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Sample records for alternative host matrix

  1. Host interactions of Chandipura virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, Sreejith; Kumar, Kapila; Rana, Jyoti; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    The rhabdovirus matrix (M) protein is a multifunctional virion protein that plays major role in virus assembly and budding, virus-induced inhibition of host gene expression and cytopathic effects observed in infected cells. The myriad roles played by this protein in the virus biology make it a critical player in viral pathogenesis. Therefore, discerning the interactions of this protein with host can greatly facilitate our understanding of virus infections, ultimately leading to both improved therapeutics and insight into cellular processes. Chandipura virus (CHPV; Family Rhabdoviridae, Genus Vesiculovirus) is an emerging rhabdovirus responsible for several outbreaks of fatal encephalitis among children in India. The present study aims to screen the human fetal brain cDNA library for interactors of CHPV M protein using yeast two-hybrid system. Ten host protein interactors were identified, three of which were further validated by affinity pull down and protein interaction ELISA. The study identified novel human host interactors for CHPV which concurred with previously described associations in other human viruses.

  2. An alternative host matrix based on iron phosphate glasses for the vitrification of specialized nuclear waste forms. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.E.; Ray, C.S.; Marasinghe, G.K.; Karabulut, M.; Fang, X.

    1998-06-01

    'Certain high level wastes (HLW) in the US contain components such as phosphates, heavy metals, and halides which make them poorly suited for disposal in borosilicate glasses. Iron phosphate glasses appear to be a technically feasible alternative to borosilicate glasses for vitrifying these HLWs. The iron phosphate glasses mentioned above and their nuclear wasteforms are relatively new, so little is known about their atomic structure, redox equilibria, structure-property relationships, and crystallization products and characteristics. The objective of this research is to gain such information for the binary iron-phosphate glasses as well as iron phosphate wasteforms so that a comprehensive scientific assessment can be made of their usefulness in nuclear waste disposal. This report summarizes the work undertaken and completed in the first 20 months of a three year project. Approximately 250 samples, binary iron phosphate glasses and iron phosphate glasses containing one or two common nuclear waste components such as UO{sub 2} , Na{sub 2}O, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} , Cs{sub 2}O, SrO, and MoO{sub 3}, have been prepared. Weight loss has been used to measure the chemical durability and the redox equilibria between Fe(II) and Fe(III) has been investigated using Moessbauer spectroscopy. The atomic structure has been investigated using a variety of techniques including Mossbauer, Raman, X-ray absorption (XAS), and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies and neutron/high energy X-ray scattering. Glass forming and crystallization characteristics have been investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA). In addition, information necessary for glass manufacturing such as suitable refractories and Joule heating parameters also have been obtained.'

  3. Alternative matrix seriation, traditional seriation, and multiple classification.

    PubMed

    Kingma, J; Tenvergert, E M

    1986-08-01

    This study investigated the structural relationships between traditional seriation tasks derived from Piaget's publications and alternative matrix seriation on the one hand, and alternative matrix seriation and multiple classification on the other. Subjects were 464 children from two kindergartens and three primary schools, Grades 1 through 6 who completed these three types of tasks. Factor analysis revealed that the alternative matrix seriation tasks (often used in neo-Piagetian research) did not reflect the same underlying concept as the traditional seriation tasks derived from Piaget's publications. In contrast, we found that alternative matrix seriation referred to the same underlying concept as multiple classification. We concluded that the alternative matrix seriation tasks cannot serve as a replacement for the traditional seriation tasks in assessing a child's seriation capacity.

  4. Dentin matrix degradation by host matrix metalloproteinases: inhibition and clinical perspectives toward regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chaussain, Catherine; Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Khaddam, Mayssam; Tjaderhane, Leo; George, Anne; Menashi, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enzymes have long been considered solely accountable for the degradation of the dentin matrix during the carious process. However, the emerging literature suggests that host-derived enzymes, and in particular the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contained in dentin and saliva can play a major role in this process by their ability to degrade the dentin matrix from within. These findings are important since they open new therapeutic options for caries prevention and treatment. The possibility of using MMP inhibitors to interfere with dentin caries progression is discussed. Furthermore, the potential release of bioactive peptides by the enzymatic cleavage of dentin matrix proteins by MMPs during the carious process is discussed. These peptides, once identified, may constitute promising therapeutical tools for tooth and bone regeneration. PMID:24198787

  5. Alternative biofuel production in non-natural hosts.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Jordan T; Atsumi, Shota

    2012-10-01

    Global energy and environmental concerns have stimulated increased efforts in synthesizing petroleum-derived products from renewable resources. Biological production of metabolites for fuel is increasingly becoming a feasible, renewable, environmentally sound alternative. However, many of these chemicals are not highly produced in any known native organism. Here we review the current progress of modifying microorganisms with heterogeneous elements for the production of biofuels. This strategy has been extensively employed in a variety of hosts for the development of production of various alcohols, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes.

  6. Luminescent guest-host composite films based on an azomethine dye in different matrix polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Luminita; Zabulica, Andrei; Moleavin, Ioana-Andreea

    2014-12-01

    New hybrid guest/host composite films obtained by dispersing a light-emitting azomethine dimer into three different matrix polymers have been studied. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), UDEL polysulfone (PSU) and chitosan were chosen as host matrix. Differential scanning calorimetry, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements revealed the composite morphology and their thermal properties. UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy indicated the influence of polymer matrix on the azomethine dye optical properties. The composite films exhibited strong photoluminescence emission when excited with maximum absorption wavelength. It was concluded that polysulfone is a good candidate in guest/host composite obtaining.

  7. Host defense peptides: an alternative as antiinfective and immunomodulatory therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Alba, Annia; López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Otero-González, Anselmo J

    2012-01-01

    Host defense peptides are conserved components of innate immune response present among all classes of life. These peptides are potent, broad spectrum antimicrobial agents with potential as novel therapeutic compounds. Also, the ability of host defense peptides to modulate immunity is an emerging therapeutic concept since its selective modulation is a novel antiinfective strategy. Their mechanisms of action and the fundamental differences between pathogens and host cells surfaces mostly lead to a not widely extended microbial resistance and to a lower toxicity toward host cells. Biological libraries and rational design are novel tools for developing such molecules with promising applications as therapeutic drugs.

  8. Evaluation of alternative host bacteria as vehicles for oral administration of bacteriophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Survival of bacteriophages through the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) and persistence in the lower gastrointestinal tract (LGIT) is essential for treatment of enteric bacterial infections. We have hypothesized that non-pathogenic Alternative Host Bacteriophage (AHB), originally isolated from p...

  9. Adaptation of the pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, during experimental evolution on a native versus alternative host plant.

    PubMed

    Meaden, Sean; Koskella, Britt

    2017-02-16

    The specialization and distribution of pathogens among species has substantial impact on disease spread, especially when reservoir hosts can maintain high pathogen densities or select for increased pathogen virulence. Theory predicts that optimal within-host growth rate will vary among host genotypes/species, and therefore that pathogens infecting multiple hosts should experience different selection pressures depending on the host environment in which they are found. This should be true for pathogens with broad host ranges, but also those experiencing opportunistic infections on novel hosts or that spill over among host populations. There is very little empirical data, however, regarding how adaptation to one host might directly influence infectivity and growth on another. We took an experimental evolution approach to examine short-term adaptation of the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, to its native tomato host compared with an alternative host, Arabidopsis, in either the presence or absence of bacteriophages. After 4 serial passages (20 days of selection in planta) we measured bacterial growth of selected lines in leaves of either the focal or alternative host. We found that passage through Arabidopsis led to greater within-host bacterial densities in both hosts than did passage through tomato. Whole genome re-sequencing of evolved isolates identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms based on our novel draft assembly for strain PT23. However, there was no clear pattern of clustering among plant selection lines at the genetic level despite the phenotypic differences observed. Together, the results emphasize that previous host associations can influence the within-host growth rate of pathogens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Human pathogens utilize host extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen for adhesion and invasion of the host.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Fleury, Christophe; Jalalvand, Farshid; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2012-11-01

    Laminin (Ln) and collagen are multifunctional glycoproteins that play an important role in cellular morphogenesis, cell signalling, tissue repair and cell migration. These proteins are ubiquitously present in tissues as a part of the basement membrane (BM), constitute a protective layer around blood capillaries and are included in the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a component of BMs, both Lns and collagen(s), thus function as major mechanical containment molecules that protect tissues from pathogens. Invasive pathogens breach the basal lamina and degrade ECM proteins of interstitial spaces and connective tissues using various ECM-degrading proteases or surface-bound plasminogen and matrix metalloproteinases recruited from the host. Most pathogens associated with the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or urogenital tracts, as well as with the central nervous system or the skin, have the capacity to bind and degrade Lns and collagen(s) in order to adhere to and invade host tissues. In this review, we focus on the adaptability of various pathogens to utilize these ECM proteins as enhancers for adhesion to host tissues or as a targets for degradation in order to breach the cellular barriers. The major pathogens discussed are Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Yersinia, Treponema, Mycobacterium, Clostridium, Listeria, Porphyromonas and Haemophilus; Candida, Aspergillus, Pneumocystis, Cryptococcus and Coccidioides; Acanthamoeba, Trypanosoma and Trichomonas; retrovirus and papilloma virus.

  11. Tick control: trapping, biocontrol, host management and other alternative strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Edited by Sonenshine, Daniel E.; Roe, R. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Biology of Ticks is the most comprehensive work on tick biology and tick-borne diseases. This second edition is a multi-authored work, featuring the research and analyses of renowned experts across the globe. Spanning two volumes, the book examines the systematics, biology, structure, ecological adaptations, evolution, genomics and the molecular processes that underpin the growth, development and survival of these important disease-transmitting parasites. Also discussed is the remarkable array of diseases transmitted (or caused) by ticks, as well as modern methods for their control. This book should serve as a modern reference for students, scientists, physicians, veterinarians and other specialists. Volume I covers the biology of the tick and features chapters on tick systematics, tick life cycles, external and internal anatomy, and others dedicated to specific organ systems, specifically, the tick integument, mouthparts and digestive system, salivary glands, waste removal, salivary glands, respiratory system, circulatory system and hemolymph, fat body, the nervous and sensory systems and reproductive systems. Volume II includes chapters on the ecology of non-nidicolous and nidicolous ticks, genetics and genomics (including the genome of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis) and immunity, including host immune responses to tick feeding and tick-host interactions, as well as the tick's innate immune system that prevents and/or controls microbial infections. Six chapters cover in depth the many diseases caused by the major tick-borne pathogens, including tick-borne protozoa, viruses, rickettsiae of all types, other types of bacteria (e.g., the Lyme disease agent) and diseases related to tick paralytic agents and toxins. The remaining chapters are devoted to tick control using vaccines, acaricides, repellents, biocontrol, and, finally, techniques for breeding ticks in order to develop tick colonies for scientific study.

  12. Alternative to colour feature classification using colour contrast ocurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R. A.; Richard, N.; Fernandez, C.

    2015-04-01

    Texture discrimination was the second more important task studied after colour perception and characterization. Nevertheless, colour texture assessment and characterization was few studied and no vector processing was proposed to assess this important visual information. In this work we show the construction of a new vector that integrates fully the information of texture and color. This vector is based on Julesz psico-physics conjectures and the Haralick cooccurrence matrix. A colour texture image in the CIEL*a* b* colour space is characterizing in a 3D matrix, from which it is possible to visually some variations in chromaticity. The performance of this vector had evaluated in tasks of classification in front of other developments that mix the texture and colour information. The colour contrast occurrence matrix (C2O) has the best classification rates in three of the four image database evaluated as OUTEX, VISTEX, STEX and ALOT. C2O texture classification was evaluated in front of co-occurrence matrix (GLMC), run-length matrix (RLM) and local binary patterns (LBP) approaches.

  13. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modern self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability. PMID:20690420

  14. The role of host-derived dentinal matrix metalloproteinases in reducing dentin bonding of resin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modem self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability.

  15. Thermophysical processes initiated by inert-matrix-hosted nanoparticles heated by laser pulses of different durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskii, A. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Nikitin, A. P.; Aduev, B. P.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, a model for the heating of inert-matrix-hosted metal nanoparticles with laser radiation taking into account the melting processes is examined. The calculations were performed using the characteristics of gold and pentaerythritol tetranitrate materials. The kinetic dependences of the temperature and molten-layer thickness on nanoparticle surface were calculated. The main non-dimensional governing parameters of the model were identified. An expression for the maximum thickness of molten layer was obtained. The results can be used in predicting the stability of nonlinear-optics devices with hosted gold nanoparticles, in raising the efficiency of hyperthermia cancer therapy, and in optimizing the optical detonators.

  16. Morphometric Differentiation Among Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) Exploiting Sympatric Alternate Hosts.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cendra, P V; Paulin, L E; Oroño, L; Ovruski, S M; Vilardi, J C

    2016-04-01

    Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) is currently considered a complex of cryptic species infesting fruits from Mexico to Argentina and represents an interesting biological model for evolutionary studies. Moreover, detecting and quantifying behavioral, morphological, and genetic differentiation among populations is also relevant to the application of environment-friendly control programs. Here, phenotypic differentiation among individuals coexisting in the wild in a Northern region of Argentina was unveiled and associated with host choice. Six morphometric traits were measured in sympatric flies exploiting three different host species. Phenotypic variation was shown to be host-dependent regardless of geographical or temporal overlap. Flies collected from synchronous alternate hosts (peach and walnut) differed from each other despite the lack of geographical isolation. By contrast, flies emerging from guavas that ripen about two months later than peach and walnut showed no significant differentiation in comparison to flies collected from walnuts, but they differ significantly from flies originating from peaches. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the same population of flies shifts from walnuts to guavas throughout the year, whereas the population of flies that uses peaches as a host is probably exploiting other alternate hosts when peach availability decreases. Further research is needed to study the underlying mechanism. Results are consistent with previous molecular markers (inter-simple sequence repeat-ISSR) research on flies stemming from the same hosts and the same area, suggesting that differentiation among flies emerging from alternative hosts occurs at both genetic and phenotypic levels. The contribution of host preference in long-term genetic differentiation is discussed.

  17. Role of alternate hosts in epidemiology and pathogen variation of cereal rusts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal rusts, caused by obligate and biotrophic fungi in the genus Puccinia of basidiomycete are an important group of diseases threatening the world food security. With the recent discovery of alternate hosts for the stripe rust fungus (Puccinia striiformis), all cereal rust fungi are now known ...

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model host for legionella pneumophila, and protective effects of Bifidobacterium infantis.

    PubMed

    Komura, Tomomi; Yasui, Chikako; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2010-06-01

    The survival times of Caenorhabditis elegans worms infected with Legionella pneumophila from day 7.5 or later after hatching were shorter than those of uninfected worms. However, nematodes fed bifidobacteria prior to Legionella infection were resistant to Legionella. These nematodes may act as a unique alternative host for Legionella research.

  19. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Reyes-López, Magda; Ortíz-Estrada, Guillermo; de la Garza, Mireya; Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina). The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa. PMID:22792442

  20. Studies of Laboulbeniales on Myrmica ants (III): myrmecophilous arthropods as alternative hosts of Rickia wasmannii

    PubMed Central

    Pfliegler, Walter P.; Báthori, Ferenc; Haelewaters, Danny; Tartally, András

    2016-01-01

    Myrmecophilous arthropods and their manifold relations to host ants are interesting from an evolutionary perspective. Rickia wasmannii is an ectoparasitic fungus belonging to the Laboulbeniales order. Here, we show that inquiline mites can become infected by R. wasmannii, which was thought to be restricted to the genus Myrmica (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). This is the first report of R. wasmannii from an alternative host in another subphylum (Chelicerata). We also found immature fruiting bodies on a larva of Microdon myrmicae (Diptera: Syrphidae), which represents the first report of any Rickia species on flies. This fungus is capable of infecting alternative, unrelated host species as they co-occur in the ant nest “microhabitat”. These observations provide direct evidence for ecological specificity in Laboulbeniales. The presence of R. wasmannii on inquilines in Myrmica ant nests suggests that the parasite may have adapted to the ant nest environment and is less dependent on acquiring specific nutrients from the hosts. However, the alternative cannot be excluded; these infections might also represent chance events if the fungus is incapable of fulfilling its life cycle. PMID:27849516

  1. The multitrace matrix model: An alternative to Connes NCG and IKKT model in 2 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ydri, Badis

    2016-12-01

    We present a new multitrace matrix model, which is a generalization of the real quartic one matrix model, exhibiting dynamical emergence of a fuzzy two-sphere and its non-commutative gauge theory. This provides a novel and a much simpler alternative to Connes non-commutative geometry and to the IKKT matrix model for emergent geometry in two dimensions. However, in higher dimensions this mechanism is not known to exist and the systematic frameworks of NCG and IKKT are expected to hold sway.

  2. Anormalous Optical Absorption in Porous Al_2O3 Host Matrix---Nano-Oxide Particle Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lide; Zhang, Biao; Mo, Chimei

    1996-03-01

    Porous Al_2O3 host matrix---nano-γ-Fe_2O3 particle composites (porous nanocomposite) were prepared by pyrolysis of Fe(NO_3)_39H_2O in porous nano- Al_2O3 matrix at 250^0C. Comparing with simple nanocomposites formed by mixing nano-γ-Fe_2O3 and compacting at room temperature, followed by annealing at 250^0C, the following anomalous optical behaviors were observed: for porous nanocomposite containing 5% Fe_2O_3, the aborption edge shifts obviously from 827nm to 543nm, and with increasing dopping amount of Fe_2O3 from 5% to 70%, blue shift phenomina decreases. Namely, the absorption edge moves from 543nm to 710nm. The mechanism of shift of the absorption edge is discussed.

  3. The Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei) Invades Hawaii: Preliminary Investigations on Trap Response and Alternate Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Messing, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    In August 2010 the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, was first reported to have invaded the Kona coffee growing region of Hawaii, posing a severe economic challenge to the fourth largest agricultural commodity in the State. Despite its long and widespread occurrence throughout the tropics as the most serious pest of coffee, there are still discrepancies in the literature regarding several basic aspects of berry borer biology relevant to its control. In Kona coffee plantations, we investigated the beetles’ response to several trap and lure formulations, and examined the occurrence of beetles in seeds of alternate host plants occurring adjacent to coffee farms. While traps were shown to capture significant numbers of beetles per day, and the occurrence of beetles in alternate hosts was quite rare, the unique situation of coffee culture in Hawaii will make this pest extremely challenging to manage in the Islands. PMID:26466620

  4. Modelling the effect of an alternative host population on the spread of citrus Huanglongbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'A. Vilamiu, Raphael G.; Ternes, Sonia; Laranjeira, Francisco F.; de C. Santos, Tâmara T.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to model the spread of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) considering the presence of a population of alternative hosts (Murraya paniculata). We developed a compartmental deterministic mathematical model for representing the dynamics of HLB disease in a citrus orchard, including delays in the latency and incubation phases of the disease in the plants and a delay period on the nymphal stage of Diaphorina citri, the insect vector of HLB in Brazil. The results of numerical simulations indicate that alternative hosts should not play a crucial role on HLB dynamics considering a typical scenario for the Recôncavo Baiano region in Brazil . Also, the current policy of removing symptomatic plants every three months should not be expected to significantly hinder HLB spread.

  5. The Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei) Invades Hawaii: Preliminary Investigations on Trap Response and Alternate Hosts.

    PubMed

    Messing, Russell H

    2012-07-11

    In August 2010 the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, was first reported to have invaded the Kona coffee growing region of Hawaii, posing a severe economic challenge to the fourth largest agricultural commodity in the State. Despite its long and widespread occurrence throughout the tropics as the most serious pest of coffee, there are still discrepancies in the literature regarding several basic aspects of berry borer biology relevant to its control. In Kona coffee plantations, we investigated the beetles' response to several trap and lure formulations, and examined the occurrence of beetles in seeds of alternate host plants occurring adjacent to coffee farms. While traps were shown to capture significant numbers of beetles per day, and the occurrence of beetles in alternate hosts was quite rare, the unique situation of coffee culture in Hawaii will make this pest extremely challenging to manage in the Islands.

  6. Extracellular matrix-associated proteome changes during non-host resistance in citrus-Xanthomonas interactions.

    PubMed

    Swaroopa Rani, Tirupaati; Podile, Appa Rao

    2014-04-01

    Non-host resistance (NHR) is a most durable broad-spectrum resistance employed by the plants to restrict majority of pathogens. Plant extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical defense barrier. Understanding ECM responses during interaction with non-host pathogen will provide insights into molecular events of NHR. In this study, the ECM-associated proteome was compared during interaction of citrus with pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) and non-host pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) at 8, 16, 24 and 48 h post inoculation. Comprehensive analysis of ECM-associated proteins was performed by extracting wall-bound and soluble ECM components using both destructive and non-destructive procedures. A total of 53 proteins was differentially expressed in citrus-Xanthomonas host and non-host interaction, out of which 44 were identified by mass spectrometry. The differentially expressed proteins were related to (1) defense-response (5 pathogenesis-related proteins, 3 miraculin-like proteins (MIR, MIR1 and MIR2) and 2 proteases); (2) enzymes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism [Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), Fe-SOD, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cysteine-peroxiredoxin]; (3) signaling (lectin, curculin-like lectin and concanavalin A-like lectin kinase); and (4) cell-wall modification (α-xylosidase, glucan 1, 3 β-glucosidase, xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase). The decrease in ascorbate peroxidase and cysteine-peroxiredoxin could be involved in maintenance of ROS levels. Increase in defense, cell-wall remodeling and signaling proteins in citrus-Xoo interaction suggests an active involvement of ECM in execution of NHR. Partially compromised NHR in citrus against Xoo, upon Brefeldin A pre-treatment supported the role of non-classical secretory proteins in this phenomenon.

  7. Reservoirs and alternate hosts for pathogens of commercially important crustaceans: a review.

    PubMed

    Small, Hamish J; Pagenkopp, Katrina M

    2011-01-01

    There is a considerable body of literature describing the causative agents of many diseases of crustaceans. Given that many of these crustaceans support commercially important fisheries, it is somewhat surprising that comparatively little information is available regarding the natural transmission pathways and reservoirs of many of the disease-causing agents. In this paper we review what is known about reservoirs and alternate hosts for several important diseases of commercially important crustaceans and provide recommendations on future areas of research.

  8. Biology of rice bug Leptocorisa oratorius (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Alydidae), population change and alternative host plants.

    PubMed

    Rattanapun, W

    2013-01-01

    Leptocorisa oratorius (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Alydidae) is a major rice pest which feeds on the sap of stems and rice seeds. Some graminaceous weed species serve as an alternative host of L. oratorius causing outbreaks throughout the rice growing season. Population changes of L. oratorius during both rice growing seasons - wet-season rice and dry-season rice - including the influence of alternative host, barnyard grass Echinochloa crus-galli (Graminaceae) on the development of L. oratorius was studied. Results presented that L. oratorius was the dominant pest species during the late phase of rice growth. Adults of L. oratorius started their migrations to wet-season rice at the vegetative stage of rice growth, while they migrated to dry-season rice at the repropuctive stage of rice growth. Leptocorisa oratorius breds rapidly in rice fields. Meanwhile, other adults migrated to the rice field. The population of adults and nymphs significantly increased from the reproductive stage to grain formation and ripening stage in both rice growing seasons. The population of nymphs was greater than adults but not significantly different in their number of individuals. Leptocorisa oratorius had one generation in each rice growing season. The results of the host plant study indicated that L oratorius developed completely in barnyard grass E. crus-galli as well as rice Oriza sativa (Graminaceae). However, L. oratorius preferred rice to barnyard grass for feeding and oviposition.

  9. Improving the Performance of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries by Employing Polyimide Particles as Hosting Matrixes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pei-Yang; Zhao, Yi; Xie, Jian; Binte Ali, Nursimaa; Nie, Lina; Xu, Zhichuan J; Zhang, Qichun

    2016-03-23

    Sulfur cathodes with four polyimide (PI) compounds as hosting matrixes have been prepared through a simple one-step approach. These four PIs-S composites exhibited higher sulfur utilization and better cycling stability than pure sulfur. At a current rate of 300 mA g(-1), the initial discharge capacities of PI-1S, PI-2S, PI-3S, and BBLS reached 1120, 1100, 1150, and 1040 mAh g(-1), respectively. After the 30th cycle, PI-1S, PI-2S, PI-3S, BBLS and pristine sulfur powder still remained discharge capacities of 715, 673, 729, 643, and 550 mAh g(-1). Especially, PI-1S and PI-3S cathodes exhibit excellent cycling stability with the discharge capacities of 522 and 574 mAh g(-1) at the 450th cycle, respectively.

  10. Low surface area graphene/cellulose composite as a host matrix for lithium sulphur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Manu U. M.; Luong, Nguyen Dang; Seppälä, Jukka; Tchernychova, Elena; Dominko, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Graphene/cellulose composites were prepared and studied as potential host matrixes for sulphur impregnation and use in Li-S batteries. We demonstrate that with the proper design of a relatively low surface area graphene/cellulose composite, a high electrochemical performance along with good cyclability can be achieved. Graphene cellulose composites are built from two constituents: a two-dimensional electronic conductive graphene and cellulose fibres as a structural frame; together they form a laminar type of pore. The graphene sheets that uniformly anchor sulphur molecules provide confinement ability for polysulphides, sufficient space to accommodate sulphur volumetric expansion, a large contact area with the sulphur and a short transport pathway for both electrons and lithium ions. Nano-cellulose prevents the opening of graphene sheets due to the volume expansion caused by dissolved polysulphides during battery operation. This, in turn, prevents the diffusion of lithium polysulphides into the electrolyte, enabling a long cycle life.

  11. Visible luminescence of Al2O3 nanoparticles embedded in silica glass host matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mir, L.; Amlouk, A.; Barthou, C.

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with the sol gel elaboration and defects photoluminescence (PL) examination of Al2O3 nanocrystallites (size ˜30 nm) confined in glass based on silica aerogel. Aluminium oxide aerogels were synthesized using esterification reaction for hydrolysis of the precursor and supercritical conditions of ethyl alcohol for drying. The obtained nanopowder was incorporated in SiO2 host matrix. After heating under natural atmosphere at 1150 °C for 2 h, the composite Al2O3/SiO2 (AS) exhibited a strong PL bands at 400 600 and 700 900 nm in 78 300 K temperature range. PL excitation (PLE) measurements show different origins of the emission. It was suggested that OH-related radiative centres and non-bridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHCs) were responsible for the bands at 400 600 and 700 900 nm, respectively.

  12. Effect of host glass matrix on structural and optical behavior of glass-ceramic nanocomposite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke Barta, M.; Nadler, Jason H.; Kang, Zhitao; Wagner, Brent K.; Rosson, Robert; Kahn, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Composite scintillator systems have received increased attention in recent years due to their promise for merging the radioisotope discrimination capabilities of single crystal scintillators with the high throughput scanning capabilities of portal monitors. However, producing the high light yield required for good energy resolution has proven challenging as scintillation photons are often scattered by variations in refractive index and agglomerated scintillator crystals within the composite. This investigation sought to mitigate these common problems by using glass-ceramic nanocomposite materials systems in which nanoscale scintillating crystallites are precipitated in a controlled manner from a transparent glass matrix. Precipitating crystallites in situ precludes nanoparticle agglomeration, and limiting crystallite size to 50 nm or less mitigates the effect of refractive index mismatch between the crystals and host glass. Cerium-doped gadolinium bromide (GdBr3(Ce)) scintillating crystals were incorporated into sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) and alumino-borosilicate (ABS) host glass matrices, and the resulting glass-ceramic structures and luminescence behavior were characterized. The as-cast glass from the ABS system displayed a highly ordered microstructure that produced the highest luminescence intensity (light yield) of the samples studied. However, heat treating to form the glass-ceramic precipitated rare-earth oxide crystallites rather than rare-earth halides. This degraded light yield relative to the unaged sample.

  13. Conductive thin-film composite hydrogels: Trapping an anionic polyelectrolyte in a polyaziridine host matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, A.; Suen, C.; Hill, S.

    1995-08-01

    Acid-catalyzed polymerization of sufficiently concentrated aqueous solutions of a trifunctional aziridine monomer affords hydrogels. Dynamic mechanical analysis has been used to demonstrate that composite hydrogels, obtained when the polymerization is effected in the presence of poly(sodium styrenesulfonate), have a composition dependent modulus. A region rich in the polyelectrolyte has a modulus which exceeds that of the {open_quotes}host{close_quotes} homogeneous polyaziridine hydrogel. This is consistent with ionic bonds between protonated sites on the polyaziridine matrix and sulfonate groups on the included polyelectrolyte augmenting the structural stability of the hydrogel. Thin films were prepared from coatings of the incipient hydrogel solutions. When the coatings are dried to a water content of 20%, water-insoluble thin films are obtained provided a critical weight fraction of the monomer is exceeded. Conductive thin films can be obtained, provided a critical weight fraction of polyelectrolyte is exceeded. FTIR analysis of the coatings in the attenuated total reflectance mode shows that conductivity increases as tight ion pairing decreases between the polyelectrolyte and its counter ions in the matrix. The S-shaped dependence of the normalized conductivity on the composition of the thin films is independent of the state of hydration of the film. Effective medium percolation theory, (EMPT), generally fits the S-shaped compositional dependence of the conductivity but overestimates the rate of growth of the conductivity beyond the critical point. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  14. A bioinformatics analysis of alternative exon usage in human genes coding for extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, Noboru Jo; Vibranovski, Maria Dulcetti; de Souza, Sandro José

    2004-12-30

    Alternative splicing increases protein diversity through the generation of different mRNA molecules from the same gene. Although alternative splicing seems to be a widespread phenomenon in the human transcriptome, it is possible that different subgroups of genes present different patterns, related to their biological roles. Analysis of a subgroup may enhance common features of its members that would otherwise disappear amidst a heterogeneous population. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are a good set for such analyses since they are structurally and functionally related. This family of proteins is involved in a large variety of functions, probably achieved by the combinatorial use of protein domains through exon shuffling events. To determine if ECM genes have a different pattern of alternative splicing, we compared clusters of expressed sequences of ECM to all other genes regarding features related to the most frequent type of alternative splicing, alternative exon usage (AEU), such as: the number of alternative exon-intron structures per cluster, the number of AEU events per exon-intron structure, the number of exons per event, among others. Although we did not find many differences between the two sets, we observed a higher frequency of AEU events involving entire protein domains in the ECM set, a feature that could be associated with their multi-domain nature. As other subgroups or even the ECM set in different tissues could present distinct patterns of AEU, it may be premature to conclude that alternative splicing is homogeneous among groups of related genes.

  15. Properties of alternative microbial hosts used in synthetic biology: towards the design of a modular chassis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juhyun; Salvador, Manuel; Saunders, Elizabeth; González, Jaime; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The chassis is the cellular host used as a recipient of engineered biological systems in synthetic biology. They are required to propagate the genetic information and to express the genes encoded in it. Despite being an essential element for the appropriate function of genetic circuits, the chassis is rarely considered in their design phase. Consequently, the circuits are transferred to model organisms commonly used in the laboratory, such as Escherichia coli, that may be suboptimal for a required function. In this review, we discuss some of the properties desirable in a versatile chassis and summarize some examples of alternative hosts for synthetic biology amenable for engineering. These properties include a suitable life style, a robust cell wall, good knowledge of its regulatory network as well as of the interplay of the host components with the exogenous circuits, and the possibility of developing whole-cell models and tuneable metabolic fluxes that could allow a better distribution of cellular resources (metabolites, ATP, nucleotides, amino acids, transcriptional and translational machinery). We highlight Pseudomonas putida, widely used in many different biotechnological applications as a prominent organism for synthetic biology due to its metabolic diversity, robustness and ease of manipulation. PMID:27903818

  16. Which Morphological Characteristics Are Most Influenced by the Host Matrix in Downy Mildews? A Case Study in Pseudoperonospora cubensis

    PubMed Central

    Runge, Fabian; Ndambi, Beninweck; Thines, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Before the advent of molecular phylogenetics, species concepts in the downy mildews, an economically important group of obligate biotrophic oomycete pathogens, have mostly been based upon host range and morphology. While molecular phylogenetic studies have confirmed a narrow host range for many downy mildew species, others, like Pseudoperonospora cubensis affect even different genera. Although often morphological differences were found for new, phylogenetically distinct species, uncertainty prevails regarding their host ranges, especially regarding related plants that have been reported as downy mildew hosts, but were not included in the phylogenetic studies. In these cases, the basis for deciding if the divergence in some morphological characters can be deemed sufficient for designation as separate species is uncertain, as observed morphological divergence could be due to different host matrices colonised. The broad host range of P. cubensis (ca. 60 host species) renders this pathogen an ideal model organism for the investigation of morphological variations in relation to the host matrix and to evaluate which characteristics are best indicators for conspecificity or distinctiveness. On the basis of twelve morphological characterisitcs and a set of twelve cucurbits from five different Cucurbitaceae tribes, including the two species, Cyclanthera pedata and Thladiantha dubia, hitherto not reported as hosts of P. cubensis, a significant influence of the host matrix on pathogen morphology was found. Given the high intraspecific variation of some characteristics, also their plasticity has to be taken into account. The implications for morphological species determination and the confidence limits of morphological characteristics are discussed. For species delimitations in Pseudoperonospora it is shown that the ratio of the height of the first ramification to the sporangiophore length, ratio of the longer to the shorter ultimate branchlet, and especially the length and

  17. Bap, a Biofilm Matrix Protein of Staphylococcus aureus Prevents Cellular Internalization through Binding to GP96 Host Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections. PMID:22876182

  18. Testing local host adaptation and phenotypic plasticity in a herbivore when alternative related host plants occur sympatrically.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Montoya, Lorena; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Host race formation in phytophagous insects can be an early stage of adaptive speciation. However, the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in host use is another possible outcome. Using a reciprocal transplant experiment we tested the hypothesis of local adaptation in the aphid Brevicoryne brassicae. Aphid genotypes derived from two sympatric host plants, Brassica oleracea and B. campestris, were assessed in order to measure the extent of phenotypic plasticity in morphological and life history traits in relation to the host plants. We obtained an index of phenotypic plasticity for each genotype. Morphological variation of aphids was summarized by principal components analysis. Significant effects of recipient host on morphological variation and life history traits (establishment, age at first reproduction, number of nymphs, and intrinsic growth rate) were detected. We did not detected genotype × host plant interaction; in general the genotypes developed better on B. campestris, independent of the host plant species from which they were collected. Therefore, there was no evidence to suggest local adaptation. Regarding plasticity, significant differences among genotypes in the index of plasticity were detected. Furthermore, significant selection on PC1 (general aphid body size) on B. campestris, and on PC1 and PC2 (body length relative to body size) on B. oleracea was detected. The elevation of the reaction norm of PC1 and the slope of the reaction norm for PC2 (i.e., plasticity) were under directional selection. Thus, host plant species constitute distinct selective environments for B. brassicae. Aphid genotypes expressed different phenotypes in response to the host plant with low or nil fitness costs. Phenotypic plasticity and gene flow limits natural selection for host specialization promoting the maintenance of genetic variation in host exploitation.

  19. Testing Local Host Adaptation and Phenotypic Plasticity in a Herbivore When Alternative Related Host Plants Occur Sympatrically

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Montoya, Lorena; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Host race formation in phytophagous insects can be an early stage of adaptive speciation. However, the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in host use is another possible outcome. Using a reciprocal transplant experiment we tested the hypothesis of local adaptation in the aphid Brevicoryne brassicae. Aphid genotypes derived from two sympatric host plants, Brassica oleracea and B. campestris, were assessed in order to measure the extent of phenotypic plasticity in morphological and life history traits in relation to the host plants. We obtained an index of phenotypic plasticity for each genotype. Morphological variation of aphids was summarized by principal components analysis. Significant effects of recipient host on morphological variation and life history traits (establishment, age at first reproduction, number of nymphs, and intrinsic growth rate) were detected. We did not detected genotype × host plant interaction; in general the genotypes developed better on B. campestris, independent of the host plant species from which they were collected. Therefore, there was no evidence to suggest local adaptation. Regarding plasticity, significant differences among genotypes in the index of plasticity were detected. Furthermore, significant selection on PC1 (general aphid body size) on B. campestris, and on PC1 and PC2 (body length relative to body size) on B. oleracea was detected. The elevation of the reaction norm of PC1 and the slope of the reaction norm for PC2 (i.e., plasticity) were under directional selection. Thus, host plant species constitute distinct selective environments for B. brassicae. Aphid genotypes expressed different phenotypes in response to the host plant with low or nil fitness costs. Phenotypic plasticity and gene flow limits natural selection for host specialization promoting the maintenance of genetic variation in host exploitation. PMID:24265743

  20. Thermalization of a two-dimensional photon gas in a polymeric host matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Julian; Damm, Tobias; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2012-07-01

    We investigate thermodynamic properties of a two-dimensional photon gas confined by a dye-filled optical microcavity. A thermally equilibrated state of the photon gas is achieved by radiative coupling to a heat bath that is realized with dye molecules embedded in a polymer at room temperature. The chemical potential of the gas is freely adjustable. The optical microcavity consisting of two curved mirrors induces both a non-vanishing effective photon mass and a harmonic trapping potential for the photons. While previous experiments of our group have used liquid dye solutions, the measurements described here are based on dye molecules incorporated into a polymer host matrix. The solid state material allows a simplified operation of the experimental scheme. We furthermore describe studies of fluorescence properties of dye-doped polymers, and verify the applicability of Kennard-Stepanov theory in this system. In the future, dye-based solid state systems hold promise for the realization of single-mode light sources in thermal equilibrium based on Bose-Einstein condensation of photons, as well as for solar energy concentrators.

  1. Host-Mediated Bioactivation of Pyrazinamide: Implications for Efficacy, Resistance, and Therapeutic Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Via, Laura E.; Savic, Rada; Weiner, Danielle M.; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Prideaux, Brendan; Irwin, Scott M.; Lyon, Eddie; O’Brien, Paul; Gopal, Pooja; Eum, Seokyong; Lee, Myungsun; Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Dutta, Noton K.; Shim, TaeSun; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Wooshik; Karakousis, Petros C.; Lenaerts, Anne; Nuermberger, Eric; Barry, Clifton E.; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide has played a critical role in shortening therapy against drug-sensitive, drug-resistant, active, and latent tuberculosis (TB). Despite widespread recognition of its therapeutic importance, the sterilizing properties of this 60-year-old drug remain an enigma given its rather poor activity in vitro. Here we revisit longstanding paradigms and offer pharmacokinetic explanations for the apparent disconnect between in vitro activity and clinical impact. We show substantial host-mediated conversion of prodrug pyrazinamide (PZA) to the active form, pyrazinoic acid (POA), in TB patients and in animal models. We demonstrate favorable penetration of this pool of circulating POA from plasma into lung tissue and granulomas, where the pathogen resides. In standardized growth inhibition experiments, we show that POA exhibits superior in vitro potency compared to PZA, indicating that the vascular supply of host-derived POA may contribute to the in vivo efficacy of PZA, thereby reducing the apparent discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo activity. However, the results also raise the possibility that subinhibitory concentrations of POA generated by the host could fuel the emergence of resistance to both PZA and POA. In contrast to widespread expectations, we demonstrate good oral bioavailability and exposure in preclinical species in pharmacokinetic studies of oral POA. Baseline exposure of oral POA can be further increased by the xanthine oxidase inhibitor and approved gout drug allopurinol. These promising results pave the way for clinical investigations of oral POA as a therapeutic alternative or an add-on to overcome PZA resistance and salvage this essential TB drug. PMID:26086040

  2. Diversity of alternative hosts of maize stemborers in Trans-Nzoia district of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kanya, James I; Ngi-Song, Adele J; Sétamou, Mamoudou F; Overholt, William; Ochora, John; Osir, Ellie O

    2004-01-01

    Genetically-engineered (GE) crops such as those expressing insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin genes have the potential to greatly reduce the use of broad spectrum insecticides and increase crop productivity. However, development of resistance by the target insect species is an important consideration in the deployment of this strategy. In areas where GE crops are deployed on a large scale, current resistance management strategies rely on a 'refuge strategy', comprising the incorporation of a certain proportion of non-GE plants in the agro-ecosystems, to conserve susceptible individuals of the target pests. In the USA, simulation models indicate that at least 20% of the crop should be non-Bt plants. In Africa, the target lepidopteran stemborers attack a wide range of wild grass species as well as cultivated cereal crops. Wild grasses generally occur in the vicinity of maize and other cereal fields, and may provide a refuge if GE crops are in the farming systems. To assess the quality of these grasses as refuges, it is critical to obtain information about their size and spatial distribution. In this study, we have assessed the abundance and diversity of alternative refuge of stemborers, mainly wild grasses occurring in the proximity of maize fields, in Trans-Nzoia district, one of the most important maize growing areas in Kenya. The proportion of wild host plants relative to maize was found to decline from 100% during the non-cropping season to <8% during the maize-growing season. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index indicated high variation in the diversity of wild hosts of stemborers between agro-ecological zones in the district. The results of this study are discussed in light of the possible role that wild host plant species might play in stemborer resistance management following the introduction of Bt maize.

  3. An alternative interpretation of the spectroscopy and internal dynamics of excited Cl 2 molecules trapped in an argon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Calvé, J.; Chergui, M.

    1986-12-01

    Recent work on the spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the excited states of Cl 2 trapped in an Ar matrix is compared with independent gas-phase results on chlorine or Cl 2 + rare gas as well as with other matrix studies. An alternative interpretation of the results is proposed.

  4. Global Profiling of the Cellular Alternative RNA Splicing Landscape during Virus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Simon; Martenon-Brodeur, Camille; Caron, Marie; Garant, Jean-Michel; Tremblay, Marie-Pier; Armero, Victoria E. S.; Durand, Mathieu; Lapointe, Elvy; Thibault, Philippe; Tremblay-Létourneau, Maude; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Scott, Michelle S.; Lemay, Guy; Bisaillon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a central mechanism of genetic regulation which modifies the sequence of RNA transcripts in higher eukaryotes. AS has been shown to increase both the variability and diversity of the cellular proteome by changing the composition of resulting proteins through differential choice of exons to be included in mature mRNAs. In the present study, alterations to the global RNA splicing landscape of cellular genes upon viral infection were investigated using mammalian reovirus as a model. Our study provides the first comprehensive portrait of global changes in the RNA splicing signatures that occur in eukaryotic cells following infection with a human virus. We identify 240 modified alternative splicing events upon infection which belong to transcripts frequently involved in the regulation of gene expression and RNA metabolism. Using mass spectrometry, we also confirm modifications to transcript-specific peptides resulting from AS in virus-infected cells. These findings provide additional insights into the complexity of virus-host interactions as these splice variants expand proteome diversity and function during viral infection. PMID:27598998

  5. Global Profiling of the Cellular Alternative RNA Splicing Landscape during Virus-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, Simon; Martenon-Brodeur, Camille; Caron, Marie; Garant, Jean-Michel; Tremblay, Marie-Pier; Armero, Victoria E S; Durand, Mathieu; Lapointe, Elvy; Thibault, Philippe; Tremblay-Létourneau, Maude; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Scott, Michelle S; Lemay, Guy; Bisaillon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a central mechanism of genetic regulation which modifies the sequence of RNA transcripts in higher eukaryotes. AS has been shown to increase both the variability and diversity of the cellular proteome by changing the composition of resulting proteins through differential choice of exons to be included in mature mRNAs. In the present study, alterations to the global RNA splicing landscape of cellular genes upon viral infection were investigated using mammalian reovirus as a model. Our study provides the first comprehensive portrait of global changes in the RNA splicing signatures that occur in eukaryotic cells following infection with a human virus. We identify 240 modified alternative splicing events upon infection which belong to transcripts frequently involved in the regulation of gene expression and RNA metabolism. Using mass spectrometry, we also confirm modifications to transcript-specific peptides resulting from AS in virus-infected cells. These findings provide additional insights into the complexity of virus-host interactions as these splice variants expand proteome diversity and function during viral infection.

  6. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer enhances host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection through MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongwei; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chunxia; Chen, Jianshe; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Hu, Yue; Niu, Xiaobin; Pei, Dongxu; He, Zhiqiang; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the role of extra-cellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the drug resistance of the pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The BALB/c mice were transfected with PA, then the mice were infected with the siRNA of EMMPRIN to silence the EMMPRIN gene. The EMMPRIN mRNA and protein were detected by using RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. In order to examine the function of EMMPRIN in drug resistance of PA, the BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were treated with EMMPRIN siRNA. The cytokines, EMMPRIN and MMP9 were examined by the RP-PCR and ELISA, respectively, undergoing the silence of EMMPRIN siRNA. Moreover, the western blot assay was also used to test the phosphorylated MAPK in the murine macrophages after silenced by the EMMPRIN siRNA. The EMMPRIN was activated, with lipopolysaccharide stimulation and treated with the MAPK inhibitor, to evaluate whether the MAPK participates in the EMMPRIN-triggered drug resistance. The results indicated that the EMMPRIN expression was elevated in the infected BALB/c at 3 or 5 days post-infection. Silence of EMMPRIN Enhanced the Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PA keratitis. Silence of EMMPRIN significantly up-regulated Th1-type cytokines IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-18, but down-regulated Th2-type cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. MMP9 was increased in the cells with rEMMPRIN treatment. EMMPRIN inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production via a MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, EMMPRIN promotes host resistance against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection via MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:28078032

  7. Demographic comparison of sweetpotato weevil reared on a major host, Ipomoea batatas, and an alternative host, I. triloba

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Gadi V. P.; Chi, Hisn

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we collected life table data for the sweetpotato weevil, Cylas formicarius, grown on Ipomoea batatas and Ipomoea triloba, and analyzed them using an age-stage, two-sex life table. We also demonstrated the growth potential of C. formicarius on these two host plants by using population projection. These data will be useful to the growers to the selection or eradication of host plants in an integrated control strategy for C. formicarius for the entire area of the targeted areas. We found that C. formicarius developed faster on I. batatas than on I. triloba. The developmental times of the larval and pupal stages on I. batatas than on I. triloba were 37.01 and 8.3 days. The adult females emerged before and began to produce eggs at 42 days earlier when reared on I. batatas. The fecundity of females was 90.0 eggs on I. batatas significantly higher than the mean fecundity of 68.5 eggs on I. triloba. Although this insect has a higher intrinsic rate of increase on I. batatas, the study indicated that C. formicarius can successfully survive and reproduce on both host plants. PMID:26156566

  8. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  9. Immune benefits from alternative host plants could maintain polyphagy in a phytophagous insect.

    PubMed

    Muller, Karen; Vogelweith, Fanny; Thiéry, Denis; Moret, Yannick; Moreau, Jérôme

    2015-02-01

    The tritrophic interactions hypothesis, integrating bottom-up (plant-herbivore) and top-down (herbivore-natural enemies) effects, predicts that specialist herbivores should outcompete generalists. However, some phytophagous insects have generalist diets, suggesting that maintenance of a diverse diet may confer certain fitness advantages that outweigh diet specialization. In field conditions, the European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana, feeds on diverse locally rare alternative host plants (AHPs) although grapevines are a highly abundant and predictable food source. The laboratory studies presented here show that survival, growth, and constitutive levels of immune defences (concentration of haemocytes and phenoloxidase activity) of L. botrana larvae were significantly enhanced when they were fed AHPs rather than grape. These results indicated a strong positive effect of AHPs on life history traits and immune defences of L. botrana. Such positive effects of AHPs should be advantageous to the moth under heavy selective pressure by natural enemies and, as a consequence, favour the maintenance of a broad diet preference in this species. We therefore believe that our results account for the role of immunity in the maintenance of polyphagy in phytophagous insects.

  10. Century-old Mystery of Puccinia striiformis Life History Solved with the Identification of Berberis as an Alternate Host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The life history of Puccinia striiformis remains a mystery because the alternate host has never been found. Inoculation of grasses using aeciospores from naturally infected Berberis chinensis and B. koreana resulted in infection on Poa pratensis, producing uredinia typical of stripe rust caused by P...

  11. Infection success of different trematode genotypes in two alternative intermediate hosts: evidence for intraspecific specialization?

    PubMed

    Leung, T L F; Poulin, R

    2010-02-01

    The evolution of host specificity and the potential trade-off between being a generalist and a specialist are central issues in the evolutionary ecology of parasites. Different species of parasites or even different populations of the same species often show different degrees of host specificity. However, less is known about intraspecific variation in host specificity within a population. We investigated intraspecific variation by experimentally exposing cercariae from different clones of the trematode Curtuteria australis to two species of second intermediate hosts, the New Zealand cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi and the wedge shell Macomona liliana. We found an overall difference in infection success between the two bivalve species, with A. stutchburyi being the more heavily infected host. However, the cercariae showed a consistent preference for encysting at the tip of the bivalve's foot, regardless of host species. Importantly, there were no significant differences among parasite clones in either relative infection success in the two hosts or preference for the host foot tip. This lack of intraspecific variation may be due to the life-history traits of both parasite and hosts in our system, which may limit opportunities for variation in performance and exploitation strategies in different hosts to evolve within the population.

  12. Tetrahymena: An Alternative Model Host for Evaluating Virulence of Aeromonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Mao-Da; Lin, Xiao-Qin; Hu, Meng; Li, Jing; Lu, Cheng-Ping; Liu, Yong-Jie

    2012-01-01

    An easier assessment model would be helpful for high-throughput screening of Aeromonas virulence. The previous study indicated the potential of Tetrahymena as a permissive model to examine virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila. Here our aim was to assess virulence of Aeromonas spp. using two model hosts, a zebrafish assay and Tetrahymena-Aeromonas co-culture, and to examine whether data from the Tetrahymena thermophila model reflects infections in the well-established animal model. First, virulence of 39 Aeromonas strains was assessed by determining the 50% lethal dose (LD50) in zebrafish. LD50 values ranging from 1.3×102 to 3.0×107 indicated that these strains represent a high to moderate degree of virulence and could be useful to assess virulence in the Tetrahymena model. In Tetrahymena-Aeromonas co-culture, we evaluated the virulence of Aeromonas by detecting relative survival of Aeromonas and Tetrahymena. An Aeromonas isolate was considered virulent when its relative survival was greater than 60%, while the Aeromonas isolate was considered avirulent if its relative survival was below 40%. When relative survival of T. thermophila was lower than 40% after co-culture with an Aeromonas isolate, the bacterial strain was regarded as virulent. In contrast, the strain was classified as avirulent if relative survival of T. thermophila was greater than 50%. Encouragingly, data from the 39 Aeromonas strains showed good correlation in zebrafish and Tetrahymena-Aeromonas co-culture models. The results provide sufficient data to demonstrate that Tetrahymena can be a comparable alternative to zebrafish for determining the virulence of Aeromonas isolates. PMID:23145022

  13. Elaboration and characterization of TiO2 nanoparticles incorporated in SiO2 host matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amlouk, A.; El Mir, L.; Kraiem, S.; Alaya, S.

    2006-07-01

    Nanometer-scale TiO2 particles have been synthesized by sol gel method. It was incorporated in a glass-based silica aerogel. The composite was characterized by various techniques such as particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and photoluminescence (PL). The bulk glass presents a strong luminescence at wavelengths ranging from 750 to 950 nm. This PL was attributed to various non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) defects resulting from thermal treatment and crystallization of TiO2 at the interface between titania nanoparticles and silica host matrix.

  14. Volatile fragrances associated with flowers mediate the host plant alternation of a polyphagous mirid bug

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is an important insect pest of cotton, fruit trees and other crops in China, and exhibits a particularly broad host range. Adult A. lucorum greatly prefers host plants at the flowering stage, and their populations track flowering plants both spatiall...

  15. A Bacterial Pathogen uses Distinct Type III Secretion Systems to Alternate between Host Kingdom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of eukaryotes often secrete proteins directly into host cells via a needle-like protein channel called a ‘type III secretion system’ (T3SS). Bacteria that are adapted to either animal or plant hosts use phylogenetically distinct T3SSs for secreting proteins. Here, ...

  16. Immigration of susceptible hosts triggers the evolution of alternative parasite defence strategies.

    PubMed

    Chabas, Hélène; van Houte, Stineke; Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R

    2016-08-31

    Migration of hosts and parasites can have a profound impact on host-parasite ecological and evolutionary interactions. Using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 and its phage DMS3vir, we here show that immigration of naive hosts into coevolving populations of hosts and parasites can influence the mechanistic basis underlying host defence evolution. Specifically, we found that at high levels of bacterial immigration, bacteria switched from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) to surface modification-mediated defence. This effect emerges from an increase in the force of infection, which tips the balance from CRISPR to surface modification-based defence owing to the induced and fixed fitness costs associated with these mechanisms, respectively.

  17. Music as Engaging, Educational Matrix: Exploring the Case of Marginalised Students Attending an "Alternative" Music Industry School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, David; Riddle, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    "Harmony High" is an alternative school where music functions as an educational magnet to attract marginalised students who have disengaged from the mainstream. Through an investigation of the student perspective, we discover that while acting as a magnet, music also becomes the educational matrix or "heart and soul" that helps…

  18. Century-old mystery of Puccinia striiformis life history solved with the identification of Berberis as an alternate host.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Szabo, Les J; Carson, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The life history of Puccinia striiformis remains a mystery because the alternate host has never been identified. Inoculation of grasses using aeciospores from naturally infected Berberis chinensis and B. koreana resulted in infection on Poa pratensis, producing uredinia typical of stripe rust caused by P. striiformis. Analyses using real-time polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence confirmed the rust fungus as P. striiformis. Pycnia and aecia were produced on B. chinensis, B. holstii, B. koreana, and B. vulgaris after inoculation using germinating telia of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. Wheat inoculated with aeciospores from B. chinensis resulted in uredinia, which demonstrated that Berberis spp. also serve as alternate hosts for the wheat stripe rust pathogen. The elucidation of the complete life history for P. striiformis f. sp. tritici will provide a powerful tool to rapidly advance our knowledge of the genetics of this rust fungus, and will lead to the development of improved strategies for a better control of stripe rust.

  19. Polyfluorides and Neat Fluorine as Host Material in Matrix-Isolation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Brosi, Felix; Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Kieninger, Stefanie; Schlöder, Tobias; Beckers, Helmut; Riedel, Sebastian

    2015-11-09

    The use of neat fluorine in matrix isolation is reported, as well as the formation of polyfluoride monoanions under cryogenic conditions. Purification procedures and spectroscopic data of fluorine are described, and matrix shifts of selected molecules and impurities in solid fluorine are compared to those of common matrix gases (Ar, Kr, N2 , Ne). The reaction of neat fluorine and IR-laser ablated metal atoms to yield fluorides of chromium (CrF5 ), palladium (PdF2 ), gold (AuF5 ), and praseodymium (PrF4 ) has been investigated. The fluorides have been characterized in solid fluorine by IR spectroscopy at 5 K. Also the fluorination of Kr and the photo-dismutation of XeO4 have been studied by using IR spectroscopy in neat fluorine. Formation of the [F5 ](-) ion was obtained by IR-laser ablation of platinum in the presence of fluorine and proven in a Ne matrix at 5 K by two characteristic vibrational bands of [F5 ](-) at $\\tilde \

  20. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as regulators of tumor-host interaction in a spontaneous metastasis model in rats.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Ana Carolina; Remedi, María Mónica; Susperreguy, Sebastián; Frede, Silvia; Gilardoni, Mónica Beatriz; Tang, Yi; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Yan, Li

    2008-12-01

    EMMPRIN has a role in invasion and metastasis through the induction of MMPs and the consequent modulation of cell-substrate and cell-cell adhesion processes. The present study evaluates the expression of EMMPRIN protein and MMP-2/9 activity in tumor and parenchymal cells in a spontaneous metastasis model in rats. Moreover, we explore the regulation of EMMPRIN and MMP-9 by tumor-epithelial cell interactions in vitro. By zymography, we observed an increased proMMP-9 expression in both metastasized liver and spleen samples from tumor bearing rats. Immunohistochemical studies showed EMMPRIN-positive tumor cells in tumor biopsies as well as in spleen and liver samples from tumor bearing rats. Interestingly, a significant increase in EMMPRIN expression in hepatic cells was also detected. The regulation of EMMPRIN expression in tumor and liver cells in response to tumor-host interaction was investigated in vitro through a tumor cell line culture on extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules or in co-culture with normal rat liver cells (BRL3A cells). No significant changes in EMMPRIN expression were detected in tumor cells cultured on ECM molecules. On the other hand, EMMPRIN protein and MMP-9 mRNA expression were induced in BRL3A cells. The increase in EMMPRIN expression in BRL3A cells was inhibited by an anti-EMMPRIN antibody. These results reinforce the main role of EMMPRIN mediating tumor-host interactions that may evolve new opportunities for therapeutic interventions.

  1. Lytic infection of Lactococcus lactis by bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 triggers alternative transcriptional host responses.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Zomer, Aldert; Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-08-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed throughout lytic infection. Whole-genome microarrays performed at various time points postinfection demonstrated a rather modest impact on host transcription. The majority of changes in the host transcriptome occur during late infection stages; few changes in host gene transcription occur during the immediate and early infection stages. Alterations in the L. lactis UC509.9 transcriptome during lytic infection appear to be phage specific, with relatively few differentially transcribed genes shared between cells infected with Tuc2009 and those infected with c2. Despite the apparent lack of a coordinated general phage response, three themes common to both infections were noted: alternative transcription of genes involved in catabolic flux and energy production, differential transcription of genes involved in cell wall modification, and differential transcription of genes involved in the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The transcriptional profiles of both bacteriophages during lytic infection generally correlated with the findings of previous studies and allowed the confirmation of previously predicted promoter sequences. In addition, the host transcriptional response to lysogenization with Tuc2009 was monitored along with tiling array analysis of Tuc2009 in the lysogenic state. Analysis identified 44 host genes with altered transcription during lysogeny, 36 of which displayed levels of transcription significantly reduced from those for uninfected cells.

  2. Classical Labeling of Bacterial Pathogens According to Their Lifestyle in the Host: Inconsistencies and Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Manuel T.

    2012-01-01

    An ample understanding of the complex interactions between host and pathogen will improve our ability to develop new prophylactic and therapeutic measures against infection. Precise classification of infectious agents in regards to their infective lifestyles in the host and corresponding pathogenic implications are required because clear concepts are essential to plan fruitful research. Classically, pathogenic bacteria are classified as extracellular, facultative intracellular, and obligate intracellular. In my opinion, this classification is inadequate because, as concluded from data here discussed, it is based on inconsistencies and hyper-valorizes the capacity of the infectious agent replicate in vitro in cell-free media. For a microbial pathogen, what matters is whether intra- or extracellularity is in the context of the in vivo life and in association with pathogenicity. When living as a pathogen in association with its host, what is relevant in microbiological terms is not the ability to grow in artificial cell-free bacteriological media or in environmental niches but whether the intracellular infectious agent, besides the phase of intracellular growth which is behind its label, also is able to live extracellularly in the natural settings of the extracellular territories of their hosts. To eliminate the inconsistencies associated with the classical labeling of bacterial pathogens, I propose that bacterial pathogens be labeled exclusive extracellular, dual intracellular/extracellular and exclusive intracellular based on their infective lifestyle in the host, not in the ability to grow in artificial bacteriological media. PMID:22393329

  3. [Parasitism capacity of Trichogramma pratissolii Querino & Zucchi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) on alternative hosts, under different temperatures].

    PubMed

    Zago, Hugo B; Pratissoli, Dirceu; Barros, Reginaldo; Gondim, Manoel G C; Santos, Hugo J G Dos

    2007-01-01

    The successful use of Trichogramma as biocontrol agent depends on its mass production in laboratory, a fundamental step for any biological control program among other factors. This work investigated the parasitism capacity of Trichogramma pratissolii Querino & Zuchi (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), a new recorded Trichogramma species, parasitizing eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller) and Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) under the temperatures of 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30 and 33 degree Celsius. Eggs of these hosts were offered to newly emerged females during 24h. This procedure was repeated daily for each female and each temperature up to female death, in order to estimate daily and accumulated parasitism, and female longevity. On both hosts, the daily parasitism decreased as function of the female age. Under all temperatures studied and both hosts the highest rate of parasitism was observed during the first 24h of host exposure, and reached 80% of total parasitism in the 4th and 3rd days when parasitizing A. kuehniella and C. cephalonica, respectively. On both hosts, the highest parasitism rate was observed under temperatures from 21 degree Celsius to 27 degree Celsius. Average longevities of T. pratissolii females deprived of food emerging from A. kuehniella and C. cephalonica lived for 1.0 and 8.9 days when reared at 15 degree Celsius e 33 degree Celsius, respectively. The results indicate that eggs of A. kuehniella and C. cephalonica and temperatures from 21 degree Celsius to 27 degree Celsius were appropriate to rear T. pratissolii.

  4. A bacterial pathogen uses distinct type III secretion systems to alternate between host kingdoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss), the causative agent of Stewart’s bacterial wilt and...

  5. Volatile fragrances associated with flowers mediate host plant alternation of a polyphagous mirid bug

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongsheng; Lu, Yanhui; Xiu, Chunli; Geng, Huihui; Cai, Xiaoming; Sun, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yongjun; Williams III, Livy; Wyckhuys, Kris A. G.; Wu, Kongming

    2015-01-01

    Apolygus lucorum (Hemiptera: Miridae) is an important insect pest of cotton and fruit trees in China. The adults prefer host plants at the flowering stage, and their populations track flowering plants both spatially and temporally. In this study, we examine whether flower preference of its adults is mediated by plant volatiles, and which volatile compositions play an important role in attracting them. In olfactometer tests with 18 key host species, the adults preferred flowering plants over non-flowering plants of each species. Coupled gas chromatography-electroantennography revealed the presence of seven electrophysiologically active compounds from flowering plants. Although the adults responded to all seven synthetic plant volatiles in electroantennography tests, only four (m-xylene, butyl acrylate, butyl propionate and butyl butyrate) elicited positive behavioral responses in Y-tube olfactometer bioassays. The adults were strongly attracted to these four active volatiles in multi-year laboratory and field trials. Our results suggest that these four fragrant volatiles, which are emitted in greater amounts once plants begin to flower, mediate A. lucorum’s preference to flowering host plants. We proved that the use of commonly occurring plant volatiles to recognize a large range of plant species can facilitate host selection and preference of polyphagous insect herbivore. PMID:26423224

  6. An Alternative Method for Computing Mean and Covariance Matrix of Some Multivariate Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Choudhury, Askar

    2009-01-01

    Computing the mean and covariance matrix of some multivariate distributions, in particular, multivariate normal distribution and Wishart distribution are considered in this article. It involves a matrix transformation of the normal random vector into a random vector whose components are independent normal random variables, and then integrating…

  7. Porous carbon derived from Sunflower as a host matrix for ultra-stable lithium-selenium battery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Min; Niu, Yubin; Mao, Cuiping; Liu, Sangui; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Shu-Juan; Xu, Maowen

    2017-03-15

    A novel porous carbon material using the spongy tissue of sunflower as raw material is reported for the first time. The obtained porous carbon has an extremely high surface area of 2493.0m(2)g(-1), which is beneficial to focus on encapsulating selenium in it and have an inhibiting effect about diffusion of polyselenides over the charge/discharge processes used as the host matrix for Li-Se battery. The porous carbon/Se composite electrode with 63wt% selenium delivers a high specific capacitance of 319mAhg(-1) of the initial capacity, and maintains 290mAhg(-1), representing an extremely high capacity retention of 90.9% after 840 cycles with the rate of 1C.

  8. Free base tetraazaporphine isolated in inert gas hosts: matrix influence on its spectroscopic and photochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Henchy, Chris; McCaffrey, John G; Arabei, Serguei; Pavich, Tatiana; Galaup, Jean-Pierre; Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Crépin, Claudine

    2014-09-28

    The absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of free base tetraazaporphine (H2TAP) trapped in Ne, N2, and Ar matrices have been recorded at cryogenic temperatures. Normal Raman spectra of H2TAP were recorded in KBr discs and predicted with density functional theory (DFT) using large basis sets calculations. The vibrational frequencies observed in the Raman Spectrum exhibit reasonable agreement with those deduced from the emission spectra, as well as with frequencies predicted from large basis set DFT computations. The upper state vibrational frequencies, obtained from highly resolved, site selected excitation spectra, are consistently lower than the ground state frequencies. This contrasts with the situation in free base phthalocyanine, where the upper state shows little changes in vibrational frequencies and geometry when compared with the ground state. Investigations of the photochemical properties of H2TAP isolated in the three matrices have been performed using the method of persistent spectral hole-burning (PSHB). This technique has been used to reveal sites corresponding to distinct N-H tautomers which were not evident in the absorption spectra. An analysis of the holes and antiholes produced with PSHB in the Qx (0-0) absorption band made it possible to identify inter-conversion of distinct host sites.

  9. Putative alternative polyadenylation (APA) events in the early interaction of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells.

    PubMed

    Afonso-Grunz, Fabian

    2015-12-01

    The immune response of epithelial cells upon infection is mediated by changing activity levels of a variety of proteins along with changes in mRNA, and also ncRNA abundance. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) represents a mechanism that diversifies gene expression similar to alternative splicing. T-cell activation, neuronal activity, development and several human diseases including viral infections involve APA, but at present it remains unclear if this mechanism is also implicated in the response to bacterial infections. Our recently published study of interacting Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells includes genome-wide expression profiles of human epithelial cells prior and subsequent to infection with the invasive pathogen. The generated dataset (GEO accession number: GSE61730) covers several points of time post infection, and one of these interaction stages was additionally profiled with MACE-based dual 3'Seq, which allows for identification of polyadenylation (PA) sites. The present study features the polyadenylation landscape in early interacting cells based on this data, and provides a comparison of the identified PA sites with those of a corresponding 3P-Seq dataset of non-interacting cells. Differential PA site usage of FTL, PRDX1 and VAPA results in transcription of mRNA isoforms with distinct sets of miRNA and protein binding sites that influence processing, localization, stability, and translation of the respective mRNA. APA of these candidate genes consequently harbors the potential to modulate the host cell response to bacterial infection.

  10. Immunity of an Alternative Host Can Be Overcome by Higher Densities of Its Parasitoids Palmistichus elaeisis and Trichospilus diatraeae

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Gilberto Santos; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola; Zanuncio, Teresinha Vinha; Leite, Germano Leão Demolin; Polanczyk, Ricardo Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Interactions of the parasitoids Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare & LaSalle and Trichospilus diatraeae Cherian & Margabandhu (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) with its alternative host Anticarsia gemmatalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) affect the success or failure of the mass production of these parasitoids for use in integrated pest management programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the cellular defense and encapsulation ability of A. gemmatalis pupae against P. elaeisis or T. diatraeae in adult parasitoid densities of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 or 13 parasitoids/pupae. We evaluated the total quantity of circulating hemocytes and the encapsulation rate versus density. Increasing parasitoid density reduced the total number of hemocytes in the hemolymph and the encapsulation rate by parasitized pupae. Furthermore, densities of P. elaeisis above 5 parasitoids/pupae caused higher reduction in total hemocyte numbers. The encapsulation rate fell with increasing parasitoid density. However, parasitic invasion by both species induced generally similar responses. The reduction in defensive capacity of A. gemmatalis is related to the adjustment of the density of these parasitoids to their development in this host. Thus, the role of the density of P. elaeisis or T. diatraeae by pupa is induced suppression of cellular defense and encapsulation of the host, even without them possesses a co-evolutionary history. Furthermore, these findings can predict the success of P. elaeisis and T. diatraeae in the control of insect pests through the use of immunology as a tool for evaluation of natural enemies. PMID:20975929

  11. Xylem structure of four grape varieties and 12 alternative hosts to the xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidious

    PubMed Central

    Chatelet, David S.; Wistrom, Christina M.; Purcell, Alexander H.; Rost, Thomas L.; Matthews, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), responsible for Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine, colonizes the xylem conduits of vines, ultimately killing the plant. However, Vitis vinifera grapevine varieties differ in their susceptibility to Xf and numerous other plant species tolerate Xf populations without showing symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine the xylem structure of grapevines with different susceptibilities to Xf infection, as well as the xylem structure of non-grape plant species that support or limit movement of Xf to determine if anatomical differences might explain some of the differences in susceptibility to Xf. Methods Air and paint were introduced into leaves and stems to examine the connectivity between stem and leaves and the length distribution of their vessels. Leaf petiole and stem anatomies were studied to determine the basis for the free or restricted movement of Xf into the plant. Key Results There were no obvious differences in stem or petiole vascular anatomy among the grape varieties examined, nor among the other plant species that would explain differences in resistance to Xf. Among grape varieties, the more tolerant ‘Sylvaner’ had smaller stem vessel diameters and 20 % more parenchyma rays than the other three varieties. Alternative hosts supporting Xf movement had slightly longer open xylem conduits within leaves, and more connection between stem and leaves, when compared with alternative hosts that limit Xf movement. Conclusions Stem–leaf connectivity via open xylem conduits and vessel length is not responsible for differences in PD tolerance among grape varieties, or for limiting bacterial movement in the tolerant plant species. However, it was found that tolerant host plants had narrower vessels and more parenchyma rays, possibly restricting bacterial movement at the level of the vessels. The implications of xylem structure and connectivity for the means and regulation of bacterial movement are

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model to study senescence of host defense and the prevention by immunonutrition.

    PubMed

    Komura, Tomomi; Ikeda, Takanori; Hoshino, Kaori; Shibamura, Ayumi; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Whether nutritional control can retard senescence of immune function and decrease mortality from infectious diseases has not yet been established; the difficulty of establishing a model has made this a challenging topic to investigate. Caenorhabditis elegans has been extensively used as an experimental system for biological studies. Particularly for aging studies, the worm has the advantage of a short and reproducible life span. The organism has also been recognized as an alternative to mammalian models of infection with bacterial pathogens in this decade. Hence we have studied whether the worms could be a model host in the fields of immunosenescence and immunonutrition. Feeding nematodes lactic acid bacteria (LAB) resulted in increases in average life span of the nematodes compared to those fed Escherichia coli strain OP50, a standard food bacteria. The 7-day-old nematodes fed LAN from age 3 days were clearly endurable to subsequent salmonella infection compared with nematodes fed OP50 before the salmonella infection. The worm could be a unique model to study effects of food factors on longevity and host defense, so-called immunonutrition. Then we attempted to establish an immunosenescence model using C. elegans. We focused on the effects of worm age on the Legionella infection and the prevention by immunonutrition. No significant differences in survival were seen between 3-day-old worms fed OP50 and 3-day-old worms infected with virulent Legionella strains. However, when the worms were infected from 7.5 days after hatching, the virulent Legionella strains were obviously nematocidal for the worms' immunosenescence. In contrast, nematodes fed with bifidobacteria prior to Legionella infection were resistant to Legionella. C. elegans could act as a unique alternative host for immunosenescence and resultant opportunistic infection, and immunonutrition researches.

  13. New host factors important for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replication revealed by a novel microfluidics screen for interactors of matrix (M) protein.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Hamad, Samar; Caly, Leon; Avrahami, Dorit; Bacharach, Eran; Jans, David A; Gerber, Doron; Bajorek, Monika

    2015-03-01

    Although human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and elderly worldwide, there is no licensed RSV vaccine or effective drug treatment available. The RSV Matrix protein plays key roles in virus life cycle, being found in the nucleus early in infection in a transcriptional inhibitory role, and later localizing in viral inclusion bodies before coordinating viral assembly and budding at the plasma membrane. In this study, we used a novel, high throughput microfluidics platform and custom human open reading frame library to identify novel host cell binding partners of RSV matrix. Novel interactors identified included proteins involved in host transcription regulation, the innate immunity response, cytoskeletal regulation, membrane remodeling, and cellular trafficking. A number of these interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and cellular colocalization approaches. Importantly, the physiological significance of matrix interaction with the actin-binding protein cofilin 1, caveolae protein Caveolin 2, and the zinc finger protein ZNF502 was confirmed. siRNA knockdown of the host protein levels resulted in reduced RSV virus production in infected cells. These results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of RSV matrix in the host cell.

  14. Muscle beta1D integrin reinforces the cytoskeleton-matrix link: modulation of integrin adhesive function by alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Belkin, A M; Retta, S F; Pletjushkina, O Y; Balzac, F; Silengo, L; Fassler, R; Koteliansky, V E; Burridge, K; Tarone, G

    1997-12-15

    Expression of muscle-specific beta1D integrin with an alternatively spliced cytoplasmic domain in CHO and GD25, beta1 integrin-minus cells leads to their phenotypic conversion. beta1D-transfected nonmuscle cells display rounded morphology, lack of pseudopodial activity, retarded spreading, reduced migration, and significantly enhanced contractility compared with their beta1A-expressing counterparts. The transfected beta1D is targeted to focal adhesions and efficiently displaces the endogenous beta1A and alphavbeta3 integrins from the sites of cell-matrix contact. This displacement is observed on several types of extracellular matrix substrata and leads to elevated stability of focal adhesions in beta1D transfectants. Whereas a significant part of cellular beta1A integrin is extractable in digitonin, the majority of the transfected beta1D is digitonin-insoluble and is strongly associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. Increased interaction of beta1D integrin with the actin cytoskeleton is consistent with and might be mediated by its enhanced binding to talin. In contrast, beta1A interacts more strongly with alpha-actinin, than beta1D. Inside-out driven activation of the beta1D ectodomain increases ligand binding and fibronectin matrix assembly by beta1D transfectants. Phenotypic effects of beta1D integrin expression in nonmuscle cells are due to its enhanced interactions with both cytoskeletal and extracellular ligands. They parallel the transitions that muscle cells undergo during differentiation. Modulation of beta1 integrin adhesive function by alternative splicing serves as a physiological mechanism reinforcing the cytoskeleton- matrix link in muscle cells. This reflects the major role for beta1D integrin in muscle, where extremely stable association is required for contraction.

  15. Muscle β1D Integrin Reinforces the Cytoskeleton–Matrix Link: Modulation of Integrin Adhesive Function by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Belkin, Alexey M.; Retta, S. Francesco; Pletjushkina, Olga Y.; Balzac, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Fassler, Reinhard; Koteliansky, Victor E.; Burridge, Keith; Tarone, Guido

    1997-01-01

    Expression of muscle-specific β1D integrin with an alternatively spliced cytoplasmic domain in CHO and GD25, β1 integrin-minus cells leads to their phenotypic conversion. β1D-transfected nonmuscle cells display rounded morphology, lack of pseudopodial activity, retarded spreading, reduced migration, and significantly enhanced contractility compared with their β1A-expressing counterparts. The transfected β1D is targeted to focal adhesions and efficiently displaces the endogenous β1A and αvβ3 integrins from the sites of cell–matrix contact. This displacement is observed on several types of extracellular matrix substrata and leads to elevated stability of focal adhesions in β1D transfectants. Whereas a significant part of cellular β1A integrin is extractable in digitonin, the majority of the transfected β1D is digitonin-insoluble and is strongly associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. Increased interaction of β1D integrin with the actin cytoskeleton is consistent with and might be mediated by its enhanced binding to talin. In contrast, β1A interacts more strongly with α-actinin, than β1D. Inside-out driven activation of the β1D ectodomain increases ligand binding and fibronectin matrix assembly by β1D transfectants. Phenotypic effects of β1D integrin expression in nonmuscle cells are due to its enhanced interactions with both cytoskeletal and extracellular ligands. They parallel the transitions that muscle cells undergo during differentiation. Modulation of β1 integrin adhesive function by alternative splicing serves as a physiological mechanism reinforcing the cytoskeleton– matrix link in muscle cells. This reflects the major role for β1D integrin in muscle, where extremely stable association is required for contraction. PMID:9396762

  16. Transfer of toxin genes to alternate bacterial hosts for mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Orduz, S; Restrepo, N; Patiño, M M; Rojas, W

    1995-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vector of serious human and animal diseases, such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, among others. The use of biological control agents has provide an environmentally safe and highly specific alternative to the use of chemical insecticides in the control of vector borne diseases. Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus produce toxic proteins to mosquito larvae. Great progress has been made on the biochemical and molecular characterization of such proteins and the genes encoding them. Nevertheless, the low residuality of these biological insecticides is one of the major drawbacks. This article present some interesting aspects of the mosquito larvae feeding habits and review the attempts that have been made to genetically engineer microorganisms that while are used by mosquito larvae as a food source should express the Bacillus toxin genes in order to improve the residuality and stability in the mosquito breeding ponds.

  17. Nasal Tip Reconstruction Using Integra Bilayer Wound Matrix: An Alternative to the Forehead Flap

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, M. A.; Carter, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Large defects of the nasal tip with exposure of the underlying cartilage pose a significant reconstructive challenge to the plastic surgeon. Objective: This article presents a case of a large nasal tip defect following basal cell excision that was successfully treated with Integra bilayer wound matrix and skin grafting. Methods: Following tumor excision, meshed Integra bilayer wound matrix was placed over the exposed nasal tip cartilage. After 4 weeks, the silicone layer was removed and a full-thickness graft placed on the nasal tip. Results: This reconstruction resulted in the restoration of patient's nasal tip with good contour and color match without the need for a forehead flap. Conclusion: This demonstrates the reconstructive potential of this modality in patients who are not candidates for reconstruction with a forehead flap. PMID:26681994

  18. Discriminating effects of heterogeneity and matrix diffusion by alternative tracer designs

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Y.Y.W.

    1995-03-01

    Flow and transport calculations are carried out by numerical simulation for different tracer designs: single-well radially diverging/converging (huff-puff), single well radially converging, and two-well injection-withdrawal (doublet) in a 2D fracture zone. The fractured rocks are conceptualized as a dual-continuum: the well-connected fractures forming a heterogeneous continuum for advective transport, and the less permeable matrix forming a second continuum for tracer diffusion. Results show that the huff-puff design can be a good diagnostic test for matrix diffusion. The two-well doublet design averages over a large volume and corrects for the extreme sensitivity to spatial heterogeneities of the single well converging test, but requires prior knowledge of presence or absence of matrix diffusion to give reliable estimate of transport parameters. Results of this study demonstrate that using a suite of different tracer designs is important to reduce the uncertainty in association with solving the inverse problem of tracer test interpretation to characterize transport in fractured rocks.

  19. Host matrix metalloproteinases in cerebral malaria: new kids on the block against blood–brain barrier integrity?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening complication of falciparum malaria, associated with high mortality rates, as well as neurological impairment in surviving patients. Despite disease severity, the etiology of CM remains elusive. Interestingly, although the Plasmodium parasite is sequestered in cerebral microvessels, it does not enter the brain parenchyma: so how does Plasmodium induce neuronal dysfunction? Several independent research groups have suggested a mechanism in which increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability might allow toxic molecules from the parasite or the host to enter the brain. However, the reported severity of BBB damage in CM is variable depending on the model system, ranging from mild impairment to full BBB breakdown. Moreover, the factors responsible for increased BBB permeability are still unknown. Here we review the prevailing theories on CM pathophysiology and discuss new evidence from animal and human CM models implicating BBB damage. Finally, we will review the newly-described role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and BBB integrity. MMPs comprise a family of proteolytic enzymes involved in modulating inflammatory response, disrupting tight junctions, and degrading sub-endothelial basal lamina. As such, MMPs represent potential innovative drug targets for CM. PMID:24467887

  20. Novel hierarchically porous carbon materials obtained from natural biopolymer as host matrixes for lithium-sulfur battery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Xiao, Min; Wang, Shuanjin; Han, Dongmei; Song, Shuqin; Chen, Guohua; Meng, Yuezhong

    2014-08-13

    Novel hierarchically porous carbon materials with very high surface areas, large pore volumes and high electron conductivities were prepared from silk cocoon by carbonization with KOH activation. The prepared novel porous carbon-encapsulated sulfur composites were fabricated by a simple melting process and used as cathodes for lithium sulfur batteries. Because of the large surface area and hierarchically porous structure of the carbon material, soluble polysulfide intermediates can be trapped within the cathode and the volume expansion can be alleviated effectively. Moreover, the electron transport properties of the carbon materials can provide an electron conductive network and promote the utilization rate of sulfur in cathode. The prepared carbon-sulfur composite exhibited a high specific capacity and excellent cycle stability. The results show a high initial discharge capacity of 1443 mAh g(-1) and retain 804 mAh g(-1) after 80 discharge/charge cycles at a rate of 0.5 C. A Coulombic efficiency retained up to 92% after 80 cycles. The prepared hierarchically porous carbon materials were proven to be an effective host matrix for sulfur encapsulation to improve the sulfur utilization rate and restrain the dissolution of polysulfides into lithium-sulfur battery electrolytes.

  1. Matrix and position correction of shuffler assays by application of the alternating conditional expectation algorithm to shuffler data

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M M; Rinard, P M

    1992-01-01

    The {sup 252}Cf shuffler assays fissile uranium and plutonium using active neutron interrogation and then counting the induced delayed neutrons. Using the shuffler, we conducted over 1700 assays of 55-gal. drums with 28 different matrices and several different fissionable materials. We measured the drums to dispose the matrix and position effects on {sup 252}Cf shuffler assays. We used several neutron flux monitors during irradiation and kept statistics on the count rates of individual detector banks. The intent of these measurements was to gauge the effect of the matrix independently from the uranium assay. Although shufflers have previously been equipped neutron monitors, the functional relationship between the flux monitor sepals and the matrix-induced perturbation has been unknown. There are several flux monitors so the problem is multivariate, and the response is complicated. Conventional regression techniques cannot address complicated multivariate problems unless the underlying functional form and approximate parameter values are known in advance. Neither was available in this case. To address this problem, we used a new technique called alternating conditional expectations (ACE), which requires neither the functional relationship nor the initial parameters. The ACE algorithm develops the functional form and performs a numerical regression from only the empirical data. We applied the ACE algorithm to the shuffler-assay and flux-monitor data and developed an analytic function for the matrix correction. This function was optimized using conventional multivariate techniques. We were able to reduce the matrix-induced-bias error for homogeneous samples to 12.7%. The bias error for inhomogeneous samples was reduced to 13.5%. These results used only a few adjustable parameters compared to the number of available data points; the data were not over fit,'' but rather the results are general and robust.

  2. Fatty acids oxidation and alternative energy sources detected in Taenia crassiceps cysticerci after host treatment with antihelminthic drugs.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Carolina Miguel; Costa, Tatiane Luiza; Bezerra, José Clecildo Barreto; de Souza Lino Junior, Ruy; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2012-05-01

    Human cysticercosis caused by Taenia crassiceps is rare however it is considered of zoonotic risk. The treatment of the infected patients was successful when using albendazole or praziquantel. The active forms of albendazole inhibit the glucose uptake and the active forms of praziquantel alter glycogen levels and nutrients absorption. The aim of this study was to analyze the production of organic acids that indicate the oxidation of fatty acids and the use of alternative energy sources from T. crassiceps cysticerci removed from the peritoneal cavity of mice treated with low dosages of albendazole (5.75 and 11.5mg/kg) or praziquantel (3.83 and 7.67 mg/kg). The beta-hydroxibutyrate production was higher by the larval stage cysticerci in all treated groups and the propionate production was higher in final stage cysticerci treated with 11.5mg/kg of albendazole when compared to the control group. The larval stages of cysticerci from the groups treated with 5.75 mg/kg of albendazole and 3.83 mg/kg of praziquantel produced more urea than the initial and final stages which indicate amino acids breakdown. We conclude that it was possible to detect the fatty acid oxidation and amino acids breakdown which indicate the use of alternative energy production sources as the used dosages only cause a partial blockage of the glucose uptake and leads to metabolic alterations in the cysticerci. The metabolic behavior observed after host treatment was different from former descriptions of the in vitro one which indicates great host-parasite interaction.

  3. An alternative host model of a mixed fungal infection by azole susceptible and resistant Aspergillus spp strains

    PubMed Central

    Alcazar-Fuoli, L; Buitrago, Mj; Gomez-Lopez, A; Mellado, E

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common mold involved in human infections. However, the number of non-fumigatus species able to cause disease is continuously increasing. Among them, Aspergillus lentulus is reported in hematological and cystic fibrosis patients and in those treated with corticosteroids. A. lentulus differs from A. fumigatus in some clinically relevant aspects such as virulence and antifungal susceptibility, showing high MICs to most antifungals. Previous studies proved that A. lentulus was pathogenic in immunocompromised mice, although the course of the infection was delayed compared to A. fumigatus. These differences could explain why A. lentulus is mostly found in mixed infections with A. fumigatus challenging the diagnosis and treatment. We used the alternative model host Galleria mellonella to compare virulence, host interaction, fungal burden and antifungal response when larvae were infected with A. fumigatus or A. lentulus alone, and with a mixture of both species. A. lentulus was pathogenic in G. mellonella but infected larvae did not respond to therapeutic doses of voriconazole. We were able to simultaneously detect A. fumigatus and A. lentulus by a multiplex Nested Real Time PCR (MN-PCR). Comparative analysis of larvae histological sections showed melanization of both species but presented a different pattern of immune response by haemocytes. Analysis of fungal burden and histology showed that A. lentulus survived in the G. mellonella despite the antifungal treatment in single and mixed infections. We conclude that the simultaneous presence of antifungal susceptible and resistant Aspergillus species would likely complicate the management of these infections. PMID:26065322

  4. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Juliany C.F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F.A.; Silva-Filho, Fernando C.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model. PMID:24765565

  5. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Petropolis, Debora B; Rodrigues, Juliany C F; Viana, Nathan B; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F A; Silva-Filho, Fernando C

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited "freeze and run" migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular "home"-macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model.

  6. Effect of gel structure of matrix orientation in pulsed alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stellwagen, N.C.; Stellwagen, J.

    1993-12-31

    Four polymeric gels with different structures, LE agarose, HEEO agarose, beta-carrageenan, and polyacrylamide, were studied by transient electric birefringence to determine the importance of various structural features on the orientation of the gels in pulsed alternating electric fields. The birefrigence relaxation times observed for agarose gels in low voltage electric fields suggest that long fibers and/or domains, ranging up to tens of microns in size, are oriented by the electric field. The sign of the birefringence reverses when the direction of the electric field is reversed, suggesting that the oriented domains change their direction of orientation from parallel to perpendicular (or vice versa) when the polarity of the electric field is reversed. These anamalous orientation effects are observed with both types of agarose gels, but not with beta-carrageenan or polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that the alternating D,L galactose residues in the agarose backbone are responsible for the anomalies.

  7. Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongqing; Cline, Melissa S.; Osborne, Robert J.; Tuttle, Daniel L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Donohue, John Paul; Hall, Megan P.; Shiue, Lily; Swanson, Maurice S.; Thornton, Charles A.; Ares, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is associated with expression of expanded CTG DNA repeats as RNA (CUGexp RNA). To test whether CUGexp RNA creates a global splicing defect, we compared skeletal muscle of two mouse DM1 models, one expressing a CTGexp transgene, and another homozygous for a defective Mbnl1 gene. Strong correlation in splicing changes for ~100 new Mbnl1-regulated exons indicates loss of Mbnl1 explains >80% of the splicing pathology due to CUGexp RNA. In contrast, only about half of mRNA level changes can be attributed to loss of Mbnl1, indicating CUGexp RNA has Mbnl1-independent effects, particularly on mRNAs for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We propose that CUGexp RNA causes two separate effects: loss of Mbnl1 function, disrupting splicing, and loss of another function that disrupts ECM mRNA regulation, possibly mediated by MBNL2. These findings reveal unanticipated similarities between DM1 and other muscular dystrophies. PMID:20098426

  8. Oral fluid as an alternative matrix to determine ethanol for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Laís Helena Picolo; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Azenha, Aline Vieira; de Souza Dias, Mariane Cristine; De Martinis, Bruno Spinosa

    2014-09-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate whether it is possible to use oral fluid to monitor alcohol in drivers. In a control experiment the subjects ingested beer with an alcoholic percentage of 4.7%, in an amount that furnished 0.5 g ethanol per kg of body weight. Volunteer's urine, oral fluid, and breath were collected at 10, 30, 60, and 90 min after alcohol intake. Urine and oral fluid were analyzed by gas chromatography with FID (Flame Ionization Detector); breath was analyzed by Alcotest 7410 (Dräger). The absorption profiles correlated well. The Pearson correlation value between samples of oral fluid and urine, and oral fluid and exhaled air, was close to 1, showing that oral fluid is a promising matrix to monitor drivers in traffic or involved in accidents.

  9. Host-Derived Artificial MicroRNA as an Alternative Method to Improve Soybean Resistance to Soybean Cyst Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Li, Jiarui; Oakley, Thomas R.; Todd, Timothy C.; Trick, Harold N.

    2016-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is one of the most important pests limiting soybean production worldwide. Novel approaches to managing this pest have focused on gene silencing of target nematode sequences using RNA interference (RNAi). With the discovery of endogenous microRNAs as a mode of gene regulation in plants, artificial microRNA (amiRNA) methods have become an alternative method for gene silencing, with the advantage that they can lead to more specific silencing of target genes than traditional RNAi vectors. To explore the application of amiRNAs for improving soybean resistance to SCN, three nematode genes (designated as J15, J20, and J23) were targeted using amiRNA vectors. The transgenic soybean hairy roots, transformed independently with these three amiRNA vectors, showed significant reductions in SCN population densities in bioassays. Expression of the targeted genes within SCN eggs were downregulated in populations feeding on transgenic hairy roots. Our results provide evidence that host-derived amiRNA methods have great potential to improve soybean resistance to SCN. This approach should also limit undesirable phenotypes associated with off-target effects, which is an important consideration for commercialization of transgenic crops. PMID:27941644

  10. Barberry as alternate host is important for Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, but not for Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in the U.S. Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common barberry (Berberis vulgaris) has been known to serve as an alternate host for the wheat stem rust pathogen, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), under natural conditions in the U. S. Pacific Northwest for a long time. The plant has been recently shown to be infected by basidiospores of th...

  11. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0751 (Pallilysin) Reveals a Non-canonical Lipocalin Fold That Mediates Adhesion to Extracellular Matrix Components and Interactions with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Lithgow, Karen V.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Kao, Wei-Chien; Lin, Yi-Pin; Ebady, Rhodaba; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Treponema pallidum disseminates widely throughout the host and extravasates from the vasculature, a process that is at least partially dependent upon the ability of T. pallidum to interact with host extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Defining the molecular basis for the interaction between T. pallidum and the host is complicated by the intractability of T. pallidum to in vitro culturing and genetic manipulation. Correspondingly, few T. pallidum proteins have been identified that interact directly with host components. Of these, Tp0751 (also known as pallilysin) displays a propensity to interact with the ECM, although the underlying mechanism of these interactions remains unknown. Towards establishing the molecular mechanism of Tp0751-host ECM attachment, we first determined the crystal structure of Tp0751 to a resolution of 2.15 Å using selenomethionine phasing. Structural analysis revealed an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a profile of short conserved regions consistent with a non-canonical lipocalin fold. Using a library of native and scrambled peptides representing the full Tp0751 sequence, we next identified a subset of peptides that showed statistically significant and dose-dependent interactions with the ECM components fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen IV. Intriguingly, each ECM-interacting peptide mapped to the lipocalin domain. To assess the potential of these ECM-coordinating peptides to inhibit adhesion of bacteria to host cells, we engineered an adherence-deficient strain of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to heterologously express Tp0751. This engineered strain displayed Tp0751 on its surface and exhibited a Tp0751-dependent gain-of-function in adhering to human umbilical vein endothelial cells that was inhibited in the presence of one of the ECM-interacting peptides (p10). Overall, these data provide the first structural insight into the

  12. An alternative approach for assessment of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry matrix effects using auto-sampler programmed co-injection.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Caitlyn A; Stockham, Peter C; Nash, Christine M; Martin, Sheridan M; Kostakis, Chris; Lenehan, Claire E

    2016-03-01

    We report the use of auto-sampler programmable functions to co-inject analyte standard solution and matrix extract to assess ion enhancement and suppression (matrix effects) in LC-MS. This is effectively an automated post-extraction addition (APEA) procedure, emulating the manual post-extraction addition (PEA) approach widely adopted for assessment of matrix effects. To verify that APEA was comparable to the conventional PEA approach, matrix effects were determined using both methods for a selection of 31 illicit and pharmaceutical drugs in 10 different human urine extracts. Matrix effects measured using APEA were statistically indistinguishable from manual PEA methodology for 27 of the 31 drugs. Of the four drugs that showed significant differences using the two methods, three differed by less than 2 %, which is within the expected accuracy limits required for matrix effect determinations. The remaining analyte, trimeprazine, was found to degrade in the spiked PEA matrix extract, accounting for the difference between matrix effects measured by the PEA and APEA approaches. APEA enables a single matrix extract to be assessed at multiple analyte concentrations, resulting in a considerable reduction in sample preparation time. In addition, APEA can reduce the quantity of analyte-free sample matrix required for matrix effect assessment, which is an important consideration in certain analytical and bioanalytical fields. This work shows that APEA may be considered as an acceptable alternative to PEA for the assessment of matrix effects in LC-MS method validation and may be applicable to a variety of matrices such as environmental samples.

  13. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. I ---Formulation---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-09-01

    Based on the viewpoint that a typical π0 condensation is realized with the [ALS] (Alternating-Layer-Spin) structure of nucleon system, a framework to calculate the energy of neutron matter under such a new phase is presented in the reaction matrix theory. This enables us to treat both effects on equal footing; the long-range effect dominated by the OPEP tensor component with the enhancement due to the mixing of Δ(1236MeV) and the sort-range effect much influenced by repulsive core and spin-orbit force. Starting with the [ALS] model wave function constructed on the Bloch basis which assures to take the limit of no localization, we have the expressions for energy quantities expressed by the partial-wave contributions. This scheme provides a way to understand the mechanism of energy gain in the new phase, by making use of the notions of the ordinary unclear matter theory such as the potential picture and the partial waves. Some numerical examples are shown.

  14. miRNA-based buffering of the cobblestone-lissencephaly-associated extracellular matrix receptor dystroglycan via its alternative 3'-UTR.

    PubMed

    Yatsenko, Andriy S; Marrone, April K; Shcherbata, Halyna R

    2014-09-18

    Many proteins are expressed dynamically during different stages of cellular life and the accuracy of protein amounts is critical for cell endurance. Therefore, cells should have a perceptive system that notifies about fluctuations in the amounts of certain components and an executive system that efficiently restores their precise levels. At least one mechanism that evolution has employed for this task is regulation of 3'-UTR length for microRNA targeting. Here we show that in Drosophila the microRNA complex miR-310s acts as an executive mechanism to buffer levels of the muscular dystrophy-associated extracellular matrix receptor dystroglycan via its alternative 3'-UTR. miR-310s gene expression fluctuates depending on dystroglycan amounts and nitric oxide signalling, which perceives dystroglycan levels and regulates microRNA gene expression. Aberrant levels of dystroglycan or deficiencies in miR-310s and nitric oxide signalling result in cobblestone brain appearance, resembling human lissencephaly type II phenotype.

  15. Variational reduced-density-matrix calculations on radicals: An alternative approach to open-shell ab initio quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Jeff R.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2006-01-15

    An alternative approach to open-shell molecular calculations using the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) theory [Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 213001 (2004)] is presented. The energy and 2-RDM of the open-shell molecule (or radical) are computed from the limit of dissociating one or more hydrogen atoms from a molecule in a singlet state. Because the ground-state energy of an 'infinitely' separated hydrogen atom in a given finite basis is known, we can determine the energy of the radical by subtracting the energy of one or more hydrogen atoms from the energy of the total dissociated system. The 2-RDM is constrained to have singlet symmetry in all calculations. Two sets of N-representability conditions are employed: (i) two-positivity conditions, and (ii) two-positivity conditions plus the T{sub 2} condition, which is a subset of the three-positivity conditions. Optimization of the energy with respect to the 2-RDM is performed with a first-order algorithm for solving the semidefinite program within the variational 2-RDM method. We present calculations of several radicals near equilibrium as well as the dissociation curves of the diatomic radicals CH and OH.

  16. Clathrin, AP-2, and the NPXY-binding subset of alternate endocytic adaptors facilitate FimH-mediated bacterial invasion of host cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Danelle S; Gordon, Hannah B; Dhakal, Bijaya K; Jones, Tiffani A; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2008-12-01

    The FimH adhesin, localized at the distal tips of type 1 pili, binds mannose-containing glycoprotein receptors like alpha3beta1 integrins and stimulates bacterial entry into target host cells. Strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major cause of urinary tract infections, utilize FimH to invade bladder epithelial cells. Here we set out to define the mechanism by which UPEC enters host cells by investigating four of the major entry routes known to be exploited by invasive pathogens: caveolae, clathrin, macropinocytosis and secretory lysosomes. Using pharmacological inhibitors in combination with RNA interference against specific endocytic pathway components, mutant host cell lines and a mouse infection model system, we found that type 1 pili-dependent bacterial invasion of host cells occurs via a cholesterol- and dynamin-dependent phagocytosis-like mechanism. This process did not require caveolae or secretory lysosomes, but was modulated by calcium levels, clathrin, and cooperative input from the primary clathrin adaptor AP-2 and a subset of alternate adaptors comprised of Numb, ARH and Dab2. These alternate clathrin adaptors recognize NPXY motifs, as found within the cytosolic tail of beta1 integrin, suggesting a functional link between the engagement of integrin receptors by FimH and the clathrin-dependent uptake of type 1-piliated bacteria.

  17. The effects of host derived metalloproteinases on dentin bond and the role of MMPs inhibitors on dentin matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    LONGHI, M.; CERRONI, L.; CONDÒ, S.G.; ARIANO, V.; PASQUANTONIO, G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. The work has the objective to analyze the literature on the degradation of the adhesive interface. In particular the study is focused on the role of the metalloproteinase in the hydrolytic degradation of collagen matrix in the bonded interface. The survey will concern also the latest innovations to improve and increase the link between dentin and the restorative materials through the MMPs inhibitors. Methods. The research has been carried out in the MEDLINE database by choosing keywords as “metalloproteinases” and “dentin bond” and “degradation”. In vitro studies were included in the research, excluding studies with no human and deciduous teeth. Language was limited to English. Results. The collagenolytic enzymes in mineralized dentin have been demonstrated to have an important role in dental hard tissue pathologies, including the degradation of the hybrid layer. Conclusion. The preservation of the collagen matrix integrity is a key issue in the attempts to improve the dentin bonding durability. PMID:25992261

  18. Alternative calibration techniques for counteracting the matrix effects in GC-MS-SPE pesticide residue analysis - a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Rimayi, Cornelius; Odusanya, David; Mtunzi, Fanyana; Tsoka, Shepherd

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the efficiency of application of four different multivariate calibration techniques, namely matrix-matched internal standard (MMIS), matrix-matched external standard (MMES), solvent-only internal standard (SOIS) and solvent-only external standard (SOES) on the detection and quantification of 20 organochlorine compounds from high, low and blank matrix water sample matrices by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled to solid phase extraction (SPE). Further statistical testing, using Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) by applying MANOVA, T-tests and Levene's F tests indicates that matrix composition has a more significant effect on the efficiency of the analytical method than the calibration method of choice. Matrix effects are widely described as one of the major sources of errors in GC-MS multiresidue analysis. Descriptive and inferential statistics proved that the matrix-matched internal standard calibration was the best approach to use for samples of varying matrix composition as it produced the most precise average mean recovery of 87% across all matrices tested. The use of an internal standard calibration overall produced more precise total recoveries than external standard calibration, with mean values of 77% and 64% respectively. The internal standard calibration technique produced a particularly high overall standard deviation of 38% at 95% confidence level indicating that it is less robust than the external standard calibration method which had an overall standard error of 32% at 95% confidence level. Overall, the matrix-matched external standard calibration proved to be the best calibration approach for analysis of low matrix samples which consisted of the real sample matrix as it had the most precise recovery of 98% compared to other calibration approaches for the low-matrix samples.

  19. Tilted Orientation of Photochromic Dyes with Guest-Host Effect of Liquid Crystalline Polymer Matrix for Electrical UV Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ranjkesh, Amid; Park, Min-Kyu; Park, Do Hyuk; Park, Ji-Sub; Choi, Jun-Chan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a highly oriented photochromic dye film for an ultraviolet (UV)-sensing layer, where spirooxazine (SO) derivatives are aligned with the liquid crystalline UV-curable reactive mesogens (RM) using a guest-host effect. For effective electrical UV sensing with a simple metal-insulator-metal structure, our results show that the UV-induced switchable dipole moment amount of the SO derivatives is high; however, their tilting orientation should be controlled. Compared to the dielectric layer with the nearly planar SO dye orientation, the photochromic dielectric layer with the moderately tilted dye orientation shows more than seven times higher the UV-induced capacitance variation. PMID:26729116

  20. Tilted Orientation of Photochromic Dyes with Guest-Host Effect of Liquid Crystalline Polymer Matrix for Electrical UV Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ranjkesh, Amid; Park, Min-Kyu; Park, Do Hyuk; Park, Ji-Sub; Choi, Jun-Chan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2015-12-29

    We propose a highly oriented photochromic dye film for an ultraviolet (UV)-sensing layer, where spirooxazine (SO) derivatives are aligned with the liquid crystalline UV-curable reactive mesogens (RM) using a guest-host effect. For effective electrical UV sensing with a simple metal-insulator-metal structure, our results show that the UV-induced switchable dipole moment amount of the SO derivatives is high; however, their tilting orientation should be controlled. Compared to the dielectric layer with the nearly planar SO dye orientation, the photochromic dielectric layer with the moderately tilted dye orientation shows more than seven times higher the UV-induced capacitance variation.

  1. Characterization of an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Spodoptera frugiperda cell line as an alternative host for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system.

    PubMed

    Maghodia, Ajay B; Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-06-01

    Cell lines derived from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf), are widely used as hosts for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system (BICS). However, it was recently discovered that these cell lines are contaminated with a virus, now known as Sf-rhabdovirus [1]. The detection of this adventitious agent raised a potential safety issue that could adversely impact the BICS as a commercial recombinant protein production platform. Thus, we examined the properties of Sf-RVN, an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Sf cell line, as a potential alternative host. Nested RT-PCR assays showed Sf-RVN cells had no detectable Sf-rhabdovirus over the course of 60 passages in continuous culture. The general properties of Sf-RVN cells, including their average growth rates, diameters, morphologies, and viabilities after baculovirus infection, were virtually identical to those of Sf9 cells. Baculovirus-infected Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells produced equivalent levels of three recombinant proteins, including an intracellular prokaryotic protein and two secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins, and provided similar N-glycosylation patterns. In fact, except for the absence of Sf-rhabdovirus, the only difference between Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells was SF-RVN produced higher levels of infectious baculovirus progeny. These results show Sf-RVN cells can be used as improved, alternative hosts to circumvent the potential safety hazard associated with the use of Sf-rhabdovirus-contaminated Sf cells for recombinant protein manufacturing with the BICS.

  2. Transmission of Citrus leprosis virus C by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) to Alternative Host Plants Found in Citrus Orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The equivalent of US$ 75 million is spent each year in Brazil to control Brevipalpus phoenicis, a mite vector of Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C). In this study we investigated the possibility that hedgerows, windbreaks, and weeds normally found in citrus orchards could host CiLV-C. Mites reared on ...

  3. Tissue-specific and SRSF1-dependent splicing of fibronectin, a matrix protein that controls host cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel Cristina; De Toledo, Marion; Della Seta, Flavio; Fafet, Patrick; Rebouissou, Cosette; Deleuze, Virginie; Blanchard, Jean Marie; Jorgensen, Christian; Tazi, Jamal; Vignais, Marie-Luce

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion targets specific tissues in physiological placental implantation and pathological metastasis, which raises questions about how this process is controlled. We compare dermis and endometrium capacities to support trophoblast invasion, using matching sets of human primary fibroblasts in a coculture assay with human placental explants. Substituting endometrium, the natural trophoblast target, with dermis dramatically reduces trophoblast interstitial invasion. Our data reveal that endometrium expresses a higher rate of the fibronectin (FN) extra type III domain A+ (EDA+) splicing isoform, which displays stronger matrix incorporation capacity. We demonstrate that the high FN content of the endometrium matrix, and not specifically the EDA domain, supports trophoblast invasion by showing that forced incorporation of plasma FN (EDA–) promotes efficient trophoblast invasion. We further show that the serine/arginine-rich protein serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) is more highly expressed in endometrium and, using RNA interference, that it is involved in the higher EDA exon inclusion rate in endometrium. Our data therefore show a mechanism by which tissues can be distinguished, for their capacity to support invasion, by their different rates of EDA inclusion, linked to their SRSF1 protein levels. In the broader context of cancer pathology, the results suggest that SRSF1 might play a central role not only in the tumor cells, but also in the surrounding stroma. PMID:23966470

  4. Alternatives to Acellular Dermal Matrix: Utilization of a Gore DualMesh Sling as a Cost-Conscious Adjunct for Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, James; Petty, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study seeks an alternative to acellular dermal matrix in 2-staged breast reconstruction while minimizing cost. It was hypothesized that use of a Gore DualMesh would allow for similar intraoperative tissue expander fill volumes, time to second-stage reconstruction, and number of postoperative fills compared with acellular dermal matrix at only a fraction of the expense. Methods: Retrospective analysis comparing Gore DualMesh (59 breasts, 34 patients), acellular dermal matrix (13 breasts, 8 patients), and total muscle coverage (25 breasts, 14 patients) for postmastectomy breast reconstruction was performed. Time to second-stage reconstruction, number of expansions, and relative initial fill volumes were compared between the 3 groups. Secondarily, complication rates were also considered, including seroma, infection, expander/implant explantation, removal of mesh, and capsular contracture. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing the Fisher exact test and the χ2 test for categorical variables and the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables. Results: Relative initial fill volumes, number of expansions, and time to second-stage reconstruction showed no statistical difference between the acellular dermal matrix and Gore DualMesh groups (P = .494, P = .146, and P = .539, respectively). Furthermore, the Gore DualMesh group underwent significantly fewer fills (P < .001) and had a higher relative initial fill volume (P < .001) than the total muscle coverage group. The additional cost per breast as a result of including DualMesh was on average $385 versus $4287 for acellular dermal matrix. Complication rates were similar between all 3 groups without statistically significant differences. Conclusions: Gore DualMesh represents a safe alternative to acellular dermal matrix for breast reconstruction with similar aesthetic results in certain patients at a fraction of the cost. PMID:28261372

  5. Translational repression of human matrix metalloproteinases-13 by an alternatively spliced form of T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-related protein (TIAR).

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing; Cok, Steven J; Zeng, Chenbo; Morrison, Aubrey R

    2003-01-17

    Human matrix metalloproteinases-13 (HMMP13) shows a wide substrate specificity, and its expression is limited to pathological situations such as chronic inflammation and cancer. The coding sequence for HMMP13 is 86% identical to rat matrix metalloproteinases-13 (RMMP13); however, the regulation of HMMP13 and RMMP13 protein synthesis in renal mesangial cells is strikingly different. In human cells there is a discordance between HMMP13 mRNA levels and protein expression. Following IL-1 beta or TGF-beta(1) stimulation, HMMP13 mRNA levels increase significantly, whereas the protein expression is absent. This discordance is because of a species-dependent translational repression. In addition to the 3'-untranslated region of the matrix metalloproteinases-13 (MMP13) gene, the differential expression of an alternatively spliced transcript of the RNA-binding protein TIAR in human cell cultures is also critical for this post-transcriptional regulation. Transient expression of the 17-amino acid insert of the alternatively spliced form of TIAR reverses the HMMP13 mRNA silencing observed in human and primate species. In addition, co-transfection of the alternatively spliced form of TIAR and HMMP13 into Rat2 cells suppresses HMMP13 protein expression. Thus, we report for the first time that a species-dependent TIAR isoform plays a major role in the post-transcriptional silencing for HMMP13.

  6. Pharmacological Targeting of the Host-Pathogen Interaction: Alternatives to Classical Antibiotics to Combat Drug-Resistant Superbugs.

    PubMed

    Munguia, Jason; Nizet, Victor

    2017-03-07

    The rise of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the dearth of new antibiotic development place an existential strain on successful infectious disease therapy. Breakthrough strategies that go beyond classical antibiotic mechanisms are needed to combat this looming public health catastrophe. Reconceptualizing antibiotic therapy in the richer context of the host-pathogen interaction is required for innovative solutions. By defining specific virulence factors, the essence of a pathogen, and pharmacologically neutralizing their activities, one can block disease progression and sensitize microbes to immune clearance. Likewise, host-directed strategies to boost phagocyte bactericidal activity, enhance leukocyte recruitment, or reverse pathogen-induced immunosuppression seek to replicate the success of cancer immunotherapy in the field of infectious diseases. The answer to the threat of multidrug-resistant pathogens lies 'outside the box' of current antibiotic paradigms.

  7. Alternative splicing of a viral mirtron differentially affects the expression of other microRNAs from its cluster and of the host transcript.

    PubMed

    Rasschaert, Perrine; Figueroa, Thomas; Dambrine, Ginette; Rasschaert, Denis; Laurent, Sylvie

    2016-12-01

    Interplay between alternative splicing and the Microprocessor may have differential effects on the expression of intronic miRNAs organized into clusters. We used a viral model - the LAT long non-coding RNA (LAT lncRNA) of Marek's disease oncogenic herpesvirus (MDV-1), which has the mdv1-miR-M8-M6-M7-M10 cluster embedded in its first intron - to assess the impact of splicing modifications on the biogenesis of each of the miRNAs from the cluster. Drosha silencing and alternative splicing of an extended exon 2 of the LAT lncRNA from a newly identified 3' splice site (SS) at the end of the second miRNA of the cluster showed that mdv1-miR-M6 was a 5'-tailed mirtron. We have thus identified the first 5'-tailed mirtron within a cluster of miRNAs for which alternative splicing is directly associated with differential expression of the other miRNAs of the cluster, with an increase in intronic mdv1-miR-M8 expression and a decrease in expression of the exonic mdv1-miR-M7, and indirectly associated with regulation of the host transcript. According to the alternative 3SS used for the host intron splicing, the mdv1-miR-M6 is processed as a mirtron by the spliceosome, dispatching the other miRNAs of the cluster into intron and exon, or as a canonical miRNA by the Microprocessor complex. The viral mdv1-miR-M6 mirtron is the first mirtron described that can also follow the canonical pathway.

  8. A Sheet-like Carbon Matrix Hosted Sulfur as Cathode for High-performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Songtao; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Zhida; Wu, Xiaohong; Gu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoping; Pang, Aimin; Jiao, Zilong; Jiang, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are a promising candidate of next generation energy storage systems owing to its high theoretical capacity and energy density. However, to date, its commercial application was hindered by the inherent problems of sulfur cathode. Additionally, with the rapid decline of non-renewable resources and active appeal of green chemistry, the intensive research of new electrode materials was conducted worldwide. We have obtained a sheet-like carbon material (shaddock peel carbon sheets SPCS) from organic waste shaddock peel, which can be used as the conductive carbon matrix for sulfur-based cathodes. Furthermore, the raw materials are low-cost, truly green and recyclable. As a result, the sulfur cathode made with SPCS (SPCS-S), can deliver a high reversible capacity of 722.5 mAh g−1 at 0.2 C after 100 cycles with capacity recuperability of ~90%, demonstrating that the SPCS-S hybrid is of great potential as the cathode for rechargeable Li-S batteries. The high electrochemical performance of SPCS-S hybrid could be attributed to the sheet-like carbon network with large surface area and high conductivity of the SPCS, in which the carbon sheets enable the uniform distribution of sulfur, better ability to trap the soluble polysulfides and accommodate volume expansion/shrinkage of sulfur during repeated charge/discharge cycles. PMID:26842015

  9. A Sheet-like Carbon Matrix Hosted Sulfur as Cathode for High-performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Songtao; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Zhida; Wu, Xiaohong; Gu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoping; Pang, Aimin; Jiao, Zilong; Jiang, Lixiang

    2016-02-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are a promising candidate of next generation energy storage systems owing to its high theoretical capacity and energy density. However, to date, its commercial application was hindered by the inherent problems of sulfur cathode. Additionally, with the rapid decline of non-renewable resources and active appeal of green chemistry, the intensive research of new electrode materials was conducted worldwide. We have obtained a sheet-like carbon material (shaddock peel carbon sheets SPCS) from organic waste shaddock peel, which can be used as the conductive carbon matrix for sulfur-based cathodes. Furthermore, the raw materials are low-cost, truly green and recyclable. As a result, the sulfur cathode made with SPCS (SPCS-S), can deliver a high reversible capacity of 722.5 mAh g‑1 at 0.2 C after 100 cycles with capacity recuperability of ~90%, demonstrating that the SPCS-S hybrid is of great potential as the cathode for rechargeable Li-S batteries. The high electrochemical performance of SPCS-S hybrid could be attributed to the sheet-like carbon network with large surface area and high conductivity of the SPCS, in which the carbon sheets enable the uniform distribution of sulfur, better ability to trap the soluble polysulfides and accommodate volume expansion/shrinkage of sulfur during repeated charge/discharge cycles.

  10. A Sheet-like Carbon Matrix Hosted Sulfur as Cathode for High-performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Songtao; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Zhida; Wu, Xiaohong; Gu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoping; Pang, Aimin; Jiao, Zilong; Jiang, Lixiang

    2016-02-04

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are a promising candidate of next generation energy storage systems owing to its high theoretical capacity and energy density. However, to date, its commercial application was hindered by the inherent problems of sulfur cathode. Additionally, with the rapid decline of non-renewable resources and active appeal of green chemistry, the intensive research of new electrode materials was conducted worldwide. We have obtained a sheet-like carbon material (shaddock peel carbon sheets SPCS) from organic waste shaddock peel, which can be used as the conductive carbon matrix for sulfur-based cathodes. Furthermore, the raw materials are low-cost, truly green and recyclable. As a result, the sulfur cathode made with SPCS (SPCS-S), can deliver a high reversible capacity of 722.5 mAh g(-1) at 0.2 C after 100 cycles with capacity recuperability of ~90%, demonstrating that the SPCS-S hybrid is of great potential as the cathode for rechargeable Li-S batteries. The high electrochemical performance of SPCS-S hybrid could be attributed to the sheet-like carbon network with large surface area and high conductivity of the SPCS, in which the carbon sheets enable the uniform distribution of sulfur, better ability to trap the soluble polysulfides and accommodate volume expansion/shrinkage of sulfur during repeated charge/discharge cycles.

  11. Organ heterogeneity of host-derived matrix metalloproteinase expression and its involvement in multiple-organ metastasis by lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shiraga, Minoru; Yano, Seiji; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Goto, Hisatsugu; Miki, Toyokazu; Miki, Keisuke; Zhang, Helong; Sone, Saburo

    2002-10-15

    Cancer metastasis is tightly regulated by the interaction of tumor cells and host organ microenvironments. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), produced by both tumor cells and host stromal cells, play a central role in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. We determined whether metastatic potential of lung cancer to multiple organs is dependent solely on the expression of MMPs by tumor cells, using two metastasis models of human lung cancer cell lines expressing various levels of MMPs and a MMP inhibitor (ONO-4817). In the lung metastasis model, tumor cells (PC14, PC14PE6, H226, A549) inoculated i.v. into nude or SCID mice metastasized only in the lung. In the multiple-organ metastasis model, tumor cells (RERF-LC-AI, SBC-3/DOX, H69/VP, which express low levels of MMPs) inoculated i.v. into natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice metastasized into the liver, kidneys, and systemic lymph nodes. Film in situ zymography analysis revealed that the nontumor parenchyma of the lung had no gelatinolytic activity, whereas gelatinolytic activity of the liver and kidney was high and low, respectively. In the lung metastasis model, gelatinolytic activity of lung nodules directly correlated with the in vitro expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by tumor cells. Inhibition of MMP activity by ONO-4817 suppressed lung metastasis by the cell lines that expressed MMPs, but not those that did not express MMP, via the inhibition of MMP activity of lung tumors. In the multiple-organ metastasis model, liver parenchyma, but not liver nodules, showed gelatinolytic activity. The MMP inhibition reduced metastasis to the liver, but not to the kidney or lymph nodes, via inhibition of MMP activity of liver parenchyma. These findings suggest that MMP expression varies among the host organ microenvironments and that stromal MMPs may promote metastasis of lung cancer. Therefore, antimetastatic effects based on MMP inhibition may be dependent on MMPs derived not only from tumor cells but also from organ

  12. Alternative Capture of Noncoding RNAs or Protein-Coding Genes by Herpesviruses to Alter Host T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yang Eric; Riley, Kasandra J.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Steitz, Joan A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In marmoset T cells transformed by Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS), a viral U-rich noncoding RNA, HSUR 1, specifically mediates degradation of host microRNA-27 (miR-27). High-throughput sequencing of RNA after crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP) identified mRNAs targeted by miR-27 as enriched in the T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling pathway, including GRB2. Accordingly, transfection of miR-27 into human T cells attenuates TCR-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and induction of CD69. MiR-27 also robustly regulates SEMA7A and IFN-γ, key modulators and effectors of T-cell function. Knockdown or ectopic expression of HSUR 1 alters levels of these proteins in virally-transformed cells. Two other T-lymphotropic γ-herpesviruses, AlHV-1 and OvHV-2, do not produce a noncoding RNA to downregulate miR-27, but instead encode homologs of miR-27 target genes. Thus, oncogenic γ-herpesviruses have evolved diverse strategies to converge on common targets in host T cells. PMID:24725595

  13. Cuticular hydrocarbons of the ectoparasitic wasp Cephalonomia hyalinipennis (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) and its alternative host, the stored product pest Caulophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Howard, Ralph W; Pérez-Lachaud, Gabriela

    2002-06-01

    Cuticular hydrocarbons of an ectoparasitic wasp attacking two beetle hosts have been identified and examined for the influence of age, gender, mating status, and host on hydrocarbon composition. The 37 wasp hydrocarbons identified consisted of a series of n-alkanes (C16 to C33), 3-, 5-, 9-, 10-, 11-, and 12-methyl alkanes and a series of Z-7 and Z-9 monoenes (C23:1 to C27:1). One C25:2 diene was found. No effects of hydrocarbon composition as a function of age, gender, or mating status were found for the wasps. Wasps reared on Hypothenemus hampei, however, had 12/37 significant abundance differences to those reared on Caulophilus oryzae, although all but one of these differences were for components in less than 2% relative abundance. The C25:2 diene from wasps reared on H. hampei was present in about 10% whereas from wasps reared on C. oryzae it was present in about 2%. The hydrocarbons of one host for this wasp, the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), have been previously reported [Howard and Infante, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 89:700-709 (1996)]. The hydrocarbons of the alternative host, C. oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) consists of n-alkanes (C17 to C31), 3-, 4-, 5-, 7-, 9-, 11-, 12-, 13-, 14-, and 15-methyl alkanes, and a series of dimethyl alkanes of the series 3, 17-; 5, 11-; 5, 17-; 7, 11-; 7, 13-; 13, 17-; and 15, 19-. No unsaturated hydrocarbons were found. No significant differences in hydrocarbon composition were found between male and female C. oryzae. Hydrocarbon patterns of four species of Cephalonomia are compared and shown to be species-specific. The data are discussed in terms of ecological and physiological parameters.

  14. Excreted/secreted Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like 9 (SmVAL9) modulates host extracellular matrix remodelling gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Timothy P.; Brown, Martha; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Jackson, Colin J.; Ocadiz-Ruiz, Ramon; Chalmers, Iain W.; Kolb, Marlen; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Hoffmann, Karl F.

    2014-01-01

    The Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like (SmVAL) protein family consists of 29 members, each possessing a conserved α-β-α sandwich tertiary feature called the Sperm-coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) domain. While the SmVALs have been found in both excretory/secretory (E/S) products and in intra/sub-tegumental (non-E/S) fractions, the role(s) of this family in host/parasite relationships or schistosome developmental processes remains poorly resolved. In order to begin quantifying SmVAL functional diversity or redundancy, dissecting the specific activity (ies) of individual family members is necessary. Towards this end, we present the characterisation of SmVAL9; a protein previously found enriched in both miracidia/sporocyst larval transformation proteins and in egg secretions. While our study confirms that SmVAL9 is indeed found in soluble egg products and miracidia/sporocyst larval transformation proteins, we find it to be maximally transcribed/translated in miracidia and subsequently down-regulated during in vitro sporocyst development. SmVAL9 localisation within sporocysts appears concentrated in parenchymal cells/vesicles as well as associated with larval germinal cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that egg-derived SmVAL9 carries an N-linked glycan containing a schistosome-specific difucosyl element and is an immunogenic target during chronic murine schistosomiasis. Finally, we demonstrate that recombinant SmVAL9 affects the expression of extracellular matrix, remodelling matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP) gene products in both Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic cell (BgMMP1) and Mus musculus bone marrow-derived macrophage (MmMMP2, MmMMP9, MmMMP12, MmMMP13, MmMMP14, MmMMP28, TIMP1 and TIMP2) in vitro cultures. These findings importantly suggest that excreted/secreted SmVAL9 participates in tissue reorganisation/extracellular matrix remodelling during intra-mammalian egg translocation, miracidia

  15. Molecular identification of larvae of a tetraphyllidean tapeworm (Platyhelminthes: Eucestoda) in a razor clam as an alternative intermediate host in the life cycle of Acanthobothrium brevissime.

    PubMed

    Holland, Nicholas D; Wilson, Nerida G

    2009-10-01

    Dwarf razor clams (Ensis minor) in the Gulf of Mexico are known to be infected with plerocercoid larvae of a tetraphyllidean tapeworm. Here, we show that these larvae live unencysted in the intestinal lumen of the clam. Morphologically, the larvae are similar to (although significantly larger than) tapeworm larvae previously described living in the gut of amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae) from the same habitat. Sequence data from the D2 region of the 28S rDNA from clam-infecting larvae were identical to the sequence of Acanthobothrium brevissime isolated as larvae from amphioxus and as adults from a stingray (Dasyatis say). The sequence data leave little doubt that the dwarf razor clam and the amphioxus are alternative intermediate hosts in the life cycle of A. brevissime.

  16. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase is involved in both compatible and incompatible host-virus combinations in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Deng, Xing-Guang; Xu, Fei; Jian, Wei; Peng, Xing-Ji; Zhu, Tong; Xi, De-Hui; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2015-10-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) functions in the resistance to biotic stress. However, the mechanisms of AOX in the systemic antiviral defense response and N (a typical resistance gene)-mediated resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are elusive. A chemical approach was undertaken to investigate the role of NbAOX in the systemic resistance to RNA viruses. Furthermore, we used a virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS)-based genetics approach to investigate the function of AOX in the N-mediated resistance to TMV. The inoculation of virus significantly increased the NbAOX transcript and protein levels and the cyanide-resistant respiration in the upper un-inoculated leaves. Pretreatment with potassium cyanide greatly increased the plant's systemic resistance, whereas the application of salicylhydroxamic acid significantly compromised the plant's systemic resistance. Additionally, in NbAOX1a-silenced N-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants, the inoculated leaf collapsed and the movement of TMV into the systemic tissue eventually led to the spreading of HR-PCD and the death of the whole plant. The hypersensitive response marker gene HIN1 was significantly increased in the NbAOX1a-silenced plants. Significant amounts of TMV-CP mRNA and protein were detected in the NbAOX1a-silenced plants but not in the control plants. Overall, evidence is provided that AOX plays important roles in both compatible and incompatible plant-virus combinations.

  17. Q-dots and Q-wires in the microporous and mesoporous zeolite as matrix host-guest and guest-guest interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel'biz, German M.; Shvets, Olexyi V.; Brodyn, Michail S.; Vozny, Volodymyr L.

    2001-04-01

    We report here on the development of host-guest and guest-guest interaction in course of preparation procedures semiconductor clusters (CdS, PbI2), in zeolite (FAU,LTL) matrix. Optical properties of practically unexplored PbI2/zeolite LTL system have been investigated. Both in absorption (reconstructed from diffuse reflection via Kubelka-Munk function) and luminescence spectra the features were observed at energies much exceeding the excitation resonance energy Eex in bulk PbI2. This is considered as an indication of size quantization through the unambiguous attribution of the respective transitions requires further studies, including theoretical ones. For the samples with relatively high PbI2 content the narrow emission peak only slightly blue-shifted from Eex was observed and attributed to long clusters formed inside the main channels of zeolite LTL lattice and possible retaining the layer structure of bulk PbI2. The gradual disappearance of this peak during the storage of samples in the air is explained by assuming that originally formed long clusters undergo fragmentation into smaller species.

  18. Carbon isotope ratios document that the elytra of western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) reflects adult versus larval feeding and later instar larvae prefer Bt corn to alternate hosts.

    PubMed

    Hiltpold, Ivan; Adamczyk, John J; Higdon, Matthew L; Clark, Thomas L; Ellersieck, Mark R; Hibbard, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    In much of the Corn Belt and parts of Europe, the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is the most important insect pest of maize. The need for additional basic knowledge of this pest has been highlighted while developing resistance management plans for insecticidal genetically modified crops. This study evaluated the possibility of tracking feeding habits of western corn rootworm larvae using stable carbon isotope signatures. Plants accumulate different ratios of (13)C:(12)C isotopes, usually expressed as δ(13)C, according to whether they use the C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathway. Herbivore biomass is expected to reflect the δ(13)C of the food they eat. For the current experiment, western corn rootworm larvae were grown on different species of plants exhibiting different δ(13)C values. The δ(13)C values were then measured in elytra of emerged beetles. When beetles were unfed, biomass reflected larval feeding. When beetles were fed for 31 d postemergence, δ(13)C values of elytra almost exclusively reflected adult feeding. These results suggest the use of caution in the interpretation of δ(13)C data aiming to document larval diet history when adult feeding history is unknown. The technique was also used to evaluate western corn rootworm larval choice between alternate hosts and maize with and without genetically modified (Bt) traits aimed at their control. Propensity for feeding on alternate hosts versus maize was biased toward feeding on maize regardless whether the maize had Bt or not, suggesting western corn rootworm larvae were not repelled by Bt. These data will be helpful for regulators in interpreting western corn rootworm feeding data on Bt maize.

  19. The alternative sigma factor B modulates virulence gene expression in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model but does not influence kidney gene expression pattern of the host.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Burian, Marc; Schäfer, Tina; Bröker, Barbara M; Ohlsen, Knut; Völker, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and are an increasing threat not only in hospital settings. The expression of the staphylococcal virulence factor repertoire is known to be affected by the alternative sigma factor B (SigB). However, its impact during infection still is a matter of debate. Kidney tissues of controls or mice infected with S. aureus HG001 or its isogenic sigB mutant were analyzed by transcriptome profiling to monitor the host response, and additionally expression of selected S. aureus genes was monitored by RT-qPCR. Direct transcript analysis by RT-qPCR revealed significant SigB activity in all mice infected with the wild-type strain, but not in its isogenic sigB mutant (p<0.0001). Despite a clear-cut difference in the SigB-dependent transcription pattern of virulence genes (clfA, aur, and hla), the host reaction to infection (either wild type or sigB mutant) was almost identical. Despite its significant activity in vivo, loss of SigB did neither have an effect on the outcome of infection nor on murine kidney gene expression pattern. Thus, these data support the role of SigB as virulence modulator rather than being a virulence determinant by itself.

  20. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. II ---Numerical Results---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-10-01

    Results obtained by applying a formulation based on the reaction matrix theory developed in I are given. Calculations by making use of a modified realistic potential, the Reid soft-core potential with the OPEP-part enhanced due to the isobar (Δ)-mixing, show that the transition to the [ALS] phase of quasi-neutrons corresponding to a typical π0 condensation occurs in the region of (2 ˜ 3) times the nuclear density. The most important ingredients responsible for this transition are the growth of the attractive 3P2 + 3F2 contribution mainly from the spin-parallel pairs in the same leyers and the reduction of the repulsive 3P1 contribution mainly from the spin-antiparallel pairs in the nearest layers; these mainfest themselves as the [ALS]-type localization develops. Properties of the matter under the new phase thus obtained such as the shape of the Fermi surface and the effective mass are discussed.

  1. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Altındas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  2. Quantification of strontium in human serum by ICP-MS using alternate analyte-free matrix and its application to a pilot bioequivalence study of two strontium ranelate oral formulations in healthy Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Man; Zhang, Lina; Deng, Ming; Liu, Huichen

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and accurate ICP-MS method using alternate analyte-free matrix for calibration standards preparation and a rapid direct dilution procedure for sample preparation was developed and validated for the quantification of exogenous strontium (Sr) from the drug in human serum. Serum was prepared by direct dilution (1:29, v/v) in an acidic solution consisting of nitric acid (0.1%) and germanium (Ge) added as internal standard (IS), to obtain simple and high-throughput preparation procedure with minimized matrix effect, and good repeatability. ICP-MS analysis was performed using collision cell technology (CCT) mode. Alternate matrix method by using distilled water as an alternate analyte-free matrix for the preparation of calibration standards (CS) was used to avoid the influence of endogenous Sr in serum on the quantification. The method was validated in terms of selectivity, carry-over, matrix effects, lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), linearity, precision and accuracy, and stability. Instrumental linearity was verified in the range of 1.00-500ng/mL, corresponding to a concentration range of 0.0300-15.0μg/mL in 50μL sample of serum matrix and alternate matrix. Intra- and inter-day precision as relative standard deviation (RSD) were less than 8.0% and accuracy as relative error (RE) was within ±3.0%. The method allowed a high sample throughput, and was sensitive and accurate enough for a pilot bioequivalence study in healthy male Chinese subjects following single oral administration of two strontium ranelate formulations containing 2g strontium ranelate.

  3. Degradation of extracellular matrix by larvae of Schistosoma mansoni. I. Degradation by cercariae as a model for initial parasite invasion of host

    SciTech Connect

    McKerrow, J.H.; Keene, W.E.; Jeong, K.H.; Werb, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni to degrade a model extracellular connective tissue matrix produced by rat vascular smooth muscle cells in culture was investigated. In this model, connective tissue macromolecules are present in the interactive framework that characterizes their structure in vivo. Cercariae were stimulated to degrade the matrix by skin lipid or linoleic acid. At the maximally stimulating concentration of linoleic acid (25 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/), 68% of the total matrix was degraded, including 57% of the glycoprotein, 79% of the elastin, and 8% of the collagen. Degradation of matrix was inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor and soybean trypsin inhibitor. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid inhibited degradation by unstimulated but not linoleic acid-stimulated cercariae. Preacetabular gland secretions collected from cercariae also degraded the matrix with an activity 86% of that of live cercariae. Preacetabular gland proteolytic activity was also inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The similar characteristics of matrix degradation by both live cercariae and cercarial preacetabular gland secretions support the idea that a proteinase secreted from cercarial preacetabular glands facilitates invasion of skin and connective tissue by these larvae. Degradation of elastin and glycoprotein constituentes of extracellular matrix is probably essential for skin penetration.

  4. First report of Oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolium) as an alternate host for the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) under artificial inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal rusts are heteroecious fungi requiring cereal crops and other unrelated host species to complete their life cycle. Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikss. (Pst), the wheat stripe rust pathogen, has five distinct spore types. Although wheat has been recognized as the primary host...

  5. Single amino acid changes in the 6K1-CI region can promote the alternative adaptation of Prunus- and Nicotiana-propagated Plum pox virus C isolates to either host.

    PubMed

    Calvo, María; Malinowski, Tadeusz; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) C is one of the less common PPV strains and specifically infects cherry trees in nature. Making use of two PPV-C isolates that display different pathogenicity features, i.e., SwCMp, which had been adapted to Nicotiana species, and BY101, which had been isolated from cherry rootstock L2 (Prunus lannesiana) and propagated only in cherry species, we have generated two infective full-length cDNA clones in order to determine which viral factors are involved in the adaptation to each host. According to our results, the C-P3(PIPO)/6K1/N-CI (cylindrical inclusion) region contains overlapping but not coincident viral determinants involved in symptoms development, local viral amplification, and systemic movement capacity. Amino acid changes in this region promoting the adaptation to N. benthamiana or P. avium have trade-off effects in the alternative host. In both cases, adaptation can be achieved through single amino acid changes in the NIapro protease recognition motif between 6K1 and CI or in nearby sequences. Thus, we hypothesize that the potyvirus polyprotein processing could depend on specific host factors and the adaptation of PPV-C isolates to particular hosts relies on a fine regulation of the proteolytic cleavage of the 6K1-CI junction.

  6. The role of alternate hosts in the ecology and life history of Hematodinium sp., a parasitic dinoflagellate of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Lohan, Katrina M Pagenkopp; Reece, Kimberly S; Miller, Terrence L; Wheeler, Kersten N; Small, Hamish J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2012-02-01

    Hematodinium sp. infections are relatively common in some American blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) populations in estuaries of the western Atlantic Ocean. Outbreaks of disease caused by Hematodinium sp. can be extensive and can cause substantial mortalities in blue crab populations in high salinities. We examined several species of crustaceans to determine if the same species of Hematodinium that infects C. sapidus is found in other crustaceans from the same localities. Over a 2-yr period, 1,829 crustaceans were collected from the Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, examined for the presence of infections. A portion of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene complex from Hematodinium sp. was amplified and sequences were compared among 35 individual crustaceans putatively infected with the parasite, as determined by microscopic examination, and 4 crustaceans putatively infected based only on PCR analysis. Of the 18 crustacean species examined, 5 were infected with Hematodinium sp. after microscopic examination and PCR analysis, including 3 new host records, and an additional species was positive only via PCR analysis. The ITS1 rRNA sequences of Hematodinium sp. from the infected crustaceans were highly similar to each other and to that reported from C. sapidus (>98%). The similarity among these ITS1 sequences and similarities in the histopathology of infected hosts is evidence that the same species of Hematodinium found in C. sapidus infects a broad range of crustaceans along the Delmarva Peninsula. Our data indicate that the species of Hematodinium found in blue crabs from estuaries along the east coast of North America is a host generalist, capable of infecting hosts in different families within the Order Decapoda. Additionally, evidence indicates that it may be capable of infecting crustaceans within the Order Amphipoda.

  7. Role of the Emp Pilus Subunits of Enterococcus faecium in Biofilm Formation, Adherence to Host Extracellular Matrix Components, and Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Singh, Kavindra V.; Somarajan, Sudha R.; Yadav, Puja; Chang, Chungyu; Spencer, Robert; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ton-That, Hung

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an important cause of hospital-associated infections, including urinary tract infections (UTIs), bacteremia, and infective endocarditis. Pili have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecium. We previously demonstrated that a nonpiliated ΔempABC::cat derivative of E. faecium TX82 was attenuated in biofilm formation and in a UTI model. Here, we studied the contributions of the individual pilus subunits EmpA, EmpB, and EmpC to pilus architecture, biofilm formation, adherence to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, and infection. We identified EmpA as the tip of the pili and found that deletion of empA reduced biofilm formation to the same level as deletion of the empABC operon, a phenotype that was restored by reconstituting in situ the empA gene. Deletion of empB also caused a reduction in biofilm, while EmpC was found to be dispensable. Significant reductions in adherence to fibrinogen and collagen type I were observed with deletion of empA and empB, while deletion of empC had no adherence defect. Furthermore, we showed that each deletion mutant was significantly attenuated in comparison to the isogenic parental strain, TX82, in a mixed-inoculum UTI model (P < 0.001 to 0.048), that reconstitution of empA restored virulence in the UTI model, and that deletion of empA also resulted in attenuation in an infective endocarditis model (P = 0.0088). Our results indicate that EmpA and EmpB, but not EmpC, contribute to biofilm and adherence to ECM proteins; however, all the Emp pilins are important for E. faecium to cause infection in the urinary tract. PMID:26930703

  8. General and specific host responses to bacterial infection in Peyer's patches: a role for stromelysin-1 (matrix metalloproteinase-3) during Salmonella enterica infection.

    PubMed

    Handley, Scott A; Miller, Virginia L

    2007-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and Yersinia enterocolitica are enteric pathogens capable of colonizing and inducing inflammatory responses in Peyer's patches (PPs) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Although the tissue colonization pattern is similar between these two pathogens, their pathogenic lifestyles are quite different. For example, while S. typhimurium is primarily an intracellular pathogen, Y. enterocolitica survives primarily extracellularly. We determined and compared the transcriptional changes occurring in response to S. typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica colonization of PP using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. Both pathogens elicited a general inflammatory response indicated by the upregulation of cytokines and chemokines. However, specific differences were also observed, most notably in the transcriptional regulation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and IFN-gamma-regulated genes in response to S. typhimurium but not Y. enterocolitica. Of particular note, a group of genes encoding matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) had increased transcript numbers in the PPs following infection with both pathogens. The experiments described here compare oral S. typhimurium or Y. enterocolitica infection in stromelysin-1 (MMP-3)-deficient mice (mmp-3(-/-)) with mice possessing functional MMP-3 (mmp-3(+/+)). There was little difference in the survival of MMP-3-deficient mice infected with Y. enterocolitica when compared with littermate controls. Surprisingly though, mmp-3(-/-) mice were markedly more resistant to S. typhimurium infection than the control mice. S. typhimurium was able to colonize mmp-3(-/-) mice, albeit in a delayed fashion, to equivalent levels as mmp-3(+/+) mice. Nevertheless, significantly lower levels of inflammatory cytokines were detected in tissues and serum in the mmp-3(-/-) mice in comparison with mmp-3(+/+) mice. We hypothesize that MMP-3 is involved in initiating an early and lethal cytokine response to S. typhimurium

  9. Alternative fluorescent labeling strategies for characterizing gram-positive pathogenic bacteria: Flow cytometry supported counting, sorting, and proteome analysis of Staphylococcus aureus retrieved from infected host cells.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Petra; Surmann, Kristin; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Normann, Nicole; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that is able to cause a broad range of infectious diseases in humans. Furthermore, S. aureus is able to survive inside nonprofessional phagocytic host cell which serve as a niche for the pathogen to hide from the immune system and antibiotics therapies. Modern OMICs technologies provide valuable tools to investigate host-pathogen interactions upon internalization. However, these experiments are often hampered by limited capabilities to retrieve bacteria from such an experimental setting. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a labeling strategy allowing fast detection and quantitation of S. aureus in cell lysates or infected cell lines by flow cytometry for subsequent proteome analyses. Therefore, S. aureus cells were labeled with the DNA stain SYTO(®) 9, or Vancomycin BODIPY(®) FL (VMB), a glycopeptide antibiotic binding to most Gram-positive bacteria which was conjugated to a fluorescent dye. Staining of S. aureus HG001 with SYTO 9 allowed counting of bacteria from pure cultures but not in cell lysates from infection experiments. In contrast, with VMB it was feasible to stain bacteria from pure cultures as well as from samples of infection experiments. VMB can also be applied for histocytochemistry analysis of formaldehyde fixed cell layers grown on coverslips. Proteome analyses of S. aureus labeled with VMB revealed that the labeling procedure provoked only minor changes on proteome level and allowed cell sorting and analysis of S. aureus from infection settings with sensitivity similar to continuous gfp expression. Furthermore, VMB labeling allowed precise counting of internalized bacteria and can be employed for downstream analyses, e.g., proteomics, of strains not easily amendable to genetic manipulation such as clinical isolates. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  10. An Alternative Theory of the Universe Based Upon a Balanced Particulate-Ethereal, Tri-Based, Ten-Dimensional, Self-Propagating Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogley, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    A model of the Universe of man designated ``MU'' is proposed. Based upon 10 working and 1 generating dimension or firmament the makeup of MU will be described. The balance of the Universe and the position form of time space and gravity will be described. The particulate physical and ethereal nature is one that departs from previous theories but is of the utmost importance in balancing the Universe and accounting for the shortfalls of the proposed theories of the day. The ten-dimensional +1 matrix will be described along with its sub-parts each distinct and closely bound to a separate dimensional level. The connections or doors between the firmaments and the methods by which they stay open close and remain separated from each other is described. Of great importance is the propagation of a firmament within the Matrix. Each firmament is itself independent and distinctly wrapped by a unique layer of the matrix. Yet each firmament is itself a separate image or part of the next larger firmament as can be thought of a subunit of that firmament. Thus each is separate yet still a part of the greater sized firmament that follows. The sizes of the dimensions are in a repeatable and constant multiple of the previous dimension. Sizes of the dimensions will be discussed. The function, form, and structural layout of the universe will be shown to have a fractal relationship to natural systems on earth and even to the image of man. )

  11. Role of microRNA 1207-5P and its host gene, the long non-coding RNA Pvt1, as mediators of extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidney: implications for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Eddy, Elena; Kiefer, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney failure and end-stage renal disease in the Western World. One of the major characteristics of this disease is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney glomeruli. While both environmental and genetic determinants are recognized for their role in the development of diabetic nephropathy, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, long non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs, have also recently been found to underlie some of the biological mechanisms, including ECM accumulation, leading to the disease. We previously found that a long non-coding RNA, the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 (PVT1), increases plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) in mesangial cells, the two main contributors to ECM accumulation in the glomeruli under hyperglycemic conditions, as well as fibronectin 1 (FN1), a major ECM component. Here, we report that miR-1207-5p, a PVT1-derived microRNA, is abundantly expressed in kidney cells, and is upregulated by glucose and TGF-β1. We also found that like PVT1, miR-1207-5p increases expression of TGF-β1, PAI-1, and FN1 but in a manner that is independent of its host gene. In addition, regulation of miR-1207-5p expression by glucose and TGFβ1 is independent of PVT1. These results provide evidence supporting important roles for miR-1207-5p and its host gene in the complex pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  12. An alternative improved method for the homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrix for the fabrication of Cu/CNTs composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Maneet; Singhal, S. K.; Sharma, Indu; Mathur, R. B.

    2013-02-01

    Copper has a wide range of applications due to its excellent properties (high thermal and electrical conductivity). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used as a reinforcing material due to their superior properties. Copper/Carbon nanotube (Cu/CNTs) composites show enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties as compared to pure Cu and Cu composites. Hence, Cu/CNTs composites have tremendous applications. Cu/CNTs are being developed for use as antifungal and antimicrobial agents, which can lead to their further use in biomedical devices and implant materials. The versatility of this material is such that Cu/CNTs are being developed for use in ultra-large scale integrated circuits for use in the latest integrated circuits and semiconductor chips. The composite material is being used as heat sinks for various industries. Cu/CNTs are now also being employed as catalysts for various industrial reactions. Fuel cell electrodes based on Cu/CNTs are being developed to replace expensive Pt/Pd-based electrodes, currently being used. Another application in the energy sector is the use of Cu/CNTs in direct methanol fuel cells and in methanol gas reforming for H2 production. These extensive applications provided motivation for the current work. However, these applications can only be realized if a stable and uniform Cu/CNTs composite powder can be made. The challenges in fabricating Cu/CNTs composites are: (1) homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrix, (2) interfacial bonding between CNTs and Cu matrix and (3) retention of structural integrity of CNTs. Powder metallurgy (PM) has been widely used, but dispersion of Cu/CNTs remains an issue. We employed the molecular level mixing method (MLM), coupled with high energy ball milling (BM) to overcome above mentioned issues. To the best of our knowledge, this is a new process for the homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in copper and has been reported for the first time. To produce a homogenous mixture of Cu and CNTs, a

  13. A single-center analysis of chronic graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival after alternative donor stem cell transplantation in children with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Jiro; Fukano, Reiji; Noguchi, Maiko; Okamura, Jun

    2017-02-15

    We assessed the clinical outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) from alternative donors for pediatric patients with hematological malignancies, defining graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) as a composite endpoint. We also defined chronic GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (cGRFS) as survival without severe chronic GVHD, relapse, or death. The probabilities of 2-year disease-free survival from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched unrelated donor (n = 57), related donor with HLA-1 antigen mismatch in the graft-versus-host direction (1Ag-GvH-MMRD, n = 28), and unrelated umbilical cord blood (n = 35) were 52.2, 38.5, and 40.4%, respectively (P = 0.14), and for 2-year GRFS were 26.2, 13.4, and 30.4%, respectively (P = 0.089), and for 2-year cGRFS were 36.2, 16.7, and 40.4%, respectively (P = 0.015). Of the three groups, the 1Ag-GvH-MMRD group showed a significantly higher cumulative incidence of severe cGVHD, and was identified as a significant risk factor for worse cGRFS. These results suggest that intensification of GVHD prophylaxis may be needed for SCT from 1Ag-GvH-MMRD. As with GRFS, cGRFS should be used as an endpoint of the clinical study to predict long-term morbidity and mortality for patients who need longer follow-up such as pediatric SCT recipients.

  14. On alternating quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseva, Jenia; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    2017-03-01

    We study an inhomogeneous quantum walk on a line that evolves according to alternating coins, each a rotation matrix. For the quantum walk with the coin alternating between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations by the same angle, we derive a closed form solution for the propagation of probabilities, and provide its asymptotic approximation via the method of stationary phase. Finally, we observe that for a x03c0;/4 angle, this alternating rotation walk will replicate the renown Hadamard walk.

  15. Alternative security

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview.

  16. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  17. Optical devices having flakes suspended in a host fluid to provide a flake/fluid system providing flakes with angularly dependent optical properties in response to an alternating current electric field due to the dielectric properties of the system

    SciTech Connect

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2006-05-09

    Optical devices utilizing flakes (also called platelets) suspended in a host fluid have optical characteristics, such as reflective properties, which are angular dependent in response to an AC field. The reflectivity may be Bragg-like, and the characteristics are obtained through the use of flakes of liquid crystal material, such as polymer liquid crystal (PLC) materials including polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) and polymer nematic liquid crystal (PNLC) material or birefringent polymers (BP). The host fluid may be propylene carbonate, poly(ethylene glycol) or other fluids or fluid mixtures having fluid conductivity to support conductivity in the flake/host system. AC field dependent rotation of 90.degree. can be obtained at rates and field intensities dependent upon the frequency and magnitude of the AC field. The devices are useful in providing displays, polarizers, filters, spatial light modulators and wherever switchable polarizing, reflecting, and transmission properties are desired.

  18. Nuclear Matrix protein SMAR1 represses HIV-1 LTR mediated transcription through chromatin remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenath, Kadreppa; Pavithra, Lakshminarasimhan; Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Surajit; Dash, Prasanta K.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-04-25

    Nuclear Matrix and MARs have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of host as well as viral genes but their precise role in HIV-1 transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that > 98% of HIV sequences contain consensus MAR element in their promoter. We show that SMAR1 binds to the LTR MAR and reinforces transcriptional silencing by tethering the LTR MAR to nuclear matrix. SMAR1 associated HDAC1-mSin3 corepressor complex is dislodged from the LTR upon cellular activation by PMA/TNFalpha leading to an increase in the acetylation and a reduction in the trimethylation of histones, associated with the recruitment of RNA Polymerase II on the LTR. Overexpression of SMAR1 lead to reduction in LTR mediated transcription, both in a Tat dependent and independent manner, resulting in a decreased virion production. These results demonstrate the role of SMAR1 in regulating viral transcription by alternative compartmentalization of LTR between the nuclear matrix and chromatin.

  19. Matrix thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  20. Differential reproductive success favours strong host preference in a highly specialized brood parasite

    PubMed Central

    De Mársico, María C; Reboreda, Juan C

    2008-01-01

    Obligate avian brood parasites show dramatic variation in the degree to which they are host specialists or host generalists. The screaming cowbird Molothrus rufoaxillaris is one of the most specialized brood parasites, using a single host, the bay-winged cowbird (Agelaioides badius) over most of its range. Coevolutionary theory predicts increasing host specificity the longer the parasite interacts with a particular avian community, as hosts evolve defences that the parasite cannot counteract. According to this view, host specificity can be maintained if screaming cowbirds avoid parasitizing potentially suitable hosts that have developed effective defences against parasitic females or eggs. Specialization may also be favoured, even in the absence of host defences, if the parasite's reproductive success in alternative hosts is lower than that in the main host. We experimentally tested these hypotheses using as alternative hosts two suitable but unparasitized species: house wrens (Troglodytes aedon) and chalk-browed mockingbirds (Mimus saturninus). We assessed host defences against parasitic females and eggs, and reproductive success of the parasite in current and alternative hosts. Alternative hosts did not discriminate against screaming cowbird females or eggs. Egg survival and hatching success were similarly high in current and alternative hosts, but the survival of parasitic chicks was significantly lower in alternative hosts. Our results indicate that screaming cowbirds have the potential to colonize novel hosts, but higher reproductive success in the current host may favour host fidelity. PMID:18647716

  1. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  2. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  3. Sync Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, William C.; Metz, W. Chris; Mitrani, Jacques E.; Hewett, Jr., Paul L.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  4. Gamma-ray solid laser: variety of work nuclei and host matrixes in Mendeleev Table screened with use of system of criteria based on joint GG&RH theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyagin, Stanislav V.

    2001-03-01

    The hosts and nuclei-candidates (mass approximately 46 - 243, transition energy approximately 1 - 200 keV, decay's time 10-7 - 10+2 s) for gamma-laser (GL) realization are represented over Mendeleev Table. The choice of active media (nuclei-candidates, hosts) for GL is based on the joint theory of (gamma) -generation and radiation-heat regime which accounts a big complex of hindrances against GL and thus discards many tentative candidates. Nuclei- candidates are screened at the analyzing of data banks for nuclear transitions. Chosen candidates (approximately 20) could be used due to author's method SPTEN (Soft Prompt Transplantation of Excited Nuclei). The discarded tentative nuclei (approximately 80) with the life-times 10-6 - 10+2 are represented too. All analyzed long-lived (approximately 0.5 - 10+2 s) isomers are turned to be not fit for GL without use of very strong multi-wave Borrman effect even at the supposition of natural line's width. The application of the revealed candidates in two different (gamma) -laser's categories (residential and non- residential) is discussed.

  5. Host thin films incorporating nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma

    The focus of this research project was the investigation of the functional properties of thin films that incorporate a secondary nanoparticulate phase. In particular to assess if the secondary nanoparticulate material enhanced a functional property of the coating on glass. In order to achieve this, new thin film deposition methods were developed, namely use of nanopowder precursors, an aerosol assisted transport technique and an aerosol into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition system. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) was used to deposit 8 series of thin films on glass. Five different nanoparticles silver, gold, ceria, tungsten oxide and zinc oxide were tested and shown to successfully deposit thin films incorporating nanoparticles within a host matrix. Silver nanoparticles were synthesised and doped within a titania film by AACVD. This improved solar control properties. A unique aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) system was used to deposit films of Au nanoparticles and thin films of gold nanoparticles incorporated within a host titania matrix. Incorporation of high refractive index contrast metal oxide particles within a host film altered the film colour. The key goal was to test the potential of nanopowder forms and transfer the suspended nanopowder via an aerosol to a substrate in order to deposit a thin film. Discrete tungsten oxide nanoparticles or ceria nanoparticles within a titanium dioxide thin film enhanced the self-cleaning and photo-induced super-hydrophilicity. The nanopowder precursor study was extended by deposition of zinc oxide thin films incorporating Au nanoparticles and also ZnO films deposited from a ZnO nanopowder precursor. Incorporation of Au nanoparticles within a VO: host matrix improved the thermochromic response, optical and colour properties. Composite VC/TiC and Au nanoparticle/V02/Ti02 thin films displayed three useful

  6. Host plant adaptation in Drosophila mettleri populations.

    PubMed

    Castrezana, Sergio; Bono, Jeremy M

    2012-01-01

    The process of local adaptation creates diversity among allopatric populations, and may eventually lead to speciation. Plant-feeding insect populations that specialize on different host species provide an excellent opportunity to evaluate the causes of ecological specialization and the subsequent consequences for diversity. In this study, we used geographically separated Drosophila mettleri populations that specialize on different host cacti to examine oviposition preference for and larval performance on an array of natural and non-natural hosts (eight total). We found evidence of local adaptation in performance on saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) for populations that are typically associated with this host, and to chemically divergent prickly pear species (Opuntia spp.) in a genetically isolated population on Santa Catalina Island. Moreover, each population exhibited reduced performance on the alternative host. This finding is consistent with trade-offs associated with adaptation to these chemically divergent hosts, although we also discuss alternative explanations for this pattern. For oviposition preference, Santa Catalina Island flies were more likely to oviposit on some prickly pear species, but all populations readily laid eggs on saguaro. Experiments with non-natural hosts suggest that factors such as ecological opportunity may play a more important role than host plant chemistry in explaining the lack of natural associations with some hosts.

  7. Host Plant Adaptation in Drosophila mettleri Populations

    PubMed Central

    Castrezana, Sergio; Bono, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    The process of local adaptation creates diversity among allopatric populations, and may eventually lead to speciation. Plant-feeding insect populations that specialize on different host species provide an excellent opportunity to evaluate the causes of ecological specialization and the subsequent consequences for diversity. In this study, we used geographically separated Drosophila mettleri populations that specialize on different host cacti to examine oviposition preference for and larval performance on an array of natural and non-natural hosts (eight total). We found evidence of local adaptation in performance on saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) for populations that are typically associated with this host, and to chemically divergent prickly pear species (Opuntia spp.) in a genetically isolated population on Santa Catalina Island. Moreover, each population exhibited reduced performance on the alternative host. This finding is consistent with trade-offs associated with adaptation to these chemically divergent hosts, although we also discuss alternative explanations for this pattern. For oviposition preference, Santa Catalina Island flies were more likely to oviposit on some prickly pear species, but all populations readily laid eggs on saguaro. Experiments with non-natural hosts suggest that factors such as ecological opportunity may play a more important role than host plant chemistry in explaining the lack of natural associations with some hosts. PMID:22493678

  8. Alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a review, of the experiences of Brazil, Canada, and New Zealand, which have implemented programs to encourage the use of alternative motor fuels. It will also discuss the results of a separate completed review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) progress in implementing the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. The act calls for, among other things, the federal government to use alternative-fueled vehicles in its fleet. The Persian Gulf War, environmental concerns, and the administration's National Energy Strategy have greatly heightened interest in the use of alternative fuels in this country.

  9. Pleasant Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unks, Gerald

    1981-01-01

    The author feels that the current wave of political conservatism may prove beneficial to education if the national mood of decentralization and decontrol leads to a resurgence of community involvement and locally-developed alternatives. He cites several examples of successful urban alternative schools. (SJL)

  10. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annett, Larry D.

    A model is presented for the categorizing of alternative schools, then the nature of the free school, which represents the essence of the alternative school movement, is examined. Strengths and weaknesses of court, legislative, and administrative approaches to resolve governance issues are set forth. This is followed by an analysis of three…

  11. Alternative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefonek, Tom; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This special double issue focuses on the issue of alternative assessment and its place in educational reform. "Alternative Assessment: A National Perspective" (T. Stefonek) emphasizes that the fundamental purposes of new assessment methods are grounded in educational goals, meaningful outcomes, and curricular and instructional programs…

  12. Candida Biofilms and the Host: Models and New Concepts for Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Tournu, Hélène; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms define mono- or multispecies communities embedded in a self-produced protective matrix, which is strongly attached to surfaces. They often are considered a general threat not only in industry but also in medicine. They constitute a permanent source of contamination, and they can disturb the proper usage of the material onto which they develop. This paper relates to some of the most recent approaches that have been elaborated to eradicate Candida biofilms, based on the vast effort put in ever-improving models of biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo, including novel flow systems, high-throughput techniques and mucosal models. Mixed biofilms, sustaining antagonist or beneficial cooperation between species, and their interplay with the host immune system are also prevalent topics. Alternative strategies against biofilms include the lock therapy and immunotherapy approaches, and material coating and improvements. The host-biofilm interactions are also discussed, together with their potential applications in Candida biofilm elimination. PMID:22164167

  13. Highly efficient direct aerobic oxidative esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with alkyl alcohols catalysed by gold nanoparticles incarcerated in a nanoporous polymer matrix: a tool for investigating the role of the polymer host.

    PubMed

    Buonerba, Antonio; Noschese, Annarita; Grassi, Alfonso

    2014-04-25

    The selective aerobic oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamaldehyde, as well as direct oxidative esterification of this alcohol with primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols, were achieved with high chemoselectivity by using gold nanoparticles supported in a nanoporous semicrystalline multi-block copolymer matrix, which consisted of syndiotactic polystyrene-co-cis-1,4-polybutadiene. The cascade reaction that leads to the alkyl cinnamates occurs through two oxidation steps: the selective oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol to cinnamaldehyde, followed by oxidation of the hemiacetal that results from the base-catalysed reaction of cinnamaldehyde with an aliphatic alcohol. The rate constants for the two steps were evaluated in the temperature range 10-45 °C. The cinnamyl alcohol oxidation is faster than the oxidative esterification of cinnamaldehyde with methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-hexanol or 1-octanol. The rate constants of the latter reaction are pseudo-zero order with respect to the aliphatic alcohol and decrease as the bulkiness of the alcohol is increased. The activation energy (Ea) for the two oxidation steps was calculated for esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with 1-butanol (Ea = 57.8±11.5 and 62.7±16.7 kJ mol(-1) for the first and second step, respectively). The oxidative esterification of cinnamyl alcohol with 2-phenylethanol follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to 2-phenylethanol and is faster than observed for other alcohols because of fast diffusion of the aromatic alcohol in the crystalline phase of the support. The kinetic investigation allowed us to assess the role of the polymer support in the determination of both high activity and selectivity in the title reaction.

  14. Alternative activation deprives macrophages of a coordinated defense program to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Antje; Seiler, Peter; Stein, Maik; Bandermann, Silke; Hahnke, Karin; Mollenkopf, Hans; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2006-03-01

    A potent Th1 immune response is critical to the control of tuberculosis. The impact of an additive Th2 response on the course of disease has so far been insufficiently characterized, despite increased morbidity after co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Th2-eliciting helminths and possible involvement of Th2 polarization in reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Here, we describe the gene expression profile of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages alternatively activated by IL-4 in response to infection with M. tuberculosis. Comparison of transcriptional profiles of infected IL-4- and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages revealed delayed and partially diminished responses to intracellular bacteria in alternatively activated macrophages, characterized by reduced exposure to nitrosative stress and increased iron availability, respectively. Alternative activation of host macrophages correlated with elevated expression of the M. tuberculosis iron storage protein bacterioferritin as well as reduced expression of the mycobactin synthesis genes mbtI and mbtJ. The extracellular matrix-remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 was induced in alternatively activated macrophages in vitro, and MMP-12-expressing macrophages were abundant at late, but not early, stages of tuberculosis in murine lungs. Our findings emphasize that alternative activation deprives macrophages of control mechanisms that limit mycobacterial growth in vivo, thus supporting intracellular persistence of M. tuberculosis.

  15. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Stanley; Kimsey, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of the DeKalb Alternative School in Atlanta, Georgia, located in a renovated shopping center. Purchasing commercial land and renovating the existing building saved the school system time and money. (EV)

  16. Method of determining lanthanidies in a transition element host

    DOEpatents

    De Kalb, Edward L.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1976-02-03

    A phosphor composition contains a lanthanide activator element within a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO.sub.4 with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On X-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence.

  17. Summary of laser speckle photogrammetry for HOST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Frank G.

    1986-01-01

    High temperature static strain measurement capability is important for the success of the HOST program. As part of the NASA Lewis effort to develop the technology for improved hot-section durability, the HOST instrumentation program has, as a major goal, the development of methods for measuring strain at high temperature. Development work includes both improvements in resistance strain-gauge technology and, as an alternative approach, the development of optical techniques for high temperature strain measurement.

  18. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  19. Magnetostrictive Alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger; Bruder, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This innovation replaces the linear alternator presently used in Stirling engines with a continuous-gradient, impedance-matched, oscillating magnetostrictive transducer that eliminates all moving parts via compression, maintains high efficiency, costs less to manufacture, reduces mass, and eliminates the need for a bearing system. The key components of this new technology are the use of stacked magnetostrictive materials, such as Terfenol-D, under a biased magnetic and stress-induced compression, continuous-gradient impedance-matching material, coils, force-focusing metallic structure, and supports. The acoustic energy from the engine travels through an impedancematching layer that is physically connected to the magnetostrictive mass. Compression bolts keep the structure under compressive strain, allowing for the micron-scale compression of the magnetostrictive material and eliminating the need for bearings. The relatively large millimeter displacement of the pressure side of the impedance-matching material is reduced to micron motion, and undergoes stress amplification at the magnetostrictive interface. The alternating compression and expansion of the magnetostrictive material creates an alternating magnetic field that then induces an electric current in a coil that is wound around the stack. This produces electrical power from the acoustic pressure wave and, if the resonant frequency is tuned to match the engine, can replace the linear alternator that is commonly used.

  20. ALTERNATIVE OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reports on the efforts of the USEPA to study chloramines, chlorine dioxide and ozone as alternative oxidants/disinfectants to chlorine for the control of disinfection by-rpdocuts (DBPs) in drinking water. It examines the control of DBPs like trihalomethanes and haloa...

  1. Alternative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Explains how advances in diesel and alternative fuels has caused schools to reconsider their use for their bus fleets. Reductions in air pollution emissions, cost-savings developments, and the economies experienced from less downtime and maintenance requirements are explored. (GR)

  2. Bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches for bacterial biofilm matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-04-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The "sum-of-the-parts" bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by Escherichia coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in Vibrio cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture.

  3. Local host adaptation and use of a novel host in the seed beetle Megacerus eulophus.

    PubMed

    Stotz, Gisela C; Suárez, Lorena H; Gonzáles, Wilfredo L; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in host plant availability may lead to specialization in host use and local host adaptation in herbivorous insects, which may involve a cost in performance on other hosts. We studied two geographically separated populations of the seed beetle Megacerus eulophus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) in central Chile: a population from the host Convolvulus chilensis (in Aucó) and a population from C. bonariensis (in Algarrobo). In Aucó C. chilensis is the only host plant, while in Algarrobo both C. bonariensis and C. chilensis are available. We tested local adaptation to these native host plants and its influence on the use of another, exotic host plant. We hypothesized that local adaptation would be verified, particularly for the one-host population (Aucó), and that the Aucó population would be less able to use an alternative, high-quality host. We found evidence of local adaptation in the population from C. chilensis. Thus, when reared on C. chilensis, adults from the C. chilensis population were larger and lived longer than individuals from the C. bonariensis population, while bruchids from the two populations had the same body size and longevity when reared on C. bonariensis. Overall, bruchids from the C. chilensis population showed greater performance traits than those from the C. bonariensis population. There were no differences between the bruchid populations in their ability to use the alternative, exotic host Calystegia sepium, as shown by body size and longevity patterns. Results suggest that differences in local adaptation might be explained by differential host availability in the study populations.

  4. Local Host Adaptation and Use of a Novel Host in the Seed Beetle Megacerus eulophus

    PubMed Central

    Stotz, Gisela C.; Suárez, Lorena H.; Gonzáles, Wilfredo L.; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in host plant availability may lead to specialization in host use and local host adaptation in herbivorous insects, which may involve a cost in performance on other hosts. We studied two geographically separated populations of the seed beetle Megacerus eulophus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) in central Chile: a population from the host Convolvulus chilensis (in Aucó) and a population from C. bonariensis (in Algarrobo). In Aucó C. chilensis is the only host plant, while in Algarrobo both C. bonariensis and C. chilensis are available. We tested local adaptation to these native host plants and its influence on the use of another, exotic host plant. We hypothesized that local adaptation would be verified, particularly for the one-host population (Aucó), and that the Aucó population would be less able to use an alternative, high-quality host. We found evidence of local adaptation in the population from C. chilensis. Thus, when reared on C. chilensis, adults from the C. chilensis population were larger and lived longer than individuals from the C. bonariensis population, while bruchids from the two populations had the same body size and longevity when reared on C. bonariensis. Overall, bruchids from the C. chilensis population showed greater performance traits than those from the C. bonariensis population. There were no differences between the bruchid populations in their ability to use the alternative, exotic host Calystegia sepium, as shown by body size and longevity patterns. Results suggest that differences in local adaptation might be explained by differential host availability in the study populations. PMID:23326528

  5. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric micro-analysis: the first non-immunological alternative attempt to quantify gluten gliadins in food samples.

    PubMed

    Camafeita, E; Alfonso, P; Mothes, T; Méndez, E

    1997-09-01

    The first epitope-independent procedure for rapidly quantifying gluten gliadins in food by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) based on the direct observation of the characteristic gliadin mass pattern is presented. This pattern was identified in both processed and unprocessed gluten-containing food samples. The procedure allows the micro-quantification of gluten in food samples below levels toxic for coeliac patients, with a linear response in the 0.4-10 mg per 100 g range and a high detection sensitivity similar to that of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems. Food samples simultaneously analyzed by MALDI/TOF-MS and a highly sensitive laboratory-made sandwich ELISA revealed a good correlation between the two techniques. In addition, MALDI/TOF-MS provides a rapid screening system to determine the presence of gliadins in food samples by directly monitoring the occurrence of the protonated gliadin mass pattern. The procedure also permits the study of the alteration of gliadins in food during the baking process, providing data on the heart effect by changes in protein mass signals.

  6. Bartonella entry mechanisms into mammalian host cells.

    PubMed

    Eicher, Simone C; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The Gram-negative genus Bartonella comprises arthropod-borne pathogens that typically infect mammals in a host-specific manner. Bartonella bacilliformis and Bartonella quintana are human-specific pathogens, while several zoonotic bartonellae specific for diverse animal hosts infect humans as an incidental host. Clinical manifestations of Bartonella infections range from mild symptoms to life-threatening disease. Following transmission by blood-sucking arthropods or traumatic contact with infected animals, bartonellae display sequential tropisms towards endothelial and possibly other nucleated cells and erythrocytes, the latter in a host-specific manner. Attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to nucleated cells is mediated by surface-exposed bacterial adhesins, in particular trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs). The subsequent engulfment of the pathogen into a vacuolar structure follows a unique series of events whereby the pathogen avoids the endolysosomal compartments. For Bartonella henselae and assumingly most other species, the infection process is aided at different steps by Bartonella effector proteins (Beps). They are injected into host cells through the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB/D4 and subvert host cellular functions to favour pathogen uptake. Bacterial binding to erythrocytes is mediated by Trw, another T4SS, in a strictly host-specific manner, followed by pathogen-forced uptake involving the IalB invasin and subsequent replication and persistence within a membrane-bound intra-erythrocytic compartment.

  7. Host defenses against cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael S; Perfect, John R

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of pathogenic Cryptococcus species with their various hosts is somewhat unique compared to other fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. Cryptococcus shares an intimate association with host immune cells, leading to enhanced intracellular growth. Furthermore, unlike most other fungal pathogens, the signs and symptoms of cryptococcal disease are typically self-inflicted by the host during the host's attempt to clear this invader from sensitive organ systems such as the central nervous system. In this review, we will summarize the story of host-Cryptococcus interactions to date and explore strategies to exploit the current knowledge for treatment of cryptococcal infections.

  8. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  9. Finding nonoverlapping substructures of a sparse matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2004-08-09

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices, thus the design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of non overlapping rectangular dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which has not been studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum non overlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm for 2 times 2 blocks that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. We discuss alternatives to rectangular blocks such as diagonal blocks and cross blocks and present complexity analysis and approximation algorithms.

  10. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

  11. The Evolution of Viruses in Multi-Host Fitness Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Santiago F; Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Lalić, Jasna

    2009-01-01

    Provided that generalist viruses will have access to potentially unlimited hosts, the question is why most viruses specialize in few hosts. It has been suggested that selection should favor specialists because there are tradeoffs limiting the fitness of generalists in any of the alternative hosts or because evolution proceeds faster with narrower niches. Here we review experiments showing that virus adaptation to a specific host is often coupled with fitness losses in alternative ones. In most instances, mutations beneficial in one host are detrimental in another. This antagonistic pleiotropy should limit the range of adaptation and promote the evolution of specialization. However, when hosts fluctuate in time or space, selective pressures are different and generalist viruses may evolve as well. PMID:19572052

  12. Analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm Extracellular Matrix by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Ferreira, Jose A. G.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly responsible for lethal fungal infections among immunosuppressed individuals. A. fumigatus forms biofilm communities that are of increasing biomedical interest due to the association of biofilms with chronic infections and their increased resistance to antifungal agents and host immune factors. Understanding the composition of microbial biofilms and the extracellular matrix is important to understanding function and, ultimately, to developing strategies to inhibit biofilm formation. We implemented a solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to define compositional parameters of the A. fumigatus extracellular matrix (ECM) when biofilms are formed in RPMI 1640 nutrient medium. Whole biofilm and isolated matrix networks were also characterized by electron microscopy, and matrix proteins were identified through protein gel analysis. The 13C NMR results defined and quantified the carbon contributions in the insoluble ECM, including carbonyls, aromatic carbons, polysaccharide carbons (anomeric and nonanomerics), aliphatics, etc. Additional 15N and 31P NMR spectra permitted more specific annotation of the carbon pools according to C-N and C-P couplings. Together these data show that the A. fumigatus ECM produced under these growth conditions contains approximately 40% protein, 43% polysaccharide, 3% aromatic-containing components, and up to 14% lipid. These fundamental chemical parameters are needed to consider the relationships between composition and function in the A. fumigatus ECM and will enable future comparisons with other organisms and with A. fumigatus grown under alternate conditions. PMID:26163318

  13. Analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm Extracellular Matrix by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Ferreira, Jose A G; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly responsible for lethal fungal infections among immunosuppressed individuals. A. fumigatus forms biofilm communities that are of increasing biomedical interest due to the association of biofilms with chronic infections and their increased resistance to antifungal agents and host immune factors. Understanding the composition of microbial biofilms and the extracellular matrix is important to understanding function and, ultimately, to developing strategies to inhibit biofilm formation. We implemented a solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to define compositional parameters of the A. fumigatus extracellular matrix (ECM) when biofilms are formed in RPMI 1640 nutrient medium. Whole biofilm and isolated matrix networks were also characterized by electron microscopy, and matrix proteins were identified through protein gel analysis. The (13)C NMR results defined and quantified the carbon contributions in the insoluble ECM, including carbonyls, aromatic carbons, polysaccharide carbons (anomeric and nonanomerics), aliphatics, etc. Additional (15)N and (31)P NMR spectra permitted more specific annotation of the carbon pools according to C-N and C-P couplings. Together these data show that the A. fumigatus ECM produced under these growth conditions contains approximately 40% protein, 43% polysaccharide, 3% aromatic-containing components, and up to 14% lipid. These fundamental chemical parameters are needed to consider the relationships between composition and function in the A. fumigatus ECM and will enable future comparisons with other organisms and with A. fumigatus grown under alternate conditions.

  14. Scanning electron image analysis to monitor of implant degradation and host healing following implantation of a drug-eluting bone graft void filler - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Sherry N; Lawson, Scott T; Grainger, David W; Brooks, Amanda E

    2013-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and often sourced during orthopedic surgical intervention. Successful treatment or prevention of this bone penetrating infection requires antibiotics be delivered in excess of the minimal inhibitory concentration to prohibit the growth of the causative organism for sufficient duration. Unfortunately, current standard-of-care antibiotic therapies, administered via intravenous or oral delivery, suffer not only from systemic toxicity and low patient compliance but also provide insufficient local concentrations for therapy. To overcome these clinical inadequacies, a synthetic bone graft material was coated with an antibiotic (tobramycin)-releasing polymer (polycaprolactone) matrix to create a polymer-controlled antibiotic- releasing combination therapy for use as a bone void filler in orthopedic surgeries. Even though this local delivery strategy allows antibiotic delivery over a clinically relevant time frame to prevent infection, complete healing requires the host bone to infiltrate and reabsorb the bone void filler, ultimately replacing the defect with healthy tissue. Unfortunately, the same polymer matrix that allows for controlled local antibiotic delivery may also discourage host bone healing. Efficient orthopedic healing requires the rate of polymer degradation to match the rate of host-bone infiltration. Current imaging techniques, such as histological staining and x-ray imaging, are insufficient to simultaneously assess polymer degradation and host bone integration. Alternative techniques relying on backscatter electron detection during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging may allow a visual differentiation between host bone, synthetic bone, and polymer. Analysis of backscattered SEM images was automated using a custom MATLAB program to determine the ratio of bone to polymer based upon the contrast between the bone (white) and polymer (dark grey). By collecting images of the implant over time

  15. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Fiber-matrix interfaces in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, E.R.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanical properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are governed by the relationships between the matrix, the interface material, and the fibers. In non-oxide matrix systems compliant pyrolytic carbon and BN have been demonstrated to be effective interface materials, allowing for absorption of mismatch stresses between fiber and matrix and offering a poorly bonded interface for crack deflection. The resulting materials have demonstrated remarkable strain/damage tolerance together with high strength. Carbon or BN, however, suffer from oxidative loss in many service environments, and thus there is a major search for oxidation resistant alternatives. This paper reviews the issues related to developing a stable and effective interface material for non-oxide matrix CMCs.

  17. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  18. Glob-Hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Behlendorf, B.; Garlick, J.

    2007-08-31

    The glob-hosts utility manipulates hostlist strings in UNIX shell scripts. Hostlists are a parseable string representatin of list of hosts, which compress nicely when a group of hosts are named with contiguous numeric suffixes. For example, the hosts blue1, blue2, and blue3 can be represented by the hostlist string "blue1, blue2, blue3" or equivalently "blue[1-3]". The globhost utility cn peform the following operations on a hostlist string: count, size, expand, nth, union, minus, intersection, and exclude.

  19. Potential alternative hosts for a powdery mildew on pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powdery mildew of pea (Pisum sativum) is an important disease in the field and in the greenhouse. The most widely documented powdery mildew on pea is Erysiphe pisi, but E. trifolii and E. baeumleri have also been reported. From greenhouse-grown peas, we obtained powdery mildew samples with rDNA ITS ...

  20. Amyloid Structures as Biofilm Matrix Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights into bacterial biofilm matrix structures have induced a paradigm shift toward the recognition of amyloid fibers as common building block structures that confer stability to the exopolysaccharide matrix. Here we describe the functional amyloid systems related to biofilm matrix formation in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and recent knowledge regarding the interaction of amyloids with other biofilm matrix components such as extracellular DNA (eDNA) and the host immune system. In addition, we summarize the efforts to identify compounds that target amyloid fibers for therapeutic purposes and recent developments that take advantage of the amyloid structure to engineer amyloid fibers of bacterial biofilm matrices for biotechnological applications. PMID:27185827

  1. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N’Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II & III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa. PMID:27140942

  2. New Hosts of The Lassa Virus.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, Ayodeji; Cadar, Daniel; Magassouba, N'Faly; Obadare, Adeoba; Kourouma, Fode; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Fasogbon, Samuel; Igbokwe, Joseph; Rieger, Toni; Bockholt, Sabrina; Jérôme, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Garigliany, Mutien; Lorenzen, Stephan; Igbahenah, Felix; Fichet, Jean-Nicolas; Ortsega, Daniel; Omilabu, Sunday; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-05-03

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a deadly haemorrhagic fever in humans, killing several thousand people in West Africa annually. For 40 years, the Natal multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis, has been assumed to be the sole host of LASV. We found evidence that LASV is also hosted by other rodent species: the African wood mouse Hylomyscus pamfi in Nigeria, and the Guinea multimammate mouse Mastomys erythroleucus in both Nigeria and Guinea. Virus strains from these animals were isolated in the BSL-4 laboratory and fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of viral genes coding for glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, polymerase and matrix protein show that Lassa strains detected in M. erythroleucus belong to lineages III and IV. The strain from H. pamfi clusters close to lineage I (for S gene) and between II &III (for L gene). Discovery of new rodent hosts has implications for LASV evolution and its spread into new areas within West Africa.

  3. Matrix Management Structures in Higher Education. Coombe Lodge Working Paper. Information Bank Number 1394.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Rob

    The matrix structure as an alternative to the departmental structure for colleges and universities is discussed, and the matrix system at Middlesex Polytechnic in England is used as illustration. The major impact of the introduction of a matrix structure is its effect on teaching activities within the institution. The matrix structure formally…

  4. Optical properties of matrix confined species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezhnina, M. M.; Kynast, U. H.

    2010-11-01

    A majority of optically functional materials can be perceived as a liaison between ionic or molecular guests and a more or less rigid host. The guests exhibit an optical function, whereas the host provides suitable space, both of them synergistically complementing each other. The embracement of guests and hosts is often very intimate, as e.g. in typical phosphors, where luminescent ions even become part of the host. While the host-guest terminology usually is not applied to such marriages, the term becomes appropriate, if the host grants some degrees of spatial freedom, yet giving order and structure to its guests. Zeolites, clays and inverse opals are porous materials naturally providing hospitable cavities, channels or other compartments, and at the same time the guests are often demanded to occupy preassigned positions within these, or to structurally adapt to the interior host topology. Whereas zeolites and clays are merely patient providers of guest space, inverse opals, can actively turn the light on and off. The present article summarises and highlights recent experimental evidence, ongoing research and some envisaged merits resulting from the interaction of matrix confined luminescent ions, complexes and molecules with a focus on the optical properties of rare earth based materials.

  5. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  6. Structure and assembly of a paramyxovirus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Anthony J; Meng, Geng; Winkler, Dennis C; McGinnes, Lori W; Plevka, Pavel; Steven, Alasdair C; Morrison, Trudy G; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-08-28

    Many pleomorphic, lipid-enveloped viruses encode matrix proteins that direct their assembly and budding, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. We have combined X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron tomography to show that the matrix protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus and relative of measles virus, forms dimers that assemble into pseudotetrameric arrays that generate the membrane curvature necessary for virus budding. We show that the glycoproteins are anchored in the gaps between the matrix proteins and that the helical nucleocapsids are associated in register with the matrix arrays. About 90% of virions lack matrix arrays, suggesting that, in agreement with previous biological observations, the matrix protein needs to dissociate from the viral membrane during maturation, as is required for fusion and release of the nucleocapsid into the host's cytoplasm. Structure and sequence conservation imply that other paramyxovirus matrix proteins function similarly.

  7. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation.

  8. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  9. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  10. Broad host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2013-11-01

    Plasmids are and will remain important cloning vehicles for biotechnology. They have also been associated with the spread of a number of diseases and therefore are a subject of environmental concern. With the advent of sequencing technologies, the database of plasmids is increasing. It will be of immense importance to identify the various bacterial hosts in which the plasmid can replicate. The present review article describes the features that confer broad host range to the plasmids, the molecular basis of plasmid host range evolution, and applications in recombinant DNA technology and environment.

  11. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  12. The intraclass covariance matrix.

    PubMed

    Carey, Gregory

    2005-09-01

    Introduced by C.R. Rao in 1945, the intraclass covariance matrix has seen little use in behavioral genetic research, despite the fact that it was developed to deal with family data. Here, I reintroduce this matrix, and outline its estimation and basic properties for data sets on pairs of relatives. The intraclass covariance matrix is appropriate whenever the research design or mathematical model treats the ordering of the members of a pair as random. Because the matrix has only one estimate of a population variance and covariance, both the observed matrix and the residual matrix from a fitted model are easy to inspect visually; there is no need to mentally average homologous statistics. Fitting a model to the intraclass matrix also gives the same log likelihood, likelihood-ratio (LR) chi2, and parameter estimates as fitting that model to the raw data. A major advantage of the intraclass matrix is that only two factors influence the LR chi2--the sampling error in estimating population parameters and the discrepancy between the model and the observed statistics. The more frequently used interclass covariance matrix adds a third factor to the chi2--sampling error of homologous statistics. Because of this, the degrees of freedom for fitting models to an intraclass matrix differ from fitting that model to an interclass matrix. Future research is needed to establish differences in power-if any--between the interclass and the intraclass matrix.

  13. Membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease-independent activation of pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 by proprotein convertases.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Hun; Kim, Hee-Hyun; Park, Michael Y; Jeon, Ok-Hee; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2009-11-01

    Matrix metalloprotease-2 is implicated in many biological processes and degrades extracellular and non-extracellular matrix molecules. Matrix metalloprotease-2 maintains a latent state through a cysteine-zinc ion pairing which, when disrupted, results in full enzyme activation. This pairing can be disrupted by a conformational change or cleavage within the propeptide. The best known activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 occurs via cleavage of the propeptide by membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease. However, significant residual activation of pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 is seen in membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease knockout mice and in fibroblasts treated with metalloprotease inhibitors. These findings indicate the presence of a membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease-independent activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 in vivo, which prompted us to explore an alternative activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotese-2. In this study, we demonstrate membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease-independent propeptide processing of matrix metalloprotease-2 in HEK293F and various tumor cell lines, and show that proprotein convertases can mediate the processing intracellularly as well as extracellularly. Furthermore, processed matrix metalloprotease-2 exhibits enzymatic activity that is enhanced by intermolecular autolytic cleavage. Thus, our experimental data, taken together with the broad expression of proprotein convertases, suggest that the proprotein convertase-mediated processing may be a general activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 in vivo.

  14. Looking for an Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Jack

    1999-01-01

    Argues that high school newspapers might do well to create stronger ties with alternative weeklies. Discusses issues of niche marketing, alternative content, and alternative presentation. Notes that high school papers could learn a lot from alternative newspapers. (SR)

  15. Implementation of a Matrix Organizational Structure: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whorton, David M.

    The implementation of a matrix structure as an alternative to the traditional collegial/bureaucratic form at a college of education in a medium-size state university is described. Matrix organizational structures are differentiated from hierarchical bureaucratic structures by dividing the organization's tasks into functional units across which an…

  16. Modifying Matrix Materials to Increase Wetting and Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Katie

    2011-01-01

    In an alternative approach to increasing the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fiber and matrix components of organic-fiber/polymer matrix composite materials, the matrix resins are modified. Heretofore, it has been common practice to modify the fibers rather than the matrices: The fibers are modified by chemical and/or physical surface treatments prior to combining the fibers with matrix resins - an approach that entails considerable expense and usually results in degradation (typically, weakening) of fibers. The alternative approach of modifying the matrix resins does not entail degradation of fibers, and affords opportunities for improving the mechanical properties of the fiber composites. The alternative approach is more cost-effective, not only because it eliminates expensive fiber-surface treatments but also because it does not entail changes in procedures for manufacturing conventional composite-material structures. The alternative approach is best described by citing an example of its application to a composite of ultra-high-molecular- weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers in an epoxy matrix. The epoxy matrix was modified to a chemically reactive, polarized epoxy nano-matrix to increase the degrees of wetting and adhesion between the fibers and the matrix. The modification was effected by incorporating a small proportion (0.3 weight percent) of reactive graphitic nanofibers produced from functionalized nanofibers into the epoxy matrix resin prior to combining the resin with the UHMWPE fibers. The resulting increase in fiber/matrix adhesion manifested itself in several test results, notably including an increase of 25 percent in the maximum fiber pullout force and an increase of 60-65 percent in fiber pullout energy. In addition, it was conjectured that the functionalized nanofibers became involved in the cross linking reaction of the epoxy resin, with resultant enhancement of the mechanical properties and lower viscosity of the matrix.

  17. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOEpatents

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  18. Development of a Biological Scaffold Engineered Using the Extracellular Matrix Secreted by Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Shiloh; Bhati, Nadia; Walker, Addison; Kasukonis, Ben; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of implantable biomaterials derived from decellularized tissue, including encouraging results with skeletal muscle, suggests that the extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from native tissue has promising regenerative potential. Yet, the supply of biomaterials derived from donated tissue will always be limited, which is why the in-vitro fabrication of ECM biomaterials that mimic the properties of tissue is an attractive alternative. Towards this end, our group has utilized a novel method to collect the ECM that skeletal muscle myoblasts secrete and form it into implantable scaffolds. The cell derived ECM contained several matrix constituents, including collagen and fibronectin that were also identified within skeletal muscle samples. The ECM was organized into a porous network that could be formed with the elongated and aligned architecture observed within muscle samples. The ECM material supported the attachment and in-vitro proliferation of cells, suggesting effectiveness for cell transplantation, and was well tolerated by the host when examined in-vivo. The results suggest that the ECM collection approach can be used to produce biomaterials with compositions and structures that are similar to muscle samples, and while the physical properties may not yet match muscle values, the in-vitro and in-vivo results indicate it may be a suitable first generation alternative to tissue derived biomaterials. PMID:25725550

  19. Pneumococcal MSCRAMM targeting of the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Gavin K.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2010-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to host cells and tissues and their subsequent invasion and dissemination are key processes during disease pathogenesis. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Jensch and co-workers provide further molecular insight into these events during infection with the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Their characterization of PavB, a bacterial surface protein with orthologues in other streptococci, shows it to bind the extracellar matrix components fibronection and plasminogen by virtue of repetitive sequences designated Streptococcal Surface Repeats (SSURE). In mice, a pavB mutant showed reduced nasopharyngeal colonisation and was attenuated in a lung infection model. As discussed here in the context of the pneumococcus, the study of PavB highlights the central role during microbal pathogenesis of targetting the extracellular matrix by so-called MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules). PMID:20444102

  20. Using lice to identify cowbird hosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, D.C.; Osenton, P.C.; Price, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Avian lice may link fledgling Brown-headed Cowbirds to the host species that raised them. Lice, if host-specific and transferred to nestling cowbirds, could serve to identify the principal host species raising cowbirds in a local area. This approach of trapping cowbird fledglings in a feeding flock, then collecting and identifying the lice they carry is economical. The alternative requires a team of people to locate large numbers of parasitized host nests. We trapped 250 cowbird fledglings during June-August 1994 on Patuxent Research Center, and from them we collected 426 lice identified as representing 6 genera and 12 species. We. also collected and identified 347 lice from 30 known host species that were mist-netted on our Center. The lice found on cowbird fledglings in this population can be linked to Wood Thrush, Red-eyed Vireo, Common Yellowthroat, Rufous-sided Towhee, Red-winged Blackbird, Common Grackle, Song Sparrow, Field Sparrow, and Tree sparrow, based on this study and also on published reports.

  1. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  2. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  3. Weed hosts of cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Vennila, S; Prasad, Y G; Prabhakar, M; Agarwal, Meenu; Sreedevi, G; Bambawale, O M

    2013-03-01

    The exotic cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) invaded India during 2006, and caused widespread infestation across all nine cotton growing states. P. solenopsis also infested weeds that aided its faster spread and increased severity across cotton fields. Two year survey carried out to document host plants of P. solenopsis between 2008 and 2010 revealed 27, 83, 59 and 108 weeds belonging to 8, 18, 10 and 32 families serving as alternate hosts at North, Central, South and All India cotton growing zones, respectively. Plant species of four families viz., Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, Malvaceae and Lamiaceae constituted almost 50% of the weed hosts. While 39 weed species supported P. solenopsis multiplication during the cotton season, 37 were hosts during off season. Higher number of weeds as off season hosts (17) outnumbering cotton season (13) at Central over other zones indicated the strong carryover of the pest aided by weeds between two cotton seasons. Six, two and seven weed hosts had the extreme severity of Grade 4 during cotton, off and cotton + off seasons, respectively. Higher number of weed hosts of P. solenopsis were located at roadside: South (12) > Central (8) > North (3) zones. Commonality of weed hosts was higher between C+S zones, while no weed host was common between N+S zones. Paper furnishes the wide range of weed hosts of P. solenopsis, discusses their significance, and formulated general and specific cultural management strategies for nationwide implementation to prevent its outbreaks.

  4. NASA HOST project overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Hot Section Technology (HOST) program has developed improved analytical models for the aerothermal environment, thermomechanical loading, material behavior, structural response, and service life of aircraft gas turbine engines' hot section components. These models, in conjunction with sophisticated computer codes, can be used in design analyses of critical combustor and turbine elements. Toward these ends, efforts were undertaken in instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue-fracture, and surface protection. Attention is presently given to the organization of HOST activities and their specific subject matter.

  5. A novel color image encryption scheme using alternate chaotic mapping structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huili; Guo, Kang

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes an color image encryption algorithm using alternate chaotic mapping structure. Initially, we use the R, G and B components to form a matrix. Then one-dimension logistic and two-dimension logistic mapping is used to generate a chaotic matrix, then iterate two chaotic mappings alternately to permute the matrix. For every iteration, XOR operation is adopted to encrypt plain-image matrix, then make further transformation to diffuse the matrix. At last, the encrypted color image is obtained from the confused matrix. Theoretical analysis and experimental results has proved the cryptosystem is secure and practical, and it is suitable for encrypting color images.

  6. Conducted Emission Evaluation for Direct Matrix Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothofer, A.; Tarisciotti, L.; Greedy, S.; Empringham, L.; De Lillo, L.; Degano, M.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix converters have been recently proposed as an alternative solution to the standard back-to-back converter in aerospace applications. However, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), in particular, conducted emissions represent a critical aspect for this converter family. Direct Matrix Converter (DMC) are usually modelled only at the normal operating frequency, but for the research presented in this paper, the model is modified in order to include a detailed high frequency description, which is of interest for conducted emission studies.This paper analyzes the performance of DMC, when different control and modulation techniques are used. Experimental results are shown to validate the simulation models.

  7. Host age modulates within-host parasite competition

    PubMed Central

    Izhar, Rony; Routtu, Jarkko; Ben-Ami, Frida

    2015-01-01

    In many host populations, one of the most striking differences among hosts is their age. While parasite prevalence differences in relation to host age are well known, little is known on how host age impacts ecological and evolutionary dynamics of diseases. Using two clones of the water flea Daphnia magna and two clones of its bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa, we examined how host age at exposure influences within-host parasite competition and virulence. We found that multiply-exposed hosts were more susceptible to infection and suffered higher mortality than singly-exposed hosts. Hosts oldest at exposure were least often infected and vice versa. Furthermore, we found that in young multiply-exposed hosts competition was weak, allowing coexistence and transmission of both parasite clones, whereas in older multiply-exposed hosts competitive exclusion was observed. Thus, age-dependent parasite exposure and host demography (age structure) could together play an important role in mediating parasite evolution. At the individual level, our results demonstrate a previously unnoticed interaction of the host's immune system with host age, suggesting that the specificity of immune function changes as hosts mature. Therefore, evolutionary models of parasite virulence might benefit from incorporating age-dependent epidemiological parameters. PMID:25994010

  8. Approaches to Alternative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamayan, Else V.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the major characteristics of nontraditional or alternative assessment in language learning, the uses of alternative assessment procedures, and different types of alternative assessment. An annotated bibliography discusses eight important works in the field. (75 references) (MDM)

  9. Hacking the Matrix.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, Michael; Spence, Jason R

    2017-01-05

    Recently in Nature, Gjorevski et al. (2016) describe a fully defined synthetic hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix to support in vitro growth of intestinal stem cells and organoids. The hydrogel allows exquisite control over the chemical and physical in vitro niche and enables identification of regulatory properties of the matrix.

  10. Host susceptibility of the papaya mosaic virus in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, R H; Herath, H M

    1981-01-01

    75 plant species from 11 families were tested in Sri Lanka for their susceptibility to transferring the papaya mosaic virus. After inoculation with this virus, six species, Cucurbita pepo, Cucumis sativus, Nicotiana tabacum, Chenopodium amaranticolor, Gomphrena globosa and Lycopersicum esculentum, developed such symptoms, and after re-isolation from the host plant the virus again infected papaya plants. Thus these species are possible alternate hosts of papaya mosaic virus in Sri Lanka.

  11. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit.more » In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.« less

  12. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.

  13. Fuzzy risk matrix.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Adam S; Mannan, M Sam

    2008-11-15

    A risk matrix is a mechanism to characterize and rank process risks that are typically identified through one or more multifunctional reviews (e.g., process hazard analysis, audits, or incident investigation). This paper describes a procedure for developing a fuzzy risk matrix that may be used for emerging fuzzy logic applications in different safety analyses (e.g., LOPA). The fuzzification of frequency and severity of the consequences of the incident scenario are described which are basic inputs for fuzzy risk matrix. Subsequently using different design of risk matrix, fuzzy rules are established enabling the development of fuzzy risk matrices. Three types of fuzzy risk matrix have been developed (low-cost, standard, and high-cost), and using a distillation column case study, the effect of the design on final defuzzified risk index is demonstrated.

  14. PROJECTION PROPERTIES AND NEUMANN-EULER EXPANSIONS FOR THE MOORE-PENROSE INVERSE OF AN ARBITRARY MATRIX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Euler expansions for the Moore-Penrose inverse of an arbitrary matrix. Projection properties based upon the classical theorems such as the Fredholm alternative, and matrix series identities of Moebius type, are developed.

  15. Targeting the bacteria–host interface

    PubMed Central

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Orth, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and are increasingly problematic to treat due to the rise in antibiotic-resistant strains. It becomes more and more challenging to develop new antimicrobials that are able to withstand the ever-increasing repertoire of bacterial resistance mechanisms. This necessitates the development of alternative approaches to prevent and treat bacterial infections. One of the first steps during bacterial infection is adhesion of the pathogen to host cells. A pathogen’s ability to colonize and invade host tissues strictly depends on this process. Thus, interference with adhesion (anti-adhesion therapy) is an efficient way to prevent or treat bacterial infections. As a basis to present different strategies to interfere with pathogen adhesion, this review briefly introduces general concepts of bacterial attachment to host cells. We further discuss advantages and disadvantages of anti-adhesion treatments and issues that are in need of improvement so as to make anti-adhesion compounds a more broadly applicable alternative to conventional antimicrobials. PMID:23799663

  16. Development of the Digital Engineering Laboratory Computer Network: Host-to-Node/Host-to-Host Protocols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    HOST-TO-HOST PROTOCOLS THESIS AFIT,’GCS/EE/8lD-8 John W. Geist Capt USAF Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. AFIT/GCS/EE/81D-8...DEVELOPMENT OF THE DIGITAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY COMPUTER NETWORK: HOST-TO-NODE/HOST-TO-HOST PROTOCOLS THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of...development and operational implementation. I wish to express my appreciation to Dr. Gary B. Lamont, my thesis advisor, for his valued support and

  17. Natural host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Heggers, J P

    1979-10-01

    Severe injury, whether the result of a major accident, a large burn, or a complicated surgical operation, often results in sepsis. Under such conditions both specific and nonspecific host defense systems are affected. The individual facets of major concern are chemotaxis, phagocytosis, intracellular killing, complement depletion, and depression of humoral and cellular mediated immunity. The most profound changes occur in cell-mediated immunity. Within a few hours o injury, the number of circulating T cells becomes depleted, concomitantly thoracic duct lymphocytes are markedly reduced. This change is not only quantitative but functional. The clinical impact of these deficient host defense mechanisms lies in the fact that low virulent organisms may become a lethal threat to the injured patient. Currently, investigators are attempting to reverse thse deficiencies through the use of immunotherapy.

  18. Hosting a Katrina Evacuee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David

    2008-03-01

    No individual or institution anticipated the impact on the academic research community of hurricane Katrina. When Tulane physicist Wayne Reed asked me to host his research group just a day or two after the disaster, with no authorization or understanding of the commitment, I agreed immediately and then pondered implications. Fortunately, colleagues helped in making the commitment real, only the bureaucracy of my public university posing small hindrances. Industry was remarkably generous in providing Reed with significant ``loaner'' equipment, and amazingly, a suite of custom Reed experiments was running within weeks. At the end, the most productive collaborations for Reed seemed not to have been with my group, with its similar research, but to other groups at my institution, particularly the synthetic chemists, who gained access to methods previously unique to Tulane while offering samples previously unique to UMass. Quickly designed projects exploiting this match turned out remarkably productive. Although begun with trepidation, hosting of Reed had huge positive benefits to me and UMass, and I believe, also to Reed and Tulane. Some key lessons for the future: (i) industry has capacity and willingness to help academic research during disruption (ii) commitment of a host institution must be immediate, without a wait for formal approvals or arrangement of special funding -- delay leads only to discouragement, (iii) continuing academic progress of displaced students must come first, and (iv) intellectual synergy rather than overlap should be the basis for seeking a host. Lastly, NSF or other funding agency should consider a program directly addressing the research needs of unexpectedly disrupted academic scientists, and most particularly, graduate students who face greatly extended studies.

  19. Mountain Pine Beetle Host Selection Between Lodgepole and Ponderosa Pines in the Southern Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel R; Briggs, Jennifer S; Jacobi, William R; Negrón, José F

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence of range expansion and host transition by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins; MPB) has suggested that MPB may not primarily breed in their natal host, but will switch hosts to an alternate tree species. As MPB populations expanded in lodgepole pine forests in the southern Rocky Mountains, we investigated the potential for movement into adjacent ponderosa pine forests. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to evaluate four aspects of MPB population dynamics and host selection behavior in the two hosts: emergence timing, sex ratios, host choice, and reproductive success. We found that peak MPB emergence from both hosts occurred simultaneously between late July and early August, and the sex ratio of emerging beetles did not differ between hosts. In two direct tests of MPB host selection, we identified a strong preference by MPB for ponderosa versus lodgepole pine. At field sites, we captured naturally emerging beetles from both natal hosts in choice arenas containing logs of both species. In the laboratory, we offered sections of bark and phloem from both species to individual insects in bioassays. In both tests, insects infested ponderosa over lodgepole pine at a ratio of almost 2:1, regardless of natal host species. Reproductive success (offspring/female) was similar in colonized logs of both hosts. Overall, our findings suggest that MPB may exhibit equally high rates of infestation and fecundity in an alternate host under favorable conditions.

  20. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  1. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  2. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  3. Faces of matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    2012-08-01

    Partition functions of eigenvalue matrix models possess a number of very different descriptions: as matrix integrals, as solutions to linear and nonlinear equations, as τ-functions of integrable hierarchies and as special-geometry prepotentials, as result of the action of W-operators and of various recursions on elementary input data, as gluing of certain elementary building blocks. All this explains the central role of such matrix models in modern mathematical physics: they provide the basic "special functions" to express the answers and relations between them, and they serve as a dream model of what one should try to achieve in any other field.

  4. Use of Alternative Therapies by Active Duty Air Force Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-13

    are led by lay people. Table I Healing Matrix Orthodox Marginal Alternative Physical Surgery Chiropractic Rolfing Cranial-sacral Manipulation...and. finally chiropractic therapy (9) . Commercial weight loss programs and self-help groups were also used by the respondents. Symptoms for which...mainstream of conventional medicine. These unconventional or alternative therapies include treatments by chiropractors, acupuncturists, herbal therapists , and

  5. All About Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Robert D.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A primer on alternative schools. Described are existing programs in different areas, philosophy of the alternative schools, funding, student behavior, community relations, accountability, State regulations, management, and the environment of the alternative school. A list of sources of additional information on alternative schools is included.…

  6. Matrix metalloproteinases and other matrix proteinases in relation to cariology: the era of 'dentin degradomics'.

    PubMed

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Carrilho, Marcela; Chaussain, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Dentin organic matrix, with type I collagen as the main component, is exposed after demineralization in dentinal caries, erosion or acidic conditioning during adhesive composite restorative treatment. This exposed matrix is prone to slow hydrolytic degradation by host collagenolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteine cathepsins. Here we review the recent findings demonstrating that inhibition of salivary or dentin endogenous collagenolytic enzymes may provide preventive means against progression of caries or erosion, just as they have been shown to retain the integrity and improve the longevity of resin composite filling bonding to dentin. This paper also presents the case that the organic matrix in caries-affected dentin may not be preserved as intact as previously considered. In partially demineralized dentin, MMPs and cysteine cathepsins with the ability to cleave off the terminal non-helical ends of collagen molecules (telopeptides) may lead to the gradual loss of intramolecular gap areas. This would seriously compromise the matrix ability for intrafibrillar remineralization, which is considered essential in restoring the dentin's mechanical properties. More detailed data of the enzymes responsible and their detailed function in dentin-destructive conditions may not only help to find new and better preventive means, but better preservation of demineralized dentin collagenous matrix may also facilitate true biological remineralization for the better restoration of tooth structural and mechanical integrity and mechanical properties.

  7. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  8. Functional Polymer Matrix Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the carbon nanofibers led to the deterioration of the polymeric cellulose structure. Extensive research on the surface treatment of carbon nanofibers...1 November 2003 - 14-Mar-05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-03-1-3042 Functional Polymer Matrix Fibres 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...MARYLABONE RD LONDON NWl 5TH PERFORMANCE REPORT Project title: Functional polymer matrix fibers Period of performance: 1 November 2003 - 31 October 2004

  9. Graft-versus-host disease

    MedlinePlus

    GVHD; Bone marrow transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Stem cell transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Allogeneic transplant - ... GVHD may occur after a bone marrow, or stem cell, transplant in which someone receives bone marrow ...

  10. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  11. Comparing mechanisms of host manipulation across host and parasite taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Shaw, Jenny C.

    2013-01-01

    Parasites affect host behavior in several ways. They can alter activity, microhabitats or both. For trophically transmitted parasites (the focus of our study), decreased activity might impair the ability of hosts to respond to final-host predators, and increased activity and altered microhabitat choice might increase contact rates between hosts and final-host predators. In an analysis of trophically transmitted parasites, more parasite groups altered activity than altered microhabitat choice. Parasites that infected vertebrates were more likely to impair the host’s reaction to predators, whereas parasites that infected invertebrates were more likely to increase the host’s contact with predators. The site of infection might affect how parasites manipulate their hosts. For instance, parasites in the central nervous system seem particularly suited to manipulating host behavior. Manipulative parasites commonly occupy the body cavity, muscles and central nervous systems of their hosts. Acanthocephalans in the data set differed from other taxa in that they occurred exclusively in the body cavity of invertebrates. In addition, they were more likely to alter microhabitat choice than activity. Parasites in the body cavity (across parasite types) were more likely to be associated with increased host contact with predators. Parasites can manipulate the host through energetic drain, but most parasites use more sophisticated means. For instance, parasites target four physiological systems that shape behavior in both invertebrates and vertebrates: neural, endocrine, neuromodulatory and immunomodulatory. The interconnections between these systems make it difficult to isolate specific mechanisms of host behavioral manipulation.

  12. Max-min distance nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been a popular representation method for pattern classification problems. It tries to decompose a nonnegative matrix of data samples as the product of a nonnegative basis matrix and a nonnegative coefficient matrix. The columns of the coefficient matrix can be used as new representations of these data samples. However, traditional NMF methods ignore class labels of the data samples. In this paper, we propose a novel supervised NMF algorithm to improve the discriminative ability of the new representation by using the class labels. Using the class labels, we separate all the data sample pairs into within-class pairs and between-class pairs. To improve the discriminative ability of the new NMF representations, we propose to minimize the maximum distance of the within-class pairs in the new NMF space, and meanwhile to maximize the minimum distance of the between-class pairs. With this criterion, we construct an objective function and optimize it with regard to basis and coefficient matrices, and slack variables alternatively, resulting in an iterative algorithm. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on three pattern classification problems and experiment results show that it outperforms the state-of-the-art supervised NMF methods.

  13. Allergic Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Noah W.; Rosenstein, Rachel K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macro-parasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity plays an important role in host defense against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, hematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  14. Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Howard, R.; Corporan, E.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Timko, M.; Woods, E.; Dodds, W.; Lee, B.; Santoni, G.; Whitefield, P.; Hagen, D.; Lobo, P.; Knighton, W. B.; Bulzan, D.; Tacina, K.; Wey, C.; VanderWal, R.; Bhargava, A.

    2011-01-01

    The rising cost of oil coupled with the need to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign suppliers has spurred great interest and activity in developing alternative aviation fuels. Although a variety of fuels have been produced that have similar properties to standard Jet A, detailed studies are required to ascertain the exact impacts of the fuels on engine operation and exhaust composition. In response to this need, NASA acquired and burned a variety of alternative aviation fuel mixtures in the Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 to assess changes in the aircraft s CFM-56 engine performance and emission parameters relative to operation with standard JP-8. This Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment, or AAFEX, was conducted at NASA Dryden s Aircraft Operations Facility (DAOF) in Palmdale, California, from January 19 to February 3, 2009 and specifically sought to establish fuel matrix effects on: 1) engine and exhaust gas temperatures and compressor speeds; 2) engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) gas phase and particle emissions and characteristics; and 3) volatile aerosol formation in aging exhaust plumes

  15. Host-Seeking Behavior in the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Suchy, James T; Lewis, Vernard R

    2011-03-07

    The reemergence of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, has recently spawned a frenzy of public, media, and academic attention. In response to the growing rate of infestation, considerable work has been focused on identifying the various host cues utilized by the bed bug in search of a meal. Most of these behavioral studies examine movement within a confined environment, such as a Petri dish. This has prevented a more complete understanding of the insect's host-seeking process. This work describes a novel method for studying host-seeking behavior, using various movement parameters, in a time-lapse photography system. With the use of human breath as an attractant, we qualitatively and quantitatively assessed how bed bugs navigate their environment between its harborage and the host. Levels of behavioral activity varied dramatically between bed bugs in the presence and absence of host odor. Bed bugs demonstrated not simply activation, but attraction to the chemical components of breath. Localized, stop-start host-seeking behavior or alternating periods of movement and pause were observed among bed bugs placed in the environment void of human breath, while those exposed to human breath demonstrated long range, stop-start host-seeking behavior. A more comprehensive understanding of bed bug host-seeking can lead to the development of traps and monitors that account for unique subtleties in their behavior. The time-lapse photography system uses a large, artificial environment and could also be employed to study other aspects of the insect's behavioral patterns.

  16. Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R. ); Ng, E.G. )

    1992-10-01

    Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

  17. D-Glucose as a modifying agent in gelatin/collagen matrix and reservoir nanoparticles for Calendula officinalis delivery.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Kok, S H-L; Bian, Z-X; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Lee, K K-H; Gambari, R; Chui, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Gelatin/Collagen-based matrix and reservoir nanoparticles require crosslinkers to stabilize the formed nanosuspensions, considering that physical instability is the main challenge of nanoparticulate systems. The use of crosslinkers improves the physical integrity of nanoformulations under the-host environment. Aldehyde-based fixatives, such as formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, have been widely applied to the crosslinking process of polymeric nanoparticles. However, their potential toxicity towards human beings has been demonstrated in many previous studies. In order to tackle this problem, D-glucose was used during nanoparticle formation to stabilize the gelatin/collagen-based matrix wall and reservoir wall for the deliveries of Calendula officinalis powder and oil, respectively. In addition, therapeutic selectivity between malignant and normal cells could be observed. The C. officinalis powder loaded nanoparticles significantly strengthened the anti-cancer effect towards human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells and human hepatoma SKHep1 cells when compared with the free powder. On the contrary, the nanoparticles did not show significant cytotoxicity towards normal esophageal epithelial NE3 cells and human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cells. On the basis of these evidences, D-glucose modified gelatin/collagen matrix nanoparticles containing C. officinalis powder might be proposed as a safer alternative vehicle for anti-cancer treatments.

  18. Immobilization and characterization of the transmembrane ion channel peptide gramicidin in a sol-gel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquembre, Rocío; Poveda, José Antonio; Mallavia, Ricardo; Mateo, C. Reyes

    2007-05-01

    Immobilization of ion channels requires of a methodology able to retain the physical properties of the lipid bilayer where their activity is performed. However, most of lipid membrane immobilization methods have been observed to alter the structural properties of the bilayers. Use of sol-gel routes seems to be an interesting alternative, although unstable liposomes were obtained when conventional sol-gel methodology was employed for immobilizing. Recently, we have suggested that use of alcohol-free sol-gel routes combined with negatively charged lipids could minimize effects exerted by host matrix on liposome structure, increasing its stability. Here we confirm this assumption by analysing the physical properties of a series of zwitterionic and anionic liposomes entrapped in a sol-gel matrix and we develop a methodology able to retain the physical properties of the lipid bilayer. This methodology has been successfully used to immobilize the transmembrane ion channel peptide gramicidin. Gramicidin was reconstituted in anionic liposomes and its immobilization was confirmed from changes observed in the photophysical properties of the tryptophan residues. Ion channel activity was determined using the fluorescent dye pyrene-1,3,6,8-tetrasulphonic acid (PTSA) and long term stability of the immobilized system was checked from steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements.

  19. Host Specificity of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, Andreas; Fang, Ferric C.

    2013-01-01

    Most pathogens are able to infect multiple hosts but some are highly adapted to a single-host species. A detailed understanding of the basis of host specificity can provide important insights into molecular pathogenesis, the evolution of pathogenic microbes, and the potential for pathogens to cross the species barrier to infect new hosts. Comparative genomics and the development of humanized mouse models have provided important new tools with which to explore the basis of generalism and specialism. This review will examine host specificity of bacterial pathogens with a focus on generalist and specialist serovars of Salmonella enterica. PMID:24296346

  20. Hospitality Occupational Skills Training Cooperative. Project HOST Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Educational Cooperative, Des Plaines, IL.

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials for an 8-week training program, entitled Hospitality Occupational Skills Training (HOST) Cooperative. It offers an alternative skills training program to meet the needs of disadvantaged, minority populations and of employers who must recruit more highly skilled workers from those populations.…

  1. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    PubMed Central

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  2. Host Plant Associations of Anagrus spp. (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) and Erythroneura elegantula (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in Northern California.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Houston; Miles, Albie F; Daane, Kent M; Altieri, Miguel A

    2016-04-22

    Anagrus erythroneurae S. Trjapitzin & Chiappini and Anagrus daanei Triapitsyn are the key parasitoids of the western grape leafhopper (Erythroneura elegantula Osborn) in northern California vineyards. Erythroneura elegantula overwinters as an adult in reproductive diapause. To successfully overwinter, Anagrus spp. must locate an alternate leafhopper host that overwinters in an egg stage that they can parasitize. These alternate leafhopper hosts are thought to be primarily located in the natural habitats surrounding vineyards. This study identifies the noncrop host plants utilized by Anagrus spp. not only during the overwintering period but throughout the entire year, as well as the leafhopper species associated with these host plants. Over a 2-yr period, Anagrus spp. and leafhoppers were sampled from numerous plants in natural and cultivated habitats surrounding vineyards. Results from this study confirm previously known Anagrus spp. host plants, but also identify new host plant species. Some of the host plants harbored Anagrus spp. year-round while others were utilized only during certain periods of the year. Leafhoppers associated with Anagrus spp. host plants may potentially serve as the alternate host utilized by Anagrus spp. on these plants, but this was not confirmed in the current study. Records of E. elegantula demonstrate their cyclical movement between the vineyard floor (winter), temporary noncrop hosts (spring/fall), and the grape vine canopy (summer).

  3. Silicide-matrix materials for high-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meschter, P.J.; Schwartz, D.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Intermetallic-matrix composites are attractive alternatives to carbon/carbon and ceramic/ceramic composities for applications up to 1,600 C. Recent work on the intermetallic compounds MoSi2 and Ti5Si3 has included determination of their mechanical properties and deformation behavior, selection of thermodynamically compatible high-strength and ductile reinforcements, and strengthening and toughening mechanisms in silicide-matrix composites for high-temperature service. 11 refs.

  4. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their ... Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their ...

  5. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... LASIK Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Laser Surgery Recovery Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Dec. 12, 2015 Today's refractive ... that releases controlled amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, instead of a laser, to apply heat to ...

  6. Generalized matrix inversion is not harder than matrix multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Marko D.; Stanimirovic, Predrag S.

    2009-08-01

    Starting from the Strassen method for rapid matrix multiplication and inversion as well as from the recursive Cholesky factorization algorithm, we introduced a completely block recursive algorithm for generalized Cholesky factorization of a given symmetric, positive semi-definite matrix . We used the Strassen method for matrix inversion together with the recursive generalized Cholesky factorization method, and established an algorithm for computing generalized {2,3} and {2,4} inverses. Introduced algorithms are not harder than the matrix-matrix multiplication.

  7. Extracellular matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  8. Matrix interdiction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  9. Shoreside Alternative Energy Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    in November 2000 titled, Shoreside Alternative Energy Evaluation. This study of alternative energies focused on usage of natural gas, and included...energy sources such as costs, benefits, and logistic availability. This study of alternative energies focused on usage of natural gas and included...resources in this area. Recognizing Air Station Cape Cod as a leader in utilizing alternative energies , the Research and Development Center established

  10. Alternatives for Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alternatives for Education, San Pedro, CA.

    A directory of alternative schools and a list of books and reprints about alternative education are presented. The alternative schools listed are almost all on the West Coast and include both day and boarding schools at the primary and secondary level. The name and address of each school is given along with supplementary material about its…

  11. Chicano Alternative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galicia, H. Homero; Almaguer, Clementina

    Alternative schooling is challenging some basic notions of curriculum, operation, and structure of traditional schools; it is not challenging the basic concept of schooling. Chicano alternative education, an elusive concept, lacks a precise definition. Chicano alternative schools reflect a vast diversity in structure, focus, and goals. The Chicano…

  12. Assessment "Honest Alternatives".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Susan Glazer

    1995-01-01

    Addresses the challenge of finding or creating alternatives to tests and traditional grading systems. Reflects on and describes the experience of creating an assessment tool and cautions against choosing alternatives that merely camouflage the grades. Encourages educators to find authentic alternatives to describe children's growth. (BAC)

  13. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  14. Host range, host specificity and hypothesized host shift events among viruses of lower vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The successful replication of a viral agent in a host is a complex process that often leads to a species specificity of the virus and can make interspecies transmission difficult. Despite this difficulty, natural host switch seems to have been frequent among viruses of lower vertebrates, especially fish viruses, since there are several viruses known to be able to infect a wide range of species. In the present review we will focus on well documented reports of broad host range, variations in host specificity, and host shift events hypothesized for viruses within the genera Ranavirus, Novirhabdovirus, Betanodavirus, Isavirus, and some herpesvirus. PMID:21592358

  15. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  16. Rheocasting Al Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girot, F. A.; Albingre, L.; Quenisset, J. M.; Naslain, R.

    1987-11-01

    Aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced by SiC short fibers (or whiskers) can be prepared by rheocasting, a process which consists of the incorporation and homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement by stirring within a semi-solid alloy. Using this technique, composites containing fiber volume fractions in the range of 8-15%, have been obtained for various fibers lengths (i.e., 1 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm for SiC fibers). This paper attempts to delineate the best compocasting conditions for aluminum matrix composites reinforced by short SiC (e.g Nicalon) or SiC whiskers (e.g., Tokamax) and characterize the resulting microstructures.

  17. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  18. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  19. Lack of Host Specialization on Winter Annual Grasses in the Fungal Seed Bank Pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda

    PubMed Central

    Beckstead, Julie; Meyer, Susan E.; Ishizuka, Toby S.; McEvoy, Kelsey M.; Coleman, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Generalist plant pathogens may have wide host ranges, but many exhibit varying degrees of host specialization, with multiple pathogen races that have narrower host ranges. These races are often genetically distinct, with each race causing highest disease incidence on its host of origin. We examined host specialization in the seed pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda by reciprocally inoculating pathogen strains from Bromus tectorum and from four other winter annual grass weeds (Bromus diandrus, Bromus rubens, Bromus arvensis and Taeniatherum caput-medusae) onto dormant seeds of B. tectorum and each alternate host. We found that host species varied in resistance and pathogen strains varied in aggressiveness, but there was no evidence for host specialization. Most variation in aggressiveness was among strains within populations and was expressed similarly on both hosts, resulting in a positive correlation between strain-level disease incidence on B. tectorum and on the alternate host. In spite of this lack of host specialization, we detected weak but significant population genetic structure as a function of host species using two neutral marker systems that yielded similar results. This genetic structure is most likely due to founder effects, as the pathogen is known to be dispersed with host seeds. All host species were highly susceptible to their own pathogen races. Tolerance to infection (i.e., the ability to germinate even when infected and thereby avoid seed mortality) increased as a function of seed germination rate, which in turn increased as dormancy was lost. Pyrenophora semeniperda apparently does not require host specialization to fully exploit these winter annual grass species, which share many life history features that make them ideal hosts for this pathogen. PMID:26950931

  20. Lack of Host Specialization on Winter Annual Grasses in the Fungal Seed Bank Pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda.

    PubMed

    Beckstead, Julie; Meyer, Susan E; Ishizuka, Toby S; McEvoy, Kelsey M; Coleman, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Generalist plant pathogens may have wide host ranges, but many exhibit varying degrees of host specialization, with multiple pathogen races that have narrower host ranges. These races are often genetically distinct, with each race causing highest disease incidence on its host of origin. We examined host specialization in the seed pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda by reciprocally inoculating pathogen strains from Bromus tectorum and from four other winter annual grass weeds (Bromus diandrus, Bromus rubens, Bromus arvensis and Taeniatherum caput-medusae) onto dormant seeds of B. tectorum and each alternate host. We found that host species varied in resistance and pathogen strains varied in aggressiveness, but there was no evidence for host specialization. Most variation in aggressiveness was among strains within populations and was expressed similarly on both hosts, resulting in a positive correlation between strain-level disease incidence on B. tectorum and on the alternate host. In spite of this lack of host specialization, we detected weak but significant population genetic structure as a function of host species using two neutral marker systems that yielded similar results. This genetic structure is most likely due to founder effects, as the pathogen is known to be dispersed with host seeds. All host species were highly susceptible to their own pathogen races. Tolerance to infection (i.e., the ability to germinate even when infected and thereby avoid seed mortality) increased as a function of seed germination rate, which in turn increased as dormancy was lost. Pyrenophora semeniperda apparently does not require host specialization to fully exploit these winter annual grass species, which share many life history features that make them ideal hosts for this pathogen.

  1. Comparing Alternatives For Replacing Harmful Chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruit, W.; Schutzenhofer, S.; Goldberg, B.; Everhart, K.

    1995-01-01

    Methodology developed to provide guidance for replacement of industrial chemicals that must be phased out by law because they are toxic and/or affect environment adversely. Chemicals and processes ranked numerically. Applies mostly to chemicals contributing to depletion of ozone in upper atmosphere; some other harmful chemicals included. Quality function deployment matrix format provides convenient way to compare alternative processes and chemicals. Overall rating at bottom of each process-and-chemical column indicates relative advantage.

  2. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  3. Prevalence of Broad-Host-Range Lytic Bacteriophages of Sphaerotilus natans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ellen C.; Schrader, Holly S.; Rieland, Brenda; Thompson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kit W.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.; Kokjohn, Tyler A.

    1998-01-01

    Two bacteriophage collections were examined with regard to their ability to form plaques on multiple bacterial host species. Nine of 10 phages studied were found to be broad-host-range bacteriophages. These phages fell into two groups. Group 1, the SN series, was isolated from sewage treatment plant samples with Sphaerotilus natans ATCC 13338 as a host. The DNAs of these bacteriophages contained modified bases and were insensitive to cleavage by type I and II restriction endonucleases. The efficiency of plating of these bacteriophages was changed only slightly on the alternate host. Group 2, the BHR series, was isolated by a two-host enrichment protocol. These bacteriophages were sensitive to restriction, and their efficiency of plating was dramatically reduced on the alternate host. Our results suggest that a multiple-host enrichment protocol may be more effective for the isolation of broad-host-range bacteriophages by avoiding the selection bias inherent in single-host methods. At least two of the broad-host-range bacteriophages mediated generalized transduction. We suggest that broad-host-range bacteriophages play a key role in phage ecology and gene transfer in nature. PMID:9464396

  4. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  5. Constructing the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2012-09-01

    As part of our 'toolkit' for analysing an extraterrestrial signal, the facility for calculating structural affinity to known phenomena must be part of our core capabilities. Without such a resource, we risk compromising our potential for detection and decipherment or at least causing significant delay in the process. To create such a repository for assessing structural affinity, all known systems (language parameters) need to be structurally analysed to 'place' their 'system' within a relational communication matrix. This will need to include all known variants of language structure, whether 'living' (in current use) or ancient; this must also include endeavours to incorporate yet undeciphered scripts and non-human communication, to provide as complete a picture as possible. In creating such a relational matrix, post-detection decipherment will be assisted by a structural 'map' that will have the potential for 'placing' an alien communication with its nearest known 'neighbour', to assist subsequent categorisation of basic parameters as a precursor to decipherment. 'Universal' attributes and behavioural characteristics of known communication structure will form a range of templates (Elliott, 2001 [1] and Elliott et al., 2002 [2]), to support and optimise our attempt at categorising and deciphering the content of an extraterrestrial signal. Detection of the hierarchical layers, which comprise intelligent, complex communication, will then form a matrix of calculations that will ultimately score affinity through a relational matrix of structural comparison. In this paper we develop the rationales and demonstrate functionality with initial test results.

  6. Matrix product state renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, M.; Rams, M. M.; Zauner, V.; Haegeman, J.; Verstraete, F.

    2016-11-01

    The truncation or compression of the spectrum of Schmidt values is inherent to the matrix product state (MPS) approximation of one-dimensional quantum ground states. We provide a renormalization group picture by interpreting this compression as an application of Wilson's numerical renormalization group along the imaginary time direction appearing in the path integral representation of the state. The location of the physical index is considered as an impurity in the transfer matrix and static MPS correlation functions are reinterpreted as dynamical impurity correlations. Coarse-graining the transfer matrix is performed using a hybrid variational ansatz based on matrix product operators, combining ideas of MPS and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz. Through numerical comparison with conventional MPS algorithms, we explicitly verify the impurity interpretation of MPS compression, as put forward by V. Zauner et al. [New J. Phys. 17, 053002 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/5/053002] for the transverse-field Ising model. Additionally, we motivate the conceptual usefulness of endowing MPS with an internal layered structure by studying restricted variational subspaces to describe elementary excitations on top of the ground state, which serves to elucidate a transparent renormalization group structure ingrained in MPS descriptions of ground states.

  7. Relative performance of European grapevine moth (Lobesia botrana) on grapes and other hosts.

    PubMed

    Thiéry, Denis; Moreau, Jérôme

    2005-05-01

    The European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana is a major grapevine pest, but despite the abundance of vineyards it is a generalist and uses either grapes or alternative species. Given the abundance and predictability of grape, L. botrana could be expected to have evolved towards monophagy. In order to understand why this species remains polyphagous, we hypothesized that larvae reared on rare wild host plants should have higher fitness than those reared on the more abundant grape host. For this, we compared larval performance and several life history traits on three alternative host plants (Daphne gnidium, Olea europaea, Tanacetum vulgare) and three Vitaceae (Vitis vinifera), two cultivars and one wild species (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata), and two control groups raised on either a low or a high nutritive value medium. Alternative hosts are more suitable than Vitaceae for the reproductive performance of L. botrana: larval mortality and development time was reduced, while pupal weight, growth rate, female longevity, female fecundity, duration of laying and mating success were increased. High quality food ingested by larvae promotes higher adult body weight and enhances female reproductive output. This suggests that alternative hosts provide greater nutritional value for L. botrana than Vitaceae. The use of alternative host plants could thus be maintained in the host range because they offer L. botrana a better fitness than on the Vitaceae. This could typically represent an advantage for moths behaving in plant diversity grape landscapes.

  8. Multitask Matrix Completion for Learning Protein Interactions Across Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Meghana; Murugesan, Keerthiram; Carbonell, Jaime G; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2017-01-27

    Disease-causing pathogens such as viruses introduce their proteins into the host cells in which they interact with the host's proteins, enabling the virus to replicate inside the host. These interactions between pathogen and host proteins are key to understanding infectious diseases. Often multiple diseases involve phylogenetically related or biologically similar pathogens. Here we present a multitask learning method to jointly model interactions between human proteins and three different but related viruses: Hepatitis C, Ebola virus, and Influenza A. Our multitask matrix completion-based model uses a shared low-rank structure in addition to a task-specific sparse structure to incorporate the various interactions. We obtain between 7 and 39 percentage points improvement in predictive performance over prior state-of-the-art models. We show how our model's parameters can be interpreted to reveal both general and specific interaction-relevant characteristics of the viruses. Our code is available online.()

  9. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  10. The distribution of Symbiodinium diversity within individual host foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, S. A.; Weber, M. X.; Lipps, J. H.

    2009-09-01

    While one-to-one specificity between reef-dwelling hosts and symbiotic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium may occur, detailed examination of some hosts reveals that they contain multiple symbiont types. Individuals of the foraminifer Amphisorus hemprichii living in Papua New Guinea contained mixed communities of Symbiodinium dominated by symbiont types in clades C and F. Moreover, the types showed a distinct pattern in their distribution across the radius of the foraminifer, with clade F Symbiodinium more prevalent in the center of the host cell. The mixed community of symbionts and their pattern of distribution within the foraminifer is likely the result of processes happening both inside the foraminifer and in its external environment. Persistent mixed symbiont communities in foraminifera may be stabilized through benefits conferred by maintaining multiple symbiont lineages for symbiont shuffling. Alternatively they may be stabilized through a heterogeneous internal host environment, partitioning of symbiont functional roles or limitation of symbiont reproduction by the host. Six factors generally determine the presence of any particular symbiont type within a foraminifer: mode of transmission, availability from the environment, recognition by the host, regulation by the host, competition between lineages, and fitness of the holobiont.

  11. Sex-biased avian host use by arbovirus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D.; Bingham, Andrea M.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of arthropod-borne parasites often differs drastically between host sexes. This sex-related disparity may be related to physiological (primarily hormonal) differences that facilitate or suppress replication of the pathogen in host tissues. Alternately, differences in pathogen prevalence between host sexes may be owing to differential exposure to infected vectors. Here, we report on the use of PCR-based assays recognizing bird sex chromosomes to investigate sex-related patterns of avian host use from field-collected female mosquitoes from Florida, USA. Mosquitoes took more bloodmeals from male birds (64.0% of 308 sexed samples) than female birds (36.0%), deviating significantly from a hypothetical 1:1 sex ratio. In addition, male-biased host use was consistent across mosquito species (Culex erraticus (64.4%); Culex nigripalpus (61.0%) and Culiseta melanura (64.9%)). Our findings support the hypothesis that sex-biased exposure to vector-borne pathogens contributes to disparities in parasite/pathogen prevalence between the sexes. While few studies have yet to investigate sex-biased host use by mosquitoes, the methods used here could be applied to a variety of mosquito-borne disease systems, including those that affect health of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. Understanding the mechanisms that drive sex-based disparities in host use may lead to novel strategies for interrupting pathogen/parasite transmission. PMID:26064562

  12. Evasion of host immune defenses by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Westrich, Joseph A; Warren, Cody J; Pyeon, Dohun

    2017-03-02

    A majority of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are asymptomatic and self-resolving in the absence of medical interventions. Various innate and adaptive immune responses, as well as physical barriers, have been implicated in controlling early HPV infections. However, if HPV overcomes these host immune defenses and establishes persistence in basal keratinocytes, it becomes very difficult for the host to eliminate the infection. The HPV oncoproteins E5, E6, and E7 are important in regulating host immune responses. These oncoproteins dysregulate gene expression, protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, and cellular trafficking of critical host immune modulators. In addition to the HPV oncoproteins, sequence variation and dinucleotide depletion in papillomavirus genomes has been suggested as an alternative strategy for evasion of host immune defenses. Since anti-HPV host immune responses are also considered to be important for antitumor immunity, immune dysregulation by HPV during virus persistence may contribute to immune suppression essential for HPV-associated cancer progression. Here, we discuss cellular pathways dysregulated by HPV that allow the virus to evade various host immune defenses.

  13. Host-parasite interactions and the evolution of ploidy.

    PubMed

    Nuismer, Scott L; Otto, Sarah P

    2004-07-27

    Although the majority of animals and plants, including humans, are dominated by the diploid phase of their life cycle, extensive diversity in ploidy level exists among eukaryotes, with some groups being primarily haploid whereas others alternate between haploid and diploid phases. Previous theory has illuminated conditions that favor the evolution of increased or decreased ploidy but has shed little light on which species should be primarily haploid and which primarily diploid. Here, we report a discovery that emerged from host-parasite models in which ploidy levels were allowed to evolve: selection is more likely to favor diploidy in host species and haploidy in parasite species. Essentially, when parasites must evade a host's immune system or defense response, selection favors parasitic individuals that express a narrow array of antigens and elicitors, thus favoring haploid parasites over diploid parasites. Conversely, when hosts must recognize a parasite before mounting a defensive response, selection favors hosts with a broader arsenal of recognition molecules, thus favoring diploid hosts over haploid hosts. These results are consistent with the predominance of haploidy among parasitic protists.

  14. Red Queen dynamics in multi-host and multi-parasite interaction system

    PubMed Central

    Rabajante, Jomar F.; Tubay, Jerrold M.; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Ebert, Dieter; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In host-parasite systems, dominant host types are expected to be eventually replaced by other hosts due to the elevated potency of their specific parasites. This leads to changes in the abundance of both hosts and parasites exhibiting cycles of alternating dominance called Red Queen dynamics. Host-parasite models with less than three hosts and parasites have been demonstrated to exhibit Red Queen cycles, but natural host-parasite interactions typically involve many host and parasite types resulting in an intractable system with many parameters. Here we present numerical simulations of Red Queen dynamics with more than ten hosts and specialist parasites under the condition of no super-host nor super-parasite. The parameter region where the Red Queen cycles arise contracts as the number of interacting host and parasite types increases. The interplay between inter-host competition and parasite infectivity influences the condition for the Red Queen dynamics. Relatively large host carrying capacity and intermediate rates of parasite mortality result in never-ending cycles of dominant types. PMID:25899168

  15. Red Queen dynamics in multi-host and multi-parasite interaction system.

    PubMed

    Rabajante, Jomar F; Tubay, Jerrold M; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Ebert, Dieter; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-04-22

    In host-parasite systems, dominant host types are expected to be eventually replaced by other hosts due to the elevated potency of their specific parasites. This leads to changes in the abundance of both hosts and parasites exhibiting cycles of alternating dominance called Red Queen dynamics. Host-parasite models with less than three hosts and parasites have been demonstrated to exhibit Red Queen cycles, but natural host-parasite interactions typically involve many host and parasite types resulting in an intractable system with many parameters. Here we present numerical simulations of Red Queen dynamics with more than ten hosts and specialist parasites under the condition of no super-host nor super-parasite. The parameter region where the Red Queen cycles arise contracts as the number of interacting host and parasite types increases. The interplay between inter-host competition and parasite infectivity influences the condition for the Red Queen dynamics. Relatively large host carrying capacity and intermediate rates of parasite mortality result in never-ending cycles of dominant types.

  16. The host model Galleria mellonella is resistant to taylorellae infection.

    PubMed

    Hébert, L; Rincé, I; Sanna, C; Laugier, C; Rincé, A; Petry, S

    2014-10-01

    The genus Taylorella is composed of two species: (i) Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative agent of CEM, a venereally transmitted infection of Equidae and (ii) Taylorella asinigenitalis, a closely related species considered to be nonpathogenic, although experimental infection of mares with this bacterium resulted in clinical signs of vaginitis, cervicitis or endometritis. Currently, there is a need for an alternative host model to further study the taylorellae species. In this context, we explored Galleria mellonella larvae as potential alternative model hosts for taylorellae. Our results showed that infection of G. mellonella larvae with a high concentration of taylorellae did not induce overt G. mellonella mortality and that taylorellae were not able to proliferate within G. mellonella. In conclusion, G. mellonella larvae are resistant to taylorellae infection and therefore do not constitute a relevant alternative system for studying the virulence of taylorellae species. Significance and impact of the study: To date, the pathogenicity and host colonization capacity of Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative agent of contagious equine metritis (CEM) and T. asinigenitalis, the second species within the Taylorella genus, remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of Galleria mellonella as an infection model for taylorellae; we showed that G. mellonella are resistant to taylorellae infection and therefore do not constitute a suitable host model for taylorellae.

  17. Alternative Certification Isn't Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kate; Jacobs, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    While nearly all states now have something on their books labeled "alternate route to certification," these programs defy standard definition due to their enormous variability. States differ in the types of candidates allowed to apply (e.g., career changers or recent college graduates) and in the academic backgrounds these individuals must…

  18. Alternative prey use affects helminth parasite infections in grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Olwyn C; Roth, James D

    2016-09-01

    Predators affect prey populations not only through direct predation, but also by acting as definitive hosts for their parasites and completing parasite life cycles. Understanding the affects of parasitism on prey population dynamics requires knowing how their predators' parasite community is affected by diet and prey availability. Ungulates, such as moose (Alces americanus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), are often important prey for wolves (Canis lupus), but wolves also consume a variety of alternative prey, including beaver (Castor canadensis) and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus). The use of alternative prey, which may host different or fewer parasites than ungulates, could potentially reduce overall abundance of ungulate parasites within the ecosystem, benefiting both wolves and ungulate hosts. We examined parasites in wolf carcasses from eastern Manitoba and estimated wolf diet using stable isotope analysis. Taeniidae cestodes were present in most wolves (75%), reflecting a diet primarily comprised of ungulates, but nematodes were unexpectedly rare. Cestode abundance was negatively related to the wolf's δ(13) C value, indicating diet affects parasite abundance. Wolves that consumed a higher proportion of beaver and caribou (Rangifer tarandus), estimated using Bayesian mixing models, had lower cestode abundance, suggesting the use of these alternative prey can reduce parasite loads. Long-term consumption of beavers may lower the abundance of adult parasites in wolves, eventually lowering parasite density in the region and ultimately benefiting ungulates that serve as intermediate hosts. Thus, alternative prey can affect both predator-prey and host-parasite interactions and potentially affect food web dynamics.

  19. Alternatives to Certain Phthalates Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The alternatives assessment partnership project on alternatives to certain phthalates seeks to eplore the human health and environmental profiles of eight action plan phthalates and functional alternatives

  20. Alternator insulation evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, W. B.; Schaefer, R. F.; Balke, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to predict the remaining electrical insulation life of a 60 KW homopolar inductor alternator following completion of NASA turbo-alternator endurance tests for SNAP-8 space electrical power systems application. The insulation quality was established for two alternators following completion of these tests. A step-temperature aging test procedure was developed for insulation life prediction and applied to one of the two alternators. Armature winding insulation life of over 80,000 hours for an average winding temperature of 248 degrees C was predicted using the developed procedure.

  1. Random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, Alan; Rao, N. Raj

    Random matrix theory is now a big subject with applications in many disciplines of science, engineering and finance. This article is a survey specifically oriented towards the needs and interests of a numerical analyst. This survey includes some original material not found anywhere else. We include the important mathematics which is a very modern development, as well as the computational software that is transforming the theory into useful practice.

  2. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  3. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  4. Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Andreas; Llorca, Javier

    2010-08-01

    In metal matrix composites, a metal is combined with another, often nonmetallic, phase to produce a novel material having attractive engineering attributes of its own. A subject of much research in the 1980s and 1990s, this class of materials has, in the past decade, increased significantly in variety. Copper matrix composites, layered composites, high-conductivity composites, nanoscale composites, microcellular metals, and bio-derived composites have been added to a palette that, ten years ago, mostly comprised ceramic fiber- or particle-reinforced light metals together with some well-established engineering materials, such as WC-Co cermets. At the same time, research on composites such as particle-reinforced aluminum, aided by novel techniques such as large-cell 3-D finite element simulation or computed X-ray microtomography, has served as a potent vehicle for the elucidation of the mechanics of high-contrast two-phase elastoplastic materials, with implications that range well beyond metal matrix composites.

  5. Receptor binding and cell entry of Old World arenaviruses reveal novel aspects of virus-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Stefan

    2009-05-10

    Ten years ago, the first cellular receptor for the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the highly pathogenic Lassa virus (LASV) was identified as alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG), a versatile receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Biochemical analysis of the interaction of alpha-DG with arenaviruses and ECM proteins revealed a strikingly similar mechanism of receptor recognition that critically depends on specific sugar modification on alpha-DG involving a novel class of putative glycosyltransferase, the LARGE proteins. Interestingly, recent genome-wide detection and characterization of positive selection in human populations revealed evidence for positive selection of a locus within the LARGE gene in populations from Western Africa, where LASV is endemic. While most enveloped viruses that enter the host cell in a pH-dependent manner use clathrin-mediated endocytosis, recent studies revealed that the Old World arenaviruses LCMV and LASV enter the host cell predominantly via a novel and unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the virus is rapidly delivered to endosomes via an unusual route of vesicular trafficking that is largely independent of the small GTPases Rab5 and Rab7. Since infection of cells with LCMV and LASV depends on DG, this unusual endocytotic pathway could be related to normal cellular trafficking of the DG complex. Alternatively, engagement of arenavirus particles may target DG for an endocytotic pathway not normally used in uninfected cells thereby inducing an entry route specifically tailored to the pathogen's needs.

  6. Sparse Covariance Matrix Estimation With Eigenvalue Constraints.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Wang, Lie; Zhao, Tuo

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new approach for estimating high-dimensional, positive-definite covariance matrices. Our method extends the generalized thresholding operator by adding an explicit eigenvalue constraint. The estimated covariance matrix simultaneously achieves sparsity and positive definiteness. The estimator is rate optimal in the minimax sense and we develop an efficient iterative soft-thresholding and projection algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers. Empirically, we conduct thorough numerical experiments on simulated datasets as well as real data examples to illustrate the usefulness of our method. Supplementary materials for the article are available online.

  7. Salmonellae interactions with host processes.

    PubMed

    LaRock, Doris L; Chaudhary, Anu; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-04-01

    Salmonellae invasion and intracellular replication within host cells result in a range of diseases, including gastroenteritis, bacteraemia, enteric fever and focal infections. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that salmonellae use to alter host cell physiology; through the delivery of effector proteins with specific activities and through the modulation of defence and stress response pathways. In this Review, we summarize our current knowledge of the complex interplay between bacterial and host factors that leads to inflammation, disease and, in most cases, control of the infection by its animal hosts, with a particular focus on Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. We also highlight gaps in our knowledge of the contributions of salmonellae and the host to disease pathogenesis, and we suggest future avenues for further study.

  8. Glass and ceramic immobilization alternatives and the use of new facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, T.; Sullivan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for placing weapons-usable surplus nuclear materials (principally plutonium [Pu] and highly enriched uranium [U]) in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to use in weapons either by the Host Country or by a subnational group. The two most promising alternatives for achieving these aims are: fabrication and use as fuel, without reprocessing, in existing or modified nuclear reactors; or vitrification in combination with high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the immobilization technologies and facilities considered in this paper and the paper ``Use of Savannah River Site (SRS) Facilities for Glass and Ceramics,`` is to produce a waste form by incorporating plutonium in either an amorphous glass or a crystalline ceramic matrix and then disposal of it in a geologic repository. This paper summarizes all the glass and ceramic alternatives under consideration and presents the immobilization options using new facilities. The subsequent paper presents the immobilization options which use existing facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  9. Host specificity of insect herbivores in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Vojtech; Basset, Yves

    2005-06-07

    Studies of host specificity in tropical insect herbivores are evolving from a focus on insect distribution data obtained by canopy fogging and other mass collecting methods, to a focus on obtaining data on insect rearing and experimentally verified feeding patterns. We review this transition and identify persisting methodological problems. Replicated quantitative surveys of plant-herbivore food webs, based on sampling efforts of an order of magnitude greater than is customary at present, may be cost-effectively achieved by small research teams supported by local assistants. Survey designs that separate historical and ecological determinants of host specificity by studying herbivores feeding on the same plant species exposed to different environmental or experimental conditions are rare. Further, we advocate the use of host-specificity measures based on plant phylogeny. Existing data suggest that a minority of species in herbivore communities feed on a single plant species when alternative congeneric hosts are available. Thus, host plant range limits tend to coincide with those of plant genera, rather than species or suprageneric taxa. Host specificity among tropical herbivore guilds decreases in the sequence: granivores > leaf-miners > fructivore > leaf-chewers = sap-suckers > xylophages > root-feeders, thus paralleling patterns observed in temperate forests. Differences in host specificity between temperate and tropical forests are difficult to assess since data on tropical herbivores originate from recent field studies, whereas their temperate counterparts derive from regional host species lists, assembled over many years. No major increase in host specificity from temperate to tropical communities is evident. This conclusion, together with the recent downward revisions of extremely high estimates of tropical species richness, suggest that tropical ecosystems may not be as biodiverse as previously thought.

  10. Hepatocyte Culture in Autologous Decellularized Spleen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Wu, Wanquan; Xiang, Junxi; Lv, Yi; Zheng, Xinglong; Chen, Qian; Wang, Haohua; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhengwen; Ma, Feng

    2015-01-01

    abstract Background and Aims: Using decellularized scaffold to reengineer liver tissue is a promising alternative therapy for end-stage liver diseases. Though the decellularized human liver matrix is the ideal scaffold for reconstruction of the liver theoretically, the shortage of liver donors is still an obstacle for potential clinical application. Therefore, an appropriate alternative scaffold is needed. In the present study, we used a tissue engineering approach to prepare a rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) and evaluate the effectiveness of this DSM for primary rat hepatocytes culture. Methods: Rat decellularized spleen matrix (DSM) was prepared by perfusion of a series of detergents through spleen vasculature. DSM was characterized by residual DNA and specific extracellular matrix distribution. Thereafter, primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in the DSM in a 3-dimensional dynamic culture system, and liver cell survival and biological functions were evaluated by comparison with 3-dimensional sandwich culture and also with cultured in decellularized liver matrix (DLM). Results: Our research found that DSM did not exhibit any cellular components, but preserved the main extracellular matrix and the intact vasculature evaluated by DNA detection, histology, immunohistochemical staining, vessel corrosion cast and upright metallurgical microscope. Moreover, the method of DSM preparation procedure was relatively simple with high success rate (100%). After seeding primary hepatocytes in DSM, the cultured hepatocytes survived inside DSM with albumin synthesis and urea secretion within 10 d. Additionally, hepatocytes in dynamic culture medium had better biological functions at day 10 than that in sandwich culture. Albumin synthesis was 85.67 ± 6.34 μg/107cell/24h in dynamic culture in DSM compared to 62.43 ± 4.59 μg/107cell/24h in sandwich culture (P < 0.01) and to 87.54 ± 5.25 μg/107cell/24h in DLM culture (P > 0.05); urea release was 32.14 ± 8.62

  11. Human acellular dermal matrix grafts for rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A; Oriel, Brad S

    2011-09-01

    Rhinoplasty often relies on graft material for structural support in the form of cartilage, bone grafts, or fascia. In addition, pliable grafts are often helpful for contouring and can function as a barrier. Unfortunately, grafts carry the disadvantage of requiring an additional donor site, with associated complications. Human acellular dermal matrix (ADM) biological implants offer an exciting alternative for structural support and nonstructural implantation in rhinoplasty procedures. To examine the efficacy of ADM placement in rhinoplasty and septoplasty, the authors report the results from a series of 51 patients. In this series, there were no cases of infection, skin discoloration, seroma formation, septal perforation, significant resorption, extrusion, or other complications related to ADM placement. Therefore, the authors believe that ADM offers a safe and effective alternative to traditional grafting methods for functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty.

  12. Do-or-die life cycles and diverse post-infection resistance mechanisms limit the evolution of parasite host ranges.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    In light of the dynamic nature of parasite host ranges and documented potential for rapid host shifts, the observed high host specificity of most parasites remains an ecological paradox. Different variants of host-use trade-offs have become a mainstay of theoretical explanations of the prevalence of host specialism, but empirical evidence for such trade-offs is rare. We propose an alternative theory based on basic features of the parasite life cycle: host selection and subsequent intrahost replication. We introduce a new concept of effective burst size that accounts for the fact that successful host selection does not guarantee intrahost replication. Our theory makes a general prediction that a parasite will expand its host range if its effective burst size is positive. An in silico model of bacteria-phage coevolution verifies our predictions and demonstrates that the tendency for relatively narrow host ranges in parasites can be explained even in the absence of trade-offs.

  13. Selective predation and productivity jointly drive complex behavior in host-parasite systems.

    PubMed

    Hall, Spencer R; Duffy, Meghan A; Cáceres, Carla E

    2005-01-01

    Successful invasion of a parasite into a host population and resulting host-parasite dynamics can depend crucially on other members of a host's community such as predators. We do not fully understand how predation intensity and selectivity shape host-parasite dynamics because the interplay between predator density, predator foraging behavior, and ecosystem productivity remains incompletely explored. By modifying a standard susceptible-infected model, we show how productivity can modulate complex behavior induced by saturating and selective foraging behavior of predators in an otherwise stable host-parasite system. When predators strongly prefer parasitized hosts, the host-parasite system can oscillate, but predators can also create alternative stable states, Allee effects, and catastrophic extinction of parasites. In the latter three cases, parasites have difficulty invading and/or persisting in ecosystems. When predators are intermediately selective, these more complex behaviors become less important, but the host-parasite system can switch from stable to oscillating and then back to stable states along a gradient of predator control. Surprisingly, at higher productivity, predators that neutrally select or avoid parasitized hosts can catalyze extinction of both hosts and parasites. Thus, synergy between two enemies can end disastrously for the host. Such diverse outcomes underscore the crucial importance of the community and ecosystem context in which host-parasite interactions occur.

  14. Alternative Automobile Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David Gordon

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for cleaner and more efficient engines have stimulated a search for alternatives to the conventional spark-ignition engine. So far, the defects of the alternative engines are clearer than the virtues. The following engines are compared: spark ignition, diesel, vapor-cycle, Stirling, and gas turbine. (Author/MA)

  15. System Alternatives Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrait, James A.

    1977-01-01

    The Systems Alternatives Project is an attempt to develop open classroom alternatives within a modular scheduling system. Biology students are given both action and test objectives that emphasize individualization. Structure of the project is detailed and an attempt to analyze the project evaluation data statistically is included. (MA)

  16. Alternative Schools, Mainstream Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Jan; Conner, Evguenia

    2007-01-01

    Alternative education has its own history. Having emerged in the sixties as a response to the social crisis, its goal was primarily to fight increasing bureaucracy and the depersonalization of public education by giving students more freedom and minimal adult supervision. In the eighties, the understanding of "alternative education" narrowed to…

  17. Alternative Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Kerri L.

    2004-01-01

    Employers are feeling the strain of needing to offer alternative work arrangements to retain and recruit employees. Due to a change in demographics, dual-career couples and increased technology; people are demanding a transformation in the workplace environment. Two alternatives, which are being offered by employers, are flextime and…

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  19. On the Matrix Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Shui-Hung; Hou, Edwin; Pang, Wan-Kai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple formula for computing the matrix exponential function is presented. Specifically, it can be used to derive explicit formulas for the matrix exponential of a general matrix A satisfying p(A) = 0 for a polynomial p(s). It is ready for use in a classroom and suitable for both hand as well as symbolic computation.

  20. Alternatives to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2013-05-25

    The use of alternatives to allogeneic blood continues to rest on the principles that blood transfusions have inherent risks, associated costs, and affect the blood inventory available for health-care delivery. Increasing evidence exists of a fall in the use of blood because of associated costs and adverse outcomes, and suggests that the challenge for the use of alternatives to blood components will similarly be driven by costs and patient outcomes. Additionally, the risk-benefit profiles of alternatives to blood transfusion such as autologous blood procurement, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and haemostatic agents are under investigation. Nevertheless, the inherent risks of blood, along with the continued rise in blood costs are likely to favour the continued development and use of alternatives to blood transfusion. We summarise the current roles of alternatives to blood in the management of medical and surgical anaemias.

  1. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  2. Extensive host sharing of central European Tula virus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Essbauer, Sandra; Petraityte, Rasa; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Tackmann, Kirsten; Conraths, Franz J; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Arikawa, Jiro; Thomas, Astrid; Pfeffer, Martin; Scharninghausen, Jerrold J; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Wenk, Matthias; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2010-01-01

    To examine the host association of Tula virus (TULV), a hantavirus present in large parts of Europe, we investigated a total of 791 rodents representing 469 Microtus arvalis and 322 Microtus agrestis animals from northeast, northwest, and southeast Germany, including geographical regions with sympatric occurrence of both vole species, for the presence of TULV infections. Based on serological investigation, reverse transcriptase PCR, and subsequent sequence analysis of partial small (S) and medium (M) segments, we herein show that TULV is carried not only by its commonly known host M. arvalis but also frequently by M. agrestis in different regions of Germany for a prolonged time period. At one trapping site, TULV was exclusively detected in M. agrestis, suggesting an isolated transmission cycle in this rodent reservoir separate from spillover infections of TULV-carrying M. arvalis. Phylogenetic analysis of the S and M segment sequences demonstrated geographical clustering of the TULV sequences irrespective of the host, M. arvalis or M. agrestis. The novel TULV lineages from northeast, northwest, and southeast Germany described here are clearly separated from each other and from other German, European, or Asian lineages, suggesting their stable geographical localization and fast sequence evolution. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that TULV represents a promiscuous hantavirus with a large panel of susceptible hosts. In addition, this may suggest an alternative evolution mode, other than a strict coevolution, for this virus in its Microtus hosts, which should be proven in further large-scale investigations on sympatric Microtus hosts.

  3. Can environmental change affect host/parasite-mediated speciation?

    PubMed

    Brunner, Franziska S; Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Parasitism can be a driver of species divergence and thereby significantly alter species formation processes. While we still need to better understand how parasite-mediated speciation functions, it is even less clear how this process is affected by environmental change. Both rapid and gradual changes of the environment can modify host immune responses, parasite virulence and the specificity of their interactions. They will thereby change host-parasite evolutionary trajectories and the potential for speciation in both hosts and parasites. Here, we summarise mechanisms of host-parasite interactions affecting speciation and subsequently consider their susceptibility to environmental changes. We mainly focus on the effects of temperature change and nutrient input to ecosystems as they are major environmental stressors. There is evidence for both disruptive and accelerating effects of those pressures on speciation that seem to be context-dependent. A prerequisite for parasite-driven host speciation is that parasites significantly alter the host's Darwinian fitness. This can rapidly lead to divergent selection and genetic adaptation; however, it is likely preceded by more short-term plastic and transgenerational effects. Here, we also consider how these first responses and their susceptibility to environmental changes could lead to alterations of the species formation process and may provide alternative pathways to speciation.

  4. Functional genomics of cactus host shifts in Drosophila mojavensis.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, Luciano M; Watts, Thomas D; Bitler, Benjamin G; Machado, Carlos A; Markow, Therese A

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to novel environments remains one of the major challenges confronting evolutionary biologists. While newly developed genomic approaches hold considerable promise for addressing this overall question, the relevant tools have not often been available in the most ecologically interesting organisms. Our study organism, Drosophila mojavensis, is a cactophilic Sonoran Desert endemic utilizing four different cactus hosts across its geographical range. Its well-known ecology makes it an attractive system in which to study the evolution of gene expression during adaptation. As a cactophile, D. mojavensis oviposits in the necrotic tissues of cacti, therefore exposing larvae and even adults to the varied and toxic compounds of rotting cacti. We have developed a cDNA microarray of D. mojavensis to examine gene expression associated with cactus host use. Using a population from the Baja California population we examined gene expression differences of third instar larvae when reared in two chemically distinct cactus hosts, agria (Stenocereus gummosus, native host) vs. organpipe (Stenocereus thurberi, alternative host). We have observed differential gene expression associated with cactus host use in genes involved in metabolism and detoxification.

  5. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  6. The paradox of matrix metalloproteinases in infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Elkington, PTG; O'Kane, CM; Friedland, JS

    2005-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteolytic enzymes that perform multiple roles in the normal immune response to infection. MMPs facilitate leucocyte recruitment, cytokine and chemokine processing, defensin activation and matrix remodelling. However, excess MMP activity following infection may lead to immunopathology that causes host morbidity or mortality and favours pathogen dissemination or persistence. Here, we review the normal functions of MMPs in immunity and then discuss viral and bacterial infections where excess MMP activity has been implicated in pathology, specifically examining HIV, HTLV-1, hepatitis B, endotoxin shock, Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tissue destruction may be exacerbated further by bacterial-derived enzymes which activate the host pro-MMPs. Finally, the potential for therapeutic targeting of excess MMP activity in infection is considered. PMID:16178851

  7. Supported Molecular Matrix Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yu-Ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are difficult to separate using conventional gel electrophoresis methods such as SDS-PAGE and agarose gel electrophoresis, owing to their large size and heterogeneity. On the other hand, cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis can separate these molecules, but is not compatible with glycan analysis. Here, we describe a novel membrane electrophoresis technique, termed "supported molecular matrix electrophoresis" (SMME), in which a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane filter is used to achieve separation. This description includes the separation, visualization, and glycan analysis of mucins with the SMME technique.

  8. Hosts and parasites as aliens.

    PubMed

    Taraschewski, H

    2006-06-01

    Over the past decades, various free-living animals (hosts) and their parasites have invaded recipient areas in which they had not previously occurred, thus gaining the status of aliens or exotics. In general this happened to a low extent for hundreds of years. With variable frequency, invasions have been followed by the dispersal and establishment of non-indigenous species, whether host or parasite. In the literature thus far, colonizations by both hosts and parasites have not been treated and reviewed together, although both are usually interwoven in various ways. As to those factors permitting invasive success and colonization strength, various hypotheses have been put forward depending on the scientific background of respective authors and on the conspicuousness of certain invasions. Researchers who have tried to analyse characteristic developmental patterns, the speed of dispersal or the degree of genetic divergence in populations of alien species have come to different conclusions. Among parasitologists, the applied aspects of parasite invasions, such as the negative effects on economically important hosts, have long been at the centre of interest. In this contribution, invasions by hosts as well as parasites are considered comparatively, revealing many similarities and a few differences. Two helminths, the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, of cattle and sheep and the swimbladder nematode, Anguillicola crassus, of eels are shown to be useful as model parasites for the study of animal invasions and environmental global change. Introductions of F. hepatica have been associated with imports of cattle or other grazing animals. In various target areas, susceptible lymnaeid snails serving as intermediate hosts were either naturally present and/or were introduced from the donor continent of the parasite (Europe) and/or from other regions which were not within the original range of the parasite, partly reflecting progressive stages of a global biota change. In several

  9. Extracellular matrix proteins of dentine.

    PubMed

    Butler, W T; Ritchie, H H; Bronckers, A L

    1997-01-01

    Bone and dentine extracellular matrix proteins are similar, consisting primarily of type I collagen, acidic proteins and proteoglycans. Although collagen forms the lattice for deposition of calcium and phosphate for formation of carbonate apatite, the non-collagenous proteins are believed to control initiation and growth of the crystals. Despite this similarity, dentine contains three unique proteins apparently absent from bone and other tissue: dentine phosphophoryn (DPP), dentine matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentine sialoprotein (DSP). DPP and DMP1 are acidic phosphoproteins probably involved in the control of mineralization processes. DPP may localize in gap regions of collagen and initiate apatite crystal formation by binding large quantities of calcium in a conformation that promotes this process. Extensive studies have been conducted in our laboratory on the nature, biosynthesis, localization and gene structure of DSP. Immunolocalization studies showed that rat DSP, a 53 kDa sialic acid-rich glycoprotein, was synthesized by young and mature odontoblasts, and by dental pulp cells and pre-ameloblasts, but not by ameloblasts, osteoblasts, chondrocytes or other cell types. The cDNA sequence indicated that DSP was a 366-residue protein with several potential N-glycosylation sites, as well as phosphorylation sites, but that the amino acid sequence was dissimilar to that of other known proteins. Northern blot analysis detected several mRNA species near 4.6 and 1.5 kb, indicative of alternative splicing events. Evidence for two DSP genes was obtained, further complicating this picture. Recent in situ hybridization studies utilizing rat and mouse molars and incisors indicated that DSP mRNA was expressed by young odontoblasts and odontoblasts in animals of all ages. Transcripts were also observed in pre-ameloblasts. The expression of DSP mRNA ceased when these cells matured to become secretory ameloblasts. DSP transcripts were not detected in osteoblasts or other cell

  10. Screening for Host Factors Directly Interacting with RSV Protein: Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Avrahami, Dorit; Bajorek, Monika; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-throughput microfluidics platform to identify novel host cell binding partners of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) matrix (M) protein. The device consists of thousands of reaction chambers controlled by micro-mechanical valves. The microfluidic device is mated to a microarray-printed custom-made gene library. These genes are then transcribed and translated on-chip, resulting in a protein array ready for binding to RSV M protein.Even small viral proteome, such as that of RSV, presents a challenge due to the fact that viral proteins are usually multifunctional and thus their interaction with the host is complex. Protein microarrays technology allows the interrogation of protein-protein interactions, which could possibly overcome obstacles by using conventional high throughput methods. Using microfluidics platform we have identified new host interactors of M involved in various cellular pathways. A number of microfluidics based assays have already provided novel insights into the virus-host interactome, and the results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of viral protein interactions with the host.

  11. Application of symbolic/numeric matrix solution techniques to the NASTRAN program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buturla, E. M.; Burroughs, S. H.

    1977-01-01

    The matrix solving algorithm of any finite element algorithm is extremely important since solution of the matrix equations requires a large amount of elapse time due to null calculations and excessive input/output operations. An alternate method of solving the matrix equations is presented. A symbolic processing step followed by numeric solution yields the solution very rapidly and is especially useful for nonlinear problems.

  12. Matrix product purifications for canonical ensembles and quantum number distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Matrix product purifications (MPPs) are a very efficient tool for the simulation of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems at finite temperatures. When a system features symmetries, these can be used to reduce computation costs substantially. It is straightforward to compute an MPP of a grand-canonical ensemble, also when symmetries are exploited. This paper provides and demonstrates methods for the efficient computation of MPPs of canonical ensembles under utilization of symmetries. Furthermore, we present a scheme for the evaluation of global quantum number distributions using matrix product density operators (MPDOs). We provide exact matrix product representations for canonical infinite-temperature states, and discuss how they can be constructed alternatively by applying matrix product operators to vacuum-type states or by using entangler Hamiltonians. A demonstration of the techniques for Heisenberg spin-1 /2 chains explains why the difference in the energy densities of canonical and grand-canonical ensembles decays as 1 /L .

  13. Alternate Fuels Combustion Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    AFWAL-TR-83-2057 AD A13 8 5 7 5 ALTERNATE FUELS COMBUSTION RESEARCH PHASE RI ’~*~~4 & IWITEY CMAAA * ’s~t:Uwz, ONTARIO October 1983 I•oerls Report...83-2057 P_______________ C TITLE (mod ,,--tt-) 5. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Alternate Fuels ioahusticn Research Interim Report for Period Phase...I$. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse sirte it necessear and identify by block number) FUELS ALTERNATE FUELS GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION EXHAUST EMISSIONS 0

  14. Alternate Fuels Combustion Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    AFWAL-TR-84-2042 ESL-TR-84-29 ALTERNATE FUELS COMBUSTION RESEARCH 0) PRATT & WHITNEY CANADA MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO CANADA In JULY 1984 Final Report for...in small engincs. -291 REFERENCES 1. Gratton, M., Sampath, P., " Alternate Fuels Combustion Research Phase If", Pratt & Whitney Canada , AFWAL-TR-83-2057...for Period May 80 Sep e ALTERNATE FUELS COMBUSTION RESEARCHMa80-Sp3 4. PERFORMING ORIJ. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTNOR(s) 4. 60ONTRA-CT-WI GANUMNER(s) *M

  15. Meningococcal interactions with the host.

    PubMed

    Carbonnelle, Etienne; Hill, Darryl J; Morand, Philippe; Griffiths, Natalie J; Bourdoulous, Sandrine; Murillo, Isabel; Nassif, Xavier; Virji, Mumtaz

    2009-06-24

    Neisseria meningitidis interacts with host tissues through hierarchical, concerted and co-ordinated actions of a number of adhesins; many of which undergo antigenic and phase variation, a strategy that helps immune evasion. Three major structures, pili, Opa and Opc predominantly influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Pili and Opa proteins also determine host and tissue specificity while Opa and Opc facilitate efficient cellular invasion. Recent studies have also implied a role of certain adhesin-receptor pairs in determining increased host susceptibility to infection. This chapter examines our current knowledge of meningococcal adhesion and invasion mechanisms particularly related to human epithelial and endothelial cells which are of primary importance in the disease process.

  16. Host-Seeking Behavior in the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius

    PubMed Central

    Suchy, James T.; Lewis, Vernard R.

    2011-01-01

    The reemergence of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, has recently spawned a frenzy of public, media, and academic attention. In response to the growing rate of infestation, considerable work has been focused on identifying the various host cues utilized by the bed bug in search of a meal. Most of these behavioral studies examine movement within a confined environment, such as a Petri dish. This has prevented a more complete understanding of the insect's host-seeking process. This work describes a novel method for studying host-seeking behavior, using various movement parameters, in a time-lapse photography system. With the use of human breath as an attractant, we qualitatively and quantitatively assessed how bed bugs navigate their environment between its harborage and the host. Levels of behavioral activity varied dramatically between bed bugs in the presence and absence of host odor. Bed bugs demonstrated not simply activation, but attraction to the chemical components of breath. Localized, stop-start host-seeking behavior or alternating periods of movement and pause were observed among bed bugs placed in the environment void of human breath, while those exposed to human breath demonstrated long range, stop-start host-seeking behavior. A more comprehensive understanding of bed bug host-seeking can lead to the development of traps and monitors that account for unique subtleties in their behavior. The time-lapse photography system uses a large, artificial environment and could also be employed to study other aspects of the insect's behavioral patterns. PMID:26467497

  17. Stennis hosts 2010 Special Olympics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    B.J. Matherne, 27, of Gulfport, scores a soccer goal during one of the 2010 Special Olympic games at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center on March 27. Stennis serves as an annual host for the special needs event. Each year, local, regional and national Special Olympics events are hosted in more than 150 countries for persons with special needs. An international Special Olympics competition is held every two years.

  18. Bifidobacteria-Host Interactions—An Update on Colonisation Factors

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Verena; Westermann, Christina; Riedel, Christian U.

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are one of the predominant bacterial groups of the human intestinal microbiota and have important functional properties making them interesting for the food and dairy industries. Numerous in vitro and preclinical studies have shown beneficial effects of particular bifidobacterial strains or strain combinations on various health parameters of their hosts. This indicates the potential of bifidobacteria in alternative or supplementary therapeutic approaches in a number of diseased states. Based on these observations, bifidobacteria have attracted considerable interest by the food, dairy, and pharmaceutical industries and they are widely used as so-called probiotics. As a consequence of the rapidly increasing number of available bifidobacterial genome sequences and their analysis, there has been substantial progress in the identification of bifidobacterial structures involved in colonisation of and interaction with the host. With the present review, we aim to provide an update on the current knowledge on the mechanisms by which bifidobacteria colonise their hosts and exert health promoting effects. PMID:25295282

  19. Marking: A Critical Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Charles

    1984-01-01

    Having pupils critique their own work is an alternative to marking that is worthy of consideration. Pupil critique fosters in students a willingness to take responsibility for the quality of their work products. (RM)

  20. Alternative fuel information sources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This short document contains a list of more than 200 US sources of information (Name, address, phone number, and sometimes contact) related to the use of alternative fuels in automobiles and trucks. Electric-powered cars are also included.

  1. An Alternative to Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunathan, Arni; Guenther, John

    1970-01-01

    Two faculty members from the University of Missouri propose film making as an alternative to writing as a means of self expression for today's students and offer suggestions for preparing and operating a film production program. (LS)

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... use practices like acupuncture in medicine. But until recently, most Western hospitals didn't provide any alternative ... medicine is often used instead of conventional medical techniques. Complementary medicine is used in addition to conventional ...

  3. Alternative disinfectant water treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternative disinfestant water treatments are disinfestants not as commonly used by the horticultural industry. Chlorine products that produce hypochlorous acid are the main disinfestants used for treating irrigation water. Chlorine dioxide will be the primary disinfestant discussed as an alternativ...

  4. Consumer Health: Alternative Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... classified by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM): Whole medical systems Mind-body medicine Biologically based practices Manipulative and body-based practices Energy medicine Keep in mind that the distinctions between ...

  5. Seal design alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sambeek, L.L.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

  6. GLOBAL ALTERNATIVE FUTURE SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One way to examine possible future outcomes for environmental protection is through the development and analysis of alternative future scenarios. This type of assessment postulates two or more different paths that social and environmental development might take, using correspond...

  7. Integrating Temperature-Dependent Life Table Data into a Matrix Projection Model for Drosophila suzukii Population Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wiman, Nik G.; Walton, Vaughn M.; Dalton, Daniel T.; Anfora, Gianfranco; Burrack, Hannah J.; Chiu, Joanna C.; Daane, Kent M.; Grassi, Alberto; Miller, Betsey; Tochen, Samantha; Wang, Xingeng; Ioriatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent fecundity and survival data was integrated into a matrix population model to describe relative Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) population increase and age structure based on environmental conditions. This novel modification of the classic Leslie matrix population model is presented as a way to examine how insect populations interact with the environment, and has application as a predictor of population density. For D. suzukii, we examined model implications for pest pressure on crops. As case studies, we examined model predictions in three small fruit production regions in the United States (US) and one in Italy. These production regions have distinctly different climates. In general, patterns of adult D. suzukii trap activity broadly mimicked seasonal population levels predicted by the model using only temperature data. Age structure of estimated populations suggest that trap and fruit infestation data are of limited value and are insufficient for model validation. Thus, we suggest alternative experiments for validation. The model is advantageous in that it provides stage-specific population estimation, which can potentially guide management strategies and provide unique opportunities to simulate stage-specific management effects such as insecticide applications or the effect of biological control on a specific life-stage. The two factors that drive initiation of the model are suitable temperatures (biofix) and availability of a suitable host medium (fruit). Although there are many factors affecting population dynamics of D. suzukii in the field, temperature-dependent survival and reproduction are believed to be the main drivers for D. suzukii populations. PMID:25192013

  8. Host dispersal as the driver of parasite genetic structure: a paradigm lost?

    PubMed

    Mazé-Guilmo, Elise; Blanchet, Simon; McCoy, Karen D; Loot, Géraldine

    2016-03-01

    Understanding traits influencing the distribution of genetic diversity has major ecological and evolutionary implications for host-parasite interactions. The genetic structure of parasites is expected to conform to that of their hosts, because host dispersal is generally assumed to drive parasite dispersal. Here, we used a meta-analysis to test this paradigm and determine whether traits related to host dispersal correctly predict the spatial co-distribution of host and parasite genetic variation. We compiled data from empirical work on local adaptation and host-parasite population genetic structure from a wide range of taxonomic groups. We found that genetic differentiation was significantly lower in parasites than in hosts, suggesting that dispersal may often be higher for parasites. A significant correlation in the pairwise genetic differentiation of hosts and parasites was evident, but surprisingly weak. These results were largely explained by parasite reproductive mode, the proportion of free-living stages in the parasite life cycle and the geographical extent of the study; variables related to host dispersal were poor predictors of genetic patterns. Our results do not dispel the paradigm that parasite population genetic structure depends on host dispersal. Rather, we highlight that alternative factors are also important in driving the co-distribution of host and parasite genetic variation.

  9. Resources, mortality, and disease ecology: Importance of positive feedbacks between host growth rate and pathogen dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Val H.; Holt, Robert D.; Smith, Marilyn S.; Niu, Yafen; Barfield, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Resource theory and metabolic scaling theory suggest that the dynamics of a pathogen within a host should strongly depend upon the rate of host cell metabolism. Once an infection occurs, key ecological interactions occur on or within the host organism that determine whether the pathogen dies out, persists as a chronic infection, or grows to densities that lead to host death. We hypothesize that, in general, conditions favoring rapid host growth rates should amplify the replication and proliferation of both fungal and viral pathogens. If a host population experiences an increase in mortality, to persist it must have a higher growth rate, per host, often reflecting greater resource availability per capita. We hypothesize that this could indirectly foster the pathogen, which also benefits from increased within-host resource turnover. We first bring together in a short review a number of key prior studies which illustrate resource effects on viral and fungal pathogen dynamics. We then report new results from a semi-continuous cell culture experiment with SHIV, demonstrating that higher mortality rates indeed can promote viral proliferation. We develop a simple model that illustrates dynamical consequences of these resource effects, including interesting effects such as alternative stable states and oscillatory dynamics. Our paper contributes to a growing body of literature at the interface of ecology and infectious disease epidemiology, emphasizing that host abundances alone do not drive community dynamics: the physiological state and resource content of infected hosts also strongly influence host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27642269

  10. Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2010-06-30

    This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels. Thailand is of particular interest since it introduced E20 to its commercial market in 2007 and the US is now considering introducing E20 into the US market.

  11. Alternative Policy Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    CpRE CENTER FOR POLICY RESEARCH IN EDUCATION Alternative Policy o Instruments I Lorraine M. McDonnell Richard F. Elmore November 1987 DTICELECTE...03 Alternative Policy Instruments Lorraine M. McDonnell The RAND Corporation Richard F. Elmore Michigan State University November 1987 THRAND...range of policy instruments available or on the political and organizational conditions needed for each to work as intended. Policy decisions would

  12. Alternate policies for alternate energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-09-01

    Some ''alternates within alternates'' are studied and possible improvement of our energy policies are explored. The viability of a hydrogen fuel economy is reviewed. Methanol, ethanol or ammonia versus hydrogen is one area of interest. Others include liquid hydrogen versus jet fuels, the use of geothermal, solar, wind or water energy for production of hydrogen gas versus development of deep earth supplies of natural gas is another. Energy enhancement as opposed to energy conservation is investigated with regard to polar climate and what might be done to improve natural energy balances, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Pumping Arctic Ocean water out into the Pacific Ocean via the Bering Strait would be an energy debit as opposed to energy gains such as biomass conversion of future plant growth throughout the Siberian and Canadian tundra regions and presently very arid desert regions, improved access to northern region fuel, metal ore and mineral resources, year-round shipping and fishing fleet operations in the Arctic Ocean and development of the tremendous Greenland hydro-electric power potential.

  13. Starved epithelial cells uptake extracellular matrix for survival

    PubMed Central

    Muranen, Taru; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Curry, Natasha L.; Hwang, Julie; DuBois, Cory D.; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Clish, Clary B.; Brugge, Joan S.; Kalaany, Nada Y.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix adhesion is required for normal epithelial cell survival, nutrient uptake and metabolism. This requirement can be overcome by oncogene activation. Interestingly, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR leads to apoptosis of matrix-detached, but not matrix-attached cancer cells, suggesting that matrix-attached cells use alternate mechanisms to maintain nutrient supplies. Here we demonstrate that under conditions of dietary restriction or growth factor starvation, where PI3K/mTOR signalling is decreased, matrix-attached human mammary epithelial cells upregulate and internalize β4-integrin along with its matrix substrate, laminin. Endocytosed laminin localizes to lysosomes, results in increased intracellular levels of essential amino acids and enhanced mTORC1 signalling, preventing cell death. Moreover, we show that starved human fibroblasts secrete matrix proteins that maintain the growth of starved mammary epithelial cells contingent upon epithelial cell β4-integrin expression. Our study identifies a crosstalk between stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells under starvation that could be exploited therapeutically to target tumours resistant to PI3K/mTOR inhibition. PMID:28071763

  14. Quantitative Modeling of the Alternative Pathway of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Angel; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is an integral part of innate immunity that detects and eliminates invading pathogens through a cascade of reactions. The destructive effects of the complement activation on host cells are inhibited through versatile regulators that are present in plasma and bound to membranes. Impairment in the capacity of these regulators to function in the proper manner results in autoimmune diseases. To better understand the delicate balance between complement activation and regulation, we have developed a comprehensive quantitative model of the alternative pathway. Our model incorporates a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the dynamics of the four steps of the alternative pathway under physiological conditions: (i) initiation (fluid phase), (ii) amplification (surfaces), (iii) termination (pathogen), and (iv) regulation (host cell and fluid phase). We have examined complement activation and regulation on different surfaces, using the cellular dimensions of a characteristic bacterium (E. coli) and host cell (human erythrocyte). In addition, we have incorporated neutrophil-secreted properdin into the model highlighting the cross talk of neutrophils with the alternative pathway in coordinating innate immunity. Our study yields a series of time-dependent response data for all alternative pathway proteins, fragments, and complexes. We demonstrate the robustness of alternative pathway on the surface of pathogens in which complement components were able to saturate the entire region in about 54 minutes, while occupying less than one percent on host cells at the same time period. Our model reveals that tight regulation of complement starts in fluid phase in which propagation of the alternative pathway was inhibited through the dismantlement of fluid phase convertases. Our model also depicts the intricate role that properdin released from neutrophils plays in initiating and propagating the alternative pathway during bacterial infection. PMID

  15. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  16. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  17. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  18. Matrix membranes and integrability

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.; Fairlie, D.; Curtright, T.

    1997-06-01

    This is a pedagogical digest of results reported in Curtright, Fairlie, {ampersand} Zachos 1997, and an explicit implementation of Euler`s construction for the solution of the Poisson Bracket dual Nahm equation. But it does not cover 9 and 10-dimensional systems, and subsequent progress on them Fairlie 1997. Cubic interactions are considered in 3 and 7 space dimensions, respectively, for bosonic membranes in Poisson Bracket form. Their symmetries and vacuum configurations are explored. Their associated first order equations are transformed to Nahm`s equations, and are hence seen to be integrable, for the 3-dimensional case, by virtue of the explicit Lax pair provided. Most constructions introduced also apply to matrix commutator or Moyal Bracket analogs.

  19. Hyaluronan: A Matrix Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügheimer, Louise

    2008-09-01

    The glucosaminoglycan hyaluronan is a key component of the extracellular matrix. It is a large, negatively charged molecule that can act as an ion exchange reservoir for positive ions. Hyaluronan is involved in renomedullary water handling through its water-binding capacity. In the renal medulla, the main source for hyaluronan production is the renomedullary interstitial cells. Hyaluronan synthases are found in the inner part of the plasma membrane and polymerize hyaluronan chains which are extruded into the extracellular space. Hyaluronidases are a family of enzymes involved in the degradation of hyaluronan. They have a wide range of properties, including differences in size, inhibitor sensitivities, catalytic mechanisms, substrate specificities and pH optima.

  20. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  1. Olfactory cues from different plant species in host selection by female pea moths.

    PubMed

    Thöming, Gunda; Norli, Hans Ragnar

    2015-03-04

    In herbivorous insects specialized on few plant species, attraction to host odor may be mediated by volatiles common to all host species, by specific compounds, or combinations of both. The pea moth Cydia nigricana is an important pest of the pea. Volatile signatures of four host plant species were studied to identify compounds involved in pea moth host selection and to improve previously reported attractive volatile blends. P. sativum and alternative Fabaceae host species were compared regarding female attraction, oviposition, and larval performance. Pea moth females were strongly attracted to the sweet pea Lathyrus odoratus, but larval performance on that species was moderate. Chemical analyses of sweet pea odor and electrophysiological responses of moth antennae led to identification of seven sweet-pea-specific compounds and ten compounds common to all tested host species. Blends of these specific and common cues were highly attractive to mated pea moth females in wind tunnel and field experiments.

  2. An Alternative Method for Multiplication of Rhotrices. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sani, B.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, an alternative multiplication method for rhotrices is proposed. The method establishes some relationships between rhotrices and matrices. This article has discussed a modified multiplication method for rhotrices. The method has a direct relationship with matrix multiplication, and so rhotrices under this multiplication procedure…

  3. Academic and Behavioral Planning Through an Alternative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Nancy E.; Dworkin, Yehoash S.

    1978-01-01

    Suggests an alternative universe in which failure is identified as a systems concern, instead of a human breakdown. The model presents successful behavior in terms of growth in process efficiency, rather than the +/- (right/wrong) matrix associated with achievement orientation. (Editor)

  4. Host defence to pulmonary mycosis

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Christopher H; Warren, Peter W

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a basic understanding of the mechanisms of host defense to pathogenic fungi. This will help physicians understand why some patients are predisposed to fungal infections and update basic scientists on how microbial immunology applies to fungal disease. DATA SOURCES: English articles from 1966 to present were identified from a MEDLINE search. STUDY SELECTION: Articles were identified by a MEDLINE search of ‘exp lung/’ or ‘exp lung diseases/’ and ‘exp fungi/’. The titles and abstracts were screened to identify articles that contained salient information pertaining to host defense of respiratory mycoses. DATA EXTRACTION: Information was summarized from the articles pertaining to host defense of pulmonary mycosis that had been identified by the MEDLINE search. DATA SYNTHESIS: Fungi represent a unique and highly diverse group of pathogenic organisms that have become an increasingly prevalent cause of life-threatening illness. A worldwide increase in persons with immunodeficiency has been a major contributing factor to the increase in fungal disease. As a result, clinicians are faced with an expanding array of fungal infections that pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The respiratory tract is the route of acquisition for many important fungal infections; thus, understanding the host defense in the lung is an essential component of understanding host defense to fungal disease. With this understanding, fungi may be divided on the basis of the predilection of certain mycosis for specific immune defects. CONCLUSIONS: By separating fungi based on the host immune defects that predispose to disease, in conjunction with traditional divisions based on the geographic distribution of fungi, clinicians are able to focus their diagnostic efforts and to identify fungal pathogens better. In addition, an understanding of the normal host defense mechanisms that serve to control fungal infections is essential to the development of novel antifungal

  5. Boost matrix converters in clean energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Ekrem

    This dissertation describes an investigation of novel power electronic converters, based on the ultra-sparse matrix topology and characterized by the minimum number of semiconductor switches. The Z-source, Quasi Z-source, Series Z-source and Switched-inductor Z-source networks were originally proposed for boosting the output voltage of power electronic inverters. These ideas were extended here on three-phase to three-phase and three-phase to single-phase indirect matrix converters. For the three-phase to three-phase matrix converters, the Z-source networks are placed between the three-switch input rectifier stage and the output six-switch inverter stage. A brief shoot-through state produces the voltage boost. An optimal pulse width modulation technique was developed to achieve high boosting capability and minimum switching losses in the converter. For the three-phase to single-phase matrix converters, those networks are placed similarly. For control purposes, a new modulation technique has been developed. As an example application, the proposed converters constitute a viable alternative to the existing solutions in residential wind-energy systems, where a low-voltage variable-speed generator feeds power to the higher-voltage fixed-frequency grid. Comprehensive analytical derivations and simulation results were carried out to investigate the operation of the proposed converters. Performance of the proposed converters was then compared between each other as well as with conventional converters. The operation of the converters was experimentally validated using a laboratory prototype.

  6. Lectures on Matrix Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ydri, Badis

    The subject of matrix field theory involves matrix models, noncommutative geometry, fuzzy physics and noncommutative field theory and their interplay. In these lectures, a lot of emphasis is placed on the matrix formulation of noncommutative and fuzzy spaces, and on the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. In particular, the phase structure of noncommutative $\\phi^4$ theory is treated in great detail, and an introduction to noncommutative gauge theory is given.

  7. Molecular fingerprinting of Helicanthus elastica (Desr.) Danser growing on five different hosts by RAPD

    PubMed Central

    Sunil Kumar, K.N.; Maruthi, K.R.; Alfarhan, A.H.; Rajakrishnan, R.; Thomas, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mistletoes are hemiparasitic plants growing on aerial parts of other host trees. Many of the mistletoes are reported to be medicinally important. The hemiparasitic nature of these plants makes their chemical composition dependent on the host on which it grows. They are shown to exhibit morphological dissimilarities also when growing on different hosts. Helicanthus elastica (Desr.) Danser (mango mistletoe) is one such less explored medicinal mistletoe found on almost every mango tree in India. Traditionally, the leaves of this plant are used for checking abortion and for removing stones in the kidney and urinary bladder while significant antioxidant and antimicrobial properties are also attributed to this species of mistletoe. The current study was undertaken to evaluate molecular differences in the genomic DNA of the plant while growing on five different host trees using four random markers employing random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) followed by similarity matrix by Jaccard’s coefficient and distance matrix by hierarchal clustering analysis. Similarity and distance matrix data employing just 4 random markers, separately and the pooled data as well, revealed significant difference in the genomic DNA of H. elastica growing on five different hosts. Pooled data of similarity from all the 4 primers cumulatively showed similarity between 0.256 and 0.311. Distance matrix ranged from of 0.256 to 0.281 on pooling the data from all the four primers. The result employing a minimum number of primers could conclude that genomic DNA of H. elastica differs depending upon the host on which it grows, hence the host must be considered while studying or utilizing this mistletoe for medicinal purposes. PMID:27081357

  8. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOEpatents

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  9. Non-Insertional Code-Switching in English-Japanese Bilingual Children: Alternation and Congruent Lexicalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namba, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates English-Japanese children's code-switching (CS) from the structural point of view. Muysken categorises it into three types, that is, insertion, alternation and congruent lexicalisation. Regarding insertion, using Myers-Scotton's matrix language frame (MLF) model, for example, the matrix language (ML) of a bilingual clause…

  10. A Nonconvex Optimization Framework for Low Rank Matrix Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Zhaoran; Liu, Han

    2016-01-01

    We study the estimation of low rank matrices via nonconvex optimization. Compared with convex relaxation, nonconvex optimization exhibits superior empirical performance for large scale instances of low rank matrix estimation. However, the understanding of its theoretical guarantees are limited. In this paper, we define the notion of projected oracle divergence based on which we establish sufficient conditions for the success of nonconvex optimization. We illustrate the consequences of this general framework for matrix sensing. In particular, we prove that a broad class of nonconvex optimization algorithms, including alternating minimization and gradient-type methods, geometrically converge to the global optimum and exactly recover the true low rank matrices under standard conditions. PMID:28316458

  11. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  12. Biodiesel: an alternative fuel.

    PubMed

    Manzanera, Maximino; Molina-Muñoz, Maria L; González-López, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative energy source and could be a substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel. To be a viable alternative, a biofuel should provide a net energy gain, have environmental benefits, be economically competitive, and be producible in large quantities without reducing food supplies. Most of the sources, methods and apparatus to produce biodiesel are reviewed here. Some of the patents propose the use of oils and fats of animal or vegetal origin and other kind of sources. Many others focus on the methods for the production or oxidation stability of the biofuel in order to make its production economically competitive. Several apparatus comprising reactors and refineries are also presented. This review article summarizes recent and important patents relating to the production of biodiesel to make its production a viable alternative.

  13. Brood parasitism selects for no defence in a cuckoo host.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Oliver

    2011-09-22

    In coevolutionary arms races, like between cuckoos and their hosts, it is easy to understand why the host is under selection favouring anti-parasitism behaviour, such as egg rejection, which can lead to parasites evolving remarkable adaptations to 'trick' their host, such as mimetic eggs. But what about cases where the cuckoo egg is not mimetic and where the host does not act against it? Classically, such apparently non-adaptive behaviour is put down to evolutionary lag: given enough time, egg mimicry and parasite avoidance strategies will evolve. An alternative is that absence of egg mimicry and of anti-parasite behaviour is stable. Such stability is at first sight highly paradoxical. I show, using both field and experimental data to parametrize a simulation model, that the absence of defence behaviour by Cape bulbuls (Pycnonotus capensis) against parasitic eggs of the Jacobin cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus) is optimal behaviour. The cuckoo has evolved massive eggs (double the size of bulbul eggs) with thick shells, making it very hard or impossible for the host to eject the cuckoo egg. The host could still avoid brood parasitism by nest desertion. However, higher predation and parasitism risks later in the season makes desertion more costly than accepting the cuckoo egg, a strategy aided by the fact that many cuckoo eggs are incorrectly timed, so do not hatch in time and hence do not reduce host fitness to zero. Selection will therefore prevent the continuation of any coevolutionary arms race. Non-mimetic eggs and absence of defence strategies against cuckoo eggs will be the stable, if at first sight paradoxical, result.

  14. Matrix market: a web resource for test matrix collection

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, R.F.; Pozo, R.; Remington, K.; Barrett, R.F.; Dongarra, J.J. /

    1996-05-30

    We describe a repository of data for the testing of numerical algorithms and mathematical software for matrix computations. The repository is designed to accommodate both dense and sparse matrices, as well as software to generate matrices. It has been seeded with the well known Harwell-Boeing sparse matrix collection. The raw data files have been augmented with an integrated World Wide Web interface which describes the matrices in the collection quantitatively and visually, For example, each matrix has a Web page which details its attributes, graphically depicts its sparsity pattern, and provides access to the matrix itself in several formats. In addition, a search mechanism is included which allows retrieval of matrices based on a variety of attributes, such as type and size, as well as through free-text search in abstracts. The URL is http://math.nist.gov/MatrixMarket.

  15. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  16. ECM-Based Biohybrid Materials for Engineering Compliant, Matrix-Dense Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bracaglia, Laura G.; Fisher, John P.

    2015-01-01

    An ideal tissue engineering scaffold should not only promote, but take an active role in, constructive remodeling and formation of site appropriate tissue. ECM-derived proteins provide unmatched cellular recognition, and therefore influence cellular response towards predicted remodeling behaviors. Materials built with only these proteins, however, can degrade rapidly or begin too weak to substitute for compliant, matrix-dense tissues. The focus of this review is on biohybrid materials that incorporate polymer components with ECM-derived proteins, to produce a substrate with desired mechanical and degradation properties, as well as actively guide tissue remodeling. Materials are described through four fabrication methods: (1) polymer and ECM-protein fibers woven together, (2) polymer and ECM proteins combined in a bilayer, (3) cell-built ECM on polymer scaffold, and (4) ECM proteins and polymers combined in a single hydrogel. Scaffolds from each fabrication method can achieve characteristics suitable for different types of tissue. In vivo testing has shown progressive remodeling in injury models, and suggests ECM-based biohybrid materials promote a prohealing immune response over single component alternatives. The prohealing immune response is associated with lasting success and long term host maintenance of the implant. PMID:26227679

  17. Mechanical properties of tyramine substituted-hyaluronan enriched fascia extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chin, Likang; Calabro, Anthony; Walker, Esteban; Derwin, Kathleen A

    2012-03-01

    Naturally occurring biomaterial scaffolds derived from extracellular matrix (ECM) have been the topic of recent investigation in the context of rotator cuff tendon repair. We previously reported a method to treat fascia ECM with high molecular weight tyramine substituted-hyaluronan (TS-HA) for use as a tendon augmentation scaffold. The presence of crosslinked TS-HA in fascia was associated with an increased macrophage and giant cell response compared to water-treated controls after implantation in a rat abdominal wall model. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which TS-HA treatment was associated with mechanical property changes of fascia after implantation in the rat model. Fascia samples in all groups demonstrated time-dependent decreases in mechanical properties. TS-HA-treated fascia with crosslinking exhibited a lower toe modulus, a trend toward lower toe stiffness, and a higher transition strain than water-treated controls not only after implantation, but also at time zero. TS-HA treatment, with or without crosslinking, had no significant effect on time-zero or post-implantation load relaxation ratio, load relaxation rate, linear-region stiffness, or linear-region modulus. Our findings demonstrated that the particular TS-HA treatment employed in this study decreased the low-load elastic mechanical properties of fascia ECM, in keeping with the heightened macrophage and giant cell host response seen previously. This work provides a starting point and guidance for investigating alternative HA treatment strategies.

  18. Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

  19. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  20. The energy cane alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    This book reviews the conceptual and theoretical background of Saccharum botany, which underlies the growing of cane as a total growth commodity. Management details are provided for energy cane planting, cultivation, harvest, and postharvest operations. Chapters on energy cane utilization stress new developments in lignocellulose conversion plus alternative options for fermentable solids usage. Chapters are also included for the management of alternative grasses to supplement energy cane, and the breeding of new hybrid canes with high biomass attributes at the intergeneric and interspecific levels.

  1. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  2. Comparative Host Response of 2 Human Acellular Dermal Matrices in a Primate Implant Model

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Maryellen; Singh, Devinder; Silverman, Ronald P.; Xu, Hui; De Deyne, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We examined the differences in capsule formation between 2 commercially available human acellular dermal matrices in a nonhuman primate model. Methods: Primates were implanted dorsally with a subcutaneously placed tissue expander and randomized into 3 groups, receiving skin coverage only, coverage with non-irradiated freeze-dried human acellular dermal matrix, or coverage with gamma-irradiated human acellular dermal matrix. After 9 weeks, soft tissue around the tissue expander was excised and evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively to assess extent of inflammation (CD68 antibodies and interleukin-6 levels), degradation and fibrosis (matrix metalloproteinase-1 and procollagen-1 staining), and mechanical (tensile) strength. Results: Histological evaluation of tissue around the tissue expander indicated differences in host response, suggesting capsule presence in the gamma-irradiated matrix group but not the freeze-dried matrix group. The extent of local inflammation was much higher in the gamma-irradiated matrix group which demonstrated mean (standard deviation) localized interleukin-6 concentration of 67.3 (53.6) vs 16.3 (6.7) pg/mg protein in the non-irradiated matrix group. There was robust degradation and fibrotic response in the gamma-irradiated matrix group versus the freeze-dried matrix group. Mechanical testing indicated mean (standard deviation) ultimate tensile strength of 12.0 (7.1) N in the gamma-irradiated matrix group versus 99.3 (48.8) N in the freeze-dried matrix group. Conclusions: Enclosure of a tissue expander with human acellular dermal matrix untreated by gamma irradiation led to minimal inflammation and minimal evidence of fibrosis/capsule around the tissue expander compared with robust capsule formation around the tissue expander that was covered by a gamma-irradiated human acellular dermal matrix. PMID:24570768

  3. The common cuckoo Cuculus canorus is not locally adapted to its reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus host.

    PubMed

    Avilés, J M; Vikan, J R; Fossøy, F; Antonov, A; Moksnes, A; Røskaft, E; Shykoff, J A; Møller, A P; Jensen, H; Procházka, P; Stokke, B G

    2011-02-01

    The obligate avian brood parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus comprises different strains of females that specialize on particular host species by laying eggs of a constant type that often mimics those of the host. Whether cuckoos are locally adapted for mimicking populations of the hosts on which they are specialized has never been investigated. In this study, we first explored the possibility of local adaptation in cuckoo egg mimicry over a geographical mosaic of selection exerted by one of its main European hosts, the reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus. Secondly, we investigated whether cuckoos inhabiting reed warbler populations with a broad number of alternative suitable hosts at hand were less locally adapted. Cuckoo eggs showed different degrees of mimicry to different reed warbler populations. However, cuckoo eggs did not match the egg phenotypes of their local host population better than eggs of other host populations, indicating that cuckoos were not locally adapted for mimicry on reed warblers. Interestingly, cuckoos exploiting reed warblers in populations with a relatively larger number of co-occurring cuckoo gentes showed lower than average levels of local adaptation in egg volume. Our results suggest that cuckoo local adaptation might be prevented when different cuckoo populations exploit more or fewer different host species, with gene flow or frequent host switches breaking down local adaptation where many host races co-occur.

  4. Mini Review: Potential Applications of Non-host Resistance for Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghee; Whitaker, Vance M.; Hutton, Samuel F.

    2016-01-01

    Plant breeding for disease resistance is crucial to sustain global crop production. For decades, plant breeders and researchers have extensively used host plant resistance genes (R-genes) to develop disease resistant cultivars. However, the general instability of R-genes in crop cultivars when challenged with diverse pathogen populations emphasizes the need for more stable means of resistance. Alternatively, non-host resistance is recognized as the most durable, broad-spectrum form of resistance against the majority of potential pathogens in plants and has gained great attention as an alternative target for managing resistance. While transgenic approaches have been utilized to transfer non-host resistance to host species, conventional breeding applications have been more elusive. Nevertheless, avenues for discovery and deployment of genetic loci for non-host resistance via hybridization are increasingly abundant, particularly when transferring genes among closely related species. In this mini review, we discuss current and developing applications of non-host resistance for crop improvement with a focus on the overlap between host and non-host mechanisms and the potential impacts of new technology. PMID:27462329

  5. Sync Matrix Enterprise

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-01

    SME is an emergency response planning and exercise design and management software. SME implements an innovative approach of hosting its data in a customized Windows SharPoint Services (WSS) 3.0 site, and uses a Microsoft Win Forms technology as front-end to access the backend SharePoint list data as a client-server application. The utilization of WSS 3.0 allowed for a light weight application with the pwoer or project, data, document and user management tools that can link with everyday application such as Microsoft Office products, especially Outlook. The WinForms front-end application programmatically accesses the SharePoint List data through the exposed SharePoint Web Services application programming inerface (API). The SharePoint environment includes customized Web Parts that programmatically create new SharePoint sites with custom lists. The application also takes advantage of AJAX and Silverlight technologies to create a richer user experience for the SharePoint users.

  6. The inflammasome in host defense.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Pedra, Joao H F

    2010-01-01

    Nod-like receptors have emerged as an important family of sensors in host defense. These receptors are expressed in macrophages, dendritic cells and monocytes and play an important role in microbial immunity. Some Nod-like receptors form the inflammasome, a protein complex that activates caspase-1 in response to several stimuli. Caspase-1 activation leads to processing and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Here, we discuss recent advances in the inflammasome field with an emphasis on host defense. We also compare differential requirements for inflammasome activation in dendritic cells, macrophages and monocytes.

  7. Dissection of the host-pathogen interaction in human tuberculosis using a bioengineered 3-dimensional model

    PubMed Central

    Tezera, Liku B; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Chancellor, Andrew; Reichmann, Michaela T; Shammari, Basim Al; Brace, Patience; Batty, Alex; Tocheva, Annie; Jogai, Sanjay; Marshall, Ben G; Tebruegge, Marc; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Mansour, Salah; Elkington, Paul T

    2017-01-01

    Cell biology differs between traditional cell culture and 3-dimensional (3-D) systems, and is modulated by the extracellular matrix. Experimentation in 3-D presents challenges, especially with virulent pathogens. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills more humans than any other infection and is characterised by a spatially organised immune response and extracellular matrix remodelling. We developed a 3-D system incorporating virulent mycobacteria, primary human blood mononuclear cells and collagen–alginate matrix to dissect the host-pathogen interaction. Infection in 3-D led to greater cellular survival and permitted longitudinal analysis over 21 days. Key features of human tuberculosis develop, and extracellular matrix integrity favours the host over the pathogen. We optimised multiparameter readouts to study emerging therapeutic interventions: cytokine supplementation, host-directed therapy and immunoaugmentation. Each intervention modulates the host-pathogen interaction, but has both beneficial and harmful effects. This methodology has wide applicability to investigate infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases and develop novel drug regimes and vaccination approaches. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21283.001 PMID:28063256

  8. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extent to which graphite fibers are released from resin matrix composites that are exposed to fire and impact conditions was determined. Laboratory simulations of those conditions that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation were evaluated. The effectiveness of various hybridizing concepts in preventing this release of graphite fibers were also evaluated. The baseline (i.e., unhybridized) laminates examined were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy, graphite/polyimide, and graphite/phenolic materials. Hybridizing concepts investigated included resin fillers, laminate coatings, resin blending, and mechanical interlocking of the graphite reinforcement. The baseline and hybridized laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, were also compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that several hybrid concepts eliminated this fiber release. Isothermal and humidity aging did not appear to alter the fiber release tendencies.

  9. Glass matrix armor

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  10. Molecular and morphological identification of the soybean aphid and other Aphis species on the primary host, Rhamnus davurica, in Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean aphid, APHIS GLYCINES Matsumura, was recently introduced into North America where it has become a serious pest of soybeans. In its native range of northeastern Asia, A. GLYCINES undergoes host alternation between the soybean, GLYCINE MAX (summer host), and the Dahurian buckthorn, RHAMNU...

  11. Alternative life-history and transmission strategies in a parasite: first come, first served?

    PubMed

    Poulin, R; Lefebvre, F

    2006-01-01

    Alternative transmission strategies are common in many parasitic organisms, often representing discrete phenotypes adopted in response to external cues. The facultative truncation of the normal 3-host life-cycle to a 2-host cycle in many trematodes provides an example: some individuals mature precociously, via progenesis, in their intermediate host and produce eggs without the need to reach a definitive host. The factors that determine how many and which individuals adopt the truncated life-cycle within a parasite population remain unknown. We investigated the occurrence of progenesis in the trematode Stegodexamene anguillae within its fish intermediate host. Location within the host was a key determinant of progenesis. Although the size and egg output of progenetic metacercariae encysted in host gonads did not differ from those of the few progenetic metacercariae in other host tissues, the likelihood of metacercariae becoming progenetic was much higher for those in the gonads than those elsewhere in the host. Progenetic parasites can only evacuate their eggs along with host eggs or sperm, providing a link between the parasite's transmission strategy and its location in the host. Host size and sex, and the presence of other parasite species in the host, did not affect the occurrence of progenesis in S. anguillae. However, the proportion of metacercariae in host gonads and the proportion of progenetic metacercariae both decreased with increasing numbers of S. anguillae per host. These results suggest that progenesis is adopted mostly by the parasites that successfully establish in host gonads. These are generally the first to infect a fish; subsequent arrivals settle in other tissues as the gonads quickly become saturated with parasites. In this system, the site of encystment within the fish host both promotes and constrains the adoption of a facultative, truncated life-cycle by the parasite.

  12. How to Study a Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how best to study a matrix. Fifty-three participants studied a matrix topically (1 column at a time), categorically (1 row at a time), or in a unified way (all at once). Results revealed that categorical and unified study produced higher: (a) performance on relationship and fact tests, (b) study material satisfaction, and…

  13. Matrix Methods to Analytic Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandy, C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of basis matrix methods to rotate axes is detailed. It is felt that persons who have need to rotate axes often will find that the matrix method saves considerable work. One drawback is that most students first learning to rotate axes will not yet have studied linear algebra. (MP)

  14. Alternatives in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusk, Bruce, Ed.

    These six lectures explore alternative approaches to education both within and outside the educational system. The contributions and their authors include: "Telling It Like It Ain't: An Examination of the Language of Education," by Neil Postman; "The Psychology of J. Piaget and Its Relevance to Education," by Vinh Bang (presented also in French);…

  15. Alternative Approaches to Negotiating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramming, Thomas M.

    1997-01-01

    The wait-and-react and laundry-list approaches to combating teachers' collective-bargaining demands are ineffective. An alternative goals-setting approach requires management and the district negotiations team to identify important needs and objectives. West Seneca Central School District ended contentious negotiations by presenting unions with…

  16. Environment and Alternative Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothari, Rajni

    Stressing the global dimension to the adversary relationship between economic development and environmental conservation, this monograph examines the philosophical, historical, cultural, and ethnic underpinnings of modern science and technology. In addition, the monograph spells out policy implications of an alternative concept of development and…

  17. Independent Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohl, Seth F.

    Ten alternative high schools serving a total of 2,750 students in New York City were evaluated in terms of their administration, programs, student body, and specific educational objectives. Three main types of programs were in operation at the schools. These included: (1) Remediation with emphasis on basic skills in reading, mathematics and…

  18. Alternative energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresselhaus, M. S.; Thomas, I. L.

    2001-11-01

    Fossil fuels currently supply most of the world's energy needs, and however unacceptable their long-term consequences, the supplies are likely to remain adequate for the next few generations. Scientists and policy makers must make use of this period of grace to assess alternative sources of energy and determine what is scientifically possible, environmentally acceptable and technologically promising.

  19. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  20. Secondary Retention Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy R.; Hopkins, Patricia

    Two alternatives to retention in grade for secondary school students were evaluated in Austin (Texas). Both were designed to allow students who are potential retainees (PRs) to receive remediation in one semester. The Transitional Academic Program (TAP) allows PRs to enroll in ninth-grade courses while repeating eighth-grade courses they had…

  1. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  2. A Better Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoeppel, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Mandated as an option for students who have not been successful in traditional programs, continuation education provides as alternative setting that helps students meet graduation requirements and earn their high school diplomas. Continuation high schools are quite successful in helping their students. This is due to their small size (usually 20:1…

  3. Augmentative & Alternative Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patti

    2007-01-01

    There is no definitive recipe for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) success, but its universal ingredients can be found at home. The main ones are: (1) Understanding that all children need to express themselves, however outgoing or shy they may be; (2) Willingness to embrace the technology that may help your child regardless of your…

  4. Alternatives in solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Although solar energy has the potential of providing a significant source of clean and renewable energy for a variety of applications, it is expected to penetrate the nation's energy economy very slowly. The alternative solar energy technologies which employ direct collection and conversion of solar radiation as briefly described.

  5. Alternative Energy Busing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, school districts have converted portions of their bus fleets to cleaner-burning, sometimes cheaper, alternative fossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas or propane. Others have adopted biodiesel, which combines regular diesel with fuel derived from organic sources, usually vegetable oils or animal fats. The number of biodiesel…

  6. Energy conversion alternatives study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. T.

    1979-01-01

    Comparison of coal based energy systems is given. Study identifies and compares various advanced energy conversion systems using coal or coal derived fuels for baselaoad electric power generation. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS) reports provede government, industry, and general public with technically consistent basis for comparison of system's options of interest for fossilfired electric-utility application.

  7. Alternative Education Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide deals with various areas of alternative education programs, including current practices and different options available to school and community personnel. Steps are outlined to assess present educational settings, design new programs, select the participants, and implement and evaluate the new program. The first appendix contains…

  8. Compensated pulsed alternator

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.; Driga, Mircea D.; Woodson, Herbert H.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an electromechanical energy converter with inertial energy storage. The device, a single phase, two or multi-pole alternator with stationary field coils, and a rotating armature is provided. The rotor itself may be of laminated steel for slower pulses or for faster pulses should be nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive in order to allow rapid penetration of the field as the armature coil rotates. The armature coil comprises a plurality of power generating conductors mounted on the rotor. The alternator may also include a stationary or counterrotating compensating coil to increase the output voltage thereof and to reduce the internal impedance of the alternator at the moment of peak outout. As the machine voltage rises sinusoidally, an external trigger switch is adapted to be closed at the appropriate time to create the desired output current from said alternator to an external load circuit, and as the output current passes through zero a self-commutating effect is provided to allow the switch to disconnect the generator from the external circuit.

  9. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  10. The SOLAR Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, E. H., Jr.; Walton, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Only when the sun's energy can be captured at a comparable or lower opportunity cost than that of competing sources will solar energy systems become viable alternatives. Economic issues of solar energy are discussed. The legitimate role of government is also examined. (RM)

  11. Alternatives in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Millard

    This paper on alternatives in teacher education begins by analyzing the current emphasis on the scientific approach in education. The author finds the promise of the scientific approach to be illusory. He defines it as education that promotes behavior change in some desirable direction. However, this definition, which the author finds equally…

  12. Alternatives to Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Notes that our capacity to diffuse conflict rests in our ability to recognize and verbalize feelings, develop empathy, and think of alternatives to violence. Explores the influence of role models and culture on violence and how the media can use violent images effectively in helping us confront a culture of violence. (HTH)

  13. Alternatives to Evolutionism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses alternative theories to evolutionism. Five theories are mentioned, but most attention is given to the steady state theory of species which the author considers the most suitable partner for Darwinism in O- and A-level biology courses in the United Kingdom. (HM)

  14. Diffusion analysis for two-phase metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Diffusion controlled filament matrix interaction in a metal matrix composite, where the filaments and matrix comprise a two phase binary alloy system, was mathematically modeled. The problem of a diffusion controlled, two phase moving interface by means of a one dimensional, variable grid, finite difference technique was analyzed. Concentration dependent diffusion coefficients and equilibrium solubility limits were used, and the change in filament diameter and compositional changes in the matrix were calculated as a function of exposure time at elevated temperatures. With the tungsten nickel (W-Ni) system as a model composite system, unidirectional composites containing from 0.06 to 0.44 initial filament volume fraction were modeled. Compositional changes in the matrix were calculated by superposition of the contributions from neighboring filaments. Alternate methods for determining compositional changes between first and second nearest neighbor filaments were also considered. The results show the relative importance of filament volume fraction, filament diameter, exposure temperature, and exposure time as they affect the rate and extent of filament matrix interaction.

  15. Micromechanics for ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The fiber substructuring concepts and the micromechanics equations that are embedded in the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer (CEMCAN) computer code are described as well as the code itself, its current features and capabilities, and some examples to demonstrate the code's versatility. The methodology is equally applicable to metal matrix and polymer matrix composites. The prediction of ply mechanical and thermal properties agree very well with the existing models in the Integrated Composite Analyzer and the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer, lending credence to the fiber substructuring approach. Fiber substructuring can capture greater local detail than conventional unit-cell-based micromechanical theories. It offers promise in simulating complex aspects of micromechanics in ceramic matrix composites.

  16. Plant cell proliferation inside an inorganic host.

    PubMed

    Perullini, Mercedes; Rivero, María Mercedes; Jobbágy, Matías; Mentaberry, Alejandro; Bilmes, Sara A

    2007-01-10

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to plant cell culture as a tool for the production of secondary metabolites and the expression of recombinant proteins. Plant cell immobilization offers many advantages for biotechnological processes. However, the most extended matrices employed, such as calcium-alginate, cannot fully protect entrapped cells. Sol-gel chemistry of silicates has emerged as an outstanding strategy to obtain biomaterials in which living cells are truly protected. This field of research is rapidly developing and a large number of bacteria and yeast-entrapping ceramics have already been designed for different applications. But even mild thermal and chemical conditions employed in sol-gel synthesis may result harmful to cells of higher organisms. Here we present a method for the immobilization of plant cells that allows cell growth at cavities created inside a silica matrix. Plant cell proliferation was monitored for a 6-month period, at the end of which plant calli of more than 1 mm in diameter were observed inside the inorganic host. The resulting hybrid device had good mechanical stability and proved to be an effective barrier against biological contamination, suggesting that it could be employed for long-term plant cell entrapment applications.

  17. Visual mimicry of host nestlings by cuckoos

    PubMed Central

    Langmore, Naomi E.; Stevens, Martin; Maurer, Golo; Heinsohn, Robert; Hall, Michelle L.; Peters, Anne; Kilner, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    Coevolution between antagonistic species has produced instances of exquisite mimicry. Among brood-parasitic cuckoos, host defences have driven the evolution of mimetic eggs, but the evolutionary arms race was believed to be constrained from progressing to the chick stage, with cuckoo nestlings generally looking unlike host young. However, recent studies on bronze-cuckoos have confounded theoretical expectations by demonstrating cuckoo nestling rejection by hosts. Coevolutionary theory predicts reciprocal selection for visual mimicry of host young by cuckoos, although this has not been demonstrated previously. Here we show that, in the eyes of hosts, nestlings of three bronze-cuckoo species are striking visual mimics of the young of their morphologically diverse hosts, providing the first evidence that coevolution can select for visual mimicry of hosts in cuckoo chicks. Bronze-cuckoos resemble their own hosts more closely than other host species, but the accuracy of mimicry varies according to the diversity of hosts they exploit. PMID:21227972

  18. Alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, W. S.; McNamara, T. M.; Maxfield, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    The commercialization of alternative fuels is analyzed. Following a synopsis of US energy use, the concept of commercialization, the impacts of supply shortages and demand inelasticity upon commercialization, and the status of alternative fuels commercialization to date in the US are discussed. The US energy market is viewed as essentially numerous submarkets. The interrelationship among these submarkets precludes the need to commercialize for a specific fuel/use. However, the level of consumption, the projected growth in demand, and the inordinate dependence upon foreign fuels dictate that additional fuel supplies in general be brought to the US energy marketplace. Commercialization efforts encompass a range of measures designed to accelerate the arrival of technologies or products in the marketplace. As discussed in this paper, such a union of willing buyers and willing sellers requires that three general conditions be met: product quality comparable to existing products; price competitiveness; and adequate availability of supply. Product comparability presently appears to be the least problematic of these three requirements. Ethanol/gasoline and methanol/gasoline blends, for example, demonstrate the fact that alternative fuel technologies exist. Yet price and availability (i.e., production capacity) remain major obstacles. Given inelasticity (with respect to price) in the US and abroad, supply shortages - actual or contrived - generate upward price pressure and should make once-unattractive alternative fuels more price competitive. It is noted, however, that actual price competitiveness has been slow to occur and that even with price competitiveness, the lengthy time frame needed to achieve significant production capacity limits the near-term impact of alternative fuels.

  19. Undiscovered Bat Hosts of Filoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, John Paul; Alexander, Laura W.; Bowden, Sarah E.; Hayman, David T. S.; Drake, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola and other filoviruses pose significant public health and conservation threats by causing high mortality in primates, including humans. Preventing future outbreaks of ebolavirus depends on identifying wildlife reservoirs, but extraordinarily high biodiversity of potential hosts in temporally dynamic environments of equatorial Africa contributes to sporadic, unpredictable outbreaks that have hampered efforts to identify wild reservoirs for nearly 40 years. Using a machine learning algorithm, generalized boosted regression, we characterize potential filovirus-positive bat species with estimated 87% accuracy. Our model produces two specific outputs with immediate utility for guiding filovirus surveillance in the wild. First, we report a profile of intrinsic traits that discriminates hosts from non-hosts, providing a biological caricature of a filovirus-positive bat species. This profile emphasizes traits describing adult and neonate body sizes and rates of reproductive fitness, as well as species’ geographic range overlap with regions of high mammalian diversity. Second, we identify several bat species ranked most likely to be filovirus-positive on the basis of intrinsic trait similarity with known filovirus-positive bats. New bat species predicted to be positive for filoviruses are widely distributed outside of equatorial Africa, with a majority of species overlapping in Southeast Asia. Taken together, these results spotlight several potential host species and geographical regions as high-probability targets for future filovirus surveillance. PMID:27414412

  20. AVTC Hosts TechnoCamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    The Area Vo-Tech Center (AVTC) in Russellville, Arkansas, recently hosted its first TechnoCamp to encourage enrollment based on the aptitude and interest level of the students enrolling in the various programs. The center currently offers student enrollment in auto technology, computer engineering, cosmetology, construction technology, drafting…

  1. Biosignatures of Pathogen and Host

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; Chromy, B A; Forde, C E; Garcia, E; Gardner, S N; Gu, P P; Kuczmarksi, T A; Melius, C F; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Milanovich, F P; Motin, V L; Ott, L L; Quong, A A; Quong, J N; Rocco, J M; Slezak, T R; Sokhansanj, B A; Vitalis, E A; Zemla, A T; McCready, P M

    2002-08-27

    In information theory, a signature is characterized by the information content as well as noise statistics of the communication channel. Biosignatures have analogous properties. A biosignature can be associated with a particular attribute of a pathogen or a host. However, the signature may be lost in backgrounds of similar or even identical signals from other sources. In this paper, we highlight statistical and signal processing challenges associated with identifying good biosignatures for pathogens in host and other environments. In some cases it may be possible to identify useful signatures of pathogens through indirect but amplified signals from the host. Discovery of these signatures requires new approaches to modeling and data interpretation. For environmental biosignal collections, it is possible to use signal processing techniques from other applications (e.g., synthetic aperture radar) to track the natural progression of microbes over large areas. We also present a computer-assisted approach to identify unique nucleic-acid based microbial signatures. Finally, an understanding of host-pathogen interactions will result in better detectors as well as opportunities in vaccines and therapeutics.

  2. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Dioverti, M Veronica; Cawcutt, Kelly A; Abidi, Maheen; Sohail, M Rizwan; Walker, Randall C; Osmon, Douglas R

    2015-12-01

    Invasive mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts, but it carries a high mortality rate. Primary gastrointestinal disease is the least frequent form of presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical in the management; however, symptoms are typically non-specific in gastrointestinal disease, leading to delayed therapy. To describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts, we reviewed all cases of primary gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts reported in English literature as well as in our Institution from January 1st 1991 to December 31st 2013 for a total of 31 patients. About 52% of patients underwent solid organ transplant (SOT), while the rest had an underlying haematologic malignancy. Abdominal pain was the most common presenting symptom, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding and fever. Gastric disease was more common in SOT, whereas those with haematologic malignancy presented with intestinal disease (P = 0.002). Although gastrointestinal mucormycosis remains an uncommon condition in immunocompromised hosts, it carries significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in cases with intestinal involvement. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance to institute early and appropriate therapy and improve outcomes.

  3. Host Event Based Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Chugg

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

  4. Alternate Reality Gaming: Teaching Visual Art Skills to Multiple Subject Credential Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engdahl, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Through Alternate Reality Games, students engage in narrative, play, cooperation, creativity, and joy by creating storylines focusing on one element of art. In 2008, the Luce Center at the Smithsonian American Art Museum presented Ghosts of a Chance. The first Alternative Reality Game (ARG) to be hosted by a museum, it was designed to deepen and…

  5. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  6. Host defense reinforces host–parasite cospeciation

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Dale H.; Bush, Sarah E.; Goates, Brad M.; Johnson, Kevin P.

    2003-01-01

    Cospeciation occurs when interacting groups, such as hosts and parasites, speciate in tandem, generating congruent phylogenies. Cospeciation can be a neutral process in which parasites speciate merely because they are isolated on diverging host islands. Adaptive evolution may also play a role, but this has seldom been tested. We explored the adaptive basis of cospeciation by using a model system consisting of feather lice (Columbicola) and their pigeon and dove hosts (Columbiformes). We reconstructed phylogenies for both groups by using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. Both phylogenies were well resolved and well supported. Comparing these phylogenies revealed significant cospeciation and correlated evolution of host and parasite body size. The match in body size suggested that adaptive constraints limit the range of hosts lice can use. We tested this hypothesis by transferring lice among hosts of different sizes to simulate host switches. The results of these experiments showed that lice cannot establish viable populations on novel hosts that differ in size from the native host. To determine why size matters, we measured three components of louse fitness: attachment, feeding, and escape from host defense (preening). Lice could remain attached to, and feed on, hosts varying in size by an order of magnitude. However, they could not escape from preening on novel hosts that differed in size from the native host. Overall, our results suggest that host defense reinforces cospeciation in birds and feather lice by preventing lice from switching between hosts of different sizes. PMID:14673114

  7. A host-race of the cuckoo Cuculus canorus with nestlings attuned to the parental alarm calls of the host species.

    PubMed

    Davies, N B; Madden, J R; Butchart, S H M; Rutila, J

    2006-03-22

    The common cuckoo has several host-specific races, each with a distinctive egg that tends to match its host's eggs. Here, we show that the host-race specializing on reed warblers also has a host-specific nestling adaptation. In playback experiments, the nestling cuckoos responded specifically to the reed warbler's distinctive 'churr' alarm (given when a predator is near the nest), by reducing begging calls (likely to betray their location) and by displaying their orange-red gape (a preparation for defence). When reed warbler-cuckoos were cross-fostered and raised by two other regular cuckoo hosts (robins or dunnocks), they did not respond to the different alarms of these new foster-parents. Instead, they retained a specific response to reed warbler alarms but, remarkably, increased both calling and gaping. This suggests innate pre-tuning to reed warbler alarms, but with exposure necessary for development of the normal silent gaping response. By contrast, cuckoo chicks of another host-race specializing on redstarts showed no response to either redstart or reed warbler alarms. If host-races are restricted to female cuckoo lineages, then chick-tuning in reed warbler-cuckoos must be under maternal control. Alternatively, some host-races might be cryptic species, not revealed by the neutral genetic markers studied so far.

  8. Why regenerative medicine needs an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, Glenn D; Healy, Kevin E

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is now coming of age. Many attempts at cell therapy have failed to show significant efficacy, and the umbrella term 'stem cell therapy' is perceived in some quarters as hype or just expensive and unnecessary medical tourism. Here we present a short editorial in three parts. First, we examine the importance of using a semisynthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) mimetic, or sECM, to deliver and retain therapeutic cells at the site of administration. Second, we describe one approach in which biophysical and biochemical properties are tailored to each tissue type, which we call "design for optimal functionality." Third, we describe an alternative approach to sECM design and implementation, called "design for simplicity," in which a deconstructed, minimalist sECM is employed and biology is allowed to perform the customization in situ. We opine that an sECM, whether minimal or instructive, is an essential contributor to improve the outcomes of cell-based therapies.

  9. Effect of host species on the distribution of mutational fitness effects for an RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Lalić, Jasna; Cuevas, José M; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge about the distribution of mutational fitness effects (DMFE) is essential for many evolutionary models. In recent years, the properties of the DMFE have been carefully described for some microorganisms. In most cases, however, this information has been obtained only for a single environment, and very few studies have explored the effect that environmental variation may have on the DMFE. Environmental effects are particularly relevant for the evolution of multi-host parasites and thus for the emergence of new pathogens. Here we characterize the DMFE for a collection of twenty single-nucleotide substitution mutants of Tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV) across a set of eight host environments. Five of these host species were naturally infected by TEV, all belonging to family Solanaceae, whereas the other three were partially susceptible hosts belonging to three other plant families. First, we found a significant virus genotype-by-host species interaction, which was sustained by differences in genetic variance for fitness and the pleiotropic effect of mutations among hosts. Second, we found that the DMFEs were markedly different between Solanaceae and non-Solanaceae hosts. Exposure of TEV genotypes to non-Solanaceae hosts led to a large reduction of mean viral fitness, while the variance remained constant and skewness increased towards the right tail. Within the Solanaceae hosts, the distribution contained an excess of deleterious mutations, whereas for the non-Solanaceae the fraction of beneficial mutations was significantly larger. All together, this result suggests that TEV may easily broaden its host range and improve fitness in new hosts, and that knowledge about the DMFE in the natural host does not allow for making predictions about its properties in an alternative host.

  10. Evaluation of lymphangiogenesis in acellular dermal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Mario; Pellegatta, Igor; Tamborini, Federico; Cerati, Michele; Sessa, Fausto; Valdatta, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Much attention has been directed towards understanding the phenomena of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in wound healing. Thanks to the manifold dermal substitute available nowadays, wound treatment has improved greatly. Many studies have been published about angiogenesis and cell invasion in INTEGRA®. On the other hand, the development of the lymphatic network in acellular dermal matrix (ADM) is a more obscure matter. In this article, we aim to characterize the different phases of host cell invasion in ADM. Special attention was given to lymphangiogenic aspects. Materials and Methods: Among 57 rats selected to analyse the role of ADM in lymphangiogenesis, we created four groups. We performed an excision procedure on both thighs of these rats: On the left one we did not perform any action except repairing the borders of the wound; while on the right one we used INTEGRA® implant. The excision biopsy was performed at four different times: First group after 7 days, second after 14 days, third after 21 days and fourth after 28 days. For our microscopic evaluation, we used the classical staining technique of haematoxylin and eosin and a semi-quantitative method in order to evaluate cellularity counts. To assess angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis development we employed PROX-1 Ab and CD31/PECAM for immunohistochemical analysis. Results: We found remarkable wound contraction in defects that healed by secondary intention while minor wound contraction was observed in defects treated with ADM. At day 7, optical microscopy revealed a more plentiful cellularity in the granulation tissue compared with the dermal regeneration matrix. The immunohistochemical process highlighted vascular and lymphatic cells in both groups. After 14 days a high grade of fibrosis was noticeable in the non-treated group. At day 21, both lymphatic and vascular endothelial cells were better developed in the group with a dermal matrix application. At day 28, lymphatic endothelial

  11. Sparse nonnegative matrix factorization with ℓ0-constraints

    PubMed Central

    Peharz, Robert; Pernkopf, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Although nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) favors a sparse and part-based representation of nonnegative data, there is no guarantee for this behavior. Several authors proposed NMF methods which enforce sparseness by constraining or penalizing the ℓ1-norm of the factor matrices. On the other hand, little work has been done using a more natural sparseness measure, the ℓ0-pseudo-norm. In this paper, we propose a framework for approximate NMF which constrains the ℓ0-norm of the basis matrix, or the coefficient matrix, respectively. For this purpose, techniques for unconstrained NMF can be easily incorporated, such as multiplicative update rules, or the alternating nonnegative least-squares scheme. In experiments we demonstrate the benefits of our methods, which compare to, or outperform existing approaches. PMID:22505792

  12. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; ...

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  13. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  14. The matrix of inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  15. Alternate dietary lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Krey, S H

    1982-09-01

    Various forms of vegetarian diets are discussed and evaluated for their nutritional adequacy. Health, philosophical, religious, ecological, and economic concerns are suggested as possible reasons for these alternate dietary lifestyles. Nutrients of specific concern ot the vegetarian are highlighted and suggestions given to help incorporate these in the diet, thereby avoiding marginal intakes. With judicious menu planning and careful thought to food selections, most vegetarian diets can supply excellent nutrition. Very restricted vegetarian diets or higher level macrobiotic diets may not be nutritionally complete, and individuals following these diets may benefit from special dietary counseling and dietary supplementation. Otherwise, these diets may place the adult as well as pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children at a nutritional risk. As vegetarian food habits are becoming more widespread, physicians and nutritionists must be knowledgeable about these alternate dietary lifestyles in order to counsel their patients appropriately, to understand the reasons for these eating habits, and to be supportive of the choice of diet.

  16. [Alternatives to animal testing].

    PubMed

    Fabre, Isabelle

    2009-11-01

    The use of alternative methods to animal testing are an integral part of the 3Rs concept (refine, reduce, replace) defined by Russel & Burch in 1959. These approaches include in silico methods (databases and computer models), in vitro physicochemical analysis, biological methods using bacteria or isolated cells, reconstructed enzyme systems, and reconstructed tissues. Emerging "omic" methods used in integrated approaches further help to reduce animal use, while stem cells offer promising approaches to toxicologic and pathophysiologic studies, along with organotypic cultures and bio-artificial organs. Only a few alternative methods can so far be used in stand-alone tests as substitutes for animal testing. The best way to use these methods is to integrate them in tiered testing strategies (ITS), in which animals are only used as a last resort.

  17. [Alternative hemodialysis regimens].

    PubMed

    Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff de; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2010-03-01

    The mortality rate among patients on hemodialysis (HD) is extremely high. Remaining life expectancy for a patient initiating HD is only approximately one quarter of that of the general population at the same age bracket. The conventional HD regimen based on four-hour sessions three times a week was empirically established nearly four decades ago and needs to be revisited. Since the failure of the HEMO Study to demonstrate the clinical benefits of higher urea Kt/V for patients on conventional HD, an increasing interest for alternative HD regimens has emerged aiming at providing a treatment for improving survival rates. Short daily HD and long nocturnal HD stand out as the most promising alternative regimens. Economical obstacles which could hinder the clinical application of emerging knowledge in the field should be overcome.

  18. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  19. Matrix cracking in brittle-matrix composites with tailored interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Chao, L.Y.; Shetty, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    Matrix cracking from controlled through cracks with bridging filaments was studied in a model unidirectional composite of SiC filaments in an epoxy-bonded alumina matrix. An unbonded, frictional interface was produced by moderating the curing shrinkage of the epoxy with the alumina filler and coating the filaments with a releasing agent. Uniaxial tension test specimens (2.5 x 25 x 125 mm) with filament-bridged through cracks were fabricated by a novel two-step casting technique involving casting, precracking and joining of cracked and uncracked sections. Distinct matrix-cracking stresses, corresponding to the extension of the filament-bridged cracks, were measured in uniaxial tension tests using a high-sensitivity extensometer. The crack-length dependence of the matrix-cracking stress was found to be in good agreement with the prediction of a fracture-mechanics analysis that employed a new crack-closure force-crack-opening displacement relation in the calculation of the stress intensity for fiber-bridged cracks. The prediction was based on independent experimental measurements of the matrix fracture toughness (K{sub cm}), the interfacial sliding friction stress ({tau}) and the residual stress in the matrix ({sigma}{sub m}{sup I}). The matrix-cracking stress for crack lengths (2a) greater than 3 mm was independent of the crack length and agreed with the prediction of the steady-state theory of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans. Tests on specimens without the deliberately introduced cracks indicated a matrix-cracking stress significantly higher than the steady-state stress.

  20. Display Sharing: An Alternative Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The current Johnson Space Center (JSC) Mission Control Center (MCC) Video Transport System (VTS) provides flight controllers and management the ability to meld raw video from various sources with telemetry to improve situational awareness. However, maintaining a separate infrastructure for video delivery and integration of video content with data adds significant complexity and cost to the system. When considering alternative architectures for a VTS, the current system's ability to share specific computer displays in their entirety to other locations, such as large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and centers must be incorporated into any new architecture. Internet Protocol (IP)-based systems also support video delivery and integration. IP-based systems generally have an advantage in terms of cost and maintainability. Although IP-based systems are versatile, the task of sharing a computer display from one workstation to another can be time consuming for an end-user and inconvenient to administer at a system level. The objective of this paper is to present a prototype display sharing enterprise solution. Display sharing is a system which delivers image sharing across the LAN while simultaneously managing bandwidth, supporting encryption, enabling recovery and resynchronization following a loss of signal, and, minimizing latency. Additional critical elements will include image scaling support, multi -sharing, ease of initial integration and configuration, integration with desktop window managers, collaboration tools, host and recipient controls. This goal of this paper is to summarize the various elements of an IP-based display sharing system that can be used in today's control center environment.

  1. New pole placement algorithm - Polynomial matrix approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, B.; Keel, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and direct pole-placement algorithm is introduced for dynamical systems having a block companion matrix A. The algorithm utilizes well-established properties of matrix polynomials. Pole placement is achieved by appropriately assigning coefficient matrices of the corresponding matrix polynomial. This involves only matrix additions and multiplications without requiring matrix inversion. A numerical example is given for the purpose of illustration.

  2. Alternatives to ECMO.

    PubMed Central

    Donn, S M

    1994-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed technological advancements which are unparalleled in neonatology. ECMO has been demonstrated to be a powerful rescue treatment, but has perhaps been overutilised and is not universally available. Alternative treatments have been shown to be both safe and efficacious in the management of infants with respiratory failure. Direct head to head clinical trials will probably be necessary to establish appropriate criteria and indications for use, given the wide diversity of pathophysiology these unique patients present. PMID:7802759

  3. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  4. Matrix Fourth-Complex Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Marinov, Marin S.; Stoev, Peter

    2009-11-01

    In the paper we consider quasi-cyclic hyper-complex variables which are naturally related to the partial differential equations with complex variables. In fact, we develop a matrix 4×4 generalization of the classical bicomplex numbers [1], [2]. We recall that a matrix 2×2 isomorphic type treatment of the classical bicomplex numbers was developed in [3]. Here we develop a matrix 4×4 generalization of the bicomplex numbers including some improvement of the papers [3] and [4]. Let us remark that a deep generalization of the considered ideas was sketch in [5] before us.

  5. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  6. Genotype imputation via matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K.; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  7. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, Tito T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) Characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  8. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  9. Outlook for alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gushee, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides a brief review of regulatory issues and Federal programs regarding alternative fuel use in automobiles. A number of U.S. DOE initiatives and studies aimed at increasing alternative fuels are outlined, and tax incentives in effect at the state and Federal levels are discussed. Data on alternative fuel consumption and alternative fuel vehicle use are also presented. Despite mandates, tax incentives, and programs, it is concluded alternative fuels will have minimal market penetration. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a ``state routing agency,`` defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  11. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a state routing agency,'' defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  12. Host finding behaviour of the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis.

    PubMed

    Melo, J W S; Lima, D B; Sabelis, M W; Pallini, A; Gondim, M G C

    2014-12-01

    For the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer, its host plant, the coconut palm, is not merely a source of food, but more generally a habitat to live in for several generations. For these minute organisms, finding a new plant is difficult and risky, especially because their main mode of dispersal is passive drifting with the wind and because they are highly specialized on their host plant. Consequently, the probability of landing on a suitable host is very low, let alone to land in their specific microhabitat within the host. How coconut mites manage to find their microhabitat within a host plant is still underexplored. We tested the hypothesis that they use volatile chemical information emanating from the plant to find a specific site within their host plants and/or use non-volatile plant chemicals to stay at a profitable site on the plant. This was investigated in a Y-tube olfactometer (i.e. under conditions of a directed wind flow) and on cross-shaped arenas (i.e. under conditions of turbulent air) that either allowed contact with odour sources or not. The mites had to choose between odours from specific parts (leaflet, spikelet or fruit) of a non-infested coconut plant and clean air as the alternative. In the olfactometer experiments, no mites were found to reach the upwind end of the Y-tube: <5 % of the mites were able to pass the bifurcation of the "Y". On the cross-shaped arenas, however, a large number of coconut mites was found only when the arm of the arena contained discs of fruit epidermis and contact with these discs was allowed. The results suggest that coconut mites on palm trees are not attracted to specific sites on the plant by volatile plant chemicals, but that they arrested once they contact the substrate of specific sites. Possibly, they perceive non-volatile chemicals, but these remain to be identified.

  13. How to evade a coevolving brood parasite: egg discrimination versus egg variability as host defences.

    PubMed

    Spottiswoode, Claire N; Stevens, Martin

    2011-12-07

    Arms races between avian brood parasites and their hosts often result in parasitic mimicry of host eggs, to evade rejection. Once egg mimicry has evolved, host defences could escalate in two ways: (i) hosts could improve their level of egg discrimination; and (ii) negative frequency-dependent selection could generate increased variation in egg appearance (polymorphism) among individuals. Proficiency in one defence might reduce selection on the other, while a combination of the two should enable successful rejection of parasitic eggs. We compared three highly variable host species of the Afrotropical cuckoo finch Anomalospiza imberbis, using egg rejection experiments and modelling of avian colour and pattern vision. We show that each differed in their level of polymorphism, in the visual cues they used to reject foreign eggs, and in their degree of discrimination. The most polymorphic host had the crudest discrimination, whereas the least polymorphic was most discriminating. The third species, not currently parasitized, was intermediate for both defences. A model simulating parasitic laying and host rejection behaviour based on the field experiments showed that the two host strategies result in approximately the same fitness advantage to hosts. Thus, neither strategy is superior, but rather they reflect alternative potential evolutionary trajectories.

  14. Preferential host switching and its relation with Hantavirus diversification in South America.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Paula C; González-Ittig, Raul E; Gardenal, Cristina N

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the notion of co-speciation between Hantavirus species and their hosts was discarded in favour of a more likely explanation: preferential host switching. However, the relative importance of this last process in shaping the evolutionary history of hantaviruses remains uncertain, given the present limited knowledge not only of virus-host relationships but also of the pathogen and reservoir phylogenies. In South America, more than 25 hantavirus genotypes were detected; several of them act as aetiological agents of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). An understanding of the diversity of hantaviruses and of the processes underlying host switching is critical since human cases of HPS are almost exclusively the result of human-host interactions. In this study, we tested if preferential host switching is the main process driving hantavirus diversification in South America, by performing a co-phylogenetic analysis of the viruses and their primary hosts. We also suggest a new level of amino acid divergence to define virus species in the group. Our results indicate that preferential host switching would not be the main process driving virus diversification. The historical geographical proximity among rodent hosts emerges as an alternative hypothesis to be tested.

  15. Supramolecular chiral host-guest nanoarchitecture induced by the selective assembly of barbituric acid derivative enantiomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien; Maurel, Francois; Dong, Changzhi

    2016-10-01

    Barbituric acid derivatives are prochiral molecules, i.e. they are chiral upon adsorption on surfaces. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that barbituric acid derivatives self-assemble into a chiral guest-host supramolecular architecture at the solid-liquid interface on graphite. The host nanoarchitecture has a sophisticated wavy shape pattern and paired guest molecules are nested insides the cavities of the host structure. Each unit cell of the host structure is composed of both enantiomers with a ratio of 1:1. Furthermore, the wavy patterns of the nanoarchitecture are formed from alternative appearance of left- and right-handed chiral building blocks, which makes the network heterochiral. The functional guest-host nanoarchitecture is the result of two-dimensional chiral amplification from single enantiomers to organizational heterochiral supramolecular self-assembly.

  16. Host modulation by therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Sekar, Santhosh; Murugan, Thamaraiselvan

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease susceptible group present advanced periodontal breakdown even though they achieve a high standard of oral hygiene. Various destructive enzymes and inflammatory mediators are involved in destruction. These are elevated in case of periodontal destruction. Host modulation aims at bringing these enzymes and mediators to normal level. Doxycycline, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), bisphosphonates, nitrous oxide (NO) synthase inhibitors, recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11), omega-3 fatty acid, mouse anti-human interleukin-6 receptor antibody (MRA), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kb) inhibitors, osteoprotegerin, and tumor necrosis factor antagonist (TNF-α) are some of the therapeutic agents that have host modulation properties. PMID:23066265

  17. Detection of extracellular matrix modification in cancer models with inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Graham L. C.; Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Young, Scott T.; Ellis, Ronald; Bauer, Greta M.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-10-01

    In cancer biology, there has been a recent effort to understand tumor formation in the context of the tissue microenvironment. In particular, recent progress has explored the mechanisms behind how changes in the cell-extracellular matrix ensemble influence progression of the disease. The extensive use of in vitro tissue culture models in simulant matrix has proven effective at studying such interactions, but modalities for non-invasively quantifying aspects of these systems are scant. We present the novel application of an imaging technique, Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography, for the non-destructive measurement of in vitro biological samples during matrix remodeling. Our findings indicate that the nanoscale-sensitive mass density correlation shape factor D of cancer cells increases in response to a more crosslinked matrix. We present a facile technique for the non-invasive, quantitative study of the micro- and nano-scale structure of the extracellular matrix and its host cells.

  18. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R

    2016-07-07

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  19. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  20. Host-Pathogen Coupled Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-04

    AFRL- RH -WP-TP-2015-0012 Host-Pathogen Coupled Interactions Peter J. Robinson C. Eric Hack Jeffery M...them. Qualified requestors may obtain copies of this report from the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) (http://www.dtic.mil). (AFRL- RH ...Branch Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-5707 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 711 HPW/RHDJ 11. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER AFRL- RH -WP

  1. Improving photo-stability of conjugated polymer MEH-PPV embedded in solid matrices by purification of the matrix polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuxi; Sheinin, Vladimir; Kulikova, Olga; Mamardashvili, Nugzar; Scheblykin, Ivan G.

    2014-04-01

    For single molecule spectroscopy (SMS), molecules under study are usually immobilized in a polymer matrix e.g. poly(methyl methacrylate). We show a very significant improvement of the conjugated polymer MEH-PPV photo-stability and decrease of the luminescence impurities concentration when the matrix is purified. We identify benzoyl peroxide (a common radical initiator) as a possible oxidizing agent which residuals in the polymer matrix destroy MEH-PPV. These results show that purification and selection of a matrix obtained by radical-free synthetic technique are of great importance for SMS as well as other technologies using polymer matrices as hosts for light-emitting materials.

  2. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects.

  3. Matrix quantum mechanics from qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Huijse, Liza; Mazenc, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a transverse field Ising model with order N 2 spins interacting via a nonlocal quartic interaction. The model has an O( N, ℤ), hyperoctahedral, symmetry. We show that the large N partition function admits a saddle point in which the symmetry is enhanced to O( N). We further demonstrate that this `matrix saddle' correctly computes large N observables at weak and strong coupling. The matrix saddle undergoes a continuous quantum phase transition at intermediate couplings. At the transition the matrix eigenvalue distribution becomes disconnected. The critical excitations are described by large N matrix quantum mechanics. At the critical point, the low energy excitations are waves propagating in an emergent 1 + 1 dimensional spacetime.

  4. Performance Appraisal for Matrix Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, M. R.; Sproull, J. Ruth

    1985-01-01

    A matrix management system designed for use by a highly technical nuclear weapons research and development facility to improve productivity and flexibility by the use of multiple authority, responsibility, and accountability relationships is described. (MSE)

  5. Stochastic determination of matrix determinants.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2015-07-01

    Matrix determinants play an important role in data analysis, in particular when Gaussian processes are involved. Due to currently exploding data volumes, linear operations-matrices-acting on the data are often not accessible directly but are only represented indirectly in form of a computer routine. Such a routine implements the transformation a data vector undergoes under matrix multiplication. While efficient probing routines to estimate a matrix's diagonal or trace, based solely on such computationally affordable matrix-vector multiplications, are well known and frequently used in signal inference, there is no stochastic estimate for its determinant. We introduce a probing method for the logarithm of a determinant of a linear operator. Our method rests upon a reformulation of the log-determinant by an integral representation and the transformation of the involved terms into stochastic expressions. This stochastic determinant determination enables large-size applications in Bayesian inference, in particular evidence calculations, model comparison, and posterior determination.

  6. Biology of Cryptosporidium from marsupial hosts.

    PubMed

    Power, Michelle L

    2010-01-01

    The majority of biological data on Cryptosporidium has been collected from humans and domestic animal hosts which creates a bias in knowledge on the biodiversity and evolution of this parasite genus. Further to understanding Cryptosporidium biology are studies encompassing broad hosts that represent diverse taxa sampled across wide geographic ranges. Marsupials represent a group of wildlife hosts from which limited information on Cryptosporidium is available. As marsupial hosts are an ancient mammalian lineage they represent an important group for studying parasite evolution. This review summarises information of the biology, epidemiology and evolution of Cryptosporidium in marsupial hosts, and discusses the importance of further understanding interactions in this parasite-host system.

  7. Evaluating Weeds as Hosts of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Hugh A; Seijo, Teresa E; Vallad, Gary E; Peres, Natalia A; Druffel, Keri L

    2015-08-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B transmits Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), which affects tomato production globally. Prompt destruction of virus reservoirs is a key component of virus management. Identification of weed hosts of TYLCV will be useful for reducing such reservoirs. The status of weeds as alternate hosts of TYLCV in Florida remains unclear. In greenhouse studies, B. tabaci adults from a colony reared on TYLCV-infected tomato were established in cages containing one of four weeds common to horticultural fields in central and south Florida. Cages containing tomato and cotton were also infested with viruliferous whiteflies as a positive control and negative control, respectively. Whitefly adults and plant tissue were tested periodically over 10 wk for the presence of TYLCV using PCR. After 10 wk, virus-susceptible tomato plants were placed in each cage to determine if whiteflies descended from the original adults were still infective. Results indicate that Bidens alba, Emilia fosbergii, and Raphanus raphanistrum are not hosts of TYLCV, and that Amaranthus retroflexus is a host.

  8. Host gene expression classifiers diagnose acute respiratory illness etiology

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Marshall; Burke, Thomas; Ko, Emily R.; McClain, Micah T.; Hudson, Lori L.; Mazur, Anna; Freeman, Debra H.; Veldman, Tim; Langley, Raymond J.; Quackenbush, Eugenia B.; Glickman, Seth W.; Cairns, Charles B.; Jaehne, Anja K.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Otero, Ronny M.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lucas, Joseph; Fowler, Vance G.; Carin, Lawrence; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Woods, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections caused by bacterial or viral pathogens are among the most common reasons for seeking medical care. Despite improvements in pathogen-based diagnostics, most patients receive inappropriate antibiotics. Host response biomarkers offer an alternative diagnostic approach to direct antimicrobial use. This observational, cohort study determined whether host gene expression patterns discriminate non-infectious from infectious illness, and bacterial from viral causes of acute respiratory infection in the acute care setting. Peripheral whole blood gene expression from 273 subjects with community-onset acute respiratory infection (ARI) or non-infectious illness as well as 44 healthy controls was measured using microarrays. Sparse logistic regression was used to develop classifiers for bacterial ARI (71 probes), viral ARI (33 probes), or a non-infectious cause of illness (26 probes). Overall accuracy was 87% (238/273 concordant with clinical adjudication), which was more accurate than procalcitonin (78%, p<0.03) and three published classifiers of bacterial vs. viral infection (78-83%). The classifiers developed here externally validated in five publicly available datasets (AUC 0.90-0.99). A sixth publically available dataset included twenty-five patients with co-identification of bacterial and viral pathogens. Applying the ARI classifiers defined four distinct groups: a host response to bacterial ARI; viral ARI; co-infection; and neither a bacterial nor viral response. These findings create an opportunity to develop and utilize host gene expression classifiers as diagnostic platforms to combat inappropriate antibiotic use and emerging antibiotic resistance. PMID:26791949

  9. Host pigments: potential facilitators of photosynthesis in coral symbioses.

    PubMed

    Dove, Sophie G; Lovell, Carli; Fine, Maoz; Deckenback, Jeffry; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Anthony, Kenneth R N

    2008-11-01

    Reef-building corals occur as a range of colour morphs because of varying types and concentrations of pigments within the host tissues, but little is known about their physiological or ecological significance. Here, we examined whether specific host pigments act as an alternative mechanism for photoacclimation in the coral holobiont. We used the coral Montipora monasteriata (Forskål 1775) as a case study because it occurs in multiple colour morphs (tan, blue, brown, green and red) within varying light-habitat distributions. We demonstrated that two of the non-fluorescent host pigments are responsive to changes in external irradiance, with some host pigments up-regulating in response to elevated irradiance. This appeared to facilitate the retention of antennal chlorophyll by endosymbionts and hence, photosynthetic capacity. Specifically, net P(max) Chl a(-1) correlated strongly with the concentration of an orange-absorbing non-fluorescent pigment (CP-580). This had major implications for the energetics of bleached blue-pigmented (CP-580) colonies that maintained net P(max) cm(-2) by increasing P(max) Chl a(-1). The data suggested that blue morphs can bleach, decreasing their symbiont populations by an order of magnitude without compromising symbiont or coral health.

  10. Hosting anions. The energetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Schmidtchen, Franz P

    2010-10-01

    Hosting anions addresses the widely spread molecular recognition event of negatively charged species by dedicated organic compounds in condensed phases at equilibrium. The experimentally accessible energetic features comprise the entire system including the solvent, any buffers, background electrolytes or other components introduced for e.g. analysis. The deconvolution of all these interaction types and their dependence on subtle structural variation is required to arrive at a structure-energy correlation that may serve as a guide in receptor construction. The focus on direct host-guest interactions (lock-and-key complementarity) that have dominated the binding concepts of artificial receptors in the past must be widened in order to account for entropic contributions which constitute very significant fractions of the total free energy of interaction. Including entropy necessarily addresses the ambiguity and fuzziness of the host-guest structural ensemble and requires the appreciation of the fact that most liquid phases possess distinct structures of their own. Apparently, it is the perturbation of the intrinsic solvent structure occurring upon association that rules ion binding in polar media where ions are soluble and abundant. Rather than specifying peculiar structural elements useful in anion binding this critical review attempts an illumination of the concepts and individual energetic contributions resulting in the final observation of specific anion recognition (95 references).

  11. Bats host major mammalian paramyxoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor Max; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Maganga, Gael Darren; Vallo, Peter; Binger, Tabea; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Rasche, Andrea; Yordanov, Stoian; Seebens, Antje; Oppong, Samuel; Sarkodie, Yaw Adu; Pongombo, Célestin; Lukashev, Alexander N.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Stöcker, Andreas; Carneiro, Aroldo José Borges; Erbar, Stephanie; Maisner, Andrea; Fronhoffs, Florian; Buettner, Reinhard; Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.; Kruppa, Thomas; Franke, Carlos Roberto; Kallies, René; Yandoko, Emmanuel R.N.; Herrler, Georg; Reusken, Chantal; Hassanin, Alexandre; Krüger, Detlev H.; Matthee, Sonja; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Leroy, Eric M.; Drosten, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The large virus family Paramyxoviridae includes some of the most significant human and livestock viruses, such as measles-, distemper-, mumps-, parainfluenza-, Newcastle disease-, respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumoviruses. Here we identify an estimated 66 new paramyxoviruses in a worldwide sample of 119 bat and rodent species (9,278 individuals). Major discoveries include evidence of an origin of Hendra- and Nipah virus in Africa, identification of a bat virus conspecific with the human mumps virus, detection of close relatives of respiratory syncytial virus, mouse pneumonia- and canine distemper virus in bats, as well as direct evidence of Sendai virus in rodents. Phylogenetic reconstruction of host associations suggests a predominance of host switches from bats to other mammals and birds. Hypothesis tests in a maximum likelihood framework permit the phylogenetic placement of bats as tentative hosts at ancestral nodes to both the major Paramyxoviridae subfamilies (Paramyxovirinae and Pneumovirinae). Future attempts to predict the emergence of novel paramyxoviruses in humans and livestock will have to rely fundamentally on these data. PMID:22531181

  12. Ascariasis: host-pathogen biology.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Z S

    1982-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the most common intestinal parasites in humans. Daily global contamination of the soil by A. lumbricoides eggs is enormous (approximately 9 x 10(14) eggs/day). Physical factors, particularly temperature and moisture, are critical in determining the maturation of eggs to the infective stage and their survival. Transmission of the infection to humans, on the other hand, depends more on various socioeconomic factors. In theory, ascariasis is preventable; it is indeed on the way to disappearing completely in developed societies where there is a high standard of sanitation. Ascariasis remains a problem in developing countries, however, where methods of disposal of human excreta are inadequate. The intensity of invasion is regulated by specific and nonspecific responses of the host to migrating A. lumbricoides larvae. Whether or not ascariasis becomes symptomatic depends on the intensity of the infection, the nutritional and immunologic status of the host, and the possible complications that may arise. Host responses to A. lumbricoides are brisk during the larval migratory stage in which hypersensitivity reactions may become clinically manifest, whereas people are rather tolerant of intestinal infections with adult worms. The role of ascariasis in the prevalence of allergic asthma still remains unclear. Complications due to migration of adult worms into the biliary duct system and to intestinal obstructions are the major causes of acute morbidity and mortality in ascariasis.

  13. The Microbiome and Host Behavior.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Helen E; Yano, Jessica M; Fung, Thomas C; Hsiao, Elaine Y

    2017-03-08

    The microbiota is increasingly recognized for its ability to influence the development and function of the nervous system and several complex host behaviors. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for the gut microbiota in modulating host social and communicative behavior, stressor-induced behavior, and performance in learning and memory tasks. We summarize effects of the microbiota on host neurophysiology, including brain microstructure, gene expression, and neurochemical metabolism across regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and hypothalamus. We further assess evidence linking dysbiosis of the gut microbiota to neurobehavioral diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder and major depression, drawing upon findings from animal models and human trials. Finally, based on increasing associations between the microbiota, neurophysiology, and behavior, we consider whether investigating mechanisms underlying the microbiota-gut-brain axis could lead to novel approaches for treating particular neurological conditions. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 40 is July 8, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  14. Bats host major mammalian paramyxoviruses.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor Max; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Maganga, Gael Darren; Vallo, Peter; Binger, Tabea; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Cottontail, Veronika M; Rasche, Andrea; Yordanov, Stoian; Seebens, Antje; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Oppong, Samuel; Adu Sarkodie, Yaw; Pongombo, Célestin; Lukashev, Alexander N; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Stöcker, Andreas; Carneiro, Aroldo José Borges; Erbar, Stephanie; Maisner, Andrea; Fronhoffs, Florian; Buettner, Reinhard; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Kruppa, Thomas; Franke, Carlos Roberto; Kallies, René; Yandoko, Emmanuel R N; Herrler, Georg; Reusken, Chantal; Hassanin, Alexandre; Krüger, Detlev H; Matthee, Sonja; Ulrich, Rainer G; Leroy, Eric M; Drosten, Christian

    2012-04-24

    The large virus family Paramyxoviridae includes some of the most significant human and livestock viruses, such as measles-, distemper-, mumps-, parainfluenza-, Newcastle disease-, respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumoviruses. Here we identify an estimated 66 new paramyxoviruses in a worldwide sample of 119 bat and rodent species (9,278 individuals). Major discoveries include evidence of an origin of Hendra- and Nipah virus in Africa, identification of a bat virus conspecific with the human mumps virus, detection of close relatives of respiratory syncytial virus, mouse pneumonia- and canine distemper virus in bats, as well as direct evidence of Sendai virus in rodents. Phylogenetic reconstruction of host associations suggests a predominance of host switches from bats to other mammals and birds. Hypothesis tests in a maximum likelihood framework permit the phylogenetic placement of bats as tentative hosts at ancestral nodes to both the major Paramyxoviridae subfamilies (Paramyxovirinae and Pneumovirinae). Future attempts to predict the emergence of novel paramyxoviruses in humans and livestock will have to rely fundamentally on these data.

  15. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  16. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-02-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  17. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  18. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  19. Algorithmic deformation of matrix factorisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carqueville, Nils; Dowdy, Laura; Recknagel, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Branes and defects in topological Landau-Ginzburg models are described by matrix factorisations. We revisit the problem of deforming them and discuss various deformation methods as well as their relations. We have implemented these algorithms and apply them to several examples. Apart from explicit results in concrete cases, this leads to a novel way to generate new matrix factorisations via nilpotent substitutions, and to criteria whether boundary obstructions can be lifted by bulk deformations.

  20. Universal Keplerian state transition matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A completely general method for computing the Keplerian state transition matrix in terms of Goodyear's universal variables is presented. This includes a new scheme for solving Kepler's problem which is a necessary first step to computing the transition matrix. The Kepler problem is solved in terms of a new independent variable requiring the evaluation of only one transcendental function. Furthermore, this transcendental function may be conveniently evaluated by means of a Gaussian continued fraction.

  1. Eimeria bovis-induced modulation of the host cell proteome at the meront I stage.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Kathleen; Schmitt, Sigrid; Linder, Monica; Hermosilla, Carlos; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The proteome of Eimeria bovis meront I-carrying host cells was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) at 14 days p.i. and compared to non-infected control cells. A total of 221 protein spots were modulated in their abundance in E. bovis-infected host cells and were subsequently analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). These analyses identified 104 proteins in total with 25 host cell proteins being up-regulated and 79 proteins being down-regulated in E. bovis-infected host cells. Moreover, 20 newly expressed proteins were identified exclusively in E. bovis-infected host cells and were most likely of parasite origin. Parasite-induced differences in protein abundance concerned distinct functional categories, with most proteins being involved in host cell metabolism, cell structure, protein fate and gene transcription. Some of the modulated molecules also indicated regulatory processes on the level of host cell stress response (HSP70, HSP90), host cell apoptosis (caspase 8) and actin elongation/depolymerization (α-actinin-1, gelsonin, tropomodulin-3, transgelin). Since merozoites I were already released shortly after cell sampling, the current data reflect the situation at the end of first merogony. This is the first proteomic approach on E. bovis-infected host cells that was undertaken to gain a rather broad insight into Eimeria-induced host cell modulation. The data processed in this investigation should provide a useful basis for more detailed analyses concerning Eimeria-host cell interactions.

  2. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, R L; Oliveira, A N; Alves, B X; Silva, B A; Li, M S; Wolff, W; Cesar, C L

    2015-07-01

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H2 are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  3. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.; Oliveira, A. N.; Li, M. S.

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  4. Recycling of aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Izawa, Norihisa; Kuramasu, Yukio

    1999-03-01

    Separation of matrix metals in composites was tried on alumina short fiber-reinforced aluminum and 6061 alloy composites and SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite for recycling. It is possible to separate molten matrix metals from fibers in the composites using fluxes that are used for melt treatment to remove inclusions. About 50 vol pct of the matrix metals was separated from the alumina short fiber-reinforced composites. The separation ratio of the matrix from the SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite was low and about 20 vol pct. The separation mechanism was discussed thermodynamically using interface free energies. Since the flux/fiber interface energy is smaller than the aluminum/fiber interface energy, the replacement of aluminum with fluxes in composites takes place easily. Gases released by the decomposition of fluxes act an important role in pushing out the molten matrix metal from the composite. The role was confirmed by the great amount cavity formed in the composite after the matrix metal flowed out.

  5. Carbonate fuel cell matrix strengthening

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Haung, C.M.; Johnsen, R.

    1995-12-31

    The present baseline electrolyte matrix is a porous ceramic powder bed impregnated with alkali carbonate electrolyte. The matrix provides both ionic conduction and gas sealing. During fuel cell stack operation, the matrix experiences both mechanical and thermal stresses. Different mechanical characteristics of active and wet seal areas generate stress. Thermal stress is generated by nonuniform temperature distribution and thermal cycling. A carbonate fuel cell generally may experience planned and unplanned thermal cycles between 650 C and room temperature during its 40,000h life. During the cycling, the electrolyte matrix expands and contracts at a different rate from other cell components. Furthermore, the change in electrolyte volume associated with freezing/melting may generate additional thermal stress. Strengthening of the matrix may be beneficial for longer-term stability of the carbonate fuel cell with respect to repeated thermal cycling. Several promising strengtheners with improved chemical and mechanical stabilities were identified. Fibers provide the highest strengthening effect, followed by particulates. Matrix fabrication technique was successfully modified for uniformly incorporating the advanced strengtheners, maintaining the desired aspect ratio. Enhanced gas sealing demonstrated using the advanced matrices.

  6. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  7. Macrophage Polarization in Virus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Miller, Laura C; Blecha, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage involvement in viral infections and antiviral states is common. However, this involvement has not been well-studied in the paradigm of macrophage polarization, which typically has been categorized by the dichotomy of classical (M1) and alternative (M2) statuses. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of macrophage polarization in response to various cellular mediators and exogenous stimuli by adopting a multipolar view to revisit the differential process of macrophages, especially those re-polarized during viral infections. Here, through examination of viral infections targeting macrophages/monocytic cells, we focus on the direct involvement of macrophage polarization during viral infections. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are critical in regulation of viral pathogenesis and host antiviral infection; thus, we propose to incorporate IFN-mediated antiviral states into the framework of macrophage polarization. This view is supported by the multifunctional properties of type I IFNs, which potentially elicit and regulate both M1- and M2-polarization in addition to inducing the antiviral state, and by the discoveries of viral mechanisms to adapt and modulate macrophage polarization. Indeed, several recent studies have demonstrated effective prevention of viral diseases through manipulation of macrophage immune statuses. PMID:26213635

  8. The Influence of Learning on Host Plant Preference in a Significant Phytopathogen Vector, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Dara G.; Martini, Xavier; Patt, Joseph M.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2016-01-01

    Although specialist herbivorous insects are guided by innate responses to host plant cues, host plant preference may be influenced by experience and is not dictated by instinct alone. The effect of learning on host plant preference was examined in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri; vector of the causal agent of citrus greening disease or huanglongbing. We investigated: a) whether development on specific host plant species influenced host plant preference in mature D. citri; and b) the extent of associative learning in D. citri in the form of simple and compound conditioning. Learning was measured by cue selection in a 2-choice behavioral assay and compared to naïve controls. Our results showed that learned responses in D. citri are complex and diverse. The developmental host plant species influenced adult host plant preference, with female psyllids preferring the species on which they were reared. However, such preferences were subject to change with the introduction of an alternative host plant within 24–48 hrs, indicating a large degree of experience-dependent response plasticity. Additionally, learning occurred for multiple sensory modalities where novel olfactory and visual environmental cues were associated with the host plant. However, males and females displayed differing discriminatory abilities. In compound conditioning tasks, males exhibited recognition of a compound stimulus alone while females were capable of learning the individual components. These findings suggest D. citri are dynamic animals that demonstrate host plant preference based on developmental and adult experience and can learn to recognize olfactory and visual host plant stimuli in ways that may be sex specific. These experience-based associations are likely used by adults to locate and select suitable host plants for feeding and reproduction and may suggest the need for more tailored lures and traps, which reflect region-specific cultivars or predominate Rutaceae in the area

  9. [Monoxenous and heteroxenous parasites of fish manipulate behavior of their hosts in different ways].

    PubMed

    Mikheev, V N

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive host manipulation hypothesis is usually supported by case studies on trophically transmitted heteroxenous endoparasites. Trematodes and cestodes are among efficient manipulators of fish, their common intermediate hosts. In this review paper, new data on modifications of host fish behavior caused by monoxenous ectoparasitic crustaceans are provided together with a review of effects caused by heteroxenous parasites. Differences in modifications of host behavior caused by heteroxenous and monoxenous parasites are discussed. Manipulation by heteroxenous parasites enhances availability of infected fish to predators--definitive hosts of the parasites. Fine-tuned synchronization of modified anti-predator behavior with a certain phase of the trematode Diplostomum spathaceum development in the eyes of fish, their second intermediate host, was shown. Modifications of behavior are habitat specific. When juvenile salmonids are in the open water, parasites impair their cooperative anti-predator behavior; in territorial bottom-dwelling salmonids, individual defense behavior such as sheltering is the main target of manipulation. It was shown that monoxenous ectoparasitic crustaceans Argulus spp. decreased motor activity, aggressiveness and increased shoal cohesiveness of infected fish. Such a behavior facilitates host and mate searching in these parasites, which often change their hosts, especially during reproduction. Reviewed experimental data suggest that heteroxenous parasites manipulate their host mainly through impaired defense behavior, e.g. impairing shoaling in fish. Alternatively, monoxenous parasites facilitate shoaling that is profitable for both parasites and hosts. Coordination of modified host behavior with the parasite life cycle, both temporal and spatial, is the most convincing criterion of the adaptive value of host manipulation.

  10. Host compatibility rather than vector-host-encounter rate determines the host range of avian Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Matthew C I; Hamer, Gabriel L; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2013-06-07

    Blood-feeding arthropod vectors are responsible for transmitting many parasites between vertebrate hosts. While arthropod vectors often feed on limited subsets of potential host species, little is known about the extent to which this influences the distribution of vector-borne parasites in some systems. Here, we test the hypothesis that different vector species structure parasite-host relationships by restricting access of certain parasites to a subset of available hosts. Specifically, we investigate how the feeding patterns of Culex mosquito vectors relate to distributions of avian malaria parasites among hosts in suburban Chicago, IL, USA. We show that Plasmodium lineages, defined by cytochrome b haplotypes, are heterogeneously distributed across avian hosts. However, the feeding patterns of the dominant vectors (Culex restuans and Culex pipiens) are similar across these hosts, and do not explain the distributions of Plasmodium parasites. Phylogenetic similarity of avian hosts predicts similarity in their Plasmodium parasites. This effect was driven primarily by the general association of Plasmodium parasites with particular host superfamilies. Our results suggest that a mosquito-imposed encounter rate does not limit the distribution of avian Plasmodium parasites across hosts. This implies that compatibility between parasites and their avian hosts structure Plasmodium host range.

  11. Interaction of Bacterial Exotoxins with Neutrophil Extracellular Traps: Impact for the Infected Host

    PubMed Central

    von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Blodkamp, Stefanie; Nizet, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in 2004, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been characterized as a fundamental host innate immune defense against various pathogens. Released in response to infectious and pro-inflammatory stimuli, NETs can immobilize invading pathogens within a fibrous matrix consisting of DNA, histones, and antimicrobial peptides. Conversely, excessive or dysregulated NET release may hold a variety of detrimental consequences for the host. A fine balance between NET formation and elimination is necessary to sustain a protective effect during infectious challenge. In recent years, a number of microbial virulence factors have been shown to modulate formation of NETs, thereby facilitating colonization or spread within the host. In this mini-review we summarize the contemporary research on the interaction of bacterial exotoxins with neutrophils that modulate NET production, focusing particular attention on consequences for the host. Understanding host–pathogen dynamics in this extracellular battlefield of innate immunity may provide novel therapeutic approaches for infectious and inflammatory disorders. PMID:27064864

  12. THE ALTERNATIVE FOR SURVIVAL*

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The need of the time is to develop the traditional health care systems as a people oriented health care system. The factors that dominated the health care structure of our nation has been systematically pushing the traditional systems of medicine away from the people. In this background, an attempt has been made to reflect upon one's own experience, to understand the pattern of domination and to probe and suggest further on what could be the possible alternative development strategy and suggest specific tasks that would help define the development problematique in a meaningful manner in order to progress further in a self-determined manner PMID:22557469

  13. Potential alternate life biochemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesky, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    While life on Earth continues to be discovered in unlikely environments, the underlying biochemistry is all very similar, based on the element carbon, and requiring liquid water. We consider alternate biochemistries based on elements other than carbon, including other group IVA elements, such as silicon and germanium, and solvents other than water. Terminal electron acceptors other than oxygen are also discussed. A fundamental issue is raised related to the detection of, and even the definition of life, whether it is carbon or non-carbon based. An extreme example of this issue would be in consideration of speculative life based on electrically charged dusty plasmas, which may have no physical body.

  14. Alternative therapy in pruritus.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Larry E

    2003-01-01

    Because of its multitude of origins, the symptom complex of pruritus has a plethora of purported remedies and few therapeutic indications. Very few topical and systemic FDA approved medications have the indication of pruritus. Specific therapy still awaits a better definition of the exact physiologic events in chronic pruritus. Hence most medications actually focus on the central nervous system--the peripheral receptors--and the lack of specific physiologic targets has inhibited pharmacologic development. The resulting gap has opened the door to a variety of alternative therapies.

  15. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached.

  16. Alternatives to eigenstate thermalization.

    PubMed

    Rigol, Marcos; Srednicki, Mark

    2012-03-16

    An isolated quantum many-body system in an initial pure state will come to thermal equilibrium if it satisfies the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH). We consider alternatives to ETH that have been proposed. We first show that von Neumann's quantum ergodic theorem relies on an assumption that is essentially equivalent to ETH. We also investigate whether, following a sudden quench, special classes of pure states can lead to thermal behavior in systems that do not obey ETH, namely, integrable systems. We find examples of this, but only for initial states that obeyed ETH before the quench.

  17. PDT-induced inflammatory and host responses.

    PubMed

    Firczuk, Małgorzata; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub

    2011-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in the management of neoplastic and nonmalignant diseases. Its unique mechanisms of action include direct cytotoxic effects exerted towards tumor cells, destruction of tumor and peritumoral vasculature and induction of local acute inflammatory reaction. The latter develops in response to (1) damage to tumor and stromal cells that leads to the release of cell death-associated molecular patterns (CDAMs) or damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), (2) early vascular changes that include increased vascular permeability, vascular occlusion, and release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators, (3) activation of alternative pathway of complement leading to generation of potent chemotactic factors, and (4) induction of signaling cascades and transcription factors that trigger secretion of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases, or adhesion molecules. The majority of studies indicate that induction of local inflammatory response contributes to the antitumor effects of PDT and facilitates development of systemic immunity. However, the degree of PDT-induced inflammation and its subsequent contribution to its antitumor efficacy depend on multiple parameters, such as chemical nature, concentration and subcellular localization of the photosensitizers, the spectral characteristics of the light source, light fluence and fluence rate, oxygenation level, and tumor type. Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms and development of therapeutic approaches modulating PDT-induced inflammation will be necessary to tailor this treatment to particular clinical conditions.

  18. Assessment of Matrix Multiplication Learning with a Rule-Based Analytical Model--"A Bayesian Network Representation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    This study explored an alternative assessment procedure to examine learning trajectories of matrix multiplication. It took rule-based analytical and cognitive task analysis methods specifically to break down operation rules for a given matrix multiplication. Based on the analysis results, a hierarchical Bayesian network, an assessment model,…

  19. Heuristic cognitive diagnosis when the Q-matrix is unknown.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Hans-Friedrich; Chiu, Chia-Yi; Brusco, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive diagnosis models of educational test performance rely on a binary Q-matrix that specifies the associations between individual test items and the cognitive attributes (skills) required to answer those items correctly. Current methods for fitting cognitive diagnosis models to educational test data and assigning examinees to proficiency classes are based on parametric estimation methods such as expectation maximization (EM) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) that frequently encounter difficulties in practical applications. In response to these difficulties, non-parametric classification techniques (cluster analysis) have been proposed as heuristic alternatives to parametric procedures. These non-parametric classification techniques first aggregate each examinee's test item scores into a profile of attribute sum scores, which then serve as the basis for clustering examinees into proficiency classes. Like the parametric procedures, the non-parametric classification techniques require that the Q-matrix underlying a given test be known. Unfortunately, in practice, the Q-matrix for most tests is not known and must be estimated to specify the associations between items and attributes, risking a misspecified Q-matrix that may then result in the incorrect classification of examinees. This paper demonstrates that clustering examinees into proficiency classes based on their item scores rather than on their attribute sum-score profiles does not require knowledge of the Q-matrix, and results in a more accurate classification of examinees.

  20. Matrix-assisted diffusion-ordered spectroscopy: choosing a matrix.

    PubMed

    Gramosa, Nilce V; Ricardo, Nágila M S P; Adams, Ralph W; Morris, Gareth A; Nilsson, Mathias

    2016-06-07

    Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) is an important technique for separating the NMR signals of the components in a mixture, and relies on differences in diffusion coefficient. Standard DOSY experiments therefore struggle when the components of a mixture are of similar size, and hence diffuse at similar rates. Fortunately, the diffusion coefficients of solutes can be manipulated by changing the matrix in which they diffuse, using matrix components that interact differentially with them, a technique known as matrix-assisted DOSY. In the present investigation, we evaluate the performance of a number of new, previously used, and mixed matrices with an informative test mixture: the three positional isomers of dihydroxybenzene. The aim of this work is to present the matrix-assisted DOSY user with information about the potential utility of a set of matrices (and combinations of matrices), including ionic and non-ionic surfactants, complexing agents, polymers, and mixed solvents. A variety of matrices improved the diffusion resolution of the signals of the test system, with the best separation achieved by mixed micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide. The use of mixed matrices offers great potential for the analyst to tailor the matrix to a particular sample under study. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Adaptation of HIV-1 to its human host.

    PubMed

    Wain, Louise V; Bailes, Elizabeth; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Decker, Julie M; Keele, Brandon F; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Li, Yingying; Takehisa, Jun; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sharp, Paul M

    2007-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) originated from three independent cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpzPtt) infecting chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) in west central Africa, giving rise to pandemic (group M) and non-pandemic (groups N and O) clades of HIV-1. To identify host-specific adaptations in HIV-1 we compared the inferred ancestral sequences of HIV-1 groups M, N and O to 12 full length genome sequences of SIVcpzPtt and four of the outlying but closely related SIVcpzPts (from P. t. schweinfurthii). This analysis revealed a single site that was completely conserved among SIVcpzPtt strains but different (due to the same change) in all three groups of HIV-1. This site, Gag-30, lies within p17, the gag-encoded matrix protein. It is Met in SIVcpzPtt, underwent a conservative replacement by Leu in one lineage of SIVcpzPts but changed radically to Arg on all three lineages leading to HIV-1. During subsequent diversification this site has been conserved as a basic residue (Arg or Lys) in most lineages of HIV-1. Retrospective analysis revealed that Gag-30 had reverted to Met in a previous experiment in which HIV-1 was passaged through chimpanzees. To examine whether this substitution conferred a species specific growth advantage, we used site-directed mutagenesis to generate variants of these chimpanzee-adapted HIV-1 strains with Lys at Gag-30, and tested their replication in both human and chimpanzee CD4+ T lymphocytes. Remarkably, viruses encoding Met replicated to higher titers than viruses encoding Lys in chimpanzee T cells, but the opposite was found in human T cells. Taken together, these observations provide compelling evidence for host-specific adaptation during the emergence of HIV-1 and identify the viral matrix protein as a modulator of viral fitness following transmission to the new human host.

  2. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Robles, Raquel O; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Yongsheng; Lee, Jae Ah; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-05-26

    Thermophones are highly promising for applications such as high-power SONAR arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets provide the most attractive performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large-size freestanding carbon nanotube aerogel sheets and other even more exotic materials recently investigated hampers the field. We describe alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high-energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanostructured materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. We demonstrate that the heat capacity of aerogel-like nanostructures can be extracted by a thorough analysis of the sound pressure spectra. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high-power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  3. Temporal regulation of adenovirus major late alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Akusjarvi, Goran

    2008-05-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced mRNAs during replication. The accumulation of viral mRNAs is subjected to a temporal regulation, a mechanism that ensures that proteins that are needed at certain stages of the virus life cycle are produced in a timely fashion. The complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery has been studied in detail during the last decade. These studies have resulted in the characterization of two viral proteins, E4-ORF4 and L4-33K, that adenovirus uses to remodel the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here I will review the current knowledge of how mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit is controlled with a particular emphasis on how cis-acting sequence element, trans-acting factors and mechanisms regulating adenovirus major late L1 alternative RNA splicing is controlled.

  4. Host-pathogen interactions in progressive chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M; Dutzan, N; García-Sesnich, J; Abusleme, L; Dezerega, A; Silva, N; González, F E; Vernal, R; Sorsa, T; Gamonal, J

    2011-10-01

    Periodontitis is an infection characterized by the occurrence of supporting tissue destruction with an episodic nature. Disease progression is often determined by the loss of attachment level or alveolar bone, and sequential probing of periodontal attachment remains the most commonly utilized method to diagnose progressive destruction of the periodontium. The tolerance method has been the most extensive clinical method used in recent years to determine site-specific attachment level changes. There is abundant evidence that major tissue destruction in periodontal lesions results from the recruitment of immune cells. Considerable effort has been made to study the host cell and mediator profiles involved in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis, but the definition of active sites, where current periodontal breakdown occurs, and consecutive characterization of the mediators involved are still among the main concerns. In the present review, we summarize periodontopathic bacteria and host factors, including infiltrating cell populations, cytokines, and host matrix metalloproteinases, associated with under-going episodic attachment loss that could partly explain the mechanisms involved in destruction of the supporting tissues of the tooth.

  5. Catabolism of host-derived compounds during extracellular bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Jamie A.; Wargo, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient catabolism of host-derived compounds is essential for bacterial survival and virulence. While these links in intracellular bacteria are well-studied, such studies in extracellular bacteria lag behind, mostly for technical reasons. The field has identified important metabolic pathways, but the mechanisms by which they impact infection and in particular, establishing the importance of a compound’s catabolism versus alternate metabolic roles has been difficult. In this review we will examine evidence for catabolism during extracellular bacterial infections in animals and known or potential roles in virulence. In the process, we point out key gaps in the field that will require new or newly adapted techniques. PMID:24038340

  6. SAVAH: Source Address Validation with Host Identity Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Dmitriy; Gurtov, Andrei

    Explosive growth of the Internet and lack of mechanisms that validate the authenticity of a packet source produced serious security and accounting issues. In this paper, we propose validating source addresses in LAN using Host Identity Protocol (HIP) deployed in a first-hop router. Compared to alternative solutions such as CGA, our approach is suitable both for IPv4 and IPv6. We have implemented SAVAH in Wi-Fi access points and evaluated its overhead for clients and the first-hop router.

  7. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction.

  8. Using self-assembled monolayers to model the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Mrksich, Milan

    2009-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is an insoluble aggregate of large proteins and glycosoaminoglycans that comprises the microenvironment of cells in tissue. The matrix displays a host of ligands that interact with cell-surface receptors to mediate the attachment and spreading of cells and regulate signaling processes. Studies of cell-matrix interactions and downstream signaling processes commonly employ substrates having an adsorbed layer of protein and are challenged by the difficulty in controlling the structure and activity of the immobilized protein. Significant effort has been directed towards the development of model substrates that present adhesion ligands in defined densities, orientations and environments. Among these approaches, self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on gold offer a high level of control over the molecular structure of the surface and are well-suited to studies of cell adhesion. This review describes the design and use of monolayers for applications in cell biology, including the use of monolayers to evaluate the roles of peptide and protein ligands in cell-matrix interactions, the development of methods to pattern ligands on monolayers and applications to cell biology, the development of dynamic monolayers that can switch the activities of ligands presented to an adherent cell, and the rewiring of interactions between a cell and its substrate. These examples illustrate the flexibility inherent to monolayers for applications in cell biology.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of porous silicon as hydroxyapatite host matrix of biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Dussan, A.; Bertel, S. D.; Melo, S. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, porous-silicon samples were prepared by electrochemical etching on p-type (B-doped) Silicon (Si) wafers. Hydrofluoric acid (HF)-ethanol (C2H5OH) [HF:Et] and Hydrofluoric acid (HF)-dimethylformamide (DMF-C3H7NO) [HF:DMF] solution concentrations were varied between [1:2]—[1:3] and [1:7]—[1:9], respectively. Effects of synthesis parameters, like current density, solution concentrations, reaction time, on morphological properties were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Pore sizes varying from 20 nm to micrometers were obtained for long reaction times and [HF:Et] [1:2] concentrations; while pore sizes in the same order were observed for [HF:DMF] [1:7], but for shorter reaction time. Greater surface uniformity and pore distribution was obtained for a current density of around 8 mA/cm2 using solutions with DMF. A correlation between reflectance measurements and pore size is presented. The porous-silicon samples were used as substrate for hydroxyapatite growth by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM were used to characterize the layers grown. It was found that the layer topography obtained on PS samples was characterized by the evidence of Hydroxyapatite in the inter-pore regions and over the surface. PMID:28291792

  10. Chemical tailoring of hybrid sol-gel thick coatings as hosting matrix for functional patterned microstructures.

    PubMed

    Falcaro, Paolo; Costacurta, Stefano; Malfatti, Luca; Buso, Dario; Patelli, Alessandro; Schiavuta, Piero; Piccinini, Massimo; Grenci, Gianluca; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Amenitsch, Heinz; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2011-02-01

    A phenyl-based hybrid organic - inorganic coating has been synthesized and processed by hard X-ray lithography. The overall lithography process is performed in a two-step process only (X-rays exposure and chemical etching). The patterns present high aspect ratio, sharp edges, and high homogeneity. The coating has been doped with a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon functional molecules, such as anthracene, pentacene, and fullerene. For the first time, hard X-rays have been combined with thick hybrid functional coatings, using the sol-gel thick film directly as resist. A new technique based on a new material combined with hard X-rays is now available to fabricate optical devices. The effect due to the high-energy photon exposure has been investigated using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, laser scanner, optical profilometer, and confocal and electron microscope. High-quality thick hybrid fullerene-doped microstructures have been fabricated.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of porous silicon as hydroxyapatite host matrix of biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Dussan, A; Bertel, S D; Melo, S F; Mesa, F

    2017-01-01

    In this work, porous-silicon samples were prepared by electrochemical etching on p-type (B-doped) Silicon (Si) wafers. Hydrofluoric acid (HF)-ethanol (C2H5OH) [HF:Et] and Hydrofluoric acid (HF)-dimethylformamide (DMF-C3H7NO) [HF:DMF] solution concentrations were varied between [1:2]-[1:3] and [1:7]-[1:9], respectively. Effects of synthesis parameters, like current density, solution concentrations, reaction time, on morphological properties were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Pore sizes varying from 20 nm to micrometers were obtained for long reaction times and [HF:Et] [1:2] concentrations; while pore sizes in the same order were observed for [HF:DMF] [1:7], but for shorter reaction time. Greater surface uniformity and pore distribution was obtained for a current density of around 8 mA/cm2 using solutions with DMF. A correlation between reflectance measurements and pore size is presented. The porous-silicon samples were used as substrate for hydroxyapatite growth by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM were used to characterize the layers grown. It was found that the layer topography obtained on PS samples was characterized by the evidence of Hydroxyapatite in the inter-pore regions and over the surface.

  12. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells). Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as a stage that

  13. Understanding host switching through ecological fitting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the fact that parasites are highly specialized to their hosts, extensive empirical evidence demonstrates that host switching rather than co-speciation is the most important factor influencing the origin of host-parasite associations. Ecological fitting in sloppy fitness space has been propos...

  14. Modified host cells with efflux pumps

    DOEpatents

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2016-08-30

    The present invention provides for a modified host cell comprising a heterologous expression of an efflux pump capable of transporting an organic molecule out of the host cell wherein the organic molecule at a sufficiently high concentration reduces the growth rate of or is lethal to the host cell.

  15. Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Medication > Other Treatments > Herbs, Supplements, and Alternative Medicines Share: Print Page Text ... magazine: meds-other, In this section Medication Other Treatments Herbs, Supplements, and Alternative Medicines Types of Dietary Supplements ...

  16. Alternatives for Jet Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, R. J.; Sain, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Approaches are developed as alternatives to current design methods which rely heavily on linear quadratic and Riccati equation methods. The main alternatives are discussed in two broad categories, local multivariable frequency domain methods and global nonlinear optimal methods.

  17. Extending the Alternating Series Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsuura, Hidefumi

    2012-01-01

    Alternating series have the simplest of sign patterns. What about series with more complicated patterns? By inspecting the alternating series test closely, we find a theorem that applies to more complicated sign patterns, and beyond.

  18. Generic Model Host System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Wu, Juhao; Qiang, Ji; Shen, Guobao; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-22

    There are many simulation codes for accelerator modelling; each one has some strength but not all. A platform which can host multiple modelling tools would be ideal for various purposes. The model platform along with infrastructure support can be used not only for online applications but also for offline purposes. Collaboration is formed for the effort of providing such a platform. In order to achieve such a platform, a set of common physics data structure has to be set. Application Programming Interface (API) for physics applications should also be defined within a model data provider. A preliminary platform design and prototype is discussed.

  19. HostDesigner, Version 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Benjamin; McCann, Billy Wayne

    2015-09-18

    HostDesigner is a computer-aided molecular design code that enables the general application of de novo structure-based methods to problems in chemistry and material science. Its purpose is to identify organic molecules with 3D structures that match user-input specifications. To accomplish this, the code connects chemical fragments to build millions of potential molecules, evaluates the resulting structures based on geometric constraints, and outputs a rank-ordered list of candidates. Example applications include the design of metal ion sequestering agents for use in separations processes, molecules that form self-assembled nanoscale containers, and molecular building blocks for metal-organic frameworks.

  20. The Astrobiology Matrix and the "Drake Matrix" in Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizser, A.; Kereszturi, A.

    2003-01-01

    We organized astrobiology lectures in the Eotvos Lorand University of Sciences and the Polaris Observatory in 2002. We present here the "Drake matrix" for the comparison of the astrobiological potential of different bodies [1], and astrobiology matrix for the visualization of the interdisciplinary connections between different fields of astrobiology. Conclusion: In Hungary it is difficult to integrate astrobiology in the education system but the great advantage is that it can connect different scientific fields and improve the view of students. We would like to get in contact with persons and organizations who already have experience in the education of astrobiology.