conducted to determine whether alterations in circulating levels of these markers of complement activation and regulation are also independently associated with advanced AMD and whether they are related to AMD genotypes. Methods Plasma and DNA samples were selected from individuals in our AMD registry who had progressed to or developed the advanced stages of AMD, including 58 with geographic atrophy and 62 with neovascular disease. Subjects of similar age and sex, but without AMD, and who did not progress were included as controls (n = 60). Plasma complment components (C3, CFB, CFI, CFH, and factor D) and activation fragments (Bb, C3a, C5a, iC3b, and SC5b-9) were analyzed. DNA samples were genotyped for seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in six genes previously shown to be associated with AMD: CFB, CFH, C2, C3, and CFI and the LOC387715/ARMS2 gene region. The association between AMD and each complement biomarker was assessed by using logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and proinflammatory risk factors: smoking and body mass index (BMI). Functional genomic analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the complement markers and genotypes. Concordance, or C, statistics were calculated to assess the effect of complement components and activation fragments in an AMD gene-environment prediction model. Results The highest quartiles of Bb and C5a were significantly associated with advanced AMD, when compared with the lowest quartiles. In multivariate models without genetic variants, the odds ratio (OR) for Bb was 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-8.6), and the OR for C5a was 3.6 (95% CI = 1.2-10.3). With adjustment for genetic variants, these ORs were substantially higher. The alternative pathway regulator CFH was inversely associated with AMD in the model without genotypes (OR = 0.3; P = 0

  15. Regulator of complement activation (RCA) gene cluster in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2009-05-01

    Genome and expressed sequence tag information of Xenopus tropicalis suggested that short-consensus repeat (SCR)-containing proteins are encoded by three genes that are mapped within a 300-kb downstream of PFKFB2, which is a marker gene for the regulator of complement activation (RCA) loci in human and chicken. Based on this observation, we cloned the three cDNAs of these proteins using 3'- or 5'-RACE technique. Since their primary structures and locations of the proximity to the PFKFB2 locus, we named them amphibian RCA protein (ARC) 1, 2, and 3. Expression in human HEK293 or CHO cells suggested that ARC1 is a soluble protein of Mr approximately 67 kDa, ARC2 is a membrane protein with Mr 44 kDa, and ARC3 a secretary protein with a putative transmembrane region. They were N-glycosylated during maturation. In human and chicken RCA clusters, the order in which genes for soluble, GPI-anchored, and membrane forms of SCR proteins are arranged is from the distant to proximity to the PFKFB2 gene. However, the amphibian ARC1, 2, and 3 resembled one another and did not reflect the same order found in human and chicken RCA genes. This may be due to self-duplication of ARCs to form a family, and it evolved after the amphibia separated from the ancestor of the amniotes, which possessed soluble, GPI-anchored, and membrane forms of SCR protein members. Taken together, frog possesses a RCA locus, but the constitution of the ARC proteins differs from that of the amniotes with a unique self-resemblance.

  16. Alternative complement pathway of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus: molecular characterization and expression analysis of factors Bf/C2 and Df

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complement system important in both innate and adaptive host defense against microbial infection in vertebrates. It contains three pathways: the classical, alternative, and lectin pathways. Complement component factors B and D are two crucial proteases in the alternative pathway. In this study,...

  17. Complement activity is associated with disease severity in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Lotte; Cats, Elisabeth A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Jansen, Marc D.; Piepers, Sanne; Veldink, Jan Herman; Franssen, Hessel; Stork, Abraham C.J.; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; van Strijp, Jos A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high innate activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement is associated with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and whether levels of innate complement activity or the potential of anti-GM1 antibodies to activate the complement system correlate with disease severity. Methods: We performed a case-control study including 79 patients with MMN and 79 matched healthy controls. Muscle weakness was documented with Medical Research Council scale sum score and axonal loss with nerve conduction studies. Activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement was assessed by ELISA. We also determined serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) concentrations and polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) and quantified complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies by ELISA. Results: Activity of the classical and lectin pathways, MBL2 genotypes, and serum MBL concentrations did not differ between patients and controls. Complement activation by anti-GM1 IgM antibodies was exclusively mediated through the classical pathway and correlated with antibody titers (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that both high innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and high complement-activating capacity of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were significantly associated with more severe muscle weakness and axonal loss. Conclusion: High innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and efficient complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies are determinants of disease severity in patients with MMN. These findings underline the importance of anti-GM1 antibody–mediated complement activation in the pathogenesis and clinical course of MMN. PMID:26161430

  18. Detection and characterisation of Complement protein activity in bovine milk by bactericidal sequestration assay.

    PubMed

    Maye, Susan; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Kelly, Philip M

    2015-08-01

    While the Complement protein system in human milk is well characterised, there is little information on its presence and activity in bovine milk. Complement forms part of the innate immune system, hence the importance of its contribution during milk ingestion to the overall defences of the neonate. A bactericidal sequestration assay, featuring a Complement sensitive strain, Escherichia coli 0111, originally used to characterise Complement activity in human milk was successfully applied to freshly drawn bovine milk samples, thus, providing an opportunity to compare Complement activities in both human and bovine milks. Although not identical in response, the levels of Complement activity in bovine milk were found to be closely comparable with that of human milk. Differential counts of Esch. coli 0111 after 2 h incubation were 6.20 and 6.06 log CFU/ml, for raw bovine and human milks, respectively - the lower value representing a stronger Complement response. Exposing bovine milk to a range of thermal treatments e.g. 42, 45, 65, 72, 85 or 95 °C for 10 min, progressively inhibited Complement activity by increasing temperature, thus confirming the heat labile nature of this immune protein system. Low level Complement activity was found, however, in 65 and 72 °C heat treated samples and in retailed pasteurised milk which highlights the outer limit to which high temperature, short time (HTST) industrial thermal processes should be applied if retention of activity is a priority. Concentration of Complement in the fat phase was evident following cream separation, and this was also reflected in the further loss of activity recorded in low fat variants of retailed pasteurised milk. Laboratory-based churning of the cream during simulated buttermaking generated an aqueous (buttermilk) phase with higher levels of Complement activity than the fat phase, thus pointing to a likely association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) layer.

  19. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  20. Probable systemic lupus erythematosus with cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPS).

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, D; Weinstein, A

    2016-08-01

    Complement activation is a key feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Detection of cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPS) occurs more frequently than serum hypocomplementemia in definite lupus. We describe a patient with normocomplementemic probable SLE who did not fulfill ACR classification criteria for lupus, but the diagnosis was supported by the presence of CB-CAPS.

  1. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electroluminescent TCC, C3dg and fB/Bb epitope assays for profiling complement cascade activation in vitro using an activated complement serum calibration standard.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, B Jansen; Bergseth, G; Mollnes, T E; Shaw, A M

    2014-01-15

    Electroluminescent assays for epitopes on the complement components C3dg, terminal complement complex (TCC) and factor B/Bb (fB/Bb) have been developed with capture and detection antibodies to produce detection limits C3dg=91±9ng/mL, TCC=3±0.1ng/mL and fB=55.7±0.1ng/mL. The assay performance was assessed against a series of zymosan and heat aggregated IgG (HAIgG) in vitro activations of complement using a calibrated activated complement serum (ACS) as calibration standard. The ACS standard was stable within 20% accuracy over a 6-month period with freeze-thaw cycles as required. Differential activation of the complement cascade was observed for TCC showing a pseudo-first order formation half-life of 3.5h after activation with zymosan. The C3dg activation fragment indicates a 10% total activation for both activation agents. The kinetic-epitope analysis for fB indicates that the capture epitope is on the fB/Bb protein fragment which can then become covered by the formation of C3bBb or C3bBbP complexes during the time course of the cascade.

  3. Serum amyloid P component bound to gram-negative bacteria prevents lipopolysaccharide-mediated classical pathway complement activation.

    PubMed

    de Haas, C J; van Leeuwen, E M; van Bommel, T; Verhoef, J; van Kessel, K P; van Strijp, J A

    2000-04-01

    Although serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known to bind many ligands, its biological function is not yet clear. Recently, it was demonstrated that SAP binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the present study, SAP was shown to bind to gram-negative bacteria expressing short types of LPS or lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS), such as Salmonella enterica serovar Copenhagen Re and Escherichia coli J5, and also to clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae. It was hypothesized that SAP binds to the bacteria via the lipid A part of LPS or LOS, since the htrB mutant of the nontypeable H. influenzae strain NTHi 2019-B29-3, which expresses a nonacetylated lipid A, did not bind SAP. This was in contrast to the parental strain NTHi 2019. The binding of SAP resulted in a clear inhibition of the deposition of complement component C3 on the bacteria. SAP inhibited only the activation of the classical complement pathway; the alternative route remained unaffected. In the classical route, SAP prevented the deposition of the first complement component, Clq, probably by interfering with the binding of Clq to LPS. Since antibody-mediated Clq activation was not inhibited by SAP, SAP seems to inhibit only the LPS-induced classical complement pathway activation. The SAP-induced inhibition of C3 deposition strongly diminished the complement-mediated lysis as well as the phagocytosis of the bacteria. The binding of SAP to gram-negative bacteria, therefore, might influence the pathophysiology of an infection with such bacteria.

  4. Complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Johnson, Alex C; Lojovich, Sarah J; Bauer, Ashley J; Marsh, Henry C; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2013-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a major obstetric problem defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria associated with compromised placental perfusion. Although activation of the complement system is increased in preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy, it remains unclear whether excess complement activation is a cause or consequence of placental ischemia. Therefore, we hypothesized that complement activation is critical for placental ischemia-induced hypertension. We employed the reduced utero-placental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia in the rat to induce hypertension in the third trimester and evaluated the effect of inhibiting complement activation with a soluble recombinant form of an endogenous complement regulator, human complement receptor 1 (sCR1; CDX-1135). On day 14 of a 21-day gestation, rats received either RUPP or Sham surgery and 15 mg/kg/day sCR1 or saline intravenously on days 14-18. Circulating complement component 3 decreased and complement activation product C3a increased in RUPP vs. Sham (p<0.05), indicating complement activation had occurred. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) measured on day 19 increased in RUPP vs. Sham rats (109.8±2.8 mmHg vs. 93.6±1.6 mmHg). Treatment with sCR1 significantly reduced elevated MAP in RUPP rats (98.4±3.6 mmHg, p<0.05) and reduced C3a production. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in RUPP compared to Sham rats, and the decrease in VEGF was not affected by sCR1 treatment. Thus, these studies have identified a mechanistic link between complement activation and the pregnancy complication of hypertension apart from free plasma VEGF and have identified complement inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for placental ischemia-induced hypertension in preeclampsia.

  5. Anti-complement activity in the saliva of phlebotomine sand flies and other haematophagous insects.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, R R; Pereira, M H; Gontijo, N F

    2003-07-01

    The saliva of haematophagous insects has a series of pharmacological activities which may favour blood feeding. In the present study, an inhibitory effect on the complement system was observed in salivary extracts obtained from the phlebotomine sand flies Lutzomyia longipalpis and Lu. migonei. Saliva from Lu. longipalpis was capable of inhibiting both the classical and alternative pathways, while that from Lu. migonei acted only on the former. Other haematophagous insect species were screened for inhibition of the classical pathway. The triatomine bugs Panstrongylus megistus, Triatoma brasiliensis and Rhodnius prolixus were also able to inhibit the classical pathway whereas the mosquito Aedes aegyti and flea Ctenocephalides felis were not. The activity of Lu. longipalpis saliva on the classical pathway was partially characterized. The inhibitor is a protein of Mr 10000-30000 Da, which is very resistant to denaturation by heat. The inhibition of the complement system by phlebotomine sand flies may have a role in the transmission of Leishmania to the vertebrate hosts. The inhibitor molecule is thus a promising component of a vaccine to target salivary immunomodulators.

  6. Activation of the lectin complement pathway in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Satoshi; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Takeshita, Morishige; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the correlation between complement pathways and clinicopathological findings in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN). Immunohistological staining was performed on renal specimens obtained from 18 patients with PSAGN and 20 controls, using antibodies against IgG, IgA, IgM, C1q, C3c, C4, fibrinogen, factor B, C4-binding protein (C4-bp), C5b-9, CD59, mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1). Controls showed no deposition of any antibody. In seven patients, glomerular deposits of C3c, C4, factor B, C4-bp, C5b-9, CD59, MBL and MASP-1 were found. In the remaining 11 patients, glomerular deposits of neither C4 nor MBL/MASP-1 were found, and glomerular deposits of C3c, factor B, C5b-9 and CD59 were evident. C4-bp was detected in seven of these 11 patients. Glomerular deposits of fibrinogen were detected in five of seven patients with MBL/MASP-1 deposits and in only two of 11 patients without MBL/MASP-1 deposits. Hematuria was prolonged in three of seven patients with MBL/MASP-1 deposits through follow up, whereas urinalysis was normal in all patients without MBL/MASP-1 deposits. However, the histological indicators were not different between the two groups. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report to show that complement activation through both the alternative and lectin pathways is evident in some patients with PSAGN. Complement activation is promoted in situ in the glomerulus.

  7. Meeting Air Transportation Demand in 2025 by Using Larger Aircraft and Alternative Routing to Complement NextGen Operational Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Viken, Jeffrey K.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.; Fenbert, James W.

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed that investigates the use of larger aircraft and alternative routing to complement the capacity benefits expected from the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) in 2025. National Airspace System (NAS) delays for the 2025 demand projected by the Transportation Systems Analysis Models (TSAM) were assessed using NASA s Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES). The shift in demand from commercial airline to automobile and from one airline route to another was investigated by adding the route delays determined from the ACES simulation to the travel times used in the TSAM and re-generating new flight scenarios. The ACES simulation results from this study determined that NextGen Operational Improvements alone do not provide sufficient airport capacity to meet the projected demand for passenger air travel in 2025 without significant system delays. Using larger aircraft with more seats on high-demand routes and introducing new direct routes, where demand warrants, significantly reduces delays, complementing NextGen improvements. Another significant finding of this study is that the adaptive behavior of passengers to avoid congested airline-routes is an important factor when projecting demand for transportation systems. Passengers will choose an alternative mode of transportation or alternative airline routes to avoid congested routes, thereby reducing delays to acceptable levels for the 2025 scenario; the penalty being that alternative routes and the option to drive increases overall trip time by 0.4% and may be less convenient than the first-choice route.

  8. PpsA-mediated alternative pathway to complement RNase E essentiality in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaru; Honda, Naoko; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Cohen, Stanley N; Kato, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli cells require RNase E, encoded by the essential gene rne, to propagate. The growth properties on different carbon sources of E. coli cells undergoing suppression of RNase E production suggested that reduction in RNase E is associated with decreased expression of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PpsA), which converts pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate during gluconeogenesis. Western blotting and genetic complementation confirmed the role of RNase E in PpsA expression. Adventitious ppsA overexpression from a multicopy plasmid was sufficient to restore colony formation of ∆rne E. coli on minimal media containing glycerol or succinate as the sole carbon source. Complementation of ∆rne by ppsA overproduction was observed during growth on solid media but was only partial, and bacteria showed slowed cell division and grew as filamentous chains. We found that restoration of colony-forming ability by ppsA complementation occurred independent of the presence of endogenous RNase G or second-site suppressors of RNase E essentiality. Our investigations demonstrate the role of phosphoryl transfer catalyzable by PpsA as a determinant of RNase E essentiality in E. coli.

  9. A Serine Protease Isolated from the Bristles of the Amazonic Caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, Is a Potent Complement System Activator

    PubMed Central

    Villas Boas, Isadora Maria; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called “Pararamose”, characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa’s bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system. Results The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly

  10. Complement C1r and C1s genes are duplicated in the mouse: differential expression generates alternative isomorphs in the liver and in the male reproductive system.

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Gérard; Circolo, Antonella; Xu, Yuanyuan; Volanakis, John E

    2003-01-01

    C1r and C1s are the serine proteases that form the catalytic unit of the C1 complex, the first component of complement. In the present study, we found that the genes encoding murine C1r and C1s are duplicated. One set of these genes, referred to as c1rA and c1sA, are primarily expressed in the liver and are therefore the homologues of the human C1r and C1s genes. The other two genes, termed c1rB and c1sB, are expressed exclusively in male reproductive tissues, specifically the coagulating gland and the prostate. The predicted C1rB and C1sB proteins share 96 and 93% amino acid identity with C1rA and C1sA respectively. Most of the substitutions are clustered in the serine protease domains, suggesting differences in catalytic efficiencies and/or substrate specificities or alternatively adaptation to different physiological environments. The high homology of C1rB and C1sB with C1rA and C1sA in the non-catalytic regions indicates that they are probably capable of assembling the C1 complex. The expression of alternative genes encoding isomorphs of activating components of complement in male reproductive tissues raises the possibility of new mechanisms of complement activation in the male genital tract or of novel functions for complement proteases in reproduction. PMID:12513694

  11. The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Osses, Ingrid; de Messias-Reason, Iara; Ramirez, Marcel I.

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system is evolutionary and ancient and is the pivotal line of the host defense system to protect against invading pathogens and abnormal self-derived components. Cellular and molecular components are involved in recognition and effector mechanisms for a successful innate immune response. The complement lectin pathway (CLP) was discovered in 1990. These new components at the complement world are very efficient. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolin not only recognize many molecular patterns of pathogens rapidly to activate complement but also display several strategies to evade innate immunity. Many studies have shown a relation between the deficit of complement factors and susceptibility to infection. The recently discovered CLP was shown to be important in host defense against protozoan microbes. Although the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by MBL and Ficolins reveal efficient complement activations, an increase in deficiency of complement factors and diversity of parasite strategies of immune evasion demonstrate the unsuccessful effort to control the infection. In the present paper, we will discuss basic aspects of complement activation, the structure of the lectin pathway components, genetic deficiency of complement factors, and new therapeutic opportunities to target the complement system to control infection. PMID:23533355

  12. Tissue microarray methodology identifies complement pathway activation and dysregulation in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Loveless, Sam; Neal, James W; Howell, Owain W; Harding, Katharine E; Sarkies, Patrick; Evans, Rhian; Bevan, Ryan J; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Harris, Claire L; Robertson, Neil P; Morgan, Bryan Paul

    2017-07-14

    The complement pathway has potential contributions to both white (WM) and grey matter (GM) pathology in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). A quantitative assessment of complement involvement is lacking. Here we describe the use of Tissue MicroArray (TMA) methodology in conjunction with immunohistochemistry to investigate the localization of complement pathway proteins in progressive MS cortical GM and subcortical WM. Antibodies targeting complement proteins C1q, C3b, regulatory proteins C1 inhibitor (C1INH, complement receptor 1 (CR1), clusterin, factor H (FH) and the C5a anaphylatoxin receptor (C5aR) were utilised alongside standard markers of tissue pathology. All stained slides were digitised for quantitative analysis. We found that numbers of cells immunolabelled for HLA-DR, GFAP, C5aR, C1q and C3b were increased in WM lesions (WML) and GM lesions (GML) compared to normal appearing WM (NAWM) and GM (NAGM), respectively. The complement regulators C1INH, CR1, FH and clusterin were more abundant in WM lesions, while the number of C1q+ neurons were increased and the number of C1INH+, clusterin+, FH+ and CR1+ neurons decreased in GM lesions. The number of complement component positive cells (C1q, C3b) correlated with complement regulator expression in WM, but there was no statistical association between complement activation and regulator expression in the GM. We conclude that TMA methodology and quantitative analysis provides evidence of complement dysregulation in MS GML, including an association of the numerical density of C1q+ cells with tissue lesions. Our work confirms that complement activation and dysregulation occur in all cases of progressive MS and suggest that complement may provide potential biomarkers of the disease. © 2017 International Society of Neuropathology.

  13. Flavonoids from the leaves of Litsea japonica and their anti-complement activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Min, Byung-Sun; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Joongku; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Chan-Soo; Kim, Young-Ho; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu

    2005-04-01

    Four flavonoids, epicatechin (1), afzelin (2), quercitrin (3), and tiliroside (4), were isolated from the leaves of Litsea japonica (Thunb.) Jussieu (Lauraceae). The structures of compounds were identified by comparing their chemical and spectral data with those previously reported. The flavonoids (1-4) were tested for their anti-complement activity against classical pathway of complement system. Compounds 2-4 showed inhibitory activity against complement system with IC50 values of 258, 440, and 101 microm, respectively, whereas 1 was inactive. For the evaluation of the structure-activity relationship of 5,7-dihydroxyflavones, myricitrin (5) from Juglans mandshurica also tested for it's anti-complement activity and is inactive in this assay system. Furthermore, compounds 2, 3, and 5 were hydrolyzed with naringinase to give kaempferol (2a), quercetin (3a), and myricetin (5a), and these were also tested for their activity. Of the three aglycones, 2a exhibited anti-complement activity with an IC50 value of 730 microM, while 3a and 5a were inactive. The inhibitory potencies of 2, 2a, 3, 3a, 5, and 5a against complement activity increased in inverse proportion to number of free hydroxyls on B-ring of 5,7-dihydroxyflavone. Of the compounds tested, 4 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the complement system.

  14. Activated complement components and complement activator molecules on the surface of cell‐derived microparticles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Biró, Éva; Nieuwland, Rienk; Tak, Paul P; Pronk, Loes M; Schaap, Marianne C L; Sturk, Augueste; Hack, C Erik

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In vitro, microparticles can activate complement via the classical pathway. If demonstrable ex vivo, this mechanism may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We therefore investigated the presence of activated complement components and complement activator molecules on the surface of cell‐derived microparticles of RA patients and healthy individuals. Methods Microparticles from synovial fluid (n = 8) and plasma (n = 9) of 10 RA patients and plasma of sex‐ and age‐matched healthy individuals (n = 10) were analysed by flow cytometry for bound complement components (C1q, C4, C3) and complement activator molecules (C‐reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid P component (SAP), immunoglobulin (Ig) M, IgG). Results Microparticles with bound C1q, C4, and/or C3 were abundant in RA synovial fluid, while in RA and control plasma much lower levels were present. Microparticles with bound C1q correlated with those with bound C3 in synovial fluid (r = 0.961, p = 0.0001), and with those with bound C4 in plasma (RA: r = 0.908, p = 0.0007; control: r = 0.632, p = 0.0498), indicating classical pathway activation. In synovial fluid, microparticles with IgM and IgG correlated with those with C1q (r = 0.728, p = 0.0408; r = 0.952, p = 0.0003, respectively), and in plasma, microparticles with CRP correlated with those with C1q (RA: r = 0.903, p = 0.0021; control: r = 0.683, p = 0.0296), implicating IgG and IgM in the classical pathway activation in RA synovial fluid, and CRP in the low level classical pathway activation in plasma. Conclusions This study demonstrates the presence of bound complement components and activator molecules on microparticles ex vivo, and supports their role in low grade complement activation in plasma and increased complement activation in RA synovial fluid. PMID:17261534

  15. Complement Activation Correlates With Disease Severity and Contributes to Cytokine Responses in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Berg, Aase; Otterdal, Kari; Patel, Sam; Gonca, Miguel; David, Catarina; Dalen, Ingvild; Nymo, Stig; Nilsson, Margareta; Nordling, Sofia; Magnusson, Peetra U; Ueland, Thor; Prato, Mauro; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Aukrust, Pål; Langeland, Nina; Nilsson, Per H

    2015-12-01

    The impact of complement activation and its possible relation to cytokine responses during malaria pathology was investigated in plasma samples from patients with confirmed Plasmodium falciparum malaria and in human whole-blood specimens stimulated with malaria-relevant agents ex vivo. Complement was significantly activated in the malaria cohort, compared with healthy controls, and was positively correlated with disease severity and with certain cytokines, in particular interleukin 8 (IL-8)/CXCL8. This was confirmed in ex vivo-stimulated blood specimens, in which complement inhibition significantly reduced IL-8/CXCL8 release. P. falciparum malaria is associated with systemic complement activation and complement-dependent release of inflammatory cytokines, of which IL-8/CXCL8 is particularly prominent. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Methods for Quantitative Detection of Antibody-induced Complement Activation on Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal1. Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis1-4. However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  17. [The medical records of home health care patients: a complement or alternative to an electronic file?].

    PubMed

    Perrot, P; Baudier, F; Schmitt, B

    2005-06-01

    Home health care services for dependant people involve participation and interventions of professionals from the health care, medico-social and social sectors. In order to ensure quality care, the flow of information must appropriately circulate between all of the various care providers. The establishment of an electronic medical file for these patients is a possible solution which has been proposed to be conducted in next years. A paper medical record is the property of the patient and offers the possibility of an alternative and complementary solution. The electronic file would use the existing available file as a starting point, and without any additional organisational structures being implicated, it allows for better coordination of the health, medical and social activities. An experimental implementation of this in the Franch-Comte region of France demonstrated the advantages and benefits of such a tool based on a logic centered upon the individual and the open sharing of practices between professionals in the medical and social sectors.

  18. Morula cells as key hemocytes of the lectin pathway of complement activation in the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Franchi; Loriano, Ballarin

    2017-04-01

    The complement system is deeply rooted in the evolution of humoral mechanism of innate immunity. In addition to the alternative pathway of complement activation, lectins and associated serine proteases exert important roles in the recognition of non-self and activation of the effectors. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri, we identified, characterized and studied the expression of three orthologues of genes involved in the lectin pathway of complement activation of vertebrates, i.e., genes for a mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a ficolin and a mannose-associated serine protease 1 (MASP1). All the genes are transcribed by hemocytes, and specifically by morula cells, the same immunocytes responsible for the transcription of C3 and Bf orthologues. The transcription levels of MASP1 and ficolin orthologues are not affected by zymosan challenge, indicating a constitutive expression of complement system associated serine proteases, whereas the MBL orthologue is up-regulated after 15 min of zymosan exposure. Collectively, our data suggest the presence of a complete lectin activation pathway in Botryllus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Systemic and lung physiological changes in rats after intravascular activation of complement.

    PubMed

    Younger, J G; Sasaki, N; Delgado, J; Ko, A C; Nghiem, T X; Waite, M D; Till, G O; Ward, P A

    2001-06-01

    Systemic complement activation has been noted in a variety of shock states, and there is growing evidence that, in addition to being proinflammatory effectors, products of complement activation contribute directly to generalized manifestations of shock, such as hypotension and acidosis. To study the effects of complement activation, we examined responses in rats to systemic activation of complement with cobra venom factor (CVF), including blood pressure, metabolic acidosis, changes in vascular permeability, and lung function. High doses of CVF produced circulatory collapse (mean arterial pressure = 110 +/- 16 and 35 +/- 9 mmHg in control and with CVF, respectively, P < 0.05), metabolic acidosis (HCO concentration = 27.8 +/- 1.7 and 9.6 +/- 3.4 meq/l in control and with CVF, respectively, P < 0.05), extravasation of albumin into the lung and gut, and modest arterial hypoxemia (PO2 = 486 +/- 51 and 201 +/- 36 Torr in control and during 100% O2 breathing, respectively, P < 0.05). Prior depletion of complement protected against these abnormalities. Other interventions, including neutrophil depletion and cyclooxygenase inhibition, prevented lung injury but had much less effect on systemic hemodynamics or gut permeability, suggesting that complement activation products induce injury by neutrophil- and cyclooxygenase-dependent pathways in the lung but not in the gut. These studies underscore the significant systemic abnormalities developing after systemic activation of complement.

  20. Synergy between the classical and alternative pathways of complement is essential for conferring effective protection against the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Ajitanuj; Pawar, Shailesh D.; Nawadkar, Renuka; Kulkarni, Neeraja

    2017-01-01

    The pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus caused significant morbidity and mortality worldwide thus necessitating the need to understand the host factors that influence its control. Previously, the complement system has been shown to provide protection during the seasonal influenza virus infection, however, the role of individual complement pathways is not yet clear. Here, we have dissected the role of intact complement as well as of its individual activation pathways during the pandemic influenza virus infection using mouse strains deficient in various complement components. We show that the virus infection in C3-/- mice results in increased viral load and 100% mortality, which can be reversed by adoptive transfer of naïve wild-type (WT) splenocytes, purified splenic B cells, or passive transfer of immune sera from WT, but not C3-/- mice. Blocking of C3a and/or C5a receptor signaling in WT mice using receptor antagonists and use of C3aR-/- and C5aR-/- mice showed significant mortality after blocking/ablation of C3aR, with little or no effect after blocking/ablation of C5aR. Intriguingly, deficiency of C4 and FB in mice resulted in only partial mortality (24%-32%) suggesting a necessary cross-talk between the classical/lectin and alternative pathways for providing effective protection. In vitro virus neutralization experiments performed to probe the cross-talk between the various pathways indicated that activation of the classical and alternative pathways in concert, owing to coating of viral surface by antibodies, is needed for its efficient neutralization. Examination of the virus-specific complement-binding antibodies in virus positive subjects showed that their levels vary among individuals. Together these results indicate that cooperation between the classical and alternative pathways not only result in efficient direct neutralization of the pandemic influenza virus, but also lead to the optimum generation of C3a, which when sensed by the immune cells along

  1. Synergy between the classical and alternative pathways of complement is essential for conferring effective protection against the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Ajitanuj; Pawar, Shailesh D; Nawadkar, Renuka; Kulkarni, Neeraja; Lal, Girdhari; Mullick, Jayati; Sahu, Arvind

    2017-03-01

    The pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus caused significant morbidity and mortality worldwide thus necessitating the need to understand the host factors that influence its control. Previously, the complement system has been shown to provide protection during the seasonal influenza virus infection, however, the role of individual complement pathways is not yet clear. Here, we have dissected the role of intact complement as well as of its individual activation pathways during the pandemic influenza virus infection using mouse strains deficient in various complement components. We show that the virus infection in C3-/- mice results in increased viral load and 100% mortality, which can be reversed by adoptive transfer of naïve wild-type (WT) splenocytes, purified splenic B cells, or passive transfer of immune sera from WT, but not C3-/- mice. Blocking of C3a and/or C5a receptor signaling in WT mice using receptor antagonists and use of C3aR-/- and C5aR-/- mice showed significant mortality after blocking/ablation of C3aR, with little or no effect after blocking/ablation of C5aR. Intriguingly, deficiency of C4 and FB in mice resulted in only partial mortality (24%-32%) suggesting a necessary cross-talk between the classical/lectin and alternative pathways for providing effective protection. In vitro virus neutralization experiments performed to probe the cross-talk between the various pathways indicated that activation of the classical and alternative pathways in concert, owing to coating of viral surface by antibodies, is needed for its efficient neutralization. Examination of the virus-specific complement-binding antibodies in virus positive subjects showed that their levels vary among individuals. Together these results indicate that cooperation between the classical and alternative pathways not only result in efficient direct neutralization of the pandemic influenza virus, but also lead to the optimum generation of C3a, which when sensed by the immune cells along

  2. Recombinant Complement Receptor 2 Radiolabeled with [99mTc(CO)3]+ : A Potential New Radiopharmaceutical for Imaging Activated Complement

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, James M.; Yahya, Norhakim; Thakor, David; Razavi, Reza; Smith, Richard; Sacks, Steven; Mullen, Gregory E. D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and synthesis of a new Tc-99m labeled bioconjugate for imaging activated complement, based on Short Consensus Repeats 1 and 2 of Complement Receptor 2 (CR2), the binding domain for C3d. To avoid non specific modification of CR2 and the potential for modifying lysine residues critical to the CR2/C3d contact surface, we engineered a new protein, recombinant CR2 (rCR2), to include the C-terminal sequence VFPLECHHHHHH, a hexahistidine tag (for site-specific radiolabeling with [99mTc(CO)3(OH2)3]+). The protein was characterized by N-terminal sequencing, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography. To test the function of the recombinant CR2, binding to C3d was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The function was further confirmed by binding of rCR2 to C3d+ red blood cells (RBC) which were generated by deposition of human or rat C3d and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The affinity of rCR2 for C3d+, in presence of 150 mM NaCl, was measured using surface plasma resonance giving rise to a KD≈500 nM. Radiolabeling of rCR2 or an inactive mutant of rCR2 (K41E CR2) or an unrelated protein of a similar size (C2A) with [99mTc(CO)3(OH2)3]+ at gave radiochemical yields >95%. Site-specifically radiolabeled rCR2 bound to C3d to C3d+ RBC. Binding of radiolabeled rCR2 to C3d was inhibited by anti-C3d and the radiolabeled inactive mutant K41E CR2 and C2A did not bind to C3d+ RBCs. We conclude that rCR2-Tc99m has excellent radiolabeling, stability and C3d binding characteristics and warrants in vivo evaluation as an activated complement imaging agent. PMID:21494666

  3. Inhibitory effect of FUT-175 on complement activation and its application for glomerulonephritis with hypocomplementemia.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Inoue, I; Inagi, R; Miyata, T; Shinzato, T; Sugiyama, S; Miyama, A; Maeda, K

    1993-04-01

    FUT-175 (6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethane-sulphonate), a potent serine protease inhibitor, has been reported to inhibit complement activity in vitro, and especially the classical complement pathway effectively. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effect of FUT-175 on the classical complement pathway components by hemolytic assay using purified human complement components. As a result, 50% inhibition of the C1 protease activity for classical C3 convertase formation and for C2 was obtained with 3.0 x 10(-8) M and 7.0 x 10(-8) M of FUT-175, respectively. FUT-175 did not inhibit the C2 protease activity at all. We then administered FUT-175 to 5 glomerulonephritic patients with hypocomplementemia and proteinuria in order to assess the clinical effectiveness of this drug. When FUT-175 was administered intravenously and continuously at a rate of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg/hr for 2 weeks, the urinary protein excretion decreased significantly from 2.9 +/- 0.8 to 1.4 +/- 0.5 g/day (P < 0.025). In these patients, some of the serum complement markers (serum C3, C4 level and the hemolytic activity via the classical complement pathway (CH50)) were increased after FUT-175 administration. The above findings suggests that FUT-175 can exert beneficial effects on glomerulonephritis with hypocomplementemia by inhibiting complement activation.

  4. Local release of properdin in the cellular microenvironment: role in pattern recognition and amplification of the alternative pathway of complement

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Claudio; Ohtola, Jennifer A.; Saggu, Gurpanna; Ferreira, Viviana P.

    2013-01-01

    Properdin, the only positive regulatory protein of the complement system, acts as both a stabilizer of the alternative pathway (AP) convertases and as a selective pattern recognition molecule of certain microorganisms and host cells (i.e., apoptotic/necrotic cells) by serving as a platform for de novo C3b,Bb assembly. Properdin, a highly positively charged protein, normally exists as cyclic dimers (P2), trimers (P3), and tetramers (P4) of head-to-tail associations of monomeric 53 kDa subunits. While most complement proteins are produced mainly in the liver, properdin is synthesized primarily by various cell types, including neutrophils, monocytes, primary T cells, and shear-stressed endothelial cells resulting in properdin serum levels of 4–25 μg/ml. Multiple inflammatory agonists stimulate the release of properdin from stimulated leukocytes into the cellular microenvironment. Concentrated, focused increases in properdin levels may lead to stabilization and initiation of AP convertases, thus greatly amplifying the complement response to a local stimulus. This review highlights current knowledge related to these properties and discusses the implications of properdin production in a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:23335922

  5. High Fc Density Particles Result in Binary Complement Activation but Tunable Macrophage Phagocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulchek, Todd; Pacheco, Patricia; White, David

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis and complement system activation represent two key components of the immune system and both can be activated through the presentation of multiple Fc domains of IgG antibodies. We have created functionalized micro- and nanoparticles with various densities of Fc domains to understand the modulation of the immune system for eventual use as a novel immunomodulation platform. Phagocytosis assays were carried out by adding functionalized particles to macrophage cells and quantitatively determined using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Complement system activation by the functionalized particles in human serum was quantified with an enzyme immunoassay. Our phagocytosis assay revealed a strong dependence on particle size and Fc density. For small particles, as the Fc density increased, the number of particles phagocytosed also increased. Large particles were phagocytosed at significantly lower levels and showed no dependency on Fc density. Complement was successfully activated at levels comparable to positive controls for small particles at high Fc densities. However at low Fc densities, there is a significant decrease in complement activation. This result suggests a binary response for complement system activation with a threshold density for successful activation. Therefore, varying the Fc density on micro/nanoparticles resulted in a tunable response in macrophage phagocytosis while a more binary response for complement activation.

  6. Identification of C3 acceptors responsible for complement activation in Crithidia fasciculata

    SciTech Connect

    Guether, M.L.T.; Travassos, L.R.; Schenkman, S.

    1988-11-01

    Crithidia fasciculata, an insect trypanosomatid is readily lysed by normal human serum at concentrations as low as 3%. Lysis occurs in the presence of Mg+2-EGTA and is antibody independent, indicating that the alternative pathway of complement activation is involved. Analysis of (131I)C3 deposition on C. fasciculata cells using C8-deficient serum, revealed that about 4 x 10(5) C3 molecules bound to each cell. Most of the C3 was bound to cells as C3b, part of it forming high molecular weight complexes, which could be dissociated by methylamine treatment at alkaline pH. To characterize the C3 acceptors on C. fasciculata, surface-iodinated cells were incubated with C8D or heat-inactivated serum, extracted and immunoprecipitated with anti-C3 or anti-arabinogalactan antisera. Analysis of the immunoprecipitated material on SDS gels showed high-molecular weight components, which disappeared after methylamine treatment, giving rise to a component of 200 kDa molecular size. This 200-kDa component corresponded to a purified arabinogalactan complex, which was immunoprecipitated from labeled cell extracts, without incubation with C8D, using anti-arabinogalactan antibodies. These results suggest that the arabinogalactan glycoconjugate is a C3 acceptor in C. fasciculata during complement activation. Purified arabinogalactan complexes were able to inactivate C3 in vitro. Solubilization in KOH to cleave the peptide moiety rendered it unable to inactivate C3. Apparently, the aggregated state of the purified arabinogalactan component at the cell surface is important for C3 deposition and activation.

  7. Reduced alternative complement pathway control protein levels in anorexia nervosa: response to parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, R J; Farrell, M; Berry, P L; Forristal, J; Maloney, M J; West, C D

    1982-05-01

    Serum levels of 16 proteins, including 11 component and control proteins of the complement system were determined before and after nutritional repletion in five female patients with severe malnutrition secondary to anorexia nervosa. Before parenteral alimentation significantly decreased serum levels were found for IgG, IgM, transferrin, Clq, C2, C3, factor B, beta lH, C3b inactivator, properdin, and C4 binding protein. A significant increase in posttreatment serum levels compared with pretreatment levels were found for transferrin, C3, factor B, beta lH, and C3b inactivator. Of the proteins measured, the C3b amplification loop control and component proteins, beta lH, C3b inactivator, C3, and factor B rose to the normal range in response to therapy most rapidly. In the absence of an acute phase reaction, these proteins appear to be particularly good indices of malnutrition and its response to therapy.

  8. Activation of immune complement by fly ash particles from coal combustion. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Rothenberg, S.J.; Kanapilly, G.M.; Hanson, R.L.; Scott, B.R.

    1982-06-01

    The interaction of immune complement with fly ash particles from coal combustion was studied in vitro. Fly ash from different coal combustors was incubated for 1 hr with pooled normal dog serum at 37/sup 0/C. The serum supernatants were assayed for complement by a 505 hemolytic (CH/sub 50/) endpoint method. Ash produced by burning one type of coal activated complement with up to 70% of the complement activated at 10 mg ash/ml serum. This activation was concentration dependent and a linear dose-response curve was obtained. Heat treatment and surface area measurements, as well as immunofluorescence studies, suggest that the active component(s) is volatile or heat labile, found on the surface of the particles, and removed by saline or water extraction.

  9. Classical and lectin complement pathway activity in polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; Cats, Elisabeth A; Vlam, Lotte; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan; Herpers, Bjorn; de Jong, Ben A W; Rijkers, Ger; van Strijp, Jos; Notermans, Nicolette C; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Pol, W-Ludo

    2016-01-15

    Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy (IgM-PNP) is a slowly progressive, sensorimotor neuropathy. It is assumed that complement activation contributes to IgM-PNP pathogenesis. We investigated whether innate differences in complement activity of the classical and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways are associated with IgM-PNP or its severity. We measured complement activity using ELISA and determined MBL serumc oncentrations and MBL gene polymorphisms in 83 patients and 83 healthy controls. We did not observe differences between IgM-PNP patients and healthy controls nor associations with different disease severities. Differences in innate complement activity are not likely to explain susceptibility to or severity of IgM-PNP.

  10. Complementing the Mainstream: An Exploration of Partnership Work between Complementary Alternative Provisions and Mainstream Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennacchia, Jodie; Thomson, Pat

    2016-01-01

    In the English context, complementary alternative provisions (APs) can make specific positive contributions for young people at risk of exclusion from mainstream school. Whilst recognising the potential value of all complementary AP that is carefully selected and of high quality, we problematise the "repair and return" rationale that…

  11. The Structure-Activity Relationship between Marine Algae Polysaccharides and Anti-Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Wenjing; Liang, Hongze; Zhang, Quanbin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 33 different polysaccharides were prepared to investigate the structure-activity relationships between the polysaccharides, mainly from marine algae, and anti-complement activity in the classical pathway. Factors considered included extraction methods, fractionations, molecular weight, molar ratio of galactose to fucose, sulfate, uronic acid (UA) content, linkage, branching, and the type of monosaccharide. It was shown that the larger the molecular weights, the better the activities. The molar ratio of galactose (Gal) to fucose (Fuc) was a positive factor at a concentration lower than 10 µg/mL, while it had no effect at a concentration more than 10 µg/mL. In addition, sulfate was necessary; however, the sulfate content, the sulfate pattern, linkage and branching had no effect at a concentration of more than 10 µg/mL. Moreover, the type of monosaccharide had no effect. Laminaran and UA fractions had no activity; however, they could reduce the activity by decreasing the effective concentration of the active composition when they were mixed with the active compositions. The effect of the extraction methods could not be determined. Finally, it was observed that sulfated galactofucan showed good anti-complement activity after separation. PMID:26712768

  12. The Structure-Activity Relationship between Marine Algae Polysaccharides and Anti-Complement Activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Wenjing; Liang, Hongze; Zhang, Quanbin

    2015-12-25

    In this study, 33 different polysaccharides were prepared to investigate the structure-activity relationships between the polysaccharides, mainly from marine algae, and anti-complement activity in the classical pathway. Factors considered included extraction methods, fractionations, molecular weight, molar ratio of galactose to fucose, sulfate, uronic acid (UA) content, linkage, branching, and the type of monosaccharide. It was shown that the larger the molecular weights, the better the activities. The molar ratio of galactose (Gal) to fucose (Fuc) was a positive factor at a concentration lower than 10 µg/mL, while it had no effect at a concentration more than 10 µg/mL. In addition, sulfate was necessary; however, the sulfate content, the sulfate pattern, linkage and branching had no effect at a concentration of more than 10 µg/mL. Moreover, the type of monosaccharide had no effect. Laminaran and UA fractions had no activity; however, they could reduce the activity by decreasing the effective concentration of the active composition when they were mixed with the active compositions. The effect of the extraction methods could not be determined. Finally, it was observed that sulfated galactofucan showed good anti-complement activity after separation.

  13. Classical Complement Pathway Activation in the Kidneys of Women With Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Penning, Marlies; Chua, Jamie S; van Kooten, Cees; Zandbergen, Malu; Buurma, Aletta; Schutte, Joke; Bruijn, Jan Anthonie; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Bloemenkamp, Kitty; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Baelde, Hans

    2015-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that complement dysregulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The kidney is one of the major organs affected in preeclampsia. Because the kidney is highly susceptible to complement activation, we hypothesized that preeclampsia is associated with renal complement activation. We performed a nationwide search for renal autopsy material in the Netherlands using a computerized database (PALGA). Renal tissue was obtained from 11 women with preeclampsia, 25 pregnant controls, and 14 nonpregnant controls with hypertension. The samples were immunostained for C4d, C1q, mannose-binding lectin, properdin, C3d, C5b-9, IgA, IgG, and IgM. Preeclampsia was significantly associated with renal C4d-a stable marker of complement activation-and the classical pathway marker C1q. In addition, the prevalence of IgM was significantly higher in the kidneys of the preeclamptic women. No other complement markers studied differed between the groups. Our findings in human samples were validated using a soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 mouse model of preeclampsia. The kidneys in the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice had significantly more C4 deposits than the control mice. The association between preeclampsia and renal C4d, C1q, and IgM levels suggests that the classical complement pathway is involved in the renal injury in preeclampsia. Moreover, our finding that soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1-injected mice develop excess C4 deposits indicates that angiogenic dysregulation may play a role in complement activation within the kidney. We suggest that inhibiting complement activation may be beneficial for preventing the renal manifestations of preeclampsia.

  14. Interrelation Between Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation in Models of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana M; Schäfer, Nicole; Kuhn, Laura B; Rohrer, Bärbel; Pauly, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals older than 50-years suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Associated with this multifactorial disease are polymorphisms of complement factor genes and a main environmental risk factor-oxidative stress. Until now the linkage between these risk factors for AMD has not been fully understood. Recent studies, integrating results on oxidative stress, complement activation, epidemiology and ocular pathology suggested the following sequence in AMD-etiology: initially, chronic oxidative stress results in modification of proteins and lipids in the posterior of the eye; these tissue alterations trigger chronic inflammation, involving the complement system; and finally, invasive immune cells facilitate pathology in the retina. Here, we summarize the results for animal studies which aim to elucidate this molecular interplay of oxidative events and tissue-specific complement activation in the eye.

  15. Terminal complement activation is increased and associated with disease severity in CIDP.

    PubMed

    Quast, Isaak; Keller, Christian W; Hiepe, Falk; Tackenberg, Björn; Lünemann, Jan D

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common chronic autoimmune neuropathy. While both cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms contribute to its pathogenesis, the rapid clinical response to plasmapheresis implicates a circulating factor responsible for peripheral nerve injury. We report that treatment-naïve patients with CIDP show increased serum and CSF levels of the anaphylatoxin C5a and the soluble terminal complement complex (sTCC). Systemic terminal complement activation correlates with clinical disease severity as determined by the Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) disability scale. These data indicate that complement activation contributes to peripheral nerve injury and suggest that complement inhibition should be explored for its potential therapeutic merit in CIDP.

  16. Complement-activated oligodendroglia: a new pathogenic entity identified by immunostaining with antibodies to human complement proteins C3d and C4d.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Akiyama, H; McGeer, P L

    1990-05-04

    Clusters of oligodendroglial fibers were identified immunohistochemically in human brain tissue with antibodies to the complement proteins C3d and C4d in several neurological disorders. These included Pick's, Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive supranuclear palsy and Shy-Drager syndrome. These complement-activated oligodendroglia occurred in selected areas of gray and white matter. They were rarely observed in control tissue. Immunogold electron microscopy established that the C4d antibody was attached to degenerating myelin sheaths. These data indicate attachment of classical complement pathway proteins to selective oligodendroglia in several neurological disorders.

  17. Healing of complement activating Ti implants compared with non-activating Ti in rat tibia.

    PubMed

    Harmankaya, N; Igawa, K; Stenlund, P; Palmquist, A; Tengvall, P

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have revealed that ozone ultraviolet (UVO) illumination of titanium (Ti) implants improves bone-implant anchorage by altering the physico-chemical and immune activating properties of the titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) layer. In the present rat tibia model, the authors compared the early events of inflammation and bone formation around UVO-treated Ti and complement activating immunoglobin g (IgG)-coated Ti. Machined Ti and machined Ti coated with a physical vapour-deposited Ti layer were used as references. Screw-shaped test and reference implants were implanted into rat tibia and harvested after 1, 7 and 28 days. Messenger RNA expression of implant adhered cells and peri-implant tissue ~250 μm from the surface were subsequently analysed with regard to IL-1β, TNF-α, osteocalcin, cathepsin K, BMP-2 and PDGF. Separate implants were retrieved after 7 and 28 days for removal torque measurements, and histological staining and histomorphometric analysis of bone area and bone-to-implant contact. While enhanced expression of inflammatory markers, TNF-α and IL-1β, was observed on IgG-coated surfaces throughout the observation time, UVO-treated surfaces indicated a significantly lower early inflammatory response. In the early phases (1 and 7 days), the UVO-treated surfaces displayed a significantly higher expression of osteoblast markers BMP-2 and osteocalcin. In summary, complement activating Ti implants elicited a stronger inflammatory response than UVO-treated Ti, with low complement activation during the first week of healing. In spite of this, the UVO-treated Ti induced only marginally more bone growth outside the implants.

  18. Low-molecular-weight heparin inhibition in classical complement activation pathway during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Oberkersch, Roxana; Attorresi, Alejandra I; Calabrese, Graciela C

    2010-05-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparin is used clinically for the prevention of pregnancy complications associated with prothrombotic disorders, particularly anti-phospholipid syndrome. Nevertheless, recent studies have suggested that heparin may exert direct effects on the placental trophoblast, independently of its anticoagulant activity. In addition, heparin prevents complement activation in vivo and protects mice from pregnancy complications. The inhibition of the classical complement activation pathway by heparin was analyzed by means of in vitro assays and in pregnant women receiving prophylaxis with therapeutic doses (40 mg/day) of subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin by haemolysis of antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes (CH(50) assay). The specific interaction between low-molecular-weight heparin and the C1q subunit of the C1 complex of the complement cascade allowed the isolation of a small subpopulation of heparin ( 8.03+/-1.20 microg %), with an anti-activated factor X activity more than four times greater than the starting material. This subpopulation could be responsible for the in vitro inhibition of the classical complement activation pathway evaluated by the total haemolysis of antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes. About 60 microg/ml of low molecular weight heparin was needed to achieve 50% of haemolysis. The detection of the classical complement pathway inhibition in pregnant women treated with heparin required a first activation with aggregated human IgG. We concluded that the interaction between low-molecular-weight heparin and C1q could be relevant not only in the complement-dependent, but also in the complement-independent inflammation mechanisms responsible for the prevention of pregnancy loss. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. [Hormonal treatments for hemorrhaging secondary to fibroids. An alternative or complement to surgery?].

    PubMed

    Cancelo Hidalgo, María Jesús

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of treatment in women with uterine fibroids is the control of associated symptoms such as abnormal uterine bleeding, pain and pressure. Although the cost and potential adverse effects of the long-term use of medical treatment may limit its use for a long time, this alternative should be considered before indicating surgical treatment. At present, we have a considerable variety of drugs that, although not specific treatments for fibroids, may be used for the short to medium-term management of bleeding; however, we have still not found an alternative that eliminates the need for invasive treatments. Further research in this field is therefore warranted. Given the heterogeneity of fibroids and the lack of effective treatments in controlling their growth, the identification of signals that stimulate the onset and growth of these fibroids opens doors to the development of new therapies. In the future we may be able to differentiate classes of fibroids by molecular techniques and thereby implement specific treatments that control their development and their associated symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Deficiencies and excessive human complement system activation in disorders of multifarious etiology.

    PubMed

    Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Complement is an integral part of the immune system protecting the host organism against invasion and proliferation of various microorganisms. It is also involved in the removal of the body's own damaged and altered cells. Activation of the complement system is a very precise process and it is strictly controlled by regulatory proteins present in both plasma and at host cells' surfaces. C3 protein plays a major role in the complement activation and generation of immune responses. Deficiencies of the C3 and other complement components, so-called early and late complement proteins, contribute to the emergence of recurrent bacterial, viral and fungal infections. The low level of mannose-binding lectin is also important. This protein plays a protective role in the early stages of infection and in the control of inflammation. Its deficit is one of the most common reasons for human immunodeficiency, observed in microbial infections as well as in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, the excessive activation of complement proteins is often discovered to be the reason for many diseases. These include e.g. autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's syndrome, schizophrenia, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, angioedema, macular degeneration, and Crohn's disease.

  1. Chimeric CD46/DAF molecules reveal a cryptic functional role for SCR1 of DAF in regulating complement activation.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, D; Loveland, B; Kyriakou, P; Lanteri, M; Rubinstein, E; Gerlier, D

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric proteins using membrane cofactor (CD46) and decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) were generated to further investigate the functional domains involved in the regulation of human serum complement. Following activation of the classical pathway, the isolated substitution of CD46 SCR III (x3DAF) exhibited a modest regulatory activity comparable to that of CD46. The isolated substitution of CD46 SCR IV (x4DAF), and the combined CD46 SCR III+IV substitutions (x3/4DAF) were essentially as efficient as DAF. No regulation of C3b deposition was observed with the combined CD46 SCR I+II substitutions (x1/2DAF). When tested after activation of the alternative pathway, both the x3DAF and x3/4DAF chimeras failed to regulate C3b deposition, while the x4DAF chimera still displayed some activity. In contrast to that observed following classical pathway activation, the x1/2DAF chimera exhibited a similar efficiency to wild type CD46 and DAF in controlling C3b deposition. Using SCR specific antibodies, the regulatory activity of the x1/2DAF chimera against the alternative pathway was mapped to the first three distal SCR (i.e. DAF 1, DAF 2 and CD46 III). These data demonstrate that several combinations of SCR domains from two related complement regulators can result in functional molecules, and reveal a novel and cryptic functional role for DAF SCR1.

  2. Effect of Complement on HIV-2 Plasma Antiviral Activity Is Intratype Specific and Potent

    PubMed Central

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Månsson, Fredrik; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2)-infected individuals develop immunodeficiency with a considerable delay and transmit the virus at rates lower than HIV-1-infected persons. Conceivably, comparative studies on the immune responsiveness of HIV-1- and HIV-2-infected hosts may help to explain the differences in pathogenesis and transmission between the two types of infection. Previous studies have shown that the neutralizing antibody response is more potent and broader in HIV-2 than in HIV-1 infection. In the present study, we have examined further the function of the humoral immune response and studied the effect of complement on the antiviral activity of plasma from singly HIV-1- or HIV-2-infected individuals, as well as HIV-1/HIV-2 dually infected individuals. The neutralization and antibody-dependent complement-mediated inactivation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4.CCR5 cells. The results showed that the addition of complement increased intratype antiviral activities of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 plasma samples, although the complement effect was more pronounced with HIV-2 than HIV-1 plasma. Using an area-under-the-curve (AUC)-based readout, multivariate statistical analysis confirmed that the type of HIV infection was independently associated with the magnitude of the complement effect. The analyses carried out with purified IgG indicated that the complement effect was largely exerted through the classical complement pathway involving IgG in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. In summary, these findings suggest that antibody binding to HIV-2 structures facilitates the efficient use of complement and thereby may be one factor contributing to a strong antiviral activity present in HIV-2 infection. PMID:23077299

  3. Expression of the alternative oxidase complements cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Emmanuel P; Dufour, Eric; Gonçalves, Sérgio; Paupe, Vincent; Hakkaart, Gertjan A J; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from early onset devastating encephalomyopathy and cardiomyopathy, to neurological diseases in adulthood and in the elderly. No method of compensating successfully for COX deficiency has been reported so far. In vitro, COX-deficient human cells require additional glucose, pyruvate and uridine for normal growth and are specifically sensitive to oxidative stress. Here, we have tested whether the expression of a mitochondrially targeted, cyanide-resistant, alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis could alleviate the metabolic abnormalities of COX-deficient human cells either from a patient harbouring a COX15 pathological mutation or rendered deficient by silencing the COX10 gene using shRNA. We demonstrate that the expression of the AOX, well-tolerated by the cells, compensates for both the growth defect and the pronounced oxidant-sensitivity of COX-deficient human cells. PMID:20049701

  4. MASP-1 of the complement system promotes clotting via prothrombin activation.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Lorenz; Dobó, József; Gál, Péter; Schroeder, Verena

    2015-06-01

    Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1), a protein of the complement lectin pathway, resembles thrombin in terms of structural features and substrate specificity, and it has been shown to activate coagulation factors. Here we studied the effects of MASP-1 on clot formation in whole blood (WB) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) by thrombelastography and further elucidated the underlying mechanism. Cleavage of prothrombin by MASP-1 was investigated by SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing of cleavage products. Addition of MASP-1 or thrombin to WB and PPP shortened the clotting time and clot formation time significantly compared to recalcified-only samples. The combination of MASP-1 and thrombin had additive effects. In a purified system, MASP-1 was able to induce clotting only in presence of prothrombin. Analysis of MASP-1-digested prothrombin confirmed that MASP-1 cleaves prothrombin at three cleavage sites. In conclusion, we have shown that MASP-1 is able to induce and promote clot formation measured in a global setting using the technique of thrombelastography. We further confirmed that MASP-1-induced clotting is dependent on prothrombin. Finally, we have demonstrated that MASP-1 cleaves prothrombin and identified its cleavage sites, suggesting that MASP-1 gives rise to an alternative active form of thrombin by cleaving at the cleavage site R393. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A universal method for measuring functional activity of complement in humans, laboratory, domestic, and agricultural animals, amphibians, and birds.

    PubMed

    Kuleshina, O N; Kozlov, L V; Cheremnykh, E G

    2014-06-01

    A new universal method for measuring activity of the serum complement system in humans, laboratory, domestic, agricultural animals, birds and amphibians is based on automated evaluation of the mortality of ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis under the effect of the complement system. In contrast to the hemolytic method, measured activity of the complement shows no erroneously high results caused by reactive lysis in febrile patients. The method can be used for studies of the complement system in humans and animals without species-specific adaptation.

  6. Aurin tricarboxylic acid self-protects by inhibiting aberrant complement activation at the C3 convertase and C9 binding stages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; Guo, Jian-Ping; McGeer, Edith G; McGeer, Patrick L

    2013-05-01

    Aberrant complement activation is known to exacerbate the pathology in a spectrum of degenerative diseases of aging. We previously reported that aurin tricarboxylic acid (ATA) is an orally effective agent which prevents formation of the membrane attack complex of complement. It inhibits C9 attachment to tissue bound C5b678 and thus prevents bystander lysis of host cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of ATA on the alternative complement pathway. We found that ATA prevented cleavage of the tissue bound properdin-C3b-Factor B complex into the active C3 convertase enzyme properdin-C3b-Factor Bb. This inhibition was reversed by adding Factor D to the serum. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent type assays, we established that ATA binds directly to Factor D and C9 but not to properdin or other complement proteins. We conclude that ATA, by inhibiting at two stages of the alternative pathway, might be a particularly effective therapeutic agent in conditions such as macular degeneration, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinemia, and rheumatoid arthritis, in which activation of the alternative complement pathway initiates self damage.

  7. SALSA: A Regulator of the Early Steps of Complement Activation on Mucosal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, Martin Parnov; Meri, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Complement is present mainly in blood. However, following mechanical damage or inflammation, serous exudates enter the mucosal surfaces. Here, the complement proteins interact with other endogenous molecules to keep microbes from entering the parenteral tissues. One of the mucosal proteins known to interact with the early complement components of both the classical and the lectin pathway is the salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA). SALSA is also known as deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and gp340. It is found both attached to the epithelium and secreted into the surrounding fluids of most mucosal surfaces. SALSA has been shown to bind directly to C1q, mannose-binding lectin, and the ficolins. Through these interactions SALSA regulates activation of the complement system. In addition, SALSA interacts with surfactant proteins A and D, secretory IgA, and lactoferrin. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are examples of diseases, where complement activation in mucosal tissues may occur. This review describes the latest advances in our understanding of how the early complement components interact with the SALSA molecule. Furthermore, we discuss how these interactions may affect disease propagation on mucosal surfaces in immunological and inflammatory diseases.

  8. Systemic Administration of Induced Neural Stem Cells Regulates Complement Activation in Mouse Closed Head Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Dong, Qin; Yao, Hui; Lu, Yingzhou; Ji, Xinchao; Zou, Mingming; Yang, Zhijun; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2017-01-01

    Complement activation plays important roles in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Patients face neurological disorders due to the development of complement activation, which contributes to cell apoptosis, brain edema, blood-brain barrier dysfunction and inflammatory infiltration. We previously reported that induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) can promote neurological functional recovery in closed head injury (CHI) animals. Remarkably, we discovered that local iNSC grafts have the potential to modulate CNS inflammation post-CHI. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of systemically delivered iNSCs in complement activation following CNS injury. Our data showed that iNSC grafts decreased the levels of sera C3a and C5a and down-regulated the expression of C3d, C9, active Caspase-3 and Bax in the brain, kidney and lung tissues of CHI mice. Furthermore, iNSC grafts decreased the levels of C3d+/NeuN+, C5b-9+/NeuN+, C3d+/Map2+ and C5b-9+/Map2+ neurons in the injured cortices of CHI mice. Subsequently, we explored the mechanisms underlying these effects. With flow cytometry analysis, we observed a dramatic increase in complement receptor type 1-related protein y (Crry) expression in iNSCs after CHI mouse serum treatment. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo loss-of-function studies revealed that iNSCs could modulate complement activation via Crry expression. PMID:28383046

  9. Acute and prolonged complement activation in the central nervous system during herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Charlotta E; Studahl, Marie; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-06-15

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is characterized by a pronounced inflammatory activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we investigated the acute and prolonged complement system activity in HSE patients, by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for numerous complement components (C). We found increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of C3a, C3b, C5 and C5a in HSE patients compared with healthy controls. C3a and C5a concentrations remained increased also compared with patient controls. Our results conclude that the complement system is activated in CNS during HSE in the acute phase, and interestingly also in later stages supporting previous reports of prolonged inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Classroom Active Learning Complemented by an Online Discussion Forum to Teach Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dengler, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies some of the pedagogical benefits of an active learning course delivery complemented by an online discussion forum to teach sustainability by evaluating the case of a geography master's course. The potential benefits and some challenges of an active learning course delivery to teach sustainability in geography and related…

  11. Classroom Active Learning Complemented by an Online Discussion Forum to Teach Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dengler, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies some of the pedagogical benefits of an active learning course delivery complemented by an online discussion forum to teach sustainability by evaluating the case of a geography master's course. The potential benefits and some challenges of an active learning course delivery to teach sustainability in geography and related…

  12. Enhanced complement activation is part of the unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile in South Asians

    PubMed Central

    Siezenga, M A; Chandie Shaw, P K; van der Geest, R N; Mollnes, T E; Daha, M R; Rabelink, T J; Berger, S P

    2009-01-01

    South Asian immigrants in western societies exhibit a high burden of diabetes and subsequent vascular complications. Diabetic vascular complications are associated with vascular inflammation. We hypothesize that enhanced complement activation is involved. Therefore, levels of complement C3 and SC5b-9 – the soluble end product of complement activation – in a group of 200 South Asians were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group of native Caucasians. In addition, the association between complement levels and albuminuria, an indicator of renal damage and a cardiovascular risk marker, was assessed in the diabetic South Asian group. Compared with native Caucasians, South Asians had significantly higher levels of both serum C3 and plasma SC5b-9, even when only non-diabetic South Asians were considered. Diabetic South Asians had significantly higher C3 levels compared with non-diabetic South Asians. In diabetic South Asians, higher levels of SC5b-9 were associated with an increased prevalence of albuminuria (odds ratio 5·4, 95% confidence interval 1·8–15·8). These results suggest that enhanced complement activation is part of the unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile in South Asians. PMID:19659775

  13. Effects of penicillinase on bactericidal and complement activities in normal human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, W H; Wunderlich, A C; Corbeil, L C; Davis, C E; Curd, J G

    1983-01-01

    During routine addition of penicillinase (beta-lactamase) to patients sera, we found that the capacity of some of these sera to kill serum-sensitive gram-negative organisms was significantly decreased. Further controlled studies showed that penicillinase decreased both the bactericidal activity of normal human sera and the total hemolytic activity (CH50) of complement in these sera. The decreased bactericidal activity correlated significantly (r = 0.57, P less than 0.05) with the reduction of CH50 in eight normal sera. These effects of penicillinase were time and temperature dependent. Measurement of individual complement component activities showed that penicillinase decreased the activity of C2, C4, and C3-C9, suggesting that the penicillinase preparation activated the classical pathway. These results cast doubts on the validity of bactericidal determinations when sera are pretreated with penicillinase. PMID:6603195

  14. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of diiminoisoindolines as complement component 3a antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grant, E B; Guiadeen, D; Singer, M; Argentieri, D; Hlasta, D J; Wachter, M

    2001-11-05

    The failure to fully regulate the inflammation response has been linked to diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, septic shock syndrome, and asthma. The human complement system initiates and regulates the inflammation response through a cascade of regulatory factors. Complement Component 3a (C3a) is an essential regulatory factor and inhibiting its binding to a C3a receptor will diminish the inflammation response by disrupting the cascade. We report the design, synthesis, in vitro and in vivo activity of diiminoisoindolines as C3a antagonists.

  15. [Study of functional activity of components and factors of the human complement system].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, L V

    2002-01-01

    Development suitable for clinical researches of hemolytic methods of determination of functional activity of the first components of a complement has allowed to show diagnostic value of testing activity of complement components in comparison with their contents as antigens. It has predetermined necessity for building modern ELISA tests-systems for quantitative determination of functional activity of complement components. Such methods built for the first time allow to determine activity of components C1q, C2, C3, C4 (and a ratio of isotypes C4A and C4B), C1-inhibitor, factors B and D. Addition of these tests-systems ELISA systems for quantitative determination of components, and in case of C1-inhibitor of presence IgG, IgA and IgM autoantibodies against C1-inhibitor frames opportunities of an evaluation complement status of the patient, hereditary predisposition to such diseases as a stomach ulcer, the glaucoma, a clamidiosis, bacteroidosis, allows to carry out differential diagnostics of angioedema. Inhibition of covalent linkage C4b or C3b various endogenic and exogenous effectors during formation C3- and C5-convertases allows to understand processes of a regulation of a homeostasis, and also the mechanism of action of drugs.

  16. Glomerular C3c localization indicates ongoing immune deposit formation and complement activation in experimental glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, M.; Pruchno, C. J.; Burns, M.; Baker, P. J.; Johnson, R. J.; Couser, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    In antibody-mediated glomerular disease, deposits of C3 (C3b) are common and are degraded by factor I to C3c and C3d. However, the kinetics of C3b degradation in glomerulonephritis have not been defined. To do this, we studied three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis with established C3 deposits (passive Heymann nephritis, cationized immunoglobulin G membranous nephropathy, and concanavalin A-anticoncanavalin A glomerulonephritis). C3b deposition was halted by administration of cobra venom factor, and the disappearance of C3c and C3d from glomeruli was measured with specific antibodies and quantitative fluorescence densitometry. Results showed that C3c deposits were reduced by over 85% within 24 hours in all three models. C3c clearance was unaffected by site or mechanism of deposit formation. C3d deposits persisted despite lack of ongoing complement activation. In passive Heymann nephritis when disease activity was monitored by urinary C5b-9 excretion, C3c was cleared in parallel with return of urine C5b-9 excretion to normal values. We conclude that glomerular deposits of C3c are cleared within 24 hours of cessation of complement activation. Positive staining for C3 utilizing antibody specific for the C3c portion documents recent complement activation usually reflecting new immune deposit formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7678717

  17. Complement activation by polyethoxylated pharmaceutical surfactants: Cremophor-EL, Tween-80 and Tween-20.

    PubMed

    Weiszhár, Zsóka; Czúcz, Judit; Révész, Csaba; Rosivall, László; Szebeni, János; Rozsnyay, Zoltán

    2012-03-12

    Immunosafety analysis of pharmaceutical surfactants is an important step in understanding the complex mechanisms by which they induce side effects in susceptible patients. This paper provides experimental evidences that polyethoxylated surfactants, Cremophor-EL and Tween-80, also known as Polysorbate-80, activate the complement system in vitro, in normal human serum and plasma. They appeared to be more efficient reactogens than their structural homolog, Tween-20. Cremophor-EL and Tween-80 promoted the generation of biologically active complement products, C3a, C5a and C5b-9. Consistently, Paclitaxel and Taxotere (Docetaxel), pharmaceuticals formulated in Cremophor-EL and Tween-80, activated the complement system in similar extent. Moreover, comparison of serum reactivity against the drug-loaded and drug-free formulations exhibited a significant linear correlation. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that therapeutic side effects, such as acute hypersensitivity and systemic immunostimulation, caused by intravenous nanomedicines containing polyethoxylated detergents such as Cremophor-EL and Tween-80, can be attributed to complement activation-derived inflammatory mediators.

  18. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  19. Properdin binding to complement activating surfaces depends on initial C3b deposition

    PubMed Central

    Harboe, Morten; Johnson, Christina; Nymo, Stig; Ekholt, Karin; Schjalm, Camilla; Lindstad, Julie K.; Pharo, Anne; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2017-01-01

    Two functions have been assigned to properdin; stabilization of the alternative convertase, C3bBb, is well accepted, whereas the role of properdin as pattern recognition molecule is controversial. The presence of nonphysiological aggregates in purified properdin preparations and experimental models that do not allow discrimination between the initial binding of properdin and binding secondary to C3b deposition is a critical factor contributing to this controversy. In previous work, by inhibiting C3, we showed that properdin binding to zymosan and Escherichia coli is not a primary event, but rather is solely dependent on initial C3 deposition. In the present study, we found that properdin in human serum bound dose-dependently to solid-phase myeloperoxidase. This binding was dependent on C3 activation, as demonstrated by the lack of binding in human serum with the C3-inhibitor compstatin Cp40, in C3-depleted human serum, or when purified properdin is applied in buffer. Similarly, binding of properdin to the surface of human umbilical vein endothelial cells or Neisseria meningitidis after incubation with human serum was completely C3-dependent, as detected by flow cytometry. Properdin, which lacks the structural homology shared by other complement pattern recognition molecules and has its major function in stabilizing the C3bBb convertase, was found to bind both exogenous and endogenous molecular patterns in a completely C3-dependent manner. We therefore challenge the view of properdin as a pattern recognition molecule, and argue that the experimental conditions used to test this hypothesis should be carefully considered, with emphasis on controlling initial C3 activation under physiological conditions. PMID:28069958

  20. Factor C acts as a lipopolysaccharide-responsive C3 convertase in horseshoe crab complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Takahara, Shusaku; Shibata, Toshio; Fukuoka, Takaaki; Ozaki, Aya; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2008-12-01

    The complement system in vertebrates plays an important role in host defense against and clearance of invading microbes, in which complement component C3 plays an essential role in the opsonization of pathogens, whereas the molecular mechanism underlying C3 activation in invertebrates remains unknown. In an effort to understand the molecular activation mechanism of invertebrate C3, we isolated and characterized an ortholog of C3 (designated TtC3) from the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Flow cytometric analysis using an Ab against TtC3 revealed that the horseshoe crab complement system opsonizes both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Evaluation of the ability of various pathogen-associated molecular patterns to promote the proteolytic conversion of TtC3 to TtC3b in hemocyanin-depleted plasma indicated that LPS, but not zymosan, peptidoglycan, or laminarin, strongly induces this conversion, highlighting the selective response of the complement system to LPS stimulation. Although originally characterized as an LPS-sensitive initiator of hemolymph coagulation stored within hemocytes, we identified factor C in hemolymph plasma. An anti-factor C Ab inhibited various LPS-induced phenomena, including plasma amidase activity, the proteolytic activation of TtC3, and the deposition of TtC3b on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, activated factor C present on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria directly catalyzed the proteolytic conversion of the purified TtC3, thereby promoting TtC3b deposition. We conclude that factor C acts as an LPS-responsive C3 convertase on the surface of invading Gram-negative bacteria in the initial phase of horseshoe crab complement activation.

  1. Antibodies to glycolipids activate complement and promote proteinuria in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed

    Susani, M; Schulze, M; Exner, M; Kerjaschki, D

    1994-04-01

    Passive Heymann nephritis is an experimental rat model of human membranous nephropathy induced by injection of antisera against crude renal cortical fractions such as Fx1A or rat tubular microvilli. This results in the formation of subepithelial immune deposits, the activation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement, and severe proteinuria. While the formation of immune deposits is attributed to in situ immune complex formation with antibodies specific for the gp330-Heymann nephritis antigenic complex (HNAC), activation of complement and proteinuria appear to be caused by at least one additional antibody species present in anti-Fx1A sera. We have separated by affinity absorption polyspecific antisera against Fx1A and rat microvilli into one IgG fraction directed specifically against microvillar proteins (anti-Fx1A-prot) and another IgG fraction specific for glycolipids (ant-Fx1A-lip) of tubular microvilli. When injected into rats, the anti-Fx1A-prot fraction induced immune deposits but failed to activate complement or produce proteinuria, similar to results obtained with affinity-purified anti-gp330 IgG. When the antibodies of the anti-Fx1A-lip fraction were injected alone they did not bind to glomeruli. By contrast, when the IgGs specific for the Fx1A-prot fraction (or for gp330-HNAC) were combined with those directed against the Fx1A-lip glycolipid preparation, immune deposits were formed, in situ complement activation was observed, and also proteinuria was induced. It is concluded that within anti-Fx1A and anti-microvillar sera there are at least two IgG fractions of relevance for the development of PHN: one directed against the gp330-HNAC complex which is responsible for the development of immune deposits, and a second specific for glycolipid antigen(s) which activate(s) the complement cascade.

  2. Structural and functional characterization of complement C4 and C1s-like molecules in teleost fish: insights into the evolution of classical and alternative pathways.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Gelman, Andrew E; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2004-07-01

    There is growing evidence that certain components of complement systems in lower vertebrates are promiscuous in their modes of activation through the classical or alternative pathways. To better understand the evolution of the classical pathway, we have evaluated the degree of functional diversification of key components of the classical and alternative pathways in rainbow trout, an evolutionarily relevant teleost species. Trout C4 was purified in two distinct forms (C4-1 and C4-2), both exhibiting the presence of a thioester bond at the cDNA and protein levels. C4-1 and C4-2 bound in a similar manner to trout IgM-sensitized sheep erythrocytes in the presence of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+), and both C4 molecules equally restored the classical pathway-mediated hemolytic activity of serum depleted of C3 and C4. Reconstitution of activity was dependent on the presence of both C3-1 and C4-1/C4-2 and on the presence of IgM bound to the sheep erythrocytes. A C1s-like molecule was shown to cleave specifically purified C4-1 and C4-2 into C4b, while failing to cleave trout C3 molecules. The C1s preparation was unable to cleave trout factor B/C2 when added in the presence of C3b or C4b molecules. Our results show a striking conservation of the mode of activation of the classical pathway. We also show that functional interchange between components of the classical and alternative pathway in teleosts is more restricted than was anticipated. These data suggest that functional diversification between the two pathways must have occurred shortly after the gene duplication that gave rise to the earliest classical pathway molecules.

  3. Visualization of Alternative Functional Configurations of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Facilitates Rapid Selection of Complementing Vaccines in Emergency Situations

    PubMed Central

    Metwally, Ashraf; Yousif, Ausama

    2017-01-01

    Successful immunization against avian influenza virus (AIV) requires eliciting an adequate polyclonal response to AIV hemagglutinin (HA) subunit 1 (HA1) epitopes. Outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) AIV subtype H5N1 can occur in vaccinated flocks in many endemic areas. Protection against emerging AIV is partly hindered by the limitations of vaccine production and transport, the use of leaky vaccines, and the use of multiple, and often antigenically-diverse, vaccines. It was hypothesized that the majority of alternative functional configurations (AFC) within the AIV HA1 can be represented by the pool of vaccine seed viruses currently in production because only a finite number of AFC are possible within each substructure of the molecule. Therefore, combinations of commercial vaccines containing complementing structural units (CSU) to each HA1 substructure can elicit responses to the totality of a given emerging AIV HA1 substructure isoforms. Analysis of homology-based 3D models of vaccine seed and emerging viruses facilitated the definition of HA1 AFC isoforms. CSU-based plots were used to predict which commercial vaccine combinations could have been used to cover nine selected AFC isoforms on recent Egyptian HP AIV H5N1 outbreak viruses. It is projected that expansion of the vaccine HA1 3D model database will improve international emergency responses to AIV. PMID:28375167

  4. Visualization of Alternative Functional Configurations of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Facilitates Rapid Selection of Complementing Vaccines in Emergency Situations.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Ashraf; Yousif, Ausama

    2017-04-04

    Successful immunization against avian influenza virus (AIV) requires eliciting an adequate polyclonal response to AIV hemagglutinin (HA) subunit 1 (HA1) epitopes. Outbreaks of highly-pathogenic (HP) AIV subtype H5N1 can occur in vaccinated flocks in many endemic areas. Protection against emerging AIV is partly hindered by the limitations of vaccine production and transport, the use of leaky vaccines, and the use of multiple, and often antigenically-diverse, vaccines. It was hypothesized that the majority of alternative functional configurations (AFC) within the AIV HA1 can be represented by the pool of vaccine seed viruses currently in production because only a finite number of AFC are possible within each substructure of the molecule. Therefore, combinations of commercial vaccines containing complementing structural units (CSU) to each HA1 substructure can elicit responses to the totality of a given emerging AIV HA1 substructure isoforms. Analysis of homology-based 3D models of vaccine seed and emerging viruses facilitated the definition of HA1 AFC isoforms. CSU-based plots were used to predict which commercial vaccine combinations could have been used to cover nine selected AFC isoforms on recent Egyptian HP AIV H5N1 outbreak viruses. It is projected that expansion of the vaccine HA1 3D model database will improve international emergency responses to AIV.

  5. Complement-fixing Activity of Fulvic Acid from Shilajit and Other Natural Sources

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Xie, Gang; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Shilajit has been used traditionally in folk medicine for treatment of a variety of disorders, including syndromes involving excessive complement activation. Extracts of Shilajit contain significant amounts of fulvic acid (FA), and it has been suggested that FA is responsible for many therapeutic properties of Shilajit. However, little is known regarding physical and chemical properties of Shilajit extracts, and nothing is known about their effects on the complement system. To address this issue, we fractionated extracts of commercial Shilajit using anion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. One neutral (S-I) and two acidic (S-II and S-III) fractions were isolated, characterized, and compared with standardized FA samples. The most abundant fraction (S-II) was further fractionated into three sub-fractions (S-II-1 to S-II-3). The van Krevelen diagram showed that the Shilajit fractions are products of polysaccharide degradation, and all fractions, except S-II-3, contained type II arabinogalactan. All Shilajit fractions exhibited dose-dependent complement-fixing activity in vitro with high potency. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between complement-fixing activity and carboxylic group content in the Shilajit fractions and other FA sources. These data provide a molecular basis to explain at least part of the beneficial therapeutic properties of Shilajit and other humic extracts. PMID:19107845

  6. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G; Ploeg, Rutger J; Yard, Benito A; Seelen, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function after transplantation. Brain death (BD) was induced in Fisher rats by inflation of an epidurally placed balloon catheter and ventilated for 6h. BD animals were treated with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) 1h before or 1h after BD. Kidney transplantation was performed and 7 days after transplantation animals were sacrificed. Plasma creatinine and urea were measured at days 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 after transplantation. Renal function was significantly better at day 1 after transplantation in recipients receiving a sCR1 pre-treated donor kidney compared to recipients of a non-treated donor graft. Also treatment with sCR1, 1h after the diagnosis of BD, resulted in a better renal function after transplantation. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1beta and TGF-beta were significantly lower in renal allografts recovered from treated donors. This study shows that targeting complement activation, during BD in the donor, leads to an improved renal function after transplantation in the recipient.

  7. Complement Activation in Relation to Capillary Leakage in Children with Septic Shock and Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Hazelzet, Jan A.; de Groot, Ronald; van Mierlo, Gerard; Joosten, Koen F. M.; van der Voort, Edwin; Eerenberg, Anke; Suur, Marja H.; Hop, Wim C. J.; Hack, C. Erik

    1998-01-01

    To assess the relationship between capillary leakage and inflammatory mediators during sepsis, blood samples were taken on hospital admission, as well as 24 and 72 h later, from 52 children (median age, 3.3 years) with severe meningococcal sepsis, of whom 38 survived and 14 died. Parameters related to cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6] IL-8, plasma phospholipase A2, and C-reactive protein [CRP]), to neutrophil degranulation (elastase and lactoferrin), to complement activation (C3a, C3b/c, C4b/c, and C3- and C4-CRP complexes), and to complement regulation (functional and inactivated C1 inhibitor and C4BP) were determined. The degree of capillary leakage was derived from the amount of plasma infused and the severity of disease by assessing the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, C3b/c, C3-CRP complexes, and C4BP on admission, adjusted for the duration of skin lesions, were significantly different in survivors and nonsurvivors (C3b/c levels were on average 2.2 times higher in nonsurvivors, and C3-CRP levels were 1.9 times higher in survivors). Mortality was independently related to the levels of C3b/c and C3-CRP complexes. In agreement with this, levels of complement activation products correlated well with the PRISM score or capillary leakage. Thus, these data show that complement activation in patients with severe meningococcal sepsis is associated with a poor outcome and a more severe disease course. Further studies should reveal whether complement activation may be a target for therapeutical intervention in this disease. PMID:9784543

  8. Complement activation by candidate biomaterials of an implantable microfabricated medical device.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Andrey; Hellerud, Bernt C; Pharo, Anne; Johannessen, Erik A; Mollnes, Tom E

    2011-08-01

    Implantable devices realized by microfabrication have introduced a new class of potential biomaterials whose properties would need to be assessed. Such devices include sensors for measuring biological substances like glucose. Thus, 14 different candidate materials intended for design of such a device were investigated with respect to their complement activation potential in human serum. The fluid-phase activation was measured by the products C4d, Bb, C3bc, and the terminal complement complex (TCC), whereas solid-phase activation was measured by deposition of TCC on the material surfaces. No fluid-phase activation was found for materials related to the capsule, carrier, or sealing. Fluid-phase activation was, however, triggered to a various extent in three of the four nanoporous membranes (cellulose, polyamide, and aluminium oxide), whereas polycarbonate was rendered inactive. Solid-phase activation discriminated more sensitively between all the materials, revealing that the capsule candidate polydimethylsiloxane and sealing candidate silicone 3140 were highly compatible, showing significantly lower TCC deposition than the negative control (p < 0.01). Three of the candidate materials were indifferent, whereas the remaining nine showed significantly higher deposition of TCC than the negative control (p < 0.01). In conclusion, complement activation, in particular when examined on the solid phase, discriminated well between the different candidate materials tested and could be used as a guide for the selection of the best-suited materials for further investigation and development of the device.

  9. Fcγ and Complement Receptors and Complement Proteins in Neutrophil Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Contribution to Pathogenesis and Progression and Modulation by Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoliello-Paschoalato, Adriana Balbina; Marchi, Larissa Fávaro; de Andrade, Micássio Fernandes; Kabeya, Luciana Mariko; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease that affects all structures of the joint and significantly impacts on morbidity and mortality in RA patients. RA is characterized by persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane lining the joint associated with infiltration of immune cells. Eighty to 90% of the leukocytes infiltrating the synovia are neutrophils. The specific role that neutrophils play in the onset of RA is not clear, but recent studies have evidenced that they have an important participation in joint damage and disease progression through the release of proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytokines, and neutrophil extracellular traps, in particular during frustrated phagocytosis of immune complexes (ICs). In addition, the local and systemic activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of RA and other IC-mediated diseases. This review discusses (i) the participation of Fcγ and complement receptors in mediating the effector functions of neutrophils in RA; (ii) the contribution of the complement system and ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms to joint damage in RA; and (iii) the use of plant extracts, dietary compounds, and isolated natural compounds in the treatment of RA, focusing on modulation of the effector functions of neutrophils and the complement system activity and/or activation. PMID:26346244

  10. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  11. Monomeric C-reactive protein modulates classic complement activation on necrotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mihlan, Michael; Blom, Anna M; Kupreishvili, Koba; Lauer, Nadine; Stelzner, Kristin; Bergström, Frida; Niessen, Hans W M; Zipfel, Peter F

    2011-12-01

    The acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) recruits C1q to the surface of damaged cells and thereby initiates complement activation. However, CRP also recruits complement inhibitors, such as C4b-binding protein (C4bp) and factor H, which both block complement progression at the level of C3 and inhibits inflammation. To define how CRP modulates the classic complement pathway, we studied the interaction of CRP with the classic pathway inhibitor C4bp. Monomeric CRP (mCRP), but not pentameric CRP (pCRP), binds C4bp and enhances degradation of C4b and C3b. Both C1q, the initiator, and C4bp, the inhibitor of the classic pathway, compete for mCRP binding, and this competition adjusts the local balance of activation and inhibition. After attachment of pCRP to the surface of necrotic rat myocytes, generation of mCRP was demonstrated over a period of 18 h. Similarly, a biological role for mCRP, C1q, and C4bp in the disease setting of acute myocardial infarction was revealed. In this inflamed tissue, mCRP, pCRP, C4bp, C1q, and C4d were detected in acetone-fixed and in unfixed tissue. Protein levels were enhanced 6 h to 5 d after infarction. Thus, mCRP bound to damaged cardiomyocytes recruits C1q to activate and also C4bp to control the classic complement pathway.

  12. STUDIES ON THE ACTIVATION OF A PROESTERASE ASSOCIATED WITH PARTIALLY PURIFIED FIRST COMPONENT OF HUMAN COMPLEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lepow, Irwin H.; Ratnoff, Oscar D.; Levy, Lawrence R.

    1958-01-01

    It has been found that under a wide range of physico-chemical conditions a positive correlation exists between the rate of disappearance of hemolytically active, partially purified first component of human complement and the rate of activation of an esterase hydrolyzing N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ethyl ester. Both reactions follow the kinetic equation for second order autocatalysis, with an apparent energy of activation of 31,000 calories per mol. They occur optimally at pH 7.3–7.7 and are inhibited by ionic strengths greater than 0.15, by 5 x 105 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and by a heat-labile serum inhibitor which appears unrelated to any component of complement. The activation of first component to esterase resembles closely the activation of trypsinogen to trypsin. Partially purified first component, containing plasminogen, may also be activated to esterase by addition of streptokinase. The significance of these data with respect to the postulated existence of first component as a proesterase and its possible role in complement-"fixation" is discussed. PMID:13513912

  13. Intracellular complement activation sustains T cell homeostasis and mediates effector differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G; Fara, Antonella F; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-12

    Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While "tonic" intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance.

  14. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host. PMID:28066433

  15. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  16. Bioactive Lysophospholipids Generated by Hepatic Lipase Degradation of Lipoproteins Lead to Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wanchao; Paik, David C.; Barile, Gaetano R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined bioactivity of lysophospholipids generated by degradation of the low-density (LDL), very low-density (VLDL), and high-density (HDL) lipoproteins with hepatic lipase (HL), cholesterol esterase (CE), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). Methods. The LDL, VLDL, and HDL were treated with HL, CE, and Lp-PLA2 after immobilization on plates, and complement activation studies were performed with diluted human serum. Complement component 3 (C3) fixation, a marker for complement activation, was determined with a monoclonal anti-human C3d antibody. Enzymatic properties of HL and CE were assayed with triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine substrates for triglyceride hydrolase and phospholipase A activities. The ARPE-19 cells were used for viability studies. Results. The HL degradation of human lipoproteins LDL, VLDL, or HDL results in the formation of modified lipoproteins that can activate the complement pathway. Complement activation is dose- and time-dependent upon HL and occurs via the classical pathway. Enzymatic studies suggest that the phospholipase A1 activity of HL generates complement-activating lysophospholipids. C-reactive protein (CRP), known to simultaneously interact with complement C1 and complement factor H (CFH), further enhances HL-induced complement activation. The lysophospholipids, 1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-Oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, can be directly cytotoxic to ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions. The HL degradation of lipoproteins, known to accumulate in the outer retina and in drusen, can lead to the formation of bioactive lysophospholipids that can trigger complement activation and induce RPE cellular dysfunction. Given the known risk associations for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with HL, CRP, and CFH, this study elucidates a possible damage pathway for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in genetically predisposed individuals, that HL activity may lead to accumulation of

  17. Bioactive lysophospholipids generated by hepatic lipase degradation of lipoproteins lead to complement activation via the classical pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wanchao; Paik, David C; Barile, Gaetano R

    2014-09-09

    We determined bioactivity of lysophospholipids generated by degradation of the low-density (LDL), very low-density (VLDL), and high-density (HDL) lipoproteins with hepatic lipase (HL), cholesterol esterase (CE), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). The LDL, VLDL, and HDL were treated with HL, CE, and Lp-PLA2 after immobilization on plates, and complement activation studies were performed with diluted human serum. Complement component 3 (C3) fixation, a marker for complement activation, was determined with a monoclonal anti-human C3d antibody. Enzymatic properties of HL and CE were assayed with triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine substrates for triglyceride hydrolase and phospholipase A activities. The ARPE-19 cells were used for viability studies. The HL degradation of human lipoproteins LDL, VLDL, or HDL results in the formation of modified lipoproteins that can activate the complement pathway. Complement activation is dose- and time-dependent upon HL and occurs via the classical pathway. Enzymatic studies suggest that the phospholipase A1 activity of HL generates complement-activating lysophospholipids. C-reactive protein (CRP), known to simultaneously interact with complement C1 and complement factor H (CFH), further enhances HL-induced complement activation. The lysophospholipids, 1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-Oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, can be directly cytotoxic to ARPE-19 cells. The HL degradation of lipoproteins, known to accumulate in the outer retina and in drusen, can lead to the formation of bioactive lysophospholipids that can trigger complement activation and induce RPE cellular dysfunction. Given the known risk associations for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with HL, CRP, and CFH, this study elucidates a possible damage pathway for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in genetically predisposed individuals, that HL activity may lead to accumulation of lysophospholipids to initiate complement

  18. Complement C1q Activates Tumor Suppressor WWOX to Induce Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Qunying; Sze, Chun-I; Lin, Sing-Ru; Lee, Ming-Hui; He, Ruei-Yu; Schultz, Lori; Chang, Jean-Yun; Chen, Shean-Jen; Boackle, Robert J.; Hsu, Li-Jin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background Tissue exudates contain low levels of serum complement proteins, and their regulatory effects on prostate cancer progression are largely unknown. We examined specific serum complement components in coordinating the activation of tumor suppressors p53 and WWOX (also named FOR or WOX1) and kinases ERK, JNK1 and STAT3 in human prostate DU145 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings DU145 cells were cultured overnight in 1% normal human serum, or in human serum depleted of an indicated complement protein. Under complement C1q- or C6-free conditions, WOX1 and ERK were mainly present in the cytoplasm without phosphorylation, whereas phosphorylated JNK1 was greatly accumulated in the nuclei. Exogenous C1q rapidly restored the WOX1 activation (with Tyr33 phosphorylation) in less than 2 hr. Without serum complement C9, p53 became activated, and hyaluronan (HA) reversed the effect. Under C6-free conditions, HA induced activation of STAT3, an enhancer of metastasis. Notably, exogenous C1q significantly induced apoptosis of WOX1-overexpressing DU145 cells, but not vehicle-expressing cells. A dominant negative and Y33R mutant of WOX1 blocked the apoptotic effect. C1q did not enhance p53-mediated apoptosis. By total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, it was determined that C1q destabilized adherence of WOX1-expressing DU145 cells by partial detaching and inducing formation of clustered microvilli for focal adhesion particularly in between cells. These cells then underwent shrinkage, membrane blebbing and death. Remarkably, as determined by immunostaining, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer were shown to have a significantly reduced expression of tissue C1q, compared to age-matched normal prostate tissues. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that complement C1q may induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q enhances prostate hyperplasia and cancerous formation due to

  19. Detection of complement activation using monoclonal antibodies against C3d.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Joshua M; Kulik, Liudmila; Orth, Heather; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Sargsyan, Siranush A; Mitchell, Lynne M; Hourcade, Dennis E; Hannan, Jonathan P; Kovacs, James M; Coughlin, Beth; Woodell, Alex S; Pickering, Matthew C; Rohrer, Bärbel; Holers, V Michael

    2013-05-01

    During complement activation the C3 protein is cleaved, and C3 activation fragments are covalently fixed to tissues. Tissue-bound C3 fragments are a durable biomarker of tissue inflammation, and these fragments have been exploited as addressable binding ligands for targeted therapeutics and diagnostic agents. We have generated cross-reactive murine monoclonal antibodies against human and mouse C3d, the final C3 degradation fragment generated during complement activation. We developed 3 monoclonal antibodies (3d8b, 3d9a, and 3d29) that preferentially bind to the iC3b, C3dg, and C3d fragments in solution, but do not bind to intact C3 or C3b. The same 3 clones also bind to tissue-bound C3 activation fragments when injected systemically. Using mouse models of renal and ocular disease, we confirmed that, following systemic injection, the antibodies accumulated at sites of C3 fragment deposition within the glomerulus, the renal tubulointerstitium, and the posterior pole of the eye. To detect antibodies bound within the eye, we used optical imaging and observed accumulation of the antibodies within retinal lesions in a model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Our results demonstrate that imaging methods that use these antibodies may provide a sensitive means of detecting and monitoring complement activation-associated tissue inflammation.

  20. The Carbohydrate-linked Phosphorylcholine of the Parasitic Nematode Product ES-62 Modulates Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Umul Kulthum; Maller, N. Claire; Iqbal, Asif J.; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Harnett, William; Raynes, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes manufacture various carbohydrate-linked phosphorylcholine (PCh)-containing molecules, including ES-62, a protein with an N-linked glycan terminally substituted with PCh. The PCh component is biologically important because it is required for immunomodulatory effects. We showed that most ES-62 was bound to a single protein, C-reactive protein (CRP), in normal human serum, displaying a calcium-dependent, high-avidity interaction and ability to form large complexes. Unexpectedly, CRP binding to ES-62 failed to efficiently activate complement as far as the C3 convertase stage in comparison with PCh-BSA and PCh-containing Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall polysaccharide. C1q capture assays demonstrated an ES-62-CRP-C1q interaction in serum. The three ligands all activated C1 and generated C4b to similar extents. However, a C2a active site was not generated following ES-62 binding to CRP, demonstrating that C2 cleavage was far less efficient for ES-62-containing complexes. We proposed that failure of C2 cleavage was due to the flexible nature of carbohydrate-bound PCh and that reduced proximity of the C1 complex was the reason that C2 was poorly cleaved. This was confirmed using synthetic analogues that were similar to ES-62 only in respect of having a flexible PCh. Furthermore, ES-62 was shown to deplete early complement components, such as the rate-limiting C4, following CRP interaction and thereby inhibit classical pathway activation. Thus, flexible PCh-glycan represents a novel mechanism for subversion of complement activation. These data illustrate the importance of the rate-limiting C4/C2 stage of complement activation and reveal a new addition to the repertoire of ES-62 immunomodulatory mechanisms with possible therapeutic applications. PMID:27044740

  1. The Carbohydrate-linked Phosphorylcholine of the Parasitic Nematode Product ES-62 Modulates Complement Activation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Umul Kulthum; Maller, N Claire; Iqbal, Asif J; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Harnett, William; Raynes, John G

    2016-05-27

    Parasitic nematodes manufacture various carbohydrate-linked phosphorylcholine (PCh)-containing molecules, including ES-62, a protein with an N-linked glycan terminally substituted with PCh. The PCh component is biologically important because it is required for immunomodulatory effects. We showed that most ES-62 was bound to a single protein, C-reactive protein (CRP), in normal human serum, displaying a calcium-dependent, high-avidity interaction and ability to form large complexes. Unexpectedly, CRP binding to ES-62 failed to efficiently activate complement as far as the C3 convertase stage in comparison with PCh-BSA and PCh-containing Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall polysaccharide. C1q capture assays demonstrated an ES-62-CRP-C1q interaction in serum. The three ligands all activated C1 and generated C4b to similar extents. However, a C2a active site was not generated following ES-62 binding to CRP, demonstrating that C2 cleavage was far less efficient for ES-62-containing complexes. We proposed that failure of C2 cleavage was due to the flexible nature of carbohydrate-bound PCh and that reduced proximity of the C1 complex was the reason that C2 was poorly cleaved. This was confirmed using synthetic analogues that were similar to ES-62 only in respect of having a flexible PCh. Furthermore, ES-62 was shown to deplete early complement components, such as the rate-limiting C4, following CRP interaction and thereby inhibit classical pathway activation. Thus, flexible PCh-glycan represents a novel mechanism for subversion of complement activation. These data illustrate the importance of the rate-limiting C4/C2 stage of complement activation and reveal a new addition to the repertoire of ES-62 immunomodulatory mechanisms with possible therapeutic applications.

  2. Increased activity of lysozyme and complement system in Atlantic halibut exposed to elevated CO2 at six different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bresolin de Souza, K; Asker, N; Jönsson, E; Förlin, L; Sturve, J

    2016-12-01

    Ocean acidification and rising seawater temperature are environmental stressors resulting from the continuous increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration due to anthropogenic activities. As a consequence, marine fish are expected to undergo conditions outside of their tolerance range, leading to physiological challenges with possible detrimental implications. Our research group has previously shown that exposure to elevated CO2 modulated the immune system of the Atlantic halibut. To further investigate this finding, we analysed non-specific immune components in blood plasma of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) juveniles acclimated to six different temperatures (5, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 °C), and to water pH of 8.0 (control) or 7.6 (predicted for year 2100) for three months. Plasma ions (K(+), Na(+), Ca(++), Cl(-)) and lactate concentrations were also measured. The analysis of plasma ions did not show any trends related to temperature or CO2 exposure, and the majority of the experimental fish were able to maintain ionic balance. The results show that both innate immune components (lysozyme and alternative complement system) had increased activities in response to elevated CO2, representing a CO2-related impact on the halibut's immune system. The increased activity of lysozyme and complement system is possibly part of the acclimatization process, and might be protective. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components: protein adsorption, coagulation, activation of the complement system and hemolysis studies.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Mitjans, Montserrat; Vinardell, Maria Pilar; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-04-14

    The intravenous administration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles has been widely reported as a promising alternative for delivery of drugs to specific cells. However, studies on their interaction with diverse blood components using different techniques are still lacking. Therefore, in the present work, the interaction of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components was described using different complementary techniques. The influence of different encapsulated compounds/functionalizing agents on these interactions was also reported. It is worth noting that all these techniques can be simply performed, without the need for highly sophisticated apparatus or skills. Moreover, their transference to industries and application of quality control could be easily performed. Serum albumin was adsorbed onto all types of tested nanoparticles. The saturation concentration was dependent on the nanoparticle size. In contrast, fibrinogen aggregation was dependent on nanoparticle surface charge. The complement activation was also influenced by the nanoparticle functionalization; the presence of a functionalizing agent increased complement activation, while the addition of an encapsulated compound only caused a slight increase. None of the nanoparticles influenced the coagulation cascade at low concentrations. However, at high concentrations, cationized nanoparticles did activate the coagulation cascade. Interactions of nanoparticles with erythrocytes did not reveal any hemolysis. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood proteins depended both on the nanoparticle properties and the protein studied. Independent of their loading/surface functionalization, PLGA nanoparticles did not influence the coagulation cascade and did not induce hemolysis of erythrocytes; they could be defined as safe concerning induction of embolization and cell lysis.

  4. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection.

  5. Effect of functionalization of carbon nanotubes with psychosine on complement activation and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Rybak-Smith, Malgorzata J; Tripisciano, Carla; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Lamprecht, Constanze; Sim, Robert B

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes possess interesting physicochemical properties which make them potentially usable in medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, for example, may carry and deliver anticancer drugs, such as cisplatin. Magnetic nanoparticles, like iron filled MWCNT, can be used in hyperthermia therapy. However, their hydrophobic character is a major difficulty, as preparation of stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes in biological buffers is an essential step towards biomedical applications. Recently, a novel treatment using the glycolipid, Galactosyl-beta1-sphingosine (psychosine), was employed to make stable suspensions of psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes in biological buffers. In this paper, the interactions of psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes with a part of the human immune system, complement, is presented. To investigate if human serum complement proteins can interact with psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes, complement consumption (depletion) assays were conducted. Moreover, direct protein binding studies, to analyze the interaction of plasma proteins with the psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes, using affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques, were applied. The psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotubes activate human complement via the classical pathway. Interestingly, as the hydrophilic part of the glycolipid may bind to ficolins, the lectin pathway could also be involved. Binding of human plasma proteins is very selective as only very few proteins adsorb to the psychosine-functionalized carbon nanotube surface, when placed in contact with human plasma. Bovine serum albumin-coated carbon nanotubes were used as a standard to find the differences in complement activation and protein adsorption patterns, caused by various non-covalent coatings of carbon nanotubes.

  6. Different activation patterns in the plasma kallikrein-kinin and complement systems during coronary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Kongsgaard, U E; Smith-Erichsen, N; Geiran, O; Amundsen, E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    1989-07-01

    Components of the plasma kallikrein-kinin and complement systems were determined in patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Spontaneous kallikrein activity (KK), plasma prekallikrein (PKK), functional kallikrein inhibition capacity (KKI), C3 activation products (C3-act), and the terminal complement complex (TCC) were measured. A marked, transitory increase in KK and a decrease in PKK were found prior to cardiopulmonary bypass just after heparin injection. An additional decline in PKK and KKI during bypass with a return to near control levels in the postoperative period was observed. C3-act increased in all patients during bypass, reaching a peak value at wound closure. The TCC concentration also increased significantly during cardiopulmonary bypass, returned to control levels in the early postoperative period, and then increased again in the late postoperative period. It is concluded that activation of the kallikrein-kinin system started after injection of heparin, prior to cardiopulmonary bypass. Activation of both the initial and the terminal complement cascade, however, started only after onset of cardiopulmonary bypass.

  7. Detection of complement activation using monoclonal antibodies against C3d

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Kulik, Liudmila; Orth, Heather; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Sargsyan, Siranush A.; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Hourcade, Dennis E.; Hannan, Jonathan P.; Kovacs, James M.; Coughlin, Beth; Woodell, Alex S.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Rohrer, Bärbel; Holers, V. Michael

    2013-01-01

    During complement activation the C3 protein is cleaved, and C3 activation fragments are covalently fixed to tissues. Tissue-bound C3 fragments are a durable biomarker of tissue inflammation, and these fragments have been exploited as addressable binding ligands for targeted therapeutics and diagnostic agents. We have generated cross-reactive murine monoclonal antibodies against human and mouse C3d, the final C3 degradation fragment generated during complement activation. We developed 3 monoclonal antibodies (3d8b, 3d9a, and 3d29) that preferentially bind to the iC3b, C3dg, and C3d fragments in solution, but do not bind to intact C3 or C3b. The same 3 clones also bind to tissue-bound C3 activation fragments when injected systemically. Using mouse models of renal and ocular disease, we confirmed that, following systemic injection, the antibodies accumulated at sites of C3 fragment deposition within the glomerulus, the renal tubulointerstitium, and the posterior pole of the eye. To detect antibodies bound within the eye, we used optical imaging and observed accumulation of the antibodies within retinal lesions in a model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Our results demonstrate that imaging methods that use these antibodies may provide a sensitive means of detecting and monitoring complement activation–associated tissue inflammation. PMID:23619360

  8. Potential induction of anti-PEG antibodies and complement activation toward PEGylated therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Johan J F; Carpenter, John F; Anchordoquy, Thomas J; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-12-01

    Conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to therapeutics has proven to be an effective approach to increase the serum half-life. However, the increased use of PEGylated therapeutics has resulted in unexpected immune-mediated side-effects. There are claims that these are caused by anti-PEG antibodies inducing rapid clearance. These claims are however hampered by the lack of standardized and well-validated antibody assays. PEGylation has also been associated with the activation of the complement system causing severe hypersensitivity reactions. Here, we critically review the clinical and analytical tools used. In addition, we propose an explanation of the immune-mediated side-effects of PEGylated products based on the haptogenic properties of PEG, responsible for complement activation and the induction of anti-PEG antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab′)2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  10. Differential activity of candidate microbicides against early steps of HIV-1 infection upon complement virus opsonization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 in genital secretions may be opsonized by several molecules including complement components. Opsonized HIV-1 by complement enhances the infection of various mucosal target cells, such as dendritic cells (DC) and epithelial cells. Results We herein evaluated the effect of HIV-1 complement opsonization on microbicide candidates' activity, by using three in vitro mucosal models: CCR5-tropic HIV-1JR-CSF transcytosis through epithelial cells, HIV-1JR-CSF attachment on immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMDDC), and infectivity of iMDDC by CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1NDK. A panel of 10 microbicide candidates [T20, CADA, lectines HHA & GNA, PVAS, human lactoferrin, and monoclonal antibodies IgG1B12, 12G5, 2G12 and 2F5], were investigated using cell-free unopsonized or opsonized HIV-1 by complements. Only HHA and PVAS were able to inhibit HIV trancytosis. Upon opsonization, transcytosis was affected only by HHA, HIV-1 adsorption on iMDDC by four molecules (lactoferrin, IgG1B12, IgG2G5, IgG2G12), and replication in iMDDC of HIV-1BaL by five molecules (lactoferrin, CADA, T20, IgG1B12, IgG2F5) and of HIV-1NDK by two molecules (lactoferrin, IgG12G5). Conclusion These observations demonstrate that HIV-1 opsonization by complements may modulate in vitro the efficiency of candidate microbicides to inhibit HIV-1 infection of mucosal target cells, as well as its crossing through mucosa. PMID:20546571

  11. Microbial Neuraminidase Induces a Moderate and Transient Myelin Vacuolation Independent of Complement System Activation.

    PubMed

    Granados-Durán, Pablo; López-Ávalos, María Dolores; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Fernández-Arjona, María Del Mar; Hughes, Timothy R; Johnson, Krista; Morgan, B Paul; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro; Grondona, Jesús M

    2017-01-01

    Some central nervous system pathogens express neuraminidase (NA) on their surfaces. In the rat brain, a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of NA induces myelin vacuolation in axonal tracts. Here, we explore the nature, the time course, and the role of the complement system in this damage. The spatiotemporal analysis of myelin vacuolation was performed by optical and electron microscopy. Myelin basic protein-positive area and oligodendrocyte transcription factor (Olig2)-positive cells were quantified in the damaged bundles. Neuronal death in the affected axonal tracts was assessed by Fluoro-Jade B and anti-caspase-3 staining. To evaluate the role of the complement, membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on damaged bundles was analyzed using anti-C5b9. Rats ICV injected with the anaphylatoxin C5a were studied for myelin damage. In addition, NA-induced vacuolation was studied in rats with different degrees of complement inhibition: normal rats treated with anti-C5-blocking antibody and C6-deficient rats. The stria medullaris, the optic chiasm, and the fimbria were the most consistently damaged axonal tracts. Vacuolation peaked 7 days after NA injection and reverted by day 15. Olig2+ cell number in the damaged tracts was unaltered, and neurodegeneration associated with myelin alterations was not detected. MAC was absent on damaged axonal tracts, as revealed by C5b9 immunostaining. Rats ICV injected with the anaphylatoxin C5a displayed no myelin injury. When the complement system was experimentally or constitutively inhibited, NA-induced myelin vacuolation was similar to that observed in normal rats. Microbial NA induces a moderate and transient myelin vacuolation that is not caused either by neuroinflammation or complement system activation.

  12. Increased expression of the C3b receptor by neutrophils and complement activation during haemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J; Hakim, R M; Fearon, D T

    1984-01-01

    Activation of complement and the relative number of C3b receptors expressed by neutrophils was assessed in patients undergoing haemodialysis with new and reused cellulosic membranes, and with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) membranes. Activation of complement was assessed by radioimmunoassay of plasma C3adesArg, and neutrophil C3b receptors were measured by fluorescent flow cytometry of cells indirectly stained with F(ab')2 anti-C3b receptor. During first use of cellulosic dialysis membranes by four patients, the mean expression of C3b receptors by neutrophils in blood taken from the afferent line of the extra-corporeal system after 10, 20, 60 and 120 min of dialysis increased to 127, 189, 255 and 296%, respectively. The mean plasma C3adesArg concentrations in the corresponding samples of blood were 225, 320, 236 and 160% of the pre-dialysis levels. During third and fifth use of the same membranes by these patients, the mean C3b receptor expression by neutrophils did not exceed 150% of the predialysis determination, and correspondingly minimal increases in plasma C3adesArg were observed. Analysis of blood taken simultaneously from the afferent and efferent lines of the first use cellulosic dialysis system indicated that the increase in C3b receptor expression by neutrophils and generation of C3adesArg occurred when blood came in contact with the dialysis membrane. Haemodialysis of four additional patients with the non-complement activating PMMA membrane caused only modest or no increases in neutrophil C3b receptors. Thus, complement activation in vivo is associated with up-regulation of neutrophilic C3b receptors, indicating that this cellular response previously described only in model, in vitro systems, is a physiological mechanism by which this cell can augment its capacity for responding to C3b opsonized material. PMID:6232024

  13. Complement activation and liver impairment in trichloroethylene-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Zha, Wansheng; Wang, Feng; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Shuhai; Yu, Junfeng; Zhou, Chengfan; Shen, Tong; Wu, Changhao; Zhu, Qixing

    2013-01-01

    Our recent studies have shown that trichloroethylene (TCE) was able to induce multisystem injuries in the form of occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis, including skin, kidney, and liver damages. However, the role of complement activation in the immune-mediated liver injury is not known. This study examined the role of complement activation in the liver injury in a mouse model of TCE-induced sensitization. Treatment of female BALB/c mice with TCE under specific dosing protocols resulted in skin inflammation and sensitization. Skin edema and erythema occurred in TCE-sensitized groups. Trichloroethylene sensitization produced liver histopathological lesions, increased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase activities, and the relative liver weight. The concentrations of serum complement components C3a-desArg, C5a-desArg, and C5b-9 were significantly increased in 24-hour, 48-hour, and 72-hour sensitization-positive groups treated with TCE and peaked in the 72-hour sensitization-positive group. Depositions of C3a, C5a, and C5b-9 into the liver tissue were also revealed by immunohistochemistry. Immunofluorescence further verified high C5b-9 expression in 24-hour, 48-hour, and 72-hour sensitization-positive groups in response to TCE treatment. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected C3 messenger RNA expression in the liver, and this was significantly increased in 24-hour and 48-hour sensitization-positive groups with a transient reduction at 72 hours. These results provide the first experimental evidence that complement activation may play a key role in the generation and progression of immune-mediated hepatic injury by exposure to TCE.

  14. Anti-complement activity of essential oils from red and black rice bran.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Yeo, Min-A; Kim, Sun-Jin; Moon, Hyung-In

    2011-05-01

    The volatile essential oils from red and black rice bran were obtained by hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type apparatus, and the components of that oil were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The present study involved characterizing the chemical compositions, their amounts and the anti-complement activities of red and black rice bran. The red rice bran essential oils yield was 0.031%, and GC-MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were (E)-β-ocimene (3.12%), nonanal (11.32%), (2E, 4E)-decadienal (2.54%), myristic acid (41.32%), geranyactone (2.41%) and methyl oleate (2.46%). The black rice bran essential oils yield was 0.053%, and GC-MS analysis revealed that its major constituents were nonanal (8.31%), acrylic acid (3.21%), 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde (2.81%), pelargonic acid (4.21%) and myrisitc acid (28.07%). The essential oils showed inhibitory activity against complement system with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) values of 246 ppm (red rice bran) and 193 ppm (black rice bran). Also, myristic acid, nonanal, (E)-β-ocimene and pelargonic acid were tested against complement system. Pelargonic acid was shown to moderate activity (50% inhibitory concentration = 132 μM).

  15. Role of complement in experiment silicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, A.H.; Sohnle, P.G.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S.

    1986-08-01

    The role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of crystal-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis was evaluated using a mouse model of silicosis and congenitally complement-deficient mice. Mice lacking the fifth component of complement (B10.D2/o) were compared to C5-sufficient animals (B10.D2/n) for pulmonary changes following intratracheal instillation of silica crystals. Complement-deficient mice demonstrated a significant reduction compared to complement-sufficient mice in both cell number and protein content of lung lavage fluid throughout the 12 weeks following silica exposure. Lung hydroxyproline content (indicative of collagen deposition) was equivalent for both strains and significantly higher than controls at all times points following silica instillation. Moreover, studies in vitro have shown that silica crystals are capable of activating complement via the alternative pathway. These studies indicate that the complement system may be responsible for some of the pulmonary inflammation, but not fibrosis elicited by silica exposure.

  16. C1q complement component and -antibodies reflect SLE activity and kidney involvement.

    PubMed

    Horák, P; Hermanová, Z; Zadrazil, J; Ciferská, H; Ordeltová, M; Kusá, L; Zurek, M; Tichý, T

    2006-07-01

    The role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of systemic diseases is very ambivalent. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), many abnormalities in the activation of the complement system have been reported. The most important antibodies formed against the complement system in SLE are the ones associated with the C1q component. The aim of this study was to assess separately the anti-C1q antibodies and C1q component in the serum from 65 patients with SLE, then in individuals with (n=33) and without (n=32) lupus nephritis and with active (n=36) and nonactive (n=29) form of the disease (European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement, ECLAM>3, ECLAMcomplement component. The mean serum levels were 90.89+/-13 IU/ml for anti-C1q antibodies and 145+/-52 mg/l for C1q. The significant difference in C1q antibodies levels was found between individuals with and without lupus nephritis (117.5+/-52 IU/ml vs. 28.2+/-12.2 IU/ml, p=0.0001) and between those with active and nonactive SLE (154.6+/-115 IU/ml vs. 50.6+/-73, p=0.001). C1q complement component was statistically lower in patients with lupus nephritis (144+/-30 mg/l vs. 175+/-50 mg/ml, p=0.002) and in active patients (138+/-40 mg/l vs. 202+/-20 mg/l, p=0.001). If the two parameters are measured together, they seem to have a mirror-like pattern of serum concentration, and they are potential markers of SLE activity and of the presence of lupus nephritis.

  17. Antibodies to glycolipids activate complement and promote proteinuria in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Susani, M.; Schulze, M.; Exner, M.; Kerjaschki, D.

    1994-01-01

    Passive Heymann nephritis is an experimental rat model of human membranous nephropathy induced by injection of antisera against crude renal cortical fractions such as Fx1A or rat tubular microvilli. This results in the formation of subepithelial immune deposits, the activation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement, and severe proteinuria. While the formation of immune deposits is attributed to in situ immune complex formation with antibodies specific for the gp330-Heymann nephritis antigenic complex (HNAC), activation of complement and proteinuria appear to be caused by at least one additional antibody species present in anti-Fx1A sera. We have separated by affinity absorption polyspecific antisera against Fx1A and rat microvilli into one IgG fraction directed specifically against microvillar proteins (anti-Fx1A-prot) and another IgG fraction specific for glycolipids (ant-Fx1A-lip) of tubular microvilli. When injected into rats, the anti-Fx1A-prot fraction induced immune deposits but failed to activate complement or produce proteinuria, similar to results obtained with affinity-purified anti-gp330 IgG. When the antibodies of the anti-Fx1A-lip fraction were injected alone they did not bind to glomeruli. By contrast, when the IgGs specific for the Fx1A-prot fraction (or for gp330-HNAC) were combined with those directed against the Fx1A-lip glycolipid preparation, immune deposits were formed, in situ complement activation was observed, and also proteinuria was induced. It is concluded that within anti-Fx1A and anti-microvillar sera there are at least two IgG fractions of relevance for the development of PHN: one directed against the gp330-HNAC complex which is responsible for the development of immune deposits, and a second specific for glycolipid antigen(s) which activate(s) the complement cascade. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8160779

  18. Molluskan Hemocyanins Activate the Classical Pathway of the Human Complement System through Natural Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Sosoniuk-Roche, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; López, Mercedes N.; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; Valck, Carolina; Ferreira, Arturo; Becker, María Inés

    2017-01-01

    Molluskan hemocyanins are enormous oxygen-carrier glycoproteins that show remarkable immunostimulatory properties when inoculated in mammals, such as the generation of high levels of antibodies, a strong cellular reaction, and generation of non-specific antitumor immune responses in some types of cancer, particularly for superficial bladder cancer. These proteins have the ability to bias the immune response toward a Th1 phenotype. However, despite all their current uses with beneficial clinical outcomes, a clear mechanism explaining these properties is not available. Taking into account reports of natural antibodies against the hemocyanin of the gastropod Megathura crenulata [keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)] in humans as well as other vertebrate species, we report here for the first time, the presence, in sera from unimmunized healthy donors, of antibodies recognizing, in addition to KLH, two other hemocyanins from gastropods with documented immunomodulatory capacities: Fisurella latimarginata hemocyanin (FLH) and Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). Through an ELISA screening, we found IgM and IgG antibodies reactive with these hemocyanins. When the capacity of these antibodies to bind deglycosylated hemocyanins was studied, no decreased interaction was detected. Moreover, in the case of FLH, deglycosylation increased antibody binding. We evaluated through an in vitro complement deposition assay whether these antibodies activated the classical pathway of the human complement system. The results showed that all three hemocyanins and their deglycosylated counterparts elicited this activation, mediated by C1 binding to immunoglobulins. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding on how the complement system could participate in the immunostimulatory properties of hemocyanins, through natural, complement-activating antibodies reacting with these proteins. Although a role for carbohydrates cannot be completely ruled out, in our experimental setting

  19. Pathogenesis of aortic dilatation in mucopolysaccharidosis VII mice may involve complement activation

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Guilherme; Wu, Susan; Howe, Ruth A.; Ramamoothy, Meera; Knutsen, Russell H.; Fang, Jiali; Mecham, Robert P.; Liu, Yuli; Wu, Xiaobo; Atkinson, John P.; Ponder, Katherine P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is due to mutations within the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase, and results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans. MPS VII causes aortic dilatation and elastin fragmentation, which is associated with upregulation of the elastases cathepsin S (CtsS) and matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12). To test the role of these enzymes, MPS VII mice were crossed with mice deficient in CtsS or MMP12, and the effect upon aortic dilatation was determined. CtsS deficiency did not protect against aortic dilatation in MPS VII mice, but also failed to prevent an upregulation of cathepsin enzyme activity. Further analysis with substrates and inhibitors specific for particular cathepsins suggests that this enzyme activity was due to CtsB, which could contribute to elastin fragmentation. Similarly, MMP12 deficiency and deficiency of both MMP12 and CtsS could not prevent aortic dilatation in MPS VII mice. Microarray and reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR were performed to look for upregulation of other elastases. This demonstrated that mRNA for complement component D was elevated in MPS VII mice, while immunostaining demonstrated high levels of complement component C3 on surfaces within the aortic media. Finally, we demonstrate that neonatal intravenous injection of a retroviral vector encoding β-glucuronidase reduced aortic dilatation. We conclude that neither CtsS nor MMP12 are necessary for elastin fragmentation in MPS VII mouse aorta, and propose that CtsB and/or complement component D may be involved. Complement may be activated by the GAGs that accumulate, and may play a role in signal transduction pathways that upregulate elastases. PMID:21944884

  20. Pathogenesis of aortic dilatation in mucopolysaccharidosis VII mice may involve complement activation.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Guilherme; Wu, Susan; Howe, Ruth A; Ramamoothy, Meera; Knutsen, Russell H; Fang, Jiali; Mecham, Robert P; Liu, Yuli; Wu, Xiaobo; Atkinson, John P; Ponder, Katherine P

    2011-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is due to mutations within the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase, and results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans. MPS VII causes aortic dilatation and elastin fragmentation, which is associated with upregulation of the elastases cathepsin S (CtsS) and matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12). To test the role of these enzymes, MPS VII mice were crossed with mice deficient in CtsS or MMP12, and the effect upon aortic dilatation was determined. CtsS deficiency did not protect against aortic dilatation in MPS VII mice, but also failed to prevent an upregulation of cathepsin enzyme activity. Further analysis with substrates and inhibitors specific for particular cathepsins suggests that this enzyme activity was due to CtsB, which could contribute to elastin fragmentation. Similarly, MMP12 deficiency and deficiency of both MMP12 and CtsS could not prevent aortic dilatation in MPS VII mice. Microarray and reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR were performed to look for upregulation of other elastases. This demonstrated that mRNA for complement component D was elevated in MPS VII mice, while immunostaining demonstrated high levels of complement component C3 on surfaces within the aortic media. Finally, we demonstrate that neonatal intravenous injection of a retroviral vector encoding β-glucuronidase reduced aortic dilatation. We conclude that neither CtsS nor MMP12 are necessary for elastin fragmentation in MPS VII mouse aorta, and propose that CtsB and/or complement component D may be involved. Complement may be activated by the GAGs that accumulate, and may play a role in signal transduction pathways that upregulate elastases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human C3 mutation reveals a mechanism of dense deposit disease pathogenesis and provides insights into complement activation and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Heurich, Meike; Valdes-Cañedo, Francisco; Vazquez-Martul, Eduardo; Torreira, Eva; Montes, Tamara; Tortajada, Agustín; Pinto, Sheila; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Morgan, B. Paul; Llorca, Oscar; Harris, Claire L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Dense deposit disease (DDD) is a severe renal disease characterized by accumulation of electron-dense material in the mesangium and glomerular basement membrane. Previously, DDD has been associated with deficiency of factor H (fH), a plasma regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation, and studies in animal models have linked pathogenesis to the massive complement factor 3 (C3) activation caused by this deficiency. Here, we identified a unique DDD pedigree that associates disease with a mutation in the C3 gene. Mutant C3923ΔDG, which lacks 2 amino acids, could not be cleaved to C3b by the AP C3-convertase and was therefore the predominant circulating C3 protein in the patients. However, upon activation to C3b by proteases, or to C3(H2O) by spontaneous thioester hydrolysis, C3923ΔDG generated an active AP C3-convertase that was regulated normally by decay accelerating factor (DAF) but was resistant to decay by fH. Moreover, activated C3b923ΔDG and C3(H2O)923ΔDG were resistant to proteolysis by factor I (fI) in the presence of fH, but were efficiently inactivated in the presence of membrane cofactor protein (MCP). These characteristics cause a fluid phase–restricted AP dysregulation in the patients that continuously activated and consumed C3 produced by the normal C3 allele. These findings expose structural requirements in C3 that are critical for recognition of the substrate C3 by the AP C3-convertase and for the regulatory activities of fH, DAF, and MCP, all of which have implications for therapeutic developments. PMID:20852386

  2. Complement-activating rheumatoid-factor-containing complexes in patients with rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Elson, C J; Scott, D G; Blake, D R; Bacon, P A; Holt, P D

    1983-04-01

    The role of complement and rheumatoid factor in immune complexes was examined in patients with a variety of rheumatic diseases. This was done by assessing the amount of rheumatoid factor (RF) bound from sera by F(ab)2 anti-C3 attached to a solid matrix. High levels of RF bound to C3 were detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by vasculitis but rarely and in lower levels in patients with synovitis, ankylosing spondylitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The activity was bound to anti-C3 through anti-C3 antibodies because little was bound by normal F(ab)2 and was evidently complexed in the sera before in-vitro testing, since it was precipitated by 2 . 5% polyethylene glycol and sedimented with high molecular weight material on sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. It is considered that RF-containing complexes are present in vasculitic sera and have the potential to bind complement in vivo.

  3. Complement activation and choriocapillaris loss in early AMD: Implications for pathophysiology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S.Scott; Sohn, Elliott H.; Chirco, Kathleen R.; Drack, Arlene V.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common and devastating disease that can result in severe visual dysfunction. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in identifying genetic variants that contribute to AMD, many of which lie in genes involved in the complement cascade. In this review we discuss the significance of complement activation in AMD, particularly with respect to the formation of the membrane attack complex in the aging choriocapillaris. We review the clinical, histological and biochemical data that indicate that vascular loss in the choroid occurs very early in the pathogenesis of AMD, and discuss the potential impact of vascular dropout on the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and the photoreceptor cells. Finally, we present a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of early AMD and consider the implications of this model on the development of new therapies. PMID:25486088

  4. Complement factor I from flatfish half-smooth tongue (Cynoglossus semilaevis) exhibited anti-microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinsong; Li, Xihong; Chen, Yadong; Lu, Yang; Yu, Mengjun; Chen, Xuejie; Zhang, Wenting; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Luming; Chen, Songlin; Sha, Zhenxia

    2015-11-01

    Complement factor I (Cfi) is a soluble serine protease which plays a crucial role in the modulation of complement cascades. In the presence of substrate modulating cofactors (such as complement factor H, C4bp, CR1, etc), Cfi cleaves and inactivates C3b and C4b, thereby controlling the complement-mediated processes. In this study, we sequenced and characterized Cfi gene from Cynoglossus Semilaevis (designated as CsCfi) for the first time. The full-length cDNA of CsCfi was 2230 bp in length, including a 98 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 164 bp 3'-UTR and a 1968 bp open reading frame (ORF). It encoded a polypeptide of 656 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 72.28 kDa and an isoelectric point of 7.71. A signal peptide was defined at N-terminus, resulting in a 626-residue mature protein. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that Cfi proteins were well conserved with the typical modular architecture and identical active sites throughout the vertebrates, which suggested the conserved function of Cfi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsCfi and the homologous Cfi sequences from teleosts clustered into a clade, separating from another clade from the cartilaginous fish and other vertebrates. Tissue expression profile analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that CsCfi mRNA constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, with the predominant expression in liver and the lowest in stomach. Temporal expression levels of CsCfi after challenging with Vibrio anguillarum showed different expression patterns in intestine, spleen, skin, blood, head kidney and liver. The recombinant CsCfi (rCsCfi) protein showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shewanella putrefaciens. The research revealed that CsCfi plays an important role in C. Semilaevis immunity.

  5. Common polymorphisms in C3, factor B, and factor H collaborate to determine systemic complement activity and disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Heurich, Meike; Martínez-Barricarte, Ruben; Francis, Nigel J.; Roberts, Dawn L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Morgan, B. Paul; Harris, Claire L.

    2011-01-01

    Common polymorphisms in complement alternative pathway (AP) proteins C3 (C3R102G), factor B (fBR32Q), and factor H (fHV62I) are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other pathologies. Our published work showed that fBR32Q influences C3 convertase formation, whereas fHV62I affects factor I cofactor activity. Here we show how C3R102G (C3S/F) influences AP activity. In hemolysis assays, C3102G activated AP more efficiently (EC50 C3102G: 157 nM; C3102R: 191 nM; P < 0.0001). fB binding kinetics and convertase stability were identical, but native and recombinant fH bound more strongly to C3b102R (KD C3b102R: 1.0 μM; C3b102G: 1.4 μM; P < 0.0001). Accelerated decay was unaltered, but fH cofactor activity was reduced for C3b102G, favoring AP amplification. Combining disease “risk” variants (C3102G, fB32R, and fH62V) in add-back assays yielded sixfold higher hemolytic activity compared with “protective” variants (C3102R, fB32Q, and fH62I; P < 0.0001). These data introduce the concept of a functional complotype (combination of polymorphisms) defining complement activity in an individual, thereby influencing susceptibility to AP-driven disease. PMID:21555552

  6. Enhanced classical complement pathway activation and altered phagocytosis signaling molecules in human epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Season K; Witt, Thomas; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Brewster, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is widely associated with seizures and epilepsy. Although microglial cells are professional phagocytes, less is known about the status of this phenotype in epilepsy. Recent evidence supports that phagocytosis-associated molecules from the classical complement (C1q-C3) play novel roles in microglia-mediated synaptic pruning. Interestingly, in human and experimental epilepsy, altered mRNA levels of complement molecules were reported. Therefore, to identify a potential role for complement and microglia in the synaptodendritic pathology of epilepsy, we determined the protein levels of classical complement proteins (C1q-C3) along with other phagocytosis signaling molecules in human epilepsy. Cortical brain samples surgically resected from patients with refractory epilepsy (RE) and non-epileptic lesions (NE) were examined. Western blotting was used to determine the levels of phagocytosis signaling proteins such as the complements C1q and C3, MerTK, Trem2, and Pros1 along with cleaved-caspase 3. In addition, immunostaining was used to determine the distribution of C1q and co-localization to microglia and dendrites. We found that the RE samples had significantly increased protein levels of C1q (p=0.034) along with those of its downstream activation product iC3b (p=0.027), and decreased levels of Trem2 (p=0.045) and Pros1 (p=0.005) when compared to the NE group. Protein levels of cleaved-caspase 3 were not different between the groups (p=0.695). In parallel, we found C1q localization to microglia and dendrites in both NE and RE samples, and also observed substantial microglia-dendritic interactions in the RE tissue. These data suggest that aberrant phagocytic signaling occurs in human refractory epilepsy. It is likely that alteration of phagocytic pathways may contribute to unwanted elimination of cells/synapses and/or impaired clearance of dead cells. Future studies will investigate whether altered complement signaling contributes to

  7. Mechanisms of rejection: role of complement.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Sacks, Steven H

    2014-02-01

    To provide the reader with an up-to-date comprehensive review of recent findings that highlight advances describing how proteins of the complement cascades contribute to the pathogenesis of solid organ rejection. The review is focussed mainly on renal transplantation. Of note are recent advances in elucidating the interactions between anaphylatoxins and their receptors in organ transplantation; there is evidence of direct engagement of C5aR on donor tubules and in addition, mechanisms by which the allostimulatory capacity of dendritic cells is modulated by complement are more fully understood. Activation of the lectin pathway is increasingly implicated in allograft rejection and the role of complement in modulating regulatory T cells is being vigorously investigated. As an alternative to systemic complement inhibition, there is continued focus on the design of targeted anti-complement therapies, directed to the donor organ. Complement has evolved as the first line of defence against pathogens, employing well defined effector mechanisms to rapidly remove infectious material. However, complement effector mechanisms are also triggered during inflammation associated with solid organ transplantation. Hence, complement has a significant role in mediating donor organ injury during both the initial ischaemia/reperfusion phase and the subsequent adaptive immune responses. Research on mechanisms of complement-mediated injury in transplantation provide a basis for the development of therapies that are aimed at transiently blocking complement activation at the site of injury, whereas leaving systemic anti-bacterial complement effector mechanisms intact.

  8. The Serum Complement System: A Simplified Laboratory Exercise to Measure the Activity of an Important Component of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Jordan E.; Radziwon, Kimberly A.; Maniero, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be…

  9. The Serum Complement System: A Simplified Laboratory Exercise to Measure the Activity of an Important Component of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Jordan E.; Radziwon, Kimberly A.; Maniero, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be…

  10. Alternative Wnt Signaling Activates YAP/TAZ

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Woo; Kim, Young Chul; Yu, Bo; Moroishi, Toshiro; Mo, Jung-Soon; Plouffe, Steven W.; Meng, Zhipeng; Lin, Kimberly C.; Yu, Fa-Xing; Alexander, Caroline M.; Wang, Cunyu; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ are key regulators of organ size and tissue homeostasis, and their dysregulation contributes to human cancer. Here we discover YAP/TAZ as bona fide downstream effectors of the alternative Wnt signaling pathway. Wnt5a/b and Wnt3a induce YAP/TAZ activation independent of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Mechanistically, we delineate the ‘alternative Wnt-YAP/TAZ signaling axis’ that consists of Wnt - FZD/ROR - Gα12/13 - Rho GTPases -Lats1/2 to promote YAP/TAZ activation and TEAD-mediated transcription. YAP/TAZ mediate the biological functions of alternative Wnt signaling including gene expression, osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, and antagonism of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Together, our work establishes YAP/TAZ as critical mediators of alternative Wnt signaling. PMID:26276632

  11. Dynamic Structural Changes During Complement C3 Activation Analyzed by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Michael C.; Ricklin, Daniel; Papp, Krisztián; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Coales, Stephen J.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Sfyroera, Georgia; Chen, Hui; Winters, Michael S.; Lambris, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of component C3 to C3b is a central step in the activation of complement. Whereas C3 is largely biologically inactive, C3b is directly involved in various complement activities. While the recently described crystal structures of C3 and C3b provide a molecular basis of complement activation, they do not reflect the dynamic changes that occur in solution. In addition, the available C3b structures diverge in some important aspects. Here we have utilized hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to investigate relative changes in the solution-phase structures of C3 and C3b. By combining two forms of mass spectrometry we could maximize the primary sequence coverage of C3b and demonstrate the feasibility of this method for large plasma proteins. While the majority of the 82 peptides that could be followed over time showed only minor alterations in HDX, we observed clear changes in solvent accessibility for 16 peptides, primarily in the α-chain (α’NT, MG6-8, CUB, TED, C345C domains). Most of these peptides could be directly linked to the structural transitions visible in the crystal structures and revealed additional information about the probability of the structural variants of C3b. In addition, a discontinuous cluster of seven peptides in the MG3, MG6, LNK and α’NT domains showed a decreased accessibility after activation to C3b. Although no gross conformational changes are detected in the crystal structure, this area may reflect a structurally flexible region in solution that contributes to C3 activation and function. PMID:18456336

  12. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    PubMed

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD.

  13. The alternative complement component factor B regulates UV-induced oedema, systemic suppression of contact and delayed hypersensitivity, and mast cell infiltration into the skin.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Hammond, Kirsten J L; Chan, Carling Y-Y; Rogers, Linda J; Beaugie, Clare; Rana, Sabita; Marsh-Wakefield, Felix; Thurman, Joshua M; Halliday, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths in sunlight are the prime cause of skin cancer in humans with both the UVA and UVB wavebands making a contribution to photocarcinogenesis. UV has many different biological effects on the skin that contribute to carcinogenesis, including suppression of adaptive immunity, sunburn and altering the migration of mast cells into and away from irradiated skin. Many molecular mechanisms have been identified as contributing to skin responses to UV. Recently, using gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data, we identified the alternative complement pathway with a central role for factor B (fB) in UVA-induced immunosuppression. In the current study we used mice genetically deficient in fB (fB-/- mice) to study the functional role of the alternative complement pathway in skin responses to UV. We found that fB is required for not only UVA but also UVB-induced immunosuppression and solar-simulated UV induction of the oedemal component of sunburn. Factor B-/- mice had a larger number of resident skin mast cells than control mice, but unlike the controls did not respond to UV by increasing mast cell infiltration into the skin. This study provides evidence for a function role for fB in skin responses to UV radiation. Factor B regulates UVA and UVB induced immunosuppression, UV induced oedema and mast cell infiltration into the skin. The alternative complement pathway is therefore an important regulator of skin responses to UV.

  14. Structural basis for activation of the complement system by component C4 cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Kidmose, Rune T.; Laursen, Nick S.; Dobó, József; Kjaer, Troels R.; Sirotkina, Sofia; Yatime, Laure; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Thiel, Steffen; Gál, Péter; Andersen, Gregers R.

    2012-01-01

    An essential aspect of innate immunity is recognition of molecular patterns on the surface of pathogens or altered self through the lectin and classical pathways, two of the three well-established activation pathways of the complement system. This recognition causes activation of the MASP-2 or the C1s serine proteases followed by cleavage of the protein C4. Here we present the crystal structures of the 203-kDa human C4 and the 245-kDa C4⋅MASP-2 substrate⋅enzyme complex. When C4 binds to MASP-2, substantial conformational changes in C4 are induced, and its scissile bond region becomes ordered and inserted into the protease catalytic site in a manner canonical to serine proteases. In MASP-2, an exosite located within the CCP domains recognizes the C4 C345C domain 60 Å from the scissile bond. Mutations in C4 and MASP-2 residues at the C345C–CCP interface inhibit the intermolecular interaction and C4 cleavage. The possible assembly of the huge in vivo enzyme–substrate complex consisting of glycan-bound mannan-binding lectin, MASP-2, and C4 is discussed. Our own and prior functional data suggest that C1s in the classical pathway of complement activated by, e.g., antigen–antibody complexes, also recognizes the C4 C345C domain through a CCP exosite. Our results provide a unified structural framework for understanding the early and essential step of C4 cleavage in the elimination of pathogens and altered self through two major pathways of complement activation. PMID:22949645

  15. Structural basis for activation of the complement system by component C4 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Kidmose, Rune T; Laursen, Nick S; Dobó, József; Kjaer, Troels R; Sirotkina, Sofia; Yatime, Laure; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Thiel, Steffen; Gál, Péter; Andersen, Gregers R

    2012-09-18

    An essential aspect of innate immunity is recognition of molecular patterns on the surface of pathogens or altered self through the lectin and classical pathways, two of the three well-established activation pathways of the complement system. This recognition causes activation of the MASP-2 or the C1s serine proteases followed by cleavage of the protein C4. Here we present the crystal structures of the 203-kDa human C4 and the 245-kDa C4·MASP-2 substrate·enzyme complex. When C4 binds to MASP-2, substantial conformational changes in C4 are induced, and its scissile bond region becomes ordered and inserted into the protease catalytic site in a manner canonical to serine proteases. In MASP-2, an exosite located within the CCP domains recognizes the C4 C345C domain 60 Å from the scissile bond. Mutations in C4 and MASP-2 residues at the C345C-CCP interface inhibit the intermolecular interaction and C4 cleavage. The possible assembly of the huge in vivo enzyme-substrate complex consisting of glycan-bound mannan-binding lectin, MASP-2, and C4 is discussed. Our own and prior functional data suggest that C1s in the classical pathway of complement activated by, e.g., antigen-antibody complexes, also recognizes the C4 C345C domain through a CCP exosite. Our results provide a unified structural framework for understanding the early and essential step of C4 cleavage in the elimination of pathogens and altered self through two major pathways of complement activation.

  16. Regulator of complement activation (RCA) locus in chicken: identification of chicken RCA gene cluster and functional RCA proteins.

    PubMed

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Shida, Kyoko; Goitsuka, Ryo; Kimura, Yuko; Katoh, Jun; Ohba, Shinya; Tamaki, Yuichiroh; Hattori, Takashi; Yamada, Nozomi; Inoue, Norimitsu; Matsumoto, Misako; Mizuno, Shigeki; Seya, Tsukasa

    2005-08-01

    A 150-kb DNA fragment, which contains the gene of the chicken complement regulatory protein CREM (formerly named Cremp), was isolated from a microchromosome by screening bacterial artificial chromosome library. Within 100 kb of the cloned region, three complete genes encoding short consensus repeats (SCRs, motifs with tandemly arranged 60 aa) were identified by exon-trap method and 3'- or 5'-RACE. A chicken orthologue of the human gene 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 2, which exists in close proximity to the regulator of complement activation genes in humans and mice, was located near this chicken SCR gene cluster. Moreover, additional genes encoding SCR proteins appeared to be present in this region. Three distinct transcripts were detected in RNA samples from a variety of chicken organs and cell lines. Two novel genes named complement regulatory secretory protein of chicken (CRES) and complement regulatory GPI-anchored protein of chicken (CREG) besides CREM were identified by cloning corresponding cDNA. Based on the predicted primary structures and properties of the expressed molecules, CRES is a secretory protein, whereas CREG is a GPI-anchored membrane protein. CREG and CREM were protected host cells from chicken complement-mediated cytolysis. Likewise, a membrane-bound form of CRES, which was artificially generated, also protected host cells from chicken complement. Taken together, the chicken possesses an regulator of complement activation locus similar to those of the mammals, and the gene products function as complement regulators.

  17. Potent complement C3a receptor agonists derived from oxazole amino acids: Structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranee; Reed, Anthony N; Chu, Peifei; Scully, Conor C G; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Suen, Jacky Y; Durek, Thomas; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    Potent ligands for the human complement C3a receptor (C3aR) were developed from the almost inactive tripeptide Leu-Ala-Arg corresponding to the three C-terminal residues of the endogenous peptide agonist C3a. The analogous Leu-Ser-Arg was modified by condensing the serine side chain with the leucine carbonyl with elimination of water to form leucine-oxazole-arginine. Subsequent elaboration with a variety of N-terminal amide capping groups produced agonists as potent as human C3a itself in stimulating Ca(2+) release from human macrophages. Structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  18. Silencing porcine genes significantly reduces human-anti-pig cytotoxicity profiles: an alternative to direct complement regulation.

    PubMed

    Butler, James R; Martens, Gregory R; Estrada, Jose L; Reyes, Luz M; Ladowski, Joseph M; Galli, Cesare; Perota, Andrea; Cunningham, Conor M; Tector, Matthew; Joseph Tector, A

    2016-10-01

    The future of solid organ transplantation is challenged by an increasing shortage of available allografts. Xenotransplantation of genetically modified porcine organs offers an answer to this problem. Strategies of genetic modification have 'humanized' the porcine model towards clinical relevance. Most notably, these approaches have aimed at either antigen reduction or human transgene expression. The object of this study was to evaluate the relative effects of both antigen reduction and direct complement regulation on the human-anti-porcine complement dependent cytotoxicity response. Genetically modified animals were created through CRISPR/Cas9-directed mutation and human transgene delivery. Pigs doubly deficient in GGTA1 and CMAH genes were compared to pigs of the same background that expressed a human complement regulatory protein (hCRP). A third animal was made deficient in GGTA1, CMAH and B4GalNT2 gene expression. Cells from these animals were subjected to measures of human antibody binding and antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity by flow cytometry. Human IgG and IgM antibody binding was unchanged between the double knockout and the transgenic hCRP double knockout pig. IgG and IgM binding was reduced by 49.1 and 43.2 % respectively by silencing the B4GalNT2 gene. Compared to the double knockout, human anti-porcine cytotoxicity was reduced by 8 % with the addition of a hCRP (p = .032); It was reduced by 21 % with silencing the B4GalNT2 gene (p = .012). Silencing the GGTA1, CMAH and B4GalNT2 genes in pigs achieved a significant antigen reduction. Changing the porcine carbohydrate profile effectively mediates human antibody-mediated complement dependent cytoxicity.

  19. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components: protein adsorption, coagulation, activation of the complement system and hemolysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Mitjans, Montserrat; Vinardell, Maria Pilar; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-03-01

    The intravenous administration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles has been widely reported as a promising alternative for delivery of drugs to specific cells. However, studies on their interaction with diverse blood components using different techniques are still lacking. Therefore, in the present work, the interaction of PLGA nanoparticles with blood components was described using different complementary techniques. The influence of different encapsulated compounds/functionalizing agents on these interactions was also reported. It is worth noting that all these techniques can be simply performed, without the need for highly sophisticated apparatus or skills. Moreover, their transference to industries and application of quality control could be easily performed. Serum albumin was adsorbed onto all types of tested nanoparticles. The saturation concentration was dependent on the nanoparticle size. In contrast, fibrinogen aggregation was dependent on nanoparticle surface charge. The complement activation was also influenced by the nanoparticle functionalization; the presence of a functionalizing agent increased complement activation, while the addition of an encapsulated compound only caused a slight increase. None of the nanoparticles influenced the coagulation cascade at low concentrations. However, at high concentrations, cationized nanoparticles did activate the coagulation cascade. Interactions of nanoparticles with erythrocytes did not reveal any hemolysis. Interactions of PLGA nanoparticles with blood proteins depended both on the nanoparticle properties and the protein studied. Independent of their loading/surface functionalization, PLGA nanoparticles did not influence the coagulation cascade and did not induce hemolysis of erythrocytes; they could be defined as safe concerning induction of embolization and cell lysis.The intravenous administration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles has been widely reported as a promising

  20. Effects of FUT-175, a novel synthetic protease inhibitor, on the development of adjuvant arthritis in rats and some biological reactions dependent on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ino, Y; Sato, T; Koshiyama, Y; Suzuki, K; Oda, M; Iwaki, M

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of FUT-175 on the development of adjuvant arthritis in rats were studied and compared with those of indomethacin. FUT-175 inhibited both primary and secondary paw lesions in the adjuvant arthritic rats when it was administered orally on a daily basis from the day before through 18th day after adjuvant injection. 2. In addition, FUT-175 inhibited the increase in hemolytic complement in adjuvant arthritic rats in a dose-dependent manner. 3. Indomethacin also showed an inhibitory effect on the development of arthritic lesion, but had no effect on the increase in hemolytic complement in the adjuvant arthritis in rats. 4. Furthermore, FUT-175 inhibited the activities of various proteases in vitro, and then strongly inhibited complement-mediated hemolysis via the classical and alternative pathways, while indomethacin had no effect on them. 5. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of FUT-175 may differ from indomethacin in the mechanisms of action and, at least in part, due to the anti-complement activity.

  1. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  2. Progranulin Deficiency Promotes Circuit-Specific Synaptic Pruning by Microglia via Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Hansen; Zhang, Jiasheng; Makinson, Stefanie R.; Cahill, Michelle K.; Kelley, Kevin W.; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Shang, Yulei; Oldham, Michael C.; Martens, Lauren Herl; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Sloan, Steven A.; Hsieh, Christine L.; Kim, Charles C.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Seeley, William W.; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce L.; Borroni, Barbara; Ghidoni, Roberta; Farese, Robert V.; Paz, Jeanne T.; Barres, Ben A.; Huang, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Microglia maintain homeostasis in the brain, but whether aberrant microglial activation can cause neurodegeneration remains controversial. Here, we use transcriptome profiling to demonstrate that deficiency in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) gene progranulin (Grn) leads to an age-dependent, progressive up-regulation of lysosomal and innate immunity genes, increased complement production, and enhanced synaptic pruning in microglia. During aging, Grn−/− mice show profound microglia infiltration and preferential elimination of inhibitory synapses in the ventral thalamus, which lead to hyperexcitability in the thalamocortical circuits and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)-like grooming behaviors. Remarkably, deleting C1qa gene significantly reduces synaptic pruning by Grn−/− microglia, and mitigates neurodegeneration, behavioral phenotypes and premature mortality in Grn−/− mice. Together, our results uncover a previously unrecognized role of progranulin in suppressing aberrant microglia activation during aging. These results represent an important conceptual advance that complement activation and microglia-mediated synaptic pruning are major drivers, rather than consequences, of neurodegeneration caused by progranulin deficiency. PMID:27114033

  3. Immune competence of the Ciona intestinalis pharynx: complement system-mediated activity.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Stefano; Melillo, Daniela; Lambris, John D; Pinto, Maria Rosaria

    2012-10-01

    In the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, the ciliated pharynx, which connects the external environment to a highly developed and compartmentalized gastrointestinal system, represents the natural portal of entry for a vast and diverse, potentially pathogenic microbial community. To address the role of the pharynx in immune surveillance in Ciona, we asked whether C3, the key component of the complement system, was expressed in this organ and whether the encoded protein was functionally active. We found by real-time PCR that C3, constitutively expressed in the pharynx, is up-regulated by LPS injection. Using two specific anti-CiC3 and anti-CiC3a polyclonal antibodies in immunohistochemical staining of pharynx sections, we found that the gene product was localized to hemocytes of the pharyngeal bars (identified as granular amoebocytes) and in stigmata ciliated cells. Use of the same antibodies in Western blot analysis indicated that CiC3 and its activation products CiC3b and CiC3a are present in pharynx homogenates. Our observation that the amount of the bioactive fragment CiC3a increased in the pharynx of LPS-treated animals provides the first molecular and functional evidence for complement-mediated immunological activity in the tunicate pharynx. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasminogen Is a Complement Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Diana; Schindler, Susann; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen is a 92-kDa single chain glycoprotein that circulates in plasma as a zymogen and when converted to proteolytically active plasmin dissolves preformed fibrin clots and extracellular matrix components. Here, we characterize the role of plasmin(ogen) in the complement cascade. Plasminogen binds the central complement protein C3, the C3 cleavage products C3b and C3d, and C5. Plasminogen binds to C3, C3b, C3d, and C5 via lysine residues, and the interaction is ionic strength-dependent. Plasminogen and Factor H bind C3b; however, the two proteins bind to different sites and do not compete for binding. Plasminogen affects complement action in multiple ways. Plasminogen enhanced Factor I-mediated C3b degradation in the presence of the cofactor Factor H. Plasminogen when activated to plasmin inhibited complement as demonstrated by hemolytic assays using either rabbit or sheep erythrocytes. Similarly, plasmin either in the fluid phase or attached to surfaces inhibited complement that was activated via the alternative and classical pathways and cleaved C3b to fragments of 68, 40, 30, and 17 kDa. The C3b fragments generated by plasmin differ in size from those generated by the complement protease Factor I, suggesting that plasmin-mediated C3b cleavage fragments lack effector function. Plasmin also cleaved C5 to products of 65, 50, 30, and 25 kDa. Thus, plasmin(ogen) regulates both complement and coagulation, the two central cascade systems of a vertebrate organism. This complement-inhibitory activity of plasmin provides a new explanation why pathogenic microbes utilize plasmin(ogen) for immune evasion and tissue penetration. PMID:22451663

  5. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  6. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  7. Shotgun proteomics implicates protease inhibition and complement activation in the antiinflammatory properties of HDL

    PubMed Central

    Vaisar, Tomas; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Green, Pattie S.; Gharib, Sina A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Cheung, Marian C.; Byun, Jaeman; Vuletic, Simona; Kassim, Sean; Singh, Pragya; Chea, Helen; Knopp, Robert H.; Brunzell, John; Geary, Randolph; Chait, Alan; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Elkon, Keith; Marcovina, Santica; Ridker, Paul; Oram, John F.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2007-01-01

    HDL lowers the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by promoting cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells. However, other antiatherosclerotic properties of HDL are poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that the lipoprotein carries proteins that might have novel cardioprotective activities, we used shotgun proteomics to investigate the composition of HDL isolated from healthy subjects and subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD). Unexpectedly, our analytical strategy identified multiple complement-regulatory proteins and a diverse array of distinct serpins with serine-type endopeptidase inhibitor activity. Many acute-phase response proteins were also detected, supporting the proposal that HDL is of central importance in inflammation. Mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses demonstrated that HDL3 from subjects with CAD was selectively enriched in apoE, raising the possibility that HDL carries a unique cargo of proteins in humans with clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Collectively, our observations suggest that HDL plays previously unsuspected roles in regulating the complement system and protecting tissue from proteolysis and that the protein cargo of HDL contributes to its antiinflammatory and antiatherogenic properties. PMID:17332893

  8. Recombinant human erythropoietin modulates erythrocyte complement receptor 1 functional activity in patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kiss, E; Kávai, M; Csipõ, I; Szegedi, G

    1998-06-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (IC) is an important step in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Impairment of IC-clearance contributes to the accumulation of IC. It may be partly attributed to decreased complement containing immune complex (ICC) binding by erythrocytic complement receptor 1 (ECR1). Stimulating erythropoiesis with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) may enhance the IC-clearance as increasing ECR1 expression and/or functional activity. Ten anemic patients with lupus nephritis were treated with 50 IU rHuEPO (Eprex) per kg body weight three times a week during a five week period. ICC-binding capacity of ECR1 was determined with 125I-labelled, C3ib containing BSA-anti-BSA complexes. In addition to effective correction of anemia, indicated by increased red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration and reticulocyte ratio, rHuEPO significantly improved decreased ECR1 functional (ICC-binding) activity in patients with lupus nephritis. This improvement correlated with the increase in reticulocyte ratio. Although patients were kept on their previous therapy during Eprex administration, their clinical condition also improved. That was shown by a decrease in Westergreen ratio, serum creatinine concentration and anti-dsDNA level and also by an increase in creatinine clearance. Results suggest a beneficial immune modulatory effect of rHuEPO in lupus nephritis.

  9. Complement activation and kidney injury molecule-1-associated proximal tubule injury in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Burwick, Richard M; Easter, Sarah Rae; Dawood, Hassan Y; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Fichorova, Raina N; Feinberg, Bruce B

    2014-10-01

    Kidney injury with proteinuria is a characteristic feature of preeclampsia, yet the nature of injury in specific regions of the nephron is incompletely understood. Our study aimed to use existing urinary biomarkers to describe the pattern of kidney injury and proteinuria in pregnancies affected by severe preeclampsia. We performed a case-control study of pregnant women from Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2012 to 2013. We matched cases of severe preeclampsia (n=25) 1:1 by parity and gestational age to 2 control groups with and without chronic hypertension. Urinary levels of kidney injury molecule-1 and complement components (C3a, C5a, and C5b-9) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and other markers (albumin, β2 microglobulin, cystatin C, epithelial growth factor, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, osteopontin, and uromodulin) were measured simultaneously with a multiplex electrochemiluminescence assay. Median values between groups were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and correlations with Spearman correlation coefficient. Analysis of urinary markers revealed higher excretion of albumin and kidney injury molecule-1 and lower excretion of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and epithelial growth factor in severe preeclampsia compared with chronic hypertension and healthy controls. Among subjects with severe preeclampsia, urinary excretion of complement activation products correlated most closely with kidney injury molecule-1, a specific marker of proximal tubule injury (C5a: r=0.60; P=0.001; and C5b-9: r=0.75; P<0.0001). Taken together, we describe a pattern of kidney injury in severe preeclampsia that is characterized by glomerular impairment and complement-mediated inflammation and injury, possibly localized to the proximal tubule in association with kidney injury molecule-1.

  10. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  11. Proteomic Profiling Analysis Reveals a Link between Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis and Complement Activation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, D D; Hu, B; Tang, H Y; Sun, Y Y; Liu, B; Tian, Q M; Bi, H S

    2017-05-01

    Uveitis is an autoimmune disease that usually damages the vision function, leading to poor visual quality in patients. As an autoimmune ocular inflammatory disease, the pathogenesis of uveitis is associated with abnormal expression of some proteins and aberrant regulation of multiple signalling pathways. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we induced an experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) model in rats. We determined the levels of C3a and membrane attack complex C5b-9 (soluble C5b-9, sC5b-9) in both plasma and aqueous humour, identified the differentially expressed proteins in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and employed bioinformatics algorithms to analyse differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasma. The results demonstrate that there were 168 differentially expressed plasma proteins in EAU rats versus control subjects. The levels of sC5b-9 and C3a were elevated in the plasmas and aqueous humours of EAU rats. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed that the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasma were mainly involved in metabolic and immune processes. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation, database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery (DAVID) and protein-protein interaction analyses revealed that the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasmas were closely associated with complement and coagulation cascades, metabolic pathways, NF-kappa B, PI3K-Akt, Toll-like receptors and autophagy. Overall, the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasmas are mainly involved in the complement and coagulation cascades. The pathogenesis of uveitis closely correlates with complement activation. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  12. Functionally active complement proteins C6 and C7 detected in C6- and C7-deficient individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Würzner, R; Orren, A; Potter, P; Morgan, B P; Ponard, D; Späth, P; Brai, M; Schulze, M; Happe, L; Götze, O

    1991-01-01

    Two sensitive sandwich ELISAs based on monoclonal antibodies directed to native C6 and C7 allowed the detection and quantitation of these complement proteins in 20 out of 37 serum samples from individuals who had previously been classified as deficient in these proteins as assessed by immunochemical and/or functional assays. Furthermore, serum from four C6-deficient and one combined C6-/C7-deficient individual showed an increase in the terminal complement complex (TCC) and a decrease in native C6 and C7 after complement activation as assayed by specific ELISAs. Despite their (incomplete) deficiencies, these individuals therefore possess functionally active terminal complement proteins with respect to their ability to generate the TCC. As these individuals have no history of a susceptibility to neisserial infections, even low concentrations of functionally active C6 and C7 may provide sufficient protection against those micro-organisms whose destruction requires TCC formation. PMID:2004484

  13. Rapid activation of monocyte tissue factor by antithymocyte globulin is dependent on complement and protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Spath, Brigitte; Fischer, Cornelia; Stolz, Moritz; Ayuk, Francis A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Ruf, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocyte depletion with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) can be complicated by systemic coagulation activation. We found that ATG activated tissue factor procoagulant activity (TF PCA) on monocytic cells more potently than other stimuli that decrypt TF, including cell disruption, TF pathway inhibitor inhibition, and calcium ionophore treatment. Induction of TF PCA by ATG was dependent on lipid raft integrity and complement activation. We showed that ATG-mediated TF activation required complement activation until assembly of the C5b-7 membrane insertion complex, but not lytic pore formation by the membrane attack complex C5b-9. Consistently, induction of TF PCA by ATG did not require maximal phosphatidylserine membrane exposure and was not correlated with the magnitude of complement-induced lytic cell injury. Blockade of free thiols, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the small-molecule PDI antagonist quercetin-3-rutinoside prevented ATG-mediated TF activation, and C5 complement activation resulted in oxidation of cell surface PDI. This rapid and potent mechanism of cellular TF activation represents a novel connection between the complement system and cell surface PDI-mediated thiol-disulfide exchange. Delineation of this clinically relevant mechanism of activation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway during immunosuppressive therapy with ATG may have broader implications for vascular thrombosis associated with inflammatory disorders. PMID:23315166

  14. Complement-mediated killing of Vibrio species by the humoral fluids of amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri: implications for a dual role of O-antigens in the resistance to bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhimin; Zhang, Shicui; Wang, Changfa; Pang, Qiuxiang

    2008-02-01

    The functional properties of complement in invertebrate deuterostomes are rather ill-defined. Here we showed that the humoral fluids from amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri were capable of causing lysis of some Vibrio species including Vibrio alginolyticus HW284, Vibrio parahaemolyticus HW458 and Vibrio harvey SF-1, the first such data in the invertebrate deuterostomes. The fluid bacteriolytic activity was abolished by pre-incubation with heat-inactivated rabbit anti-human C3 serum, heating at 45 degrees C for 30 min, and repeated thawing and freezing. Additionally, the bacteriolytic activity was Mg(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent, and selective activation of the alternative pathway by zymosan A induced a loss of bacteriolytic activity. This strongly suggests that activation of the alternative complement pathway is responsible for the fluid bacteriolytic activity. It was also shown that some Vibrio species like Vibrio cincinnatiensis HW287 appeared resistant to the complement-mediated lysis. The LPS profiling revealed that the fluid-resistant V. cincinnatiensis HW287 had an LPS profile with a ladder of both high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW) O-antigen bands, whereas the fluid-sensitive V. alginolyticus HW284 had few HMW O-antigen bands, suggesting a positive correlation between O-antigen size and humoral fluid resistance. Moreover, complement consumption assays demonstrated that both V. alginolyticus HW284 and V. cincinnatiensis HW287 consumed complement, with the former consuming significantly higher complement than the latter. Overall, it is suggested that HMW O-antigens may protect the fluid-resistant Vibrio species by a dual act of avoiding initiating complement activation as well as sterically hindering complement from gaining access to and damaging the cell membrane.

  15. The role of complement in AMD.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Lauer, Nadine; Skerka, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common form of blindness in the western world and genetic variations of several complement genes, including the complement regulator Factor H, the central complement component C3, Factor B, C2, and also Factor I confer a risk for the disease. However deletion of a chromosomal segment in the Factor H gene cluster on human chromosome 1, which results in the deficiency of the terminal pathway regulator CFHR1, and of the putative complement regulator CFHR3 has a protective effect for development of AMD. The Factor H gene encodes two proteins Factor H and FHL1 which are derived from alternatively processed transcripts. In particular a sequence variation at position 402 of both Factor H and FHL1 is associated with a risk for AMD. A tyrosine residue at position 402 represents the protective and a histidine residue the risk variant. AMD is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, which can be caused by defective and inappropriate regulation of the continuously activated alternative complement pathway. This activation generates complement effector products and inflammatory mediators that stimulate further inflammatory reactions. Defective regulation can lead to formation of immune deposits, drusen and ultimately translate into damage of retinal pigment epithelial cells, rupture of the interface between these epithelial cells and the Bruch's membrane and vision loss. Here we describe the role of complement in the retina and summarize the current concept how defective or inappropriate local complement control contributes to inflammation and the pathophysiology of AMD.

  16. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy A; Sartain, Sarah E; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  17. Human CD55 Expression Blocks Hyperacute Rejection and Restricts Complement Activation in Gal Knockout Cardiac Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Christopher G.A.; Ricci, Davide; Miyagi, Naoto; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Du, Zeji; Oehler, Elise A.; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Byrne, Guerard W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transgenic expression of human complement regulatory proteins (hCRPs) reduces the frequency of hyperacute rejection (HAR) in Gal-positive cardiac xenotransplantation. In this study we examine the impact of human CD55 (hCD55) expression on a Gal knock-out (GTKO) background using pig-to-primate heterotopic cardiac xenotransplantation. Methods Cardiac xenotransplantation was performed with GTKO (Group 1; n=6) and GTKO.hCD55 (Group 2; n=5) donor pigs using similar immunosuppression. Cardiac biopsies were obtained 30 minutes after organ reperfusion. Rejection was characterized by histology and immunohistology. Intragraft gene expression, serum non-Gal antibody and antibody recovered from rejected hearts were analyzed. Results HAR of a GTKO heart was observed. Remaining grafts developed delayed xenograft rejection. Median survival was 21 and 28 days for Groups 1 and 2 respectively. Vascular antibody deposition was uniformly detected 30 minutes after organ reperfusion and at explant. A higher frequency of vascular C5b deposition was seen in GTKO organs at explant. Serum non-Gal antibody, antibody recovered from the graft and intragraft gene expression were similar between the groups. Conclusion HAR of GTKO hearts without hCD55 may occur. Expression of hCD55 appeared to restrict local complement activation, but did not improve graft survival. Chronic vascular antibody deposition with evidence of protracted endothelial cell activation was seen. These observations suggest that non-Gal antibody-induced chronic endothelial cell activation coupled to possible haemostatic incompatibilities may be the primary stimulus for DXR of GTKO hearts. To avoid possible HAR, future clinical studies should employ donors expressing hCRPs in the GTKO background. PMID:22391577

  18. Studies on the phenylethanoid glycosides with anti-complement activity from Paulownia tomentosa var. tomentosa wood.

    PubMed

    Si, Chuan-Ling; Deng, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Zhong; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Bae, Young-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Four epimeric phenylethanoid glycosides, including a new one, R,S-beta-ethoxy-beta-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1-->3)-beta-D-(6-O-E-caffeoyl)-glucopyranoside named isoilicifolioside A (1), and three known compounds, ilicifolioside A (2), campneoside II (3), and isocampneoside II (4), were isolated from Paulownia tomentosa var. tomentosa wood. The structures of the four compounds were elucidated by the interpretation of 1D and 2D NMR and MS spectra. This is the first report of the chemical profile of this tree. Compounds 1-4 exhibited excellent anti-complement activity with IC(50) values less than 74 microM, compared with tiliroside (IC(50) = 104 microM) and rosmarinic acid (IC(50) = 182 microM) that were used as positive controls.

  19. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. PMID:28106852

  20. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-19

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression.

  1. Complement Activation and STAT4 Expression Are Associated with Early Inflammation in Diabetic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K; Pallera, Haree K; Pineros-Fernandez, Angela; Rivera, Magdielis Gregory; Hair, Pamela S; Lassiter, Brittany P; Huyck, Ryan; Clements, Mary A; Hood, Antoinette F; Rodeheaver, George T; Cottler, Patrick S; Nadler, Jerry L; Dobrian, Anca D

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic non-healing wounds are a major clinical problem. The mechanisms leading to poor wound healing in diabetes are multifactorial but unresolved inflammation may be a major contributing factor. The complement system (CS) is the most potent inflammatory cascade in humans and contributes to poor wound healing in animal models. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) is a transcription factor expressed in immune and adipose cells and contributes to upregulation of some inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Persistent CS and STAT4 expression in diabetic wounds may thus contribute to chronic inflammation and delayed healing. The purpose of this study was to characterize CS and STAT4 in early diabetic wounds using db/db mice as a diabetic skin wound model. The CS was found to be activated early in the diabetic wounds as demonstrated by increased anaphylatoxin C5a in wound fluid and C3-fragment deposition by immunostaining. These changes were associated with a 76% increase in nucleated cells in the wounds of db/db mice vs. The novel classical CS inhibitor, Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) reduced inflammation when added directly or saturated in an acellular skin scaffold, as reflected by reduced CS components and leukocyte infiltration. A significant increase in expression of STAT4 and the downstream macrophage chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 were also found in the early wounds of db/db mice compared to non-diabetic controls. These studies provide evidence for two new promising targets to reduce unresolved inflammation and to improve healing of diabetic skin wounds.

  2. Complement Activation and STAT4 Expression Are Associated with Early Inflammation in Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.; Pallera, Haree K.; Pineros-Fernandez, Angela; Rivera, Magdielis Gregory; Hair, Pamela S.; Lassiter, Brittany P.; Huyck, Ryan; Clements, Mary A.; Hood, Antoinette F.; Rodeheaver, George T.; Nadler, Jerry L.; Dobrian, Anca D.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic non-healing wounds are a major clinical problem. The mechanisms leading to poor wound healing in diabetes are multifactorial but unresolved inflammation may be a major contributing factor. The complement system (CS) is the most potent inflammatory cascade in humans and contributes to poor wound healing in animal models. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) is a transcription factor expressed in immune and adipose cells and contributes to upregulation of some inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Persistent CS and STAT4 expression in diabetic wounds may thus contribute to chronic inflammation and delayed healing. The purpose of this study was to characterize CS and STAT4 in early diabetic wounds using db/db mice as a diabetic skin wound model. The CS was found to be activated early in the diabetic wounds as demonstrated by increased anaphylatoxin C5a in wound fluid and C3-fragment deposition by immunostaining. These changes were associated with a 76% increase in nucleated cells in the wounds of db/db mice vs. controls. The novel classical CS inhibitor, Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) reduced inflammation when added directly or saturated in an acellular skin scaffold, as reflected by reduced CS components and leukocyte infiltration. A significant increase in expression of STAT4 and the downstream macrophage chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 were also found in the early wounds of db/db mice compared to non-diabetic controls. These studies provide evidence for two new promising targets to reduce unresolved inflammation and to improve healing of diabetic skin wounds. PMID:28107529

  3. Real-time imaging of notch activation with a luciferase complementation-based reporter.

    PubMed

    Ilagan, Ma Xenia G; Lim, Sora; Fulbright, Mary; Piwnica-Worms, David; Kopan, Raphael

    2011-07-12

    Notch signaling regulates many cellular processes during development and adult tissue renewal. Upon ligand binding, Notch receptors undergo ectodomain shedding followed by γ-secretase-mediated release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which translocates to the nucleus and associates with the DNA binding protein CSL [CBF1/RBPjκ/Su(H)/Lag1] to activate gene expression. Mammalian cells contain four Notch receptors that can have both redundant and specific activities. To monitor activation of specific Notch paralogs in live cells and in real time, we developed luciferase complementation imaging (LCI) reporters for NICD-CSL association and validated them as a specific, robust, and sensitive assay system that enables structure-function and pharmacodynamic analyses. Detailed kinetic analyses of various mechanistic aspects of Notch signaling, including nuclear translocation and inhibition of the activities of γ-secretase and ADAM metalloproteases, as well as agonist- and ligand-dependent activation, were conducted in live cells. These experiments showed that Notch-LCI is an effective approach for characterizing modulators that target Notch signaling and for studying pathway dynamics in normal and disease contexts.

  4. Bothrops asper snake venom and its metalloproteinase BaP-1 activate the complement system. Role in leucocyte recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Farsky, S H; Gonçalves, L R; Gutiérrez, J M; Correa, A P; Rucavado, A; Gasque, P; Tambourgi, D V

    2000-01-01

    The venom of the snake Bothrops asper, the most important poisonous snake in Central America, evokes an inflammatory response, the mechanisms of which are not well characterized. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether B. asper venom and its purified toxins--phospholipases and metalloproteinase--activate the complement system and the contribution of the effect on leucocyte recruitment. In vitro chemotaxis assays were performed using Boyden's chamber model to investigate the ability of serum incubated with venom and its purified toxins to induce neutrophil migration. The complement consumption by the venom was evaluated using an in vitro haemolytic assay. The importance of complement activation by the venom on neutrophil migration was investigated in vivo by injecting the venom into the peritoneal cavity of C5-deficient mice. Data obtained demonstrated that serum incubated with crude venom and its purified metalloproteinase BaP-1 are able to induce rat neutrophil chemotaxis, probably mediated by agent(s) derived from the complement system. This hypothesis was corroborated by the capacity of the venom to activate this system in vitro. The involvement of C5a in neutrophil chemotaxis induced by venom-activated serum was demonstrated by abolishing migration when neutrophils were pre-incubated with antirat C5a receptor antibody. The relevance of the complement system in in vivo leucocyte mobilization was further demonstrated by the drastic decrease of this response in C5-deficient mice. Pre-incubation of serum with the soluble human recombinant complement receptor type 1 (sCR 1) did not prevent the response induced by the venom, but abolished the migration evoked by metalloproteinase-activated serum. These data show the role of the complement system in bothropic envenomation and the participation of metalloproteinase in the effect. Also, they suggest that the venom may contain other component(s) which can cause direct activation of C5a. PMID:11200361

  5. Serum complement activation on heterologous platelets is associated with arterial thrombosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Peerschke, EIB; Yin, W; Alpert, DR; Roubey, RAS; Salmon, JE; Ghebrehiwet, B

    2009-01-01

    Complement plays a major role in inflammation and thrombosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). A cross-sectional retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate serum complement fixation on platelets and thrombotic incidence using banked sera and clinical data from patients with SLE (n = 91), SLE with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) or APS (n = 78) and primary aPL (n = 57) or APS (n = 96). In-situ complement fixation was measured as C1q and C4d deposition on heterologous platelets using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay approach. Platelet activation by patient serum in the fluid phase was assessed via serotonin release assay. Enhanced in-situ complement fixation was associated with the presence of IgG aPL and IgG anti-β2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies (P < 0.05) and increased platelet activation (P < 0.005). Moreover, enhanced complement fixation, especially C4d deposition on heterologous platelets, was positively associated with arterial thrombotic events in patients with SLE and aPL (P = 0.039). Sera from patients with aPL possess an enhanced capacity for in-situ complement fixation on platelets. This capacity may influence arterial thrombosis risk in patients with SLE. PMID:19395455

  6. A blockade of complement activation prevents rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mucosal mast cell degranulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, T; Andoh, A; Fujiyama, Y; Saotome, T; Bamba, T

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to define the putative role of complement activation in association with mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation in the pathogenesis of rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We prepared complement activity-depleted rats by the administration of the anti-complement agent K-76COOH and the serine-protease inhibitor FUT-175. Autoperfused segments of the jejunum were exposed to 60 min of ischaemia, followed by reperfusion for various time periods, and the epithelial permeability was assessed by the 51Cr-EDTA clearance rate. The number of MMC was immunohistochemically assessed. In control rats, the maximal increase in mucosal permeability was achieved by 30–45 min of reperfusion. This increase was significantly attenuated by the administration of either K-76COONa alone or in combination with FUT-175. In contrast, the administration of carboxypeptidase inhibitor (CPI), which prevents the inactivation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins such as C5a, significantly enhanced the increase in I/R-induced mucosal permeability. These findings were confirmed morphologically by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the I/R-induced mucosal injury was accompanied by a marked decrease in the number of MMC, and administration of K-76COOH significantly inhibited this change. These results indicate that complement activation and the generation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins are key events in I/R-induced mucosal injury. It is likely that intestinal I/R-induced mucosal injury may be partially mediated by MMC activation associated with the complement activation. PMID:9528887

  7. Complement inhibition reduces material-induced leukocyte activation with PEG modified polystyrene beads (Tentagel) but not polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Gorbet, M B; Sefton, M V

    2005-09-15

    With isolated leukocytes, inhibiting complement reduced material-induced leukocyte activation (CD11b) with polyethylene glycol modified polystyrene beads (PS-PEG), but not with polystyrene beads (PS). The PS-PEG beads (TentaGel) were complement activating as measured by SC5b-9 levels consistent with the sensitivity of these beads to leukocyte inhibition with complement inhibitors. Following contact with PS and PS-PEG beads, isolated leukocytes in plasma and in the absence in platelets were found to significantly upregulate CD11b, while TF expression and exposure of phosphatidylserine remained at background levels. Complement inhibition by means of sCR1 partially reduced CD11b upregulation on PS-PEG beads, but had no effect with PS beads. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P5P) was able to significantly reduce both CD11b upregulation and exposure of phosphatidylserine with PS-PEG beads, although it did not appear to inhibit SC5b-9 production. Pentamidine and NAAGA inhibited complement and were effective in reducing CD11b upregulation with both PS and PS-PEG. However, they also had an inhibitory effect on leukocyte signaling mechanisms, precluding their utility for further study in this context. Leukocyte adhesion occurred to similar extents on both PS and PS-PEG beads. While sCR1 and P5P blocked adhesion and activation (for adherent leukocytes) on PS-PEG beads, they had no effect on leukocytes adherent to PS beads. The role of complement in leukocyte activation and adhesion was found to be material-dependent. Thus, leukocyte-material compatibility may be resolved by complement inhibition in some but not all cases. For these other materials (example here was PS), other mechanisms, such as fibrinogen adsorption and direct leukocyte release, may need exploitation to minimize leukocyte activation and adhesion. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2005.

  8. Real-time imaging of Notch activation using a Luciferase Complementation-based Reporter*

    PubMed Central

    Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.; Lim, Sora; Fulbright, Mary; Piwnica-Worms, David; Kopan, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates many cellular processes during development and adult tissue renewal. Upon ligand binding, Notch receptors undergo ectodomain shedding followed by γ-secretase-mediated release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which translocates to the nucleus and associates with the DNA-binding protein CSL (CBF1/RBPjκ/Su(H)/Lag1) to activate gene expression. Mammalian cells contain four Notch receptors that can have both redundant and specific activities. To monitor activation of specific Notch paralogs in live cells and in real time, we developed luciferase complementation imaging (LCI) reporters for NICD/CSL association and validated them as a specific, robust and sensitive assay system that enables structure-function and pharmacodynamic analyses. Detailed kinetic analyses of various mechanistic aspects of Notch signaling, including nuclear translocation, γ-secretase and ADAM inhibition, as well as agonist- and ligand-dependent activation were conducted in live cells. Notch-LCI represents a powerful approach for characterizing modulators that target Notch signaling and for studying pathway dynamics in normal and disease contexts. PMID:21775282

  9. Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) - A possible link between coagulation and complement activation in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

    PubMed

    Grosso, Giorgia; Vikerfors, Anna; Woodhams, Barry; Adam, Mariette; Bremme, Katarina; Holmström, Margareta; Ågren, Anna; Eelde, Anna; Bruzelius, Maria; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Antovic, Aleksandra

    2017-06-24

    Thrombosis and complement activation are pathogenic features of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Their molecular link is Plasma carboxypeptidase-B, also known as thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa), which plays a dual role: anti-fibrinolytic, by cleaving carboxyl-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin, and anti-inflammatory, by downregulating complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. To investigate the levels of TAFI (proenzyme) and TAFIa (active enzyme) in relation to complement activation, fibrin clot permeability and fibrinolytic function in clinical and immunological subsets of 52 APS patients and 15 controls. TAFI (p<0.001), TAFIa (p<0.05) and complement factor C5a (p<0.001) were increased, while fibrin permeability (p<0.01) was decreased and clot lysis time (CLT) was prolonged (p<0.05) in APS patients compared to controls. Furthermore, TAFIa was increased (p<0.01) in samples from APS patients affected by arterial thrombosis compared to other APS-phenotypes. Positive associations were found between TAFI and age, fibrinogen and C5a, and between TAFIa and age, fibrinogen and thrombomodulin. TAFI and TAFIa levels were increased in patients with APS as a potential response to complement activation. Interestingly, TAFI activation was associated with arterial thrombotic APS manifestations. Thus, TAFIa may be considered a novel biomarker for arterial thrombosis in APS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Release and characterization of single side chains of white cabbage pectin and their complement-fixing activity.

    PubMed

    Westereng, Bjorge; Coenen, Gerd Jan; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Voragen, Alphons G J; Samuelsen, Anne Berit; Schols, Henk A; Knutsen, Svein Halvor

    2009-06-01

    A mixture of single side chains from white cabbage pectin were obtained by anion exchange chromatography after applying mild chemical conditions promoting beta-elimination. These pectin fragments were characterized by their molecular weight distribution, sugar composition, 13C-NMR, and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. These analyses revealed that the large oligosaccharides released by beta-eliminative treatment were composed of alpha-1,5 linked arabinosyl residues with 2- and 3-linked alpha-arabinosyl side chains, and, or beta-1,4 linked galactosyl side chains. Fractions were tested for complement-fixing activity in order to determine their interaction with the complement system. These results strongly indicated that there was a minimal unit size responsible for the complement-fixing activity. Neutral pectin fragments (8 kDa) obtained from beta-elimination were inactive in the complement system, although they contained a sugar composition previously shown to be highly active. Larger pectin fragments (17 kDa) retained some activity, but much lower than polymers containing rhamnogalacturonan type 1 (RGI) structures isolated from the same source. This implied that structural elements containing multiple side chains is necessary for efficient complement-fixing activity.

  11. Contribution of Chondroitin Sulfate A to the Binding of Complement Proteins to Activated Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lasaosa, Maria; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Nilsson, Bo; Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure of chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A) on the surface of activated platelets is well established. The aim of the present study was to investigate to what extent CS-A contributes to the binding of the complement recognition molecule C1q and the complement regulators C1 inhibitor (C1INH), C4b-binding protein (C4BP), and factor H to platelets. Principal Findings Human blood serum was passed over Sepharose conjugated with CS-A, and CS-A-specific binding proteins were identified by Western blotting and mass spectrometric analysis. C1q was shown to be the main protein that specifically bound to CS-A, but C4BP and factor H were also shown to interact. Binding of C1INH was dependent of the presence of C1q and then not bound to CS-A from C1q-depleted serum. The specific interactions observed of these proteins with CS-A were subsequently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis using purified proteins. Importantly, C1q, C4BP, and factor H were also shown to bind to activated platelets and this interaction was inhibited by a CS-A-specific monoclonal antibody, thereby linking the binding of C1q, C4BP, and factor H to exposure of CS-A on activated platelets. CS-A-bound C1q was also shown to amplify the binding of model immune complexes to both microtiter plate-bound CS-A and to activated platelets. Conclusions This study supports the concept that CS-A contributes to the binding of C1q, C4BP, and factor H to platelets, thereby adding CS-A to the previously reported binding sites for these proteins on the platelet surface. CS-A-bound C1q also seems to amplify the binding of immune complexes to activated platelets, suggesting a role for this molecule in immune complex diseases. PMID:20886107

  12. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  13. Cell culture model that mimics drusen formation and triggers complement activation associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lincoln V; Forest, David L; Banna, Christopher D; Radeke, Carolyn M; Maloney, Michelle A; Hu, Jane; Spencer, Christine N; Walker, Aimee M; Tsie, Marlene S; Bok, Dean; Radeke, Monte J; Anderson, Don H

    2011-11-08

    We introduce a human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cell-culture model that mimics several key aspects of early stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These include accumulation of sub-RPE deposits that contain molecular constituents of human drusen, and activation of complement leading to formation of deposit-associated terminal complement complexes. Abundant sub-RPE deposits that are rich in apolipoprotein E (APOE), a prominent drusen constituent, are formed by RPE cells grown on porous supports. Exposure to human serum results in selective, deposit-associated accumulation of additional known drusen components, including vitronectin, clusterin, and serum amyloid P, thus suggesting that specific protein-protein interactions contribute to the accretion of plasma proteins during drusen formation. Serum exposure also leads to complement activation, as evidenced by the generation of C5b-9 immunoreactive terminal complement complexes in association with APOE-containing deposits. Ultrastructural analyses reveal two morphologically distinct forms of deposits: One consisting of membrane-bounded multivesicular material, and the other of nonmembrane-bounded particle conglomerates. Collectively, these results suggest that drusen formation involves the accumulation of sub-RPE material rich in APOE, a prominent biosynthetic product of the RPE, which interacts with a select group of drusen-associated plasma proteins. Activation of the complement cascade appears to be mediated via the classical pathway by the binding of C1q to ligands in APOE-rich deposits, triggering direct activation of complement by C1q, deposition of terminal complement complexes and inflammatory sequelae. This model system will facilitate the analysis of molecular and cellular aspects of AMD pathogenesis, and the testing of new therapeutic agents for its treatment.

  14. Cell culture model that mimics drusen formation and triggers complement activation associated with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lincoln V.; Forest, David L.; Banna, Christopher D.; Radeke, Carolyn M.; Maloney, Michelle A.; Hu, Jane; Spencer, Christine N.; Walker, Aimee M.; Tsie, Marlene S.; Bok, Dean; Radeke, Monte J.; Anderson, Don H.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cell-culture model that mimics several key aspects of early stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These include accumulation of sub-RPE deposits that contain molecular constituents of human drusen, and activation of complement leading to formation of deposit-associated terminal complement complexes. Abundant sub-RPE deposits that are rich in apolipoprotein E (APOE), a prominent drusen constituent, are formed by RPE cells grown on porous supports. Exposure to human serum results in selective, deposit-associated accumulation of additional known drusen components, including vitronectin, clusterin, and serum amyloid P, thus suggesting that specific protein–protein interactions contribute to the accretion of plasma proteins during drusen formation. Serum exposure also leads to complement activation, as evidenced by the generation of C5b-9 immunoreactive terminal complement complexes in association with APOE-containing deposits. Ultrastructural analyses reveal two morphologically distinct forms of deposits: One consisting of membrane-bounded multivescicular material, and the other of nonmembrane-bounded particle conglomerates. Collectively, these results suggest that drusen formation involves the accumulation of sub-RPE material rich in APOE, a prominent biosynthetic product of the RPE, which interacts with a select group of drusen-associated plasma proteins. Activation of the complement cascade appears to be mediated via the classical pathway by the binding of C1q to ligands in APOE-rich deposits, triggering direct activation of complement by C1q, deposition of terminal complement complexes and inflammatory sequelae. This model system will facilitate the analysis of molecular and cellular aspects of AMD pathogenesis, and the testing of new therapeutic agents for its treatment. PMID:21969589

  15. Immune complement activation on polystyrene and silicon dioxide surfaces. Impact of reversible IgG adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sellborn, Anders; Andersson, Marcus; Hedlund, Julia; Andersson, Jonas; Berglin, Mattias; Elwing, Hans

    2005-03-01

    We have studied aspects of the molecular background to immune complement activation on solid surfaces. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) sensor surfaces were modified by means of spin coating with polystyrene (PS) or sputtering of silicon dioxide (SiO2). The IC activation on modified QCM-D surfaces was investigated by incubation in serum, followed by determinations of the amounts of bound C3 fragments (C3c) at the surface. Determinations of soluble C3a and soluble C5b-9 complex (sC5b-9) were made with enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method. We found that IC activation was high on PS surfaces, independent of the method used for measurements. On the SiO2 surfaces, IC activation was generally lower, but still detectable with anti-C3c as well as sC5b-9 and C3a determinations. Pre-coating the surfaces with a layer of IgG resulted in that IC activation became very high on PS surface, while the IC response remained low on SiO2 surfaces. The lower level of IC activation on the SiO2 surfaces was explained by a low surface concentration of IgG as measured with QCM-D. This was a result of the high reversibility of the IgG protein adsorption as well as absence of sufficient conformational changes of adsorbed IgG molecules. The QCM-D method was as sensitive as the C3a and sC5b-9 determinations to reveal surface associated IC-activation on these model surfaces. Additional advantages of the QCM-D method are the broad dynamic measurement window, i.e. the high precision and the ability to perform time resolved measurements and the ease of making different surface modifications.

  16. Computer Generated Ability Complements as an Alternative to Continuous Hierarchy Positions: A Cybernetic Model of School Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Ron Roy

    The design of an alternative administrative structure related to the cybernetic era and its organizational characteristics are discussed. In View of the role of electronic information systems today, it would be valuable to synthesize the six perspectives of administration--leader, manager, change agent, theorist, planner, and futurist--to provide…

  17. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  18. The Anticomplementary Activity of ’Fusobacterium polymorphum’ in Normal and C-4 Deficient Sources of Guinea Pig Complement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-12

    aide Il neceeea~~ end Identity by block number) F sobacterium polymorphum has been isolated from the gingival crevice in man , and~~~s been impl...icated in theimmunopathology of periodontal diseases . The presence\\of alternate complement pathway factors in gingival crev i ce material suggests t’het...Abstract Fusobacteriwn po l~p ivrphwn has been isolated from the gingival crevice in man, and has been implicated in the imnunopathology of

  19. C4B gene influences intestinal microbiota through complement activation in patients with Pediatric-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nissilä, Eija; Korpela, Katri; Lokki, A Inkeri; Paakkanen, Riitta; Jokiranta, Sakari; de Vos, Willem; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Meri, Seppo

    2017-08-23

    Complement C4 genes are linked to pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (PIBD), but the mechanisms have remained unclear. We examined the influence of C4B gene number on intestinal microbiota and in vitro serum complement activation by intestinal microbes in PIBD patients. Complement C4A and C4B gene numbers were determined by genomic RT-PCR from 64 patients with PIBD (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis). The severity of the disease course was determined from fecal calprotectin levels. Intestinal microbiota was assessed using the HITChip microarray. Complement reactivity in patients was analyzed by incubating their sera with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Akkermansia muciniphila and determining the levels of C3a and SC5b-9 using enzyme immunoassays. The microbiota diversity was wider in patients with no C4B genes than in those with 1 or 2 C4B genes, irrespective of intestinal inflammation. C4B and total C4 gene numbers correlated positively with soluble terminal complement complex (TCC, SC5b-9) levels, when patient serum samples were stimulated with bacteria. Our results suggest that the C4B gene number associates positively to inflammation in patients with PIBD. Multiple copies of the C4B gene may thus aggravate the IBD-associated dysbiosis through escalated complement reactivity towards the microbiota. (Word count 191/250) This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Uncoupling complement C1s activation from C1q binding in apoptotic cell phagocytosis and immunosuppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Parry, Graham C; Panicker, Sandip; Elkon, Keith B

    2016-02-01

    Complement activation contributes to inflammation in many diseases, yet it also supports physiologic apoptotic cells (AC) clearance and its downstream immunosuppressive effects. The roles of individual complement components in AC phagocytosis have been difficult to dissect with artificially depleted sera. Using human in vitro systems and the novel antibody complement C1s inhibitor TNT003, we uncoupled the role of the enzymatic activation of the classical pathway from the opsonizing role of C1q in mediating a) the phagocytosis of early and late AC, and b) the immunosuppressive capacity of early AC. We found that C1s inhibition had a small impact on the physiologic clearance of early AC, leaving their immunosuppressive properties entirely unaffected, while mainly inhibiting the phagocytosis of late apoptotic/secondary necrotic cells. Our data suggest that C1s inhibition may represent a valuable therapeutic strategy to control classical pathway activation without causing significant AC accumulation in diseases without defects in AC phagocytosis.

  1. Insights into the Effects of Complement Factor H on the Assembly and Decay of the Alternative Pathway C3 Proconvertase and C3 Convertase.

    PubMed

    Bettoni, Serena; Bresin, Elena; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina; Donadelli, Roberta

    2016-04-08

    The activated fragment of C3 (C3b) and factor B form the C3 proconvertase (C3bB), which is cleaved by factor D to C3 convertase (C3bBb). Older studies (Conrad, D. H., Carlo, J. R., and Ruddy, S. (1978)J. Exp. Med.147, 1792-1805; Pangburn, M. K., and Müller-Eberhard, H. J. (1978)Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.75, 2416-2420; Kazatchkine, M. D., Fearon, D. T., and Austen, K. F. (1979)J. Immunol.122, 75-81) indicated that the complement alternative pathway regulator factor H (FH) competes with factor B for C3b binding; however, the capability of FH to prevent C3bB assembly has not been formally investigated. Moreover, in the few published studies FH did not favor C3bB dissociation. Whether FH may affect C3bBb formation from C3bB is unknown. We set up user-friendly assays based on combined microplate/Western blotting techniques that specifically detect either C3bB or C3bBb, with the aim of investigating the effect of FH on C3bB assembly and decay and C3bBb formation and decay. We document that FH does not affect C3bB assembly, indicating that FH does not efficiently compete with factor B for C3b binding. We also found that FH does not dissociate C3bB. FH showed a strong C3bBb decay-accelerating activity, as reported previously, and also exerted an apparent inhibitory effect on C3bBb formation. The latter effect was not fully attributable to a rapid FH-mediated dissociation of C3bBb complexes, because blocking decay with properdin and C3 nephritic factor did not restore C3bBb formation. FH almost completely prevented release of the smaller cleavage subunit of FB (Ba), without modifying the amount of C3bB complexes, suggesting that FH inhibits the conversion of C3bB to C3bBb. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FH on C3bBb formation is likely the sum of inhibition of C3bB conversion to C3bBb and of C3bBb decay acceleration. Further studies are required to confirm these findings in physiological cell-based settings.

  2. Insights into the Effects of Complement Factor H on the Assembly and Decay of the Alternative Pathway C3 Proconvertase and C3 Convertase*

    PubMed Central

    Bettoni, Serena; Bresin, Elena; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina; Donadelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The activated fragment of C3 (C3b) and factor B form the C3 proconvertase (C3bB), which is cleaved by factor D to C3 convertase (C3bBb). Older studies (Conrad, D. H., Carlo, J. R., and Ruddy, S. (1978) J. Exp. Med. 147, 1792–1805; Pangburn, M. K., and Müller-Eberhard, H. J. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75, 2416–2420; Kazatchkine, M. D., Fearon, D. T., and Austen, K. F. (1979) J. Immunol. 122, 75–81) indicated that the complement alternative pathway regulator factor H (FH) competes with factor B for C3b binding; however, the capability of FH to prevent C3bB assembly has not been formally investigated. Moreover, in the few published studies FH did not favor C3bB dissociation. Whether FH may affect C3bBb formation from C3bB is unknown. We set up user-friendly assays based on combined microplate/Western blotting techniques that specifically detect either C3bB or C3bBb, with the aim of investigating the effect of FH on C3bB assembly and decay and C3bBb formation and decay. We document that FH does not affect C3bB assembly, indicating that FH does not efficiently compete with factor B for C3b binding. We also found that FH does not dissociate C3bB. FH showed a strong C3bBb decay-accelerating activity, as reported previously, and also exerted an apparent inhibitory effect on C3bBb formation. The latter effect was not fully attributable to a rapid FH-mediated dissociation of C3bBb complexes, because blocking decay with properdin and C3 nephritic factor did not restore C3bBb formation. FH almost completely prevented release of the smaller cleavage subunit of FB (Ba), without modifying the amount of C3bB complexes, suggesting that FH inhibits the conversion of C3bB to C3bBb. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FH on C3bBb formation is likely the sum of inhibition of C3bB conversion to C3bBb and of C3bBb decay acceleration. Further studies are required to confirm these findings in physiological cell-based settings. PMID:26903516

  3. Characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides bearing sialyl lewis x moieties on an alternatively glycosylated form of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1).

    PubMed

    Picard, M D; Pettey, C L; Marsh, H C; Thomas, L J

    2000-02-01

    We sought to produce a complement inhibitory protein possessing oligosaccharides specifically modified to contain the sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x)) moiety. This modified glycoprotein could combine anti-complement activity with the ability to inhibit selectin-mediated interactions and concentrate this activity to sites of activated endothelium where selectins are upregulated. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), previously shown to be effective in inhibiting the complement cascade, was produced in a cell line capable of adding fucose to N-linked oligosaccharides in the alpha1-3 linkage, which is necessary for sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoprotein purified from these cells was designated sCR1sLe(x), and may prove to be more effective than sCR1 in some clinical applications. Detailed analysis and characterization of sCR1sLe(x) was performed to confirm that the N-linked oligosaccharides possessed sLe(x) moieties and also to determine the extent of sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoproteins were characterized by oligosaccharide profiling, sequencing, linkage analysis and quantified by differential enzymic digestion, using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. The major glycans were identified as biantennary oligosaccharides (including sialylated and non-core fucosylated glycans). The linkages of sialic acid and the branched fucose were analysed by digestion with linkage-specific enzymes and subsequent separation by electrophoresis. All data were consistent with the presence of sLe(x) moieties on the N-linked oligosaccharides of sCR1sLe(x). sCR1sLe(x) is a prime example of a recombinant protein expressed with oligosaccharides engineered for a specific biological function, and produced using a commercially viable method.

  4. Activation of the complement cascade enhances motility of leukemic cells by downregulating expression of HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Borkowska-Rzeszotek, S; Kubis, E; Bujko, K; Brzeźniakiewicz-Janus, K; Bolkun, L; Kloczko, J; Moniuszko, M; Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ratajczak, M Z

    2017-01-01

    As a crucial arm of innate immunity, the complement cascade (ComC) is involved both in mobilization of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood and in their homing to BM. Despite the fact that ComC cleavage fragments alone do not chemoattract normal HSPCs, we found that leukemia cell lines as well as clonogenic blasts from chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients respond robustly to C3 and C5 cleavage fragments by chemotaxis and increased adhesion. This finding was supported by the detection of C3a and C5a receptors in cells from human malignant hematopoietic cell lines and patient blasts at the mRNA (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and protein level (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), and by the demonstration that these receptors respond to stimulation by C3a and C5a by phosphorylation of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/AKT). We also found that inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a negative regulator of ComC-mediated trafficking of leukemic cells, and that stimulation of leukemic cells by C3 or C5 cleavage fragments activates p38 MAPK, which downregulates HO-1 expression, rendering cells more mobile. We conclude that activation of the ComC in leukemia/lymphoma patients (for example, as a result of accompanying infections) enhances the motility of malignant cells and contributes to their spread in a p38 MAPK–HO-1-dependent manner. Therefore, inhibition of p38 MAPK or upregulation of HO-1 by small-molecule modulators would have a beneficial effect on ameliorating cell migration-mediated expansion of leukemia/lymphoma cells when the ComC becomes activated. PMID:27451975

  5. Activation of the complement cascade enhances motility of leukemic cells by downregulating expression of HO-1.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Borkowska-Rzeszotek, S; Kubis, E; Bujko, K; Brzeźniakiewicz-Janus, K; Bolkun, L; Kloczko, J; Moniuszko, M; Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ratajczak, M Z

    2017-02-01

    As a crucial arm of innate immunity, the complement cascade (ComC) is involved both in mobilization of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood and in their homing to BM. Despite the fact that ComC cleavage fragments alone do not chemoattract normal HSPCs, we found that leukemia cell lines as well as clonogenic blasts from chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients respond robustly to C3 and C5 cleavage fragments by chemotaxis and increased adhesion. This finding was supported by the detection of C3a and C5a receptors in cells from human malignant hematopoietic cell lines and patient blasts at the mRNA (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and protein level (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), and by the demonstration that these receptors respond to stimulation by C3a and C5a by phosphorylation of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/AKT). We also found that inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a negative regulator of ComC-mediated trafficking of leukemic cells, and that stimulation of leukemic cells by C3 or C5 cleavage fragments activates p38 MAPK, which downregulates HO-1 expression, rendering cells more mobile. We conclude that activation of the ComC in leukemia/lymphoma patients (for example, as a result of accompanying infections) enhances the motility of malignant cells and contributes to their spread in a p38 MAPK-HO-1-dependent manner. Therefore, inhibition of p38 MAPK or upregulation of HO-1 by small-molecule modulators would have a beneficial effect on ameliorating cell migration-mediated expansion of leukemia/lymphoma cells when the ComC becomes activated.

  6. A potential alternative/complement to the traditional thermal neutron based counting in Nuclear Safeguards and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikova, Dina; Naeem, Syed F.; Axell, Kåre; Trnjanin, Nermin; Nordlund, Anders

    2016-02-01

    A new concept for thermal neutron based correlation and multiplicity measurements is proposed in this paper. The main idea of the concept consists of using 2.223 MeV gammas (or 1.201 MeV, DE) originating in the 1 H (n , γ) 2 D-reaction instead of using traditional thermal neutron counting. Results of investigations presented in this paper indicate that gammas from thermal neutron capture reactions preserve the information about the correlation characteristics of thermal (fast) neutrons in the same time scale. Therefore, instead of thermal neutron detectors (or as a complement) one may use traditional and inexpensive gamma detectors, such as NaI, BGO, CdZnTe or any other gamma detector. In this work we used D8×8 cm2 NaI scintillator to test the concept. Thus, the new approach helps to address the problem of replacement of 3He-counters and problems related to the specific measurements of spent nuclear fuel directly in the spent fuel pool. It has a particular importance for Nuclear Safeguards and Security. Overall, this work represents the proof of concept study and reports on the experimental and numerical evidence that thermal neutron capture gammas may be used in the context of correlation and multiplicity measurements. Investigations were performed using a 252Cf-correlated neutron source and an 241Am-Be-random neutron source. The related idea of the Gamma Differential Die-Away approach is investigated numerically in this paper as well, and will be tested experimentally in future work.

  7. Nebulized C1-Esterase Inhibitor does not Reduce Pulmonary Complement Activation in Rats with Severe Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Friso; Lagrand, Wim; Glas, Gerie J; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; van Mierlo, Gerard; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Juffermans, Nicole P; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J

    2016-12-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement system in the lungs by repeated treatment with nebulized plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor reduces pulmonary complement activation and subsequently attenuates lung injury and lung inflammation. This was investigated in a rat model of severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Rats were intra-tracheally challenged with S. pneumoniae to induce pneumonia. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor or saline (control animals) was repeatedly administered to rats, 30 min before induction of pneumonia and every 6 h thereafter. Rats were sacrificed 20 or 40 h after inoculation with bacteria. Brochoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were obtained for measuring levels of complement activation (C4b/c), lung injury and inflammation. Induction of pneumonia was associated with pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 1.24 % [0.56-2.59] and at 40 h 2.08 % [0.98-5.12], compared to 0.50 % [0.07-0.59] and 0.03 % [0.03-0.03] in the healthy control animals). The functional fraction of C1-INH was detectable in BALF, but no effect was found on pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 0.73 % [0.16-1.93] and at 40 h 2.38 % [0.54-4.19]). Twenty hours after inoculation, nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor treatment reduced total histology score, but this effect was no longer seen at 40 h. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor did not affect other markers of lung injury or lung inflammation. In this negative experimental animal study, severe S. pneumoniae pneumonia in rats is associated with pulmonary complement activation. Repeated treatment with nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor, although successfully delivered to the lungs, does not affect pulmonary complement activation, lung inflammation or lung injury.

  8. Complement activation pathways in murine immune complex-induced arthritis and in C3a and C5a generation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Banda, N K; Levitt, B; Wood, A K; Takahashi, K; Stahl, G L; Holers, V M; Arend, W P

    2010-01-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) of complement alone is capable of mediating immune complex-induced arthritis in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model in mice. Whether the classical pathway (CP) or lectin pathway (LP) alone can mediate CAIA is not known. Using mice genetically deficient in different complement components, our results reported herein establish that the CP and LP alone are each incapable of mediating CAIA. A lower level or absence of C3 and/or C5 activation by the CP may be possible explanations for the importance of the AP in CAIA and in many murine models of disease. In addition, other investigators have reported that CP C5 convertase activity is absent in mouse sera. To address these questions, we employed an in vitro system of adherent immunoglobulin (Ig)G-induced complement activation using plates coated with murine anti-collagen monoclonal antibody (mAb). These experiments used complement-deficient mouse sera and wild-type mouse or normal human sera under conditions inactivating either the CP (Ca++ deficiency) or the AP (mAb inhibitory to factor B). Robust generation of both C3a and C5a by either the AP or CP alone were observed with both mouse and human sera, although there were some small differences between the species of sera. We conclude that neither the CP nor LP alone is capable of mediating CAIA in vivo and that mouse sera exhibits a high level of IgG-induced C5a generation in vitro through either the CP or AP. PMID:19843088

  9. The profile of adsorbed plasma and serum proteins on methacrylic acid copolymer beads: Effect on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Wells, Laura A; Guo, Hongbo; Emili, Andrew; Sefton, Michael V

    2017-02-01

    Polymer beads made of 45% methacrylic acid co methyl methacrylate (MAA beads) promote vascular regenerative responses in contrast to control materials without methacrylic acid (here polymethyl methacrylate beads, PMMA). In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that MAA copolymers induce differences in macrophage phenotype and polarization and inflammatory responses, presumably due to protein adsorption differences between the beads. To explore differences in protein adsorption in an unbiased manner, we used high resolution shotgun mass spectrometry to identify and compare proteins that adsorb from human plasma or serum onto MAA and PMMA beads. From plasma, MAA beads adsorbed many complement proteins, such as C1q, C4-related proteins and the complement inhibitor factor H, while PMMA adsorbed proteins, such as albumin, C3 and apolipoproteins. Because of the differences in complement protein adsorption, follow-up studies focused on using ELISA to assess complement activation. When incubated in serum, MAA beads generated significantly lower levels of soluble C5b9 and C3a/C3adesarg in comparison to PMMA beads, indicating a decrease in complement activation with MAA beads. The differences in adsorbed protein on the two materials likely alter subsequent cell-material interactions that ultimately result in different host responses and local vascularization.

  10. Bovine intra-mammary challenge with Streptococcus dysgalactiae spp. Dysgalactiae to explore the effect on the response of Complement activity.

    PubMed

    Maye, Susan; Flynn, James; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Kelly, Philip M

    2017-08-01

    Recently published work as described by the authors highlighted the extent of Complement activity in bovine milk. Localised mastitis infection occurring in the mammary glands of dairy cows is readily detectable by the levels of somatic cells in milk. Thus, it is opportune to monitor Complement activity in milks in association with the animal's innate immune response to mammary infection. Preliminary screening of milk samples taken randomly showed that milk with a high somatic cell count (SCC) reduced growth of the Complement-sensitive strain E. coli O111 to a greater extent (P < 0·05) than when the marker microorganism was grown in milk heated for the purpose of inactivating Complement. A follow-up study set out to determine the effect on Complement activity when a sub-clinical mastitis infection was induced in the mammary gland of four lactating dairy cows. The effect of Str. dysgalactiae spp. dysgalactiae inoculation into selected individual udder quarters of the mammary glands of each animal was followed by monitoring of SCC levels in the milks from the segregated udder samples during subsequent milking. At 72 and 96 h post inoculation (PI), the SCCs for the challenged quarter were increased compared to normal values. At the same time, the bactericidal sequestration assay identified increased E. coli O111 inhibition that can be directly linked to greater Complement activity in those quarter milks affected by induced inflammation. Thus, it can be identified that the high SCC milks were more effective in limiting E. coli O111 growth. Milks from the unchallenged quarters in all four cows were significantly less effective at reducing growth of the assay strain (P < 0·05). An ELISA assay targeting specific activation components of the Complement pathways confirmed that greater bacterial inhibition observed during the bactericidal sequestration assay was attributable to higher Complement activity in the milk samples from the affected quarters, i.e., with higher SCC

  11. Targeted Inhibition of Complement Using Complement Receptor 2-Conjugated Inhibitors Attenuates EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases. PMID:23079547

  12. Targeted inhibition of complement using complement receptor 2-conjugated inhibitors attenuates EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-11-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases.

  13. A Revised Mechanism for the Activation of Complement C3 to C3b

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Elizabeth; Nan, Ruodan; Li, Keying; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    The solution structure of complement C3b is crucial for the understanding of complement activation and regulation. C3b is generated by the removal of C3a from C3. Hydrolysis of the C3 thioester produces C3u, an analog of C3b. C3b cleavage results in C3c and C3d (thioester-containing domain; TED). To resolve functional questions in relation to C3b and C3u, analytical ultracentrifugation and x-ray and neutron scattering studies were used with C3, C3b, C3u, C3c, and C3d, using the wild-type allotype with Arg102. In 50 mm NaCl buffer, atomistic scattering modeling showed that both C3b and C3u adopted a compact structure, similar to the C3b crystal structure in which its TED and macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domains were connected through the Arg102–Glu1032 salt bridge. In physiological 137 mm NaCl, scattering modeling showed that C3b and C3u were both extended in structure, with the TED and MG1 domains now separated by up to 6 nm. The importance of the Arg102–Glu1032 salt bridge was determined using surface plasmon resonance to monitor the binding of wild-type C3d(E1032) and mutant C3d(A1032) to immobilized C3c. The mutant did not bind, whereas the wild-type form did. The high conformational variability of TED in C3b in physiological buffer showed that C3b is more reactive than previously thought. Because the Arg102-Glu1032 salt bridge is essential for the C3b-Factor H complex during the regulatory control of C3b, the known clinical associations of the major C3S (Arg102) and disease-linked C3F (Gly102) allotypes of C3b were experimentally explained for the first time. PMID:25488663

  14. Myeloperoxidase reduces the opsonizing activity of immunoglobulin G and complement component C3b.

    PubMed

    Coble, B I; Dahlgren, C; Hed, J; Stendahl, O

    1984-12-20

    The effect of myeloperoxidase, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a halide (Cl) on the opsonizing molecules in immunoglobulin G (IgG) and complement factor C3b was assayed. At concentrations of the enzyme (1 microgram/ml) that can be found in the extracellular fluid during inflammation, the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-Cl system inhibited the opsonizing effect of IgG and C3b measured as phagocytic uptake and superoxide generation. The effect was related to the enzymatic peroxidative activity of the protein. The presence of albumin (10 mg/ml) reduced the effect of myeloperoxidase with 10-20%. Taurine, which in the presence of myeloperoxidase-H2O2-Cl forms hydrophilic chloramines, and D-penicillamine, which scavenges HOCl, neutralize the inhibitory effect of myeloperoxidase. This suggests that either hypochlorous acid or lipophilic chloramines may exert its effect by oxidizing free sulphydryl groups exposed on the opsonizing ligands. Since the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system also affects chemotactic factors, leukotrienes, proteinases and membrane receptors, the system may in several ways affect the development of the inflammatory response.

  15. Activity Recognition Using Community Data to Complement Small Amounts of Labeled Instances †

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ceja, Enrique; Brena, Ramon F.

    2016-01-01

    Human Activity Recognition (HAR) is an important part of ambient intelligence systems since it can provide user-context information, thus allowing a greater personalization of services. One of the problems with HAR systems is that the labeling process for the training data is costly, which has hindered its practical application. A common approach is to train a general model with the aggregated data from all users. The problem is that for a new target user, this model can perform poorly because it is biased towards the majority type of users and does not take into account the particular characteristics of the target user. To overcome this limitation, a user-dependent model can be trained with data only from the target user that will be optimal for this particular user; however, this requires a considerable amount of labeled data, which is cumbersome to obtain. In this work, we propose a method to build a personalized model for a given target user that does not require large amounts of labeled data. Our method uses data already labeled by a community of users to complement the scarce labeled data of the target user. Our results showed that the personalized model outperformed the general and the user-dependent models when labeled data is scarce. PMID:27314355

  16. Oral Vaccination with Heat Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis Activates the Complement System to Protect against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Moreno-Cid, Juan A.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar. PMID:24842853

  17. The Local Complement Activation on Vascular Bed of Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Hypothesis-Generating Study

    PubMed Central

    Scambi, Cinzia; Ugolini, Sara; Jokiranta, T. Sakari; De Franceschi, Lucia; Bortolami, Oscar; La Verde, Valentina; Guarini, Patrizia; Caramaschi, Paola; Ravagnani, Viviana; Martignoni, Guido; Colato, Chiara; Pedron, Serena; Benedetti, Fabio; Sorio, Marco; Poli, Fabio; Biasi, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of complement system in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) has been debated during the last decade but an evident implication in this disease has never been found. We carried out an explorative study on SSc patients to evaluate the expression of soluble and local C5b-9 complement complex and its relation with a complement regulator, the Membrane Cofactor Protein (MCP, CD46) on skin vascular bed as target distinctive of SSc disease. We also analyzed two polymorphic variants in the complement activation gene cluster involving the MCP region. Methods C5b-9 plasma levels of SSc patients and healthy subjects were analyzed by ELISA assay. Archival skin biopsies of SSc patients and controls were subjected to immunofluorescence analysis to detect C5b-9 and MCP on vascular endothelial cells. The expression of MCP was validated by immunoblot analysis with specific antibody. Polymorphic variants in the MCP gene promoter were tested by a quantitative PCR technique-based allelic discrimination method. Results Even though circulating levels of C5b-9 did not differ between SSc and controls, C5b-9 deposition was detected in skin biopsies of SSc patients but not in healthy subjects. MCP was significantly lower in skin vessels of SSc patients than in healthy controls and was associated with the over-expression of two polymorphic variants in the MCP gene promoter, which has been related to more aggressive phenotypes in other immune-mediated diseases. Conclusions Our results firsty document the local complement activation with an abnormal expression of MCP in skin vessels of SSc patients, suggesting that a subset of SSc patients might be exposed to more severe organ complications and clinical evolution due to abnormal local complement activation. PMID:25658605

  18. Sex differences in body fluid homeostasis: Sex chromosome complement influences on bradycardic baroreflex response and sodium depletion induced neural activity.

    PubMed

    Vivas, L; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and basic findings indicate that angiotensin II (ANG II) differentially modulates hydroelectrolyte and cardiovascular responses in male and female. But are only the activational and organizational hormonal effects to blame for such differences? Males and females not only differ in their sex (males are born with testes and females with ovaries) but also carry different sex chromosome complements and are thus influenced throughout life by different genomes. In this review, we discuss our recent studies in order to evaluate whether sex chromosome complement is in part responsible for gender differences previously observed in ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response and sodium depletion-induced sodium appetite and neural activity. To test the hypothesis that XX or XY contributes to the dimorphic ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response, we used the four core genotype mouse model, in which the effects of gonadal sex (testes or ovaries) and sex chromosome complement (XX or XY) are dissociated. The results indicate that ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex sexual dimorphic response may be ascribed to differences in sex chromosomes, indicating an XX-sex chromosome complement facilitatory bradycardic-baroreflex control of heart rate. Furthermore, we evaluated whether genetic differences within the sex chromosome complement may differentially modulate the known sexually dimorphic sodium appetite as well as basal or induced brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system by furosemide and low-sodium treatment. Our studies demonstrate an organizational hormonal effect on sexually dimorphic induced sodium intake in mice, while at the brain level (subfornical organ and area postrema) we showed a sex chromosome complement effect in sodium-depleted mice, suggesting a sex chromosome gene participation in the modulation of neural pathways underlying regulatory response to renin-angiotensin stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fosb gene products contribute to excitotoxic microglial activation by regulating the expression of complement C5a receptors in microglia

    PubMed Central

    Nomaru, Hiroko; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Katogi, Atsuhisa; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Kajitani, Kosuke; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nestler, Eric J.; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    The Fosb gene encodes subunits of the activator protein-1 transcription factor complex. Two mature mRNAs, Fosb and ΔFosb, encoding full-length FOSB and ΔFOSB proteins respectively, are formed by alternative splicing of Fosb mRNA. Fosb products are expressed in several brain regions. Moreover, Fosb-null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and adult-onset spontaneous epilepsy, demonstrating important roles in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Study of Fosb products has focused almost exclusively on neurons; their function in glial cells remains to be explored. In this study, we found that microglia express equivalent levels of Fosb and ΔFosb mRNAs to hippocampal neurons and, using microarray analysis, we identified six microglial genes whose expression is dependent on Fosb products. Of these genes, we focused on C5ar1 and C5ar2, which encode receptors for complement C5a. In isolated Fosb-null microglia, chemotactic responsiveness toward the truncated form of C5a was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells. Fosb-null mice were significantly resistant to kainate-induced seizures compared with wild-type mice. C5ar1 mRNA levels and C5aR1 immunoreactivity were increased in wild-type hippocampus 24 hours after kainate administration; however, such induction was significantly reduced in Fosb-null hippocampus. Furthermore, microglial activation after kainate administration was significantly diminished in Fosb-null hippocampus, as shown by significant reductions in CD68 immunoreactivity, morphological change and reduced levels of Il6 and Tnf mRNAs, although no change in the number of Iba-1-positive cells was observed. These findings demonstrate that, under excitotoxicity, Fosb products contribute to a neuroinflammatory response in the hippocampus through regulation of microglial C5ar1 and C5ar2 expression. PMID:24771617

  20. Immune Response to Snake Envenoming and Treatment with Antivenom; Complement Activation, Cytokine Production and Mast Cell Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harendra; Ariaratnam, Ariaranee; Jacoby-Alner, Tamara E.; Cotterell, Claire L.; Brown, Simon G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Snake bite is one of the most neglected public health issues in poor rural communities worldwide. In addition to the clinical effects of envenoming, treatment with antivenom frequently causes serious adverse reactions, including hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and pyrogenic reactions. We aimed to investigate the immune responses to Sri Lankan snake envenoming (predominantly by Russell's viper) and antivenom treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Plasma concentrations of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), soluble TNF receptor I (sTNFRI), anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a, C5a; markers of complement activation), mast cell tryptase (MCT), and histamine were measured in 120 Sri Lankan snakebite victims, both before and after treatment with antivenom. Immune mediator concentrations were correlated with envenoming features and the severity of antivenom-induced reactions including anaphylaxis. Envenoming was associated with complement activation and increased cytokine concentrations prior to antivenom administration, which correlated with non-specific systemic symptoms of envenoming but not with coagulopathy or neurotoxicity. Typical hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom occurred in 77/120 patients (64%), satisfying criteria for a diagnosis of anaphylaxis in 57/120 (48%). Pyrogenic reactions were observed in 32/120 patients (27%). All patients had further elevations in cytokine concentrations, but not complement activation, after the administration of antivenom, whether a reaction was noted to occur or not. Patients with anaphylaxis had significantly elevated concentrations of MCT and histamine. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that Sri Lankan snake envenoming is characterized by significant complement activation and release of inflammatory mediators. Antivenom treatment further enhances the release of inflammatory mediators in all patients, with anaphylactic reactions characterised by high levels of mast

  1. Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation Is Associated with Vulnerability of Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Perego, Carlo; Zangari, Rosalia; De Blasio, Daiana; Oggioni, Marco; De Nigris, Francesca; Snider, Francesco; Garred, Peter; Ferrante, Angela M. R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms may be involved in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. By using a novel histology-based method to quantify plaque instability here, we assess whether lectin pathway (LP) of complement activation, a major inflammation arm, could represent an index of plaque instability. Plaques from 42 consecutive patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the lipid core, cholesterol clefts, hemorrhagic content, thickness of tunica media, and intima, including or not infiltration of cellular debris and cholesterol, were determined. The presence of ficolin-1, -2, and -3 and mannose-binding lectin (MBL), LP initiators, was assessed in the plaques by immunofluorescence and in plasma by ELISA. LP activation was assessed in plasma by functional in vitro assays. Patients presenting low stenosis (≤75%) had higher hemorrhagic content than those with high stenosis (>75%), indicating increased erosion. Increased hemorrhagic content and tunica media thickness, as well as decreased lipid core and infiltrated content were associated with vulnerable plaques and therefore used to establish a plaque vulnerability score that allowed to classify patients according to plaque vulnerability. Ficolins and MBL were found both in plaques’ necrotic core and tunica media. Patients with vulnerable plaques showed decreased plasma levels and intraplaque deposition of ficolin-2. Symptomatic patients experiencing a transient ischemic attack had lower plasma levels of ficolin-1. We show that the LP initiators are present within the plaques and their circulating levels change in atherosclerotic patients. In particular, we show that decreased ficolin-2 levels are associated with rupture-prone vulnerable plaques, indicating its potential use as marker for cardiovascular risk assessment in atherosclerotic patients. PMID:28360913

  2. Complement Activation by Giardia duodenalis Parasites through the Lectin Pathway Contributes to Mast Cell Responses and Parasite Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erqiu; Tako, Ernest A.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Giardia duodenalis is one of the most common causes of diarrheal disease in the world. While numerous studies have identified important contributions of adaptive immune responses to parasite control, much less work has examined innate immunity and its connections to the adaptive response during this infection. We explored the role of complement in immunity to Giardia using mice deficient in mannose-binding lectin (Mbl2) or complement factor 3a receptor (C3aR). Both strains exhibited delayed clearance of parasites and a reduced ability to recruit mast cells in the intestinal submucosa. C3aR-deficient mice had normal production of antiparasite IgA, but ex vivo T cell recall responses were impaired. These data suggest that complement is a key factor in the innate recognition of Giardia and that recruitment of mast cells and activation of T cell immunity through C3a are important for parasite control. PMID:26831470

  3. PASylated Coversin, a C5-Specific Complement Inhibitor with Extended Pharmacokinetics, Shows Enhanced Anti-Hemolytic Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Nadine; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schlapschy, Martin; Skerra, Arne

    2016-10-19

    The Ornithodoros moubata Complement Inhibitor (OmCI) binds complement component 5 (C5) with high affinity and, thus, selectively prevents proteolytic activation of the terminal lytic complement pathway. A recombinant version of OmCI (also known as Coversin and rEV576) has proven efficacious in several animal models of complement-mediated diseases and successfully completed a phase Ia clinical trial. Coversin is a small 17 kDa lipocalin protein which has a very short plasma half-life if not bound to C5; therefore, the drug requires frequent dosing. We have improved the pharmacokinetics of Coversin by N-terminal translational conjugation with a 600 residue polypeptide composed of Pro, Ala, and Ser (PAS) residues. To this end, PAS-Coversin as well as the unmodified Coversin were functionally expressed in the cytoplasm of E. coli and purified to homogeneity. Both versions showed identical affinity to human C5, as determined by surface plasmon resonance measurements, and revealed similar complement inhibitory activity, as measured in ELISAs with human serum. In line with the PEG-like biophysical properties, PASylation dramatically prolonged the plasma half-life of uncomplexed Coversin by a factor ≥50 in mice. In a clinically relevant in vitro model of the complement-mediated disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) both versions of Coversin effectively reduced erythrocyte lysis. Unexpectedly, while the IC50 values were comparable, PAS-Coversin reached a substantially lower plateau of residual lysis at saturating inhibitor concentrations. Taken together, our data demonstrate two clinically relevant improvements of PASylated Coversin: markedly increased plasma half-life and considerably reduced background hemolysis of erythrocytes with PNH-induced phenotype.

  4. Excretion of complement proteins and its activation marker C5b-9 in IgA nephropathy in relation to renal function.

    PubMed

    Onda, Kisara; Ohsawa, Isao; Ohi, Hiroyuki; Tamano, Mariko; Mano, Satoshi; Wakabayashi, Michiro; Toki, Akie; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Fujita, Teizo; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2011-11-23

    Glomerular damage in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is mediated by complement activation via the alternative and lectin pathways. Therefore, we focused on molecules stabilizing and regulating the alternative pathway C3 convertase in urine which might be associated with IgAN pathogenesis. Membrane attack complex (MAC), properdin (P), factor H (fH) and Complement receptor type 1 (CR1) were quantified in urine samples from 71 patients with IgAN and 72 healthy controls. Glomerular deposition of C5, fH and P was assessed using an immunofluorescence technique and correlated with histological severity of IgAN and clinical parameters. Fibrotic changes and glomerular sclerosis were evaluated in renal biopsy specimens. Immunofluorescence studies revealed glomerular depositions of C5, fH and P in patients with IgAN. Urinary MAC, fH and P levels in IgAN patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (p < 0.001), but CR1 was significantly lower than that in healthy controls (p < 0.001). Urinary MAC and fH levels were positively correlated with serum creatinine (sCr), urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (u-NAG), urinary β2 microglobulin (u-Bm), urinary protein (p < 0.001), interstitial fibrosis (MAC: p < 0.01, fH: p < 0.05) and the percentage of global glomerular sclerosis (p < 0.01). Urinary P was positively correlated with u-NAG, u-Bm, and urinary protein (p < 0.01). Complement activation occurs in the urinary space in IgAN and the measurement of levels of MAC and fH in the urine could be a useful indicator of renal injury in patients with IgAN.

  5. Active invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and infection-induced complement activation in ApoE-/- mice brains.

    PubMed

    Poole, Sophie; Singhrao, Sim K; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera, Mercedes; Velsko, Irina; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Crean, StJohn

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

  6. [IgA rheumatoid factor formation in connection with complement activation and circulating immune complexes in chronic polyarthritis].

    PubMed

    Kullich, W

    1994-01-01

    The IgA-rheumatoid factor (IgA-RF) as well as the complement component C3a in plasma and serum levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC) (C1q binding assay and Raji Cell Replacement assay) were measured with enzyme immunoassays in 81 patients with established rheumatoid arthritis. The serum levels of the complement component C3a were found significantly higher (p < 0.02) in the cases with high IgA-RF (> 6 AU/ml) than in those with low IgA-RF. Distinct significant correlations (r = 0.38; p < 0.001) were observed between production of IgA-RF and activation of the complement fragment C3a, which might be associated with production of antibodies and with complement activation accompanying inflammatory processes. A weaker correlation between CIC and IgA-RF-levels indicates CIC not to be closely related to the production of IgA-RF in the examined R.A.-patients. However, an indirect connection by the way of inflammation and activation of T-cells is possible.

  7. Preparation of Low Molecular Weight Chondroitin Sulfates, Screening of a High Anti-Complement Capacity of Low Molecular Weight Chondroitin Sulfate and Its Biological Activity Studies in Attenuating Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Feng, Danyang; Xu, Linghua; Yin, Fengxin; Zang, Hengchang; Liu, Chunhui; Wang, Fengshan

    2016-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) plays important roles in the complement system. However, the CS structure is complicated due to different sources and the number and positions of sulfate groups. The objective of this study was to prepare different low molecular weight chondroitin sulfates (LMWCSs) and to investigate the biological activity in anti-complement capacity. A series of LMWCSs was prepared from different sources and characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV) spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Hemolytic, anti-complement 3 deposition capacity and cell viability assays were carried out to investigate the biological activities in vitro. The results showed that LMWCS prepared from shark cartilage with the oxidative degradation method (LMWCS-S-O) had the best anti-complement capacity. LMWCS-S-O could inhibit the alternative pathway of the complement system and protect chondrocytes from cell death. The attenuating effect of LMWCS-S-O on Osteoarthritis (OA) was investigated by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) model in vivo. Functional wind-up, histological and C5b-9 analyses were used to evaluate the treatment effect on the OA model. In vivo results showed that LMWCS-S-O could attenuate OA. LMWCS-S-O with a high content of ΔDi-2,6diS and ΔDi-6S could be used for attenuating OA through regulating the complement system. PMID:27727159

  8. The mechanisms of complement activation in normal bovine serum and normal horse serum against Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 strains with different outer membrane proteins content.

    PubMed

    Miętka, K; Brzostek, K; Guz-Regner, K; Bugla-Płoskońska, G

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a common zoonotic pathogen and facultative intracellular bacterium which can survive within blood cells. Cattle and horses are considered a reservoir of Y. enterocolitica which often causes several serious syndromes associated with yersiniosis such as abortions, premature births or infertility. The aim of our investigation was to determine the vitality of Y. enterocolitica O:9 strains (Ye9) in bovine and horse sera (NBS and NHrS) and explain the role of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in serum resistance of these bacteria. Our previous studies demonstrated moderate human serum (NHS) resistance of the wild type Ye9 strain, whereas mutants lacking YadA, Ail or OmpC remained sensitive to the bactericidal activity of NHS. The present study showed that the wild type of Ye9 strain was resistant to the bactericidal activity of both NHrS and NBS, while Ye9 mutants lacking the YadA, Ail and OmpC proteins were sensitive to NHrS and NBS as well as to NHS. The mechanisms of complement activation against Ye9 strains lacking Ail and YadA were distinguished, i.e. activation of the classical/lectin pathways decisive in the bactericidal mechanism of complement activation of NBS, parallel activation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of NHrS. In this research the mechanism of independent activation of the classical/lectin or the alternative pathway of NBS and NHrS against Ye9 lacking OmpC porin was also established. The results indicate that serum resistance of Ye9 is multifactorial, in which extracellular structures, i.e. outer membrane proteins (OMPs) such as Ail, OmpC or YadA, play the main role.

  9. Cholesterol Crystals Activate the Lectin Complement Pathway via Ficolin-2 and Mannose-Binding Lectin: Implications for the Progression of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pilely, Katrine; Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Gal, Peter; Pál, Gábor; Halvorsen, Bente; Holm, Sverre; Aukrust, Pål; Bakke, Siril Skaret; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Nervik, Ingunn; Niyonzima, Nathalie; Bartels, Emil D; Stahl, Gregory L; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Espevik, Terje; Garred, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Cholesterol crystals (CC) play an essential role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. CC activate the classical and the alternative complement pathways, but the role of the lectin pathway is unknown. We hypothesized that the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) from the lectin pathway bind CC and function as an upstream innate inflammatory signal in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We investigated the binding of the PRMs mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3, the associated serine proteases, and complement activation products to CC in vitro using recombinant proteins, specific inhibitors, as well as deficient and normal sera. Additionally, we examined the deposition of ficolin-2 and MBL in human carotid plaques by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the lectin pathway was activated on CC by binding of ficolin-2 and MBL in vitro, resulting in activation and deposition of complement activation products. MBL bound to CC in a calcium-dependent manner whereas ficolin-2 binding was calcium-independent. No binding was observed for ficolin-1 or ficolin-3. MBL and ficolin-2 were present in human carotid plaques, and binding of MBL to CC was confirmed in vivo by immunohistochemistry, showing localization of MBL around CC clefts. Moreover, we demonstrated that IgM, but not IgG, bound to CC in vitro and that C1q binding was facilitated by IgM. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that PRMs from the lectin pathway recognize CC and provides evidence for an important role for this pathway in the inflammatory response induced by CC in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Study of the variables associated with local complement activation in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Segarra-Medrano, Alfons; Carnicer-Caceres, Clara; Valtierra-Carmeno, Naiara; Agraz-Pamplona, Irene; Ramos-Terrades, Natalia; Jatem Escalante, Elías; Ostos-Roldan, Elena

    1. To identify the variables that are associated with urinary levels of properdin, MBL, C4d, and C5b-9 in patients with idiopathic IgA nephropathy. 2. To analyse whether urinary levels of MBL and/or C4d are useful for identifying the presence of mesangial deposits of C4d/MBL. A total of 96 patients with IgA nephropathy were studied. Demographic, clinical and biochemical variables were recorded at the time of diagnosis. Renal lesions were quantified using the Oxford classification. Immunohistochemical staining for MBL, MASP-2, properdin, C4d, and C5b-9 was performed in kidney biopsies, and in urine, the levels of properdin, MBL, C4d and C5b-9 were determined. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of C4d and MBL levels in urine were the mesangial deposits of each protein and, to a lesser extent, the urinary protein excretion. The independent predictors of urinary levels of C5b-9 were MBL properdin and proteinuria. Urinary excretion of C4d had a sensitivity of 90% (95% CI: 58,7 to 99) and a specificity of 73% (95% CI: 54-87) for detecting mesangial C4d deposits, and the level of MBL had a sensitivity of 83.9% (95% CI: 62-95) and a specificity of 81.6% (95% CI: 65-92) for identifying mesangial deposits of MBL. The main predictor of urinary concentration of C4d and MBL was the presence of their respective mesangial deposits. Urine MBL may contribute to complement activation in the tubular luz through the lectin pathway. Urinary levels of MBL and C4d could be sensitive and specific biomarkers for the identification of patients with mesangial deposits of MBL and C4d. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  11. Microdialysis monitoring of liver grafts by metabolic parameters, cytokine production, and complement activation.

    PubMed

    Waelgaard, Lars; Thorgersen, Ebbe Billmann; Line, Pål-Dag; Foss, Aksel; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Tønnessen, Tor Inge

    2008-10-27

    The outcome of liver transplantation is steadily improving. Still there is need for earlier detection of complications like hepatic artery thrombosis and rejection. The aim of this study was to explore whether microdialysis with a 100-kDa cutoff filter could be used to monitor local inflammation after liver transplantation. Twenty patients undergoing liver transplantations were observed for 1 week posttransplant. Microdialysis catheters were introduced in each liver lobe subcutaneously and metabolic parameters (glucose, pyruvate, glycerol, and lactate), cytokines (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8, monocyte chemottractic protein-1, and inducible protein [IP]-10), and complement activation (C5a) were measured. Fourteen patients experienced an uneventful course, judged clinically by ultrasound Doppler and by metabolic markers including lactate and the ischemia indicator lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. All patients with uneventful course had a consistent rise in IP-10 from 200 to 3000 pg/mL after transplantation, whereas the other cytokines stayed low. Two patients with rejection showed a selective increase in IL-8 and C5a, starting 2 to 4 days before alanine transferase increased, reaching 10- to 50-fold increase compared with baseline levels, and decreased rapidly after start of antirejection therapy. C5a concentration was substantially increased in these two patients at the time of transplantation. A third patient developed a hepatic artery thrombosis and rejection and showed a rapid rise in intrahepatic lactate and a complex inflammatory pattern. Microdialysis using a 100-kDa filter is a promising way of monitoring the inflammatory reaction after liver transplantation. Increase in IP-10 reflects a normal pathophysiologic response posttransplant, whereas IL-8 and C5a were increased only in patients with rejection.

  12. Age-related macular degeneration associated polymorphism rs10490924 in ARMS2 results in deficiency of a complement activator.

    PubMed

    Micklisch, Sven; Lin, Yuchen; Jacob, Saskia; Karlstetter, Marcus; Dannhausen, Katharina; Dasari, Prasad; von der Heide, Monika; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Schmölz, Lisa; Grassmann, Felix; Alene, Medhanie; Fauser, Sascha; Neumann, Harald; Lorkowski, Stefan; Pauly, Diana; Weber, Bernhard H; Joussen, Antonia M; Langmann, Thomas; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine

    2017-01-05

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. The polymorphism rs10490924 in the ARMS2 gene is highly associated with AMD and linked to an indel mutation (del443ins54), the latter inducing mRNA instability. At present, the function of the ARMS2 protein, the exact cellular sources in the retina and the biological consequences of the rs10490924 polymorphism are unclear. Recombinant ARMS2 was expressed in Pichia pastoris, and protein functions were studied regarding cell surface binding and complement activation in human serum using fluoresence-activated cell sorting (FACS) as well as laser scanning microscopy (LSM). Biolayer interferometry defined protein interactions. Furthermore, endogenous ARMS2 gene expression was studied in human blood derived monocytes and in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived microglia (iPSdM) by PCR and LSM. The ARMS2 protein was localized in human genotyped retinal sections and in purified monocytes derived from AMD patients without the ARMS2 risk variant by LSM. ARMS2 expression in monocytes under oxidative stress was determined by Western blot analysis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that ARMS2 functions as surface complement regulator. Recombinant ARMS2 binds to human apoptotic and necrotic cells and initiates complement activation by recruiting the complement activator properdin. ARMS2-properdin complexes augment C3b surface opsonization for phagocytosis. We also demonstrate for the first time expression of ARMS2 in human monocytes especially under oxidative stress and in microglia cells of the human retina. The ARMS2 protein is absent in monocytes and also in microglia cells, derived from patients homozygous for the ARMS2 AMD risk variant (rs10490924). ARMS2 is likely involved in complement-mediated clearance of cellular debris. As AMD patients present with accumulated proteins and lipids on Bruch's membrane, ARMS2 protein deficiency due to the genetic risk variant

  13. Antibacterial Activity of the Contact and Complement Systems Is Blocked by SIC, a Protein Secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes*

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Inga-Maria; Shannon, Oonagh; Åkesson, Per; Mörgelin, Matthias; Collin, Mattias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Björck, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that activation of complement and contact systems results in the generation of antibacterial peptides. Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial pathogen in humans, exists in >100 different serotypes due to sequence variation in the surface-associated M protein. Cases of invasive and life-threatening S. pyogenes infections are commonly associated with isolates of the M1 serotype, and in contrast to the large majority of M serotypes, M1 isolates all secrete the SIC protein. Here, we show that SIC interferes with the activation of the contact system and blocks the activity of antibacterial peptides generated through complement and contact activation. This effect promotes the growth of S. pyogenes in human plasma, and in a mouse model of S. pyogenes sepsis, SIC enhances bacterial dissemination, results which help explain the high frequency of severe S. pyogenes infections caused by isolates of the M1 serotype. PMID:21068386

  14. A plant proton-pumping inorganic pyrophosphatase functionally complements the vacuolar ATPase transport activity and confers bafilomycin resistance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castiñeira, José R; Hernández, Agustín; Drake, Rocío; Serrano, Aurelio

    2011-07-15

    V-ATPases (vacuolar H+-ATPases) are a specific class of multi-subunit pumps that play an essential role in the generation of proton gradients across eukaryotic endomembranes. Another simpler proton pump that co-localizes with the V-ATPase occurs in plants and many protists: the single-subunit H+-PPase [H+-translocating PPase (inorganic pyrophosphatase)]. Little is known about the relative contribution of these two proteins to the acidification of intracellular compartments. In the present study, we show that the expression of a chimaeric derivative of the Arabidopsis thaliana H+-PPase AVP1, which is preferentially targeted to internal membranes of yeast, alleviates the phenotypes associated with V-ATPase deficiency. Phenotypic complementation was achieved both with a yeast strain with its V-ATPase specifically inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and with a vma1-null mutant lacking a catalytic V-ATPase subunit. Cell staining with vital fluorescent dyes showed that AVP1 recovered vacuole acidification and normalized the endocytic pathway of the vma mutant. Biochemical and immunochemical studies further demonstrated that a significant fraction of heterologous H+-PPase is located at the vacuolar membrane. These results raise the question of the occurrence of distinct proton pumps in certain single-membrane organelles, such as plant vacuoles, by proving yeast V-ATPase activity dispensability and the capability of H+-PPase to generate, by itself, physiologically suitable internal pH gradients. Also, they suggest new ways of engineering macrolide drug tolerance and outline an experimental system for testing alternative roles for fungal and animal V-ATPases, other than the mere acidification of subcellular organelles.

  15. Provirus activation plus CD59 blockage triggers antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis of latently HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jie; Yang, Kai; Byrd, Daniel; Hu, Ningjie; Amet, Tohti; Shepherd, Nicole; Desai, Mona; Gao, Jimin; Gupta, Samir; Sun, Yongtao; Yu, Qigui

    2014-10-01

    Latently HIV-1-infected cells are recognized as the last barrier toward viral eradication and cure. To purge these cells, we combined a provirus stimulant with a blocker of human CD59, a key member of the regulators of complement activation, to trigger Ab-dependent complement-mediated lysis. Provirus stimulants including prostratin and histone deacetylase inhibitors such as romidepsin and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid activated proviruses in the latently HIV-1-infected T cell line ACH-2 as virion production and viral protein expression on the cell surface were induced. Romidepsin was the most attractive provirus stimulant as it effectively activated proviruses at nanomolar concentrations that can be achieved clinically. Antiretroviral drugs including two protease inhibitors (atazanavir and darunavir) and an RT inhibitor (emtricitabine) did not affect the activity of provirus stimulants in the activation of proviruses. However, saquinavir (a protease inhibitor) markedly suppressed virus production, although it did not affect the percentage of cells expressing viral Env on the cell surface. Provirus-activated ACH-2 cells expressed HIV-1 Env that colocalized with CD59 in lipid rafts on the cell surface, facilitating direct interaction between them. Blockage of CD59 rendered provirus-activated ACH-2 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells that were latently infected with HIV-1 sensitive to Ab-dependent complement-mediated lysis by anti-HIV-1 polyclonal Abs or plasma from HIV-1-infected patients. Therefore, a combination of provirus stimulants with regulators of complement activation blockers represents a novel approach to eliminate HIV-1. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  17. Integrated electric alternators/active filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towliat Abolhassani, Mehdi

    In response to energy crisis and power quality concerns, three different methodologies to integrate the concept of active filtering into the alternators are proposed. Wind energy, due to its free availability and its clean and renewable character, ranks as the most promising renewable energy resource that could play a key role in solving the worldwide energy crisis. An Integrated Doubly-fed Electric Alternator/Active filter (IDEA) for wind energy conversion systems is proposed. The proposed IDEA is capable of simultaneously capturing maximum power of wind energy and improving power quality, which are achieved by canceling the most significant and troublesome harmonics of the utility grid and power factor correction and reactive power compensation in the grid. The back-to-back current regulated power converters are employed to excite the rotor of IDEA. The control strategy of rotor-side power converter is based on position sensorless field oriented control method with higher power density. Analysis and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed IDEA. In the next step, an integrated synchronous machine/active filter is discussed. The proposed technology is essentially a rotating synchronous machine with suitable modification to its field excitation circuit to allow dc and ac excitations. It is shown that by controlling the ac excitation, the 5 th and 7th harmonics currents of the utility are compensated. The proposed method is cost effective because it can be applied to existing standby generators in commercial and industrial plants with minimal modification to the excitation circuits. To boost the gain of harmonic compensatory, an advanced electric machine is proposed. An Asymmetric Airgap Concentrated Winding Synchronous Machine (AACWSM) with ac and dc excitation was designed and employed. It is shown that the AACWSM with its unique design, in addition to power generation capability, could be used to compensate the most

  18. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  19. Alternatively activated macrophages in infection and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Cihakova, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play an important role in activation of the immune response and wound healing. Pathogens that require T helper-type 2 (Th2) responses for effective clearance, such as parasitic worms, are strong inducers of alternatively activated or M2 macrophages. However, infections such as bacteria and viruses that require Th1-type responses may induce M2 as a strategy to evade the immune system. M2 are particularly efficient at scavenging self tissues following injury through receptors like the mannose receptor and scavenger receptor-A. Thus, M2 may increase autoimmune disease by presenting self tissue to T cells. M2 may also exacerbate immune complex (IC)-mediated pathology and fibrosis, a hallmark of autoimmune disease in women, due to the release of profibrotic factors such as interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor-β, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. We have found that M2 comprise anywhere from 30% to 70% of the infiltrate during acute viral or experimental autoimmune myocarditis, and shifts in M2 populations correlate with increased IC-deposition, fibrosis and chronic autoimmune pathology. Thus, women may be at an increased risk of M2-mediated autoimmunity due to estrogen’s ability to increase Th2 responses. PMID:19819674

  20. Alternating Current Influences Anaerobic Electroactive Biofilm Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Lean; Lu, Lu; Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Li, Nan; Wang, Heming; Park, Jaedo; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-09-06

    Alternating current (AC) is known to inactivate microbial growth in suspension, but how AC influences anaerobic biofilm activities has not been systematically investigated. Using a Geobacter dominated anaerobic biofilm growing on the electrodes of microbial electrochemical reactors, we found that high frequency AC ranging from 1 MHz to 1 kHz (amplitude of 5 V, 30 min) showed only temporary inhibition to the biofilm activity. However, lower frequency (100 Hz, 1.2 or 5 V) treatment led to 47 ± 19% permanent decrease in limiting current on the same biofilm, which is attributed to the action of electrohydrodynamic force that caused biofilm damage and loss of intercellular electron transfer network. Confocal microscopy images show such inactivation mainly occurred at the interface between the biofilm and the electrode. Reducing the frequency further to 1 Hz led to water electrolysis, which generated gas bubbles that flushed all attached cells out of the electrode. These findings provide new references on understanding and regulating biofilm growth, which has broader implications in biofouling control, anaerobic waste treatment, energy and product recovery, and general understanding of microbial ecology and physiology.

  1. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy in a 95+ cohort: complement activation and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, M; Lindsberg, P J; Tienari, P J; Polvikoski, T; Sulkava, R; Verkkoniemi, A; Rastas, S; Paetau, A; Kiuru-Enari, S

    2005-12-01

    There is growing evidence that in Alzheimer's disease (AD) amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) triggers a chronic inflammatory reaction in cerebral amyloid plaques, including complement proteins. Abeta also accumulates cerebrovascularly in age- and AD-associated cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). We investigated complement proteins in CAA in a population-based series using histological and immunohistochemical staining methods. The 74 subjects, aged 95 years or more, had undergone clinical neurological examination and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotyping. The brains had been studied for AD post-mortem, allowing us to relate the histopathological findings to clinical and genetic conditions. CAA with congophilic amyloid was found in 36/74 individuals (48.6%). The vascular amyloid deposits immunoreacted with antibodies to Abeta and complements 3d (C3d) and 9 (C9). The positivity in complement stains increased with growing severity of CAA (P = 0.001). The presence of CAA associated with ApoE epsilon4 (P = 0.0005) and overrepresentation of epsilon4 among those with moderate or severe vs. mild CAA (P = 0.03) was demonstrated. The presence of CAA associated with dementia (P = 0.01), which was contributed by both epsilon4+ (P = 0.02) and epsilon4- (P = 0.06) subjects. Our study shows that complement proteins are deposited in the affected vessels in Abeta-associated CAA. They may solely represent the cerebral Abeta- burden associated to inflammatory stimuli, or signal a contribution in the clearance of cerebral Abeta, thereby contributing to the events associated with evolution of clinical dementia. Our results demonstrate a strong association between CAA and ApoE epsilon4 as well as dementia and suggest that the contribution of CAA to dementia is largely independent of ApoE epsilon4.

  2. Endothelial targeting with C1-inhibitor reduces complement activation in vitro and during ex vivo reperfusion of pig liver

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschini, L; Gobbo, G; Gatti, S; Caccamo, L; Prato, P; Maggioni, M; Braidotti, P; Di Stefano, R; Fassati, L R

    2001-01-01

    Tissue damage during cold storage and reperfusion remains a major obstacle to wider use of transplantation. Vascular endothelial cells and complement activation are thought to be involved in the inflammatory reactions following reperfusion, so endothelial targeting of complement inhibitors is of great interest. Using an in vitro model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cold storage and an animal model of ex vivo liver reperfusion after cold ischaemia, we assessed the effect of C1-INH on cell functions and liver damage. We found that in vitro C1-INH bound to HUVEC in a manner depending on the duration of cold storage. Cell-bound C1-INH was functionally active since retained the ability to inhibit exogenous C1s. To assess the ability of cell-bound C1-INH to prevent complement activation during organ reperfusion, we added C1-INH to the preservation solution in an animal model of extracorporeal liver reperfusion. Ex vivo liver reperfusion after 8 h of cold ischaemia resulted in plasma C3 activation and reduction of total serum haemolytic activity, and at tissue level deposition of C3 associated with variable level of inflammatory cell infiltration and tissue damage. These findings were reduced when livers were stored in preservation solution containing C1-INH. Immunohistochemical analysis of C1-INH-treated livers showed immunoreactivity localized on the sinusoidal pole of the liver trabeculae, linked to sinusoidal endothelium, so it is likely that the protective effect was due to C1-INH retained by the livers. These results suggest that adding C1-INH to the preservation solution may be useful to reduce complement activation and tissue injury during the reperfusion of an ischaemic liver. PMID:11737055

  3. Endothelial targeting with C1-inhibitor reduces complement activation in vitro and during ex vivo reperfusion of pig liver.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschini, L; Gobbo, G; Gatti, S; Caccamo, L; Prato, P; Maggioni, M; Braidotti, P; Di Stefano, R; Fassati, L R

    2001-12-01

    Tissue damage during cold storage and reperfusion remains a major obstacle to wider use of transplantation. Vascular endothelial cells and complement activation are thought to be involved in the inflammatory reactions following reperfusion, so endothelial targeting of complement inhibitors is of great interest. Using an in vitro model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cold storage and an animal model of ex vivo liver reperfusion after cold ischaemia, we assessed the effect of C1-INH on cell functions and liver damage. We found that in vitro C1-INH bound to HUVEC in a manner depending on the duration of cold storage. Cell-bound C1-INH was functionally active since retained the ability to inhibit exogenous C1s. To assess the ability of cell-bound C1-INH to prevent complement activation during organ reperfusion, we added C1-INH to the preservation solution in an animal model of extracorporeal liver reperfusion. Ex vivo liver reperfusion after 8 h of cold ischaemia resulted in plasma C3 activation and reduction of total serum haemolytic activity, and at tissue level deposition of C3 associated with variable level of inflammatory cell infiltration and tissue damage. These findings were reduced when livers were stored in preservation solution containing C1-INH. Immunohistochemical analysis of C1-INH-treated livers showed immunoreactivity localized on the sinusoidal pole of the liver trabeculae, linked to sinusoidal endothelium, so it is likely that the protective effect was due to C1-INH retained by the livers. These results suggest that adding C1-INH to the preservation solution may be useful to reduce complement activation and tissue injury during the reperfusion of an ischaemic liver.

  4. A Gammaherpesvirus Complement Regulatory Protein Promotes Initiation of Infection by Activation of Protein Kinase Akt/PKB

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Beatrix; Adler, Barbara; Jonjic, Stipan; Stewart, James P.; Adler, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Background Viruses have evolved to evade the host's complement system. The open reading frames 4 (ORF4) of gammaherpesviruses encode homologs of regulators of complement activation (RCA) proteins, which inhibit complement activation at the level of C3 and C4 deposition. Besides complement regulation, these proteins are involved in heparan sulfate and glycosaminoglycan binding, and in case of MHV-68, also in viral DNA synthesis in macrophages. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we made use of MHV-68 to study the role of ORF4 during infection of fibroblasts. While attachment and penetration of virions lacking the RCA protein were not affected, we observed a delayed delivery of the viral genome to the nucleus of infected cells. Analysis of the phosphorylation status of a variety of kinases revealed a significant reduction in phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt in cells infected with ORF4 mutant virus, when compared to cells infected with wt virus. Consistent with a role of Akt activation in initial stages of infection, inhibition of Akt signaling in wt virus infected cells resulted in a phenotype resembling the phenotype of the ORF4 mutant virus, and activation of Akt by addition of insulin partially reversed the phenotype of the ORF4 mutant virus. Importantly, the homologous ORF4 of KSHV was able to rescue the phenotype of the MHV-68 ORF4 mutant, indicating that ORF4 is functionally conserved and that ORF4 of KSHV might have a similar function in infection initiation. Conclusions/Significance In summary, our studies demonstrate that ORF4 contributes to efficient infection by activation of the protein kinase Akt and thus reveal a novel function of a gammaherpesvirus RCA protein. PMID:20657771

  5. Cytoplasmic Drosha activity generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lisheng; Chen, Kevin; Youngren, Brenda; Kulina, Julia; Yang, Acong; Guo, Zhengyu; Li, Jin; Yu, Peng; Gu, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    RNase III enzyme Drosha interacts with DGCR8 to form the Microprocessor, initiating canonical microRNA (miRNA) maturation in the nucleus. Here, we re-evaluated where Drosha functions in cells using Drosha and/or DGCR8 knock out (KO) cells and cleavage reporters. Interestingly, a truncated Drosha mutant located exclusively in the cytoplasm cleaved pri-miRNA effectively in a DGCR8-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that in vitro generated pri-miRNAs when transfected into cells could be processed to mature miRNAs in the cytoplasm. These results indicate the existence of cytoplasmic Drosha (c-Drosha) activity. Although a subset of endogenous pri-miRNAs become enriched in the cytoplasm of Drosha KO cells, it remains unclear whether pri-miRNA processing is the main function of c-Drosha. We identified two novel in-frame Drosha isoforms generated by alternative splicing in both HEK293T and HeLa cells. One isoform loses the putative nuclear localization signal, generating c-Drosha. Further analysis indicated that the c-Drosha isoform is abundant in multiple cell lines, dramatically variable among different human tissues and upregulated in multiple tumors, suggesting that c-Drosha plays a unique role in gene regulation. Our results reveal a new layer of regulation on the miRNA pathway and provide novel insights into the ever-evolving functions of Drosha. PMID:27471035

  6. Secondary Cell Wall Polymers of Enterococcus faecalis Are Critical for Resistance to Complement Activation via Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Geiss-Liebisch, Stefan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Beczala, Agnieszka; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Kruszynska, Karolina; Repp, Christian; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes; Theilacker, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is part of our first line of defense against invading pathogens. The strategies used by Enterococcus faecalis to evade recognition by human complement are incompletely understood. In this study, we identified an insertional mutant of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthesis gene tagB in E. faecalis V583 that exhibited an increased susceptibility to complement-mediated killing by neutrophils. Further analysis revealed that increased killing of the mutant was due to a higher rate of phagocytosis by neutrophils, which correlated with higher C3b deposition on the bacterial surface. Our studies indicated that complement activation via the lectin pathway was much stronger on the tagB mutant compared with wild type. In concordance, we found an increased binding of the key lectin pathway components mannose-binding lectin and mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on the mutant. To understand the mechanism of lectin pathway inhibition by E. faecalis, we purified and characterized cell wall carbohydrates of E. faecalis wild type and V583ΔtagB. NMR analysis revealed that the mutant strain lacked two WTAs with a repeating unit of →6)[α-l-Rhap-(1→3)]β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P and →6) β-d-Glcp-(1→3) [α-d-Glcp-(1→4)]-β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P→, respectively (Rbo, ribitol). In addition, compositional changes in the enterococcal rhamnopolysaccharide were noticed. Our study indicates that in E. faecalis, modification of peptidoglycan by secondary cell wall polymers is critical to evade recognition by the complement system. PMID:22908219

  7. A Novel Interaction between Complement Inhibitor C4b-binding Protein and Plasminogen That Enhances Plasminogen Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Talens, Simone; Grandits, Alexander M.; Blom, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The complement, coagulation, and fibrinolytic systems are crucial for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To date numerous interactions and cross-talks have been identified between these cascades. In line with this, here we propose a novel, hitherto unknown interaction between the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and plasminogen of the fibrinolytic pathway. Binding of C4BP to Streptococcus pneumoniae is a known virulence mechanism of this pathogen and it was increased in the presence of plasminogen. Interestingly, the acute phase variant of C4BP lacking the β-chain and protein S binds plasminogen much stronger than the main isoform containing the β-chain and protein S. Indeed, the complement control protein (CCP) 8 domain of C4BP, which would otherwise be sterically hindered by the β-chain, primarily mediates this interaction. Moreover, the lysine-binding sites in plasminogen kringle domains facilitate the C4BP-plasminogen interaction. Furthermore, C4BP readily forms complexes with plasminogen in fluid phase and such complexes are present in human serum and plasma. Importantly, whereas the presence of plasminogen did not affect the factor I cofactor activity of C4BP, the activation of plasminogen by urokinase-type plasminogen activator to active plasmin was significantly augmented in the presence of C4BP. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel interaction between two proteins of the complement and fibrinolytic system. Most complexes might be formed during the acute phase of inflammation and have an effect on the homeostasis at the site of injury or acute inflammation. PMID:26067271

  8. Critical Role and Therapeutic Control of the Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation in an Abortion-Prone Mouse Mating.

    PubMed

    Petitbarat, Marie; Durigutto, Paolo; Macor, Paolo; Bulla, Roberta; Palmioli, Alessandro; Bernardi, Anna; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Ledee, Nathalie; Chaouat, Gerard; Tedesco, Francesco

    2015-12-15

    The abortion-prone mating combination CBA/J × DBA/2 has been recognized as a model of preeclampsia, and complement activation has been implicated in the high rate of pregnancy loss observed in CBA/J mice. We have analyzed the implantation sites collected from DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice for the deposition of the complement recognition molecules using CBA/J mated with BALB/c mice as a control group. MBL-A was observed in the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2 combination in the absence of MBL-C and was undetectable in BALB/c-mated CBA/J mice. Conversely, C1q was present in both mating combinations. Searching for other complement components localized at the implantation sites of CBA/J × DBA/2, we found C4 and C3, but we failed to reveal C1r. These data suggest that complement is activated through the lectin pathway and proceeds to completion of the activation sequence as revealed by C9 deposition. MBL-A was detected as early as 3.5 d of pregnancy, and MBL-A deficiency prevented pregnancy loss in the abortion-prone mating combination. The contribution of the terminal complex to miscarriage was supported by the finding that pregnancy failure was largely inhibited by the administration of neutralizing Ab to C5. Treatment of DBA/2-mated CBA/J mice with Polyman2 that binds to MBL-A with high affinity proved to be highly effective in controlling the activation of the lectin pathway and in preventing fetal loss. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Protease inhibitor nafamostat mesilate attenuates complement activation and improves function of xenografts in a discordant lung perfusion model.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Anti-complement activity of nafamostat mesilate (FUT-175) is strong including its variety of pharmacological effects. The effect of FUT-175 for xenografts in an ex vivo guinea pig-to-rat lung perfusion model was evaluated. Heparinized Lewis rat blood was used to perfuse the lungs in three groups (n = 6 each). Group I used Lewis rat left lung for donor, Group X used guinea pig left lung for donor, and Group XF used guinea pig left lung for donor, which was perfused with Lewis rat blood with 0.2 mg/ml of FUT-175. Complement activity causing 50% hemolysis (CH50) in the perfusion blood and pulmonary function either before or during perfusion were serially measured. Pathological assessments of the lungs were also carried out after perfusion. The duration of satisfactory pulmonary function was significantly increased in Group XF. Complement activity causing 50% hemolysis in Group XF decreased more significantly compared to Group X. FUT-175 suppressed both the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and airway resistance, and the decrease in dynamic lung compliance. In Group X, pathology showed intra-alveolar hemorrhage, perivascular edema, and medial thickening with endothelial swelling of the pulmonary arteries. In Group XF, less changes were observed compared to Group X. Group X showed deposition of IgM, IgG, and C3 at the endothelium of arteries, which was fewer in Group XF, and even fewer in Group I. This study suggests that FUT-175 inhibited complement activation and improved lung xenograft function. FUT-175 ameliorates hyperacute rejection in a guinea pig-to-rat ex vivo xenogeneic lung perfusion model. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides can activate the early components of complement classical pathway in a C1q-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschini, L; Canziani, S; Bottasso, B; Cugno, M; Braidotti, P; Agostoni, A

    1999-01-01

    β-Amyloid (β-A) accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is presumably involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, on account of its neurotoxicity and complement-activating ability. Although assembly of β-A in particular aggregates seems to be crucial, soluble non-fibrillar β-A may also be involved. Non-fibrillar β-A does not bind C1q, so we investigated alternative mechanisms of β-A-dependent complement activation in vitro. On incubation with normal human plasma, non-fibrillar β-A 1-42, and truncated peptide 1–28, induced dose-dependent activation of C1s and C4, sparing C3, as assessed by densitometric analysis of immunostained membrane after SDS–PAGE and Western blotting. The mechanism of C4 activation was not dependent on C1q, because non-fibrillar β-A can still activate C1s and C4 in plasma genetically deficient in C1q (C1qd). In Factor XII-deficient plasma (F.XIId) the amount of cleaved C4 was about 5–10% less that in C1qd and in normal EDTA plasma; the reconstitution of F.XIId plasma with physiologic concentrations of F.XII resulted in an increased (8–15%) β-A-dependent cleavage of C4. Thus our results indicate that the C1q-independent activation of C1 and C4 can be partially mediated by the activation products of contact system. Since the activation of contact system and of C4 leads to generation of several humoral inflammatory peptides, non-fibrillar β-A might play a role in initiating the early inflammatory reactions leading to a multistep cascade contributing to neuronal and clinical dysfunction of AD brain. PMID:10193429

  11. Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptides can activate the early components of complement classical pathway in a C1q-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschini, L; Canziani, S; Bottasso, B; Cugno, M; Braidotti, P; Agostoni, A

    1999-03-01

    beta-Amyloid (beta-A) accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is presumably involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, on account of its neurotoxicity and complement-activating ability. Although assembly of beta-A in particular aggregates seems to be crucial, soluble non-fibrillar beta-A may also be involved. Non-fibrillar beta-A does not bind C1q, so we investigated alternative mechanisms of beta-A-dependent complement activation in vitro. On incubation with normal human plasma, non-fibrillar beta-A 1-42, and truncated peptide 1-28, induced dose-dependent activation of C1s and C4, sparing C3, as assessed by densitometric analysis of immunostained membrane after SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The mechanism of C4 activation was not dependent on C1q, because non-fibrillar beta-A can still activate C1s and C4 in plasma genetically deficient in C1q (C1qd). In Factor XII-deficient plasma (F.XIId) the amount of cleaved C4 was about 5-10% less that in C1qd and in normal EDTA plasma; the reconstitution of F.XIId plasma with physiologic concentrations of F.XII resulted in an increased (8-15%) beta-A-dependent cleavage of C4. Thus our results indicate that the C1q-independent activation of C1 and C4 can be partially mediated by the activation products of contact system. Since the activation of contact system and of C4 leads to generation of several humoral inflammatory peptides, non-fibrillar beta-A might play a role in initiating the early inflammatory reactions leading to a multistep cascade contributing to neuronal and clinical dysfunction of AD brain.

  12. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    PubMed

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  13. Activation of the complement system in baboons challenged with live Escherichia coli: correlation with mortality and evidence for a biphasic activation pattern.

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-01-01

    Activation of the complement system was studied in baboons that were challenged with live Escherichia coli. In the group challenged with a lethal dose (n = 4), the complement activation parameters C3b/c, C4b/c, and C5b-9 increased 13, 5, and 12 times the baseline value, respectively, during the first 6 h after the E. coli infusion, whereas in the group challenged with a sublethal dose (n = 10), they increased only moderately, by 2 to 3 times the baseline value. However, in this latter group, a more pronounced activation occurred at 24 h. Subsequent experiments showed that this second phase in complement activation started at 6 h after the challenge, at which time infused microorganisms had been cleared from the circulation. The simultaneous increase in C-reactive protein with this second phase suggested an endogenous activation mechanism involving this acute-phase protein. Levels of inactivated (modified) C1 inhibitor also increased in both groups, with peak levels of 2.5 times the baseline value at 24 h in the sublethal group and of 4 times at 6 h after the challenge in the lethal group. Thus, activation of complement in this animal model for sepsis occurs in a biphasic pattern, the initial phase mediated by the bacteria and the later phase mediated by an endogenous mechanism possibly involving C-reactive protein. The differences in complement activation between animals with lethal or sublethal sepsis support the hypothesis that complement activation contributes to the lethal complications of sepsis. PMID:8406818

  14. Activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 signaling induces CD46 expression and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Huang, Mei; Gritsko, Tanya; Karras, Jim; Enkemann, Steve; Mesa, Tania; Nam, Sangkil; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2007-08-01

    CD46 is one of the complement-regulatory proteins expressed on the surface of normal and tumor cells for protection against complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Cancer cells need to access the blood circulation for continued growth and metastasis, thus exposing themselves to destruction by complement system components. Previous studies have established that the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor is persistently activated in a wide variety of human cancer cells and primary tumor tissues compared with their normal counterparts. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified the CD46 gene as a target for activated STAT3 signaling in human breast and prostate cancer cells. The CD46 promoter contains two binding sites for activated STAT3 and mutations introduced into the major site abolished STAT3 binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of STAT3 to the CD46 promoter. CD46 promoter activity is induced by activation of STAT3 and blocked by a dominant-negative form of STAT3 in luciferase reporter assays. CD46 mRNA expression is induced by interleukin-6 and by transient transfection of normal human epithelial cells with a persistently active mutant construct of STAT3, STAT3C. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of STAT3-mediated CD46 cell surface expression sensitizes DU145 prostate cancer cells to cytotoxicity in an in vitro complement lysis assay using rabbit anti-DU145 antiserum and rabbit complement. These results show that activated STAT3 signaling induces the CD46 promoter and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby oncogenic signaling contributes to tumor cell evasion of antibody-mediated immunity.

  15. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  16. CsMAP34, a teleost MAP with dual role: A promoter of MASP-assisted complement activation and a regulator of immune cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo-fei; Li, Jun; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    In teleost fish, the immune functions of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) associated protein (MAP) and MBL associated serine protease (MASP) are scarcely investigated. In the present study, we examined the biological properties both MAP (CsMAP34) and MASP (CsMASP1) molecules from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). We found that CsMAP34 and CsMASP1 expressions occurred in nine different tissues and were upregulated by bacterial challenge. CsMAP34 protein was detected in blood, especially during bacterial infection. Recombinant CsMAP34 (rCsMAP34) bound C. semilaevis MBL (rCsBML) when the latter was activated by bacteria, while recombinant CsMASP1 (rCsMASP1) bound activated rCsBML only in the presence of rCsMAP34. rCsMAP34 stimulated the hemolytic and bactericidal activities of serum complement, whereas anti-CsMAP34 antibody blocked complement activities. Knockdown of CsMASP1 in C. semilaevis resulted in significant inhibition of complement activities. Furthermore, rCsMAP34 interacted directly with peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and enhanced the respiratory burst, acid phosphatase activity, chemotactic activity, and gene expression of PBL. These results indicate for the first time that a teleost MAP acts one hand as a regulator that promotes the lectin pathway of complement activation via its ability to recruit MBL to MASP, and other hand as a modulator of immune cell activity. PMID:28008939

  17. Structural characterization of a homogalacturonan from Capparis spinosa L. fruits and anti-complement activity of its sulfated derivative.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijun; Wang, Hongwei; Shi, Songshan; Duan, Jinyou; Wang, Shunchun

    2012-08-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide CSPS-2B-2 with a molecular mass of 8.8 kDa, was obtained from the fruits of Capparis spinosa L. Chemical and NMR spectral analysis verified CSPS-2B-2 was a linear poly-(1-4)-α-D-galactopyranosyluronic acid in which 12.9±0.4% of carboxyl groups existed as methyl ester and 2.6±0.1% of D-GalpA residues were acetylated. A sulfated derivative Sul-2B-2 with a sulfation degree of 0.88±0.02 was prepared via the substitution of C-2 and/or C-3 of GalpA residues in CSPS-2B-2. Bioassay on the complement and coagulation system demonstrated that Sul-2B-2 (CH(50): 3.5±0.2 μg/mL) had a stronger inhibitory effect on the activation of complement system through the classic pathway than that of heparin (CH(50): 8.9±0.3 μg/mL). Interestingly, Sul-2B-2 at low dose even middle dose (for example 52 μg/mL) had no effect on coagulation system, which was totally different from heparin. Thus, our observation indicated that Sul-2B-2 was more efficient than heparin in inhibiting the activation of the complement system through classical pathway and exhibiting a relatively less anti-coagulant activity. These results suggested that the sulfated derivative Sul-2B-2 prepared from the homogalacturonan in the fruits of Capparis spinosa L, might be a promising drug candidate in case of necessary therapeutic complement inhibition.

  18. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  19. Activation of the complement system by (1----3)-beta-D-glucans having different degrees of branching and different ultrastructures.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ohno, N; Saito, K; Yadomae, T

    1992-06-01

    Activation of the alternative (APC) and classical (CPC) pathways of complement by fungal (1----3)-beta-D-glucans having different degrees of branching (DB) and different conformations were examined by using human serum and plasma. The glucans used in this study were curdlan (no branch; 0/1), grifolan (one branch in every third main chain unit; 1/3), schizophyllan (1/3), SSG (1/2), and OL-2(2/3). Triple or single helix conformer of these glucans were prepared by heating at 150 degrees C or dissolution in sodium hydroxide. Activation of APC by these glucans were dependent on incubation time, concentration, molecular weight, and DB. Interestingly, the triple helix conformer of all glucans tested activated APC stronger than a single helix one. The activity of branched glucans in plasma was weaker than those in serum. On the other hand, in the case of CPC, a single helix conformer activated CPC stronger than a triple helix one, and the activity was dependent on DB. Activation of CPC by a single helix conformer was thought to be dependent on the binding of beta-glucan to immunoglobulin in serum, because the complex was clearly detected by gel permeation chromatography only in the case of single helix one. From these results, it appears that the different conformers were recognized by the host complement systems in different ways. (1----3)-beta-D-Glucan is one of the major constituents of fungal cell wall and is thought to be clearly recognized by the host immune systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Astrocyte-Microglia Cross Talk through Complement Activation Modulates Amyloid Pathology in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Hong; Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Chiang, Angie C.-A.; Aithmitti, Nadia; Jankowsky, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we identified a neuron–glia signaling pathway whereby Aβ acts as an upstream activator of astroglial nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), leading to the release of complement C3, which acts on the neuronal C3a receptor (C3aR) to influence dendritic morphology and cognitive function. Here we report that astrocytic complement activation also regulates Aβ dynamics in vitro and amyloid pathology in AD mouse models through microglial C3aR. We show that in primary microglial cultures, acute C3 or C3a activation promotes, whereas chronic C3/C3a treatment attenuates, microglial phagocytosis and that the effect of chronic C3 exposure can be blocked by cotreatment with a C3aR antagonist and by genetic deletion of C3aR. We further demonstrate that Aβ pathology and neuroinflammation in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice are worsened by astroglial NF-κB hyperactivation and resulting C3 elevation, whereas treatment with the C3aR antagonist (C3aRA) ameliorates plaque load and microgliosis. Our studies define a complement-dependent intercellular cross talk in which neuronal overproduction of Aβ activates astroglial NF-κB to elicit extracellular release of C3. This promotes a pathogenic cycle by which C3 in turn interacts with neuronal and microglial C3aR to alter cognitive function and impair Aβ phagocytosis. This feedforward loop can be effectively blocked by C3aR inhibition, supporting the therapeutic potential of C3aR antagonists under chronic neuroinflammation conditions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The complement pathway is activated in Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that the central complement factor C3 secreted from astrocytes interacts with microglial C3a receptor (C3aR) to mediate β-amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in AD mouse models. Our study provides support for targeting C3aR as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease. PMID

  1. Astrocyte-Microglia Cross Talk through Complement Activation Modulates Amyloid Pathology in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lian, Hong; Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Chiang, Angie C-A; Aithmitti, Nadia; Jankowsky, Joanna L; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-13

    Increasing evidence supports a role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we identified a neuron-glia signaling pathway whereby Aβ acts as an upstream activator of astroglial nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), leading to the release of complement C3, which acts on the neuronal C3a receptor (C3aR) to influence dendritic morphology and cognitive function. Here we report that astrocytic complement activation also regulates Aβ dynamics in vitro and amyloid pathology in AD mouse models through microglial C3aR. We show that in primary microglial cultures, acute C3 or C3a activation promotes, whereas chronic C3/C3a treatment attenuates, microglial phagocytosis and that the effect of chronic C3 exposure can be blocked by cotreatment with a C3aR antagonist and by genetic deletion of C3aR. We further demonstrate that Aβ pathology and neuroinflammation in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice are worsened by astroglial NF-κB hyperactivation and resulting C3 elevation, whereas treatment with the C3aR antagonist (C3aRA) ameliorates plaque load and microgliosis. Our studies define a complement-dependent intercellular cross talk in which neuronal overproduction of Aβ activates astroglial NF-κB to elicit extracellular release of C3. This promotes a pathogenic cycle by which C3 in turn interacts with neuronal and microglial C3aR to alter cognitive function and impair Aβ phagocytosis. This feedforward loop can be effectively blocked by C3aR inhibition, supporting the therapeutic potential of C3aR antagonists under chronic neuroinflammation conditions. The complement pathway is activated in Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that the central complement factor C3 secreted from astrocytes interacts with microglial C3a receptor (C3aR) to mediate β-amyloid pathology and neuroinflammation in AD mouse models. Our study provides support for targeting C3aR as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 the authors

  2. Differential effects of complement activation products c3a and c5a on cardiovascular function in hypertensive pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Opacich, Jonathan W; Peterson, Jenna M; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Regal, Ronald R; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset pre-eclampsia is characterized by decreased placental perfusion, new-onset hypertension, angiogenic imbalance, and endothelial dysfunction associated with excessive activation of the innate immune complement system. Although our previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of complement activation attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension using the rat reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, the important product(s) of complement activation has yet to be identified. We hypothesized that antagonism of receptors for complement activation products C3a and C5a would improve vascular function and attenuate RUPP hypertension. On gestational day (GD) 14, rats underwent sham surgery or vascular clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta (RUPP). Rats were treated once daily with the C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA), PMX51 (acetyl-F-[Orn-P-(D-Cha)-WR]), the C3a receptor antagonist (C3aRA), SB290157 (N(2)-[(2,2-diphenylethoxy)acetyl]-l-arginine), or vehicle from GD 14-18. Both the C3aRA and C5aRA attenuated placental ischemia-induced hypertension without affecting the decreased fetal weight or decreased concentration of free circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also present in this model. The C5aRA, but not the C3aRA, attenuated placental ischemia-induced increase in heart rate and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. The C3aRA abrogated the acute pressor response to C3a peptide injection, but it also unexpectedly attenuated the placental ischemia-induced increase in C3a, suggesting nonreceptor-mediated effects. Overall, these results indicate that both C3a and C5a are important products of complement activation that mediate the hypertension regardless of the reduction in free plasma VEGF. The mechanism by which C3a contributes to placental ischemia-induced hypertension appears to be distinct from that of C5a, and management of pregnancy-induced hypertension is likely to require a broad anti

  3. Treatment of platelets with riboflavin and ultraviolet light mediates complement activation and suppresses monocyte interleukin-12 production in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Loh, Y S; Dean, M M; Johnson, L; Marks, D C

    2015-11-01

    Pathogen inactivation (PI) and storage may alter the immunomodulatory capacity of platelets (PLTs). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of PI (Riboflavin and ultraviolet light treatment) and storage on the capacity of PLTs to induce cytokine responses in recipient inflammatory cells. A pool and split design was used to prepare untreated and PI-treated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates (PCs). Samples were taken on days 2 and 7 postcollection and incubated with ABO/RhD-matched fresh whole blood for 6 h with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The intracellular production of IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α and MIP-1β in monocytes and neutrophils was assessed using flow cytometry. Complement proteins in PLT supernatants were measured using a cytometric bead array. PLTs and PLT supernatant (both untreated and PI-treated) resulted in modulation of intracellular MIP-1β and IL-12 production in monocytes. Compared to untreated PLTs, PI-treated PLTs resulted in significantly lower LPS-induced monocyte IL-12 production (day 7). The concentration of C3a and C5a (and their desArg forms) was significantly increased in PLT supernatants following PI. PI results in decreased LPS-induced monocyte IL-12 production and increased complement activation. The association between platelet-induced complement activation and IL-12 production warrants further investigation. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  4. Blood-brain barrier disruption and complement activation in the brain following rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Baker, E A; Tian, Y; Adler, S; Verbalis, J G

    2000-10-01

    In previous studies we developed a rat model in which demyelination is reproducibly produced following rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia and demonstrated that the development of demyelination in this model is strongly associated with NMR indices of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Because complement is toxic to oligodendrocytes, we evaluated the hypothesis that BBB disruption precipitated by correction of hypoosmolality is followed by an influx of complement into the brain, which then contributes to the demyelination that occurs under these conditions. We studied four groups of rats with immunocytochemical analysis using primary antibodies to IgG and the C3d split-fragment of activated complement: (1) normal rats; (2) rats in which hyponatremia was maintained for 7 days; (3) chronically hyponatremic rats in which the plasma [Na(+)] was rapidly corrected with hypertonic saline administration 20 h prior to perfusion; and (4) chronically hyponatremic rats in which the plasma [Na(+)] was rapidly corrected with hypertonic saline administration 5 days prior to perfusion. In normonatremic and uncorrected hyponatremic rats only background staining was observed in areas lacking a BBB and in blood vessel walls, whereas marked increases in IgG and C3d staining were seen in the brains of rats both 20 h and 5 days after rapid correction of hyponatremia. The staining intensity was significantly correlated with the degree of neurological impairment. These results provide evidence for functional BBB disruption following rapid correction of hyponatremia and support the hypothesis that complement activation may be involved in the pathogenesis of osmotic demyelination.

  5. Structural features and complement-fixing activity of pectin from three Brassica oleracea varieties: white cabbage, kale, and red kale.

    PubMed

    Samuelsen, Anne Berit; Westereng, Bjørge; Yousif, Osman; Holtekjølen, Ann Katrin; Michaelsen, Terje E; Knutsen, Svein H

    2007-02-01

    Leaves of different cabbage species are used both as food and as wound healing remedies in traditional medicine. This supposed wound healing activity might be connected to presence of immunomodulating water soluble polysaccharides. To study this, three different cabbage varieties, white cabbage (W), kale (K), and red kale (RK), were pretreated with 80% ethanol and then extracted with water at 50 degrees C and 100 degrees C for isolation of polysaccharide-containing fractions. The fractions were analyzed for monosaccharide composition, glycosidic linkages, Mw distribution, protein content, and phenolic compounds and then tested for complement-fixing activity. All fractions contained pectin type polysaccharides with linkages corresponding to homogalacturonan and hairy regions. Those extracted at 50 degrees C contained higher amounts of neutral side chains and were more active in the complement-fixation test than those extracted at 100 degrees C. The fractions can be ranged by decreasing activity: K-50 > RK-50 > W-50 approximately = K-100 > RK100 approximately = W-100. Studies on structure-activity relationships (SAR) employing multivariate statistical analysis strongly suggest that the magnitude of the measured activity is influenced by the content of certain side chains in the polymers. High activity correlates to large neutral side chains with high amounts of (1-->6)- and (1-->3,6)-linked Gal and low amounts of (1-->4)-linked GalA but not on molecular weight distribution of the polymers.

  6. Complement activation as a bioequivalence issue relevant to the development of generic liposomes and other nanoparticulate drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Szebeni, Janos; Storm, Gert

    2015-12-18

    Liposomes are known to activate the complement (C) system, which can lead in vivo to a hypersensitivity syndrome called C activation-related pseudoallergy (CARPA). CARPA has been getting increasing attention as a safety risk of i.v. therapy with liposomes, whose testing is now recommended in bioequivalence evaluations of generic liposomal drug candidates. This review highlights the adverse consequences of C activation, the unique symptoms of CARPA triggered by essentially all i.v. administered liposomal drugs, and the various features of vesicles influencing this adverse immune effect. For the case of Doxil, we also address the mechanism of C activation and the opsonization vs. long circulation (stealth) paradox. In reviewing the methods of assessing C activation and CARPA, we delineate the most sensitive porcine model and an algorithm for stepwise evaluation of the CARPA risk of i.v. liposomes, which are proposed for standardization for preclinical toxicology evaluation of liposomal and other nanoparticulate drug candidates. - Highlights: • Outlining of difficulties in generic development of liposomal drugs. • New regulatory requirements to evaluate CARPA in preclinical studies. • Review of complement activation by liposomes and its adverse consequences (CARPA). • Assays of C activation in vitro and CARPA in vivo, with the porcine test in focus. • Decision tree how to handle the risk of CARPA assessed by a battery of tests.

  7. Regulation of Complement and Contact System Activation via C1 Inhibitor Potentiation and Factor XIIa Activity Modulation by Sulfated Glycans – Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Lahrsen, Eric; Alban, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The serpin C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is the only regulator of classical complement activation as well as the major regulator of the contact system. Its importance is demonstrated by hereditary angioedema (HAE), a severe disease with potentially life-threatening attacks due to deficiency or dysfunction of C1-INH. C1-INH replacement is the therapy of choice in HAE. In addition, C1-INH showed to have beneficial effects in other diseases characterized by inappropriate complement and contact system activation. Due to some limitations of its clinical application, there is a need for improving the efficacy of therapeutically applied C1-INH or to enhance the activity of endogenous C1-INH. Given the known potentiating effect of heparin on C1-INH, sulfated glycans (SG) may be such candidates. The aim of this study was to characterize suitable SG by evaluating structure-activity relationships. For this, more than 40 structurally distinct SG were examined for their effects on C1-INH, C1s and FXIIa. The SG turned out to potentiate the C1s inhibition by C1-INH without any direct influence on C1s. Their potentiating activity proved to depend on their degree of sulfation, molecular mass as well as glycan structure. In contrast, the SG had no effect on the FXIIa inhibition by C1-INH, but structure-dependently modulated the activity of FXIIa. Among the tested SG, β-1,3-glucan sulfates with a Mr ≤ 10 000 were identified as most promising lead candidates for the development of a glycan-based C1-INH amplifier. In conclusion, the obtained information on structural characteristics of SG favoring C1-INH potentiation represent an useful elementary basis for the development of compounds improving the potency of C1-INH in diseases and clinical situations characterized by inappropriate activation of complement and contact system. PMID:27783665

  8. TLR-Induced Murine Dendritic Cell (DC) Activation Requires DC-Intrinsic Complement.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joong-Hyuk; Strainic, Michael G; Liu, Jinbo; Zhang, Weijia; Yi, Zhengzi; Medof, M Edward; Heeger, Peter S

    2017-07-01

    Induction of proinflammatory T cell immunity is augmented by innate dendritic cell (DC) maturation commonly initiated by TLR signaling. We demonstrate that ligation of TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9 induces murine DC production of complement components and local production of the anaphylatoxin C5a. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo analyses show that TLR-induced DC maturation, as assessed by surface phenotype, expression profiling by gene array, and functional ability to stimulate T cell responses, requires autocrine C3a receptor and C5a receptor (C3ar1/C5ar1) signaling. Studies using bone marrow chimeric animals and Foxp3-GFP/ERT2-Cre/dTomato fate-mapping mice show that TLR-initiated DC autocrine C3ar1/C5ar1 signaling causes expansion of effector T cells and instability of regulatory T cells and contributes to T cell-dependent transplant rejection. Together, our data position immune cell-derived complement production and autocrine/paracrine C3ar1/C5ar1 signaling as crucial intermediary processes that link TLR stimulation to DC maturation and the subsequent development of effector T cell responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Backdiffusion or bicarbonate may stimulate complement activation during haemodialysis with low-flux membranes.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, L; Stegmayr, B G; Wehle, B

    1994-03-01

    Backdiffusion of dialysate during haemodialysis with low-flux membranes and the use of bicarbonate dialysatebase, may increase the risk for contamination. The influence on the complement system was studied by altering the flux of acetate or bicarbonate dialysate base across the membrane. Eight patients were dialysed with a transmembrane pressure of 100 mm Hg (group I) during the first 60 min to standardize the ultrafiltration (UF) and acetate as dialysate. In eight other patients (group II) the UF was "set at zero" ml during the first 60 min using an FCM 10-1 monitor (Gambro) and bicarbonate as base. The groups were dialysed three times on two hollow-fiber membranes made of Hemophan and cellulose acetate (CA). Blood samples were taken at 0, 15, 60 and 180 min, and analysed for plasma protein, haematocrit and complement C3d. In group II there was a reduction in plasma protein concentration at 15 and 60 min (p < 0.002) for Hemophan and at 60 min (p < 0.01) using CA. C3d was increased at 15 min for both filters (p < 0.03). The reduction of protein in group II was followed by changes in the haematocrit, indicating a backdiffusion of dialysate, which may contribute to the concomittant increase in C3d.

  10. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes.

  11. Activation of the Complement Classical Pathway (C1q Binding) by Mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Nogueras, Maria Mercedes; Aguilar, Alicia; Rubires, Xavier; Albertí, Sebastian; Benedí, Vicente Javier; Tomás, Juan M.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of killing of Aeromonas hydrophila serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway has been studied. The bacterial cell surface component that binds C1q more efficiently was identified as a major outer membrane protein of 39 kDa, presumably the porin II described by D. Jeanteur, N. Gletsu, F. Pattus, and J. T. Buckley (Mol. Microbiol. 6:3355–3363, 1992), of these microorganisms. We have demonstrated that the purified form of porin II binds C1q and activates the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted of factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular to rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the outer membrane protein. The strains possessing O-antigen lipopolysaccharide bind less C1q than the serum-sensitive strains, because the outer membrane protein is less accessible, and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Finally, a similar or identical outer membrane protein (presumably porin II) that binds C1q was shown to be present in strains from the most common mesophilic Aeromonas O serogroups. PMID:9673268

  12. C1q binding and activation of the complement classical pathway by Klebsiella pneumoniae outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Albertí, S; Marqués, G; Camprubí, S; Merino, S; Tomás, J M; Vivanco, F; Benedí, V J

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway have been studied. The bacterial cell surface components that bind C1q more efficiently were identified as two major outer membrane proteins, presumably the porins of this bacterial species. These two outer membrane proteins were isolated from a representative serum-sensitive strain. We have demonstrated that in their purified form, they bind C1q and activate the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted in factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular the rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the two outer membrane proteins. The antibody-independent binding of C1q to serum-sensitive strains was independent of the presence of capsular polysaccharide, while strains possessing lipopolysaccharide O antigen bind less C1q and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Images PMID:8432605

  13. Lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 can activate native complement C3 in absence of C4 and/or C2.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Sadam; Demopulos, Gregory; Dudler, Thomas; Yabuki, Munehisa; Wood, Christi L; Cummings, W Jason; Tjoelker, Larry W; Fujita, Teizo; Sacks, Steven; Garred, Peter; Andrew, Peter; Sim, Robert B; Lachmann, Peter J; Wallis, Russell; Lynch, Nicholas; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J

    2017-05-01

    All 3 activation pathways of complement-the classic pathway (CP), the alternative pathway, and the lectin pathway (LP)- converge into a common central event: the cleavage and activation of the abundant third complement component, C3, via formation of C3-activating enzymes (C3 convertases). The fourth complement component, C4, and the second component, C2, are indispensable constituents of the C3 convertase complex, C4bC2a, which is formed by both the CP and the LP. Whereas in the absence of C4, CP can no longer activate C3, LP retains a residual but physiologically critical capacity to convert native C3 into its activation fragments, C3a and C3b. This residual C4 and/or C2 bypass route is dependent on LP-specific mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2. By using various serum sources with defined complement deficiencies, we demonstrate that, under physiologic conditions LP-specific C4 and/or C2 bypass activation of C3 is mediated by direct cleavage of native C3 by mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 bound to LP-activation complexes captured on ligand-coated surfaces.-Yaseen, S., Demopulos, G., Dudler, T., Yabuki, M., Wood, C. L., Cummings, W. J., Tjoelker, L. W., Fujita, T., Sacks, S., Garred, P., Andrew, P., Sim, R. B., Lachmann, P. J., Wallis, R., Lynch, N., Schwaeble, W. J. Lectin pathway effector enzyme mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 can activate native complement C3 in absence of C4 and/or C2. © FASEB.

  14. Complement in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Veerhuis, Robert; Nielsen, Henrietta M.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is considered to be an immune privileged site, because the blood-brain barrier limits entry of blood borne cells and proteins into the central nervous system (CNS). As a result, the detection and clearance of invading microorganisms and senescent cells as well as surplus neurotransmitters, aged and glycated proteins, in order to maintain a healthy environment for neuronal and glial cells, is largely confined to the innate immune system. In recent years it has become clear that many factors of innate immunity are expressed throughout the brain. Neuronal and glial cells express Toll like receptors as well as complement receptors, and virtually all complement components can be locally produced in the brain, often in response to injury or developmental cues. However, as inflammatory reactions could interfere with proper functioning of the brain, tight and fine tuned regulatory mechanisms are warranted. In age related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), accumulating amyloid proteins elicit complement activation and a local, chronic inflammatory response that leads to attraction and activation of glial cells that, under such activation conditions, can produce neurotoxic substances, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxygen radicals. This process may be exacerbated by a disturbed balance between complement activators and complement regulatory proteins such as occurs in AD, as the local synthesis of these proteins is differentially regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Much knowledge about the role of complement in neurodegenerative diseases has been derived from animal studies with transgenic overexpressing or knockout mice for specific complement factors or receptors. These studies have provided insight into the potential therapeutic use of complement regulators and complement receptor antagonists in chronic neurodegenerative diseases as well as in acute conditions, such as stroke. Interestingly, recent animal studies have also indicated that

  15. Membrane-controlled depletion of complement activity by spin-label-specific IgM

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Gillian M. K.; McConnell, Harden M.

    1977-01-01

    Complement depletion mediated by high molecular weight (IgM) rabbit antibodies specifically bound to spin-label lipid haptens dispersed in model membranes is controlled by various physical attributes of those membranes other than the total number of exposed determinants that they provide. Carrier lipids used at 32° were (i) a “fluid” phosphatidylcholine (PC), (ii) a “solid” PC, and (iii) a cholesterol/PC mixture. The concentration of hapten in the plane of the membranes (two-dimensional concentration) was varied while the overall hapten molarity (three-dimensional concentration) was kept constant. Both specific binding and the efficiency of depletion by IgM are markedly enhanced by systematically decreasing the average distance between haptens (∞ → 26 A). Heterogeneous distribution was found to be more favorable than a random homogeneous distribution of the same number of haptens in the same total quantity of lipids. IgM efficiency is also markedly increased by the inclusion of cholesterol in PC membranes, an effect thought to result from enhanced projection of the determinant from the surface of the membrane and hence increased accessibility to the antibody-binding site. Furthermore, the efficiency of IgM was increased by using haptens dispersed in fluid rather than in solid PC membranes. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that IgM molecules must be bound to a critical multiple of antigenic determinants at a membrane surface in order to induce complement-mediated attack and that subtle variation of the physical state of membrane antigens can be the crucial factor in determining the outcome of this type of efferent immune response. PMID:198789

  16. BF*F allotype of the alternative pathway of complement: A marker of protection against the development of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Picceli, V F; Skare, T L; Nisihara, R M; Nass, F R; Messias-Reason, I T; Utiyama, S R R

    2016-04-01

    B factor (BF) from the alternative complement pathway seems to participate in the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To study the allotypic variability of BF in SLE and their associations with clinical and autoantibodies profile. BF allotypes were determined by high-voltage agarose gel electrophoresis, under constant cooling, followed by immunofixation with anti-human BF antibody, in 188 SLE patients and 103 controls. Clinical and serological data were obtained from medical examination and records. No significant differences of BF variants between patients and controls were found, neither in relation to epidemiologic or clinical manifestations. Associations of phenotype BF SS07 and allotype BF*S07 were found with anticardiolipin IgM (aCl-IgM) antibodies (p = 0.014 and p = 0.009 respectively), but not with aCl-IgG, lupus anticoagulant (LA), anti β2GPI or clinical APS. A significant decrease in BF*F allotype (p = 0.043) and BF SF phenotype (p = 0.018) was detected in patients with anti-phospholipid antibodies as a whole (aCl-IgG, aCl-IgM, LA and anti β2GPI). There is a link between phenotype BF SS07 and allotype BF*S07 with aCl-IgM in SLE patients; BF*F allotype could be considered a marker of protection against the development of antiphospholipid antibodies in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Comparative evaluation of alternative batteries of genetic markers to complement autosomal STRs in kinship investigations: autosomal indels vs. X-chromosome STRs.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Magalhães, Marta; Alves, Cíntia; Amorim, António; Pinto, Nádia; Gusmão, Leonor

    2012-11-01

    Kinship investigations such as paternity are currently solved using sets of (commercially available) highly polymorphic autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), which lead to powerful likelihood ratios (LR). Still, some difficult cases arise whenever the kinship is much more remote or if the alternative hypotheses are not correctly formulated due to the lack of information (for e.g. there is an unknown relationship between the alleged and the true fathers). In these situations, beyond the routinely used marker set, laboratories usually enlarge the number and/or the type of markers analysed. Among these, autosomal indels and X-chromosome STRs have gained popularity. The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained after complementing an initial set of autosomal STRs with indels or with X-chromosome-specific STRs in simulated paternity cases where the alleged father is a close relative of the real one. Results show that in paternity cases where a low number of incompatibilities are observed, the best strategy is to increase the number of autosomal STRs under analysis. Nevertheless, if these are not available, our study globally shows that in father-daughter duos, a set of 12 X-STRs is more advantageous than 38 highly diverse autosomal biallelic markers. Additionally, the usefulness of X-STRs was also evaluated in cases where only a close relative of the alleged parent (father or mother) is available for testing. For those situations where these markers have the power to exclude, strong LR values are obtained. In the remaining cases, LRs are usually weak and sometimes the results are more likely under the wrong kinship hypothesis.

  18. Seroprevalence of Antibody-Mediated, Complement-Dependent Opsonophagocytic Activity against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B in England.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Holly E; Brookes, Charlotte; Allen, Lauren; Kuisma, Eeva; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    The correlate of protection for the licensure of meningococcal vaccines is serum bactericidal activity. However, evidence indicates that a complex situation and other mechanisms, such as antibody-mediated, complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis (OP), may play a role in protection and should be investigated in order to understand immunity to this disease. In this study, a high-throughput flow cytometric opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) was optimized. The assay measures the presence of killed fluorescently labeled Neisseria meningitidis within human granulocytes (differentiated HL60 cells) by flow cytometry, using IgG-depleted pooled human plasma as an exogenous source of complement. This method was found to be reliable and correlated with the results of an opsonophagocytic killing assay. The OPA was used to measure OP activity in 1,878 serum samples from individuals ranging from 0 to 99 years of age against N. meningitidis strain NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7-2,4). The levels of OP activity in individual serum samples varied greatly. OP activity showed an initial peak in the 6- to 12-month age group corresponding to a peak in disease incidence. The OP activity dropped in childhood until the late teenage years, although there was still a higher percentage of individuals with OP activity than with protective bactericidal antibody titers. OP activity reached a peak in the 30- to 39-year age group and then declined. This later peak in OP activity did not coincide with the young adults in whom peak serum bactericidal activity and disease incidence occurred. The demonstration of OP activity when disease incidence is low and when protective bactericidal antibody titers are not detected may indicate a role for OP in protection from meningococcal disease in these age groups.

  19. Seroprevalence of Antibody-Mediated, Complement-Dependent Opsonophagocytic Activity against Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B in England

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Charlotte; Allen, Lauren; Kuisma, Eeva; Gorringe, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The correlate of protection for the licensure of meningococcal vaccines is serum bactericidal activity. However, evidence indicates that a complex situation and other mechanisms, such as antibody-mediated, complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis (OP), may play a role in protection and should be investigated in order to understand immunity to this disease. In this study, a high-throughput flow cytometric opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) was optimized. The assay measures the presence of killed fluorescently labeled Neisseria meningitidis within human granulocytes (differentiated HL60 cells) by flow cytometry, using IgG-depleted pooled human plasma as an exogenous source of complement. This method was found to be reliable and correlated with the results of an opsonophagocytic killing assay. The OPA was used to measure OP activity in 1,878 serum samples from individuals ranging from 0 to 99 years of age against N. meningitidis strain NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7-2,4). The levels of OP activity in individual serum samples varied greatly. OP activity showed an initial peak in the 6- to 12-month age group corresponding to a peak in disease incidence. The OP activity dropped in childhood until the late teenage years, although there was still a higher percentage of individuals with OP activity than with protective bactericidal antibody titers. OP activity reached a peak in the 30- to 39-year age group and then declined. This later peak in OP activity did not coincide with the young adults in whom peak serum bactericidal activity and disease incidence occurred. The demonstration of OP activity when disease incidence is low and when protective bactericidal antibody titers are not detected may indicate a role for OP in protection from meningococcal disease in these age groups. PMID:25739917

  20. Interaction of Leptospira elongation factor Tu with plasminogen and complement factor H: a metabolic leptospiral protein with moonlighting activities.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Danielly G; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica M; Abe, Cecília M; Monaris, Denize; Morais, Zenaide M; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia A E; Barbosa, Angela S

    2013-01-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), an abundant bacterial protein involved in protein synthesis, has been shown to display moonlighting activities. Known to perform more than one function at different times or in different places, it is found in several subcellular locations in a single organism, and may serve as a virulence factor in a range of important human pathogens. Here we demonstrate that Leptospira EF-Tu is surface-exposed and performs additional roles as a cell-surface receptor for host plasma proteins. It binds plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner, and lysine residues are critical for this interaction. Bound plasminogen is converted to active plasmin, which, in turn, is able to cleave the natural substrates C3b and fibrinogen. Leptospira EF-Tu also acquires the complement regulator Factor H (FH). FH bound to immobilized EF-Tu displays cofactor activity, mediating C3b degradation by Factor I (FI). In this manner, EF-Tu may contribute to leptospiral tissue invasion and complement inactivation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a leptospiral protein exhibiting moonlighting activities.

  1. Dissociable effects of Sry and sex chromosome complement on activity, feeding and anxiety-related behaviours in mice.

    PubMed

    Kopsida, Eleni; Lynn, Phoebe M; Humby, Trevor; Wilkinson, Lawrence S; Davies, William

    2013-01-01

    Whilst gonadal hormones can substantially influence sexual differentiation of the brain, recent findings have suggested that sex-linked genes may also directly influence neurodevelopment. Here we used the well-established murine 'four core genotype' (FCG) model on a gonadally-intact, outbred genetic background to characterise the contribution of Sry-dependent effects (i.e. those arising from the expression of the Y-linked Sry gene in the brain, or from hormonal sequelae of gonadal Sry expression) and direct effects of sex-linked genes other than Sry ('sex chromosome complement' effects) to sexually dimorphic mouse behavioural phenotypes. Over a 24 hour period, XX and XY gonadally female mice (lacking Sry) exhibited greater horizontal locomotor activity and reduced food consumption per unit bodyweight than XX and XY gonadally male mice (possessing Sry); in two behavioural tests (the elevated plus and zero mazes) XX and XY gonadally female mice showed evidence for increased anxiety-related behaviours relative to XX and XY gonadally male mice. Exploratory correlational analyses indicated that these Sry-dependent effects could not be simply explained by brain expression of the gene, nor by circulating testosterone levels. We also noted a sex chromosome complement effect on food (but not water) consumption whereby XY mice consumed more over a 24hr period than XX mice, and a sex chromosome complement effect in a third test of anxiety-related behaviour, the light-dark box. The present data suggest that: i) the male-specific factor Sry may influence activity and feeding behaviours in mice, and ii) dissociable feeding and anxiety-related murine phenotypes may be differentially modulated by Sry and by other sex-linked genes. Our results may have relevance for understanding the molecular underpinnings of sexually dimorphic behavioural phenotypes in healthy men and women, and in individuals with abnormal sex chromosome constitutions.

  2. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Iyer, Anand M; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Baas, Frank; Das, Pranab K

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM) during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM damages peripheral nerves by in situ generation of the membrane attack complex (MAC). Investigating the role of complement activation in skin lesions of leprosy patients might provide insight into the dynamics of in situ immune reactivity and the destructive pathology of M. leprae. In this study, we analyzed in skin lesions of leprosy patients, whether M. leprae antigen LAM deposition correlates with the deposition of complement activation products MAC and C3d on nerves and cells in the surrounding tissue. Skin biopsies of paucibacillary (n = 7), multibacillary leprosy patients (n = 7), and patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (n = 6) or reversal reaction (RR) (n = 4) and controls (n = 5) were analyzed. The percentage of C3d, MAC and LAM deposition was significantly higher in the skin biopsies of multibacillary compared to paucibacillary patients (p = <0.05, p = <0.001 and p = <0.001 respectively), with a significant association between LAM and C3d or MAC in the skin biopsies of leprosy patients (r = 0.9578, p< 0.0001 and r = 0.8585, p<0.0001 respectively). In skin lesions of multibacillary patients, MAC deposition was found on axons and co-localizing with LAM. In skin lesions of paucibacillary patients, we found C3d positive T-cells in and surrounding granulomas, but hardly any MAC deposition. In addition, MAC immunoreactivity was increased in both ENL and RR skin lesions compared to non-reactional leprosy patients (p = <0.01 and p = <0.01 respectively). The present findings demonstrate that complement is deposited in skin lesions of leprosy patients, suggesting that inflammation driven by complement activation might contribute to nerve damage in the lesions of

  3. Biological effects of short-term, high-concentration exposure to methyl isocyanate. VI. In vitro and in vivo complement activation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, W.P.; Savary, J.R.; Troup, C.M.; Dodd, D.E.; Tamerius, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    The ability of MIC to induce complement activation in vitro and in vivo was investigated. For the in vitro studies, both human and guinea pig serum or EDTA-plasma samples were exposed to 1167 to 1260 ppm MIC vapor for 15 min at room temperature. The human serum samples exposed to MIC showed significant reduction in Factor B, C2, C4, C3, C5, and total hemolytic complement CH/sub 50/ activity levels. The C3, C5, and CH/sub 50/ functional activities in guinea pig serum were more sensitive to MIC-mediated reduction than the corresponding activity reductions observed in the human serum samples. The human and single guinea pig EDTA-plasma samples exposed to MIC vapor showed no evidence of C3 consumption but did show significant reductions in CH/sub 50/ levels. Thus, MIC vapor was able to active, and thereby reduce serum complement C3 activity in vitro by a complement-dependent process. For the in vivo studies, five pairs of guinea pigs were exposed to 644 to 702 ppm MIC vapor until one of the pair died (11-15 min). MIC exposure was then discontinued, the surviving guinea pig was sacrificed, and EDTA-plasma was obtained from both animals and analyzed for complement consumption. Clear evidence was obtained to indicate that complement activation had occurred in these animals exposed to MIC for 11 to 15 min. In addition, the complement activation profile observed in these guinea pigs was qualitatively similar to that seen in the guinea pig serum samples exposed to MIC vapor in vitro. The total protein concentration present in plasma samples obtained from guinea pigs that had died from MIC exposure was elevated significantly. The possible contribution of complement activation to the fatal reaction(s) observed in these MIC-treated animals is discussed.

  4. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis.

  5. Functionally diverse complement of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BK) alpha-subunits generated from a single site of splicing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Tian, Lijun; MacDonald, Stephen H-F; McClafferty, Heather; Hammond, Martin S L; Huibant, Jean-Marc; Ruth, Peter; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Shipston, Michael J

    2005-09-30

    The pore-forming alpha-subunits of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels are encoded by a single gene that undergoes extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing. However, the extent to which differential exon usage at a single site of splicing may confer functionally distinct properties on BK channels is largely unknown. Here we demonstrated that alternative splicing at site of splicing C2 in the mouse BK channel C terminus generates five distinct splice variants: ZERO, e20, e21(STREX), e22, and a novel variant deltae23. Splice variants display distinct patterns of tissue distribution with e21(STREX) expressed at the highest levels in adult endocrine tissues and e22 at embryonic stages of mouse development. deltae23 is not functionally expressed at the cell surface and acts as a dominant negative of cell surface expression by trapping other BK channel splice variant alpha-subunits in the endoplasmic reticulum and perinuclear compartments. Splice variants display a range of biophysical properties. e21(STREX) and e22 variants display a significant left shift (>20 mV at 1 microM [Ca2+]i) in half-maximal voltage of activation compared with ZERO and e20 as well as considerably slower rates of deactivation. Splice variants are differentially sensitive to phosphorylation by endogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase; ZERO, e20, and e22 variants are all activated, whereas e21 (STREX) is the only variant that is inhibited. Thus alternative pre-mRNA splicing from a single site of splicing provides a mechanism to generate a physiologically diverse complement of BK channel alpha-subunits that differ dramatically in their tissue distribution, trafficking, and regulation.

  6. Activity Therapy: An Alternative Therapy for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of activity therapy for preteens and adolescents, where the client is engaged in nonverbal modes of relationship--games, free play, movement, drama, music, art or other activities, as the chief therapeutic media in which conflicts are resolved and intellectual and emotional energies freed. Reviews the literature, describes…

  7. Activity Therapy: An Alternative Therapy for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of activity therapy for preteens and adolescents, where the client is engaged in nonverbal modes of relationship--games, free play, movement, drama, music, art or other activities, as the chief therapeutic media in which conflicts are resolved and intellectual and emotional energies freed. Reviews the literature, describes…

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies against Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acquire an Ability To Kill Tumor Cells through Complement Activation by Mutations That Selectively Facilitate the Hexamerization of IgG on Opsonized Cells.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Annalina; Derer, Stefanie; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Rösner, Thies; Kretschmer, Anna; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I; Valerius, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    Triggering of the complement cascade induces tumor cell lysis via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and attracts and activates cytotoxic cells. It therefore represents an attractive mechanism for mAb in cancer immunotherapy development. The classical complement pathway is initiated by IgG molecules that have assembled into ordered hexamers after binding their Ag on the tumor cell surface. The requirements for CDC are further impacted by factors such as Ab epitope, valency, and affinity. Thus, mAb against well-validated solid tumor targets, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that effectively induces complement activation and CDC, are highly sought after. The potency of complement activation by IgG Abs can be increased via several strategies. We identified single-point mutations in the Fc domain (e.g., E345K or E430G) enhancing Fc:Fc interactions, hexamer formation, and CDC after Ab binds cell-surface Ag. We show that EGFR Abs directed against clinically relevant epitopes can be converted into mAb with unprecedented CDC activity. Alternative strategies rely on increasing the affinity of monomeric IgG for C1q by introduction of a quadruple mutation at the C1q binding site or via generation of an IgG1/IgG3 chimera. In this study we show that selective enhancement of C1q binding via avidity modulation is superior to the unattended increase in C1q binding via affinity approaches, particularly for target cells with reduced EGFR expression levels. Improving Fc:Fc interactions of Ag-bound IgG therefore represents a highly promising and novel approach for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of therapeutic mAb against EGFR and potentially other tumor targets.

  9. Glycoproteins, antigens, and regulation of complement activation on the surface of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma lewisi: implications for immune evasion

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The surface antigens and glycoproteins of the rat parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma lewisi were characterized. Radioiodination with /sup 125/I identified 10 out of more 40 polypeptides separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of these components were identified as glycoproteins by peroxidase-conjugated Conconavalin A (HR-Con A) lectin affinoblotting. This analysis detected that quantitative but not qualitative changes occurred during infection. Localization of most of the reactive determinants was indicated by immunoblotting extracts of radioiodinated T. lewisi. Changes in the antigenicity as related to survival in the host are discussed. The presence of IgG and IgM on the surface of T. lewisi isolated from intact and ..gamma..-irradiated rats (irr.) and that determinants bind Ig from uninfected rat sera (NRS) was indicated by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoblotting identified the major NRS IgG binding component as the 74 kd surface glycoprotein. Complement component C3 deposition during infection was indicated by flow cytometric analysis and immunoblotting. Incubation of intact T. lewisi with normal human sera indicated that C3, C5, and factor B deposition was Mg/sup 2 +/ dependent, Ca/sup 2 +/ independent and deposited C3 was rapidly processed to hemolytically inactive fragments. Radioiodination of intact and protease T. lewisi after cultivation identified three components which correlate with resistance to lysis. This suggests that surface moieties on intact T. lewisi modulate host complement activity by restricting C3/C5 convertase activity.

  10. C1q acts in the tumour microenvironment as a cancer-promoting factor independently of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Roberta; Tripodo, Claudio; Rami, Damiano; Ling, Guang Sheng; Agostinis, Chiara; Guarnotta, Carla; Zorzet, Sonia; Durigutto, Paolo; Botto, Marina; Tedesco, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Complement C1q is the activator of the classical pathway. However, it is now recognized that C1q can exert functions unrelated to complement activation. Here we show that C1q, but not C4, is expressed in the stroma and vascular endothelium of several human malignant tumours. Compared with wild-type (WT) or C3- or C5-deficient mice, C1q-deficient (C1qa(-/-)) mice bearing a syngeneic B16 melanoma exhibit a slower tumour growth and prolonged survival. This effect is not attributable to differences in the tumour-infiltrating immune cells. Tumours developing in WT mice display early deposition of C1q, higher vascular density and an increase in the number of lung metastases compared with C1qa(-/-) mice. Bone marrow (BM) chimeras between C1qa(-/-) and WT mice identify non-BM-derived cells as the main local source of C1q that can promote cancer cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. Together th