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Sample records for alternative starting materials

  1. Alternative starting materials for industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J W

    1992-02-01

    In the manufacture of chemical feedstocks and subsequent processing into derivatives and materials, the U.S. chemical industry sets the current standard of excellence for technological competitiveness. This world-class leadership is attributed to the innovation and advancement of chemical engineering process technology. Whether this status is sustained over the next decade depends strongly on meeting increasingly demanding challenges stimulated by growing concerns about the safe production and use of chemicals without harmful impacts on the environment. To comply with stringent environmental regulations while remaining economically competitive, industry must exploit alternative benign starting materials and develop environmentally neutral industrial processes. Opportunities are described for development of environmentally compatible alternatives and substitutes for some of the most abundantly produced, potentially hazardous industrial chemicals now labeled as "high-priority toxic chemicals." For several other uniquely important commodity chemicals where no economically competitive, environmentally satisfactory, nontoxic alternative starting material exists, we advocate the development of new dynamic processes for the on-demand generation of toxic chemicals. In this general concept, which obviates mass storage and transportation of chemicals, toxic raw materials are produced in real time, where possible, from less-hazardous starting materials and then chemically transformed immediately into the final product. As a selected example for semiconductor technology, recent progress is reviewed for the on-demand production of arsine in turnkey electrochemical generators. Innovation of on-demand chemical generators and alternative processes provide rich areas for environmentally responsive chemical engineering processing research and development for next-generation technology.

  2. Alternative starting materials for industrial processes.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J W

    1992-01-01

    In the manufacture of chemical feedstocks and subsequent processing into derivatives and materials, the U.S. chemical industry sets the current standard of excellence for technological competitiveness. This world-class leadership is attributed to the innovation and advancement of chemical engineering process technology. Whether this status is sustained over the next decade depends strongly on meeting increasingly demanding challenges stimulated by growing concerns about the safe production and use of chemicals without harmful impacts on the environment. To comply with stringent environmental regulations while remaining economically competitive, industry must exploit alternative benign starting materials and develop environmentally neutral industrial processes. Opportunities are described for development of environmentally compatible alternatives and substitutes for some of the most abundantly produced, potentially hazardous industrial chemicals now labeled as "high-priority toxic chemicals." For several other uniquely important commodity chemicals where no economically competitive, environmentally satisfactory, nontoxic alternative starting material exists, we advocate the development of new dynamic processes for the on-demand generation of toxic chemicals. In this general concept, which obviates mass storage and transportation of chemicals, toxic raw materials are produced in real time, where possible, from less-hazardous starting materials and then chemically transformed immediately into the final product. As a selected example for semiconductor technology, recent progress is reviewed for the on-demand production of arsine in turnkey electrochemical generators. Innovation of on-demand chemical generators and alternative processes provide rich areas for environmentally responsive chemical engineering processing research and development for next-generation technology. Images PMID:11607260

  3. An Alternative Starting Point for Fraction Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortina, José Luis; Višnovská, Jana; Zúñiga, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the results of a study conducted for the purpose of assessing the viability of an alternative starting point for teaching fractions. The alternative is based on Freudenthal's insights about fraction as comparison. It involves portraying the entities that unit fractions quantify as always being apart from the reference unit, instead of…

  4. An Alternative Starting Point for Fraction Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortina, José Luis; Višnovská, Jana; Zúñiga, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the results of a study conducted for the purpose of assessing the viability of an alternative starting point for teaching fractions. The alternative is based on Freudenthal's insights about fraction as comparison. It involves portraying the entities that unit fractions quantify as always being apart from the reference unit, instead of…

  5. Alternate materials for alternate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports on an extensive investigation of five different crystalline engineering thermoplastics and their reactions to various alternate fuels. The investigation covered acetal copolymer, nylon 6/6, polyphenylene sulfide, PBT polyester, and liquid crystal polymer. These five base resins were used in unfilled, glass fiber reinforced, impact modified, glass/mineral reinforced, and long-glass fiber reinforced grades. All of the materials were tested in ASTM reference Fuel C (50% toluene, 50% iso-octane), Auto-oxidized (sour gas), and Aggressive fuel with M25, M50, and M85 at 60{degrees} and 121{degrees} C. This study was undertaken due to the automotive industry's shift towards alternate fuels and higher operating temperatures.

  6. Life's Starting Materials Found in Dusty Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Full Image of Graph

    This graph, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that some of the most basic ingredients of DNA and protein are concentrated in a dusty planet-forming disk circling a young sun-like star called IRS 46. These data also indicate that the ingredients -- molecular gases called acetylene and hydrogen cyanide -- are located in the star's terrestrial planet zone, the region where scientists believe Earth-like planets would be most likely to form.

    The data were acquired by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which split light from the star's disk into distinct features characteristic of a particular chemical. The features, seen here as bumps and squiggles, are like bar codes used in supermarkets to identify different products. In this case, the products are the two DNA and protein precursors, acetylene and hydrogen cyanide, as well as carbon dioxide gas. All three gases are termed 'organic' because they contain the element carbon.

    The shapes of the features in this spectrum helped pinpoint the location of the gases in the star's disk. A feature's shape reflects the temperature of the gas. By comparison with model spectra, astronomers were able to deduce that the gases are present in regions where the temperature ranges from approximately the boiling point of water on Earth (212 degrees Fahrenheit), to nearly a thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Such hot temperatures place the gases in the star's terrestrial planet zone, which is sometimes referred to as the 'Goldilocks' zone because it is just right for Earths.

    Acetylene and hydrogen cyanide are some of life's most basic starting materials. If you mix them together in a test tube with water, and give them some kind of surface on which to be concentrated and react, you'll get a slew of organic compounds, including many of the 20 essential amino acids and one of the four chemical units, called bases, that make up

  7. Life's Starting Materials Found in Dusty Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Full Image of Graph

    This graph, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that some of the most basic ingredients of DNA and protein are concentrated in a dusty planet-forming disk circling a young sun-like star called IRS 46. These data also indicate that the ingredients -- molecular gases called acetylene and hydrogen cyanide -- are located in the star's terrestrial planet zone, the region where scientists believe Earth-like planets would be most likely to form.

    The data were acquired by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which split light from the star's disk into distinct features characteristic of a particular chemical. The features, seen here as bumps and squiggles, are like bar codes used in supermarkets to identify different products. In this case, the products are the two DNA and protein precursors, acetylene and hydrogen cyanide, as well as carbon dioxide gas. All three gases are termed 'organic' because they contain the element carbon.

    The shapes of the features in this spectrum helped pinpoint the location of the gases in the star's disk. A feature's shape reflects the temperature of the gas. By comparison with model spectra, astronomers were able to deduce that the gases are present in regions where the temperature ranges from approximately the boiling point of water on Earth (212 degrees Fahrenheit), to nearly a thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Such hot temperatures place the gases in the star's terrestrial planet zone, which is sometimes referred to as the 'Goldilocks' zone because it is just right for Earths.

    Acetylene and hydrogen cyanide are some of life's most basic starting materials. If you mix them together in a test tube with water, and give them some kind of surface on which to be concentrated and react, you'll get a slew of organic compounds, including many of the 20 essential amino acids and one of the four chemical units, called bases, that make up

  8. Predicting the reactivity of adhesive starting materials

    Treesearch

    Anthony H. Conner

    1999-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are important in the production of bonded-wood products. Phenolic compounds in addition to phenol and resorcinol are potential alternative feedstocks for producing adhesives. The reactivity of a wide variety of phenolic compounds with formaldehyde was investigated using semi-empirical and ab initio computational chemistry methods...

  9. Alternate nozzle ablative materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    Four subscale solid rocket motor tests were conducted successfully to evaluate alternate nozzle liner, insulation, and exit cone structural overwrap components for possible application to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle asasembly. The 10,000 lb propellant motor tests were simulated, as close as practical, the configuration and operational environment of the full scale SRM. Fifteen PAN based and three pitch based materials had no filler in the phenolic resin, four PAN based materials had carbon microballoons in the resin, and the rest of the materials had carbon powder in the resin. Three nozzle insulation materials were evaluated; an aluminum oxide silicon oxide ceramic fiber mat phenolic material with no resin filler and two E-glass fiber mat phenolic materials with no resin filler. It was concluded by MTI/WD (the fabricator and evaluator of the test nozzles) and NASA-MSFC that it was possible to design an alternate material full scale SRM nozzle assembly, which could provide an estimated 360 lb increased payload capability for Space Shuttle launches over that obtainable with the current qualified SRM design.

  10. Improved Starting Materials for Back-Illuminated Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2009-01-01

    An improved type of starting materials for the fabrication of silicon-based imaging integrated circuits that include back-illuminated photodetectors has been conceived, and a process for making these starting materials is undergoing development. These materials are intended to enable reductions in dark currents and increases in quantum efficiencies, relative to those of comparable imagers made from prior silicon-on-insulator (SOI) starting materials. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the improved starting materials and process. A prior SOI starting material, depicted in the upper part the figure, includes: a) A device layer on the front side, typically between 2 and 20 m thick, made of p-doped silicon (that is, silicon lightly doped with an electron acceptor, which is typically boron); b) A buried oxide (BOX) layer (that is, a buried layer of oxidized silicon) between 0.2 and 0.5 m thick; and c) A silicon handle layer (also known as a handle wafer) on the back side, between about 600 and 650 m thick. After fabrication of the imager circuitry in and on the device layer, the handle wafer is etched away, the BOX layer acting as an etch stop. In subsequent operation of the imager, light enters from the back, through the BOX layer. The advantages of back illumination over front illumination have been discussed in prior NASA Tech Briefs articles.

  11. Alternative Materials in Libraries: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Elliott, Ed.; Danky, James, Ed.

    The papers presented focus on the library acquisition, processing, and use of alternative publications, which include small press and other materials produced by non-standard, non-establishment groups or individuals. In "Libraries and Alternatives: An Essay," Patricia Glass Schuman discusses the importance of alternative publications and…

  12. Alternative Materials in Libraries: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Elliott, Ed.; Danky, James, Ed.

    The papers presented focus on the library acquisition, processing, and use of alternative publications, which include small press and other materials produced by non-standard, non-establishment groups or individuals. In "Libraries and Alternatives: An Essay," Patricia Glass Schuman discusses the importance of alternative publications and…

  13. 20 CFR 404.242 - Use of old-start primary insurance amount as guaranteed alternative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of old-start primary insurance amount as guaranteed alternative. 404.242 Section 404.242 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Old-Start Method of Computing Primary...

  14. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K. A.; Schmidt, F. A.; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, K. A.

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  15. Fluoride glass starting materials - Characterization and effects of thermal treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, William; Dunn, Bruce; Shlichta, Paul; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The production of heavy metal fluoride (HMF) glasses, and the effects of thermal treatments on the HMF glasses are investigated. ZrF4, BaF2, AlF3, LaF3, and NaF were utilized in the synthesis of zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum-sodium fluoride glass. The purity of these starting materials, in particular ZrF4, is evaluated using XRD analysis. The data reveal that low temperature heating of ZrF4-H2O is effective in removing the water of hydration, but causes the production of ZrF4 and oxyfluorides; however, dehydration followed by sublimation results in the production of monoclinic ZrFe without water or oxyfluoride contaminants.

  16. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  17. Feasibility Study of Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Permanent Magnet Alternator Start Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Tokars, Roger P.

    2006-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission was a proposed, (recently cancelled) long duration science mission to study three moons of Jupiter: Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa. One design of the JIMO spacecraft used a nuclear heat source in conjunction with a Brayton rotating machine to generate electrical power for the electric thrusters and the spacecraft bus. The basic operation of the closed cycle Brayton system was as follows. The working fluid, a heliumxenon gas mixture, first entered a compressor, then went through a recuperator and hot-side heat exchanger, then expanded across a turbine that drove an alternator, then entered the cold-side of the recuperator and heat exchanger and finally returned to the compressor. The spacecraft was to be launched with the Brayton system off-line and the nuclear reactor shut down. Once the system was started, the helium-xenon gas would be circulated into the heat exchangers as the nuclear reactors were activated. Initially, the alternator unit would operate as a motor so as to drive the turbine and compressor to get the cycle started. This report investigated the feasibility of the start up sequence of a permanent magnet (PM) machine, similar in operation to the alternator unit, without any position or speed feedback sensors ("sensorless") and with a variable load torque. It is found that the permanent magnet machine can start with sensorless control and a load torque of up to 30 percent of the rated value.

  18. Starting Point: Linking Methods and Materials for Introductory Geoscience Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; MacDonald, R. H.; Merritts, D.; Savina, M.

    2004-12-01

    Introductory courses are one of the most challenging teaching environments for geoscience faculty. Courses are often large, students have a wide variety of background and skills, and student motivation can include completing a geoscience major, preparing for a career as teacher, fulfilling a distribution requirement, and general interest. The Starting Point site (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/index.html) provides help for faculty teaching introductory courses by linking together examples of different teaching methods that have been used in entry-level courses with information about how to use the methods and relevant references from the geoscience and education literature. Examples span the content of geoscience courses including the atmosphere, biosphere, climate, Earth surface, energy/material cycles, human dimensions/resources, hydrosphere/cryosphere, ocean, solar system, solid earth and geologic time/earth history. Methods include interactive lecture (e.g think-pair-share, concepTests, and in-class activities and problems), investigative cases, peer review, role playing, Socratic questioning, games, and field labs. A special section of the site devoted to using an Earth System approach provides resources with content information about the various aspects of the Earth system linked to examples of teaching this content. Examples of courses incorporating Earth systems content, and strategies for designing an Earth system course are also included. A similar section on Teaching with an Earth History approach explores geologic history as a vehicle for teaching geoscience concepts and as a framework for course design. The Starting Point site has been authored and reviewed by faculty around the country. Evaluation indicates that faculty find the examples particularly helpful both for direct implementation in their classes and for sparking ideas. The help provided for using different teaching methods makes the examples particularly useful. Examples are chosen from

  19. Alternative Translation Initiation of a Haloarchaeal Serine Protease Transcript Containing Two In-Frame Start Codons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Wu, Yufeng; Li, Moran; Wang, Jian; Mei, Sha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have shown that haloarchaea employ leaderless and Shine-Dalgarno (SD)-less mechanisms for translation initiation of leaderless transcripts with a 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of <10 nucleotides (nt) and leadered transcripts with a 5′ UTR of ≥10 nt, respectively. However, whether the two mechanisms can operate on the same naturally occurring haloarchaeal transcript carrying multiple potential start codons is unknown. In this study, the transcript of the sptA gene (encoding an extracellular serine protease of Natrinema sp. strain J7-2) was experimentally determined and found to contain two potential in-frame AUG codons (AUG1 and AUG2) located 5 and 29 nt, respectively, downstream of the transcription start site. Mutational analysis revealed that both AUGs can function as the translation start codon for production of active SptA, although AUG1 is more efficient than AUG2 for translation initiation. Insertion of a stable stem-loop structure between the two AUGs completely abolished initiation at AUG1 but did not affect initiation at AUG2, indicating that AUG2-initiated translation does not involve ribosome scanning from the 5′ end of the transcript. Furthermore, the efficiency of AUG2-initiated translation was not influenced by an upstream SD-like sequence. In addition, both AUG1 and AUG2 contribute to transcript stability, probably by recruiting ribosomes to protect the transcript against degradation. These data suggest that depending on which of two in-frame start codons is used, the sptA transcript can act as either a leaderless or a leadered transcript for SptA production in haloarchaea. IMPORTANCE In eukaryotes and bacteria, alternative translation start sites contribute to proteome complexity and can be used as a functional mechanism to increase translation efficiency. However, little is known about alternative translation initiation in archaea. Our results demonstrate that leaderless and SD-less mechanisms can be used for

  20. Alternative Translation Initiation of a Haloarchaeal Serine Protease Transcript Containing Two In-Frame Start Codons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Wu, Yufeng; Li, Moran; Wang, Jian; Mei, Sha; Tang, Bing; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that haloarchaea employ leaderless and Shine-Dalgarno (SD)-less mechanisms for translation initiation of leaderless transcripts with a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of <10 nucleotides (nt) and leadered transcripts with a 5' UTR of ≥10 nt, respectively. However, whether the two mechanisms can operate on the same naturally occurring haloarchaeal transcript carrying multiple potential start codons is unknown. In this study, the transcript of the sptA gene (encoding an extracellular serine protease of Natrinema sp. strain J7-2) was experimentally determined and found to contain two potential in-frame AUG codons (AUG(1) and AUG(2)) located 5 and 29 nt, respectively, downstream of the transcription start site. Mutational analysis revealed that both AUGs can function as the translation start codon for production of active SptA, although AUG(1) is more efficient than AUG(2) for translation initiation. Insertion of a stable stem-loop structure between the two AUGs completely abolished initiation at AUG(1) but did not affect initiation at AUG(2), indicating that AUG(2)-initiated translation does not involve ribosome scanning from the 5' end of the transcript. Furthermore, the efficiency of AUG(2)-initiated translation was not influenced by an upstream SD-like sequence. In addition, both AUG(1) and AUG(2) contribute to transcript stability, probably by recruiting ribosomes to protect the transcript against degradation. These data suggest that depending on which of two in-frame start codons is used, the sptA transcript can act as either a leaderless or a leadered transcript for SptA production in haloarchaea. In eukaryotes and bacteria, alternative translation start sites contribute to proteome complexity and can be used as a functional mechanism to increase translation efficiency. However, little is known about alternative translation initiation in archaea. Our results demonstrate that leaderless and SD-less mechanisms can be used for translation

  1. Pervasive isoform-specific translational regulation via alternative transcription start sites in mammals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Hou, Jingyi; Quedenau, Claudia; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-18

    Transcription initiated at alternative sites can produce mRNA isoforms with different 5'UTRs, which are potentially subjected to differential translational regulation. However, the prevalence of such isoform-specific translational control across mammalian genomes is currently unknown. By combining polysome profiling with high-throughput mRNA 5' end sequencing, we directly measured the translational status of mRNA isoforms with distinct start sites. Among 9,951 genes expressed in mouse fibroblasts, we identified 4,153 showed significant initiation at multiple sites, of which 745 genes exhibited significant isoform-divergent translation. Systematic analyses of the isoform-specific translation revealed that isoforms with longer 5'UTRs tended to translate less efficiently. Further investigation of cis-elements within 5'UTRs not only provided novel insights into the regulation by known sequence features, but also led to the discovery of novel regulatory sequence motifs. Quantitative models integrating all these features explained over half of the variance in the observed isoform-divergent translation. Overall, our study demonstrated the extensive translational regulation by usage of alternative transcription start sites and offered comprehensive understanding of translational regulation by diverse sequence features embedded in 5'UTRs. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. The Effect of an Alternate Start Codon on Heterologous Expression of a PhoA Fusion Protein in Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Indu S; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    While the genomes of many Mycoplasma species have been sequenced, there are no collated data on translational start codon usage, and the effects of alternate start codons on gene expression have not been studied. Analysis of the annotated genomes found that ATG was the most prevalent translational start codon among Mycoplasma spp. However in Mycoplasma gallisepticum a GTG start codon is commonly used in the vlhA multigene family, which encodes a highly abundant, phase variable lipoprotein adhesin. Therefore, the effect of this alternate start codon on expression of a reporter PhoA lipoprotein was examined in M. gallisepticum. Mutation of the start codon from ATG to GTG resulted in a 2.5 fold reduction in the level of transcription of the phoA reporter, but the level of PhoA activity in the transformants containing phoA with a GTG start codon was only 63% of that of the transformants with a phoA with an ATG start codon, suggesting that GTG was a more efficient translational initiation codon. The effect of swapping the translational start codon in phoA reporter gene expression was less in M. gallisepticum than has been seen previously in Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis, suggesting the process of translational initiation in mycoplasmas may have some significant differences from those used in other bacteria. This is the first study of translational start codon usage in mycoplasmas and the impact of the use of an alternate start codon on expression in these bacteria.

  3. Getting Started: Materials and Equipment for Active Learning Preschools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Nancy

    This book provides information to guide the development of an active learning early childhood program by assisting in the selection of materials and equipment to support children's cognitive, physical and social development. The guide considers the arrangement of classroom areas, and elements of the daily routine. The following classroom interest…

  4. Getting Started: Materials and Equipment for Active Learning Preschools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Nancy

    This book provides information to guide the development of an active learning early childhood program by assisting in the selection of materials and equipment to support children's cognitive, physical and social development. The guide considers the arrangement of classroom areas, and elements of the daily routine. The following classroom interest…

  5. A concise synthesis of (+)-batzelladine B from simple pyrrole-based starting materials

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Brendan T.; Economou, Christos; Herzon, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaloids, secondary metabolites that contain basic nitrogen atoms, are some of the most well-known biologically active natural products in chemistry and medicine1. Although the efficient laboratory syntheses of alkaloids would enable researchers to study and optimize their biological properties,2 the basicity and nucleophilicity of nitrogen, its susceptibility to oxidation, and its ability to alter reaction outcomes in unexpected ways – for example, through stereochemical instability and neighboring group participation – complicates their preparation in the laboratory. Efforts to address these issues have led to the invention of a large number of protecting groups that temper the reactivity of nitrogen3; however, the use of protecting groups typically introduce additional steps and obstacles into the synthetic route. Alternatively, the use of aromatic nitrogen heterocycles as synthetic precursors can attenuate the reactivity of nitrogen and streamline synthetic strategies4. In this manuscript, we use such an approach to achieve a synthesis of the complex anti-HIV alkaloid (+)-batzelladine B in nine steps (longest-linear sequence) from simple pyrrole-based starting materials. The route employs several key transformations that would be challenging or impossible to implement using saturated nitrogen heterocycles and highlights some of the advantages conferred by the use of aromatic starting materials. PMID:26375010

  6. Multiparameter integrated sensor development involving alternate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G.

    2001-11-01

    The sensor community has long been presented with the problem of prioritizing among several competing sensor system variables due to the inability to produce a high confidence, low-cost, reliable, and compact device. Typically a solution for very critical scenarios has been a high-cost scale reduction of larger more laboratory based instrumentation. This often produces data on a single parameter that is beyond reproach, however this can also produce a very delicate, bulky, and costly system often requiring a vacuum system of some sort. An alternative approach involves using micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) based sensors. This typically results in low-cost and extremely compact devices that often produce dubious or insufficient data. Our approach integrates multiple orthogonal stimuli within a single chip to produce a MOEMS based sensor that has a very high degree of signal confidence. The combination of multiple independent parameters significantly improves detection reliability in a small low-cost package. However, it is often the case that the most efficient MOEMS sensing methods require the use of material properties other than the conventional microlithograph based Si, SiNx, SiO2 and metals. Thus we have been developing techniques to employ more exotic semiconductors for various sensing applications. The group III-V and II-VI compound semiconductors form a very important and versatile collection of material property variables (thermal, optical, mechanical, electrical) available to the MOEMS designer.

  7. Cobalt Nanocrystals as Starting Materials for Shape Modificationand Assembly Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Erdonmez, Can Kerem

    2005-01-01

    Surfactant-coated cobalt nanocrystals can be prepared with areasonable degree of control over particle size and shape using athermolytic route. The small crystallite size, enhanced reactivity andtunable interparticle interactions enable use of this material asstarting material for demonstration of achievement of novel structuresusing extremely simple solution-based approaches. In particular,formation of hollow cobalt sulfide nanocrystals upon chemicalmodification and emergence of long-range orientational order upondrying-mediated assembly of cobalt nanocrystals is reportedhere.Colloidal preparation of Co nanocrystals has been well-studied.Here, we emphasize general principles and crystallographic/morphologicalcharacterization of disk-shaped hcp-Co nanocrystals. Use of surfactantmolecules enables achievement of multiple morphologies in one syntheticsystem.Formation of hollow structures upon in-solution sulfidation of Conanocrystals is presented and discussed. A Kirkendall-type effect,involving dominant outward mass transport during formation of the ionicshell material explains the results naturally. It is expected that thisphenomenon will generalize extensively to formation of hollow structuresof an enormous variety of compositions. Detailed study of particlemorphology as a function of reaction conditions suggest phenomena likelyto be generally relevant to use of this approach. A short report ofcrystallographic co-alignment into vortex-like structures is alsoprovided. Our current best picture of this process involves an interplayof packing and magnetic interactions between facetedparticles.

  8. Alternative Approaches to Group IV Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedaker, Matthew Loren

    In the pursuit of energy efficiency, there is a demand for systems capable of recovering waste heat. A temperature gradient across a thermoelectric material results in the thermal diffusion of charge carriers from the hot side to the cold side, giving rise to a voltage that can be used to convert waste heat to electricity. Silicon germanium (SiGe) alloys are the standard materials used for thermoelectric generators at high temperatures. We report an alternative method for preparing p-type Si1- xGex alloys from a boron-doped silica-germania nanocomposite. This is the first demonstration of the thermoelectric properties of SiGe-based thermoelectrics prepared at temperatures below the alloy's melting point through a magnesiothermic reduction of the (SiO 2)1-x(GeO2) x. We observe a thermoelectric power factor that is competitive with the literature record for the conventionally prepared SiGe. The large grain size in our hot pressed SiGe limits the thermoelectric figure of merit to 0.5 at 800°C for an optimally doped p-type Si80Ge 20 alloy. A phosphorus-doped oxide can yield n-type Si1- xGex; however, the current processing method introduces a background boron content that compensates ~10% of the donor impurities and limits the thermoelectric power factor. Spark plasma sintering of the nano-Si1-xGe x yields a heterogeneous alloy with thermal conductivity lower than that of the hot pressed homogeneous alloy due to a reduction in the average crystallite size. Magnesiothermic reduction in the presence of molten salts allows some control over crystallite growth and the extent of Si-Ge alloying.

  9. Methanol market slowly tightens as Brazil starts soaking up material

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.

    1992-11-25

    Although the US methanol market's response to mandated oxygen requirements in reformulated gasoline has been disappointing, the European market has surprisingly been tightening in recent weeks and looks set for a price rise in first-quarter 1993. The tightness is being felt mainly in the Mediterranean market, where the Libyan methanol plant is running at only 70% because of problems with gas feedstock supplies. More significantly, the Brazilian government has now given the go-ahead for a yearlong extension on imports of methanol for use as an ethanol replacement in fuel blending. The new authorization sets a monthly import limit of 48,000 m.t. during that period. Libya is an important supplier of methanol to the Brazilian market and has already shipped about 20,000 m.t. since the authorization was given. Another major supplier to Brazil is Russia, from its two giant 750,000-m.t./year plants at Gubakha and Tomsk. The material is shipped from the terminal at Yuzhnyy on the Black Sea, in Ukrainian territory since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

  10. The Effect of an Alternate Start Codon on Heterologous Expression of a PhoA Fusion Protein in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Indu S.; Browning, Glenn F.; Markham, Philip F.

    2015-01-01

    While the genomes of many Mycoplasma species have been sequenced, there are no collated data on translational start codon usage, and the effects of alternate start codons on gene expression have not been studied. Analysis of the annotated genomes found that ATG was the most prevalent translational start codon among Mycoplasma spp. However in Mycoplasma gallisepticum a GTG start codon is commonly used in the vlhA multigene family, which encodes a highly abundant, phase variable lipoprotein adhesin. Therefore, the effect of this alternate start codon on expression of a reporter PhoA lipoprotein was examined in M. gallisepticum. Mutation of the start codon from ATG to GTG resulted in a 2.5 fold reduction in the level of transcription of the phoA reporter, but the level of PhoA activity in the transformants containing phoA with a GTG start codon was only 63% of that of the transformants with a phoA with an ATG start codon, suggesting that GTG was a more efficient translational initiation codon. The effect of swapping the translational start codon in phoA reporter gene expression was less in M. gallisepticum than has been seen previously in Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis, suggesting the process of translational initiation in mycoplasmas may have some significant differences from those used in other bacteria. This is the first study of translational start codon usage in mycoplasmas and the impact of the use of an alternate start codon on expression in these bacteria. PMID:26010086

  11. Research study for gel precursors as glass and ceramic starting materials for space processing applications research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Miller, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The development of techniques for the preparation of glass and ceramic starting materials that will result in homogeneous glasses or ceramic products when melted and cooled in a containerless environment is described. Metal-organic starting materials were used to make compounds or mixtures which were then decomposed by hydrolysis reactions to the corresponding oxides. The sodium tungstate system was chosen as a model for a glass with a relatively low melting temperature. The alkoxide tungstates also have interesting optical properties. For all the compositions studied, comparison samples were prepared from inorganic starting materials and submitted to the same analyses.

  12. Sapphire: Relation between luminescence of starting materials and luminescence of single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevsky, R.; Nedilko, S.; Sharafutdinova, L.; Burlay, S.; Sherbatskii, V.; Boyko, V.; Mittl, S.

    2009-10-01

    A relation between photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of different starting materials used for crystal growth and un-doped sapphire single crystals manufactured using various methods of crystal growth (Kyropolus, HEM, Czochralski, and EFG) was found. The crystals grown using the Verneuil starting material exhibited significant PL when any method of crystal growth was used. On the contrary, sapphire samples grown by the same technologies wherein the starting material was EMT HPDA R revealed very low PL. (HPDA R is produced by EMT, Inc., with proprietary and patented technology.)

  13. Head Start's Impact Is Contingent on Alternative Type of Care in Comparison Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhai, Fuhua; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Waldfogel, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Using data ("n" = 3,790 with 2,119 in the 3-year-old cohort and 1,671 in the 4-year-old cohort) from 353 Head Start centers in the Head Start Impact Study, the only large-scale randomized experiment in Head Start history, this article examined the impact of Head Start on children's cognitive and parent-reported social-behavioral outcomes…

  14. Head Start's Impact Is Contingent on Alternative Type of Care in Comparison Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhai, Fuhua; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Waldfogel, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Using data ("n" = 3,790 with 2,119 in the 3-year-old cohort and 1,671 in the 4-year-old cohort) from 353 Head Start centers in the Head Start Impact Study, the only large-scale randomized experiment in Head Start history, this article examined the impact of Head Start on children's cognitive and parent-reported social-behavioral outcomes…

  15. A concise synthesis of (+)-batzelladine B from simple pyrrole-based starting materials.

    PubMed

    Parr, Brendan T; Economou, Christos; Herzon, Seth B

    2015-09-24

    Alkaloids, secondary metabolites that contain basic nitrogen atoms, are some of the most well-known biologically active natural products in chemistry and medicine. Although efficient laboratory synthesis of alkaloids would enable the study and optimization of their biological properties, their preparation is often complicated by the basicity and nucleophilicity of nitrogen, its susceptibility to oxidation, and its ability to alter reaction outcomes in unexpected ways--for example, through stereochemical instability and neighbouring group participation. Efforts to address these issues have led to the invention of a large number of protecting groups that temper the reactivity of nitrogen; however, the use of protecting groups typically introduces additional steps and obstacles into the synthetic route. Alternatively, the use of aromatic nitrogen heterocycles as synthetic precursors can attenuate the reactivity of nitrogen and streamline synthetic strategies. Here we use such an approach to achieve a synthesis of the complex anti-HIV alkaloid (+)-batzelladine B in nine steps (longest linear sequence) from simple pyrrole-based starting materials. The route uses several key transformations that would be challenging or impossible to implement using saturated nitrogen heterocycles and highlights some of the advantages of beginning with aromatic reagents.

  16. A concise synthesis of (+)-batzelladine B from simple pyrrole-based starting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, Brendan T.; Economou, Christos; Herzon, Seth B.

    2015-09-01

    Alkaloids, secondary metabolites that contain basic nitrogen atoms, are some of the most well-known biologically active natural products in chemistry and medicine. Although efficient laboratory synthesis of alkaloids would enable the study and optimization of their biological properties, their preparation is often complicated by the basicity and nucleophilicity of nitrogen, its susceptibility to oxidation, and its ability to alter reaction outcomes in unexpected ways--for example, through stereochemical instability and neighbouring group participation. Efforts to address these issues have led to the invention of a large number of protecting groups that temper the reactivity of nitrogen; however, the use of protecting groups typically introduces additional steps and obstacles into the synthetic route. Alternatively, the use of aromatic nitrogen heterocycles as synthetic precursors can attenuate the reactivity of nitrogen and streamline synthetic strategies. Here we use such an approach to achieve a synthesis of the complex anti-HIV alkaloid (+)-batzelladine B in nine steps (longest linear sequence) from simple pyrrole-based starting materials. The route uses several key transformations that would be challenging or impossible to implement using saturated nitrogen heterocycles and highlights some of the advantages of beginning with aromatic reagents.

  17. Training Migrant Paraprofessionals in Bilingual Mini Head Start. Mexican Cultural Heritage Materials for Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermea, Maria Teresa Cruz

    Given in this manual are materials used in the Bilingual Mini Head Start Program to teach migrant preschool children about their Mexican cultural heritage. Presented in Spanish, the activities include pronunciation exercises, rhymes, tales, songs, dances, games, and manual activities. Materials are given for teaching about: (1) El Dia de la…

  18. ALTERNATE MATERIALS IN DESIGN OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

  19. Status and prognosis for alternative engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Nathal, Michael V.

    1988-01-01

    The current state of research and development of new materials for advanced aircraft engines is reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of intermetallic compounds and refractory metals as replacements for today's nickel-base alloys are discussed along with some results of research directed at overcoming some of the problems which restrict their application. It is concluded that continuous fiber reinforced intermetallic matrix composites offer one of the best chances for success. However, major technical barriers still exist, especially in the development of suitable fibers. The introduction of these materials into aircraft engines is expected to take in excess of 5 to 10 years.

  20. Demonstration of packaging materials alternatives to expanded polystyrene. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Menke, D.M.

    1998-04-01

    The report presents information on the environmental, economical, and performance characteristics of alternative packaging materials. Three alternative cushioning materials were identified for evaluation within this research; starch-based foam planks, layered corrugated pads, and recycled polyethylene foam. Through some have been used as cushioning materials for some time, these materials are termed alternative because each offers unique features beyond their cushioning capabilities. These unique features include their manufacture from recycled materials, biodegradability, water solubility, recyclability, and reusability. The properties and cushioning characteristics of expanded polystyrene (EPS) represent the baseline for this research; evaluation results for each material are compared against those of EPS. Technical, environmental, and economic evaluations were completed to assess various characteristics and parameters concerning the cushioning materials.

  1. Alternate Materials for Recovery Boiler Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Kish, Joseph; Singbeil, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The ever escalating demands for increased efficiency of all types of boilers would most sensibly be realized by an increase in the steam parameters of temperature and pressure. However, materials and corrosion limitations in the steam generating components, particularly the superheater tubes, present major obstacles to boiler designers in achieving systems that can operate under the more severe conditions. This paper will address the issues associated with superheater tube selection for many types of boilers; particularly chemical recovery boilers, but also addressing the similarities in issues for biomass and coal fired boilers. It will also review our recent study of materials for recovery boiler superheaters. Additional, more extensive studies, both laboratory and field, are needed to gain a better understanding of the variables that affect superheater tube corrosion and to better determine the best means to control this corrosion to ultimately permit operation of recovery boilers at higher temperatures and pressures.

  2. Identification of Alternative Power Sources for Dredged Material Processing Operations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    This report provides a basis for selecting alternative, renewable power sources specifically for operating dredged material processing systems. A...obtaining power from solid waste (such as incineration of trash), but was discarded. Of all the alternative power sources studied, wind electric generation seems to be the most practical and versatile to apply at this time.

  3. Two Alternative Ways of Start Site Selection in Human Norovirus Reinitiation of Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Luttermann, Christine; Meyers, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The calicivirus minor capsid protein VP2 is expressed via termination/reinitiation. This process depends on an upstream sequence element denoted termination upstream ribosomal binding site (TURBS). We have shown for feline calicivirus and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus that the TURBS contains three sequence motifs essential for reinitiation. Motif 1 is conserved among caliciviruses and is complementary to a sequence in the 18 S rRNA leading to the model that hybridization between motif 1 and 18 S rRNA tethers the post-termination ribosome to the mRNA. Motif 2 and motif 2* are proposed to establish a secondary structure positioning the ribosome relative to the start site of the terminal ORF. Here, we analyzed human norovirus (huNV) sequences for the presence and importance of these motifs. The three motifs were identified by sequence analyses in the region upstream of the VP2 start site, and we showed that these motifs are essential for reinitiation of huNV VP2 translation. More detailed analyses revealed that the site of reinitiation is not fixed to a single codon and does not need to be an AUG, even though this codon is clearly preferred. Interestingly, we were able to show that reinitiation can occur at AUG codons downstream of the canonical start/stop site in huNV and feline calicivirus but not in rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus. Although reinitiation at the original start site is independent of the Kozak context, downstream initiation exhibits requirements for start site sequence context known for linear scanning. These analyses on start codon recognition give a more detailed insight into this fascinating mechanism of gene expression. PMID:24599949

  4. Two alternative ways of start site selection in human norovirus reinitiation of translation.

    PubMed

    Luttermann, Christine; Meyers, Gregor

    2014-04-25

    The calicivirus minor capsid protein VP2 is expressed via termination/reinitiation. This process depends on an upstream sequence element denoted termination upstream ribosomal binding site (TURBS). We have shown for feline calicivirus and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus that the TURBS contains three sequence motifs essential for reinitiation. Motif 1 is conserved among caliciviruses and is complementary to a sequence in the 18 S rRNA leading to the model that hybridization between motif 1 and 18 S rRNA tethers the post-termination ribosome to the mRNA. Motif 2 and motif 2* are proposed to establish a secondary structure positioning the ribosome relative to the start site of the terminal ORF. Here, we analyzed human norovirus (huNV) sequences for the presence and importance of these motifs. The three motifs were identified by sequence analyses in the region upstream of the VP2 start site, and we showed that these motifs are essential for reinitiation of huNV VP2 translation. More detailed analyses revealed that the site of reinitiation is not fixed to a single codon and does not need to be an AUG, even though this codon is clearly preferred. Interestingly, we were able to show that reinitiation can occur at AUG codons downstream of the canonical start/stop site in huNV and feline calicivirus but not in rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus. Although reinitiation at the original start site is independent of the Kozak context, downstream initiation exhibits requirements for start site sequence context known for linear scanning. These analyses on start codon recognition give a more detailed insight into this fascinating mechanism of gene expression.

  5. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J; Wilson, Dane F

    2013-05-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  6. Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steve; Moore, D.

    2013-04-05

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  7. Alternative Antimicrobial Approach: Nano-Antimicrobial Materials

    PubMed Central

    Beyth, Nurit; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Domb, Avi; Khan, Wahid; Hazan, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous existing potent antibiotics and other antimicrobial means, bacterial infections are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the need to develop additional bactericidal means has significantly increased due to the growing concern regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilm associated infections. Consequently, attention has been especially devoted to new and emerging nanoparticle-based materials in the field of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present review discusses the activities of nanoparticles as an antimicrobial means, their mode of action, nanoparticle effect on drug-resistant bacteria, and the risks attendant on their use as antibacterial agents. Factors contributing to nanoparticle performance in the clinical setting, their unique properties, and mechanism of action as antibacterial agents are discussed in detail. PMID:25861355

  8. Quantum Interactive Dualism: An Alternative to Materialism

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P

    2005-06-01

    Materialism rest implicitly upon the general conception of nature promoted by Galileo and Newton during the seventeenth century. It features the causal closure of the physical: The course of physically described events for all time is fixed by laws that refer exclusively to the physically describeable features of nature, and initial conditions on these feature. No reference to subjective thoughts or feeling of human beings enter. That simple conception of nature was found during the first quarter of the twentieth century to be apparently incompatible with the empirical facts. The founders of quantum theory created a new fundamental physical theory, quantum theory, which introduced crucially into the causal structure certain conscious choices made by human agents about how they will act. These conscious human choices are ''free'' in the sense that they are not fixed by the known laws. But they can influence the course of physically described events. Thus the principle of the causal closure of the physical fails. Applications in psycho-neuro-dynamics are described.

  9. Photoluminescence Studies of ZnSe Starting Materials and Vapor Grown Bulk Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, S.; Wang, Ling Jun; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra were measured on ZnSe starting materials provided by various vendors and on bulk crystals grown from these starting materials by physical vapor transport (PVT) to study the effects of purification and contamination during PVT process. The impurity levels in one set of starting material/grown crystal were also measured by glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS). The purification effect of pre-growth heat treatments and the PVT process is evidenced from the GDMS results which showed orders of magnitude reduction in the Li and Na concentration and a factor of 3 reduction in the O content after growth. The PL spectra showed that the strong emissions associated with Li (or Na) in one of the starting materials disappeared after growth. The GDMS results also showed increases in the At and Si contents by orders of magnitude after growth. To evaluate the contamination of the crystal during the high temperature growth process, three growth runs were processed using similar growth parameters but different furnace environments. The PL spectra suggest that the At contamination originated from the fused silica ampoule and that the Inconel cartridge might have been the cause of the broad Cu green and Cu red bands observed in one of the grown crystals.

  10. Photoluminescence Studies of ZnSe Starting Materials and Vapor Grown Bulk Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, S.; Wang, Ling Jun; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra were measured on ZnSe starting materials provided by various vendors and on bulk crystals grown from these starting materials by physical vapor transport (PVT) to study the effects of purification and contamination during PVT process. The impurity levels in one set of starting material/grown crystal were also measured by glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS). The purification effect of pre-growth heat treatments and the PVT process is evidenced from the GDMS results which showed orders of magnitude reduction in the Li and Na concentration and a factor of 3 reduction in the O content after growth. The PL spectra showed that the strong emissions associated with Li (or Na) in one of the starting materials disappeared after growth. The GDMS results also showed increases in the At and Si contents by orders of magnitude after growth. To evaluate the contamination of the crystal during the high temperature growth process, three growth runs were processed using similar growth parameters but different furnace environments. The PL spectra suggest that the At contamination originated from the fused silica ampoule and that the Inconel cartridge might have been the cause of the broad Cu green and Cu red bands observed in one of the grown crystals.

  11. Alternative EHC heating patterns and their impact on cold-start emissions performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kubsh, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    Electrically heated catalytic converter (EHC) heating patterns which utilize zones covering less than the available face cross-sectional area have been evaluated for cold start FTP performance. In this work a closer look is given to the concept of partial cross-sectional heating of the EHC as a means of reducing EHC energy demands. A specially designed EHC prototype that includes provisions for electrically heating various extents of the EHC cross-section has been evaluated in both low-mileage and simulated high-mileage conditions using the FTP driving cycle. The impact of various `zoned` EHC heating patterns on cold-start emission performance is presented and discussed. 12 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. UPS CNG Truck Fleet Start Up Experience: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walkowicz, K.

    2001-08-14

    UPS operates 140 Freightliner Custom Chassis compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles with Cummins B5.9G engines. Fifteen are participating in the Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project being funded by DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies and the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies.

  13. Determination of component mobilities in bimineralic reaction rims using isotopically doped starting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, Bastian; Abart, Rainer; Höschen, Carmen; Heinrich, Wilhelm

    2013-04-01

    Rim growth experiments were performed between monticellite (CaMgSiO4) single crystals and wollastonite (CaSiO3) powder at 900° C and 1.2 GPa to produce bimineralic diopside (CaMgSi2O6) + merwinite (Ca3MgSi2O8) reaction rims. Symmetrical makeup of the internal rim microstructure implies that rims grow from the original interface towards both reactants at identical rates, indicating that solely MgO-diffusion controls overall rim growth with logD (MgO) = -16.3 ± 0.2 m2s-1 (Joachim et al. 2012). Presence of ppm-amounts of water significantly affects the internal rim microstructure. At "very dry" condition, a lamellar microstructure of alternating palisade-shaped diopside and merwinite grains elongated normal to the reaction front is generated, indicating that CaO and SiO2-mobilities are significantly smaller compared to the MgO-mobility. In presence of minute amounts of water a segregated multilayer microstructure with almost perfectly monomineralic merwinite - diopside - merwinite layers oriented parallel to the reaction front develops, indicating a sufficient additional mobility of either CaO or SiO2 compared to MgO. We used isotopically doped wollastonite (44Ca29SiO3) to identify, which component mobility, CaO or SiO2, is enhanced in presence of ppm amounts of water. Both, 44Ca stemming from the wollastonite as well as 40Ca stemming from the monticellite are distributed across the entire rim. In addition to that, small amounts of 40Ca are found within the wollastonite and substantial amounts of 44Ca are found in the monticellite starting material. In contrast to that, 28Si and 29Si remain in the regions that were originally occupied by their respective source materials monticellite and wollastonite, indicating that the SiO2-mobility is comparatively low. This suggests that the presence of small amounts of water significantly enhances the relative mobility of CaO. Consequently minute amounts of water may not only affect overall rim growth kinetics but also the

  14. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  15. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  16. Heat Treatments of ZnSe Starting Materials for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Palosz, W.; Feth, S.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different heat treatments on stoichiometry and residual gas pressure in ZnSe physical vapor transport system was investigated. The dependence of the amount and composition of the residual gas on various heat treatment procedures is reported. Heat treatment of ZnSe starting materials by baking under the condition of dynamic vacuum to adjust its stoichiometry was performed and the effectiveness of the treatment was confirmed by the measurements of the partial pressure of Se2, P(sub Se2), in equilibrium with the heat treated samples. Optimum heat treatment procedures on the ZnSe starting material for the physical vapor transport process are discussed and verified experimentally.

  17. Synthesis and impurity profiling of MDMA prepared from commonly available starting materials.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ryan; Shimmon, Ronald; McDonagh, Andrew M

    2012-11-30

    This work examines the synthesis of 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) from common starting materials that may be utilised by clandestine laboratory operators. Piperonal was prepared from two common starting materials, piperine (from pepper) and vanillin (a common flavouring). Piperine was converted to piperonal by ozonolysis and oxidative cleavage with potassium permanganate and tetrahydrofuran. Vanillin was converted to piperonal by demethylation with pyridine and aluminium chloride followed by methylenation with dichloromethane. The resulting piperonal samples were converted via a commonly encountered route to MDMA. The impurities that indicate a particular route were identified and the feasibility of each method was also assessed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoluminescence Studies of ZnSe Starting Materials and Vapor Grown Bulk Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, Shari; Wang, Ling Jun; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1999-01-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra and glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS) were measured on ZnSe starting materials provided by various vendors and on bulk crystals grown from these starting materials by physical vapor transport (PVT) to study the effects of purification and contamination during crystal growth process. The purification effect of pre-growth heat treatments and the PVT process is evidenced from the GDMS results which showed orders of magnitude reduction in the Li and Na concentration and a factor of 3 reduction in the 0 content after growth. The PL spectra showed that the strong emissions associated with Li (or Na) in one of the starting materials disappeared after growth. To evaluate the contamination of the crystal during the high temperature growth process three growth runs were processed using similar growth parameters but with different furnace environments. The GDMS results showed orders of magnitude increase in the Al and Si contents after growth. The PL spectra suggest that the Al contamination was originated from the fused silica ampoule and the Inconel cartridge might have been the cause for the broad Cu green and Cu red bands observed in one of the grown crystal.

  19. Photoluminescence Studies of ZnSe Starting Materials and Vapor Grown Bulk Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, Shari; Wang, Ling Jun; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1999-01-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra and glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS) were measured on ZnSe starting materials provided by various vendors and on bulk crystals grown from these starting materials by physical vapor transport (PVT) to study the effects of purification and contamination during crystal growth process. The purification effect of pre-growth heat treatments and the PVT process is evidenced from the GDMS results which showed orders of magnitude reduction in the Li and Na concentration and a factor of 3 reduction in the 0 content after growth. The PL spectra showed that the strong emissions associated with Li (or Na) in one of the starting materials disappeared after growth. To evaluate the contamination of the crystal during the high temperature growth process three growth runs were processed using similar growth parameters but with different furnace environments. The GDMS results showed orders of magnitude increase in the Al and Si contents after growth. The PL spectra suggest that the Al contamination was originated from the fused silica ampoule and the Inconel cartridge might have been the cause for the broad Cu green and Cu red bands observed in one of the grown crystal.

  20. Improved alternatives for estimating in-use material stocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Qiang; Graedel, T E

    2015-03-03

    Determinations of in-use material stocks are useful for exploring past patterns and future scenarios of materials use, for estimating end-of-life flows of materials, and thereby for guiding policies on recycling and sustainable management of materials. This is especially true when those determinations are conducted for individual products or product groups such as "automobiles" rather than general (and sometimes nebulous) sectors such as "transportation". We propose four alternatives to the existing top-down and bottom-up methods for estimating in-use material stocks, with the choice depending on the focus of the study and on the available data. We illustrate with aluminum use in automobiles the robustness of and consistencies and differences among these four alternatives and demonstrate that a suitable combination of the four methods permits estimation of the in-use stock of a material contained in all products employing that material, or in-use stocks of different materials contained in a particular product. Therefore, we anticipate the estimation in the future of in-use stocks for many materials in many products or product groups, for many regions, and for longer time periods, by taking advantage of methodologies that fully employ the detailed data sets now becoming available.

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF PACKAGING MATERIALS ALTERNATIVES TO EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report represents the second demonstration of cleaner technologies to support the goals of the 33/50 Program under the EPA Cooperative Agreement No. CR-821848. The report presents assessment results of alternative packaging materials which could potentially replace expanded...

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF PACKAGING MATERIALS ALTERNATIVES TO EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report represents the second demonstration of cleaner technologies to support the goals of the 33/50 Program under the EPA Cooperative Agreement No. CR-821848. The report presents assessment results of alternative packaging materials which could potentially replace expanded...

  3. Interlibrary Loan of Alternative Format Materials: A Balanced Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massis, Bruce E., Ed.; Vitzansky, Winnie, Ed.

    This document presents perspectives on, and a reference guide to internationally interlending materials in alternate formats (recordings, braille, large print). A questionnaire was sent to the world's known libraries serving the blind; results of the survey include specific lending information from 29 countries including: South Africa, Hong Kong,…

  4. A new synthesis of TATB using inexpensive starting materials and mild reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A.R.; Pagoria, P.F.; Schmidt, R.D.

    1996-04-01

    TATB is currently manufactured in US by nitration of the expensive TCB to give 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene which is then aminated to yield TATB. Elevated temperatures (150 C) are required for both reactions. There is a need for a more economical synthesis of TATB that also addresses current environmental issues. We have recently found that 1,1,1-trimethylhydrazinium iodide (TMHI) allows the amination of nitroarenes at ambient temperature via Vicarious Nucleophilic Substitution of hydrogen. TMHI reacts with picramide in presence of strong base (NaOMe or t-BuOK) to give TATB in over 95% yield. TMHI and picramide can be obtained from either inexpensive starting materials or surplus energetic materials from demilitarization activities, such as the 30,000 metric tons of UDMH (surplus rocket propellant) from the former Soviet Union.

  5. Formation Mechanism of Titanium Silicon Carbide: The Effect of Different Composition of Starting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solihin; Mursito, Anggoro Tri; Sun, Zhengming

    2017-07-01

    Titanium silicon carbide (Ti3SiC2) is a kind of ceramic that has physical property value similar with metal. Ti3SiC2 has been synthesized through various methods based on solid state reaction. Although Ti3SiC2 has been synthesized through various methods by using various starting materials consisting titanium (Ti), silicon (Si), and carbon (C) the mechanism of Ti3SiC2 formation through sintering has not fully understood. The aim of this research is to reveal the mechanism happening during sintering. Two composition of starting material was used, 2Ti/2Si/3TiC and 5Ti/2Si/3C. The analysis through XRD and SEM-EDS shows that the formation of intermediate phases, TiC and Ti5Si3, takes place prior to the formation of Ti3SiC2. In other words, Ti3SiC2 can only be formed through solid state reaction between TiC and Ti5Si3. Since TiC has already available in the system 2Ti/2Si/3TiC, the phase purity of Ti3SiC2 in 2Ti/2Si/3TiC is always higher than that of 5Ti/2Si/3C.

  6. Evaluation of alternate construction materials for a lithium electrolysis cell

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Olsen, A.R.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Electrolytic cells currently used for the production of lithium metal are constructed of A285 Grade A steel (carbon content less than 0.15%). Failures of the cell wall have frequently occurred after 2 to 5 years of service, and these failures have been attributed to corrosion resulting from the reaction of iron carbide with lithium. An examination of a recent failure confirmed this conclusion. In an effort to identify alternate construction materials with better corrosion resistance for this application, five materials with very low carbon levels and/or carbides more stable than those in A285 were selected for evaluation. Materials were evaluated after exposure in an operating electrolytic cell, after exposure to pure lithium, and after exposure to a moist air-chlorine mixture. Results show that all five of the alternative materials selected are more corrosion resistant than A285, but two were eliminated from further consideration because of other potential shortcomings. Additional long-term corrosion tests are recommended for the remaining three candidate materials. Final selection should be based on considerations of cost, availability, and fabricability in addition to compatibility. 26 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Alternative material study for heat assisted magnetic recording transducer application

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, B. X. Cen, Z. H.; Hu, J. F.; Tsai, J. W. H.

    2015-05-07

    In heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), optical near field transducer (NFT) is a key component. Au is currently used as NFT material because of its strong surface plasmon effect. Due to the soft property of Au material, reliability of Au NFT becomes a key issue for realizing HAMR production. In this paper, the possibility of alternative materials, including transition metal nitrides (TMNs) and transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) to replace Au is studied. The results show that all of the listed TMN and TCO materials can meet the mechanical requirements at room temperature in terms of hardness and thermal expansion. An optical model, which includes optical waveguide, NFT and FePt media, is used to simulate NFT performances. The results indicate that the resonant wavelengths for NFT with TCO materials are longer than 1500 nm, which is not suitable for HAMR application. TMN materials are suitable for NFT application at wavelength band of around 800 nm. But the NFT efficiency is very low. ZrN is the best material among TMN materials and the efficiency of ZrN NFT is only 13% of the Au NFT's efficiency. Reducing refractive index (n) and increasing extinction coefficient (k) will both lead to efficiency increase. Increasing k contributes more in the efficiency increase, while reducing n has a relatively low NFT absorption. For materials with the same figure of merit, the NFT with larger k material has higher efficiency. Doping materials to increase the material conduction electron density and growing film with larger size grain may be the way to increase k and reduce n.

  8. Manufacture of a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas from a starting material containing carbon and/or hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Santen, S.; Johansson, B.

    1984-08-21

    In a process for manufacturing a gas substantially containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas from a starting material containing carbon and/or hydrocarbon, the starting material is injected in powder or liquid form together with an oxidizing agent and slag former in a combustion zone while heat energy is simultaneously supplied. The combustion zone is formed in the lower portion of a shaft filled with particulate, solid, carbonaceous material and sulphur-binding slag former.

  9. Tumor-specific usage of alternative transcription start sites in colorectal cancer identified by genome-wide exon array analysis.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Kasper; Schepeler, Troels; Øster, Bodil; Rasmussen, Mads H; Vang, Søren; Wang, Kai; Hansen, Kristian Q; Lamy, Philippe; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Eller, Asger; Mansilla, Francisco; Laurila, Kirsti; Wiuf, Carsten; Laurberg, Søren; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Ørntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2011-10-14

    Approximately half of all human genes use alternative transcription start sites (TSSs) to control mRNA levels and broaden the transcriptional output in healthy tissues. Aberrant expression patterns promoting carcinogenesis, however, may arise from alternative promoter usage. By profiling 108 colorectal samples using exon arrays, we identified nine genes (TCF12, OSBPL1A, TRAK1, ANK3, CHEK1, UGP2, LMO7, ACSL5, and SCIN) showing tumor-specific alternative TSS usage in both adenoma and cancer samples relative to normal mucosa. Analysis of independent exon array data sets corroborated these findings. Additionally, we confirmed the observed patterns for selected mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Interestingly, for some of the genes, the tumor-specific TSS usage was not restricted to colorectal cancer. A comprehensive survey of the nine genes in lung, bladder, liver, prostate, gastric, and brain cancer revealed significantly altered mRNA isoform ratios for CHEK1, OSBPL1A, and TCF12 in a subset of these cancer types.To identify the mechanism responsible for the shift in alternative TSS usage, we antagonized the Wnt-signaling pathway in DLD1 and Ls174T colorectal cancer cell lines, which remarkably led to a shift in the preferred TSS for both OSBPL1A and TRAK1. This indicated a regulatory role of the Wnt pathway in selecting TSS, possibly also involving TP53 and SOX9, as their transcription binding sites were enriched in the promoters of the tumor preferred isoforms together with their mRNA levels being increased in tumor samples. Finally, to evaluate the prognostic impact of the altered TSS usage, immunohistochemistry was used to show deregulation of the total protein levels of both TCF12 and OSBPL1A, corresponding to the mRNA levels observed. Furthermore, the level of nuclear TCF12 had a significant correlation to progression free survival in a cohort of 248 stage II colorectal cancer samples. Alternative TSS usage in colorectal adenoma and

  10. Alternative processing methods for tungsten-base composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    Tungsten composite materials contain large amounts of tungsten distributed in a continuous matrix phase. Current commercial materials include the tungsten-nickel-iron with cobalt replacing some or all of the iron, and also tungsten-copper materials. Typically, these are fabricated by liquid-phase sintering of blended powders. Liquid-phase sintering offers the advantages of low processing costs, established technology, and generally attractive mechanical properties. However, liquid-phase sintering is restricted to a very limited number of matrix alloying elements and a limited range of tungsten and alloying compositions. In the past few years, there has been interest in a wider range of matrix materials that offer the potential for superior composite properties. These must be processed by solid-state processes and at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid undesired reactions between the tungsten and the matrix phase. These processes, in order of decreasing process temperature requirements, include hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing), hot extrusion, and dynamic compaction. The HIPing and hot extrusion processes have also been used to improve mechanical properties of conventional liquid-phase-sintered materials. Results of laboratory-scale investigations of solid-state consolidation of a variety of matrix materials, including titanium, hafnium, nickel aluminide, and steels are reviewed. The potential advantages and disadvantages of each of the possible alternative consolidation processes are identified. Postconsolidation processing to control microstructure and macrostructure is discussed, including novel methods of controlling microstructure alignment.

  11. Alternative processing methods for tungsten-base composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-01

    Tungsten composite materials contain large amounts of tungsten distributed in a continuous matrix phase. Current commercial materials include the tungsten-nickel-iron with cobalt replacing some or all of the iron, and also tungsten-copper materials. Typically, these are fabricated by liquid-phase sintering of blended powders. Liquid-phase sintering offers the advantages of low processing costs, established technology, and generally attractive mechanical properties. However, liquid-phase sintering is restricted to a very limited number of matrix alloying elements and a limited range of tungsten and alloying compositions. In the past few years, there has been interest in a wider range of matrix materials that offer the potential for superior composite properties. These must be processed by solid-state processes and at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid undesired reactions between the tungsten and the matrix phase. These processes, in order of decreasing process temperature requirements, include hot isostatic pressing (HEPing), hot extrusion, and dynamic compaction. The HIPing and hot extrusion processes have also been used to improve mechanical properties of conventional liquid-phase-sintered materials. The results of laboratory-scale investigations of solid-state consolidation of a variety of matrix materials, including titanium, hafnium, nickel aluminide, and steels are reviewed. The potential advantages and disadvantages of each of the possible alternative consolidation processes are identified. Post consolidation processing to control microstructure and macrostructure is discussed, including novel methods of controlling microstructure alignment.

  12. Uranium(iii) and thorium(iv) alkyl complexes as potential starting materials.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Myers, Alexander J; Rungthanaphatsophon, Pokpong; Lukens, Wayne W; Barnes, Charles L; Walensky, Justin R

    2016-12-13

    The synthesis and characterisation of a rare U(iii) alkyl complex, U[η(4)-Me2NC(H)C6H5]3, using the dimethylbenzylamine (DMBA) ligand has been accomplished. While attempting to prepare the U(iv) compound, reduction to the U(iii) complex occurred. In the analogous Th(iv) system, C-H bond activation of a methyl group of one dimethylamine was observed yielding Th[η(4)-Me2NC(H)C6H5]2[η(5)-(CH2)MeNC(H)C6H5] with a dianionic DMBA ligand. The utility of these complexes as starting materials has been analyzed using a bulky dithiocarboxylate ligand to yield tetravalent actinide species.

  13. Sweet potato starch residue as starting material to prepare polyacrylonitrile adsorbent via SI-SET-LRP.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhihai; Wang, Dongju; Chen, Hou; Sun, Jinming; Xu, Yuanyuan

    2014-02-26

    Sweet potato starch residue (SPSR) was used as starting material to prepare an eco-friendly adsorbent. SPSR was modified by bromoacetyl bromide to obtain a macroinitiator for surface-initiated single electron transfer-living radical polymerization (SI-SET-LRP) of acrylonitrile (AN) catalyzed by La(0)/hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of ascorbic acid (VC). The amidoxime (AO) adsorbent was prepared by the reaction of the graft copolymer bromoactylated sweet potato starch (BSPS)/polyacrylonitrile (BSPS-g-PAN) with hydroxylamine. The maximum adsorption capacity for Hg(II) was 4.03 mmol·g(-1). This simple method provided a novel approach to recycle and reuse agricultural residues for controlling heavy metal pollution.

  14. Influence of starting material on the degassing behavior of trachytic and phonolitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, Oliver; Marxer, Holger; Nowak, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic magmatic processes beneath volcanic systems, occurring during magma ascent, cannot be observed directly in nature. Simulation of magma ascent in the lab realized by continuous decompression (CD) of a volatile containing melt is essential to understand these processes that may lead to potentially catastrophic eruptions threatening millions of people in highly populated areas like Naples located between the Campi Flegrei Volcanic Field and the Monte Somma-Vesuvio strato-volcano. In this project, experimental simulations of Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) magma ascent will give insight to the mechanisms of the CI super eruption, thus providing tools for volcanic hazard assessment at the high risk Campanian Volcanic District and other comparable volcanic systems. Additionally, comparable experiments with the same conditions using the 'white pumice' composition of the catastrophic Vesuvius AD 79 (VAD79) eruption, have been conducted. So far, the experiments were performed in an internally heated argon pressure vessel coupled with a high-pressure low-flow metering valve and a piezoelectric nano-positioning system using a starting pressure of 200 MPa, H2O content of about 5 wt% and two different decompression rates (0.024 and 0.17 MPa/s) at a superliquidus temperature of 1050 ° C to ensure a crystal free melt and a homogeneous bubble nucleation. Experiments were conducted with both, glass powder and cylinders, subsequently decompressed to 75 and 100 MPa and rapidly quenched. Beside the results that e.g. decompression rate, volatile content, fluid solubility and target pressure affect the degassing behavior of the melt, the influence of the starting material on the degassing processes is significant. Analyses of BSE- and transmitted light microscopy images revealed a different degassing behavior of glass cylinder experiments compared to powders. Nitrogen has a very low solubility in hydrous silicate melts, supporting our suggestion that preexisting nitrogen rich

  15. Recommendation to replace PVC disposable shoe cover with alternative materials

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, A.E.; Rankin, W.N.

    1992-01-17

    An alternative for disposable shoe covers presently fabricated from PVC (polyvinyl chloride) was investigated to minimize disposal costs. Plans are to incinerate these items for disposal. The exhaust from the incineration of PVC must be processed through a sodium hydroxide scrubber to remove the chlorides. A substantial cost savings ($70OK/yr) would be expected from replacing these supplies with similar items fabricated from a material that contains no chlorides. This report contains evaluations of submitted to the Savannah River Laboratory for testing.

  16. Tribological performance of some alternative bearing materials for artificial joints.

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G.; Erdemir, A.; Liang, H.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Alaska

    2003-08-01

    In current artificial joints consisting of metal or ceramic and polyethylene (ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene, UHMWPE) bearing surfaces, the wear debris of polyethylene is the main cause for shortening implant's life. In order to enhance the durability of human artificial joints, alternative bearing surfaces may be needed. In the present study, the tribological performance of several candidate implant materials, including the diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film coating on stainless steel were investigated. A pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding was used for preliminary materials evaluation and friction and wear testing. Test pairs were lubricated with bovine blood serum. The DLC coating sliding against uncoated stainless steel showed the lowest friction coefficient and very little, if any, wear. Wear mechanisms in tests of ceramics and steel pairs were primarily abrasive.

  17. ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS FOR RAMP-EDGE SNS JUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Q.; Fan, Y.

    1999-06-01

    We report on the processing optimization and fabrication of ramp-edge high-temperature superconducting junctions by using alternative materials for both superconductor electrodes and normal-metal barrier. By using Ag-doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (Ag:YBCO) as electrodes and a cation-modified compound of (Pr{sub y}Gd{sub 0.6{minus}y})Ca{sub 0.4}Ba{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.4}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (y = 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6) as a normal-metal barrier, high-temperature superconducting Josephson junctions have been fabricated in a ramp-edge superconductor/normal-metal/superconductor (SNS) configuration. By using Ag:YBCO as electrodes, we have found that the processing controllability /reproducibility and the stability of the SNS junctions are improved substantially. The junctions fabricated with these alternative materials show well-defined RSJ-like current vs voltage characteristics at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  18. Materials for Alternative Energies: Computational Materials Discovery and Crystal Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverton, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Many of the key technological problems associated with alternative energies may be traced back to the lack of suitable materials. The materials discovery process may be greatly aided by the use of computational methods, particular those atomistic methods based on density functional theory. In this talk, we present an overview of recent work on energy-related materials from density-functional based approaches. We have developed novel computational tools which enable accurate prediction of crystal structures for new materials (using both Monte Carlo and Genetic Algorithm based approaches), materials discovery via high-throughput, data mining techniques, and automated phase diagram calculations. We highlight applications in the area of Li battery materials and hydrogen storage materials.

  19. Alternative materials to cadmium for neutron absorbers in safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Corey R; Geist, William H; West, James D

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium is increasingly difficult to use in safeguards applications because of rising cost and increased safety regulations. This work examines the properties of two materials produced by Ceradyne, inc. that present alternatives to cadmium for neutron shielding. The first is an aluminum metal doped with boron and the second is a boron carbide powder, compressed into a ceramic. Both are enriched in the {sup 10}B isotope. Two sheets of boron doped aluminum (1.1 mm and 5.2mm thick) and one sheet of boron carbide (8.5mm thick) were provided by Ceradyne for testing. An experiment was designed to test the neutron absorption capabilities of these three sheets against two different thicknesses of cadmium (0.6mm and 1.6mm thick). The thinner piece of aluminum boron alloy (1.1mm) performed as well as the cadmium pieces at absorbing neutrons. The thicker aluminum-boron plate provided more shielding than the cadmium sheets and the boron carbide performed best by a relatively large margin. Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code modeling of the experiment was performed to provide validaLed computational tools for predicting the behavior of systems in which these materials may be incorporated as alternatives to cadmium. MCNPX calculations predict that approximately 0.17mm of the boron carbide is equivalent to 0.6mm of cadmium. There are drawbacks to these materials that need to be noted when considering using them as replacements for cadmium. Notably, they may need to be thicker than cadmium, and are not malleable, requiring machining to fit any curved forms.

  20. Alternative comparison, analysis, and evaluation of solid waste and materials system alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the impact of solid waste technical options on values and objectives that are important to the public. It is written in support of the Solid Waste and Materials Systems Alternatives Study (WHC, 1995). Described are the values that were identified, the major programmatic risks, how the impacts were measured, the performance of alternatives, the methodology used for the analysis, and the implications of the results. Decision analysis was used to guide the collection and analysis of data and the logic of the evaluation. Decision analysis is a structured process for the analysis and evaluation of alternatives. It is theoretically grounded in a set of axioms that capture the basic principles of decision making (von Neuman and Morgenstern 1947). Decision analysis objectively specifies what factors are to be considered, how they are to be measured and evaluated, and heir relative importance. The result is an analysis in which the underlying rationale or logic upon which the decision is based is made explicit. This makes possible open discussion of the decision basis in which facts and values are clearly distinguished, resulting in a well- documented decision that can be clearly explained and justified. The strategy of decision analysis is to analyze the various components relevant to the decision separately and then integrate the individual judgments to arrive at an overall decision. This assures that all the relevant factors are identified and their relative importance is considered. The procedure for obtaining the individual judgments, and the decision rules, for combining them and evaluating alternatives, have both theoretical and empirical foundation in mathematics, economics, and psychology.

  1. Mesoporous Carbon-based Materials for Alternative Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Kimberly Michelle

    Increasing concerns for the escalating issues activated by the effect of carbon dioxide emissions on the global climate from extensive use of fossil fuels and the limited amount of fossil resources has led to an in-depth search for alternative energy systems, primarily based on nuclear or renewable energy sources. Recent innovations in the production of more efficient devices for energy harvesting, storage, and conversion are based on the incorporation of nanostructured materials into electrochemical systems. The aforementioned nano-electrochemical energy systems hold particular promise for alternative energy transportation related technologies including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, and electrochemical supercapacitors. In each of these devices, nanostructured materials can be used to increase the surface area where the critical chemical reactions occur within the same volume and mass, thereby increasing the energy density, power density, electrical efficiency, and physical robustness of the system. Durable corrosion resistant carbon support materials for fuel cells have been designed by adding conductive low cost carbon materials with chemically robust ceramic materials. Since a strict control of the pore size is mandatory to optimize properties for improved performance, chemical activation agents have been utilized as porogens to tune surface areas, pore size distributions, and composition of carbon-based mesoporous materials. Through the use of evaporative self-assembly methods, both randomly disordered and surfactant-templated, ordered carbon-silica nanocomposites have been synthesized with controlled surface area, pore volume, and pore size ranging from 50-800 m2/g, 0.025-0.75 cm3/g, and 2-10 nm, respectively. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) ranging from 0.05-1.0 wt. % were added to the aforementioned carbon-silica nanocomposites, which provided an additional increase in surface area and improved conductivity. Initially, a conductivity value of 0.0667 S

  2. Organic Chemical Attribution Signatures for the Sourcing of a Mustard Agent and Its Starting Materials.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Carlos G; Bronk, Krys; Dockendorff, Brian P; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-05-17

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) are being investigated for the sourcing of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their starting materials that may be implicated in chemical attacks or CW proliferation. The work reported here demonstrates for the first time trace impurities from the synthesis of tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) that point to the reagent and the specific reagent stocks used in the synthesis of this CW agent. Thirty batches of HN3 were synthesized using different combinations of commercial stocks of triethanolamine (TEA), thionyl chloride, chloroform, and acetone. The HN3 batches and reagent stocks were then analyzed for impurities by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. All the reagent stocks had impurity profiles that differentiated them from one another. This was demonstrated by building classification models with partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) and obtaining average stock classification errors of 2.4, 2.8, 2.8, and 11% by cross-validation for chloroform (7 stocks), thionyl chloride (3 stocks), acetone (7 stocks), and TEA (3 stocks), respectively, and 0% for a validation set of chloroform samples. In addition, some reagent impurities indicative of reagent type were found in the HN3 batches that were originally present in the reagent stocks and presumably not altered during synthesis. More intriguing, impurities in HN3 batches that were apparently produced by side reactions of impurities unique to specific TEA and chloroform stocks, and thus indicative of their use, were observed.

  3. Organic Chemical Attribution Signatures for the Sourcing of a Mustard Agent and Its Starting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Carlos G.; Bronk, Krys; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-05-17

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) are being investigated for the sourcing of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their starting materials that may be implicated in chemical attacks or CW proliferation. The work reported here demonstrates for the first time trace impurities produced during the synthesis of tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) that point to specific reagent stocks used in the synthesis of this CW agent. Thirty batches of HN3 were synthesized using different combinations of commercial stocks of triethanolamine (TEA), thionyl chloride, chloroform, and acetone. The HN3 batches and reagent stocks were then analyzed for impurities by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reaction-produced impurities indicative of specific TEA and chloroform stocks were exclusively discovered in HN3 batches made with those reagent stocks. In addition, some reagent impurities were found in the HN3 batches that were presumably not altered during synthesis and believed to be indicative of reagent type regardless of stock. Supervised classification using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) on the impurity profiles of chloroform samples from seven stocks resulted in an average classification error by cross-validation of 2.4%. A classification error of zero was obtained using the seven-stock PLSDA model on a validation set of samples from an arbitrarily selected chloroform stock. In a separate analysis, all samples from two of seven chloroform stocks that were purposely not modeled had their samples matched to a chloroform stock rather than assigned a “no class” classification.

  4. Integrative Multi-omic Analysis of Human Platelet eQTLs Reveals Alternative Start Site in Mitofusin 2

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Lukas M.; Chen, Edward S.; Edelstein, Leonard C.; Kong, Xianguo; Bhatlekar, Seema; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Bray, Paul F.; Shaw, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in ischemic cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death worldwide. Numerous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified loci associated with CVD risk. However, our understanding of how these variants contribute to disease is limited. Using data from the platelet RNA and expression 1 (PRAX1) study, we analyzed cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in platelets from 154 normal human subjects. We confirmed these results in silico by performing allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis, which demonstrated that the allelic directionality of eQTLs and ASE patterns correlate significantly. Comparison of platelet eQTLs with data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project revealed that a number of platelet eQTLs are platelet specific and that platelet eQTL peaks localize to the gene body at a higher rate than eQTLs from other tissues. Upon integration with data from previously published GWASs, we found that the trait-associated variant rs1474868 coincides with the eQTL peak for mitofusin 2 (MFN2). Additional experimental and computational analyses revealed that this eQTL is linked to an unannotated alternate MFN2 start site preferentially expressed in platelets. Integration of phenotype data from the PRAX1 study showed that MFN2 expression levels were significantly associated with platelet count. This study links the variant rs1474868 to a platelet-specific regulatory role for MFN2 and demonstrates the utility of integrating multi-omic data with eQTL analysis in disease-relevant tissues for interpreting GWAS results. PMID:27132591

  5. Twisting, an alternative strategy to compact granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asencio, Karol; Zuriguel, Iker; Maza, Diego

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, the common method to pack granular materials is to tap the ensemble against the gravity. Despite the apparent simplicity of that method, the asymptotic states reached by the tapped systems have strongly dependences on parameters like the shape of the tapping pulse, the container geometry or the ratio between lateral and axial dimensions. Beyond the restrictions imposed by the system boundaries, the particle shape (like rods or tetrahedrons) plays a central role in the evolution and the final state of the ensemble. In this work, we introduce an unconventional method for compacting granular ensembles by applying a sequence of alternating counterrotating pulses or "twists". By using spherical particles we analyze the efficiency of this method to achieve highly packed configurations.

  6. Alternative materials lead to practical nanophotonic components (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Nathaniel; Ferrera, Marcello; DeVault, Clayton; Kim, Jongbum; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been a flurry of research in the field of alternative plasmonic materials, but for telecommunication applications, CMOS compatible materials titanium nitride and doped zinc oxides are among the most promising materials currently available. TiN is a gold-like ceramic with a permittivity cross-over near 500nm. In addition, TiN can attain ultra-thin, ultra-smooth epitaxial films on substrates such as c-sapphire, MgO, and silicon. Partnering TiN with CMOS compatible silicon nitride enables a fully solid state waveguide which is able to achieve a propagation length greater than 1cm for a ~8μm mode size at 1.55μm. Utilizing doped zinc oxide films as a dynamic material, high performance modulators can also be realized due to the low-loss achieved by the TiN/Si3N4 waveguide. Simply by placing a thin layer of aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) on top of the waveguide structure, a modulator with very low insertion loss is achieved. Our recent work has investigated optical tuning of AZO films by the pump-probe method, demonstrating a change in the refractive index of -0.17+0.25i at 1.3μm with an ultrafast response of 1ps. Assuming this change in the refractive index for the AZO film, a modulation of ~0.7dB/μm is possible in the structure with ~0.5dB insertion loss and an operational speed of 1THz. Further optimization of the design is expected to lead to an increased modulation depth without sacrificing insertion loss or speed. Consequently, nanophotonic technologies are reaching a critical point where many applications including telecom, medicine, and quantum science can see practical systems which provide new functionalities.

  7. Critical appraisal of arguments for the delayed-start design proposed as alternative to the parallel-group randomized clinical trial design in the field of rare disease.

    PubMed

    Spineli, Loukia M; Jenz, Eva; Großhennig, Anika; Koch, Armin

    2017-08-17

    A number of papers have proposed or evaluated the delayed-start design as an alternative to the standard two-arm parallel group randomized clinical trial (RCT) design in the field of rare disease. However the discussion is felt to lack a sufficient degree of consideration devoted to the true virtues of the delayed start design and the implications either in terms of required sample-size, overall information, or interpretation of the estimate in the context of small populations. To evaluate whether there are real advantages of the delayed-start design particularly in terms of overall efficacy and sample size requirements as a proposed alternative to the standard parallel group RCT in the field of rare disease. We used a real-life example to compare the delayed-start design with the standard RCT in terms of sample size requirements. Then, based on three scenarios regarding the development of the treatment effect over time, the advantages, limitations and potential costs of the delayed-start design are discussed. We clarify that delayed-start design is not suitable for drugs that establish an immediate treatment effect, but for drugs with effects developing over time, instead. In addition, the sample size will always increase as an implication for a reduced time on placebo resulting in a decreased treatment effect. A number of papers have repeated well-known arguments to justify the delayed-start design as appropriate alternative to the standard parallel group RCT in the field of rare disease and do not discuss the specific needs of research methodology in this field. The main point is that a limited time on placebo will result in an underestimated treatment effect and, in consequence, in larger sample size requirements compared to those expected under a standard parallel-group design. This also impacts on benefit-risk assessment.

  8. Regulatory Exclusions and Alternative Standards for the Recycling of Materials, Solid Wastes and Hazardous Wastes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Determining the Level of Regulation for Hazardous Waste Recycling, Recycled Materials that are not Subject to RCRA Hazardous Waste Regulation, Materials Subject to Alternative Regulatory Controls, Materials Subject to Full Hazardous Waste Regulations.

  9. Alternate electrode materials for the SP100 reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Randich, E.

    1992-05-01

    This work was performed in response to a request by the Astro-Space Division of the General Electric Co. to develop alternate electrodes materials for the electrodes of the PD2 modules to be used in the SP100 thermoelectric power conversion system. Initially, the project consisted of four tasks: (1) development of a ZrB{sub 2} (C) CVD coating on SiMo substrates, (2) development of a ZrB{sub 2} (C) CVD coating on SiGe substrates, (3) development of CVI W for porous graphite electrodes, and (4) technology transfer of pertinent developed processes. The project evolved initially into developing only ZrB{sub 2} coatings on SiGe and graphite substrates, and later into developing ZrB{sub 2} coatings only on graphite substrates. Several sizes of graphite and pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite substrates were coated with ZrB{sub 2} during the project. For budgetary reasons, the project was terminated after half the allotted time had passed. Apart from the production of coated specimens for evaluation, the major accomplishment of the project was the development of the CVD processing to produce the desired coatings.

  10. How to Start Your Own Business. Women Entrepreneurs Project. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Barbara S.; McNamara, Patricia P.

    This text consisting of eight learning activities packages (LAP's) was developed during the California Women Entrepreneurs Project for use in a course designed to help women entrepreneurs learn how to start their own small business. The LAP's included here are self-paced, student-centered modules which take the learner step by step through the…

  11. How to Start Your Own Business. Women Entrepreneurs Project. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Barbara S.; McNamara, Patricia P.

    This text consisting of eight learning activities packages (LAP's) was developed during the California Women Entrepreneurs Project for use in a course designed to help women entrepreneurs learn how to start their own small business. The LAP's included here are self-paced, student-centered modules which take the learner step by step through the…

  12. 46 CFR 50.20-30 - Alternative materials or methods of construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... scientific data and evidence as may be necessary to establish the suitability of such materials or methods of... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternative materials or methods of construction. 50.20... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Plan Submittal and Approval § 50.20-30 Alternative materials or methods of...

  13. 46 CFR 50.20-30 - Alternative materials or methods of construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... scientific data and evidence as may be necessary to establish the suitability of such materials or methods of... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alternative materials or methods of construction. 50.20... ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Plan Submittal and Approval § 50.20-30 Alternative materials or methods of...

  14. DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Start-Up Experience (Alternative Fuel Transit Buses Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Battelle

    2000-06-30

    This report, based on interviews and site visits conducted in October 1999, describes the start-up activities of the DART liquefied natural gas program, identifying problem areas, highlighting successes, and capturing the lessons learned in DART's ongoing efforts to remain at the forefront of the transit industry.

  15. Numbers Start Here. Material from the Merseyside and Cheshire Numeracy Lift-Off Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit, London (England).

    This skills pack is intended to assist basic numeracy tutors working with adults needing help with prenumber work, number concepts up to 10, time telling, and British money handling. The package includes notes on using the materials provided; materials for use in assessing student skills with respect to color and shape recognition, number…

  16. Start-up alternatives and performance of an UASB pilot plant treating diluted municipal wastewater at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J A; Ruiz, I; Gómez, M; Presas, J; Soto, M

    2006-09-01

    Different start-up procedures of an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) digester were carried out. Start-up without inoculum (experiment A) was delayed for about 120 day. The digester reached 75-85% total suspended solids (TSS) removal, 54-58% total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal and 63-73% biological oxygen demand (BOD5) removal at influent concentrations of 240-340 mg TCODil-1, temperatures of 13.5-15 degrees C and hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 10-11 h. Digested sludge was used as inoculum in experiment B. After the start-up period of 75 days, digester efficiencies were 58%, 41% and 54% for TSS, TCOD and BOD5 removal, respectively, working at 169 mg TCODil-1, temperature of 14 degrees C and HRT of 11 h. The sludge bed developed and stabilised quickly when using a hydraulically adapted inoculum (experiment C), but TCOD and BOD5 removals remained low and volatile fatty acids (VFA) accumulated in the effluent.

  17. A clean start to productive orchards and vineyards: recent research on methyl bromide alternatives for perennial crop nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methyl bromide (MB) is an important pest management tool in open field perennial crop nurseries in California for control of many soil borne pests including plant parasitic nematodes, pathogens, and weeds. Because MB is being phased out under the provisions of the Montreal Protocol, alternatives are...

  18. Effect of starting materials on the superconducting properties of SmFeAsO1-xFx tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlei; Yao, Chao; Zhang, Xianping; Gao, Zhaoshun; Wang, Dongliang; Wang, Chengduo; Lin, He; Ma, Yanwei; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-03-01

    SmFeAsO1-xFx tapes were prepared using three kinds of starting materials. This showed that the starting materials have an obvious effect on the impurity phases in the final superconducting tapes. Compared with the other samples, the samples fabricated with SmAs, FeO, Fe2As, and SmF3 have the smallest arsenide impurity phases and voids. As a result, these samples possess much denser structures and better grain connectivities. Moreover, among the three kinds of sample fabricated in this work, this kind of sample has the highest zero resistivity temperature, ˜40 K, and the largest critical current density, ˜4600 A cm-2, in self-field at 4.2 K. This is the highest Jc value reported so far for SmFeAsO1-xFx wires and tapes.

  19. TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    HOLM MJ

    2009-06-25

    This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

  20. Effects of Water Location in Starting Materials on Bonding Behavior of Hydroxyapatite and Titanium via Hydrothermal Hot-pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoki, Takamasa; Hosoi, Kazuyuki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    Solidification of hydroxyapatite (HA:Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) and its bonding with titanium (Ti) was achieved simultaneously by using the hydrothermal hot-pressing method at temperatures as low as 150° C with no special surface treatment of Ti. A mixture of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate and calcium hydroxide was used as the starting powder material for solidifying HA. Three point bending tests were conducted to obtain an estimate of the fracture toughness for the HA/Ti interface as well as for the HA ceramics only. The fracture toughness tests showed that the induced crack from the pre-crack tip deviated from the HA/Ti interface and propagated into the HA. It is cleared that water in starting materials must be crystallized in starting materials in order to achieve the bonding HA ceramics and Ti by the HHP method. The fracture toughness determined on the bonded HA/Ti specimen was close to that of the HA ceramics only (approximate 0.3 Mpam1/2).

  1. Effects of Water Location in Starting Materials on Bonding Behavior of Hydroxyapatite and Titanium via Hydrothermal Hot-pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Onoki, Takamasa; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Hosoi, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-15

    Solidification of hydroxyapatite (HA:Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) and its bonding with titanium (Ti) was achieved simultaneously by using the hydrothermal hot-pressing method at temperatures as low as 150 deg. C with no special surface treatment of Ti. A mixture of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate and calcium hydroxide was used as the starting powder material for solidifying HA. Three point bending tests were conducted to obtain an estimate of the fracture toughness for the HA/Ti interface as well as for the HA ceramics only. The fracture toughness tests showed that the induced crack from the pre-crack tip deviated from the HA/Ti interface and propagated into the HA. It is cleared that water in starting materials must be crystallized in starting materials in order to achieve the bonding HA ceramics and Ti by the HHP method. The fracture toughness determined on the bonded HA/Ti specimen was close to that of the HA ceramics only (approximate 0.3 Mpam1/2)

  2. Non-proliferation, safeguards, and security for the fissile materials disposition program immobilization alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Tolk, K.M.; Moore, L.R.

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy is analyzing long-term storage and disposition alternatives for surplus weapons-usable fissile materials. A number of different disposition alternatives are being considered. These include facilities for storage, conversion and stabilization of fissile materials, immobilization in glass or ceramic material, fabrication of fissile material into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for reactors, use of reactor based technologies to convert material into spent fuel, and disposal of fissile material using geologic alternatives. This paper will focus on how the objectives of reducing security and proliferation risks are being considered, and the possible facility impacts. Some of the areas discussed in this paper include: (1) domestic and international safeguards requirements, (2) non-proliferation criteria and measures, (3) the threats, and (4) potential proliferation, safeguards, and security issues and impacts on the facilities. Issues applicable to all of the possible disposition alternatives will be discussed in this paper. However, particular attention is given to the plutonium immobilization alternatives.

  3. Alternative Processing of High Temperature Hafnium and Zirconium Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Gusman, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of refractory hafnium and zirconium based materials are being investigated at NASA Ames as part of ongoing research aimed at developing superior heat resistant materials for aerospace applications. Hafnium and zirconium diboride based materials have shown high temperature capabilities in simulated reentry environments indicating that these materials may successfully operate as reusable oxidation resistant components for leading edge applications. Due to the refractory nature of these materials, processing of fine-grained uniform microstructures poses a number of challenges. To better understand the process-property-microstructure relationship, processing of these materials has been carried out with conventional hot pressing in addition to the novel approach of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The two processing methods are compared and contrasted in an evaluation of the sintering behavior of high temperature diboride based materials and preliminary physical and mechanical properties are presented.

  4. Alternative Processing of High Temperature Hafnium and Zirconium Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Gusman, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of refractory hafnium and zirconium based materials are being investigated at NASA Ames as part of ongoing research aimed at developing superior heat resistant materials for aerospace applications. Hafnium and zirconium diboride based materials have shown high temperature capabilities in simulated reentry environments indicating that these materials may successfully operate as reusable oxidation resistant components for leading edge applications. Due to the refractory nature of these materials, processing of fine-grained uniform microstructures poses a number of challenges. To better understand the process-property-microstructure relationship, processing of these materials has been carried out with conventional hot pressing in addition to the novel approach of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The two processing methods are compared and contrasted in an evaluation of the sintering behavior of high temperature diboride based materials and preliminary physical and mechanical properties are presented.

  5. [Comparative analysis of conventional dental floss and alternative materials].

    PubMed

    Campos Júnior, A; Passanezi, E; Serizawa, T C; Barros, A S; Navarro, M F; Lopes, E S

    1990-01-01

    The interproximal plaque-removing effect of three different materials (classic dental floss, rafia floss and indian floss) was tested in a group of 80 males (18 years-old). After two weeks all the materials had the same efficacy in removing the bacterial plaque, with significant reduction in interproximal plaque index. According to an opinion inquiry the rafia floss was the most comfortable material to use and has the lowest cost as well.

  6. Effect of starting microstructure on helium plasma-materials interaction in tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Kun; Bannister, Mark E.; Meyer, Fred W.; ...

    2016-11-24

    Here, in a magnetic fusion energy (MFE) device, the plasma-facing materials (PFMs) will be subjected to tremendous fluxes of ions, heat, and neutrons. The response of PFMs to the fusion environment is still not well defined. Tungsten metal is the present candidate of choice for PFM applications such as the divertor in ITER. However, tungsten's microstructure will evolve in service, possibly to include recrystallization. How tungsten's response to plasma exposure evolves with changes in microstructure is presently unknown. In this work, we have exposed hot-worked and recrystallized tungsten to an 80 eV helium ion beam at a temperature of 900more » °C to fluences of 2 × 1023 or 20 × 1023 He/m2. This resulted in a faceted surface structure at the lower fluence or short but well-developed nanofuzz structure at the higher fluence. There was little difference in the hot-rolled or recrystallized material's near-surface (≤50 nm) bubbles at either fluence. At higher fluence and deeper depth, the bubble populations of the hot-rolled and recrystallized were different, the recrystallized being larger and deeper. This may explain previous high-fluence results showing pronounced differences in recrystallized material. The deeper penetration in recrystallized material also implies that grain boundaries are traps, rather than high-diffusivity paths.« less

  7. Effect of starting microstructure on helium plasma-materials interaction in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kun; Bannister, Mark E.; Meyer, Fred W.; Parish, Chad M.

    2016-11-24

    Here, in a magnetic fusion energy (MFE) device, the plasma-facing materials (PFMs) will be subjected to tremendous fluxes of ions, heat, and neutrons. The response of PFMs to the fusion environment is still not well defined. Tungsten metal is the present candidate of choice for PFM applications such as the divertor in ITER. However, tungsten's microstructure will evolve in service, possibly to include recrystallization. How tungsten's response to plasma exposure evolves with changes in microstructure is presently unknown. In this work, we have exposed hot-worked and recrystallized tungsten to an 80 eV helium ion beam at a temperature of 900 °C to fluences of 2 × 1023 or 20 × 1023 He/m2. This resulted in a faceted surface structure at the lower fluence or short but well-developed nanofuzz structure at the higher fluence. There was little difference in the hot-rolled or recrystallized material's near-surface (≤50 nm) bubbles at either fluence. At higher fluence and deeper depth, the bubble populations of the hot-rolled and recrystallized were different, the recrystallized being larger and deeper. This may explain previous high-fluence results showing pronounced differences in recrystallized material. The deeper penetration in recrystallized material also implies that grain boundaries are traps, rather than high-diffusivity paths.

  8. Comparison of the effects of face mask treatment started simultaneously and after the completion of the alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction procedure.

    PubMed

    Canturk, Bilge H; Celikoglu, Mevlut

    2015-03-01

    To test the null hypothesis that there were significant differences for skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue changes induced by face mask (FM) started simultaneously and after an alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC) procedure. Thirty-six patients with Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency were randomly assigned to Group I (FM started after the completion of the Alt-RAMEC) and Group II (FM started simultaneously with the Alt-RAMEC). The screw of the RME appliance was alternately activated and deactivated twice daily (0.20 mm per turn) for 1 week over the course of 8 weeks. The changes observed in both groups were assessed using the cephalometric lateral films and statistically evaluated using the paired t-test and Student's t-test. Thirty patients completed the present prospective study. No significant differences were observed between the groups. Class III malocclusion and negative overjet were improved by means of skeletal changes in conjunction with upper incisor proclination in both groups. Skeletal contribution to overjet correction in Groups I and II was 91.70% and 86.10%, respectively. Maxilla showed a forward movement of 3.84 mm and 3.02 mm in Groups I and II, respectively. The null hypothesis was rejected. Both groups showed similar results, and, thus, waiting until completion of the Alt-RAMEC procedure for the FM treatment is not necessary.

  9. Accepting Mixed Waste as Alternate Feed Material for Processing and Disposal at a Licensed Uranium Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Frydenland, D. C.; Hochstein, R. F.; Thompson, A. J.

    2002-02-26

    Certain categories of mixed wastes that contain recoverable amounts of natural uranium can be processed for the recovery of valuable uranium, alone or together with other metals, at licensed uranium mills, and the resulting tailings permanently disposed of as 11e.(2) byproduct material in the mill's tailings impoundment, as an alternative to treatment and/or direct disposal at a mixed waste disposal facility. This paper discusses the regulatory background applicable to hazardous wastes, mixed wastes and uranium mills and, in particular, NRC's Alternate Feed Guidance under which alternate feed materials that contain certain types of mixed wastes may be processed and disposed of at uranium mills. The paper discusses the way in which the Alternate Feed Guidance has been interpreted in the past with respect to processing mixed wastes and the significance of recent changes in NRC's interpretation of the Alternate Feed Guidance that sets the stage for a broader range of mixed waste materials to be processed as alternate feed materials. The paper also reviews the le gal rationale and policy reasons why materials that would otherwise have to be treated and/or disposed of as mixed waste, at a mixed waste disposal facility, are exempt from RCRA when reprocessed as alternate feed material at a uranium mill and become subject to the sole jurisdiction of NRC, and some of the reasons why processing mixed wastes as alternate feed materials at uranium mills is preferable to direct disposal. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of the specific acceptance, characterization and certification requirements applicable to alternate feed materials and mixed wastes at International Uranium (USA) Corporation's White Mesa Mill, which has been the most active uranium mill in the processing of alternate feed materials under the Alternate Feed Guidance.

  10. Preparation of nanofluids based on solar salt and boehmite nanoparticles: Characterization of starting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, B.; Nieto-Maestre, J.; Iparraguirre-Torres, I.; Sánchez-García, J. A.; Julia, J. E.; García-Romero, A.

    2016-05-01

    A nanofluid composed of Solar Salt (SS) and boehmite nanoparticles (A) in a concentration of 1% by weight, is proposed as thermal storage medium for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants. A wide characterization of the raw materials has been done, focused on their thermal stability and the nanoparticle primary size and shape among other properties such as its specific heat and crystalline structure. Some features of the final nanofluids have been also investigated: thermal stability, nanoparticle sizes and their distribution and specific heat. The showed results confirm that these materials are thermally stable in the working temperature range both individually and combined. In addition, the synthesis procedure implemented is effective to keep the nanoparticle sizes in the nanometric range (<100 nm). These findings mean the first step to carry on research and characterization of this nanofluid.

  11. Demonstration of passive saturable absorber by utilizing MWCNT-ABS filament as starting material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuikafly, S. N. F.; Ahmad, F.; Ibrahim, M. H.; Latif, A. A.; Harun, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    This work demonstrated a stable passively Q-switched laser with the employment MWCNTs dispersed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resin (MWCNTs-ABS) based filament as passive saturable absorber. The simple fabrication process of the SA is further explained, started from the process of extruding the filament through a 3D printer nozzle at 210 °C to reduce the diameter from 1.75 mm to 200 μm. It is then weighed to about 25 mg and mixed with 1 ml acetone before sonicated for 5 minutes to dissolve the ABS. The resultant MWCNTs-acetone suspension is dropped on a glass slide to be characterized using Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy. It is also drop-casted on the end of a fiber ferrule to be integrated in the laser cavity. The proposed work revealed that the laser oscillated at about 1558 nm with threshold input pump power of 22.54 mW and maximum input pump power of 108.8 mW. The increase in pump power resulted in the increase in repetition rate where the pulse train increases from 8.96 kHz to 39.34 kHz while the pulse width decreases from 33.58 μs to 5.14 μs. The generated pulsed laser yields a maximum of 1.01 mW and 5.53 nJ of peak power and pulse energy respectively. The signal-to-noise ratio of 40 dB indicates that the generated pulse is stable.

  12. Heavy Duty and Industrial Alternative Fuel Applications. Forklift and Material Handling. Alternative Fuels Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Doug; Casto, Lori

    This training manual is designed to lay the foundation for trainers and technicians by showing the steps to achieve and maintain good indoor air quality through use of cleaner-burning forklifts and materials handlers. The first part of the manual consists of nine units that provide informational material and diagrams on these topics: comparison of…

  13. Heavy Duty and Industrial Alternative Fuel Applications. Forklift and Material Handling. Alternative Fuels Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Doug; Casto, Lori

    This training manual is designed to lay the foundation for trainers and technicians by showing the steps to achieve and maintain good indoor air quality through use of cleaner-burning forklifts and materials handlers. The first part of the manual consists of nine units that provide informational material and diagrams on these topics: comparison of…

  14. The Hansenula polymorpha MOX gene presents two alternative transcription start points differentially utilized and sensitive to respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    Genu, Victor; Gödecke, Stefanie; Hollenberg, Cornelis P; Pereira, Gonçalo G

    2003-06-01

    The peroxisomal methanol metabolism of Hansenula polymorpha depends on a group of genes that are coordinately regulated. Methanol oxidase (Mox) plays a key role in this pathway and its synthesis has been shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level. MOX expression is strongly repressed on glucose and activated on glycerol or methanol. In this study we have identified two MOX transcripts that are differentially expressed along MOX derepression. The first one, named l-MOX (for longer MOX), starts at position -425, is only weakly and transiently transcribed and is not translated into the Mox protein. The other is the true MOX mRNA, which initiates around position -25. Using a strain bearing multiple copies of MOX(Q1N) and a reporter gene fused to the MOX promoter, regulation of the two transcripts was investigated. Initiation of the true MOX correlates with repression of l-MOX and conditions that are repressive for MOX transcription, such as the inhibition of mitochondrial activity, lead to higher levels of l-MOX expression. This effect was first observed in a mox mutant (Q1N-M8) unable to grow on nonfermentable carbon sources. No function was detected for l-MOX, but its regulation follows a pattern similar to that of catalase, which is essential for methanol metabolism. This suggests that, l-MOX, although precisely regulated, seems to be a remnant of the evolution of the methanol metabolism network.

  15. Alternative start sites in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GLR1 gene are responsible for mitochondrial and cytosolic isoforms of glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Outten, Caryn E; Culotta, Valeria C

    2004-02-27

    To combat oxidative damage, eukaryotic cells have evolved with numerous anti-oxidant factors that are often distributed between cytosolic and mitochondrial pools. Glutathione reductase, which regenerates the reduced form of glutathione, represents one such anti-oxidant factor, yet nothing is known regarding the partitioning of this enzyme within the cell. Using the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we provide evidence that a single gene, namely GLR1, encodes both the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of glutathione reductase. A deletion in GLR1 drastically increases levels of oxidized glutathione in these two subcellular compartments. The GLR1 gene has two inframe start codons that are both used as translation initiation sites. Translation from the first codon generates the mitochondrial form that includes a mitochondrial targeting signal, whereas translation from the second codon produces the cytosolic form that lacks this sequence. Our results indicate that the sequence context of the two AUG codons influences the efficiency of translation initiation at each site, which in turn affects the relative levels of cytosolic and mitochondrial Glr1p. This method of subcellular distribution of glutathione reductase may be conserved in mammalian cells as well.

  16. Effect of disinfection on irreversible hydrocolloid and alternative impression materials and the resultant gypsum casts.

    PubMed

    Suprono, Montry S; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Winer, Myron S

    2012-10-01

    Many new products have been introduced and marketed as alternatives to traditional irreversible hydrocolloid materials. These alternative materials have the same structural formula as addition reaction silicone, also known as vinyl polysiloxane (VPS), impression materials. Currently, there is limited in vitro and in vivo research on these products, including on the effects of chemical disinfectants on the materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a spray disinfecting technique on a traditional irreversible hydrocolloid and 3 new alternative impression materials in vitro. The tests were performed in accordance with the American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA) Specification Nos. 18 and 19. Under standardized conditions, 100 impressions were made of a ruled test block with an irreversible hydrocolloid and 3 alternative impression materials. Nondisinfected irreversible hydrocolloid was used as the control. The impressions were examined for surface detail reproduction before and after disinfection with a chloramine-T product. Type III and Type V dental stone casts were evaluated for linear dimensional change and gypsum compatibility. Comparisons of linear dimensional change were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA of mean ranks with the Scheffé post hoc comparisons (α=.05). Data for surface detail reproduction were analyzed with the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank procedure and gypsum compatibility with the Kruskal-Wallis Rank procedure (α=.05). The alternative impression materials demonstrated significantly better outcomes with all 3 parameters tested. Disinfection with chloroamine-T did not have any effect on the 3 alternative impression materials. The irreversible hydrocolloid groups produced the most variability in the measurements of linear dimensional change. All of the tested materials were within the ADA's acceptable limit of 1.0% for linear dimensional change, except for the disinfected irreversible hydrocolloid

  17. Dispersion, spatial growth rate, and start current of a Cherenkov free-electron laser with negative-index material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wei, Yanyu; Jiang, Xuebing; Tang, Xianfeng; Shi, Xianbao; Gong, Yubin; Li, Dazhi; Takano, Keisuke; Nakajima, Makoto; Feng, Jinjun; Miyamoto, Shuji

    2015-08-15

    We present an analysis of a Cherenkov free-electron laser based on a single slab made from negative-index materials. In this system, a flat electron beam with finite thickness travelling close to the surface of the slab interacts with the copropagating electromagnetic surface mode. The dispersion equation for a finitely thick slab is worked out and solved numerically to study the dispersion relation of surface modes supported by negative-index materials, and the calculations are in good agreement with the simulation results from a finite difference time domain code. We find that under suitable conditions there is inherent feedback in such a scheme due to the characteristics of negative-index materials, which means that the system can oscillate without external reflectors when the beam current exceeds a threshold value, i.e., start current. Using the hydrodynamic approach, we setup coupled equations for this system, and solve these equations analytically in the small signal regime to obtain formulas for the spatial growth rate and start current.

  18. Low-cost stator material for M734 alternators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, J. E.

    1983-03-01

    Silicon steels costing only $0.50 per pound were studied as substitutes for Permalloy used to fabricate two-piece stators for air driven alternators used to power the fuze electronics and to furnish a mechanical arming signature. Nickel-coated M-36 silicon electrical steel is a suitable substitute for the Permalloy which costs $6.00 per pound. However, differences in stamping and drawing properties from those of Permalloy affect the end-plate and housing contact surface and the ability to draw the cup that contains the bearing. Production dies must be developed that allow for the stamping and drawing properties of the electrical steel.

  19. A framework of analysis for field experiments with alternative materials in road construction.

    PubMed

    François, D; Jullien, A

    2009-01-01

    In France, a wide variety of alternative materials is produced or exists in the form of stockpiles built up over time. Such materials are distributed over various regions of the territory depending on local industrial development and urbanisation trends. The use of alternative materials at a national scale implies sharing local knowledge and experience. Building a national database on alternative materials for road construction is useful in gathering and sharing information. An analysis of feedback from onsite experiences (back analysis) is essential to improve knowledge on alternative material use in road construction. Back analysis of field studies has to be conducted in accordance with a single common framework. This could enable drawing comparisons between alternative materials and between road applications. A framework for the identification and classification of data used in back analyses is proposed. Since the road structure is an open system, this framework has been based on a stress-response approach at both the material and structural levels and includes a description of external factors applying during the road service life. The proposal has been shaped from a review of the essential characteristics of road materials and structures, as well as from the state of knowledge specific to alternative material characterisation.

  20. Testing of Alternative Materials for Advanced Suit Bladders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Makinen, Janice; Tang, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Several candidate advanced pressure bladder membrane materials have been developed for NASA Johnson Space Center by DSM Biomedical for selective permeability of carbon dioxide and water vapor. These materials were elasthane and two other formulations of thermoplastic polyether polyurethane. Each material was tested in two thicknesses for permeability to carbon dioxide, oxygen and water vapor. Although oxygen leaks through the suit bladder would amount to only about 60 cc/hr in a full size suit, significant amounts of carbon dioxide would not be rejected by the system to justify its use. While the ratio of carbon dioxide to oxygen permeability is about 48 to 1, this is offset by the small partial pressure of carbon dioxide in acceptable breathing atmospheres of the suit. Humidity management remains a possible use of the membranes depending on the degree to which the water permeability is inhibited by cations in the sweat. Tests are underway to explore cation fouling from sweat.

  1. An Alternative Way of Measuring the SE of Shielding Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocai, M.; Dotto, I.; Festa, D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the Authors compare two methods to perform Shielding Effectiveness measurements on shielding materials: an apertured TEM cell used as emitter ("source") in a GTEM, and the same apertured TEM cell as a receiver in a Reverberation Chamber (RC). The aim of the work is to compare the experimental results of the different measurement methods on the same samples of homogeneous material (aluminium sheet) and meshed materials (cotton canvas). The criteria adopted to make the comparison are briefly explained and the results achieved are presented. The two methods examined both provided very similar results for homogeneous conductive samples, while in the GTEM the SE values for meshed samples has shown results ranging from a minimum to a maximum depending on the orientation of the sample.

  2. Photoluminescence study of p -type ZnO:Sb prepared by thermal oxidation of the Zn-Sb starting material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeździecka, E.; Kamińska, E.; Pasternak, I.; Piotrowska, A.; Kossut, J.

    2007-11-01

    We have investigated photoluminescence (PL) from Sb-doped p -type ZnO films obtained by thermal oxidation of the Zn-Sb starting material. Very well resolved PL spectra were obtained from samples, with the hole concentration above 1×1017cm-3 . Acceptor binding energy is determined to be 137meV from free electron to acceptor transitions. The binding energy between the acceptor and the exciton obtained from the analysis of the acceptor bound excitonic PL transitions measured as a function of temperature is 12-15meV .

  3. CRADA (AL-C-2009-02) Final Report: Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl; Schmidt, Frederick; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, Katherine A.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La{sub 1-x}R{sub x})(Ni{sub 1-y}M{sub y})(Si{sub z}), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  4. The eyeless mouse mutation (ey1) removes an alternative start codon from the Rx/rax homeobox gene.

    PubMed

    Tucker, P; Laemle, L; Munson, A; Kanekar, S; Oliver, E R; Brown, N; Schlecht, H; Vetter, M; Glaser, T

    2001-09-01

    The eyeless inbred mouse strain ZRDCT has long served as a spontaneous model for human anophthalmia and the evolutionary reduction of eyes that has occurred in some naturally blind mammals. ZRDCT mice have orbits but lack eyes and optic tracts and have hypothalamic abnormalities. Segregation data suggest that a small number of interacting genes are responsible, including at least one major recessive locus, ey1. Although predicted since the 1940s, these loci were never identified. We mapped ey1 to chromosome 18 using an F2 genome scan and there found a Met10-->Leu mutation in Rx/rax, a homeobox gene that is expressed in the anterior headfold, developing retina, pineal, and hypothalamus and is translated via a leaky scanning mechanism. The mutation affects a conserved AUG codon that functions as an alternative translation initiation site and consequently reduces the abundance of Rx protein. In contrast to a targeted Rx null allele, which causes anophthalmia, central nervous system defects, and neonatal death, the hypomorphic M10L allele is fully viable.

  5. Alternative SEM techniques for observing pyritised fossil material.

    PubMed

    Poole; Lloyd

    2000-11-01

    Two scanning electron microscopy (SEM) electron-specimen interactions that provide images based on sample crystal structure, electron channelling and electron backscattered diffraction, are described. The SEM operating conditions and sample preparation are presented, followed by an example application of these techniques to the study of pyritised plant material. The two approaches provide an opportunity to examine simultaneously, at higher magnifications normally available optically, detailed specimen anatomy and preservation state. Our investigation suggests that whereas both techniques have their advantages, the electron channelling approach is generally more readily available to most SEM users. However, electron backscattered diffraction does afford the opportunity of automated examination and characterisation of pyritised fossil material.

  6. Anisotropy in hybrid materials: An alternative tool for characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Dessolle, V.; Bayle, J.P.; Judeinstein, P.; Lafontaine, E.

    1996-12-31

    Hybrid materials presenting mechanical rubbery properties are prepared from silicon alkoxides modified by organic polymers [i.e. poly(propyleneoxide), poly(ethyleneoxide), poly(butadiene) of moderate molecular weight (M{sub W} {approx} 3,000--4,000)]. These materials were characterized by {sup 29}Si NMR. They can be swollen by deuterated probes which can be used with {sup 2}H NMR to follow the network structure. Under unidirectional mechanical strain, uniaxial anisotropy of the samples is obtained and the macroscopic ordering is evidenced by quadrupolar deuterium NMR of swelling probe.

  7. DNA Sensors with Diamond as a Promising Alternative Transducer Material

    PubMed Central

    Vermeeren, Veronique; Wenmackers, Sylvia; Wagner, Patrick; Michiels, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Bio-electronics is a scientific field coupling the achievements in biology with electronics to obtain higher sensitivity, specificity and speed. Biosensors have played a pivotal role, and many have become established in the clinical and scientific world. They need to be sensitive, specific, fast and cheap. Electrochemical biosensors are most frequently cited in literature, often in the context of DNA sensing and mutation analysis. However, many popular electrochemical transduction materials, such as silicon, are susceptible to hydrolysis, leading to loss of bioreceptor molecules from the surface. Hence, increased attention has been shifted towards diamond, which surpasses silicon on many levels. PMID:22346717

  8. Effect of Selected Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials on the Cement Clinker Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigáč, Július

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with the study of the effects of alternative fuels and raw materials on the cement clinker quality. The clinker quality was expressed by the content of two principal minerals alite C3S and belite C2S. The additions of alternative fuels ashes and raw materials, in principle, always increased the belite content and conversely reduced the amount of alite. The alternative fuels with high ash content were used such as the meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge and the used alternative raw materials were metallurgical slags - granulated blastfurnace slag, air cooled blastfurnace slag and demetallized steel slag, fluidized bed combustion fly ash and waste glass. Meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge were evaluated as moderately suitable alternative fuels which can be added in the amounts of 2.8 wt. % addition of meat-bone meals ash, 3.64 wt. % addition of sewage sludge ash and 3.8 wt. % addition of paper sludge ash to the cement raw mixture. Demetallised steel slag is suitable for production of special sulphate resistant cement clinker for CEM I -SR cement with addition up to 5 wt. %. Granulated blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4 wt. %. Air cooled blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4.2 wt. %. Waste glass is not very appropriate alternative raw material with addition only 1.16 wt. %. Fluidized bed combustion fly ash appears not to be equally appropriate alternative raw material for cement clinker burning with less potential utilization in the cement industry and with addition 3.41 wt. %, which forms undesired anhydrite CaSO4 in the cement clinker.

  9. A proteogenomics approach integrating proteomics and ribosome profiling increases the efficiency of protein identification and enables the discovery of alternative translation start sites.

    PubMed

    Koch, Alexander; Gawron, Daria; Steyaert, Sandra; Ndah, Elvis; Crappé, Jeroen; De Keulenaer, Sarah; De Meester, Ellen; Ma, Ming; Shen, Ben; Gevaert, Kris; Van Criekinge, Wim; Van Damme, Petra; Menschaert, Gerben

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation transcriptome sequencing is increasingly integrated with MS to enhance MS-based protein and peptide identification. Recently, a breakthrough in transcriptome analysis was achieved with the development of ribosome profiling (ribo-seq). This technology is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments, thereby enabling the direct observation of in vivo protein synthesis at the transcript level. In order to explore the impact of a ribo-seq-derived protein sequence search space on MS/MS spectrum identification, we performed a comprehensive proteome study on a human cancer cell line, using both shotgun and N-terminal proteomics, next to ribosome profiling, which was used to delineate (alternative) translational reading frames. By including protein-level evidence of sample-specific genetic variation and alternative translation, this strategy improved the identification score of 69 proteins and identified 22 new proteins in the shotgun experiment. Furthermore, we discovered 18 new alternative translation start sites in the N-terminal proteomics data and observed a correlation between the quantitative measures of ribo-seq and shotgun proteomics with a Pearson correlation coefficient ranging from 0.483 to 0.664. Overall, this study demonstrated the benefits of ribosome profiling for MS-based protein and peptide identification and we believe this approach could develop into a common practice for next-generation proteomics.

  10. ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS TO PD MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PURIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T; Paul Korinko, P

    2007-11-13

    Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate two different classes of materials for potential replacement of conventional Pd-alloy purification/diffuser membranes. Crystalline V-Ni-Ti and Amorphous Fe- and Co-based metallic glass alloys have been evaluated using both electrochemical and gaseous hydrogen permeation testing techniques..

  11. Techno-economic feasibility of waste biorefinery: Using slaughtering waste streams as starting material for biopolyester production.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Khurram; Narodoslawsky, Michael; Sagir, Muhammad; Ali, Nadeem; Ali, Shahid; Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Ismail, Iqbal Mohammad Ibrahim; Koller, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The utilization of industrial waste streams as input materials for bio-mediated production processes constitutes a current R&D objective not only to reduce process costs at the input side but in parallel, to minimize hazardous environmental emissions. In this context, the EU-funded project ANIMPOL elaborated a process for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biopolymers starting from diverse waste streams of the animal processing industry. This article provides a detailed economic analysis of PHA production from this waste biorefinery concept, encompassing the utilization of low-quality biodiesel, offal material and meat and bone meal (MBM). Techno-economic analysis reveals that PHA production cost varies from 1.41 €/kg to 1.64 €/kg when considering offal on the one hand as waste, or, on the other hand, accounting its market price, while calculating with fixed costs for the co-products biodiesel (0.97 €/L) and MBM (350 €/t), respectively. The effect of fluctuating market prices for offal materials, biodiesel, and MBM on the final PHA production cost as well as the investment payback time have been evaluated. Depending on the current market situation, the calculated investment payback time varies from 3.25 to 4.5years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Alternative materials to improve total hip replacement tribology.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, Seppo; Böhler, Max; Harris, William H; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Lappalainen, Reijo; Muratoglu, Orhun; Rieker, Claude; Salzer, Martin

    2003-08-01

    An improvement in tribology of bearing surfaces is an effective means of increasing the longevity of total hip replacement (THR). Currently, 3 approaches are available to achieve this aim: first, use of highly cross-linked UHMWPE; second, aluminum oxide ceramic bearings, and third, metal-on-metal bearings. Cross-linking reduces the wear resistance of UHMWPE markedly without impairment of other significant properties of the material. Simulator studies and some clinical long-term (10-22 years) follow-up surveys suggest an almost immeasurable wear of the highly cross-linked UHMWPE-based acetabular components during an expected clinical life span. Bioinert alumina ceramic (aluminum oxide) was introduced 3 decades ago for THR-bearing surfaces to improve performance and longevity. Alumina ceramic is entirely biostable and bioinert and has good mechanical properties. For correctly positioned alumina-on-alumina bearings, the annual linear wear rate has been reported to be 3.9 microm. Alumina heads have been successfully used in combination with polyethylene sockets, but as regards wear, the best results have been obtained with alumina-on-alumina bearings. In ceramic THR bearings, precise manufacture and contact surface geometry, including optimal clearance, are most important. For the currently available products, the component fracture risk is almost nonexistent (less than 1 per 1000). Metal-on-metal bearings were used in the early stage of THR surgery, although not all old designs were successful. More recent analyses of the early series have shown the advantages of metal-on-metal to be better and have led to a renaissance of this articulation. Initially, stainless steel was used because it was easy to manufacture and polish. Current metal-on-metal bearings are based on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with varying carbon contents. Such bearings are self-polishing. Linear wear rates remain at the level of a few microm a year. An improvement in technology has increased

  13. Changes and Trends in the Pallet Industry: Alternative Materials and Industry Structure

    Treesearch

    Robert J. Bush; Philip A. Araman

    1998-01-01

    In the first article of this three-part series we described trends in the use of new wood materials for pallets and containers. The second article described changes in pallet recovery and recycling. In this third article, we describe alternative (i.e., other than solid wood) materials used to manufacture pallets as well as changes in the structure of the industry....

  14. Field-assisted sintering of effective materials for alternative power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulat, L. P.; Novotel'nova, A. V.; Osvenskii, V. B.; Sorokin, A. I.; Pshenai-Severin, D. A.; Tukmakova, A. S.; Yerezhep, D.

    2017-07-01

    The process of field-assisted sintering of nanostructured thermoelectrics for the formation of effective materials for alternative power engineering has been numerically simulated. Functionally graded thermoelectrics and segmented thermoelement branches have been sintered in a temperature-gradient field. Modified die tooling elements are proposed that allow the desired thermal conditions to be created for the sintering of inhomogeneous effective materials.

  15. Findings and Recommendations from the NIST Workshop on Alternative Fuels and Materials: Biocorrosion

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Elisabeth; Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Applied Chemicals and Materials Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) hosted a workshop to identify and prioritize research needs in the area of biocorrosion. Materials used to store and distribute alternative fuels have experienced an increase in corrosion due to the unique conditions caused by the presence of microbes and the chemistry of biofuels and biofuel precursors. Participants in this workshop, including experts from the microbiological, fuel, and materials communities, delved into the unique materials and chemical challenges that occur with production, transport, and storage of alternative fuels. Discussions focused on specific problems including: a) the changing composition of “drop-in” fuels and the impact of that composition on materials; b) the influence of microbial populations on corrosion and fuel quality; and c) state-of-the-art measurement technologies for monitoring material degradation and biofilm formation. PMID:26958436

  16. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATE MATERIALS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, E.; Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2010-02-24

    The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton{reg_sign} GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

  17. Findings and Recommendations from the NIST Workshop on Alternative Fuels and Materials: Biocorrosion.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Elisabeth; Sowards, Jeffrey W; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Applied Chemicals and Materials Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) hosted a workshop to identify and prioritize research needs in the area of biocorrosion. Materials used to store and distribute alternative fuels have experienced an increase in corrosion due to the unique conditions caused by the presence of microbes and the chemistry of biofuels and biofuel precursors. Participants in this workshop, including experts from the microbiological, fuel, and materials communities, delved into the unique materials and chemical challenges that occur with production, transport, and storage of alternative fuels. Discussions focused on specific problems including: a) the changing composition of "drop-in" fuels and the impact of that composition on materials; b) the influence of microbial populations on corrosion and fuel quality; and c) state-of-the-art measurement technologies for monitoring material degradation and biofilm formation.

  18. Preliminary Structural Sizing and Alternative Material Trade Study of CEV Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steve M.; Collier, Craig S.; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary structural sizing and alternate material trade study for NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Crew Module (CM). This critical CEV component will house the astronauts during ascent, docking with the International Space Station, reentry, and landing. The alternate material design study considers three materials beyond the standard metallic (aluminum alloy) design that resulted from an earlier NASA Smart Buyer Team analysis. These materials are graphite/epoxy composite laminates, discontinuously reinforced SiC/Al (DRA) composites, and a novel integrated panel material/concept known as WebCore. Using the HyperSizer (Collier Research and Development Corporation) structural sizing software and NASTRAN finite element analysis code, a comparison is made among these materials for the three composite CM concepts considered by the 2006 NASA Engineering and Safety Center Composite Crew Module project.

  19. Press Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    This level sets the stage for the design philosophy called “Triadic Game Design” (TGD). This design philosophy can be summarized with the following sentence: it takes two to tango, but it takes three to design a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Before the philosophy is further explained, this level will first delve into what is meant by a meaningful game or a game with a purpose. Many terms and definitions have seen the light and in this book I will specifically orient at digital games that aim to have an effect beyond the context of the game itself. Subsequently, a historical overview is given of the usage of games with a serious purpose which starts from the moment we human beings started to walk on our feet till our contemporary society. It turns out that we have been using games for all kinds of non-entertainment purposes for already quite a long time. With this introductory material in the back of our minds, I will explain the concept of TGD by means of a puzzle. After that, the protagonist of this book, the game Levee Patroller, is introduced. Based on the development of this game, the idea of TGD, which stresses to balance three different worlds, the worlds of Reality, Meaning, and Play, came into being. Interested? Then I suggest to quickly “press start!”

  20. Evaluation of Alternative Refractory Materials for the Main Flame Deflectors at KSC Launch Complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Trejo, David; Rutkowsky, Justin

    2006-01-01

    The deterioration of the refractory materials used to protect the KSC launch complex steel base structures from the high temperatures during launches results in frequent and costly repairs and safety hazards. KSC-SPEC-P-0012, Specification for Refractory Concrete, is ineffective in qualifying refractory materials. This study of the specification and of alternative refractory materials recommends a complete revision of the specification and further investigation of materials that were found to withstand the environment of the Solid Rocket Booster main flame deflector better than the refractory materials in current use in terms of compressive strength, tensile strength, modulus of rupture, shrinkage, and abrasion.

  1. Dimensional accuracy of 2 irreversible hydrocolloid alternative impression materials with immediate and delayed pouring.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Usama; Hussein, Bayan; Oko, Andrea; Carey, Jason P; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    To assess dimensional accuracy and stability of 2 irreversible hydrocolloid alternative impression materials with immediate and delayed pouring. Two alternative impression materials, AlgiNot FS and Position Penta Quick, were compared with a traditional irreversible hydrocolloid, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial alginate. Impressions were made of a metal model with 4 cylinders of known dimensions, with pouring performed immediately or after 4 hours of storage. A digital micrometer was used to measure cylinder diameter on the model and the poured casts. Dimensional changes were analyzed according to American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association (ANSI/ADA) Specification 19 (2004 version) (α=0.05). There were significant differences among the 3 materials, between the 2 pour times and as a function of storage time (multivariate analysis of variance, p<0.001). One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the 2 alternative impression materials, but changes for these materials differed significantly from those for the traditional impression material for immediate (p<0.05) and 4-hour (p<0.001) pouring. Linear dimensional changes for the 2 substitute materials were within the limits of the ANSI/ADA specification. With immediate pouring, both alternative impression materials exhibited minimal dimensional changes, which were maintained or reduced with 4-hour pouring. For both pouring times, these changes were less than 0.5%. The minimal dimensional changes observed with these irreversible hydrocolloid alternative impression materials after 4 hours of storage may save chairside time and help to produce accurate results for procedures such as partial denture framework, surgical guides, and pediatric and orthodontic devices.

  2. Assay at low ppm level of dimethyl sulfate in starting materials for API synthesis using derivatization in ionic liquid media and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Nelu; Albu, Florin; Fandrick, Keith; Iorgulescu, Elena; Medvedovici, Andrei

    2013-03-05

    Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) is frequently used in pharmaceutical manufacturing processes as an alkylating agent. Trace levels of DMS in drug substances should be carefully monitored since the compound can become an impurity which is genotoxic in nature. Derivatization of DMS with dibenzazepine leads to formation of the N-methyl derivative, which can be retained on a reversed phase column and subsequently separated from other potential impurities. Such derivatization occurs relatively slowly. However, it can be substantially speed up if ionic liquids are used as reaction media. In this paper we report the use of 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (IL1) and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (IL2) as reaction media for the derivatization of DMS with dibenzazepine. It was determined that the stoichiometry between the substrate and DMS may be 1:1 or 2:1, in relation with the nature of the reaction media. An (+)ESI-MS/MS approach was used for quantitation of the derivatized product. Alternatively, DMS derivatization may be carried out with pyridine in acetonitrile (ACN). The N-methylpyridinium derivative was separated by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and detected through (+)ESI-MS (in the SIM mode). In both cases, a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 0.05 μg/ml DMS was achievable, with a linearity range up to 10 μg/ml. Both analytical alternatives were applied to assay DMS in 4-(2-methoxyethyl)phenol, which is used as a starting material in the synthesis of metoprolol. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a high-throughput real time PCR based on a hot-start alternative for Pfu mediated by quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Fuming; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Lin; Ren, Jicun; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2015-09-01

    Hot start (HS) PCR is an excellent alternative for high-throughput real time PCR due to its ability to prevent nonspecific amplification at low temperature. Development of a cost-effective and simple HS PCR technique to guarantee high-throughput PCR specificity and consistency still remains a great challenge. In this study, we systematically investigated the HS characteristics of QDs triggered in real time PCR with EvaGreen and SYBR Green I dyes by the analysis of amplification curves, standard curves and melting curves. Two different kinds of DNA polymerases, Pfu and Taq, were employed. Here we showed that high specificity and efficiency of real time PCR were obtained in a plasmid DNA and an error-prone two-round PCR assay using QD-based HS PCR, even after an hour preincubation at 50 °C before real time PCR. Moreover, the results obtained by QD-based HS PCR were comparable to a commercial Taq antibody DNA polymerase. However, no obvious HS effect of QDs was found in real time PCR using Taq DNA polymerase. The findings of this study demonstrated that a cost-effective high-throughput real time PCR based on QD triggered HS PCR could be established with high consistency, sensitivity and accuracy.Hot start (HS) PCR is an excellent alternative for high-throughput real time PCR due to its ability to prevent nonspecific amplification at low temperature. Development of a cost-effective and simple HS PCR technique to guarantee high-throughput PCR specificity and consistency still remains a great challenge. In this study, we systematically investigated the HS characteristics of QDs triggered in real time PCR with EvaGreen and SYBR Green I dyes by the analysis of amplification curves, standard curves and melting curves. Two different kinds of DNA polymerases, Pfu and Taq, were employed. Here we showed that high specificity and efficiency of real time PCR were obtained in a plasmid DNA and an error-prone two-round PCR assay using QD-based HS PCR, even after an hour

  4. Influence of amount of starting material for DNA extraction on detection of low-level presence of genetically engineered traits.

    PubMed

    Demeke, Tigst; Phan, Anh; Ratnayaka, Indira; Holigroski, Michelle; Jenkins, G Ronald

    2014-05-14

    Two laboratories independently examined how the amount of starting material influences DNA extraction efficiency and, ultimately, the detection of low-level presence of genetically engineered (GE) traits in commercialized grains. GE traits from one maize, two canola, and two soybean samples were used as prototypical models in the study design as well as two commonly used DNA extraction methods, a small scale (0.1 and 0.2 g samples) and a large scale (1.0 and 2.0 g samples). The DNA samples were fortified (spiked) at 0.1 and 0.01% (w/w) levels. The amount of DNA recovery varied between the two laboratories, although a sufficient amount of DNA was obtained to perform replicate PCR analysis by both laboratories. Reliable detection of all five events was achieved by both laboratories at 0.1% level using either small-scale or large-scale DNA extractions. Reliable detection of the GE events was achieved at 0.01% level for soybean and canola but not for maize. Variability was observed among the two laboratories in terms of the Ct values generated. There was no difference between small-scale and large-scale DNA extraction methods for qualitative PCR detections of all five GE events.

  5. Aspergillus Associated with Meju, a Fermented Soybean Starting Material for Traditional Soy Sauce and Soybean Paste in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus is an important fungal genus used for the fermentation of Asian foods; this genus is referred to as koji mold in Japan and China. A. oryzae, A. sojae, and A. tamari are used in the production of miso and shoyu in Japan, but a comprehensive taxonomic study of Aspergillus isolated from Meju, a fermented soybean starting material for traditional soy sauce and soybean paste in Korea, has not been conducted. In this study, various Aspergillus species were isolated during a study of the mycobiota of Meju, and the aspergilli were identified based on phenotypic characteristics and sequencing of the β-tubulin gene. Most strains of Aspergillus were found to belong to the following sections: Aspergillus (n = 220), Flavi (n = 213), and Nigri (n = 54). The most commonly identified species were A. oryzae (n = 183), A. pseudoglaucus (Eurotium repens) (n = 81), A. chevalieri (E. chevalieri) (n = 62), A. montevidensis (E. amstelodami) (n = 34), A. niger (n = 21), A. tamari (n = 15), A. ruber (E. rubrum) (n = 15), A. proliferans (n = 14), and A. luchuensis (n = 14); 25 species were identified from 533 Aspergillus strains. Aspergillus strains were mainly found during the high temperature fermentation period in the later steps of Meju fermentation. PMID:26539037

  6. Analysis of the Influence of Starting Materials and Processing Conditions on the Properties of W/Cu Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre-Meléndez, Isabel; Arévalo, Cristina; Perez-Soriano, Eva M.; Neubauer, Erich; Rubio-Escudero, Cristina; Kitzmantel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a study of the influence of the starting materials and the processing time used to develop W/Cu alloys is carried out. Regarding powder metallurgy as a promising fabrication route, the difficulties in producing W/Cu alloys motivated us to investigate the influential factors on the final properties of the most industrially demanding alloys: 85-W/15-Cu, 80-W/20-Cu, and 75-W/25-Cu alloys. Two different tungsten powders with large variation among their particle size—fine (Wf) and coarse (Wc) powders—were used for the preparation of W/Cu alloys. Three weight ratios of fine and coarse (Wf:Wc) tungsten particles were analyzed. These powders were labelled as “tungsten bimodal powders”. The powder blends were consolidated by rapid sinter pressing (RSP) at 900 °C and 150 MPa, and were thus sintered and compacted simultaneously. The elemental powders and W/Cu alloys were studied by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal conductivity, hardness, and densification were measured. Results showed that the synthesis of W/Cu using bimodal tungsten powders significantly affects the final alloy properties. The higher the tungsten content, the more noticeable the effect of the bimodal powder. The best bimodal W powder was the blend with 10 wt % of fine tungsten particles (10-Wf:90-Wc). These specimens present good values of densification and hardness, and higher values of thermal conductivity than other bimodal mixtures. PMID:28772502

  7. An alternative transcription start site yields estrogen unresponsive Kiss1 mRNA transcripts in the hypothalamus of prepubertal female rats

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Juan Manuel; Wright, Hollis; Ojeda, Sergio R.; Lomniczi, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the Kiss1 gene in the control of reproductive development is well documented. However, much less is known about the transcriptional regulation of Kiss1 expression in the hypothalamus. Critical for these studies is an accurate identification of the site(s) where Kiss1 transcription is initiated. Employing 5’-RACE PCR we detected a transcription start site (TSS1) used by the hypothalamus of rats, mice, nonhuman primates and humans to initiate Kiss1 transcription. In rodents, an exon 1 encoding 5’-untranslated sequences is followed by an alternatively spliced second exon, which encodes 5’-untranslated regions of two different lengths and contains the translation initiation codon (ATG). In nonhuman primates and humans exon 2 is not alternatively spliced. Surprisingly, in rat mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), but not preoptic region (POA), an additional TSS (TSS2) located upstream from TSS1 generates an exon 1 longer (377 bp) than the TSS1-derived exon 1 (98 bp). The content of TSS1-derived transcripts increased at puberty in the POA and MBH of female rats. It also increased in the MBH after ovariectomy, and this change was prevented by estrogen. In contrast, no such changes in TSS2-derived transcript abundance were detected. Promoter assays showed that the proximal TSS1 promoter is much more active than the putative TSS2 promoter, and that only the TSS1 promoter is regulated by estrogen. These differences appear to be related to the presence of a TATA box and binding sites for transcription factors activating transcription and interacting with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the TSS1, but not TSS2, promoter. PMID:24686008

  8. Differential gene expression and subcellular targeting of Arabidopsis glutathione S-transferase F8 is achieved through alternative transcription start sites.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Carrie, Chris; Andersson, Carol R; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Whelan, James; Singh, Karam B

    2007-09-28

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play major roles in the protection of plants from biotic and abiotic stresses through the detoxification of xenobiotics and toxic endogenous products. This report describes additional complexity in the regulation of the well characterized stress-responsive Arabidopsis thaliana GSTF8 promoter. This complexity results from the use of multiple transcription start sites (TSS) to give rise to alternate GSTF8 transcripts with the potential to produce two in-frame proteins differing only in their N-terminal sequence. In addition to the originally mapped TSS (Chen, W., Chao, G., and Singh, K. B. (1996) Plant J. 10, 955-966), a further nine TSS have been identified, with the majority clustered into a distinct group. The most 3' TSS gives rise to the major message (GSTF8-S) and the shorter form of the protein, whereas those originating from upstream TSS (GSTF8-L) are more weakly expressed and encode for the larger form of the protein. Differential tissue-specific and stress-responsive expression patterns were observed (e.g. GSTF8-L is more highly expressed in leaves compared with roots, whereas GSTF8-S expression has the opposite pattern and is much more stress-responsive). Analysis of GSTF8-L and GSTF8-S proteins demonstrated that GSTF8-L is solely targeted to plastids, whereas GSTF8-S is cytoplasmic. In silico analysis revealed potential conservation of GSTF8-S across a wide range of plants; in contrast, conservation of GSTF8-L was confined to the Brassicaceae. These studies demonstrate that alternate TSS of the GSTF8 promoter are used to confer differential tissue-specific and stress-responsive expression patterns as well as to target the same protein to two different subcellular localizations.

  9. Materials and degradation modes in an alternative LLW (low-level waste) disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, M.G.; MacKenzie, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The materials used in the construction of alternative low-level waste disposal facilities will be subject to interaction with both the internal and the external environments associated with the facilities and unless precautions are taken, may degrade, leading to structural failure. This paper reviews the characteristics of both environments with respect to three alternative disposal concepts, then assesses how reaction with them might affect the properties of the materials, which include concrete, steel-reinforced concrete, structural steel, and various protective coatings and membranes. It identifies and evaluates the probability of reactions occurring which might lead to degradation of the materials and so compromise the structure. The probability of failure (interpreted relative to the ability of the structure to restrict ingress and egress of water) is assessed for each material and precautionary measures, intended to maximize the durability of the facility, are reviewed. 19 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Development of a high-throughput real time PCR based on a hot-start alternative for Pfu mediated by quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sang, Fuming; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Lin; Ren, Jicun; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2015-10-14

    Hot start (HS) PCR is an excellent alternative for high-throughput real time PCR due to its ability to prevent nonspecific amplification at low temperature. Development of a cost-effective and simple HS PCR technique to guarantee high-throughput PCR specificity and consistency still remains a great challenge. In this study, we systematically investigated the HS characteristics of QDs triggered in real time PCR with EvaGreen and SYBR Green I dyes by the analysis of amplification curves, standard curves and melting curves. Two different kinds of DNA polymerases, Pfu and Taq, were employed. Here we showed that high specificity and efficiency of real time PCR were obtained in a plasmid DNA and an error-prone two-round PCR assay using QD-based HS PCR, even after an hour preincubation at 50 °C before real time PCR. Moreover, the results obtained by QD-based HS PCR were comparable to a commercial Taq antibody DNA polymerase. However, no obvious HS effect of QDs was found in real time PCR using Taq DNA polymerase. The findings of this study demonstrated that a cost-effective high-throughput real time PCR based on QD triggered HS PCR could be established with high consistency, sensitivity and accuracy.

  11. ZnO glass-ceramics: An alternative way to produce semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Masai, Hirokazu; Toda, Tatsuya; Ueno, Takahiro; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2009-04-13

    Fabrication of transparent glass-ceramics containing ZnO nanocrystallites has been reported. The obtained material shows UV-excited photoluminescence consisting of both broad emission in the visible region and the free exciton emission at 3.28 eV. Since the observed emission depends on the precipitated state of ZnO in the glass matrix, the glass-ceramics obtained by this way will give an alternative selection of semiconductor material with unique optical and electronic functions.

  12. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum: Its effectiveness as an alternative bedding material for broiler production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) may be a viable low-cost alternative bedding material for broiler production. In order to evaluate FGD gypsum’s viability, three consecutive trials were conducted to determine its influence on live performance (body weight, feed consumption, feed efficiency, an...

  13. Preliminary investigation and application of alternate dry gas seal face materials{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, R.; Peterson, R.; Hanson, R.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional seal mating ring materials such as tungsten carbide (WC) are commonly used in high pressure centrifugal gas compressor dry gas (gas lubricating film) seal applications. Although these materials possess desirable properties for minimizing thermal distortion and deformation when subjected to pressure and centrifugal force, they have low toughness, i.e., they are brittle and have poor resistance to thermal shock. It has been found that these materials are easily heat checked during seal face touchdown. Heat checking as well as other crack indications inherent in these materials can quickly propagate, resulting in a catastrophic seal ring failure. In this paper, an investigation of alternate seal face materials is described. Two ductile, nitrided, low ferrous materials proved to be readily manufacturable into dry gas seal rings and performed comparably to tungsten carbide in natural gas service. 10 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Fissile material disposition program: Screening of alternate immobilization candidates for disposition of surplus fissile materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.

    1996-01-08

    With the end of the Cold War, the world faces for the first time the need to dismantle vast numbers of ``excess`` nuclear weapons and dispose of the fissile materials they contain, together with fissile residues in the weapons production complex left over from the production of these weapons. If recently agreed US and Russian reductions are fully implemented, tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, containing a hundred tons or more of plutonium and hundreds of tonnes* of highly enriched uranium (HEU), will no longer be needed worldwide for military purposes. These two materials are the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons, and limits on access to them are the primary technical barrier to prospective proliferants who might desire to acquire a nuclear weapons capability. Theoretically, several kilograms of plutonium, or several times that amount of HEU, is sufficient to make a nuclear explosive device. Therefore, these materials will continue to be a potential threat to humanity for as long as they exist.

  15. Alternative routes for highway shipments of radioactive materials and lessons learned from state designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under docket numbers HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select altemative routes. First, the state must establish a state routing agency'', defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with DOTs Guidelines for Selecting Preferred Highway Routes for Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice to DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective. The purpose of this report is to discuss the lessons learned'' by the five states within the southern region that have designated alternative or preferred routes under the regulations of the Department of Transportation (DOT) established for the transportation of radioactive materials. The document was prepared by reviewing applicable federal laws and regulations, examining state reports and documents and contacting state officials and routing agencies involved in making routing decisions. In undertaking this project, the Southern States Energy Board hopes to reveal the process used by states that have designated alternative routes and thereby share their experiences (i.e., lessons learned) with other southern states that have yet to make designations.

  16. Alternative routes for highway shipments of radioactive materials and lessons learned from state designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under docket numbers HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select altemative routes. First, the state must establish a ``state routing agency``, defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with DOTs Guidelines for Selecting Preferred Highway Routes for Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice to DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective. The purpose of this report is to discuss the ``lessons learned`` by the five states within the southern region that have designated alternative or preferred routes under the regulations of the Department of Transportation (DOT) established for the transportation of radioactive materials. The document was prepared by reviewing applicable federal laws and regulations, examining state reports and documents and contacting state officials and routing agencies involved in making routing decisions. In undertaking this project, the Southern States Energy Board hopes to reveal the process used by states that have designated alternative routes and thereby share their experiences (i.e., lessons learned) with other southern states that have yet to make designations.

  17. Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

    1995-09-26

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center ( a partnership of Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories), is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. Major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Department of Energy has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The Department of Defense has several hundred million pounds of energetic materials in its demilitarization inventory, with millions more added each year. In addition, there are vast energetic materials demilitarization inventories world-wide, including those in the former Soviet Union and eastern Bloc countries. Although recycling and reusing is the preferred method of dealing with these surplus materials, there will always be the necessity of destroying intractable or unusable energetic materials. Traditionally, open bum/open detonation (OB/OD) has been the method of choice for the destruction of energetic materials. Public concerns and increasingly stringent environmental regulations have made open burning and open detonation of energetic materials increasingly costly and nearly unacceptable. Thus, the impetus to develop environmentally sound alternatives to dispose of energetic materials is great.

  18. Full-scale experimentations on alternative materials in roads: analysis of study practices.

    PubMed

    François, D; Jullien, A; Kerzreho, J P; Chateau, L

    2009-03-01

    In France beginning in the 1990s, the topic of road construction using various alternative materials has given rise to several studies aimed at clarifying the technical and environmental feasibility of such an option. Although crucial to understanding and forecasting their behaviour in the field, an analysis of feedback from onsite experiences (back analysis) of roads built with alternative materials has not yet been carried out. The aim of the CAREX project (2003-2005) has been to fill this gap at the national scale. Based on a stress-response approach applied to both the alternative material and the road structure and including the description of external factors, a dedicated standardised framework for field data classification and analysis was adopted. To carry out this analysis, a set of 17 documented field experiments was identified through a specific national survey. It appears that a great heterogeneity exists in data processing procedures among studies. The description of material is acceptable while it is generally poor regarding external factors and structure responses. Structure monitoring is usually brief and mechanical loads too weak, which limits the significance of field testing. For future full-scale experiments, strengthening the realism within the testing conditions would be appropriate.

  19. Biofilm development during the start-up period of anaerobic biofilm reactors: the biofilm Archaea community is highly dependent on the support material.

    PubMed

    Habouzit, Frédéric; Hamelin, Jérôme; Santa-Catalina, Gaëlle; Steyer, Jean-P; Bernet, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of the nature of the support material on its colonization by a methanogenic consortium, four substrata made of different materials: polyvinyl chloride, 2 polyethylene and polypropylene were tested during the start-up of lab-scale fixed-film reactors. The reactor performances were evaluated and compared together with the analysis of the biofilms. Biofilm growth was quantified and the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities were characterized by molecular fingerprinting profiles (capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism). The composition of the inoculum was shown to have a major impact on the bacterial composition of the biofilm, whatever the nature of the support material or the organic loading rate applied to the reactors during the start-up period. In contrast, the biofilm archaeal populations were independent of the inoculum used but highly dependent on the support material. Supports favouring Archaea colonization, the limiting factor in the overall process, should be preferred.

  20. Biofilm development during the start-up period of anaerobic biofilm reactors: the biofilm Archaea community is highly dependent on the support material

    PubMed Central

    Habouzit, Frédéric; Hamelin, Jérôme; Santa-Catalina, Gaëlle; Steyer, Jean-P; Bernet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the nature of the support material on its colonization by a methanogenic consortium, four substrata made of different materials: polyvinyl chloride, 2 polyethylene and polypropylene were tested during the start-up of lab-scale fixed-film reactors. The reactor performances were evaluated and compared together with the analysis of the biofilms. Biofilm growth was quantified and the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities were characterized by molecular fingerprinting profiles (capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism). The composition of the inoculum was shown to have a major impact on the bacterial composition of the biofilm, whatever the nature of the support material or the organic loading rate applied to the reactors during the start-up period. In contrast, the biofilm archaeal populations were independent of the inoculum used but highly dependent on the support material. Supports favouring Archaea colonization, the limiting factor in the overall process, should be preferred. PMID:24612643

  1. Is there life after Buckley's Formocresol? Part I -- a narrative review of alternative interventions and materials.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, V; Patchett, C L; Waterhouse, P J

    2006-03-01

    (1) To present a narrative review of the currently available alternative interventions and materials to formocresol pulpotomy for the management of extensive caries in the primary molar, and (2) to produce a clinical protocol for pulp therapy techniques in the extensively carious primary molar. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has recently classified formaldehyde as carcinogenic to human beings. Since Buckley's Formocresol contains 19% formaldehyde in its full strength and, therefore, 1% in a 20% dilution, a safer alternative should be identified. A narrative review of the published literature for primary molar pulp therapy techniques was undertaken following an extensive and appropriate literature search. A specialist group of paediatric dentists was formed to arrive at a consensus and establish an evidence-based protocol for the management of extensively carious primary molar teeth. Part I of this paper explores the currently available alternative interventions and materials to formocresol in the form of a narrative review. The second part of the paper will present the formation of a specialist group to arrive at a consensus and establish an evidence-based protocol for the management of the extensively carious primary molar. After consideration of a review of extensively searched literature, a protocol and key points document have been developed to assist clinicians in their treatment planning. Further long-term studies with the highest level of evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials) are required to enable us to identify acceptable alternatives which can replace formocresol.

  2. The National Shipbuilding Research Program: Producibility Cost Reductions through Alternative Materials and Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    neoprene foam core and a stated temperature resistance of about 380oF. Avery - Dennison offers Avery 1185, with a short term temperature resistance of...Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) Ship Production Committee, looks specifically at increased use of fiberglass and plastic pipe, adhesives , and...fiberglass and plastic pipe, adhesives , and flexible and rubber hose, traditional methods and materials are questioned, and alternatives are evaluated. The

  3. The influence of production conditions, starting material and deposition environment on charcoal alteration in a tropical biome.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascough, Philippa; Bird, Michael; Meredith, Will; Large, David; Snape, Colin; Manion, Corinne

    2014-05-01

    Natural and anthropogenic burning events are a key link in the global carbon cycle, substantially influencing atmospheric CO2 levels, and consuming c.8700 teragrams yr-1 of dry biomass [1,2,3]. An important result of this process is charcoal, when lignocellulosic structures in biomass (e.g. wood) are converted to aromatic domains with high chemical stability. Charcoal is therefore not readily re-oxidized to CO2, with estimates of 5-7 ky for the half-life of charcoal carbon in soils [3,4]. Charcoal's high carbon content coupled with high environmental resistance has led to the concept of biochar as a valuable means of global carbon sequestration, capable of carbon offsets comparable to annual anthropogenic fuel emissions [5,6,7]. Charcoal is not, however, an environmentally inert substance, and at least some components of charcoal are susceptible to alteration in depositional environments. Despite the importance of charcoal in global carbon cycling, the mechanisms by which charcoal is altered in the environment remain, as yet, poorly understood. This fact limits our ability to properly incorporate both natural environmental charcoal and biochar into global carbon budgets. This study aimed to improve understanding of charcoal alteration in the environment by examining the influence of production conditions, starting material and deposition environment on the physical and chemical characteristics of charcoal at a field site in the Daintree rainforest. These factors have been identified as critical in determining the dynamics of charcoal in depositional environments [8,9] and climatic conditions at the field site (in Tropical Queensland, Australia) are likely to result in extensive alteration of charcoal. Charcoal from wood (Nothofagus spp.), algae (Enteromorpha spp.), and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) biomass was produced at temperatures over 300-500°C and exposed to conditions of varying pH and vegetation cover. The effect of these variables on charcoal chemistry

  4. Effect of the purity of starting materials on the growth and properties of potassium dihydrogen phosphate single crystals – A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, P.; Charoen In, Urit; Manyum, Prapun; Ramasamy, P.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Bulk size KDP crystal has been grown with higher growth rate. • Systematic study on the effect of starting materials has been done. • Crystalline perfection is maintained in the entire crystal. - Abstract: A systematic study on the effect of purity of starting materials on the growth and properties of potassium dihydrogen phosphate single crystals is crucial for the future study of the material for nonlinear optical applications. Potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals were grown using high pure (99.999%) and ordinary (99.9%) starting raw materials using slow cooling method in identical conditions. Their optical transparency and crystalline perfection are studied by UV and high resolution X-ray diffraction analyses respectively. The results are checked with the help of etching analyses. The full width at half maximum is 8″ which is close to that expected from the plane wave theory of dynamical X-ray diffraction for an ideally perfect crystal. Results of those studies are correlated with each other. The quantitative results show that the raw material plays an important role in the growth of good quality crystals.

  5. Alternative materials in view of new light weight x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulinova, M.; Hudec, R.; Sik, J.; Lorenc, M.; Pina, L.; Semencova, V.

    2009-08-01

    The ESA's invitation to participate in the innovative technology developments for the new space mission represents the natural continuation of the efforts of the Czech team in development of innovative X-ray telescopes, focusing on particular demands and requirements of a concrete project, with emphasis on fully new and light-weight technologies. In this paper we focus on studying of other alternative materials such as SiC or glassy carbon, which could be considered as suitable materials for the producing of precise light weight X-ray optics due to their physical and chemical properties and so far successfully compete with more common materials (like glass or Si) as well as on Si wafers with improved surface quality and analysis and evaluation of measured data.

  6. Gas permeability of biochar-amended clay: potential alternative landfill final cover material.

    PubMed

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2016-04-01

    Compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as an alternative landfill final cover material in this study. Biochar has long been proposed to promote crop growth, mitigate odor emission, and promote methane oxidation in field soils. However, previous studies showed that soil-gas permeability was increased upon biochar application, which will promote landfill gas emission. The objective of the present study is to investigate the possibility of using compacted BAC as an alternative material in landfill final cover by evaluating its gas permeability. BAC samples were prepared by mixing 425-μm-sieved peanut shell biochar with kaolin clay in different ratios (0, 5, 10, and 15 %, w/w) and compacting at different degrees of compactions (DOC) (80, 85, and 90 %) with an optimum water content of 35 %. The gas permeability of the BACs was measured by flexible wall gas permeameter and the microstructure of the BACs was analyzed by SEM with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results show that the effects of biochar content on BAC gas permeability is highly dependent on the DOC. At high DOC (90 %), the gas permeability of BAC decreases with increasing biochar content due to the combined effect of the clay aggregation and the inhibition of biochar in the gas flow. However, at low DOC (80 %), biochar incorporation has no effects on gas permeability because it no longer acts as a filling material to the retard gas flow. The results from the present study imply that compacted BAC can be used as an alternative final cover material with decreased gas permeability when compared with clay.

  7. Commercial-scale recycling of NdFeB-type magnets with grain boundary modification yields products with 'designer properties' that exceed those of starting materials.

    PubMed

    Zakotnik, M; Tudor, C O

    2015-10-01

    NdFeB-type magnets dominate the market for high performance magnetic materials, yet production of 'virgin' magnets via mining is environmentally, financially and energetically costly. Hence, interest is growing in 'magnet to magnet' recycling schemes that offer the potential for cheaper, more environmentally-friendly solutions to the world's growing appetite for rare-earth based magnetic materials. Unfortunately, previously described recycling processes only partially capitalise on this potential, because the methods described to date are limited to 'laboratory scale' or operate only under ideal conditions and result in products that fail to recapture the coercivity of the starting, scrap materials. Herein, we report a commercial scale process (120 kg batches) that completely recovers the properties of the starting scrap magnets. Indeed, 'grain boundary modification', via careful addition of a proprietary mix of blended elements, produces magnets with 'designer properties' that can exceed those of the starting materials and can be closely tailored to meet a wide variety of end-user applications, including high-coercivity (>2000 kA/m), sintered magnets suitable for motor applications.

  8. Efficacy of pine leaves as an alternative bedding material for broiler chicks during summer season

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gourav; Khan, Asma; Singh, Surender; Anand, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess the efficacy of pine leaves as an alternative bedding material on the performance of broiler chicks. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted in summer. Total 120, day old Vencobb straight run chicks were procured, and after 5 days of brooding, chicks were randomly distributed into four treatment groups viz. paddy husk (Group I), paddy straw (Group II), pine leaves (Group III), and combination of paddy straw and pine leaves (Group IV), each having 30 chicks with 3 replicates of 10 chicks each. Chicks were reared under intensive conditions in houses that have a semi-controlled environment, with optimum temperature and adequate ventilation. Food and water were provided as per NRC (1994) requirement. Results: The average body weight after 6 weeks of the experiment was 2018.83±31.11, 1983.80±33.27, 2007.36±35.73, and 1938.43±36.35 g. The bedding type had no significant effect on the carcass characteristics viz. evisceration rate and proportion of cut-up parts of the carcass except giblet yield. The experiment suggested that performance of broiler chicks reared on paddy straw and pine leaves as litter material, had improved body weight and feed conversion ratio as compared to rearing on paddy husk as bedding material. Bacterial count, parasitic load and the N, P, K value of manure of different bedding material shows no significant difference. Conclusion: Pine leaves have a potential to be used as an alternative source of litter material to economize poultry production in a sustainable way, so as to make poultry farming as a profitable entrepreneur. PMID:27047021

  9. Evaluation of Alternate Materials and Methods for Strontium and Alpha Removal from Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    2000-11-07

    A literature survey indicated a number of alternate materials and methods for the removal of strontium and alpha-emitting radionuclides (actinides). We evaluated the use of alternate materials versus proposed flowsheets for salt processing at the Savannah River Site (SRS). From this evaluation we recommend the following materials for further testing to determine the rate and extent of removal. We do not recommend testing of liquid/liquid extraction and polymer filtration methods at this time.

  10. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  11. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  12. Sequestration of phosphorus from wastewater by cement-based or alternative cementitious materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jiding; Kong, Yaping; Shi, Xianming

    2014-10-01

    Cement-based and alternative cementitious materials were tested in the laboratory for their capability of removing phosphate from wastewater. The results demonstrated that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were suitable for describing the adsorption characteristics of these materials. Among the four types of filter media tested, the cement-based mortar A has the highest value of maximum adsorption (30.96 mg g(-1)). The P-bonding energy (KL) and adsorption capacity (K) exhibited a positive correlation with the total content of Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in each mortar. The maximum amount of P adsorbed (Qm) and adsorption intensity (1/n) exhibited a positive correlation with the CaO content in each mortar. For three of them, the P-removal rates were in excess of 94 percent for phosphorus concentrations ranging from 20 to 1000 mg L(-1). The underlying mechanisms were examined using field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM), coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results reveal that the removal of phosphate predominantly followed a precipitation mechanism in addition to weak physical interactions between the surface of adsorbent filter media and the metallic salts of phosphate. The use of cement-based or alternative cementitious materials in the form of ground powder shows great promise for developing a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable technology for P-sequestration and for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Efficacy of pine leaves as an alternative bedding material for broiler chicks during summer season.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gourav; Khan, Asma; Singh, Surender; Anand, Ashok Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to assess the efficacy of pine leaves as an alternative bedding material on the performance of broiler chicks. The present study was conducted in summer. Total 120, day old Vencobb straight run chicks were procured, and after 5 days of brooding, chicks were randomly distributed into four treatment groups viz. paddy husk (Group I), paddy straw (Group II), pine leaves (Group III), and combination of paddy straw and pine leaves (Group IV), each having 30 chicks with 3 replicates of 10 chicks each. Chicks were reared under intensive conditions in houses that have a semi-controlled environment, with optimum temperature and adequate ventilation. Food and water were provided as per NRC (1994) requirement. The average body weight after 6 weeks of the experiment was 2018.83±31.11, 1983.80±33.27, 2007.36±35.73, and 1938.43±36.35 g. The bedding type had no significant effect on the carcass characteristics viz. evisceration rate and proportion of cut-up parts of the carcass except giblet yield. The experiment suggested that performance of broiler chicks reared on paddy straw and pine leaves as litter material, had improved body weight and feed conversion ratio as compared to rearing on paddy husk as bedding material. Bacterial count, parasitic load and the N, P, K value of manure of different bedding material shows no significant difference. Pine leaves have a potential to be used as an alternative source of litter material to economize poultry production in a sustainable way, so as to make poultry farming as a profitable entrepreneur.

  14. Peregrine: A rapid and unbiased method to produce strand-specific RNA-Seq libraries from small quantities of starting material.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Stanley A; Bent, Zachary W; Solberg, Owen D; Curtis, Deanna J; Lane, Pamela D; Williams, Kelly P; Schoeniger, Joseph S; Sinha, Anupama; Lane, Todd W; Branda, Steven S

    2013-04-01

    Use of second generation sequencing (SGS) technologies for transcriptional profiling (RNA-Seq) has revolutionized transcriptomics, enabling measurement of RNA abundances with unprecedented specificity and sensitivity and the discovery of novel RNA species. Preparation of RNA-Seq libraries requires conversion of the RNA starting material into cDNA flanked by platform-specific adaptor sequences. Each of the published methods and commercial kits currently available for RNA-Seq library preparation suffers from at least one major drawback, including long processing times, large starting material requirements, uneven coverage, loss of strand information and high cost. We report the development of a new RNA-Seq library preparation technique that produces representative, strand-specific RNA-Seq libraries from small amounts of starting material in a fast, simple and cost-effective manner. Additionally, we have developed a new quantitative PCR-based assay for precisely determining the number of PCR cycles to perform for optimal enrichment of the final library, a key step in all SGS library preparation workflows.

  15. Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of Alternative Fuel Materials in Thermal Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Oggianu, Stella Maris; No, Hee Cheon; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2003-09-15

    A strategy is proposed for the assessment of nuclear fuel material economic potential use in future light water reactors (LWRs). In this methodology, both the required enrichment and the fuel performance limits are considered. In order to select the best fuel candidate, the optimal burnup that produces the lowest annual fuel cost within the burnup potential for a given fuel material and smear density ratio is determined.Several nuclear materials are presented as examples of the application of the methodology proposed in this paper. The alternative fuels considered include uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium carbide (UC), uranium nitride (UN), metallic uranium (U-Zr alloy), combined thorium and uranium oxides (ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}), and combined thorium and uranium metals (U/Th). For these examples, a typical LWR lattice geometry in a zirconium-based cladding was assumed. The uncertainties in the results presented are large due to the scarcity of experimental data regarding the behavior of the considered materials at high burnups. Also, chemical compatibility issues are to be considered separately.The same methodology can be applied in the future to evaluate the economic potential of other nuclear fuel materials including different cladding designs, dispersions of ceramics into ceramics, dispersions of ceramics into metals, and also for geometries other than the traditional circular fuel pin.

  16. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 6, Alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for material and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment 111-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VI - Alternatives Study, presents a study of the different storage/containment options considered for NMSF.

  17. Stabilization of different starting materials through vermicomposting in a continuous-feeding system: Changes in chemical and biological parameters.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Taušnerová, Hana; Hanč, Aleš; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    In this study the feasibility of Eisenia andrei to digest great amount of wastes including horse manure (HM), apple pomace (AP), grape pomace (GP), and digestate (DG) was monitored through a continuous-feeding system. New layers of fresh material were gradually added to form an aged-profile of layers in order to understand the interaction between earthworms and microorganisms during vermicomposting. Thus, changes in chemical and biological parameters were evaluated for 240days. The earthworm population reached maximum values in 120 d-old-layer, which was related to an increase in overall microbial biomass, assayed as dehydrogenase activity, in all of the processed materials. The pH was generally alkaline or neutral in all of the materials. The electrical conductivity did not modify significantly during vermicomposting, except in the case of the processed GP, and DG. The stabilization, in all of the processed materials, was detected after 240 d of vermicomposting, as indicated the decline in the content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The N-NO3(-) content exhibited an enhanced in the processed HM and AP, while a generalized decreased was found in the GP, and DG materials in 240 d-old-layer. The decline in microbial biomass activity, in all processed substrates, was related to a decrease in the earthworm activity after 240 d of vermicomposting, indicating a high degree of stabilization. However, the β-glucosidase, phosphatase, protease, and o-diphenol oxidase activities were different according to the age of layers and type of processed material. The phytotoxicity test indicated that the end products of the processed AP and DG were chemically stable and enriched with nutrients in comparison with the HM and GP vermicompost. This fact indicates to stabilization (maturation) in the end product, which is important for its safe disposal as an organic nutrient-rich product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Compared to What? Estimating Causal Effects for Latent Subgroups to Understand Variation in the Impacts of Head Start by Alternate Child Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Avi; Grindal, Todd; Miratrix, Luke; Page, Lindsay C.

    2014-01-01

    Head Start programs currently provide early childhood education and family support services to more than 900,000 low-income children and their families across the United States with an annual budget of around $8 billion in state and federal funds. Researchers and policy makers have debated the program's effectiveness since its inception in 1964.…

  19. Getting Started with French or Spanish in the Elementary School: FLES Materials and the Cost in Time and Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Yvonne V.

    Two articles address issues in the development of French and Spanish language programs in elementary schools: instructional materials and time and money factors. The information presented is drawn from experience in developing the Radford, Virginia FLES (Foreign Language in the Elementary School) program. The first article describes some aspects…

  20. Starting from Scratch: Greening Your Game Day--The Collegiate Football Sustainable Materials Management Toolkit. Version 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Collegiate Football Sustainable Materials Management Toolkit" was researched by student interns in the Virginia Tech Office of Energy & Sustainability, developed in collaboration with the US EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency) and a national panel of technical experts from universities across the nation, and driven forward…

  1. Starting from Scratch: Greening Your Game Day--The Collegiate Football Sustainable Materials Management Toolkit. Version 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Collegiate Football Sustainable Materials Management Toolkit" was researched by student interns in the Virginia Tech Office of Energy & Sustainability, developed in collaboration with the US EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency) and a national panel of technical experts from universities across the nation, and driven forward…

  2. Measurement of the resistivity of porous materials with an alternating air-flow method.

    PubMed

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Ianniello, Carmine; Romano, Rosario A

    2011-02-01

    Air-flow resistivity is a main parameter governing the acoustic behavior of porous materials for sound absorption. The international standard ISO 9053 specifies two different methods to measure the air-flow resistivity, namely a steady-state air-flow method and an alternating air-flow method. The latter is realized by the measurement of the sound pressure at 2 Hz in a small rigid volume closed partially by the test sample. This cavity is excited with a known volume-velocity sound source implemented often with a motor-driven piston oscillating with prescribed area and displacement magnitude. Measurements at 2 Hz require special instrumentation and care. The authors suggest an alternating air-flow method based on the ratio of sound pressures measured at frequencies higher than 2 Hz inside two cavities coupled through a conventional loudspeaker. The basic method showed that the imaginary part of the sound pressure ratio is useful for the evaluation of the air-flow resistance. Criteria are discussed about the choice of a frequency range suitable to perform simplified calculations with respect to the basic method. These criteria depend on the sample thickness, its nonacoustic parameters, and the measurement apparatus as well. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of acoustic materials.

  3. Alternative materials and processing techniques for optimized nanostructures in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hart, Judy N; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Simon, George P; Spiccia, Leone

    2008-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) represent an exciting application of nanotechnology and offer an appealing alternative to conventional solar cells based on photovoltaic devices, with significantly reduced production and material costs. However, further improvements are required to enhance the commercial viability of these solar cells. These improvements may be achieved through the careful manipulation of the structure at the nanoscale and the application of novel processing techniques, which may help to increase the efficiency of these solar cells, improve the ease of manufacture and allow the production of flexible, solid-state solar cells. For example, the use of a nanometre-thick coating of an insulating oxide over the semiconducting film in these solar cells may reduce recombination losses. Also, selective heating techniques such as microwave heating may assist in the production of efficient solar cells on polymer, rather than glass, substrates, by allowing a rapid heat treatment to be applied to the titanium dioxide film at a higher temperature than would be possible with conventional heating. Some novel approaches to the production of semiconducting thin films for dye-sensitized solar cells, as well as the use of alternative materials and nanostructures, are reviewed.

  4. Replacing noble metals with alternative materials in plasmonics and metamaterials: how good an idea?

    PubMed

    Khurgin, Jacob B

    2017-03-28

    Noble metals that currently dominate the fields of plasmonics and metamaterials suffer from large ohmic losses. Some of the new plasmonic materials, such as doped oxides and nitrides, have smaller material loss, and using them in place of metals carries the promise of reduced-loss plasmonic and metamaterial structures, with sharper resonances and higher field concentrations. This promise is put to a rigorous analytical test in this work, which reveals that having low material loss is not sufficient to have reduced modal loss in plasmonic structures. To reduce the modal loss, it is absolutely necessary for the plasma frequency to be significantly higher than the operational frequency. Using examples of nanoparticle plasmons and gap plasmons one comes to the conclusion that, even in the mid-infrared spectrum, metals continue to hold an advantage over alternative media when it comes to propagation distances and field enhancements. Of course, the new materials still have an application niche where high absorption loss is beneficial, e.g. in medicine and thermal photovoltaics.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  5. Replacing noble metals with alternative materials in plasmonics and metamaterials: how good an idea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurgin, Jacob B.

    2017-03-01

    Noble metals that currently dominate the fields of plasmonics and metamaterials suffer from large ohmic losses. Some of the new plasmonic materials, such as doped oxides and nitrides, have smaller material loss, and using them in place of metals carries the promise of reduced-loss plasmonic and metamaterial structures, with sharper resonances and higher field concentrations. This promise is put to a rigorous analytical test in this work, which reveals that having low material loss is not sufficient to have reduced modal loss in plasmonic structures. To reduce the modal loss, it is absolutely necessary for the plasma frequency to be significantly higher than the operational frequency. Using examples of nanoparticle plasmons and gap plasmons one comes to the conclusion that, even in the mid-infrared spectrum, metals continue to hold an advantage over alternative media when it comes to propagation distances and field enhancements. Of course, the new materials still have an application niche where high absorption loss is beneficial, e.g. in medicine and thermal photovoltaics. This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  6. Alternative disposal for Investigation Derived Wastes (IDW) containing low activity source material

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, H.T.; Majer, T.

    2007-07-01

    As part of a Remedial Investigation (RI) at a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site, approximately 77,111 kg (85 tons) I would use the actual tons of investigation derived wastes (IDW) were generated from exploratory soil borings and as part of removal activities at a former drum burial area. Characterization of these materials indicated elevated concentrations of metals including uranium and thorium (source material). Concentrations of uranium and thorium were at levels less than 0.05% by mass, which is the threshold for exempt source material under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Disposal of this material was evaluated as low-level radioactive waste and as exempt radioactive waste. The NRC has established a process for evaluation and review of exempt source material transfer and direct disposal in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) landfill. These requests are normally approved if the dose to a member of the general public is unlikely to exceed 0.25 mSv per year (25 milli-rem per year). The soil was evaluated for disposal as exempt radioactive waste at a RCRA landfill, which included dose modeling to workers during transportation and disposal as well as potential dose to members of the public after closure of the disposal facility. These evaluations determined that the potential dose was very small, and review by the agreement state regulatory agency indicated that this disposal process should not result in any undue hazard to public health and safety or property. The advantage of this approach is that disposal of 77,111 kg (85 tons) of IDW at a RCRA landfill is estimated to result in a savings of $80,000 as compared to disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Alternative waste disposal of exempt source material provides more disposal options and can lead to significant cost savings. (authors)

  7. Influence of various alternative bedding materials on pododermatitis in broilers raised in a built-up litter system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Broilers in the United States are frequently raised on built-up litter systems, primarily bedded with pine wood chips (shavings) or sawdust. There is continuing interest in alternative bedding materials as pine products are often in short supply and prices rise accordingly. Alternative bedding mat...

  8. An evaluation of aerobic and anaerobic sludges as start-up material for microbial fuel cell systems.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Justo; Cañizares, Pablo; Fernández, Francisco Jesus; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2012-02-15

    The operation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) seeded with the same quantities of aerobic or anaerobic sludge has been compared. The two sludges consisted of mixed cultures obtained from the aerobic reactor and anaerobic digester, respectively, of a municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP). Both the sludges were diluted with their sedimentation supernatant to avoid modifying their metabolism. The results show that the type of sludge has a major impact on the performance of the system. Seeding an MFC with anaerobic acclimated sludge leads to a more rapid start-up of electricity production and the absence of a lag period. In the MFC seeded with anaerobic sludge, the steady-state operation conditions were achieved in less than 10 days, while in the aerobic sludge-seeded MFC more than 20 days were necessary to achieve this regime. The anaerobic sludge also led to better performance of the MFC. Thus, maximum power densities above 300mWm(-2) were obtained for such systems (i.e. two times higher than that achieved with the aerobic sludge-seeded MFC in the same setup). This better performance is a direct consequence of the greater availability of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) in anaerobic sludge. However, the performance is not a consequence of the coulombic efficiency in the use of the COD to produce electricity because the aerobic sludge-seeded MFC doubles this figure with respect to the anaerobic sludge-seeded system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  10. Start Young!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Penni

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early interest in science and how effective it is on career choice in adult stages of life. Recommends starting mathematics and science activities in preschool and kindergarten. Describes how to create a career-oriented learning center in the classroom with examples of kitchen chemistry, nutrition/botany, zoology,…

  11. Papercrete brick as an alternate building material to control Environmental Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarsan, J. S.; Ramesh, S.; Jothilingam, M.; Ramasamy, Vishalatchi; Rajan, Rajitha J.

    2017-07-01

    Utilization of concrete in the construction industry is increasing day by day. The increasing demand for concrete in the future is the major issue, for which an alternate option is to find out at a reduced or no additional cost and to reduce the environmental impact due to increase of cement industries that are important ingredient to economic development. It turns out urgent to find out alternate for the partial replacement of concrete and cement, as natural sources of aggregates are becoming exhausted. As large quantity of paper waste is generated from different countries all over the world which causes serious environmental problems, So in this present study abandoned paper waste was used as a partial replacement material in concrete,. Study indicates that 80% of the construction cost of a building was contributed by building material and still millions of people in developing countries like India are not able to afford the cost of construction of house. This study is based on potential use of light weight composite brick as a building material and potential use of paper waste for producing at low-cost. Experimental investigation was carried out to analyse optimization of mix for papercrete bricks depending upon the water absorption, compressive strength and unit weight. Papercrete bricks were prepared out of waste paper, and quarry dust with partial replacement of cement by another industrial by-product Fly Ash in varying proportions of 25%, 40% and 55%. The properties like mechanical strength, standard quality comparisons with the conventional bricks through standard tests like hardness, soundness, fire resistance and Cost-Benefit Analysis were performed and studied. The specimens of dimension 230mm x 110mm x 80mm were subjected to 7 Days and 28 days air curing and sun drying before tests were performed on them. Based on the study it was found that for non-load bearing walls papercrete bricks are best suited.

  12. Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment – ICPMSE Proceedings Series: How Did It All Start?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiman, Jacob

    A historical overview of the first ten meetings of the International Conference for Protection of Materials from Space Environment (ICPMSE) is presented. Through the published documents and pictures from personal archives the rich history of the meeting is illustrated. The collaborative links with ESA, CNES, ONERA and JAXA are described that helped to make the ICPMSE series of meeting a truly International event. The review is based on published ICPMSE proceedings as well as on personal archives of Prof. J. Kleiman who initiated the meeting in 1991.

  13. Alternative approaches of SiC & related wide bandgap materials in light emitting & solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmann, Peter; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-03-01

    Materials for optoelectronics give a fascinating variety of issues to consider. Increasingly important are white light emitting diode (LED) and solar cell materials. Profound energy savings can be done by addressing new materials. White light emitting diodes are becoming common in our lighting scene. There is a great energy saving in the transition from the light bulb to white light emitting diodes via a transition of fluorescent light tubes. However, the white LEDs still suffer from a variety of challenges in order to be in our daily use. Therefore there is a great interest in alternative lighting solutions that could be part of our daily life. All materials create challenges in fabrication. Defects reduce the efficiency of optical transitions involved in the light emitting diode materials. The donor-acceptor co-doped SiC is a potential light converter for a novel monolithic all-semiconductor white LED. In spite of considerable research, the internal quantum efficiency is far less than theoretically predicted and is likely a fascinating scientific field for studying materials growth, defects and optical transitions. Still, efficient Si-based light source represents an ongoing research field in photonics that requires high efficiency at room temperature, wavelength tuning in a wide wavelength range, and easy integration in silicon photonic devices. In some of these devices, rare earth doped materials is considered as a potential way to provide luminescence spanning in a wide wavelength range. Divalent and trivalent oxidation states of Eu provide emitting centers in the visible region. In consideration, the use of Eu in photonics requires Eu doped thin films that are compatible with CMOS technology but for example faces material science issues like a low Eu solid solubility in silica. Therefore approaches aim to obtain efficient light emission from silicon oxycarbide which has a luminescence in the visible range and can be a host material for rare earth ions. The

  14. An alternative parameter to characterize biogas materials: Available carbon-nitrogen ratio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Li, Wenzhe; Li, Pengfei; Yan, Shuiping; Zhang, Yanlin

    2017-03-01

    Available carbon-nitrogen ratio (AC/N) was proposed as an alternative parameter for evaluating the potential of biogas materials in this paper. In the calculation of AC/N ratio, only the carbon that could be effectively utilized in anaerobic digestion (AD) process is included. Compared with total C/N, AC/N is particularly more suitable for the characterization of biogas materials rich in recalcitrant components. Nine common biogas materials were selected and a series of semi-continuous tests for up to 110days were carried out to investigate the source of available carbon and the relationship between AC/N and the stability of AD process. The results showed that only the carbon existing in proteins, sugars, fat and hemicelluose should be considered as available carbon for anaerobic microbes. Besides, the optimal AC/N for semi-continuous AD process was preliminarily determined to be 11-15. Taken together, our results demonstrate that AC/N is more effective than total C/N in the evaluation of the potential performance of AD process.

  15. Evaluation of the odour reduction potential of alternative cover materials at a commercial landfill.

    PubMed

    Solan, P J; Dodd, V A; Curran, T P

    2010-02-01

    The availability of virgin soils and traditional landfill covers are not only costly and increasingly becoming scarce, but they also reduce the storage capacity of landfill. The problem can be overcome by the utilisation of certain suitable waste streams as alternative landfill covers. The objective of this study was to assess the suitability of Construction & Demolition fines (C&D), Commercial & Industrial fines (C&I) and woodchip (WC) as potential landfill cover materials in terms of odour control. Background odour analysis was conducted to determine if any residual odour was emitted from the cover types. It was deemed negligible for the three materials. The odour reduction performance of each of the materials was also examined on an area of an active landfill site. A range of intermediate cover compositions were also studied to assess their performance. Odour emissions were sampled using a Jiang hood and analysed. Results indicate that the 200 mm deep combination layer of C&D and wood chip used on-site is adequate for odour abatement. The application of daily cover was found to result in effective reduction allowing for the background odour of woodchip.

  16. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface coating materials: Their compositions and potential as an alternative fuel.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Choi, In-Young; Son, Youn-Suk; Song, Kyu-Yong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    A sampling system was designed to determine the composition ratios of VOCs emitted from 31 surface coating materials (SCMs). Representative architectural, automotive, and marine SCMs in Korea were investigated. Toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were the predominant VOCs. The VOC levels (wt%) from automotive SCMs were significantly higher than those from architectural and marine paints. It was found that target SCMs comprised mainly VOCs with 6-10 carbon atoms in molecules, which could be adsorbed by activated carbon. The saturated activated carbon which had already adsorbed toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene was combusted. The saturated activated carbon was more combustible than new activated carbon because it comprised inflammable VOCs. Therefore, it could be an alternative fuel when using in a "fuelization system". To use the activated carbon as a fuel, a control technology of VOCs from a coating process was also designed and introduced.

  17. Evaluation of SRB phenolic TPS material made by an alternate vendor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karu, Z. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tests conducted to evaluate the adequacy of solid rocket booster (SRB) phenolic thermal protection system (TPS) material supplied by an alternate vendor chosen by United Space Boosters, Inc. (USBI), to replace the current phenolic TPS sections used thus far on the first four Shuttle flights. The phenolic TPS is applied mainly to the attach and kick rings of the solid rocket booster (SRB). Full-scale sectional models of both the attach and kick ring structure were made up with 0.0265 in. thick stainless steel thin skin covers with thermocouples on them to determine the heating rates. Such models were made up for both the forward and rear faces of the kick ring which has a different configuration on each side. The thin skins were replaced with the alternate phenolic TPS sections cut from flight hardware configuration phenolic parts as supplied by the new vendor. Two tests were performed for each configuration of the attach and kick rings and the samples were exposed to the flow for a duration that gave a heat load equivalent to that obtained in the series of runs made for the current line of phenolic TPS. The samples performed very well with no loss of any phenolic layers. The post-test samples looked better than those used to verify the current phenolic TPS.

  18. Are polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) implants an alternative material for nasal dorsal augmentation in Asians?

    PubMed

    Hong, Joon Pio; Yoon, Ji Young; Choi, Jong Woo

    2010-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty is a relatively common procedure in Korea. Alloplastic materials such as silicone, supramid mesh, Proplast, Mersiline, Medpor, and hydroxyapatite are frequently used for dorsal augmentation. Alloplastic implants have advantages, such as ready availability and no donor-site morbidity, but are associated with higher infection and extrusion rates than are autogenous materials. Although polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) implants have recently been introduced, such implants are yet to be established as an alternative for nasal augmentation because of a lack of relevant reports. From March 1998 to March 2007, we operated on 873 nasal dorsum augmentation patients using hard-type Gore-Tex implants. The patients were all of Korean ethnicity. There were 826 female and 47 male patients and aged ranging from 18 to 57 years (mean, 24 y). The Gore-Tex implant thicknesses were 3.1 to 4.9 mm (used in 59% of cases), 2 to 3 mm (8%), or 5 to 6 mm (33%). The Gore-Tex implants were used only for dorsal augmentation, whereas conchal or septal cartilage was used for nasal tip plasty. Of the total of 873 patients, 257 received long-term follow-up (mean follow-up, 34 mo). Apart from 34 patients with revision, no patient reported dissatisfaction, and there were no reports of problems with nasal contour, implant migration, or resorption of the implant material. The overall complication rate was 3.8%. Of the 257 long-term follow-up patients, 34 (13.5%) required revision. Four of these patients involved minor complications that were managed conservatively, whereas 30 patients required implant removal and revision procedures. These 30 cases included irregularity, infection, deviation, unfavorable dorsum height, and apparent implant silhouette, in addition to obvious supratip deformity. A review of the literature revealed that Gore-Tex implants seemed to have a lower implant removal rate than silicone implants. However, the overall complication rates seemed to be

  19. An alternative method for the certification of the sulfur mass fraction in coal Standard Reference Materials.

    PubMed

    Winchester, M R; Kelly, W R; Mann, J L; Guthrie, W F; MacDonald, B S; Turk, G C

    2001-06-01

    The S mass fractions of coal SRMs 2682b, 2684b, and 2685b are certified by direct comparison with coal SRMs 2682a, 2684a, and 2685a, respectively, using high-temperature combustion analysis with infrared (IR) absorption detection. The S mass fractions of the "a" materials used for calibration were previously determined by means of isotope-dilution thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). Therefore, the comparisons performed with the combustion-IR absorption method establish direct traceability links to accurate and precise ID-TIMS measurements. The expanded uncertainties associated with the certified S mass fractions are of approximately the same magnitude as would be expected for the ID-TIMS methodology. An important aspect of these certifications is that each "b" material is essentially identical with the corresponding "a" material, because both were produced from the same bulk, homogenized coal. As a test of the efficacy of the new certification approach when calibrant and unknown are not identical, the S mass fraction of coal SRM 2683b has been determined by direct comparison to coal SRM 2683a. These two coals, which have both previously been analyzed with ID-TIMS, are different in terms of S content and other properties. Whereas the S mass fraction for SRM 2683b determined with the new methodology agrees statistically with the ID-TIMS value, there is reason for caution in such cases. In addition to the usefulness of the alternative approach for certification activities within NIST, this approach might also be an excellent way of establishing NIST traceability during the value assignment process for reference materials not issued by NIST. Further research is needed, however, to understand better the scope of applicability.

  20. Determination of major, minor and trace elements in Glyceric Macerates and Mother Tinctures and in the starting plant materials.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Mery; Giacomino, Agnese; Abollino, Ornella; Allio, Arianna; Toniolo, Rosanna; Colombo, Maria Laura

    2015-03-15

    Glyceric Macerates (GMs) and Mother Tinctures (MTs) are liquid preparations obtained from plant buds (for GMs) and flowers, leaves or roots (for MT) by extraction with a mixture of solvents. Their quality depends on the quality of the plant materials and on the preparation procedures. In this work we determined the concentrations of major, minor and trace elements in buds, flowers and other plant components and in the GMs and MTs obtained from them by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) after microwave mineralization. To the best of our knowledge, this procedure has been applied for the first time here to the analysis of buds. We have taken into account spectral interferences and other causes of errors. Analogies and differences with regard to the method reported by European Pharmacopoeia for heavy metal determination in herbal drugs have been highlighted. The experimental results have been interpreted with chemometric techniques. No significant contamination was detected during the manufacturing step. Element concentrations in GMs and MTs, taking into account their daily dosages, are lower than acceptable intake levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Vapor-Phase Stoichiometry and Heat Treatment of CdTe Starting Material for Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao; Lehoczky, S. L.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Fang, Rei; Brebrick, R. F.

    1998-01-01

    Six batches of CdTe, having total amounts of material from 99 to 203 g and gross mole fraction of Te, X(sub Te), 0.499954-0.500138, were synthesized from pure Cd and Te elements. The vapor-phase stoichiometry of the assynthesized CdTe batches was determined from the partial pressure of Te2, P(sub Te2) using an optical absorption technique. The measured vapor compositions at 870 C were Te-rich for all of the batches with partial pressure ratios of Cd to Te2, P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2), ranging from 0.00742 to 1.92. After the heat treatment of baking under dynamic vacuum at 870 C for 8 min, the vapor-phase compositions moved toward that of the congruent sublimation, i.e. P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2) = 2.0, with the measured P(sub Cd)/P(sub Te2) varying from 1.84 to 3.47. The partial pressure measurements on one of the heat-treated samples also showed that the sample remained close to the congruent sublimation condition over the temperature range 800-880 C.

  2. The Alternative School: Alachua County (Florida) Public Schools. Descriptive Materials Covering the Secondary Center for Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alachua County Schools, Gainesville, FL.

    Compiled are materials which describe the Alternative School of the Alachua County, Florida, Public School District, which serves a severely emotionally disturbed population of about 75-85 adolescents. The following materials are included: an introductory letter, which includes information on staff operations and the curriculum framework, given…

  3. Variability of total flavonoids in Crataegus--factor evaluation for the monitored production of industrial starting material.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Wieland; Bohr, Christine; Plescher, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    European Hawthorn species (Crataegus spp.) are traditionally used for their demonstrated cardioprotective benefits. Most products are based on the compendial leaf and flower drug (LFD), which is standardised on the total flavonoid content (TF). In order to reduce variability associated with the wild plant origin and to ease product standardisation, we set out to develop a sustainable source of high quality raw material. Firstly, the LFD of wild trees in Germany was screened in terms of TF content (spectrophotometric analysis, calculated as hyperoside) according to the current pharmacopoeia requirements. Secondly, eleven high value provenances were selected, propagated, cultivated and the grafted clones were reanalysed. Thirdly, major environmental and sourcing influences were assessed: the year of harvest, the growing location, exposure to sunlight, the harvest time and the portion of leaf, flower and wood within the LFD. We found the TF in LFD of 150 wild grown Crataegus ranged between 0.28% and 1.92% (average 1.15%). Pure single styled Crataegus monogyna and hybrid trees represented the major portion (57%) of all screened trees. The hybrids with mainly two-styled flowers (pure Crataegus laevigata and hybrids) showed slightly higher TF values. The selected clones proved to maintain a high TF profile in cultivation, although superiority was attenuated when not only O-glycosides, but also C-glycosides were covered by the assay. Environmental influence surpassed in part the genetic variation of the selection in this study. In conclusion, cultivated high performance trees under central European conditions produced LFD exceeding the Pharmacopoeia standards. Careful monitoring of production--particularly in terms of the harvest time and actual LFD location and composition--has decisive impact to guarantee consistent high TF values.

  4. Search for greener Li-ion batteries: an alternative offered by organic electroactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Joaquin; Renault, Stéven; Poizot, Philippe; Dolhem, Franck

    2011-06-01

    The threats of climate change and the issues of secure energy supply are among the fundamental challenges of the 21stcentury that push humanity to adopt a sustainable development and to favour the use of renewable sources of energy. In addition to their historical use, LIBs seem on the road to power the next "Zero Emission" vehicles or could be used to assist the integration of renewable energy sources both on- and off-the-grid. Consequently, production of LIBs is expected to keep on growing. However LIBs are nearly exclusively based on inorganic compounds, non-renewable and energy-greedy materials. Thus in parallel with regular research on inorganic-based LIBs, we have recently proposed to probe an alternative pathway by searching for redox-active organic materials, easier to discard while possibly derived from biomass resources. As solid-state electrochemistry of organics is not that well documented, our current approach consists in a global survey of selected organic structures in order to grasp relevant parameters that affect the redox potential, the stability upon cycling and so on. In this report, we extend our current database of redox-active organic structures by evaluating vs. Li bulky pyrazine-based structures and dilithium polyporate as a supplementary specimen of p-benzoquinone derivatives.

  5. Study of alternate material for pedal ventilator kits. Final report May 79-May 80

    SciTech Connect

    Buday, J.M.

    1980-04-01

    The objective of this program was to conduct a study of alternate materials that could be utilized in the construction of a pedal ventilator kit (PVK). The goal of the study was to reduce unit cost in a large scale procurement. Cost savings and performance parameters were evaluated using the PVK developed in 1979 under Contract No. DCP01-78-C-0184 as a basis for comparison. A value analysis study was conducted on the PVK to determine viable material/design revisions that offered potential manufacturing economies. Based on the conclusions of the study, one optimum design was chosen for fabrication. Prior to fabrication, five breadboard support frames were constructed and tested. Fifteen fully assembled prototype pedal ventilator kits were constructed. Five of the PVK's were subsequently tested to assure compliance with performance and reliability requirements. Preliminary specifications and operating instructions were generated for the PVK. In addition, production cost estimates based on a procurement of 100,000 units were formulated for FEMA budgetary purposes.

  6. Toenails as an alternative source material for the extraction of DNA from decomposed human remains.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Andrew; Grimble, Katelyn; Azim, Arani; Owen, Rebecca; Hartman, Dadna

    2016-01-01

    The DNA identification of decomposed human remains for coronial investigations at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine routinely requires the retrieval and processing of a bone sample obtained from the deceased. Bone is a difficult sample type to work with as it requires surgical removal from the deceased, refrigerated storage, and additional processing steps prior to DNA analysis in comparison to other samples types such as buccal swabs or blood stains. In an attempt to overcome the issues posed by bone, a DNA extraction method utilising toenails as an alternate source material was optimised and trialled. Two DNA extraction methods were optimised for digestion of toenail material, with the method utilising the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit selected for a casework trial. Single source DNA profiles, matching those of the conventional samples taken, were obtained for toenail samples collected from 28 of 30 coronial cases available for this study. Of these, 26 toenail samples produced full profiles. Although the overall DNA profile quality from the toenails was less than that of the conventional sample, the profiles from toenails met the reporting requirements for identification. Based on the results obtained, the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine will be implementing toenails as the primary sample type for collection from decomposed remains when blood is not a suitable sample type. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of Nb and Alternative Material Thin Films Tailored for SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Reece, C E; Spradlin, J K; Xiao, B; Zhao, X; Gu, Diefeng; Baumgart, Helmut; Beringer, Douglas; Lukaszew, Rosa; Seo, Kang

    2011-09-01

    Over the years, Nb/Cu technology, despite its shortcomings due to the commonly used magnetron sputtering, has positioned itself as an alternative route for the future of superconducting structures used in accelerators. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of energetic vacuum deposition techniques, showing promise for the production of thin films tailored for SRF applications. JLab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via techniques such as Electron Cyclotron Resonance and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering. As part of this project, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated with the characterization of their surface, structure, superconducting properties and RF response. It has been shown that the film RRR can be tuned from single digits to values greater than 400. This paper presents results on surface impedance measurements correlated with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on various substrates, monocrystalline and polycrystalline as well as amorphous. A progress report on work on NbTiN and AlN based multilayer structures will also be presented.

  8. Evaluation of heavy crude oil from a water-oil model system as starting material for the preparation of adsorbents type NaY zeolite-templated carbon.

    PubMed

    Elles-Pérez, Cindy J; Muñoz-Acevedo, Amner; Guzmán, Andrés; Camargo, Hernando; Henao, José

    2017-03-22

    In this work, NaY zeolite is explored as a possible "template" to obtain porous materials type ZTC from the adsorption of heavy crude oil in a water-oil model system (emulsion). In order to produce the adsorbents, a cationic surfactant is selected to facilitate the adsorption of the crude oil into the pores of the zeolite and to get the composite, which was activated with controlled thermal treatments (T: 700-800 °C and t: 0.5-1 h) in inert conditions (N2 gaseous). The starting materials, composite and porous carbons were characterized using structural/surface analysis techniques (API Gravity, SARA, IR, XRD, XRF, TGA, Langmuir isotherms, BET and SEM). The results showed that four types of mesoporous carbons were produced with specific surface areas between 70 ± 1 m(2)/g and 220 ± 3 m(2)/g, average pore volumes between 0.144 cm(3)/g and 0.40 cm(3)/g and average pore widths between 4.9 nm and 8.3 nm. The activation conditions of 800 °C and 1 h allowed to make the carbonaceous material with the best surface characteristics (220 ± 3 m(2)/g, 0.27 cm(3)/g, and 4.9 nm). Therefore, it is concluded that under assay conditions employed, the heavy crude oil, as a mixed model (water-oil), from an aqueous environment is a starting material suitable for preparation of "mesoporous" carbons.

  9. Starting motor

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Hamano, I

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a starting motor having a housing, planetary reduction gears including an internal gear in the housing. The improvement consists of an elastic member having a first annular portion mounted in engagement with a fixed annular member of the housing and a plurality of protruding axially extending elastic portions providing a corrugated surface pressed into engagement with an end portion of the internal gear, the elastic member being sandwiched between the internal gear and the housing member, the protruding axially extending elastic portions providing resilient means which flex and incline circumferentially under turning force from the internal gear and exert reactive thrust on the internal gear elastically so that the frictional force at the abutting surfaces of the protruding portions holds the internal gear in resilient engagement with the elastic member and the resilient means acts as a buffer to absorb rotary impact force developing in the planetary reduction gears.

  10. Alternative materials for next-generation transistors: High-k/germanium-based MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Chein-Lan

    Electronic devices that make up 99% of the computer processor and memory market are based on silicon (semiconductor) and silicon dioxide (insulator) technology. Unfortunately the key transistor gate stack structure within the "traditional" technology has reached an intrinsic physical scaling limit; the ultrathin gate oxide, already at 1nm thickness, cannot be made thinner without resulting in an intolerably high leakage current and reduced drive current. This limitation can be avoided by replacing the thin gate dielectric with a thicker film of an alternative material with a permittivity higher than that of SiO2, an accomplishing that has been realized in production just as this thesis goes to press. To further increase device performance, replacing the Si semiconductor with germanium as an alternative channel material is an attractive option for its high mobility and narrow band gap. However, the lack of a stable insulating oxide with high quality electrical properties prevents the fabrication of competitive Ge-based metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). This dissertation reports the study of potential future-generation transistors with high-k dielectrics (HfO2 and Al2O3) on Ge substrates. A brief review of current research and development is first given followed by an introduction of the thin film characterization techniques used in this work. Various cleaning treatments as well as surface passivation methods using wet chemistry have been investigated on Ge substrates. Next, thin high-k dielectric films of HfO2 and Al2O3 have been deposited on Ge using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD permits films to be grown with monolayer control and excellent film conformality. Physical, chemical and electrical characterization has been performed on the multilayer film structures. Optimization of the film growth has been developed and we have demonstrated high quality with Au/HfO2/Ge nMOS devices. Capacitance-voltage electrical measurements show that

  11. Use of a fluidized bed hammer mill for size reduction and classification: effects of process variables and starting materials on the particle size distribution of milled lactose batches.

    PubMed

    Lee, C C; Chan, L W; Heng, Paul W S

    2003-01-01

    The process capability of a fluidized bed hammer mill was investigated with respect to four process variables, namely, rotational speeds of beater system and classifier wheel, airflow rates and length of grinding zones, as well as the particle size and flow property of the starting materials. The size distributions of all the milled lactose batches could be fitted to the Rosin Rammler distribution (RRD) function. The characteristic particle size (De) and uniform coefficient (n), which were derived from the RRD function, complemented the size at the 99th percentile of the cumulative undersize distribution (D99) to characterize the lactose batches. Lower De and D99 values indicate a finer powder while a higher n value indicates a narrower size distribution. The beater speed played a critical role. Increasing the beater speed from 12000 to 21000 rpm generally resulted in an increase in n and a decrease in D99 values due to the greater amount of milling energy supplied. The particle size and flow property of the starting material also played an important role at beater speed of 12000 rpm, where the lowest amount of milling energy was supplied. When a higher amount of milling energy was provided, the effect of particle size of the starting material was less significant. The other process variables exerted varying effects. Increasing the classifier wheel speed from 5000 to 15000 rpm decreased the De and D99 and increased the n values of the milled lactose batches, provided sufficient milling energy was supplied to the lactose particles. Changing airflow rates from 80 to 90 m3/h generally resulted in larger De and D99 values and lower n values as the higher airflow rate provided greater airflow-induced kinetic energy that facilitated the passage of lactose through the classifier wheel. However, changing the long grinding zone to a short one did not significantly affect the De, D99 and n values of the milled lactose batches produced. Small lactose particles of narrow size

  12. Poly(3-hydroxypropionate): a promising alternative to fossil fuel-based materials.

    PubMed

    Andreessen, Björn; Taylor, Nicolas; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are storage compounds synthesized by numerous microorganisms and have attracted the interest of industry since they are biobased and biodegradable alternatives to fossil fuel-derived plastics. Among PHAs, poly(3-hydroxypropionate) [poly(3HP)] has outstanding material characteristics and exhibits a large variety of applications. As it is not brittle like, e.g., the best-studied PHA, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [poly(3HB)], it can be used as a plasticizer in blends to improve their properties. Furthermore, 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is considered likely to become one of the new industrial building blocks, and it can be obtained from poly(3HP) by simple hydrolysis. Unfortunately, no natural organism is known to accumulate poly(3HP) so far. Thus, several efforts have been made to engineer genetically modified organisms capable of synthesizing the homopolymer or copolymers containing 3HP. In this review, the achievements made so far in efforts to obtain biomass which has accumulated poly(3HP) or 3HP-containing copolymers, as well as the properties of these polyesters and their applications, are compiled and evaluated. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Industrial wastes as alternative raw materials to produce eco-friendly fired bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Quero, V.; Maza-Ignacio, O. T.; Guerrero-Paz, J.; Campos-Venegas, K.

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on the incorporation of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA) and silica fume (SF) wastes as an alternative raw material into clay bricks, replacing clay by up to 40 wt.%. Fly ash (FA) was used as reference. The plasticity of the batches was determined by Atterberg’s consistency limits. Bricks were produced by uniaxial pressing and fired a 900 and 1000°C. Physical properties (fired shrinkage, water absorption, apparent porosity and Initial water absorption rate) and mechanical properties (compressive strength and flexural strength) as function of the firing temperature and type waste were investigated. The results showed that wastes into clay body increase its global plasticity. 80%Clay-20%SCBA mixture has the lower linear shrinkage. After firing process, the brick produced with clay-SCBA show the higher water absorption and apparent porosity, regardless of the firing temperature. The brick produced with 60%clay-40%SF show the water absorption and apparent porosity similar to control bricks. The SCBA waste additions tend to decrease the mechanical strength of the clay bricks, therefore amounts of 40% SCBA waste should be avoided because it reduce the mechanical strength of the red fired bricks. The fired bricks with 40% SF, firing a 900°C show mechanical properties similar control bricks.

  14. Application of broadband alternating current magnetic susceptibility to the characterization of magnetic nanoparticles in natural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    A new method is proposed for characterizing magnetic particles by measuring low-field alternating current magnetic susceptibility at a number of frequency steps spanning four orders of magnitude, from 125 Hz to 512 kHz. This method was tested using natural samples with various grain size distributions, including basalt (Kilauea, Hawaii), loess and paleosol (Luochuan, China), tuff (Yucca Mountain, Nevada), granite (Minnesota Valley, Minnesota), and andesite (Sakurajima, Japan). The resulting frequency spectrum of magnetic susceptibility (FSMS) of the basalt, loess/paleosol, and tuff decreases with increasing frequency, but at different rates of decrease. The FSMS of the basalt is characterized by a monotonic decrease with increasing frequency over the entire range. The FSMS of the loess/paleosol and the tuff decreases more markedly than that of the basalt, which agrees with previous results showing that superparamagnetic particles are dominant in such material. Quantitative estimates using FSMSs allow reconstruction of characteristic grain size distributions and clearly identify differences in the distribution of superparamagnetic particles. The multidomain granite sample has no distinct frequency dependence, which is probably due to the smooth displacement of domain walls in the presence of the external field. In contrast, the FSMSs of the andesite samples exhibit maxima over a limited frequency range, between 16 and 128 kHz. This behavior, together with low-temperature measurements, can be accounted for by magnetic resonance of domain walls in the multidomain phenocrysts.

  15. Poly(3-Hydroxypropionate): a Promising Alternative to Fossil Fuel-Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Andreeßen, Björn; Taylor, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are storage compounds synthesized by numerous microorganisms and have attracted the interest of industry since they are biobased and biodegradable alternatives to fossil fuel-derived plastics. Among PHAs, poly(3-hydroxypropionate) [poly(3HP)] has outstanding material characteristics and exhibits a large variety of applications. As it is not brittle like, e.g., the best-studied PHA, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [poly(3HB)], it can be used as a plasticizer in blends to improve their properties. Furthermore, 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) is considered likely to become one of the new industrial building blocks, and it can be obtained from poly(3HP) by simple hydrolysis. Unfortunately, no natural organism is known to accumulate poly(3HP) so far. Thus, several efforts have been made to engineer genetically modified organisms capable of synthesizing the homopolymer or copolymers containing 3HP. In this review, the achievements made so far in efforts to obtain biomass which has accumulated poly(3HP) or 3HP-containing copolymers, as well as the properties of these polyesters and their applications, are compiled and evaluated. PMID:25149521

  16. Starting Trees from Cuttings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for starting tree cuttings from woody plants, explaining "lag time," recommending materials, and giving step-by-step instructions for rooting and planting. Points out species which are likely candidates for cuttings and provides tips for teachers for developing a unit. (JM)

  17. Phase changing material: an alternative method for cooling babies with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Niranjan; Chakrapani, Yogeshwar; Rebekah, Grace; Kareti, Kalyani; Devasahayam, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) has been proved effective. Standard equipment is expensive, while ice packs used in low resource settings are labour intensive and associated with wider temperature fluctuations. To assess the feasibility of using phase changing material (PCM) as an alternative method for providing therapeutic hypothermia. We retrospectively analysed 41 babies with HIE who had been cooled with PCM (OM 32 or HS 29) to a target rectal temperature of 33-34°C. Rectal temperature was continuously monitored and recorded every hour. If the rectal temperature was >33.8°C, cool gel packs were applied, and if the temperature was <33.2°C, the baby was covered with sheets and the warmer output turned on till the temperature stabilized at 33.5°C. The unit's standard protocol for cooling was followed for monitoring and treatment. The outcome measures were stability and fluctuation of the rectal temperature and the need for interventions to maintain the target temperature. The mean (±SD) temperature during the cooling phase was 33.45 ± 0.26°C. Throughout the cooling phase, the target temperature range was maintained in 96.2% of the time. There was no temperature reading <32°C. With HS 29, ice packs were not used in any baby, and the warmer was used for a median of 7 h (interquartile range 1.5-14). PCM provides a low cost and effective method to maintain therapeutic hypothermia. However, careful monitoring is required during induction and the rewarming phase to avoid hypothermia outside the therapeutic range. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Exciton Dynamics in Alternative Solar Cell Materials: Polymers, Nanocrystals, and Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pundsack, Thomas J.

    To keep fossil fuel usage in 2040 even with 2010 usage, 50% of global energy will need to come from alternative sources such as solar cells. While the photovoltaic market is currently dominated by crystalline silicon, there are many low-cost solar cell materials such as conjugated polymers, semiconductor nanocrystals, and organic small molecules which could compete with fossil fuels. To create cost-competitive devices, understanding the excited state dynamics of these materials is necessary. The first section of this thesis looks at aggregation in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) which is commonly used in organic photovoltaics. The amount of aggregation in P3HT thin films was controlled by using a mixture of regioregular and regiorandom P3HT. Even with few aggregates present, excited states were found to transfer from amorphous to aggregate domains in <50 fs which could indicate efficient long-range energy transfer. To further study P3HT aggregation, a triblock consisting of two P3HT chains with a coil polymer between them was investigated. By changing solvents, aggregation was induced in a stable and reversible manner allowing for spectroscopic studies of P3HT aggregates in solution. The polarity of the solvent was adjusted, and no change in excited state dynamics was observed implying the excited state has little charge-transfer character. Next, the conduction band density of states for copper zinc tin sulfide nanocrystals (CZTS NCs) was measured using pump-probe spectroscopy and found to be in agreement with theoretical results. The density of states shifted and dilated for smaller NCs indicative of quantum confinement. The excited state lifetime was found to be short (<20 ps) and independent of NC size which could limit the efficiency of CZTS photovoltaic devices. Finally, triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) was studied in platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) thin films. By analyzing pump-probe spectra, the product of TTA in PtOEP thin films was assigned to a long

  19. Solar power satellite: Analysis of alternatives for transporting material to geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, W. J.; Huang, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    A systems design study of the alternative methods and relative merits of various approaches to transporting and assembling a solar power satellite in geosynchronous orbit was conducted. State of the art alternatives for chemical and electrical interorbital propulsion were studied, and several possible scenarios for construction were proposed.

  20. Experimental demonstration of radiation effects on the performance of a stirling-alternator convertor and candidate materials evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles, Omar R.

    Free-piston Stirling power convertors are under consideration by NASA for service in the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) and Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems to enable aggressive exploration missions by providing a reliable and constant power supply. The ASRG must withstand environmental radiation conditions, while the FSP system must tolerate a mixed neutron and gamma-ray environment resulting from self-irradiation. Stirling-alternators utilize rare earth magnets and a variety of organic materials whose radiation limits dominate service life estimates and shielding requirements. The project objective was to demonstrate the performance of the alternator, identify materials that exhibit excessive radiation sensitivity, identify radiation tolerant substitutes, establish empirical dose limits, and demonstrate the feasibility of cost effective nuclear and radiation tests by selection of the appropriate personnel and test facilities as a function of hardware maturity. The Stirling Alternator Radiation Test Article (SARTA) was constructed from linear alternator components of a Stirling convertor and underwent significant pre-exposure characterization. The SARTA was operated at the Sandia National Laboratories Gamma Irradiation Facility to a dose of over 40 Mrad. Operating performance was within nominal variation, although modestly decreasing trends occurred in later runs as well as the detection of an electrical fault after the final exposure. Post-irradiation disassembly and internal inspection revealed minimal degradation of the majority of the organic components. Radiation testing of organic material coupons was conducted since the majority of the literature was inconsistent. These inconsistencies can be attributed to testing at environmental conditions vastly different than those Stirling-alternator organics will experience during operation. Samples were irradiated at the Texas A&M TRIGA reactor to above expected FSP neutron fluence. A thorough

  1. Investigation on the long-term radiation hardness of low resistivity starting silicon materials for RT silicon detectors in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.

    1994-02-01

    Relatively low resistivity (200 to 1000 {Omega}-cm) starting silicon materials have been studied in the search of room temperature neutron radiation-hard silicon detectors. It has been found that, moderate resistivity (300-700 {Omega}-cm) silicon detectors, after being irradiated to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 13} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, are extremely stable in terms of the detector full depletion voltage (V{sub d}) or the net effective concentration of ionized space charges (N{sub eff} ---- there is little ``reverse annealing`` of N{sub eff} at RT and elevated temperatures as compared with large reverse annealing observed for high resistivity silicon detectors. Detectors with starting resistivity of 300-700 {Omega}-cm have been found to be stable, during the equivalent of one year RT anneal that would reach the saturation of the first stage of reverse anneal, within then N{sub eff} window of {vert_bar}N{sub eff}{vert_bar}{le} 2.5 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} (V{sub d} = 180 V for d = 300 {mu}m) in a working range of 5.0 {times} 10{sup 13} to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, or a net neutron radiation tolerance of 1.0 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. The observed effects are in very good agreement with an early proposed model, which predicted among others, that there might be an off set between the reverse annealing effect and the partial annealing of the P-V centers that leads to the partial recovery of the shallow impurity donors.

  2. An Alternative Host Material for Long-Lifespan Blue Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Lee, Namheon; Jeon, Soon Ok; Sim, Myungsun; Kang, Hosuk; Jung, Yongsik; Huh, Dal Ho; Son, Young Mok; Lee, Sae Youn; Numata, Masaki; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Aguilera-Iparraguirre, Jorge; Hirzel, Timothy; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Kim, Sunghan; Lee, Sangyoon

    2017-08-01

    It has been challenging to find stable blue organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) that rely on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). Lack of stable host materials well-fitted to the TADF emitters is one of the critical reasons. The most popular host for blue TADF, bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl] ether oxide (DPEPO), leads to unrealistically high maximum external quantum efficiency. DPEPO is however an unstable material and has a poor charge transporting ability, which in turn induces an intrinsic short OLED operating lifespan. Here, an alternative host material is introduced which educes the potential efficiency and device lifespan of given TADF emitters with the appropriateness of replacing the most popular host material, DPEPO, in developing blue TADF emitters. It simultaneously provides much longer device lifespan and higher external quantum efficiency at a practical brightness due to its high material stability and electron-transport-type character well-fitted for hole-transport-type TADF emitters.

  3. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

  4. Predicted concentrations in new relocatable classrooms of volatile organic compounds emitted from standard and alternate interior finish materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Fisk, William J.; Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.

    2001-07-01

    Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are widely employed by California school districts to satisfy rapidly expanding space requirements due to population growth and class size reduction policies. There is public concern regarding indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, particularly in RCs, but very little data to support or dispel these concerns. Several studies are investigating various aspects of IEQ in California schools. This laboratory-based study focused on evaluating the emissions of toxic and/or odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, from materials used to finish the interiors of new RCs. Furthermore, the study implemented a procedure for VOC source reduction by testing and selecting lower-emitting materials as substitutes for standard materials. In total, 17 standard and alternate floor coverings, wall panels and ceiling panels were quantitatively tested for emissions of VOCs using smallscale environmental chambers. Working with the largest northern California manufacturer of conventional RCs and two school districts, specifications were developed for four new RCs to be produced in early summer 2001. Two of these will be predominantly finished with standard materials. Alternate carpet systems, an alternate wall panel covering and an alternate ceiling panel were selected for the two other RCs based on the results of the laboratory study and considerations of cost and anticipated performance and maintenance. Particular emphasis was placed on reducing the concentrations of VOCs on California agency lists of toxic compounds. Indoor concentrations of toxic and odorous VOCs were estimated for the four classrooms by mass balance using the measured VOC emission factors, exposed surface areas of the materials in the RCs, and three ventilation rate scenarios. Results indicate that reductions in the concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde phenol, di(ethylene glycol) butyl ether, vinyl acetate, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene

  5. PEM Fuel Cell Freeze Durability and Cold Start Project

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, T.; O'Neill, Jonathan

    2008-01-02

    UTC has taken advantage of the unique water management opportunities inherent in micro-porous bipolar-plates to improve the cold-start performance of its polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). Diagnostic experiments were used to determine the limiting factors in micro-porous plate PEFC freeze performance and the causes of any performance decay. Alternative cell materials were evaluated for their freeze performance. Freeze-thaw cycling was also performed to determine micro-porous plate PEFC survivability. Data from these experiments has formed the basis for continuing development of advanced materials capable of supporting DOE's cold-start and durability objectives.

  6. Experimental Rate Study of Vitrinite Maturation as a Function of Temperature, Time, Starting Material, Aqueous Fluid Pressure, and Oxygen Fugacity: Corroboration of Prior Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, W. G.; Mählmann, R. F.

    2002-05-01

    Kinetic studies were performed on disaggregated samples of gymnosperm and angiosperm huminite at 2.0 kbar aqueous fluid pressure and oxygen fugacities defined by hematite-magnetite and magnetite + quartz-fayalite solid buffers. Individual experiments lasted from 5-204 days. The rate of vitrinite reflectance (VR) increase was evaluated at 200, 250, 300, and 400oC isotherms; experimentally determined, approximately steady-state values for the mean percentage Rmax are 0.54, 0.74, 1.10, and 2.25, respectively. The overall activation energy governing the kinetics of several devolatilization reactions responsible for increase in VR measured in our experiments is 21.8+/- 0.3 kJ/mol. Combined with earlier rate studies conducted by Dalla Torre et al. (1997), we conclude that the rate of vitrinite maturation is unaffected by oxidation state, "wet" versus "dry" conditions, and the nature of the starting lignitic material. To a small extent, elevated lithostatic pressure retards the rate of increase in VR. These new run data demonstrate that VR is chiefly a function of temperature and time. In support of most earlier field, theoretical, and laboratory studies, our research indicates that, for all but geologically insignificant times intervals, vitrinite reflectance is an appropriate proxy for host-rock burial temperature.

  7. TSE risk assessment for starting materials used during, or in the manufacture of vaccines for human use--a consultant's view of the commercial approach.

    PubMed

    Bradley, R

    2006-01-01

    Vaccination is an essential tool to protect humans from many infectious diseases. Materials derived from bovine tissues are used in, or during the manufacture of, most vaccines. Following the occurrence of BSE in cattle in three continents since 1986, the need to ensure the TSE safety of vaccines is vital. Various actions have been taken to ensure safety targets are reached. This paper shows that selecting starting tissues used in vaccine manufacture on the basis of their inherent TSE risk is of prime importance and is more secure than using geography as the primary criterion of a safe origin. Other approaches can also contribute to safety assurance. These include avoiding, where possible, tissues from animals, risk tissues and tissues of unknown or uncertain provenance. It is essential to ensure tissues are collected and processed appropriately and detailed records are kept. The risk assessment approach, based on the main safety factors of Source, Process and Use, coupled with these additional features, combine to establish that the TSE safety of vaccines is ensured, despite the challenge resulting from the occurrence of BSE.

  8. THE USE OF ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS FOR DAILY COVER AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS. A Project Summary (EPA/600/SR-93/172)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation was conducted to assess the applicability of currently available (ca. 1992) alternative materials for use as daily cover at landfills. Information on characteristics, material and equipment requirements, methods of preparation and application, climatic and ope...

  9. Alternating block polyurethanes based on PCL and PEG as potential nerve regeneration materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangyao; Li, Dandan; Niu, Yuqing; He, Tao; Chen, Kevin C; Xu, Kaitian

    2014-03-01

    Polyurethanes with regular and controlled block arrangement, i.e., alternating block polyurethanes (abbreviated as PUCL-alt-PEG) based on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-diol) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was prepared via selectively coupling reaction between PCL-diol and diisocyanate end-capped PEG. Chemical structure, molecular weight, distribution, and thermal properties were systematically characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, GPC, DSC, and TGA. Hydrophilicity was studied by static contact angle of H2O and CH2I2. Film surface was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy, and mechanical properties were assessed by universal test machine. Results show that alternating block polyurethanes give higher crystal degree, higher mechanical properties, and more hydrophilic and rougher (deep ravine) surface than their random counterpart, due to regular and controlled structure. Platelet adhesion illustrated that PUCL-alt-PEG has better hemocompatibility and the hemacompatibility was affected significantly by PEG content. Excellent hemocompatibility was obtained with high PEG content. CCK-8 assay and SEM observation revealed much better cell compatibility of fibroblast L929 and rat glial cells on the alternating block polyurethanes than that on random counterpart. Alternating block polyurethane PUC20-a-E4 with optimized composition, mechanical, surface properties, hemacompatibility, and highest cell growth and proliferation was achieved for potential use in nerve regeneration.

  10. Evaluation of Anticorrosion Performance of New Materials for Alternative Superheater Tubes in Biomass Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuchun; Zhang, Hongliang; He, Yuwu

    2016-09-01

    One way of controlling alkali chloride-induced corrosion in biomass boilers is by designing new alloy materials used as superheater tubes. Four newly designed Cr-Ni alloy was designed and studied for applicability in biomass power plants. High-temperature oxidation experiments and high-temperature corrosion experiments were carried out for evaluation material characterization. Through analysis and discussion of the corrosion kinetics and oxidation kinetics, it can be concluded that materials with series number of "2xx" and "3xx" had better endurance ability in KCl environment under 650°C and 700°C than TP316 material. In the same conditions, 3xx material had better anticorrosion ability in 700°C with KCl environment.

  11. Synthesis of a reactive polymethacrylate capillary monolith and its use as a starting material for the preparation of a stationary phase for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kip, Çiğdem; Erkakan, Damla; Gökaltun, Aslıhan; Çelebi, Bekir; Tuncel, Ali

    2015-05-29

    Poly(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate), poly(HPMA-Cl-co-EDMA) capillary monolith was proposed as a reactive starting material with tailoring flexibility for the preparation of monolithic stationary phases. The reactive capillary monolith was synthesized by free radical copolymerization of 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA-Cl) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA). The mean pore size, the specific surface area and the permeability of poly(HPMA-Cl-co-EDMA) monoliths were controlled by adjusting porogen/monomer volume ratio, porogen composition and polymerization temperature. The porogen/monomer volume ratio was found as the most effective factor controlling the porous properties of poly(HPMA-Cl-co-EDMA) monolith. Triethanolamine (TEA-OH) functionalized polymethacrylate monoliths were prepared by using the reactive chloropropyl group of poly(HPMA-Cl-co-EDMA) monolith via one-pot and simple post-functionalization process. Poly(HPMA-Cl-co-EDMA) monolith reacted with TEA-OH was evaluated as a stationary phase in nano-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (nano-HILIC). Nucleotides, nucleosides and benzoic acid derivatives were satisfactorily separated with the plate heights up to 20μm. TEA-OH attached-poly(HPMA-Cl-co-EDMA) monolith showed a reproducible and stable retention behaviour in nano-HILIC runs. However, a decrease in the column performance (i.e. an increase in the plate height) was observed with the increasing retention factor. Hence "retention-dependent column efficiency" behaviour was shown for HILIC mode using the chromatographic data collected with the polymer based monolith synthesized.

  12. Embodied Energy Assessment and Comparisons for a Residential Building Using Conventional and Alternative Materials in Indian Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen Kishore, K.; Chouhan, J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Building sector is responsible for 40 % of the primary energy use and 24 % of carbon dioxide emissions in India. The main source of green house gas emissions from buildings is due to energy consumption. This paper aims to assess the embodied energy index and environmental impact of a two storied residential building. The study proposes various alternative materials which can be used in day to day construction in order to mitigate the environmental impact and climate change due to construction activity in India. Two types of construction techniques have been considered for the study, namely load bearing and reinforced concrete framed construction. Embodied energy and carbon dioxide emissions of walling and roofing components using conventional and alternative materials has also been analyzed and compared. The comparison is done based on two parameters namely, embodied energy/m2 and CO2 emissions per unit of floor area. The study shows that bricks, cement and steel are the three major contributors to the energy cost of constructing a building by conventional methods. A conventional two storied load bearing structure is 22 % more energy efficient when compared to a reinforced concrete structure. It has also been observed from the study that use of alternative material in the building envelope gives embodied energy savings between 50 and 60 % for a two storey load bearing structure and 30-42 % for a two storey reinforced concrete structure. Hence a load bearing construction is certainly a better alternative to RC framed construction for up to two storied structures in terms of embodied energy and environmental impacts.

  13. Alternative Media Technologies for the Open University. A Research Report on Costed Alternatives to the Direct Transmission of Audio-Visual Materials. Final Report. I.E.T. Papers on Broadcasting No. 79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Tony; Kern, Larry

    This study examines alternatives to direct transmission of television and radio programs for courses with low student enrollment at the Open University. Examined are cut-off points in terms of student numbers at which alternative means of distributing audio or audio-visual materials become more economical than direct television or radio…

  14. Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Brummond, W.A.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-09-08

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center (a partnership of Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories), is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Department of Energy has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The Department of Defense has several hundred million pounds of energetic materials in its demilitarization inventory, with millions more added each year.

  15. Optical detection of special nuclear materials: an alternative approach for standoff and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. Bruce; Reeve, S. W.; Burns, W. A.; Allen, Susan D.

    2010-04-01

    Termed Special Nuclear Material (SNM) by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, fissile materials, such as 235U and 239Pu, are the primary components used to construct modern nuclear weapons. Detecting the clandestine presence of SNM represents an important capability for Homeland Security. An ideal SNM sensor must be able to detect fissile materials present at ppb levels, be able to distinguish between the source of the detected fissile material, i.e., 235U, 239Pu, 233U or other fission source, and be able to perform the discrimination in near real time. A sensor with such capabilities would provide not only rapid identification of a threat but, ultimately, information on the potential source of the threat. For example, current detection schemes for monitoring clandestine nuclear testing and nuclear fuel reprocessing to provide weapons grade fissile material rely largely on passive air sampling combined with a subsequent instrumental analysis or some type of wet chemical analysis of the collected material. It would be highly useful to have a noncontact method of measuring isotopes capable of providing forensic information rapidly at ppb levels of detection. Here we compare the use of Kr, Xe and I as "canary" species for distinguishing between 235U and 239Pu fission sources by spectroscopic methods.

  16. Different drying technologies and alternation of mycobiots in the raw material of Hyssopus officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Raila, Algirdas; Lugauskas, Albinas; Kemzūraite, Aurelija; Zvicevicius, Egidijus; Ragazinskiene, Ona; Railiene, Marija

    2009-01-01

    Contamination of medicinal plant mass with mycobiots is one of the negative factors deteriorating the quality of raw material. In order to evaluate the impact of the yield processing technologies upon the changes of mycobiots in raw material, the mycobiotic conditions of herb hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L.) raw material were evaluated under various regimes of active ventilation and optimization of the drying parameters. The impact of ventilation intensity and temperature of drying agent upon the changes and abundance of mycobiota species in medicinal raw material was determined. Irrespective of the temperature of the airflow, the strongest suppressive effect upon the mycobiotic contamination in Hyssopi herba was produced by the 5,000 m3 x (t x h)(-1) airflow. Analysis of the isolated fungi revealed the prevalence of Penicillium, Aspergillus, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Mucor, Rhizopus species in the raw material. In separate samples Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Aureobasidium pullulans, Chrysosporium merdarium, Cladorrhinum foecundissimum, Ulocladium consortiale, Trichoderma hamatum, T. harzianum, Gilmaniella humicola, Talaromyces flavus, Rhizomucor pusillus, Hansfordia ovalispora, Verticicladium trifi dum, Trichosporiella cerebriformis micromycetes were also rather abundant. Detection of the above-mentioned micromycetes in herb hyssop samples differed, and partially depended upon the medium used for their isolation.

  17. The use of Ormocer as an alternative material for bonding orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Ajlouni, Raed; Bishara, Samir E; Soliman, Manal M; Oonsombat, Charuphan; Laffoon, John F; Warren, John

    2005-01-01

    As new adhesives, composite resins, and bonding techniques were introduced, orthodontists adopted some of these innovations and added them to their armamentarium. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of two adhesive materials; one with an organically modified ceramic matrix, Admira (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) and another that contains the traditional Bis GMA matrix namely Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). The new materials have a lower wear rate and are more biocompatible than traditional composites. Forty molar teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 20 teeth bonded with the Transbond adhesive system and the other 20 teeth with the Admira bonding system. Student's t-test was used to compare the SBS of the two adhesives. Significance was predetermined at P < or = .05. The results of the t-test comparisons (t = 0.489) of the SBS indicated that there was no significant (P = .628) difference between the two adhesives tested. The mean SBS for Admira was 5.1 +/- 3.3 MPa and that for Transbond XT was 4.6 +/- 3.2 MPa. It was concluded that the new material, Ormocer, which is an organically modified ceramic restorative material can potentially have orthodontic applications if available in a more flowable paste. These new materials are more biocompatible and have lower wear rate including bonding orthodontic brackets to teeth.

  18. Attenuation of hydrogen sulfide at construction and demolition debris landfills using alternative cover materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Reinhart, Debra

    2010-04-01

    The attenuation of H(2)S emissions by various landfill cover materials was evaluated using both laboratory and field experiments. The results demonstrated that cover materials consisting of selected waste products (compost and yard trash) and soils amended with quicklime and calcium carbonate effectively attenuated H(2)S emissions and detectable H(2)S emissions were only encountered in a testing plot using a sandy soil cover (average emission rate was 4.67x10(-6)mgm(-2)s(-1)). H(2)S concentration profiles in the cover materials indicated that H(2)S was removed as it migrated through the cover materials. At the same depth in the testing area, the H(2)S concentration in the sandy soil field plot was always higher than that of other testing plots because the sand (a) demonstrated less ability to remove H(2)S and (b) exhibited a higher H(2)S concentration at the base of the cover. Laboratory experiments confirmed these observations, with a combination of physical adsorption, chemical reactions, and biological oxidation, accounting for the enhanced removal. In addition to removal, the results suggest that some of the cover materials reduced H(2)S generation by creating less favorable conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria (e.g., high pH and temperature).

  19. Click maltose as an alternative to reverse phase material for desalting glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Xiuling; Guo, Zhimou; Yu, Long; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2011-10-07

    Desalting peptides before mass spectrometry analysis is important because salts lead to adduct formation, increased chemical noise and ion suppression effect. A high concentration of salt can clog nanoelectrospray ionization (ESI) emitters. The reverse phase C18 material is commonly used to desalt peptides because of its high binding capacity. However, peptides with high hydrophilicity, such as glycopeptides, are not retained well on this material, resulting in the loss of peptide information. To improve the efficiency of glycopeptide desalting, we introduced a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)-based material named click maltose. Four glycoproteins, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), human serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), bovine ribonuclease B (RNase B), and α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) were chosen as models and their glycopeptides were desalted with click maltose, AQ C18, Empore C18 and ZipTip C18. Click maltose as a HILIC material exhibited better performance than the other three C18 materials for both number of targeted glycopeptides and their corresponding intensities. In addition, accurate glycopeptide profiling was achieved with click maltose desalting regardless of peptide lengths and glycan types.

  20. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  1. The Starting Early Starting Smart Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey Family Programs, Seattle, WA.

    Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) is an early childhood public/private initiative designed to identify new, empirical knowledge about the effectiveness of integrating substance abuse prevention, addictions treatment, and mental health services with primary health care and childcare service settings (e.g., Head Start, day care, preschool) to…

  2. Evaluation of alternative phase change materials for energy storage in solar dynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. A.; Dustin, M. O.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of fluoride salt and metallic thermal energy storage materials are compared in terms of basic performance as applied to solar dynamic power generation. Specific performance considerations include uniformity of cycle inlet temperature, peak cavity temperature, TES utilization, and system weights. Also investigated were means of enhancing the thermal conductivity of the salts and its effect on the system performance.

  3. Seeking alternatives to probit 9 when developing treatments for wood packaging materials under ISPM No. 15

    Treesearch

    R.A. Haack; A. Uzunovic; K. Hoover; J.A. Cook

    2011-01-01

    ISPM No. 15 presents guidelines for treating wood packaging material used in international trade. There are currently two approved phytosanitary treatments: heat treatment and methyl bromide fumigation. New treatments are under development, and are needed given that methyl bromide is being phased out. Probit 9 efficacy (100% mortality of at least 93 613 test organisms...

  4. The Relation between Life Satisfaction and the Material Situation: A Re-Evaluation Using Alternative Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoph, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Among the surprising results of research on the relation between a person's material circumstances and his or her subjective well-being was the finding that this relationship appears to be rather weak (throughout this paper the terms "(general) life satisfaction", "(subjective) satisfaction", "happiness" and…

  5. [Dental materials. A critical assessment from the viewpoint of alternative medicine].

    PubMed

    Weilenmann, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Practical experience with unconventional treatments suggests that the paradigm used by conventional medical science to assess the impact of dental materials must be broadened. First, several diagnostic methods commonly employed to evaluate allergies and toxicological burdens are described and subjected to a critical analysis. These diagnostics include test methods used in the field of complementary medicine in addition to the traditional epicutaneous tests, the Lymphocyte Transformation Test and quantitative analysis of blood and urine. Finally, the fundamentals of toxicology in the low-dose range are discussed; in this context special attention is paid to possible factors enhancing the effect of various substance groups. The impact of dental materials is also viewed from the perspective of environmental toxicology. In addition, the authors discuss various paradigms for obtaining evidence of multifactorial causes and show why nonuniform results are obtained with dental materials. Reference is also made to new theories broadening our understanding of biological processes such as the Biphoton Theory, which has been the subject of increased discussion among quantum physicists in recent years. It becomes evident in this context that there are to date no evidence-based methods for demonstrating the absolute non-toxicity of dental materials. Finally, it is shown - on the basis of various reports provided by a practitioner of complementary medicine in private practice - that, in patients with chronic diseases, unconventional therapies integrating these insights may by the only effective therapeutic options to succeed.

  6. The Relation between Life Satisfaction and the Material Situation: A Re-Evaluation Using Alternative Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoph, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Among the surprising results of research on the relation between a person's material circumstances and his or her subjective well-being was the finding that this relationship appears to be rather weak (throughout this paper the terms "(general) life satisfaction", "(subjective) satisfaction", "happiness" and…

  7. Alternatives of informed consent for storage and use of human biological material for research purposes: Brazilian regulation.

    PubMed

    Marodin, Gabriela; França, Paulo Henrique Condeixa de; Salgueiro, Jennifer Braathen; Motta, Marcia Luz da; Tannous, Gysélle Saddi; Lopes, Anibal Gil

    2014-12-01

    Informed consent is recognized as a primary ethical requirement to conduct research involving humans. In the investigations with the use of human biological material, informed consent (IC) assumes a differentiated condition on account of the many future possibilities. This work presents suitable alternatives for IC regarding the storage and use of human biological material in research, according to new Brazilian regulations. Both norms - Resolution 441/11 of the National Health Council, approved on 12 May 2011, and Ordinance 2.201 (NATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR BIOREPOSITORIES AND BIOBANKS OF HUMAN BIOLOGICAL MATERIAL FOR RESEARCH PURPOSE) of the Brazil Ministry of Health, approved on 14 September 2011 - state that the consent of subjects for the collection, storage and use of samples stored in Biobanks is necessarily established by means of a Free and Informed Consent Form (ICF). In order to obtain individual and formal statements, this form should contain the following two mutually exclusive options: an explanation about the use of the stored material in each research study, and the need for new consent or the waiver thereof when the material is used for a new study. On the other hand, ICF suitable for Biorepositories must be exclusive and related to specific research. Although Brazilian and international regulations identify the main aspects to be included in the IC, efforts are still necessary to improve the consent process, so that the document will become a bond of trust between subject and researcher. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Partial replacement of non renewable fossil fuels energy by the use of waste materials as alternative fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indrawati, V.; Manaf, A.; Purwadi, G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports recent investigations on the use of biomass like rice husk, palm kernel shell, saw dust and municipal waste to reduce the use of fossil fuels energy in the cement production. Such waste materials have heat values in the range approximately from 2,000 to 4,000 kcal/kg. These are comparable to the average value of 5800 kcal/kg from fossil materials like coals which are widely applied in many industrial processing. Hence, such waste materials could be used as alternative fuels replacing the fossil one. It is shown that replacement of coals with such waste materials has a significant impact on cost effectiveness as well as sustainable development. Variation in moisture content of the waste materials, however should be taken into account because this is one of the parameter that could not be controlled. During fuel combustion, some amount of the total energy is used to evaporate the water content and thus the net effective heat value is less.

  9. The use of elemental sulfur as an alternative feedstock for polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Woo Jin; Griebel, Jared J.; Kim, Eui Tae; Yoon, Hyunsik; Simmonds, Adam G.; Ji, Hyun Jun; Dirlam, Philip T.; Glass, Richard S.; Wie, Jeong Jae; Nguyen, Ngoc A.; Guralnick, Brett W.; Park, Jungjin; Somogyi, Árpád; Theato, Patrick; Mackay, Michael E.; Sung, Yung-Eun; Char, Kookheon; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    An excess of elemental sulfur is generated annually from hydrodesulfurization in petroleum refining processes; however, it has a limited number of uses, of which one example is the production of sulfuric acid. Despite this excess, the development of synthetic and processing methods to convert elemental sulfur into useful chemical substances has not been investigated widely. Here we report a facile method (termed ‘inverse vulcanization’) to prepare chemically stable and processable polymeric materials through the direct copolymerization of elemental sulfur with vinylic monomers. This methodology enabled the modification of sulfur into processable copolymer forms with tunable thermomechanical properties, which leads to well-defined sulfur-rich micropatterned films created by imprint lithography. We also demonstrate that these copolymers exhibit comparable electrochemical properties to elemental sulfur and could serve as the active material in Li-S batteries, exhibiting high specific capacity (823 mA h g-1 at 100 cycles) and enhanced capacity retention.

  10. Pumping through porous hydrophobic/oleophilic materials: an alternative technology for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin; Ye, Yin-Dong; Yao, Hong-Bin; Zhu, Xi; Wang, Xu; Wu, Liang; Wang, Jin-Long; Ding, Hang; Yong, Ni; He, Ling-Hui; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-01

    Recently, porous hydrophobic/oleophilic materials (PHOMs) have been shown to be the most promising candidates for cleaning up oil spills; however, due to their limited absorption capacity, a large quantity of PHOMs would be consumed in oil spill remediation, causing serious economic problems. In addition, the complicated and time-consuming process of oil recovery from these sorbents is also an obstacle to their practical application. To solve the above problems, we apply external pumping on PHOMs to realize the continuous collection of oil spills in situ from the water surface with high speed and efficiency. Based on this novel design, oil/water separation and oil collection can be simultaneously achieved in the remediation of oil spills, and the oil sorption capacity is no longer limited to the volume and weight of the sorption material. This novel external pumping technique may bring PHOMs a step closer to practical application in oil spill remediation.

  11. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  12. The use of elemental sulfur as an alternative feedstock for polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woo Jin; Griebel, Jared J; Kim, Eui Tae; Yoon, Hyunsik; Simmonds, Adam G; Ji, Hyun Jun; Dirlam, Philip T; Glass, Richard S; Wie, Jeong Jae; Nguyen, Ngoc A; Guralnick, Brett W; Park, Jungjin; Somogyi, Arpád; Theato, Patrick; Mackay, Michael E; Sung, Yung-Eun; Char, Kookheon; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    An excess of elemental sulfur is generated annually from hydrodesulfurization in petroleum refining processes; however, it has a limited number of uses, of which one example is the production of sulfuric acid. Despite this excess, the development of synthetic and processing methods to convert elemental sulfur into useful chemical substances has not been investigated widely. Here we report a facile method (termed 'inverse vulcanization') to prepare chemically stable and processable polymeric materials through the direct copolymerization of elemental sulfur with vinylic monomers. This methodology enabled the modification of sulfur into processable copolymer forms with tunable thermomechanical properties, which leads to well-defined sulfur-rich micropatterned films created by imprint lithography. We also demonstrate that these copolymers exhibit comparable electrochemical properties to elemental sulfur and could serve as the active material in Li-S batteries, exhibiting high specific capacity (823 mA h g(-1) at 100 cycles) and enhanced capacity retention.

  13. Fusible heat sink materials - Evaluation of alternate candidates. [for PLSS cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna S.; Lomax, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. Materials with greater thermal storage capability than water could enable both an extension of time between recharging and/or a reduction in size and/or mass. An extensive literature search identified 1,215 candidates with a solid-liquid transformation within the temperature range of -13 C to 5 C. Based on data available in the literature, several candidates with a cooling capacity significantly greater than water were identified. Measurements of the transformation temperature and enthalpy of transformation were then undertaken with a differential scanning calorimeter in order to confirm the accuracy of the literature. Laboratory measurements have thus far not been able to corroborate the extremely high values found from the literature. This paper presents the approach for materials selection utilized in this study, the experimental procedure, and the results of the measurements thus far undertaken.

  14. Safety and environmental comparisons of stainless steel with alternative structural materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzig, A.P.; Holdren, J.P.; Hibbard, P.J.

    1994-08-01

    Using the FuseDose II computer code, we calculated and compared several indices of safety and environmental (S&E) hazards for conceptual magnetic-fusion reactor designs based on a variety of structural materials-stainless steel, ferritic steel, vanadium-chromium-titanium alloy, and silicon-carbide-and, for comparison, the fuel of a liquid-metal fast breeder fission reactor. FuseDose II is a second-generation code derived from the Fuse-Dose code used in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM) study in the late 1980s. The comparisons update and extend those of the ESECOM study by adding the stainless-steel case, some new indices, graphical representation of the results, and other refinements. The results of our analysis support earlier conclusions concerning the S&E liabilities of stainless steel: The use of stainless steel would significantly reduce the S&E advantages of fusion over fission that are implied by the indices we consider, compared with the advantages portrayed in the ESECOM results for lower-activation fusion materials. The dose potentials represented by the radioactive materials that conceivably could be mobilized in severe accidents are substantially higher for the stainless steel case than for the lower activation fusion designs analyzed by ESECOM, and the waste disposal burden imposed by a stainless steel fusion reactor, though significantly smaller than that associated with a fission reactor of the same output, is high enough to rule out the chance of qualification for shallow burial under current regulations (in contrast to some of the lower activation fusion cases). This work underscores the conclusion that research to demonstrate the viability of the low-activation materials is essential if fusion is to achieve its potential for large and easily demonstrated S&E advantages over fission. 37 refs., 17 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. A Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Using Alternate Materials for Non-Skid in Shipboard Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Applications By: Kurt P. Boenisch, Hector A. Cervantes , Andrew J. Clark IV, Jesse G. Espe, and Erik B. Lohrke June...AUTHOR(S) LT Kurt P. Boenisch, United States Navy, LT Andrew J. Clark IV, United States Navy, LT Hector A. Cervantes , United States Navy, LT Jesse G...MATERIALS FOR NON-SKID IN SHIPBOARD APPLICATIONS Kurt P. Boenisch, Lieutenant, United States Navy Hector A. Cervantes , Lieutenant, United States

  16. Alternative nano-structured thin-film materials used as durable thermal nanoimprint lithography templates.

    PubMed

    Bossard, M; Boussey, J; Le Drogoff, B; Chaker, M

    2016-02-19

    Nanoimprint templates made of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) thin films and fluorine-doped associated materials, i.e. F-DLC and F-SiC were investigated in the context of thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL) with respect to their release properties. Their performances in terms of durability and stability were evaluated and compared to those of conventional silicon or silica molds coated with antisticking molecules applied as a self-assembled monolayer. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition parameters were firstly tuned to optimize mechanical and structural properties of the DLC and SiC thin films. The impact of the amount of fluorine dopant on the deposited thin films properties was then analyzed. A comparative analysis of DLC, F-DLC as well as SiC and F-SiC molds was then carried out over multiple imprints, performed into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thermo-plastic resist. The release properties of un-patterned films were evaluated by the measurement of demolding energies and surface energies, associated with a systematic analysis of the mold surface contamination. These analyses showed that the developed materials behave as intrinsically easy-demolding and contamination-free molds over series of up to 40 imprints. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a large number of imprints has been considered within an exhaustive comparative study of materials for NIL. Finally, the developed materials went through standard e-beam lithography and plasma etching processes to obtain nanoscale-patterned templates. The replicas of those patterned molds, imprinted into PMMA, were shown to be of high fidelity and good stability after several imprints.

  17. The investigation of vermiculite as an alternating shielding material for gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülbiçim, Hasan; Tufan, M. Çağatay; Türkan, M. Nureddin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, gamma ray shielding properties of vermiculite has been investigated for the first time as a shielding material. The photon total mass attenuation coefficients μm, the half value layer (HVL), the tenth value layer (TVL) and the mean free path (MFP) values have been experimentally determined for the photon energies at 0.244, 0.262, 0.342, 0.600, 0.778, 1.173, 1.332, 1.408 and 1.728 MeV. The theoretical data are calculated by using WinXCom computer code. At the end, we obtained good agreement between experimental and theoretical values. As well as the total mass attenuation coefficients, we have also calculated the effective atomic number, Zeff, the effective electron number, Neff, the total atomic cross-section, σt,a, the total electronic cross-section, σt,e, values for vermiculite and some building materials. Consequently, the obtained results showed that vermiculite could be used as a shielding material for gamma radiation.

  18. Molten salt destruction as an alternative to open burning of energetic material wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

    1994-07-05

    LLNL has built a small-scale (about 1 kg/hr throughput unit to test the destruction of energetic materials using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) process. We have modified the unit described in the earlier references to inject energetic waste material continuously into the unit. In addition to the HMX, other explosives we have destroyed include RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. We have also destroyed a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyl ammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, we have destroyed a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10 (HMX/Viton), LX-16 (PETN/FPC461, LX-17 (TATB/Kel F), and PBX-9404 (HMX)/CEF/Nitro cellulose). Our experiments have demonstrated that energetic materials can be safely and effectively treated by MSD.We have also investigated the issue of steam explosions in molten salt units, both experimentally and theoretically, and concluded that steam explosions can be avoided under proper design and operating conditions. We are currently building a larger unit (nominal capacity 5 kg/hr,) to investigate the relationship between residence time, temperature, feed concentration and throughputs, avoidance of back-burn, a;nd determination of the products of combustion under different operating conditions.

  19. The Thermochemical Degradation of Hot Section Materials for Gas Turbine Engines in Alternative-Fuel Combustion Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalbano, Timothy

    Gas turbine engines remain an integral part of providing the world's propulsion and power generation needs. The continued use of gas turbines requires increased temperature operation to reach higher efficiencies and the implementation of alternative fuels for a lower net-carbon footprint. This necessitates evaluation of the material coatings used to shield the hot section components of gas turbines in these new extreme environments in order to understand how material degradation mechanisms change. Recently, the US Navy has sought to reduce its use of fossil fuels by implementing a blended hydroprocessed renewable diesel (HRD) derived from algae in its fleet. To evaluate the material degradation in this alternative environment, metal alloys are exposed in a simulated combustion environment using this blended fuel or the traditional diesel-like fuel. Evaluation of the metal alloys showed the development of thick, porous scales with a large depletion of aluminum for the blend fuel test. A mechanism linking an increased solubility of the scale to the blend fuel test environment will be discussed. For power generation applications, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants can provide electricity with 45% efficiency and full carbon capture by using a synthetic gas (syngas) derived from coal, biomass, or another carbon feedstock. However, the combustion of syngas is known to cause high water vapor content levels in the exhaust stream with unknown material consequences. To evaluate the effect of increased humidity, air-plasma sprayed (APS), yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is thermally aged in an environment with and without humidity. An enhanced destabilization of the parent phase by humid aging is revealed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning-TEM (STEM) indicate an enhanced coarsening of the domain structure of the YSZ in the humid environment. The enhanced

  20. Hydration characteristics of calcium silicate cements with alternative radiopacifiers used as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Josette

    2010-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is composed of calcium silicate cement and bismuth oxide added for radiopacity. The bismuth oxide in MTA has been reported to have a deleterious effect on the physical and chemical properties of the hydrated material. This study aimed to investigate the hydration mechanism of calcium silicate cement loaded with different radiopacifiers for use as a root-end filling material. Calcium silicate cement loaded with barium sulfate, gold, or silver/tin alloy was hydrated, and paste microstructure was assessed after 30 days. In addition, atomic ratio plots of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca and Al/Ca were drawn, and X-ray energy dispersive analysis of the hydration products was performed to assess for inclusion of heavy metals. The leachate produced from the cements after storage of the cements in water for 28 days and the leaching of the radiopacifiers in an alkaline solution was assessed by using inductively coupled plasma. The hydrated calcium silicate cement was composed of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, ettringite, and monosulfate. Unhydrated cement particles were few. No heavy metals were detected in the calcium silicate hydrate except for the bismuth in MTA. Calcium was leached out early in large quantities that reduced with time. The barium and bismuth were leached in increasing amounts. Copper was the most soluble in alkaline solution followed by bismuth and barium in smaller amounts. The bismuth oxide can be replaced by other radiopacifiers that do not affect the hydration mechanism of the resultant material. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasonic cleaning of depleted uranium material as an alternative to nitric acid cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, L.E.; Senviel, C.B.

    1991-05-28

    Nitric acid is used to clean depleted uranium in the form of cast billets, and cast and wrought parts in the processing cycle and is the largest contributor of waste to the West End Treatment Facility (WETF). An estimated 27,000 gallons of liquid and 75 to 95% of all uranium received was sent to the WETF for processing from this facility in our baseline year. Because wrought parts account for the largest throughput at the nitric acid facility, an alternative cleaning method for these parts was examined first. Test results on the first part type from the wrought family showed ultrasonic cleaning to be an effective cleaning method. Since the geometry for this part presented the most difficulty in terms of ultrasonic cleaning, the entire wrought family is expected to be moved from the nitric acid facility to the ultrasonic cleaning facility. As a result, there will be an 83% reduction part throughput at the nitric acid facility which corresponds to a significant decrease in wastes sent to the WETF and a reduction in the generation and associated costs of waste overall. This change also eliminated two building moves involving two RAD areas resulting in a part movement reduction of approximately 25% which is a significant cost savings.

  2. Geometry and bond-length alternation in nonlinear optical materials. I. Standard parameters in two precursors.

    PubMed

    Gainsford, Graeme J; Bhuiyan, M Delower H; Kay, Andrew J

    2007-11-01

    2-{3-Cyano-4-[4-(N-formylanilino)-trans-1,3-butadienyl]-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-ylidene}propanedinitrile, C(22)H(18)N(4)O(2), (I), and 2-{3-cyano-4-[6-(N-formylanilino)-trans,trans-1,3,5-hexatrienyl]-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-ylidene}propanedinitrile, C(24)H(20)N(4)O(2), (II), show the alternating single/double-bond behaviour of push-pull chromophores. In the two structures, the planar polyene chains are twisted with respect to the furanylidene ring by 18.2 (2) and 12.4 (2) degrees , respectively. Comparison with structures of related and parent molecules shows subtle but consistent bond-length variations consistent with charge-delocalized structures. Crystal cohesion is provided by various sets of hydrogen bonds, viz. C-H(methyl)...N(cyano) and bifurcated (C=C-H)(2)...O=C in (I), and C-H(methyl/phenyl)...O and C=C-H...N(cyano) in (II).

  3. An alternative to modal analysis for material stiffness and damping identification from vibrating plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Alain; Pierron, Fabrice; Guo, Baoqiao

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents an alternative to modal analysis to extract stiffness and damping parameters from thin vibrating plates. Full-field slope measurements are performed through a deflectometry technique on a plate vibrating at a given frequency. Images are recorded in phase and at π/2 lag from the excitation. From this information, deflection fields are computed by integration and curvature fields are obtained by differentiation. This information is then input into the principle of virtual work to extract both stiffness and damping parameters. This procedure, known as the Virtual Fields Method, is detailed in the paper and the notion of special optimized virtual fields is extended to the present problem. Validation on simulated data is performed before moving to experimental data. One of the main advantages of this technique is that it is completely insensitive to the damping coming from the boundary conditions. This is illustrated experimentally on two tests where a viscoelastic layer and rubber washers are added in the experimental set up.

  4. Tissue-specific transcription start sites and alternative splicing of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor gene: a new PTH/PTHrP receptor splice variant that lacks the signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Joun, H; Lanske, B; Karperien, M; Qian, F; Defize, L; Abou-Samra, A

    1997-04-01

    The PTH/PTHrP receptor gene is expressed in bone and kidney as well as in many other tissues. Using primer extension followed by rapid cloning of amplified complementary DNA ends, we have isolated new PTH/PTHrP receptor complementary DNAs with different splicing patterns and have characterized a new upstream transcription start site. Three 5' nontranslated exons, U3, U2 and U1, located 4.8, 2.5, and 1.2 kb upstream of the exon that encodes the putative signal peptide of the classical receptor (exon S), have been characterized. Four types of splicing patterns were recognized. Type I splicing pattern is transcribed from exon U1 and is spliced to exons S and E1; this pattern was found in most tissues tested. Types II, III, and IV splicing patterns are transcribed from exon U3 and have a restricted tissue distribution. Type II splice pattern, containing exons U3, U2, and S and type III splicing pattern, containing exon U3, U2, and E1 (skipping exon S), was found only in kidney. Type IV splice pattern, containing exon U3 and S was found both in kidney and ovary. Because the type III splice variant skips exon S, translation of this splice variant initiates at a different AUG codon. The type III splice variant was weakly expressed on the cell surface of COS-7 cells, as assessed by double antibody binding assay, and no detectable ligand binding was observed on intact cells. The type III splice variant, however, increased cAMP accumulation in COS-7 cells when challenged with PTH(1-34), PTH(1-84) and hPTHrP(1-36) with EC50s that are similar to those observed in COS-7 cells expressing the type I variant but with a maximum stimulation that was lower than that observed in COS-7 cells expressing the type I variant. These data indicate low levels of cell surface expression of the type III splice variant. Treatment of COS-7 cells with tunicamycin decreased the size of the type I splice variant from a broad band of 85 kDa to a compact band of about 60 kDa. The type III splice

  5. Development of an alternate pathway for materials destined for disposition to WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Georgette Y; Mckerley, Bill; Veazey, Gerald W; Ricketts, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory currently has an inventory of process residues that may be viable candidates for disposition to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) located at Carlsbad, New Mexico. A recent 'Attractiveness Level D' exemption allows for the discard of specified intractable materials regardless of the percent plutonium. However, the limits with respect to drum loadings must be met. Cementation is a key component of the aqueous nitrate flowsheet and serves as a 'bleed-off' stream for impurities separated from the plutonium during processing operations. The main 'feed' to the cementation operations are the 'bottoms' from the evaporation process. In the majority of cases, the cemented bottoms contain less than the allowed amount per drum for WIPP acceptance. This project would expand the route to WIPP for items that have no defined disposition path, are difficult to process, have been through multiple passes, have no current recovery operations available to recover the plutonium and that are amenable to cementation. This initial work will provide the foundation for a full scale disposition pathway of the candidate materials. Once the pathway has been expanded and a cementation matrix developed, routine discard activities will be initiated.

  6. Electrostatic painting residues as an alternative raw material for red clay industry.

    PubMed

    Basegio, Tania; Machado, Andréa; Bernardes, Andréa Moura; Bergmann, Carlos Pérez

    2006-12-01

    In this study, the viability of using electrostatic painting residues--paint sludge--as a raw material to the red clay industry was investigated. Red clay-based ceramic masses containing electrostatic paint residues were formulated during the study. The clays were obtained from the Rio do Rastro deposit, in Gravataí, and were of the standard formulation used in industry. Different ceramic mass formulations with additions of 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 wt.% electrostatic painting residue in addition to a formulation with no residue addition (standard formulation), were evaluated. The samples were uniaxially pressed in a double-effect press and were fired in an electric oven at 900, 950 and 1000 degrees C. The firing at constant temperature lasted 8 h, and heating rate was 150 K h(-1). After processing the samples were characterized in terms of their physical and mechanical properties. Environmental compatibility was also considered by the evaluation of gaseous emissions and leaching and solubilization tests according to the Brazilian standards NBR 10.005 and NBR 10.006, respectively. The results showed that it was possible to produce ceramic materials containing electrostatic painting residues within their formulations.

  7. Alternative blade materials for technical and ecological optimization of a hydraulic pressure machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwyzer, Olivier; Saenger, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    The Hydraulic Pressure Machine (HPM) is an energy converter to exploit head differences between 0.5 and 2.5 m in small streams and irrigation canals. Previous investigations show that efficiencies above 60% are possible. Several case studies indicate good continuity for aquatic life (e.g. fish) and bed load for the technology. The technology is described as an economically and ecologically viable option for small scale hydropower generation. Primary goal of this research is to improve the HPM blade design regarding its continuity properties by maintaining good efficiency rates. This is done by modifying the blade tip and testing within a large physical model under laboratory condition. Blade tips from steel (conventional - reference case) and a combination of EPDM rubber and steel as sandwich construction (rubber, steel, rubber - adhesive layered) are tested and compared. Both materials reach similar values for hydraulic efficiency (approx. 58%) and mechanical power output (approx. 220 W). The variation of different gap sizes pointed out the importance of small clearance gaps to reach high efficiencies. For assessing the two blade tip materials regarding continuity for aquatic life, fish dummies were led through the wheel. Analysis of slow motion video of dummies hit by the blade show significant advantages for the EPDM blade tip. The EPDM rubber allows to bend and thus reduces the shock and the probability for cuts on the fish dummy. It was shown that blade tips from EPDM have certain advantages regarding continuity compared to standard blade tips from steel. No compromise regarding energy production had to be made. These results from the HPM can be transferred to breast shot water wheel and may be applied for new and retrofitting projects.

  8. Review of material recovery from used electric and electronic equipment-alternative options for resource conservation.

    PubMed

    Friege, Henning

    2012-09-01

    For waste from electric and electronic equipment, the WEEE Directive stipulates the separate collection of electric and electronic waste. As to new electric and electronic devices, the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive bans the use of certain chemicals dangerous for man and environment. From the implementation of the WEEE directive, many unsolved problems have been documented: poor collection success, emission of dangerous substances during collection and recycling, irretrievable loss of valuable metals among others. As to RoHS, data from the literature show a satisfying success. The problems identified in the process can be reduced to some basic dilemmas at the borders between waste management, product policy and chemical safety. The objectives of the WEEE Directive and the specific targets for use and recycling of appliances are not consistent. There is no focus on scarce resources. Extended producer responsibility is not sufficient to guarantee sustainable waste management. Waste management reaches its limits due to problems of implementation but also due to physical laws. A holistic approach is necessary looking at all branch points and sinks in the stream of used products and waste from electric and electronic equipment. This may be done with respect to the general rules for sustainable management of material streams covering the three dimensions of sustainable policy. The relationships between the players in the field of electric and electronic devices have to be taken into account. Most of the problems identified in the implementation process will not be solved by the current amendment of the WEEE Directive.

  9. Potential of sago starch/carrageenan mixture as gelatin alternative for hard capsule material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeloengasih, Crescentiana Dewi; Pranoto, Yudi; Anggraheni, Frida Dwi; Marseno, Djagal Wiseso

    2017-03-01

    In order to replace gelatin in capsule shell production, blends of sago starch and carrageenan were developed. Films and capsules were prepared with 10% (w/v) of sago starch, 25% (w/w starch) of glycerol and various carrageenan concentration (1, 2, 3% w/w starch) in two different kappa/iota-carrageenan ratio (1:3 and 3:1). The resulted films and capsules were characterized by mechanical property, water vapor and oxygen permeability. In addition, moisture absorption and solubility of capsule in acid solution were investigated. The results reveal that addition of carrageenan makes the films stronger and less permeable. Higher kappa-carrageenan content improved tensile strength and barrier properties of the films, whereas higher iota-carrageenan content produced films with higher elongation, moisture absorption and capsule solubility in acid solution. Capsule with 2% (w/w starch) of carrageenan at kappa-/iota-ratio 3:1 had the lowest moisture absorption, whereas capsule with 3% (w/w starch) of carrageenan at kappa/iota ratio 1:3 had the highest solubility. It is illustrated that sago starch/carrageenan blends can be used as hard capsule material.

  10. US strategic and critical materials imports: Dependency and vulnerability. The Latin American alternative. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, J.L.

    1989-05-31

    In time of war or during a National Emergency, it will be necessary for the United States to minimize dependence on extra hemisphere supply. This paper examines the extent to which current suppliers of strategic and critical imported minerals and petroleum, received from outside the American Continent, could be superseded with Latin American sources, including the Caribbean, Central and South America. The paper concludes that this substitution of trade would be a desirable course of action now, to be pursued in peacetime, not only for the U.S. but also for the Latin American States as well. This paper lists the strategic and critical imported materials for the U.S., and also identifies current supply sources; determines to what extent current supply sources could be replaced by Latin American ones; identifies major U.S. policy changes that would be required to make new trade arrangements suitable, feasible, and acceptable; proposes conclusions, which are related to the future of the U.S. strategic stockpiling and to the improvement of the Latin American sources of supply.

  11. Bio-based alternative to the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with controlled materials properties.

    PubMed

    Maiorana, Anthony; Spinella, Stephen; Gross, Richard A

    2015-03-09

    A series of biobased epoxy monomers were prepared from diphenolic acid (DPA) by transforming the free acid into n-alkyl esters and the phenolic hydroxyl groups into diglycidyl ethers. NMR experiments confirmed that the diglycidyl ethers of diphenolates (DGEDP) with methyl and ethyl esters have 6 and 3 mol % of glycidyl ester. Increasing the chain length of DGEDP n-alkyl esters from methyl to n-pentyl resulted in large decreases in epoxy resin viscosity (700-to-11 Pa·s). Storage modulus of DPA epoxy resins, cured with isophorone diamine, also varied with n-alkyl ester chain length (e.g., 3300 and 2100 MPa for the methyl and n-pentyl esters). The alpha transition temperature of the cured materials showed a linear decrease from 158 to 86 °C as the ester length increases. The Young's modulus and tensile strengths were about 1150 and 40 MPa, respectively, for all the cured resins tested (including DGEBA) and varied little as a function of ester length. Degree of cure for the different epoxy resins, determined by FTIR and DSC, closely approached the theoretical maximum. The result of this work demonstrates that diglycidyl ethers of n-alkyl diphenolates represent a new family of biobased liquid epoxy resins that, when cured, have similar properties to those from DGEBA.

  12. Molten salt destruction of energetic material wastes as an alternative to open burning. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Brummond, W.A.; Pruneda, C.O.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-11-02

    As a result of the end of the Cold War and the shift in emphasis to a smaller stockpile, many munitions, both conventional and nuclear, are scheduled for retirement and rapid dismantlement and demilitarization. Major components of these munitions are the explosives and propellants, or energetic materials. The Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process has been demonstrated for the destruction of HE and HE-containing wastes. MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as binders and metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. LLNL has built a small-scale (about 1 kg/hr throughput) unit to test the destruction of HE using the MSD process. The authors have demonstrated that HE`s and liquid propellants can be safely and fully destroyed using the molten salt destruction process. The authors are currently working on a number of improvements to the process. They are modifying the design of unit to obtain more throughput without any increase in salt entrainment. They are implementing an advanced nozzle design for injection of larger particles. They are defining operating envelopes for a number of high explosives and formulations. They are developing models to study the temperature profile of a top-feed nozzle for feeding larger particles into the unit.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of NpCl4(DME)2 and PuCl4(DME)2 neutral transuranic An(IV) starting materials.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Sean D; Brown, Jessie L; Scott, Brian L; Gaunt, Andrew J

    2014-01-28

    The 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) solvento adducts of Np(iv) and Pu(iv) tetrachloride have been prepared and isolated in good and moderate yields, respectively, along with single-crystal structural determinations. These neutral molecules are expected to provide alternative synthetic pathways in the pursuit of non-aqueous and organometallic complexes.

  14. Comparative alternative materials assessment to screen toxicity hazards in the life cycle of CIGS thin film photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Daniel A; Yu, Mengjing; Lam, Carl W; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-09-15

    Copper-indium-gallium-selenium-sulfide (CIGS) thin film photovoltaics are increasingly penetrating the market supply for consumer solar panels. Although CIGS is attractive for producing less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil-fuel based energy sources, CIGS manufacturing processes and solar cell devices use hazardous materials that should be carefully considered in evaluating and comparing net environmental benefits of energy products. Through this research, we present a case study on the toxicity hazards associated with alternative materials selection for CIGS manufacturing. We applied two numeric models, The Green Screen for Safer Chemicals and the Toxic Potential Indicator. To improve the sensitivity of the model outputs, we developed a novel, life cycle thinking based hazard assessment method that facilitates the projection of hazards throughout material life cycles. Our results show that the least hazardous CIGS solar cell device and manufacturing protocol consist of a titanium substrate, molybdenum metal back electrode, CuInS₂ p-type absorber deposited by spray pyrolysis, ZnS buffer deposited by spray ion layer gas reduction, ZnO:Ga transparent conducting oxide (TCO) deposited by sputtering, and the encapsulant polydimethylsiloxane.

  15. Alternative material to mitigate chrome degradation on high volume ArF layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Gopalakrishnan, Selvi; Thamm, Thomas; Oleynik, Nikolay; Ackmann, Paul; Riviere, Remi; Maelzer, Stephanie; Foong, Yee Mei

    2013-09-01

    One of the objectives of a robust optical proximity correction (OPC) model is to simulate the process variation including 3D mask effects or mask models for different mask blanks. Assuming that the data of different reticle blanks is the same, the wafer data should be a close match for the same OPC model. In order to enhance the robustness of the OPC model, the 3D mask effects need to be reduced. A test of this would be to ensure a close match of the so called fingerprints of different reticle blanks at the wafer level. Features for fingerprint test patterns include "critical dimension through pitch" (CDTP), "inverse CDTP", and "linearity patterns" and critical dimension (CD) difference of disposition structures. In this manuscript the proximity matching of implant layers on chrome on glass (COG) and advance binary reticle blanks will be demonstrated. We will also investigate the influence of reticle blank material including reticle process on isolated and dense features upon the proximity matching for 28 nm high volumes ArF layers such as implant and 2X metal layers. The OPC model verification has been done successfully for both bare wafer and full field wafer for implant layers. There is comparable OPC model for advanced binary and COG reticle. Moreover, the wafer critical dimension uniformity (CDU) results show that advance binary has much better wafer CDU then COG. In spite of higher reticle cost when switching over to advanced binary, there is a considerable cost reduction for the wafer fab which includes a 39% savings in total reticle cost as well as cost reduction due to minimal line holds (LH), wafer reworks and scraps due to Chrome degradation.

  16. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shatkin, J. A.; Ong, Kimberly J.; Beaudrie, Christian; Clippinger, Amy J.; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Haber, Lynne T.; Hill, Myriam; Holden, Patricia; Kennedy, Alan J.; Kim, Baram; MacDonell, Margaret; Powers, Christina M.; Sharma, Monita; Sheremeta, Lorraine; Stone, Vicki; Sultan, Yasir; Turley, Audrey; White, Ronald H.

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article.

  17. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement.

    PubMed

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, Kimberly J; Beaudrie, Christian; Clippinger, Amy J; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Haber, Lynne T; Hill, Myriam; Holden, Patricia; Kennedy, Alan J; Kim, Baram; MacDonell, Margaret; Powers, Christina M; Sharma, Monita; Sheremeta, Lorraine; Stone, Vicki; Sultan, Yasir; Turley, Audrey; White, Ronald H

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. 49 CFR Table 3 to Subpart B of... - Alternative Schedule for Application of Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... owner shall take such additional action as may be necessary to achieve future compliance. (D) Cars to be... Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) 3 Table 3 to Subpart B of Part 224...—Alternative Schedule for Application of Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) (A)...

  19. 49 CFR Table 3 to Subpart B of... - Alternative Schedule for Application of Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... owner shall take such additional action as may be necessary to achieve future compliance. (D) Cars to be... Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) 3 Table 3 to Subpart B of Part 224...—Alternative Schedule for Application of Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) (A)...

  20. Determination of allowable fluid temperature during start-up operation of outlet header under the assumption of constant and temperature-dependent material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rząsa, Dariusz; Duda, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    Modern supercritical power plants operate at very high temperatures and pressures. Thus the construction elements are subjected to both high thermal and mechanical loads. As a result high stresses in those components are created. In order to operate safely, it is important to monitor stresses, especially during start-up and shut-down processes. The maximum stresses in the construction elements should not exceed the allowable stresses that are defined according to boiler regulations. It is important to find optimum operating parameters, that can assure safe heating and cooling processes. The optimum parameters define temperature and pressure histories that can keep the highest stresses within allowable limit and reduce operation time as much as possible. In this paper a new numerical method for determining optimum working fluid parameters is presented. In this method, properties of steel can be assumed as constant or temperature dependent. The constant value is taken usually at the average temperature of the operation cycle. For both cases optimal parameters are determined. Based on these parameters start-up operations for both cases are conducted. During entire processes stresses in the heated element are monitored. The results obtained are compared with German boiler regulations - Technische Regeln fur Dampfkessel 301.

  1. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic.

  2. Comprehensive capacitance-voltage analysis including quantum effects for high-k interfaces on germanium and other alternative channel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Sarkar R. M.

    High mobility alternative channel materials to silicon are critical to the continued scaling of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices. However, before they can be incorporated into advanced devices, some major issues need to be solved. The high mobility materials suffer from lower allowable thermal budgets compared to Si (before desorption and defect formation becomes an issue) and the absence of a good quality native oxide has further increased the interest in the use of high-k dielectrics. However, the high interface state density and high electric fields at these semiconductor/high-k interfaces can significantly impact the capacitance-voltage (C-V) profile, and current C-V modeling software cannot account for these effects. This in turn affects the parameters extracted from the C-V data of the high mobility semiconductor/high-k interface, which are crucial to fully understand the interface properties and expedite process development. To address this issue, we developed a model which takes into account quantum corrections which can be applied to a number of these alternative channel materials including SixGe1-x, Ge, InGaAs, and GaAs. The C-V simulation using this QM correction model is orders of magnitude faster compared to a full band Schrodinger-Poisson solver. The simulated C-V is directly benchmarked to a self consistent Schrodinger-Poisson solution for each bulk semiconductor material, and from the benchmarking process the QM correction parameters are extracted. The full program, C-V Alternative Channel Extraction (CV ACE), incorporates a quantum mechanical correction model, along with the interface state density model, and can extract device parameters such as equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), doping density and flat band voltage (Vfb) as well as the interface state density profile using multiple measurements performed at different frequencies and temperatures, simultaneously. The program was used to analyze experimentally measured C-V profiles and the

  3. A powerful methodological approach combining headspace solid phase microextraction, mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis for profiling the volatile metabolomic pattern of beer starting raw materials.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, João L; Figueira, José A; Rodrigues, Fátima P; Ornelas, Laura P; Branco, Ricardo N; Silva, Catarina L; Câmara, José S

    2014-10-01

    The volatile metabolomic patterns from different raw materials commonly used in beer production, namely barley, corn and hop-derived products - such as hop pellets, hop essential oil from Saaz variety and tetra-hydro isomerized hop extract (tetra hop), were established using a suitable analytical procedure based on dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by thermal desorption gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry detection (GC-qMS). Some SPME extraction parameters were optimized. The best results, in terms of maximum signal recorded and number of isolated metabolites, were obtained with a 50/30 μm DVB/CAR/PDMS coating fiber at 40 °C for 30 min. A set of 152 volatile metabolites comprising ketones (27), sesquiterpenes (26), monoterpenes (19), aliphatic esters (19), higher alcohols (15), aldehydes (11), furan compounds (11), aliphatic fatty acids (9), aliphatic hydrocarbons (8), sulphur compounds (5) and nitrogen compounds (2) were positively identified. Each raw material showed a specific volatile metabolomic profile. Monoterpenes in hop essential oil and corn, sesquiterpenes in hop pellets, ketones in tetra hop and aldehydes and sulphur compounds in barley were the predominant chemical families in the targeted beer raw materials. β-Myrcene was the most dominant volatile metabolite in hop essential oil, hop pellets and corn samples while, in barley, the predominant volatile metabolites were dimethyl sulphide and 3-methylbutanal and, in tetra hop, 6-methyl-2-pentanone and 4-methyl-2-pentanone. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed natural sample grouping among beer raw materials.

  4. Entrepreneur Training Program. Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maria, Richard

    This student workbook on starting a small business is part of the entrepreneur training program at Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools. The workbook consists of 16 units containing goals and objectives, study questions, exercises, sample materials, and information sheets. Unit topics are as follows: being a small business owner;…

  5. Assessment outcome is weakly correlated with lecture attendance: influence of learning style and use of alternative materials.

    PubMed

    Horton, Dane M; Wiederman, Steven D; Saint, David A

    2012-06-01

    The relation between lecture attendance and learning is surprisingly weak, and the role of learning styles in this is poorly understood. We hypothesized that 1) academic performance is related to lecture attendance and 2) learning style influences lecture attendance and, consequently, affects performance. We also speculated that the availability of alternative resources would affect this relationship. Second-year Bachelor of Science physiology students (n = 120) self-reported their lecture attendance in a block of 21 lectures (attendance not compulsory) and use of alternative resources. Overall self-reported lecture attendance was 73 ± 2%. Female students (n = 71) attended more lectures (16.4 ± 0.6) than male students (14.3 ± 0.08, n = 49) and achieved a higher composite mark in all assessments (73.6% vs. 69.3%, P < 0.02). Marks in the final exam were not statistically different between the sexes and correlated only weakly with lecture attendance (r = 0.29, n = 49, P < 0.04 for male students; r = 0.10, n = 71, P = not significant for female students; and r =0.21, n = 120, P < 0.02 for the whole class). Of the students who passed the exam, poor attenders (<11 lectures) reported significantly more use of lecture recordings (37 ± 8%, n = 15, vs. 10 ± 1%, n = 85, P < 0.001). In a VARK learning style assessment (where V is visual, A is auditory, R is reading/writing, and K is kinesthetic), students were multimodal, although female students had a slightly higher average percentage of the R learning style (preferred read/write) compared with male students (28.9 ± 0.9%, n = 63, vs. 25.3 ± 1.3%, n = 32, P < 0.03). Lecture attendance was not correlated with measured learning style. We concluded that lecture attendance is only weakly correlated with academic performance and is not related to learning style. The substitution of alternative materials for lecture attendance appears to have a greater role than learning style in determining academic outcomes.

  6. Head Start Automation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Univ. Coll.

    The task for the National Data Management Project is to share technological capabilities with the Head Start Community in order to implement improved services for children and families involved in Head Start. Many Head Start programs have incorporated technology into their programs, including word processing, database management systems,…

  7. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  8. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  9. Combining Focused Ion Beam and Electron Microscopy to Prepare and Analyze Starting and Recovered Materials of High Pressure and Temperature Diamond-Anvil Cell Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, S.; Marquardt, H.; Wirth, R.; Schreiber, A.; Marquardt, K.; Neusser, G.; Reichmann, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    Experimental mineral physics research in the diamond-anvil cell (DAC) is experiencing a rapid progress from the study of average thermoelastic properties of single phases to both the investigation of anisotropic single-crystal properties and the behavior of complex multiphase aggregates, including the effects of chemical reactions. The studies are performed at high temperatures and pressures, compatible with the conditions present in the deep Earth. The extreme experimental conditions impose strict requirements both in terms of sample quality and sample characterization at the micro- to nanoscale and demand for novel approaches to both prepare miniature samples and recover, treat and analyze samples that were subject to extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and stresses in DAC experiments. Single-crystal studies of materials synthesized at extreme conditions in very small amounts, fragile materials, or materials with extremely small grain-sizes, need delicate preparation to obtain samples with the required characteristics for spectroscopic studies in the DAC. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling allows us micromachining single-crystal samples of appropriate orientation, shape and surface quality for experiments such as Brillouin scattering in the DAC. Preferred orientation of polymineralic aggregates can be nowadays measured at extreme conditions in the DAC. The detailed interpretation of these results requires a fine characterization of the local microfabrics. A combination of FIB and scanning electron microscopy allows us to characterize grain-sizes, shapes, grain boundary geometries in selected sites of the recovered samples. In addition, mineral physics research in the DAC offers the possibility of extending the approaches of petrology to the study of chemical processes involving rocks at the conditions of the deep mantle. In situ X-ray diffraction can give precious information about the average phase assemblages and put constraints of the phase diagrams of

  10. Carbon black as an alternative cathode material for electrical energy recovery and transfer in a microbial battery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqin; Guo, Kun; Shen, Dongsheng; Feng, Huajun; Wang, Meizhen; Zhou, Yuyang; Jia, Yufeng; Liang, Yuxiang; Zhou, Mengjiao

    2017-08-01

    Rather than the conventional concept of viewing conductive carbon black (CB) to be chemically inert in microbial electrochemical cells (MECs), here we confirmed the redox activity of CB for its feasibility as an electron sink in the microbial battery (MB). Acting as the cathode of a MB, the solid-state CB electrode showed the highest electron capacity equivalent of 18.58 ± 0.46 C/g for the unsintered one and the lowest capacity of 2.29 ± 0.48 C/g for the one sintered under 100% N2 atmosphere. The capacity vibrations of CBs were strongly in coincidence with the abundances of C=O moiety caused by different pretreatments and it implied one plausible mechanism based on CB's surface functionality for its electron capturing. Once subjected to electron saturation, CB could be completely regenerated by different strategies in terms of electrochemical discharging or donating electrons to biologically-catalyzed nitrate reduction. Surface characterization also revealed that CB's regeneration fully depended on the reversible shift of C=O moiety, further confirming the functionality-based mechanism for CB's feasibility as the role of MB's cathode. Moreover, resilience tests demonstrated that CB cathode was robust for the multi-cycles charging-discharging operations. These results imply that CB is a promising alternative material for the solid-state cathode in MBs.

  11. Impacts of process variability of alternating-material self-aligned multiple patterning on SRAM circuit performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ting; Hong, Chuyang; Cheng, Qi; Chen, Yijian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel modular patterning technology to reduce the edge-placement errors (EPE) significantly by combining alternating-material self-aligned multiple patterning (altSAMP) and selective etching processes. It is assumed that gates and fins are fabricated by the same type of altSAMP process as mixing two different processing techniques will drive up the manufacturing costs. Process variability induced circuit performance degradation is shown to be a serious issue as FinFET devices are scaled down to sub-10nm. We analyze the dependence of FinFET-based SRAM circuit performance on supply voltage, fin-width and gate-length variations. Improved device control with narrower fins helps to increase the static noise margin (SNM) in all SRAM cell designs. Higher supply voltage is also beneficial to the SNM performance. Our simulation results show that 6-T SRAM circuit design does not meet the six-sigma yield requirement when the half pitch is scaled down to sub-7 nm. To reduce the SRAM circuit variability, we study an 8-T SRAM cell and show that it significantly improves the SRAM performance.

  12. Binding waste anthracite fines with Si-containing materials as an alternative fuel for foundry cupola furnaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Fox, John T; Cannon, Fred S; Komarneni, Sridhar; Kulik, Joseph; Furness, Jim

    2011-04-01

    An alternative fuel to replace foundry coke in cupolas was developed from waste anthracite fines. Waste anthracite fines were briquetted with Si-containing materials and treated in carbothermal (combination of heat and carbon) conditions that simulated the cupola preheat zone to form silicon carbide nanowires (SCNWs). SCNWs can provide hot crushing strengths, which are important in cupola operations. Lab-scale experiments confirmed that the redox level of the Si-source significantly affected the formation of SiC. With zerovalent silicon, SCNWs were formed within the anthracite pellets. Although amorphous Si (+4) plus anthracite formed SiC, these conditions did not transform the SiC into nanowires. Moreover, under the test conditions, SiC was not formed between crystallized Si (+4) and anthracite. In a full-scale demonstration, bricks made from anthracite fines and zerovalent silicon successfully replaced a part of the foundry coke in a full-scale cupola. In addition to saving in fuel cost, replacing coke by waste anthracite fines can reduce energy consumption and CO2 and other pollution associated with conventional coking.

  13. Solar water disinfection (SODIS) of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., and MS2 coliphage: effects of additives and alternative container materials.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Michael B; Iriarte, Mercedes; Nelson, Kara L

    2012-04-15

    The use of alternative container materials and added oxidants accelerated the inactivation of MS2 coliphage and Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. bacteria during solar water disinfection (SODIS) trials. Specifically, bottles made from polypropylene copolymer (PPCO), a partially UVB-transparent plastic, resulted in three-log inactivation of these organisms in approximately half the time required for disinfection in bottles made from PET, polycarbonate, or Tritan(®), which absorb most UVB light. Furthermore, the addition of 125 mg/L sodium percarbonate in combination with either citric acid or copper plus ascorbate tended to accelerate inactivation by factors of 1.4-19. Finally, it was observed that the inactivation of E. coli and enterococci derived from local wastewater was far slower than the inactivation of laboratory-cultured E. coli and Enterococcus spp., while the inactivation of MS2 was slowest of all. These results highlight the importance of UVB in SODIS under certain conditions, and also the greater sunlight resistance of some viruses and of bacteria of fecal origin, as compared to the laboratory-cultured bacteria commonly used to model their inactivation. Furthermore, this study illustrates promising new avenues for accelerating the inactivation of bacteria and viruses by solar disinfection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation into the sorption of nitroglycerin and diazepam into PVC tubes and alternative tube materials during application.

    PubMed

    Treleano, Anna; Wolz, Gerd; Brandsch, Rainer; Welle, Frank

    2009-03-18

    Plastic bags and tubes are increasingly used for the storage and application of pharmaceutical formulations. The most common polymer material for drug application sets is plasticized poly(vinylchloride) (PVC). During application of pharmaceutical drug solution through PVC tubes, the polymer and the contact media interact which leads to leaching out of polymer additives or sorption of ingredients of the drug solution. Whereas the discussion of leaching of plasticizers is focussed on the toxicological properties of a drug packaging system, the sorption of drug formulation compounds has an influence on the dosage of the active pharmaceutical ingredient resulting in a reduced drug delivery to the patient. Therefore sorption has an influence on the effectiveness and success of the therapy. Within the study, the concentration profiles of nitroglycerin and diazepam solutions were determined after pumping the solutions through infusion administration sets. The study includes plasticized PVC tubes with different plasticizers (DEHP, DEHA, DEHT, TEHTM, DINCH, poly adipate), PVC (DEHP) tubes with different shore hardness as well as alternative polymer materials like EVA, TPE, PUR, silicone, LDPE and PP. From the experimental concentration curves it could be shown, that in the first minutes of the application of the drug solution the sorption of the active compound is at its maximum, resulting in the lowest concentration in the applied pharmaceutical solution. For a PVC tube with DEHP as plasticizer and a shore hardness of 80 only about 57% of the initial nitroglycerin concentration in the solution is applied to the patient in the first minutes of the application. For PVC tube (DEHP, shore 80) the experimental data were simulated using mathematical diffusion models. The concentration profiles during application could be well simulated using the partition coefficient K=50 (nitroglycerin) and K=300 (diazepam), respectively. However, the experimental results indicate, that the

  15. The Use of a Modified Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK) as an Alternative Framework Material for Removable Dental Prostheses. A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Zoidis, Panagiotis; Papathanasiou, Ioannis; Polyzois, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    This clinical report presents a modified poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as an alternative material for the fabrication of distal extension removable dental prosthesis (RDP) frameworks. This material can be used for patients allergic to metals, or who dislike the metallic taste, the weight, and the unpleasant metal display of the denture framework and retentive clasps. This modified PEEK material, known as BioHPP, is a biocompatible, nonallergic, rigid material, with flexibility comparable to bone, high polishing and low absorption properties, low plaque affinity, and good wear resistance. It has been used for years in orthopedics and medical technology. BioHPP frameworks can be constructed either via CAD/CAM manufacturing or via the conventional lost wax technique. The clinical use of a BioHPP RDP framework is presented as an alternative for the treatment of a distal extension case.

  16. The Alternative School: Alachua County Florida Public Schools. Descriptive Materials Covering the Secondary Center for Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents in Alachua County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Russell W.; Sickles, Walter L.

    Presented is a compilation of materials describing the Alternative School of Alachua County, Florida, a special day school which serves 85 severely emotionally disturbed adolescents in grades 6 to 12. Included are brief sections covering the following topics: a description of the school in the form of an introductory letter which is given out to…

  17. Recycling biosolids and lake-dredged materials to pasture-based animal agriculture: Alternative nutrient sources for forage productivity and sustainability.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prohibition of dumping dredged and domestic sewage sludge (DSS) materials in streams and oceans, diminishing land fill space, skyrocketing landfill costs, and concerns over air pollution from incineration of wastes have contributed to a strong public interest in finding alternative, environmenta...

  18. Designing and Diagnosing Novel Electrode Materials for Na-ion Batteries: Potential Alternatives to Current Li-ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing

    Owing to outstanding energy density, Li-ion batteries have dominated the portable electronic industry for the past 20 years and they are now moving forward powering electric vehicles. In light of concerns over limited lithium reserve and rising lithium costs in the future, Na-ion batteries have re-emerged as potential alternatives for large scale energy storage. On the other hand, though both sodium and lithium are alkali metals sharing many chemical similarities, research on Na-ion batteries is still facing many challenges due to the larger size and unique bonding characteristics of Na ions. In this thesis, a series of sodium transition metal oxides are investigated as cathode materials for Na-ion batteries. P2 - Na2/3[Ni1/3 Mn2/3]O2 is firstly studied with a combination of first principles calculation and experiment, and battery performance is improved by excluding the phase transformation region. Li substituted compound, P2-Na0.8[Li0.12Ni0.22Mn0.66]O 2, is then explored. Its crystal / electronic structure evolution upon cycling is tracked by combing in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and solid state NMR. It is revealed that the presence of Li-ions in the transition metal layer allows increased amount of Na-ions to maintain the P2 structure during cycling. The design principles for the P2 type Na cathodes are devised based on this in-depth understanding and an optimized composition is proposed. The idea of Li substitution is then transferred to O3 type cathode. The new material, O3 - Na0.78 Li0.18Ni0.25Mn0.583O2, shows discharge capacity of 240 mAh/g, which is the highest capacity and highest energy density so far among cathode materials in Na-ion batteries. With significant progress on cathode materials, a comprehensive understanding of Na2Ti3O7 as anode for Na-ion batteries is discussed. The electrochemical performance is enhanced, due to increased electronic conductivity and reduced SEI formation with carbon coating

  19. Amorphous carbon nitride as an alternative electrode material in electroanalysis: simultaneous determination of dopamine and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Roberta A; Matos, Roberto; Benchikh, Abdelkader; Saidani, Boualem; Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine; Deslouis, Claude; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2013-10-03

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) films are excellent electrode materials, whose electrochemical activity for some analytes can be tuned by controlling their surface termination, most commonly either to predominantly hydrogen or oxygen. This tuning can be accomplished by e.g. suitable cathodic or anodic electrochemical pretreatments. Recently, it has been shown that amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films may present electrochemical characteristics similar to those of BDD, including the influence of surface termination on their electrochemical activity toward some analytes. In this work, we report for the first time a complete electroanalytical method using an a-CNx electrode. Thus, an a-CNx film deposited on a stainless steel foil by DC magnetron sputtering is proposed as an alternative electrode for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) in synthetic biological samples by square-wave voltammetry. The obtained results are compared with those attained using a BDD electrode. For both electrodes, a same anodic pretreatment in 0.1 mol L(-1) KOH was necessary to attain an adequate and equivalent separation of the DA and AA oxidation potential peaks of about 330 mV. The detection limits obtained for the simultaneous determination of these analytes using the a-CNx electrode were 0.0656 μmol L(-1) for DA and 1.05 μmol L(-1) for AA, whereas with the BDD electrode these values were 0.283 μmol L(-1) and 0.968 μmol L(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the results obtained in the analysis of the analytes in synthetic biological samples were satisfactory, attesting the potential application of the a-CNx electrode in electroanalysis.

  20. Hypervelocity Impacts on ISS Handrails and Evaluation of Alternative Materials to Prevent Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Glove Damage During EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eruc; Davis, B. Alan; Ordonez, Erick

    2009-01-01

    During post-flight processing of STS-116, damage to crewmember Robert Curbeam's Phase VI Glove Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment was discovered. This damage consisted of: loss of RTV-157 palm pads on the thumb area on the right glove, a 0.75 inch cut in the Vectran adjacent to the seam and thumb pad (single event cut), constituting the worst glove damage ever recorded for the U.S. space program. The underlying bladder and restraint were found not be damaged by this event. Evaluation of glove damage found that the outer Vectran fibers were sliced as a result of contact with a sharp edge or pinch point rather than general wear or abrasion (commonly observed on the RTV pads). Damage to gloves was also noted on STS-118 and STS-120. One potential source of EMU glove damages are sharp crater lips on external handrails, generated by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts. In this paper, the results of a hypervelocity impact (HVI) test program on representative and actual ISS handrails are presented. These tests were performed in order to characterize impact damage profiles on ISS handrails and evaluate alternatives for limiting risk to future missions. It was determined that both penetrating and non-penetrating MMOD impacts on aluminum and steel ISS handrails are capable of generating protruding crater profiles which exceed the heights required for EMU glove abrasion risk by an order of magnitude. Testing demonstrated that flexible overwraps attached to the outside of existing handrails are capable of limiting contact between hazardous crater formations and crewmember gloves during extravehicular activity (EVA). Additionally, replacing metallic handrails with high strength, low ductility, fiber reinforced composite materials would limit the formation of protruding crater lips on new ISS modules.

  1. Comparative evaluation of pumice stone as an alternative immobilization material for 1,3-propanediol production from waste glycerol by immobilized Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Cagdas; Gungormusler, Mine; Azbar, Nuri

    2012-12-01

    In this study, pumice stone (PS), which is a vastly available material in Turkey, was evaluated as an alternative immobilization material in comparison to other commercially available immobilization materials such as glass beads and polyurethane foam. All immobilized bioreactors resulted in much better 1,3-propanediol production from waste glycerol in comparison to the suspended cell culture bioreactor. It was also demonstrated that the locally available PS material is as good as the commercially available immobilization material. The maximum volumetric productivity (8.5 g L(-1) h(-1)) was obtained by the PS material, which is 220 % higher than the suspended cell system. Furthermore, the immobilized bioreactor system was much more robust against cell washout even at very low hydraulic retention time values.

  2. Start at the End ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsworthy, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Start at the end; that's the way to improve children's plans for investigations. Strange as it may seem, there are times when beginning at the beginning of an investigation is not the best way to start things off. To give children the opportunity to ask questions and plan what to do, sometimes it is best to get them first to consider others' data…

  3. Head Start. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Head Start is a national program that provides comprehensive developmental services for preschool children (ages 3 to 5) from low-income families and social services for their families. Approximately 1,400 community-based nonprofit organizations and school systems develop programs to meet specific needs. Head Start began in 1965 in the Office of…

  4. Science Starts Early.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. Christine; Weeks, Valerie; Evans, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the Science Starts Early program, which is designed to expose young, potentially gifted children, particularly girls, to basic scientific principles that will allow them to explore the world around them. A Science Starts Early program curriculum is described and examples are provided of experiments. (Contains references.)…

  5. Starting School in August

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chmelynski, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the controversial decision of the school board from the Broward County, Florida to start the school year on August 9. School boards across the country that are grappling with the idea of starting school earlier in the year are increasingly running up against strong opposition from parents. In many districts,…

  6. Magnetostrictive Alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger; Bruder, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This innovation replaces the linear alternator presently used in Stirling engines with a continuous-gradient, impedance-matched, oscillating magnetostrictive transducer that eliminates all moving parts via compression, maintains high efficiency, costs less to manufacture, reduces mass, and eliminates the need for a bearing system. The key components of this new technology are the use of stacked magnetostrictive materials, such as Terfenol-D, under a biased magnetic and stress-induced compression, continuous-gradient impedance-matching material, coils, force-focusing metallic structure, and supports. The acoustic energy from the engine travels through an impedancematching layer that is physically connected to the magnetostrictive mass. Compression bolts keep the structure under compressive strain, allowing for the micron-scale compression of the magnetostrictive material and eliminating the need for bearings. The relatively large millimeter displacement of the pressure side of the impedance-matching material is reduced to micron motion, and undergoes stress amplification at the magnetostrictive interface. The alternating compression and expansion of the magnetostrictive material creates an alternating magnetic field that then induces an electric current in a coil that is wound around the stack. This produces electrical power from the acoustic pressure wave and, if the resonant frequency is tuned to match the engine, can replace the linear alternator that is commonly used.

  7. START II and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, J.

    1996-10-01

    The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START II), signed by President George Bush and Russian President Boris yeltsin in January 1993, was ratified by the US Senate in January 1996 by and overwhelming vote of 87-4. The treaty, which will slash the strategic arsenals of the United States and Russia to 3,000-3,500 warheads each, is now before the two houses of the Russian Parliament (the Duma and the Federation Council) awaiting ratification amidst confusion and criticism. The Yeltsin administration supports START II and spoke in favor of Russian ratification after the Senate acted on the treaty. The Russian foreign minister and the Russian military believed that START II should be ratified as soon as possible. During the recent presidential campaign and his subsequent illness, President Yeltsin has been virtually silent on the subject of START II and nuclear force reductions. Without a push from the Yeltsin administration, the tone among Duma members, has been sharply critical of START II. Voices across the Russian political spectrum have questioned the treaty and linked it to constraints on highly capable theater missile defense (TMD) systems and the continued viability of the ABM Treaty. And urged that START II ratification be held hostage until NATO abandons its plans to expand eastward. Although the START I and START II accords have generated the momentum, opportunity and expectation-both domestic and international-for additional nuclear arms reductions, the current impasse over ratification in the Duma has cast a shadow over the future of START II and raised questions about the chances for any follow-on (START III) agreement.

  8. The physics of tokamak start-up

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.

    2013-05-15

    Tokamak start-up on present-day devices usually relies on inductively induced voltage from a central solenoid. In some cases, inductive startup is assisted with auxiliary power from electron cyclotron radio frequency heating. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade and JT60, now under construction, will make use of the understanding gained from present-day devices to ensure successful start-up. Design of a spherical tokamak (ST) with DT capability for nuclear component testing would require an alternative to a central solenoid because the small central column in an ST has insufficient space to provide shielding for the insulators in the solenoid. Alternative start-up techniques such as induction using outer poloidal field coils, electron Bernstein wave start-up, coaxial helicity injection, and point source helicity injection have been used with success, but require demonstration of scaling to higher plasma current.

  9. The Physics of Tokamak Start-up

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller

    2012-11-13

    Tokamak start-up on present-day devices usually relies on inductively induced voltage from a central solenoid. In some cases inductive startup is assisted with auxiliary power from electron cyclotron radio frequency heating. ITER, the National Spherical Torus eXperiment Upgrade and JT60, now under construction, will make use of the understanding gained from present-day devices to ensure successful start-up. Design of a spherical tokamak (ST) with DT capability for nuclear component testing would require an alternative to a central solenoid because the small central column in an ST has insufficient space to provide shielding for the insulators in the solenoid. Alternative start-up techniques such as induction using outer poloidal field coils, electron Bernstein wave start-up, coaxial helicity injection and point source helicity injection have been used with success, but require demonstration of scaling to higher plasma current.

  10. Life Starting Materials Found in Dusty Disk

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-12-20

    This graph, or spectrum, from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that some of the most basic ingredients of DNA and protein are concentrated in a dusty planet-forming disk circling a young sun-like star called IRS 46.

  11. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  12. Biosolids and dredged materials: alternative sources of nutrients for crop productivity and sustainability of pasture-based agroecosystem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic sewage sludge or “biosolids” and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling and influencing the quantity, quality and cha...

  13. Development of Dodecaniobate Keggin Chain Materials as Alternative Sorbents for SR and Actinide Removal from High-Level Nuclear Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May; Bonhomme, Francois

    2004-03-28

    The current baseline sorbent (monosodium titanate) for Sr and actinide removal from Savannah River Site's high level wastes has excellent adsorption capabilities for Sr but poor performance for the actinides. We are currently investigating the development of alternative materials that sorb radionuclides based on chemical affinity and/or size selectivity. The polyoxometalates, negatively-charged metal oxo clusters, have known metal binding properties and are of interest for radionuclide sequestration. We have developed a class of Keggin-ion based materials, where the Keggin ions are linked in 1- dimensional chains separated by hydrated, charge-balancing cations. These Nb-based materials are stable in the highly basic nuclear waste solutions and show good selectivity for Sr and Pu. Synthesis, characterization and structure of these materials in their native forms and Sr-exchanged forms will be presented.

  14. A multi-element ICP-MS survey method as an alternative to the heavy metals limit test for pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Wu, J; Hartman, R; Jia, X; Egan, R S

    2000-10-01

    A multi-element inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) survey method has been demonstrated as an alternative to the antiquated 'heavy metals limit test' prescribed by United States Pharmacopoeia (USP), European Pharmacopoeia (EP), and British Pharmacopoeia (BP), for drug substances, intermediates, and raw materials. The survey method is simple, fast, sensitive, semi-quantitative to quantitative, and includes all the elements which can be analyzed by atomic spectroscopy.

  15. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River Estuary Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Report 6. Laboratory Testing for Subaqueous Capping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    movement of PCB contaminants. 6 ’ ," - Accesion For NTIS CRA&I OTIC TAB 0 Uianno," d C1 Jnlstlllcdt d/ By AvW ’,b. ,’ des ni-i SECURlTY CLASSIPCATION...CSE 7.8 1. 11mld 0 1020304 CAPPINGA MATERIALS (CNTOL Figure 6 . Effect of cap thickness on orthophosphate-phosphorus release rate the capping material...ALTERNATIVES -~ Report 6 LABORATORY TESTING FOR SUBAQUEOUS CAPPINGi!I0by N ThormdS C. Sturgis, Douglas Gunnison Environmental Laboratory DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

  16. Video as Supplementary Material. The Impact of an Alternative Development of Study Materials in Solving Formal Economic Problems. Working Papers in Distance Education No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaser, W.; And Others

    This study investigated the efficiency of video as an additional teaching aid for a statistics course offered by the Fernuniversitat (Open University, West Germany). A total of 65 distance students and internal students from the Universities of Bochum and Dortmund were divided into five groups to test the effects of five alternative treatments:…

  17. Video as Supplementary Material. The Impact of an Alternative Development of Study Materials in Solving Formal Economic Problems. Working Papers in Distance Education No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaser, W.; And Others

    This study investigated the efficiency of video as an additional teaching aid for a statistics course offered by the Fernuniversitat (Open University, West Germany). A total of 65 distance students and internal students from the Universities of Bochum and Dortmund were divided into five groups to test the effects of five alternative treatments:…

  18. Fusible heat sink materials - An identification of alternate candidates. [for astronaut thermoregulation in EVA portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvaduray, Guna; Lomax, Curtis

    1991-01-01

    Fusible heat sinks are a possible source for thermal regulation of space suited astronauts. An extensive database search was undertaken to identify candidate materials with liquid solid transformations over the temperature range of -18 C to 5 C; and 1215 candidates were identified. Based on available data, 59 candidate materials with thermal storage capability, DeltaH values higher than that of water were identified. This paper presents the methodology utilized in the study, including the decision process used for materials selection.

  19. High-Throughput Predictive Approaches to Evaluating Chemicals in Food Contact Materials: Migration, Exposure, and Alternatives Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation describing CSS research on HT predictive methods to modeling exposure and predicting functional substitutes. It will be presented at a forum co-sponsored by the State of California and UC Berekeley on evaluation of chemical alternatives for food contact ch...

  20. High-Throughput Predictive Approaches to Evaluating Chemicals in Food Contact Materials: Migration, Exposure, and Alternatives Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation describing CSS research on HT predictive methods to modeling exposure and predicting functional substitutes. It will be presented at a forum co-sponsored by the State of California and UC Berekeley on evaluation of chemical alternatives for food contact ch...

  1. Training Curriculum for Alternative Clothes Cleaning. Volume I: Curriculum [and] Volume II: Instructor's Manual [and Presentation Materials].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luskin, Jack; Manning, Teena; Siegel, Jodie

    This two-volume document consists of a curriculum and an instructor's manual for a learner-centered workshop on alternative clothes cleaning that is intended for operators of dry-cleaning establishments and individuals who are interested in opening a garment wet cleaning facility. Volume 1, the curriculum, contains 11 learning modules. Each module…

  2. Blogs: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyrud, Marilyn A.; Worley, Rebecca B.; Schultz, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Blogs are communication tools, they serve as vehicles to transmit messages. Before deciding to blog, one needs to devise a strategy on how this medium will fit in with his or her communication needs. This will also help later in deciding which features one will need to include in his or her blog. This article discusses ways on how to start and…

  3. Is Head Start Dying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Ann; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of problems faced by Head Start and its present status includes a review of its transfer from O.E.O. to H.E.W., its extensions, the Westinghouse Report, and other studies and articles. Decline in public interest and support is noted. (KW)

  4. Starting in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertine, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Through its signature initiative, Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP), the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) is promoting a vision for learning that begins in school: Starting in School . . . Rigorous and rich curriculum focused on the essential learning outcomes; comprehensive, individualized, and…

  5. TARCOG Home Start Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments, Huntsville. Human Resources Program.

    This report describes the Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments (TARCOG) Home Start Program. Five aspects of the program are presented. (1) The nutrition component is aimed at helping parents make the best use of food resources through good planning, buying, and cooking. (2) The health program involves provision of medical and dental…

  6. Mapping Sure Start Scotland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham-Burley, Sarah; Jamieson, Lynn; Morton, Sarah; Adam, Rachel; McFarlane, Vivienne

    Sure Start Scotland is part of a broader action program for children from birth to age three and their families with the objectives of improving children's social and emotional development, health, and ability to learn, as well as strengthening families and communities. This summary report details a "mapping" project to identify services…

  7. Starting in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertine, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Through its signature initiative, Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP), the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) is promoting a vision for learning that begins in school: Starting in School . . . Rigorous and rich curriculum focused on the essential learning outcomes; comprehensive, individualized, and…

  8. Project Right Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Barbara B.

    The University-Urban Interface Program (UUIP) is a federally-funded project to study an urban university's community relations efforts and innovations, their successes and failures. This is a study of one of the UUIP areas of priority, Project Right Start, a plan for creating a facility for the detection and treatment of psychological problems in…

  9. Smart Start Evaluation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Donna; Burchinal, Margaret; Buysse, Virginia; Kotch, Jonathan; Maxwell, Kelly; Neenan, Peter; Noblit, George; Orthner, Dennis; Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen; Telfair, Joseph

    Smart Start is North Carolina's partnership between state government and local leaders, service providers, and families to better serve children under 6 years of age and their families. This report describes the comprehensive plan to evaluate the state and local goals and objectives of the program, focusing on the components addressing the…

  10. Home Start Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roggman, Lori; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains monthly work plans and weekly activity units for a Home Start Program. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the home, the family unit, and the education and development of young children by their own parents. Yearly goals include concern for the following: physical and dental health, nutrition, mental health and…

  11. Home Start Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

    Case studies of eight Home Start programs are given as the third section of an evaluation study. Communities involved are Binghamton, New York; Franklin, North Carolina; Cleveland, Ohio; Harrogate, Tennessee; Houston, Texas; Weslaco, Texas; Millville, Utah; Parkersburg, West Virginia. Although each study varies in format, each describes in detail…

  12. In vivo degradation in modern orthopaedic UHMWPE bearings and structural characterization of a novel alternative UHMWPE material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinitz, Steven D.

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the most common bearing material for total joint arthroplasty. Advances in radiation cross-linking and other post-consolidation treatments have led to a rapid differentiation of polyethylene products on the market, with more than twenty unique materials currently being sold by the five largest orthopaedic manufacturers alone. Through oxidation, cross-link density, and free radical measurements, this work demonstrates for the first time that in vivo material degradation is occurring in cross-linked UHMWPE materials. Based on the rate of the reaction in certain materials, it is concluded that oxidative degradation may compromise the mechanical properties of the bearings in as few as ten years, potentially leading to early clinical failure of the devices. Using the knowledge gained from this work as well as previously published observations about UHMWPE oxidation, a two-mechanism model of oxidation is proposed that offers an explanation for the observed in vivo changes. From this model it is concluded that oxidative degradation is in part the result of in vivo chemical species. The two-mechanism model of oxidation suggests that different processing techniques for UHMWPE may reduce the risk of oxidative degradation. It is concluded that by avoiding any radiation cross-linking step, Equal Channel Angular Processing (ECAP) can produce UHMWPE materials with a reduced risk for in vivo oxidation while at the same time offering superior mechanical properties compared to commercially available UHMWPE materials, as well as similar wear behavior. Using dynamic mechanical analysis, the entanglement density in ECAP materials is quantified, and is related back to the ECAP processing parameters. The relationship between entanglement density and resultant material properties is established. The results will allow informed processing parameter selection for producing optimized materials for orthopaedics and other applications.

  13. Starting New Schools: Lessons for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Wayne B.

    Arguments for beginning new schools as a robust alternative to the incremental improvement of existing schools are presented in this paper. The educational improvement approach of starting new schools or programs, rather than making incremental improvements or generating comprehensive change in existing schools, is advocated. Two major types of…

  14. Sludge from paper mill effluent treatment as raw material to produce carbon adsorbents: An alternative waste management strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaria, Guilaine; Silva, Carla Patrícia; Ferreira, Catarina I A; Otero, Marta; Calisto, Vânia

    2017-03-01

    Pulp and paper industry produces massive amounts of sludge from wastewater treatment, which constitute an enormous environmental challenge. A possible management option is the conversion of sludge into carbon-based adsorbents to be applied in water remediation. For such utilization it is important to investigate if sludge is a consistent raw material originating reproducible final materials (either over time or from different manufacturing processes), which is the main goal of this work. For that purpose, different primary (PS) and biological sludge (BS) batches from two factories with different operation modes were sampled and subjected to pyrolysis (P materials) and to pyrolysis followed by acid washing (PW materials). All the materials were characterized by proximate analysis, total organic carbon (TOC) and inorganic carbon (IC), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and N2 adsorption isotherms (specific surface area (SBET)and porosity determination). Sludge from the two factories proved to have distinct physicochemical properties, mainly in what concerns IC. After pyrolysis, the washing step was essential to reduce IC and to considerably increase SBET, yet with high impact in the final production yield. Among the materials here produced, PW materials from PS were those having the highest SBET values (387-488 m(2) g(-1)). Overall, it was found that precursors from different factories might originate final materials with distinct characteristics, being essential to take into account this source of variability when considering paper mill sludge as a raw material. Nevertheless, for PS, low variability was found between batches, which points out to the reliability of such residues to be used as precursors of carbon adsorbents.

  15. Tetra methyl substituted Cu(II) phthalocyanine as alternative hole transporting material for organometal halide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfyri, Georgia; Kumar, Challuri Vijay; Wang, Yu-Long; Xu, Zong-Xiang; Krontiras, C. A.; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Copper phthalocyanine is a promising hole transporting material, which can be employed with solid state perovskite solar cells. Tetra methyl substituted copper phthalocyanine was presently studied as a hole transporting material and demonstrated improved performance with respect to unsubstituted copper phthalocyanine. This material shows a strong absorption in the Visible and Near IR part of the electromagnetic spectrum contributing to the absorption of photons. Its LUMO and HOMO level are favourably positioned for injecting electrons and scavenging holes. Methyl substitution facilitates closer molecular packing leading to a stronger extinction coefficient, stronger Ͽ⿿Ͽ interaction and higher charge carrier mobility.

  16. 23 CFR Appendix to Subpart F of... - Alternate Method of Determining the Color of Retroreflective Sign Materials and Pavement Marking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of retroreflective materials. The geometric conditions to be used in both test methods are 0/45 or 45.... Average performance sheeting is identified as Types I and II sheeting and high performance sheeting...

  17. XRD technique: a way to discriminate structural changes in iron-based amorphous materials [An Alternative Method of Synthesizing Iron-based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, Cheng K.; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joe C.; Bauer, William

    2008-02-06

    Prevention of corrosion is a vital goal for the Department of Defense when billions of dollars are spent every year. Corrosion resistant materials have applications in all sort of military vehicles, and more importantly in naval vessels and submarines which come in contact with the seawater. It is known that corrosion resistance property can be improved by the used of structurally designed materials in the amorphous state where the atoms are arranged in a non-periodic fashion and specific atoms, tailored to the required properties can be interjected into the matrix for specific application. The XRD techniques reported here is to demonstrate the optimal conditions for characterization of these materials. The samples, which normally contain different compositions of Fe, Cr, B, Mo, Y, Mn, Si and W, are in the form of powders, ribbons and coatings. These results will be compared for the different forms of the sample which appears to correlate to the cooling rate during sample processing. In most cases, the materials are amorphous or amorphous with very small amount of crystallinity. In the ribbon samples for different compositions we observed that the materials are essentially amorphous. In most cases, starting from an amorphous powder sample, the coatings are also observed to be amorphous with a small amount of iron oxide on the surface, probably due to exposure to air.

  18. Engine Cold Start

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    have a high surface to volume ratio for the combustion chamber , and high gas velocities during compression that results in high heat transfer rates...into the pre- chambers during the injection event to augment ignition. Except for a thermostatically controlled cold start advance, the mechanical fuel...Kistler Cylinder Pressure Transducer, 6052B (Main- Chamber ) • Kistler 5018 Charge Amplifiers • Kistler Fuel Line Pressure Transducer, 4065A1000 with

  19. Nutriendo la Promesa: Materiales Para la Aplicacion de las Normas de Ejecucion del Programa Head Start. Guia Para la Utilizacion de los Materiales [y] Transparencias (Nurturing the Promise: Set of Training Materials on the Head Start Program Performance Standards. User's Guide [and] Set of Transparencies).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Services, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Since 1975, the Head Start Program Performance Standards have defined the services that local programs are required to provide to enrolled children and families. With revisions effective in 1998, the Program Performance Standards translate the Head Start vision into quality practices implemented at the local level. This document is comprised of a…

  20. The future of dental amalgam: a review of the literature. Part 7: Possible alternative materials to amalgam for the restoration of posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Eley, B M

    1997-07-12

    This is the last in a series of articles on the future of dental amalgam. It considers possible alternative materials to amalgam for the restoration of posterior teeth. The materials discussed are gold inlays, gold foil, gallium alloys, and tooth coloured non-metal alternatives including glass-ionomer cements, composite resins, glass-ionomer-resin hybrids, compomers and ceramics. The clinical indications for these restorations are first described along with their potential clinical problems and their mean survival rates in comparison with dental amalgam. Secondly, the safety of composite resins is considered and potential toxic and hypersensitive effects of these materials are discussed. Finally, it is concluded that the present evidence does not appear to demonstrate that dental amalgam is hazardous to the health of the general population. It does, however, recommend that in continuing to use amalgam dentists must use strict mercury hygiene procedures to avoid risk to their staff and contamination of the environment. It seems that mercury contamination of the environment is likely to be the main reason for any future government action against the continued clinical use of dental amalgam.

  1. Immediate start of hormonal contraceptives for contraception.

    PubMed

    Lopez, L M; Newmann, S J; Grimes, D A; Nanda, K; Schulz, K F

    2008-04-16

    Health care providers often tell women to wait until the next menses to begin hormonal contraception. The main intent is to avoid contraceptive use during an undetected pregnancy. An alternative is to start hormonal contraception immediately with back-up birth control for the first seven days. Immediate initiation was first introduced with combined oral contraceptives (COCs), and has expanded to other hormonal contraceptives. How immediate start compares to conventional menses-dependent start is unclear regarding effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. The immediate-start approach may improve women's access to, and continuation of, hormonal contraception. This review examined randomized controlled trials of immediate-start hormonal contraception for differences in effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. We searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS for trials of immediate-start hormonal contraceptives. We contacted researchers to find other studies. We included randomized controlled trials that compared immediate start to conventional start of hormonal contraception. Also included were trials that compared immediate start of different hormonal contraceptive methods with each other. Data were abstracted by two authors and entered into RevMan. The Peto odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Five studies were included. Method discontinuation was similar between groups in all trials. Bleeding patterns and side effects were similar in trials that compared immediate with conventional start. In a study of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), immediate start of DMPA showed fewer pregnancies than a 'bridge' method before DMPA (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.84). Further, more women in the immediate-DMPA group were very satisfied versus those with a 'bridge' method (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.05 to 3.77).A trial of two immediate-start methods showed the vaginal ring group had less prolonged bleeding (OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.20 to 0

  2. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... away. What conditions increase the urgency to start ART? The following conditions increase the urgency to start ... risk of HIV transmission. Once a person starts ART, why is medication adherence important? ART is a ...

  3. Alternative perovskite materials as a cathode component for intermediate temperature single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudillère, Cyril; Olivier, Louis; Vernoux, Philippe; Zhang, Chunming; Shao, Zongping; Farrusseng, David

    This paper exploits the suitability of three perovskite materials Ba 0.5Sr 0.5Co 0.8Fe 0.2O 3- δ (BSCF), GdBaCo 2O 5+ δ (GBC) and Ba 0.5Sr 0.5Mn 0.7Fe 0.3O 3- δ (BSMF) as SOFC cathodes in the single-chamber configuration operating at the intermediate temperature range. TG analysis showed high thermal stability depending on the crystalline phases of the materials. The catalytic activity of these three materials for hydrocarbon conversion was investigated under a realistic feed, i.e. with hydrocarbon, oxygen, water and carbon dioxide. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the various cathodes tested in symmetric cell configuration revealed a B-site dependence of the electrode catalytic activity for oxygen reduction. High temperature (1000 °C) powder reactivity tests over a gadolinium doped-ceria (CGO) and perovskite cathode revealed excellent chemical compatibility of BSMF and CGO. Catalytic tests associated with thermal and structural characterization attest to the suitability of these materials in the single-chamber configuration.

  4. In vitro Alternative Methodologies for Central Nervous System Assessment: A Critique using Nanoscale Materials as an Example.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the potential health hazards to the central nervous system of a new family of materials presents many challenges. Whole-animal toxicity testing has been the tradition, but in vitro methods have been steadily gaining popularity. There are numerous challenges in testing...

  5. Physico-Chemical Alternatives in Lignocellulosic Materials in Relation to the Kind of Component for Fermenting Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Coz, Alberto; Llano, Tamara; Cifrián, Eva; Viguri, Javier; Maican, Edmond; Sixta, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The complete bioconversion of the carbohydrate fraction is of great importance for a lignocellulosic-based biorefinery. However, due to the structure of the lignocellulosic materials, and depending basically on the main parameters within the pretreatment steps, numerous byproducts are generated and they act as inhibitors in the fermentation operations. In this sense, the impact of inhibitory compounds derived from lignocellulosic materials is one of the major challenges for a sustainable biomass-to-biofuel and -bioproduct industry. In order to minimise the negative effects of these compounds, numerous methodologies have been tested including physical, chemical, and biological processes. The main physical and chemical treatments have been studied in this work in relation to the lignocellulosic material and the inhibitor in order to point out the best mechanisms for fermenting purposes. In addition, special attention has been made in the case of lignocellulosic hydrolysates obtained by chemical processes with SO2, due to the complex matrix of these materials and the increase in these methodologies in future biorefinery markets. Recommendations of different detoxification methods have been given. PMID:28773700

  6. Critical Pedagogic Analysis: An Alternative to User Feedback for (Re)Designing Distance Learning Materials for Language Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Internationally, guidelines for distance education advise the use of feedback from students in designing and redesigning materials. As my own attempt to elicit such feedback was an instructive failure, I decided to draw on theorisations of pedagogy, mediation and subjectivity and on international and local (South African) conceptualisations of a…

  7. In vitro Alternative Methodologies for Central Nervous System Assessment: A Critique using Nanoscale Materials as an Example.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the potential health hazards to the central nervous system of a new family of materials presents many challenges. Whole-animal toxicity testing has been the tradition, but in vitro methods have been steadily gaining popularity. There are numerous challenges in testing...

  8. Preparation, structure, and properties of aluminium nitride (AIN) reinforced polymer composites: alternative substrate materials for microelectronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Koh, Juay S.; Hing, Peter

    1997-08-01

    A series of composite materials of varying compositions based on a high temperature resistance engineering thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer and particulate aluminium nitride (AlN) were compounded at relatively low temperature using a co-rotating twin screw extruder/compounder equipped with the segmented screws. The compounded composites are injection molded into different shapes, i.e., dumbbell, rectangular bar and cylindrical disk, for various physical and mechanical tests. In particular, detailed study was carried out to understand the effect of AlN on the dielectric constant, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of these materials. Results have shown that the thermal conductivity steadily increases with AlN filler concentration. An increase by about 80 percent in thermal conductivity of the composite materials is achieved as compared to the unfilled polymer. The dielectric constants of these composites were found to increase with filer content and range from 3.6 to 5.0 at 1 kHz and 3.0 to 4.2 at 10 MHz. Substantial reductio in thermal expansion coefficient was also achieved in the composite materials. Attempt has been made to correlate the experimental data with composite theories.

  9. Effect of the working gas of the ion-assisted source on the optical and mechanical properties of SiO2 films deposited by dual ion beam sputtering with Si and SiO2 as the starting materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jean-Yee; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2006-05-20

    Silicon and fused-silica targets are used as the starting materials for depositing silicon oxide (SiO2) films. The SiO2 films are prepared by a dual ion beam sputtering deposition system with a main ion source and an ion-assisted source with different working gases. The films deposited are then examined and compared by using a visible spectrophotometer, a Fourier-transform IR spectrophotometer, an atomic force microscope, and contact angle instruments. A Twyman-Green interferometer is employed to study the film stress by phase-shift interferometry. All the SiO2 films show excellent optical properties with extra-low extinction coefficients (below 2x10(-5)) and have no water absorption. When the working gas is O2 for the ion-assisted source, the deposited SiO2 films show good properties in terms of stress and roughness and with a good molecular bonding structure order for both targets. However, SiO2 films deposited from the fused-silica target had a larger contact angle, while those deposited from the silicon target had 2.5 times the deposition rate.

  10. New functional and aesthetic composite materials used as an alternative to traditional post materials for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Almaroof, A; Alhashimi, R; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2015-11-01

    To tailor composites of polyethylene-hydroxyapatite to function as a new intracanal post for the restoration of endodontically treated teeth (ETT). Silanated hydroxyapatite (HA) and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) filled low-density polyethylene (LDPE) composites were fabricated by a melt extrusion process and characterised using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The flexural strength and modulus were determined in dry state and post ageing in simulated body fluid and fractured surfaces analysed by SEM. The water uptake and radiographic appearance of the experimental composites were also measured and compared with a commercially known endodontic fibre post. Data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey multiple comparison tests at a level of significance P<0.05. The LDPE/HA composites were structurally flexible and the HA content had a significant effect on the flexural strength and modulus. A univariate analysis of variance showed no significant differences in modulus and strength (P<0.05) post accelerated ageing in simulated body fluid with very low water uptake. The melting point of the LDPE/HA composites ranged between 135 and 136°C, which would facilitate removal in case of retreatment using conventional dental heating devices. The inclusion of HA reduced the damping thereby enhancing dimensional stability, whilst the addition of zirconia yielded a semi-translucent material that was sufficiently radiopaque, comparable to commercial posts, thus yielding aesthetic materials. Innovative materials for restoration of ETT were developed; offering considerable benefits over the currently available material in terms of biomechanical and thermal properties. This study provided a new option for the development of a new intracanal post made up of functional and aesthetic composites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Properties of "started" earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeshko, V. A.; Evdokimova, O. V.; Babeshko, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    The properties of earthquakes called "started" in [1] are studied. The problems associated with the method of revealing them, the expected behavior of the event, and the determination of its place, time, and intensity are discussed. Certain characteristic properties of real earthquakes are compared with the modeled ones. It is emphasized that there are no data on earthquakes of a similar type in scientific publications. The method of using high-efficiency calculations is proposed by imbedding the investigations in topological spaces having a wider spectrum of properties than the functional ones.

  12. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  13. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  14. Direct-current arc and alternating-current spark emission spectrographic field methods for the semiquantitative analysis of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, D.J.; Marranzino, A.P.

    1968-01-01

    Two spectrographic methods are used in mobile field laboratories of the U. S. Geological Survey. In the direct-current arc method, the ground sample is mixed with graphite powder, packed into an electrode crater, and burned to completion. Thirty elements are determined. In the spark method, the sample, ground to pass a 150-mesh screen, is digested in hydrofluoric acid followed by evaporation to dryness and dissolution in aqua regia. The solution is fed into the spark gap by means of a rotating-disk electrode arrangement and is excited with an alternating-current spark discharge. Fourteen elements are determined. In both techniques, light is recorded on Spectrum Analysis No. 1, 35-millimeter film, and the spectra are compared visually with those of standard films.

  15. Technical assessment of critical Plasma-Materials Interaction (PMI) and High Heat Flux (HHF) issues for alternative fusion concepts (AFCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.N.

    1986-03-01

    A number of approaches to fusion energy are being pursued as alternative fusion concepts (AFCs). The goal of these systems is to provide a more desirable method of producing fusion energy than the mainline programs. Some of the AFCs have both a Low Power Density (LPD) option and a High Power Density (HPD) option. A summary of representative AFC programs and their associated PMI and HHF issues is followed by the technical assessment of the critical issues. These requirements are discussed relative to the mainline and/or HPD components. The HPD options are contrasted with a tabulation of the characteristics of components for the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), which is representative of the HPD concept.

  16. Enhanced electrochemical performance of mesoporous NiCo2O4 as an excellent supercapacitive alternative energy storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhojane, Prateek; Sen, Somaditya; Shirage, Parasharam M.

    2016-07-01

    Here we report the supercapacitive properties of mesoporous nickel cobalt oxide (NiCo2O4) synthesized by fast, inexpensive and facile chemical bath method, by avoiding high pressure, high temperature and chemical complexity. Physico-chemical characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman Spectra, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm analysis is performed to characterize the electrode material. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements reveal the surface area 52.86 m2 g-1 and from Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH), typical pores size ranges between 10 and 50 nm, also confirms the mesoporosity. The electrochemical properties are measured by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charging/discharging. The synthesized material exhibits remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance with specific capacitance of 1130 F g-1 at 1 mV s-1 sweep rate and 1125 F g-1 at current density of 0.05 A g-1, highest without supporting base like carbon cloth, Ni-foam, Ti- foil used for direct growth (deposition) of electrode material. It is superior to those of its individual and hybrid components prepared by similar technique. Ragone plot shows high specific energy density (49.25 Wh kg-1) and corresponding specific power density (1851.31 W kg-1) even at high current density of 0.5 A g-1.

  17. Beneficial reuse of Brest-Harbor (France)-dredged sediment as alternative material in road building: laboratory investigations.

    PubMed

    Maherzi, Walid; Benzerzour, Mahfoud; Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; van Veen, Eleanor; Boutouil, Mohamed; Abriak, Nor Edine

    2017-04-09

    The scarcity of natural aggregates promotes waste reuse as secondary raw material in the field of civil engineering. This article focuses on the beneficial reuse of marine-dredged sediments in road building. Thus, mixtures of raw sediments and dredged sand collected from Brest Harbur (Bretagne, France) were treated with road hydraulic binders. Formulation were prepared and characterized as recommended by the French Technical Guidelines for soil treatment with lime and/or hydraulic binders. Mechanical resistance results are quite similar for both the hydraulic binders, suggesting a similar reactivity with the studied sediment sample. However, some discrepancies can be noted on sustainability parameters. Indeed, water resistance after immersion at 40°C is significantly better for the mixtures treated with cement containing more glass-forming oxides (SiO2 + Al2O3) and fluxing (Fe2O3+CaO + MgO + K2O + Na2O). Moreover, the both hydraulic binders can lead to swelling in the road materials as observed in scanning electron microscopy analyses. Indeed, microscopic observations indicated volumetric swelling of treated samples, which is greatly influenced on the one side by ettringite quantity and on the other hand by the presence of water in pores material.

  18. Some considerations in the evaluation of concrete as a structural material for alternative LLW (low-level radioactive waste) disposal technologies

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Siskind, B.; Bowerman, B.S.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop information needed to evaluate the long-term performance of concrete and reinforced concrete as a structural material for alternative LLW disposal methods. The capability to carry out such an evaluation is required for licensing a site which employs one of these alternative methods. The basis for achieving the study objective was the review and analysis of the literature on concrete and its properties, particularly its durability. In carrying out this program characteristics of concrete useful in evaluating its performance and factors that can affect its performance were identified. The factors are both intrinsic, i.e., associated with composition of the concrete (and thus controllable), and extrinsic, i.e., due to external environmental forces such as climatic conditions and aggressive chemicals in the soil. The testing of concrete, using both accelerated tests and long-term non-accelerated tests, is discussed with special reference to its application to modeling of long-term performance prediction. On the basis of the study's results, conditions for acceptance are recommended as an aid in the licensing of disposal sites which make use of alternative methods.

  19. Alternatives for Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alternatives for Education, San Pedro, CA.

    A directory of alternative schools and a list of books and reprints about alternative education are presented. The alternative schools listed are almost all on the West Coast and include both day and boarding schools at the primary and secondary level. The name and address of each school is given along with supplementary material about its…

  20. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  1. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  2. PEEK and CFR-PEEK as alternative bearing materials to UHMWPE in a fixed bearing total knee replacement: An experimental wear study.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Carbone, Silvia; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2017-03-15

    New bearing materials for total joint replacement have been explored as the need to improve longevity and enhance performance is driven by the changing demands of the patient demographic. Carbon-reinforced PEEK has demonstrated good wear characteristics in experimental wear simulation in both simple geometry pin-on-plate studies and in total hip joint replacement. Carbon reinforced PEEK CFR-PEEK has the potential to reduce tibial insert thickness and preserve bone in the knee. This study investigated the wear performance of PEEK and CFR-PEEK in a low conformity total knee replacement configuration. Custom-made flat inserts were tested against cobalt-chromium femoral bearings in a knee wear simulation for a period of three million cycles. Wear was assessed gravimetrically at intervals throughout the study. The wear rates of both PEEK and CFR-PEEK were very high and almost two orders of magnitude higher than the wear rate of UHMWPE under comparable conditions. Evidence of mechanical failure of the materials, including surface cracking and delamination was observed in both materials. This study highlights that these materials may not be suitable alternatives for UHMWPE in low-conformity designs.

  3. Microencapsulation of grape polyphenols using maltodextrin and gum arabic as two alternative coating materials: Development and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tolun, Aysu; Altintas, Zeynep; Artik, Nevzat

    2016-12-10

    Phenolic compounds obtained from fruits have recently gained a great attention due to their bioactive roles. However, they are sensitive and they can be easily affected by physicochemical factors that create a great challenge to incorporate them into the food products. Hence, this work aimed to investigate microencapsulation of these compounds to provide a solution for this problem by improving their stability and protecting them against oxidation, light, moisture and temperature. A lab scale spray-dryer was chosen to produce microcapsules of polyphenols using different dextrose equivalents of maltodextrin and gum arabic as a coating material. Two different core: coating material ratios (1:1 and 1:2), three different maltodextrin: gum arabic ratios (10:0, 8:2 and 6:4), and four different inlet temperatures (120, 140, 160, 180°C) were investigated. When all parameters (yields, hygroscopicity, total and surface phenolic contents, antioxidant activity, individual phenolic compounds and particle morphology) were evaluated; the most efficient microcapsules were obtained with an 8:2 ratio of maltodextrin: gum arabic at 140°C inlet temperature. Microcapsules were also comprehensively studied and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A simulation-based and analytic analysis of the off-Hugoniot response of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    The attainment of self-propagating fusion burn in an inertial confinement target at the National Ignition Facility will require the use of an ablator with high rocket-efficiency and ablation pressure. The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign (Lindl et al. 2014) [1], a glow-discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile (Robey et al., 2012). We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) compared to the performance of GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator material subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP, and analytic estimations of the ablation pressure indicate that while the pressure produced by B4C and GDP is similar when the ablator is allowed to release, the pressure reached by B4C seems to exceed that of HDC when backed by a Au/quartz layer.

  5. Nanocrystalline BaSnO₃ as an Alternative Gas Sensor Material: Surface Reactivity and High Sensitivity to SO₂.

    PubMed

    Marikutsa, Artem; Rumyantseva, Marina; Baranchikov, Alexander; Gaskov, Alexander

    2015-09-18

    Nanocrystalline perovskite-type BaSnO₃ was obtained via microwave-assisted hydrothermal route followed by annealing at variable temperature. The samples composition and microstructure were characterized. Particle size of 18-23 nm was unaffected by heat treatment at 275-700 °C. Materials DC-conduction was measured at variable temperature and oxygen concentration. Barium stannate exhibited n-type semiconductor behavior at 150-450 °C with activation energy being dependent on the materials annealing temperature. Predominant ionosorbed oxygen species types were estimated. They were shown to change from molecular to atomic species on increasing temperature. Comparative test of sensor response to various inorganic target gases was performed using nanocrystalline SnO₂-based sensors as reference ones. Despite one order of magnitude smaller surface area, BaSnO₃ displayed higher sensitivity to SO₂ in comparison with SnO₂. DRIFT spectroscopy revealed distinct interaction routes of the oxides surfaces with SO₂. Barium-promoted sulfate formation favoring target molecules oxidation was found responsible for the increased BaSnO₃ sensitivity to ppm-range concentrations of SO₂ in air.

  6. Nanocrystalline BaSnO3 as an Alternative Gas Sensor Material: Surface Reactivity and High Sensitivity to SO2

    PubMed Central

    Marikutsa, Artem; Rumyantseva, Marina; Baranchikov, Alexander; Gaskov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline perovskite-type BaSnO3 was obtained via microwave-assisted hydrothermal route followed by annealing at variable temperature. The samples composition and microstructure were characterized. Particle size of 18–23 nm was unaffected by heat treatment at 275–700 °C. Materials DC-conduction was measured at variable temperature and oxygen concentration. Barium stannate exhibited n-type semiconductor behavior at 150–450 °C with activation energy being dependent on the materials annealing temperature. Predominant ionosorbed oxygen species types were estimated. They were shown to change from molecular to atomic species on increasing temperature. Comparative test of sensor response to various inorganic target gases was performed using nanocrystalline SnO2-based sensors as reference ones. Despite one order of magnitude smaller surface area, BaSnO3 displayed higher sensitivity to SO2 in comparison with SnO2. DRIFT spectroscopy revealed distinct interaction routes of the oxides surfaces with SO2. Barium-promoted sulfate formation favoring target molecules oxidation was found responsible for the increased BaSnO3 sensitivity to ppm-range concentrations of SO2 in air. PMID:28793573

  7. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement.

  8. Alternative p-doped hole transport material for low operating voltage and high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, Caroline Fuchs, Cornelius; Hofmann, Simone; Leo, Karl; Gather, Malte C.

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the properties of N,N′-[(Diphenyl-N,N′-bis)9,9,-dimethyl-fluoren-2-yl]-benzidine (BF-DPB) as hole transport material (HTL) in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and compare BF-DPB to the commonly used HTLs N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-benzidine (MeO-TPD), 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N′-di-p-methylphenylamino)-9,9′-spirobifluorene (Spiro-TTB), and N,N′-di(naphtalene-1-yl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (NPB). The influence of 2,2′-(perfluoronaphthalene-2,6-diylidene)dimalononitrile (F6-TCNNQ p-dopant) concentration in BF-DPB on the operation voltage and efficiency of red and green phosphorescent OLEDs is studied; best results are achieved at 4 wt. % doping. Without any light extraction structure, BF-DPB based red (green) OLEDs achieve a luminous efficacy of 35 .1 lm/W (74 .0 lm/W) at 1000 cd/m{sup 2} and reach a very high brightness of 10 000 cd/m{sup 2} at a very low voltage of 3.2 V (3.1 V). We attribute this exceptionally low driving voltage to the high ionization potential of BF-DPB which enables more efficient hole injection from BF-DPB to the adjacent electron blocking layer. The high efficiency and low driving voltage lead to a significantly lower luminous efficacy roll-off compared to the other compounds and render BF-DPB an excellent HTL material for highly efficient OLEDs.

  9. Are allogenic or xenogenic screws and plates a reasonable alternative to alloplastic material for osteosynthesis--a histomorphological analysis in a dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, C; Obwegeser, J A

    2010-12-01

    Despite invention of titanium and resorbable screws and plates, still, one of the main challenges in bone fixation is the search for an ideal osteosynthetic material. Biomechanical properties, biocompatibility, and also cost effectiveness and clinical practicability are factors for the selection of a particular material. A promising alternative seems to be screws and plates made of bone. Recently, xenogenic bone pins and screws have been invented for use in joint surgery. In this study, screws made of allogenic sheep and xenogenic human bone were analyzed in a vital and dynamic sheep-model and compared to conventional titanium screws over a standard period of bone healing of 56 days with a constant applied extrusion force. Biomechanical analysis and histomorphological evaluation were performed. After 56 days of insertion xenogenic screws made of human bone showed significantly larger distance of extrusion of on average 173.8 μm compared to allogenic screws made of sheep bone of on average 27.8 and 29.95 μm of the titanium control group. Severe resorption processes with connective tissue interposition were found in the histomorphological analysis of the xenogenic screws in contrast to new bone formation and centripetal vascularization of the allogenic bone screw, as well as in processes of incorporation of the titanium control group. The study showed allogenic cortical bone screws as a substantial alternative to titanium screws with good biomechanical properties. In contrast to other reports a different result was shown for the xenogenic bone screws. They showed insufficient holding strength with confirmative histomorphological signs of degradation and insufficient osseointegration. Before common clinical use of xenogenic osteosynthetic material, further evaluation should be performed.

  10. Detecting dynamic responses of materials and devices under an alternating electric potential by phase-locked transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Soma, Kentaro; Konings, Stan; Aso, Ryotaro; Kamiuchi, Naoto; Kobayashi, Genki; Yoshida, Hideto; Takeda, Seiji

    2017-10-01

    An apparatus is developed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to acquire image and spectral data, such as TEM images, electron holograms, and electron energy loss spectra, synchronized with the measurement of the dynamic response of a specimen under an applied alternating current (AC) electric potential (voltage, denoted VAC). From a VAC of frequency f, a shutter pulse signal is generated to open and close a pre-specimen shutter in a base TEM apparatus. A pulse is generated per VAC cycle from the targeted phase Φ to Φ +∆Φ with phase width ∆Φ (∆Φ <2π). ∆Φ corresponds to the temporal pulse width τ (τ < 1/f) of an electron beam; i.e., ∆Φ =2πfτ. Because of the high sensitivity of the TEM camera used in this study, the images and spectra that are acquired at the same target phase are integrated by means of stroboscopic illumination to obtain the final phase-locked images and spectra with sufficiently small S/N ratio. Phase-locked (strobe) images and/or spectra are obtained for model specimens of polycrystalline aluminum and an all-solid-state lithium ion battery (LIB). In the phase-locked TEM conditions, f ranges from 1Hz to about 40kHz and ∆Φ from 2π/80 to π. VAC ranges from 2mV to 1V depending on observation conditions. The quality of phase-locked strobe images can be improved markedly using a phase-locked strobe electron beam. Under specific conditions, the spatial resolution in images is better than 0.12nm, even though the spatial resolution generally depends on VAC, f, the base TEM, and the conductivity of the specimen. For the model specimens, it is shown that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry can be performed in a TEM apparatus, and could potentially be synchronized with phase-locked (strobe) imaging and spectroscopy. Severe electron irradiation damage is detected during phase-locked (strobe) electron holography of the model LIB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of two methods based on ultrasound energy as alternative to European standards for soluble salts extraction from building materials.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Taboada, N; Gómez-Laserna, O; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Olazabal, M A; Madariaga, J M

    2012-11-01

    The Italian recommendation NORMAL 13/83, later replaced by the UNI 11087/2003 norm, were used as standard for soluble salts extraction from construction materials. These standards are based on long-time stirring (72 and 2h, respectively) of the sample in deionized water. In this work two ultrasound based methods were optimized in order to reduce the extraction time while efficiency is improved. The instrumental variables involved in the extraction assisted by ultrasound bath and focused ultrasounds were optimized by experimental design. As long as it was possible, the same non-instrumental parameters values as those of standard methods were used in order to compare the results obtained on a mortar sample showing a black crust by the standards and the optimized methods. The optimal extraction time for the ultrasounds bath was found to be of two hours. Although the extraction time was equal to the standard UNI 11087/2003, the obtained extraction recovery was improved up to 119%. The focused ultrasound system achieved also better recoveries (up to 106%) depending on the analyte in 1h treatment time. The repeatabilities of the proposed ultrasound based methods were comparables to those of the standards. Therefore, the selection of one or the other of the ultrasound based methods will depend on topics such as laboratory facilities or number of samples, and not in aspects related with their quality parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Healthy start program participation: the consumers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ley, Christine E; Copeland, Valire Carr; Flint, Cheryl Squire

    2011-01-01

    In 1991, the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau developed the Healthy Start Initiative as a comprehensive community-based program to eliminate the high rates of poor pregnancy outcomes among women of color. To date, few studies of the programmatic outcomes of this Initiative have examined the views of Healthy Start consumers. To understand the benefits of Healthy Start from their consumers' perspective, the Pittsburgh Allegheny County Healthy Start project conducted a survey of 202 of their Healthy Start participants in 2003. The participants completing the survey reported benefits of participating in the program including stress reduction, receiving resources and referrals, and consistent social support of program staff. According to the project's annual statistics, Healthy Start has improved pregnancy outcomes among African American women participants in the Pittsburgh community. However, and according to these participants, the quality of staff and consumer connectedness, availability and consistency of material resources, and social support are as critical as more traditional health interventions to their satisfaction, motivation to participate, and willingness to refer others to the program. Women of color will often forego health services perceived as intimidating and/or culturally insensitive, but programs such as the Healthy Start Initiative offer a critical link that encourages participation and, as a result, improves maternal and child health status.

  13. An alternative hypothesis for high-T 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum discordance in polyphase extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Shuster, D. L.; Renne, P. R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    A common feature observed in 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of extraterrestrial (ET) rocks is a conspicuous decrease in the ages of high temperature extractions relative to lower temperature steps and a correlated increase in Ca/K, often succeeded by a monotonic increase in ages. This feature is routinely attributed to recoil-implanted 39Ar from a potassium (K)-rich donor phase into a K-poor receptor phase (e.g., 1,2). While 39Ar recoil redistribution is undoubtedly manifested in many terrestrial and ET 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock age spectra, it cannot easily explain the magnitude of high release temperature 40Ar*/39ArK anomalies observed in Martian meteorites ALH 84001 and Nakhla, as well as other course-grained meteorites and lunar rocks. Depending on the aliquot and sample, 50 - 100% of the pyroxene release spectra in ALH 84001 and Nakhla appear strongly perturbed to lower ages. As the mean recoil distance of 39Ar ~0.1 µm, the recoil hypothesis demands that a high-K phase be ubiquitously distributed amongst sub-micron to micron sized pyroxene crystals to account for the observed pyroxene age spectra. However, in both Nakhla and ALH 84001, pyroxene is often completely isolated from high-K phases and individual grains commonly exceed 100 µm in diameter. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of pyroxene-bearing terrestrial basalts, wherein fine-grained pyroxene and plagioclase are intimately adjoined, show that recoil-implanted 39Ar into pyroxene produces much less precipitous anomalies in 40Ar*/39ArK, as predicted by the recoil lengthscale. An alternative hypothesis is that whole-rock age spectra of ET samples with anomalously low ages at high temperatures may reflect diffusive 40Ar distributions within considerably degassed pyroxene grains. Owing to apparent differences in activation energies between glass and/or plagioclase and pyroxene, 40Ar may diffuse more rapidly from pyroxene under certain high-temperature conditions (i.e., above the temperature at which the extrapolated Ar Arrhenius

  14. From Head Start to Sure Start: Reflections on Policy Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welshman, John

    2010-01-01

    This article uses the history of debates over the US Head Start programme (1965), Early Head Start (1994) and the UK Sure Start initiative (1998), as a window on to policy transfer. In all the three, the aim was that early intervention could offer a means of boosting children's educational attainment and of countering the wider effects of poverty…

  15. Head Start Works! Two Head Start Veterans Share Their Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallory, Nancy J.; Goldsmith, Nancy A.

    1990-01-01

    Elements of a successful Head Start program are described. These elements are provision of comprehensive services, parent involvement and family support, a commitment to meeting local needs, training and technical assistance support, and use of a collaborative approach. Anecdotes about two Head Start parents and a former Head Start participant are…

  16. Starting with Complex Primitives Pays Off: Complicate Locally, Simplify Globally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Aravind K.

    2004-01-01

    In setting up a formal system to specify a grammar formalism, the conventional (mathematical) wisdom is to start with primitives (basic primitive structures) as simple as possible, and then introduce various operations for constructing more complex structures. An alternate approach is to start with complex (more complicated) primitives, which…

  17. Starting with Complex Primitives Pays Off: Complicate Locally, Simplify Globally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshi, Aravind K.

    2004-01-01

    In setting up a formal system to specify a grammar formalism, the conventional (mathematical) wisdom is to start with primitives (basic primitive structures) as simple as possible, and then introduce various operations for constructing more complex structures. An alternate approach is to start with complex (more complicated) primitives, which…

  18. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  19. Steel slag: a waste industrial by-product as an alternative sustainable green building material in construction applications--an attempt for solid waste management.

    PubMed

    Pofale, Arun D; Nadeem, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    This investigation explores the possibility of utilizing granular slag as an alternative to fine aggregate (natural sand) in construction applications like masonry and plastering. Construction industry utilizes large volume of fine aggregate in all the applications which has resulted into shortage of good quality naturally available fine aggregate. Use of granular slag serves two fold purposes, i.e. waste utilisation as well as alternative eco-friendly green building material for construction. The investigation highlights comparative study of properties with partial and full replacement of fine aggregate (natural sand) by granular slag in cement mortar applications (masonry and plastering). For this purpose, cement mortar mix proportions from 1:3, 1:4, 1:5 & 1:6 by volume were selected for 0, 25, 50, 75 & 100% replacement levels with w/c ratios of 0.60, 0.65, 0.70 & 0.72 respectively. Based on the study results, it could be inferred that replacement of natural sand with granular slag from 25 to 75% increased the packing density of mortar which resulted into reduced w/c ratio, increased strength properties of all mortar mixes. Hence, it could be recommended that the granular slag could be effectively utilized as fine aggregate in masonry and plastering applications in place of conventional cement mortar mixes using natural sand.

  20. Flu Season Starting to Peak

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162917.html Flu Season Starting to Peak More severe strain of ... 6, 2017 FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Flu season is in full swing and it's starting ...

  1. Alternative security

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview.

  2. Involving Parents in Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leik, Robert K.; Chalkley, Mary Anne

    1989-01-01

    The Head Start Family Impact Project involved a one-year study of 81 single mothers and their children from the Hennepin County Head Start Program. This program was planned to test the notion that parent-child interaction in the context of Head Start would be the most beneficial form of parental involvement. An assessment session, which measured…

  3. Yes, Head Start Improves Reading!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Janet J.

    This study evaluated the effect of a Head Start program on children's intelligence and reading achievement test scores over a three year period. Each of 25 Head Start children was paired with a non-Head Start child of the same reace, sex, age, socioeconomic status, date of school entrance, kindergarten experience, promotion record, and type of…

  4. Assessment of Readability and Learning of Easy-to-Read Educational Health Materials Designed and Written with the Help of Citizens by Means of Two Non-Alternative Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daghio, M. Monica; Fattori, Giuseppe; Ciardullo, Anna V.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: We compared two non-alternative methods to assess the readability and learning of easy-to-read educational health materials co-written by physicians, educators and citizens. Methods: Data from seven easy-to-read materials were analyzed. Readability formulae, and ad hoc data on readability and learning were also computed. Results: The…

  5. Signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop measurement for crack detection of conductive substrate with tunable coating materials through finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep Rao, Simha; Liu, Ming; Peng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Huijuan

    2016-12-01

    We adopt a finite element numerical modeling approach to investigate the electromagnetic coupling effect of two parallel electric conductors with tunable electric conductivity σ and magnetic permeability μ. For two parallel conductors C and S (μ C   ṡ  σ C   ≤  μ S   ṡ  σ S), we find that the shape of current density profile of conductor S is dependent on the product of μ C   ṡ  σ C, while the magnitude is determined by the AC current frequency f. On the other hand, the frequency f affects not only the shape but also the magnitude of the current density profile of conductor C. We further adopt a coplanar model to investigate the signal sensitivity of alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement for both surface crack and inner crack detection. We find that with modified coating materials (lower electric conductivity and higher magnetic permeability, compared with the substrate material properties), the crack detection signal sensitivity can be greatly enhanced for both the cracks within the coating and at the coating/substrate interface, where cracks are most commonly encountered in real situations.

  6. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  7. Immediate start of hormonal contraceptives for contraception.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Laureen M; Newmann, Sara J; Grimes, David A; Nanda, Kavita; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2012-12-12

    Health care providers often tell women to wait until the next menses to begin hormonal contraception. The intent is to avoid contraceptive use during an undetected pregnancy. An alternative is to start hormonal contraception immediately with back-up birth control for the first seven days. Immediate initiation was introduced with combined oral contraceptives (COCs), and has expanded to other hormonal contraceptives. At the time of the initial review, how immediate start compared to conventional menses-dependent start was unclear regarding effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. The immediate-start approach may improve women's access to, and continuation of, hormonal contraception. This review examined randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of immediate-start hormonal contraception for differences in effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. In August 2012, we searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP for trials of immediate-start hormonal contraceptives. We contacted researchers to find other studies. Earlier searches also included EMBASE. We included RCTs that compared immediate start to conventional start of hormonal contraception. Also included were trials that compared immediate start of different hormonal contraceptive methods with each other. Data were abstracted by two authors and entered into RevMan. The Peto odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Five studies were included. No new eligible studies have been found since the review was initially conducted. Method discontinuation was similar between groups in all trials. Bleeding patterns and side effects were similar in trials that compared immediate with conventional start. In a study of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), immediate start of DMPA showed fewer pregnancies than a 'bridge' method before DMPA (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.84). Further, more women in the immediate-DMPA group were very satisfied versus those with a 'bridge

  8. Argus II retinal prosthesis implantation with scleral flap and autogenous temporalis fascia as alternative patch graft material: a 4-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Matet, Alexandre; Amar, Nawel; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Barale, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Argus II retinal prosthesis is composed of an epiretinal electrode array positioned over the macula and connected to an extrascleral electronics case via a silicone cable, running through a sclerotomy. During implantation, the manufacturer recommends to cover the sclerotomy site with a patch of processed human pericardium to prevent postoperative hypotony and conjunctival erosion by the underlying electronics case. Due to biomedical regulations prohibiting the use of this material in France, we developed an alternative technique combining a scleral flap protecting the sclerotomy and an autogenous graft of superior temporalis fascia overlying the electronics case. Methods The purpose of this study is to describe the 4-year outcomes of this modified procedure in three subjects who underwent Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System implantation. Clinical data consisting of intraocular pressure measurements and tolerance in terms of conjunctival erosion or inflammation were retrospectively assessed over a 4-year postoperative follow-up. Results None of the three patients implanted with the modified technique developed ocular hypotony over 4 years. A normal, transient conjunctival inflammation occurred during the first postoperative month but conjunctival erosion was not observed in any of the three patients over 4 years. Four years after implantation, the autogenous temporalis fascia graft remained well tolerated and the retinal prosthesis was functional in all three patients. Conclusion The combination of an autograft of superficial temporalis fascia and a scleral flap efficiently prevented leakage through the sclerotomy site, ocular hypotony, and conjunctival erosion by the extrascleral electronics case. This modified technique is suitable for the implantation of existing and forthcoming retinal prostheses. Superficial temporalis fascia may also be used as alternative to commercial tectonic tissues for scleral wound repair in clinical settings where they

  9. Argus II retinal prosthesis implantation with scleral flap and autogenous temporalis fascia as alternative patch graft material: a 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Matet, Alexandre; Amar, Nawel; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Barale, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Argus II retinal prosthesis is composed of an epiretinal electrode array positioned over the macula and connected to an extrascleral electronics case via a silicone cable, running through a sclerotomy. During implantation, the manufacturer recommends to cover the sclerotomy site with a patch of processed human pericardium to prevent postoperative hypotony and conjunctival erosion by the underlying electronics case. Due to biomedical regulations prohibiting the use of this material in France, we developed an alternative technique combining a scleral flap protecting the sclerotomy and an autogenous graft of superior temporalis fascia overlying the electronics case. The purpose of this study is to describe the 4-year outcomes of this modified procedure in three subjects who underwent Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System implantation. Clinical data consisting of intraocular pressure measurements and tolerance in terms of conjunctival erosion or inflammation were retrospectively assessed over a 4-year postoperative follow-up. None of the three patients implanted with the modified technique developed ocular hypotony over 4 years. A normal, transient conjunctival inflammation occurred during the first postoperative month but conjunctival erosion was not observed in any of the three patients over 4 years. Four years after implantation, the autogenous temporalis fascia graft remained well tolerated and the retinal prosthesis was functional in all three patients. The combination of an autograft of superficial temporalis fascia and a scleral flap efficiently prevented leakage through the sclerotomy site, ocular hypotony, and conjunctival erosion by the extrascleral electronics case. This modified technique is suitable for the implantation of existing and forthcoming retinal prostheses. Superficial temporalis fascia may also be used as alternative to commercial tectonic tissues for scleral wound repair in clinical settings where they are not available.

  10. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  11. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes as alternative reversed-dispersive solid phase extraction materials in pesticide multi-residue analysis with QuEChERS method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengyue; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Fengzu; Kang, Shu; Pan, Canping

    2012-02-17

    A multi-residue method based on modified QuEChERS sample preparation with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reversed-dispersive solid phase extraction (r-DSPE) material and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination by selected ion monitoring (GC/MS-SIM) mode was validated on 30 representative pesticides residues in vegetables and fruits. The acetonitrile-based QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) sample preparation technique was used to obtain the extracts, and the further cleanup was carried out by applying r-DSPE. It was found that the amount of MWCNTs influenced the cleanup performance and the recoveries. The optimal amount of 10mg MWCNTs was suitable for cleaning up all selected matrices, as a suitable alternative r-DSPE material to primary secondary amine (PSA). This method was validated on cabbage, spinach, grape and orange spiked at concentration levels of 0.02 and 0.2 mg/kg. The recoveries of 30 pesticides were in the range of 71-110%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) lower than 15%. Matrix effects were observed by comparing the slope of matrix-matched standard calibration with that of solvent. Good linearity was achieved at the concentration levels of 0.02-0.5 mg/L. The limits of quantification (LOQs) and the limits of detection (LODs) for 30 pesticides ranged from 0.003 to 0.05 mg/kg and 0.001 to 0.02 mg/kg at the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 10 and 3, respectively. The method was successfully applied to analysis real samples in Beijing. In conclusion, the modified QuEChERS method with MWCNTs cleanup step showed reliable method validation performances and good cleanup effects in this study.

  12. How To Start a Prep Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Jesse D.

    1998-04-01

    At City College, we follow our mother institution, the University of California at Berkeley, in that we require high school physics as a prerequisite for general college physics and then provide a one-semester prep physics course as an alternative to meet this prerequisite. Many people have asked me how they can start such a course. In traveling about on my sabbatical, doing Physics Of Magic (1) at various schools, I have observed how various schools implement this prerequisite course. I will discuss my observations.

  13. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  14. Maine: Early Head Start Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Maine has two initiatives that build on Early Head Start (EHS). The first initiative, Fund for a Healthy Maine, has since 2001 provided tobacco settlement money to existing Head Start and EHS programs to expand the number of children who receive full-day, full-year services. Local programs have the option of using these funds for EHS, depending on…

  15. Head Start Nutrition Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montclair State Coll., Upper Montclair, NJ.

    This multidisciplinary preschool nutrition education curriculum was written for use in the instruction of 3- to 5-year-olds in the National Head Start program. Introductory notes on cooking experiences for Head Start children and suggested menus for young children are followed by nine units. The curriculum incorporates a variety of teaching…

  16. State Funding of Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Legislature, Boise. Office of Performance Evaluation.

    This background paper details Head Start, a federally funded program serving preschool age children from low-income families, and focuses on the program's effectiveness and the adequacy of historic federal funding levels. The paper provides an overview of the Head Start Program, describes federal requirements for local programs, and describes Head…

  17. Calcium carbonate precipitation by strain Bacillus licheniformis AK01, newly isolated from loamy soil: a promising alternative for sealing cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Ali; Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Vali, Hojatollah; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2015-01-01

    The relevant experiments were designed to determine the ability of indigenous bacterial strains isolated from limestone caves, mineral springs, and loamy soils to induce calcium carbonate precipitation. Among all isolates examined in this study, an efficient carbonate-precipitating soil bacterium was selected from among the isolates and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences as Bacillus licheniformis AK01. The ureolytic isolate was able to grow well on alkaline carbonate-precipitation medium and precipitate calcium carbonate more than 1 g L(-1). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) examinations were performed in order to confirm the presence of calcium carbonate in the precipitate and to determine which polymorphs were present. The selected isolate was determined to be an appropriate candidate for application in a surface treatment of cement-based material to improve the properties of the mortar. Biodeposition of a layer of calcite on the surface of cement specimens resulted in filling in pore spaces. This could be an alternative method to improve the durability of the mortar. The kind of bacterial culture and medium composition had a profound impact on the resultant CaCO(3) crystal morphology. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Structural and thermoelectric properties of pure and La, Y doped HoMnO3 for their use as alternative energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Banaras; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Razghandi, N.; Maqbool, M.; Jalali Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-02-01

    HoMnO3 and its La and Y doped compounds Ho0.67La0.33MnO3 and Ho0.67Y 0.33MnO3 are investigated for their structural and thermoelectric transport properties. Small bandgaps of these compounds, as investigated by first principles calculations, make them suitable for application in thermoelectric devices. It is found that the bandgap of pure HoMnO3 increases with La and Y dopants. Thermoelectric parameters such as Seebeck coefficient, electric conductivity and thermal conductivity are calculated and their dependences on chemical potential are reported. Electrical conductivity is found to be of the order of 1020 1/m Ω s, and thermal conductivity of the order of 1015 W/mKs for all these alloys. HoMnO3 in pure form and in the presence of La and Y dopants is very suitable for thermoelectric devices and as alternative energy materials.

  19. Low-cost solid FeS lubricant as a possible alternative to MoS2 for producing Fe-based friction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tao; Yan, Qing-zhi; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Xiao-jiao; Ba, Ming-yang

    2017-01-01

    Three reaction systems of MoS2-Fe, FeS-Fe, and FeS-Fe-Mo were designed to investigate the use of FeS as an alternative to MoS2 for producing Fe-based friction materials. Samples were prepared by powder metallurgy, and their phase compositions, microstructures, mechanical properties, and friction performance were characterized. The results showed that MoS2 reacts with the matrix to produce iron-sulfides and Mo when sintered at 1050°C. Iron-sulfides produced in the MoS2-Fe system were distributed uniformly and continuously in the matrix, leading to optimal mechanical properties and the lowest coefficient of friction among the systems studied. The lubricity observed was hypothesized to originate from the iron-sulfides produced. The FeS-Fe-Mo system showed a phase composition, porosity, and density similar to those of the MoS2-Fe system, but an uneven distribution of iron-sulfides and Mo in this system resulted in less-optimal mechanical properties. Finally, the FeS-Fe system showed the poorest mechanical properties among the systems studied because of the lack of Mo reinforcement. In friction tests, the formation of a sulfide layer contributed to a decrease in coefficient of friction (COF) in all of the samples.

  20. Hydrazine engine start system air start performance and controls sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.T.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine has been used as an energy source in many applications to fuel in-flight main engine starting. In a current application, an existing hydrazine engine start system (ESS) design was adapted to meet new fuel control requirements. This paper presents a brief system description, historical context, and the motivating factors for the hydrazine controls changes and three case studies of controls design and analysis from the ESS program. 4 refs.

  1. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  2. Synthesis of Functionalized Cinnamaldehyde Derivatives by an Oxidative Heck Reaction and Their Use as Starting Materials for Preparation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 1-Deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate Reductoisomerase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde derivatives were synthesized in good to excellent yields in one step by a mild and selective, base-free palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative Heck reaction starting from acrolein and various arylboronic acids. Prepared α,β-unsaturated aldehydes were used for synthesis of novel α-aryl substituted fosmidomycin analogues, which were evaluated for their inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase. IC50 values between 0.8 and 27.3 μM were measured. The best compound showed activity comparable to that of the most potent previously reported α-aryl substituted fosmidomycin-class inhibitor. PMID:21936546

  3. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  4. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  5. A comparison of soft start mechanisms for mining belt conveyors

    SciTech Connect

    Nave, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Belt Conveyors are an important method for transportation of bulk material in the mining industry. The control of the application of the starting torque from the belt drive system to the belt fabric effects the performance, life cost, and reliability of the conveyor. This paper examines application of each starting method within the coal mining industry.

  6. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  7. Exercise starts and ends in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Bengt

    2003-10-01

    Classically the limit to endurance of exercise is explained in terms of metabolic capacity. Cardio-respiratory capacity and muscle fatigue are thought to set the limit and the majority of studies on factors limiting endurance exercise discuss issues such as maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), aerobic enzyme capacity, cardiac output, glycogen stores, etc. However, this paradigm does not explain the limitation to endurance exercise with large muscle groups at altitude, when at exhaustion exercise is ended without limb locomotor muscle fatigue and with sub-maximal cardiac output. A simple fact provides a basis for an explanation. Voluntary exercise starts and ends in the brain. It starts with spatial and temporal recruitment of motor units and ends with their de-recruitment. A conscious decision precedes a voluntary effort. The end of effort is again volitional and a forced conscious decision to stop precedes it, but it is unknown what forces the off-switch of recruitment at exhaustion although sensation of exertion certainly plays a role. An alternative model explaining the limitation of exercise endurance thus proposes that the central nervous system integrates input from various sources all related to the exercise and limits the intensity and duration of recruitment of limb skeletal muscle to prevent jeopardizing the integrity of the organism. This model acknowledges the cardio-respiratory and muscle metabolic capacities as prime actors on the performance scene, while crediting the central nervous system for its pivotal role as the ultimate site where exercise starts and ends.

  8. Alternative strategies: a better alternative.

    PubMed

    Doody, Dennis

    2010-05-01

    Alternatives can be defined as being any financial asset other than traditional stocks and bonds. They include marketable alternatives, private capital, and equity real estate. There are two primary reasons for investing in alternatives: the potential for greater return and the opportunity to diversify a portfolio. Although alternatives were challenged in the highly volatile environment that existed in 2008 and early 2009, they generally lived up to expectations.

  9. Dynamic usage of transcription start sites within core promoters

    PubMed Central

    Kawaji, Hideya; Frith, Martin C; Katayama, Shintaro; Sandelin, Albin; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2006-01-01

    Background Mammalian promoters do not initiate transcription at single, well defined base pairs, but rather at multiple, alternative start sites spread across a region. We previously characterized the static structures of transcription start site usage within promoters at the base pair level, based on large-scale sequencing of transcript 5' ends. Results In the present study we begin to explore the internal dynamics of mammalian promoters, and demonstrate that start site selection within many mouse core promoters varies among tissues. We also show that this dynamic usage of start sites is associated with CpG islands, broad and multimodal promoter structures, and imprinting. Conclusion Our results reveal a new level of biologic complexity within promoters - fine-scale regulation of transcription starting events at the base pair level. These events are likely to be related to epigenetic transcriptional regulation. PMID:17156492

  10. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Richard W.; Nieman, G. William; Weertman, Julia R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  11. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  12. Alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a review, of the experiences of Brazil, Canada, and New Zealand, which have implemented programs to encourage the use of alternative motor fuels. It will also discuss the results of a separate completed review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) progress in implementing the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. The act calls for, among other things, the federal government to use alternative-fueled vehicles in its fleet. The Persian Gulf War, environmental concerns, and the administration's National Energy Strategy have greatly heightened interest in the use of alternative fuels in this country.

  13. Bilingual/Multicultural Early Childhood Education: Proceedings of Head Start Regional Conferences, 1978-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Kenneth A.; Arenas, Soledad

    This summary of the presentation given at four Head Start Regional Bilingual/Multicultural Conferences consists of materials related to the Head Start Strategy for Spanish-speaking Children. Keynote addresses focus on Head Start policy implications, the future of Head Start in the 1980s, and the relation of bilingual/bicultural programs to the…

  14. Head Start Planned Variation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jenny

    There is little agreement concerning which methods of preschool intervention are most effective. In order to evaluate several approaches to early childhood education, Project Head Start, in conjunction with Project Follow Through, has initiated the Planned Variation program. This year only a pilot project is underway with eight schools…

  15. Employment Obtaining and Business Starting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Jian

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of business starting education in higher vocational colleges is of important and realistic meanings for cultivating advanced technology application-type talents and for releasing the employment obtaining pressure of higher vocational students. Based on the analysis on the employment situation of higher vocational graduates, this…

  16. Near Field of Starting Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Gharib, M.; Dabiri, D.

    1997-11-01

    Although steady jets and plumes have been studied extensively in the past, there is relatively little known about the initial stages of starting buoyant jets. The present investigation examined buoyancy-driven flows resulting from cylindrical containers w ith length to diameter ratios (L/D) between 2 and 13. Density ratios up to ten percent were utilized. A technique was developed to release the column of buoyant fluid with minimal disturbance during the discharge. Our observations indicate that the majori ty of the released fluid gets entrained into the starting vortex ring for L/D < 4. Longer columns result in a jet trailing behind the starting vortex. In all cases, the starting vortex ring becomes unstable as a result of the baroclinic torque generation around its perimeter, and disintegrates into a turbulent mass within the first 5 diameters. This fluid mass then gets reorganized into a larger, more diffuse thermal. The thermal formation occurs closer to the source as the length to diameter ratio of th e buoyant column gets smaller. The temporal evolution of the circulation associated with the buoyant fluid, which was derived from the digital particle image velocimetry technique, will be presented.

  17. Rigor Made Easy: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Bestselling author and noted rigor expert Barbara Blackburn shares the secrets to getting started, maintaining momentum, and reaching your goals. Learn what rigor looks like in the classroom, understand what it means for your students, and get the keys to successful implementation. Learn how to use rigor to raise expectations, provide appropriate…

  18. Rigor Made Easy: Getting Started

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Bestselling author and noted rigor expert Barbara Blackburn shares the secrets to getting started, maintaining momentum, and reaching your goals. Learn what rigor looks like in the classroom, understand what it means for your students, and get the keys to successful implementation. Learn how to use rigor to raise expectations, provide appropriate…

  19. Head Start Families Sharing Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Connie R.; Halsall, Sharen W.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to ascertain the types of books read by Head Start families to their children, conditions for reading aloud at home, perceived benefits of reading aloud, and children's responses to books. Data were collected from parent interviews and reading logs. Participants included 14 children and families from four Head…

  20. Multiple Perspectives on Starting Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lilian G.

    This paper addresses multiple perspectives on the quality of early childhood care and education, including lessons learned from programs in various countries, the implications of these perspectives, and recommendations for the improvement of early childhood provision. It also examines the ideas expressed in the 1994 "Start Right" report on early…

  1. Kids Get a Smart Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1996-01-01

    Under the Smart Start program, 19 of North Carolina's Appalachian counties have qualified for competitive state funding to improve community services to young children and their families. Programs tailored to local needs provide subsidized child care to children of working parents, preventive health screenings, literacy and high school equivalency…

  2. Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This curriculum for Head Start programs provides preschool learning experiences that teach about dental health. The majority of the curriculum guide is devoted to the following lesson plans: (1) "Introduction of 'Smiley the Super Pup'," an optional puppet character which may be used to review the concepts covered in each lesson; (2)…

  3. Off to a Good Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1994-01-01

    Caring Start is a mobile-clinic program that provides prenatal care, well-baby clinics, childhood immunizations, counseling services, and contraceptives to rural poor families in northwest Pennsylvania. Before the mobile clinic, many rural women (mostly teenagers) went without prenatal health care due to lack of transportation. (LP)

  4. Start Where Your Students Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Robyn R.

    2010-01-01

    Starting where your students are means understanding how currencies are negotiated and traded in the classroom. Any behavior that students use to acquire the knowledge and skills needed in the classroom functions as currency. Teachers communicate the kinds of currencies they accept in their classrooms, such as getting good grades; students do…

  5. Regional Applied Research Effort Project (RARE) with Region 8 - Beneficial Use of Red and Brown Mud and Phosphogypsum as Alternative Construction Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Red and brown muds are the secondary materials generated from the extraction of alumina from bauxite, an aluminum-containing sedimentary rock (Ref. 2). Phosphogypsum is the secondary material generated by the phosphorous fertilizer industry from phosphate-containing sedimentary ...

  6. Regional Applied Research Effort Project (RARE) with Region 8 - Beneficial Use of Red and Brown Mud and Phosphogypsum as Alternative Construction Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Red and brown muds are the secondary materials generated from the extraction of alumina from bauxite, an aluminum-containing sedimentary rock (Ref. 2). Phosphogypsum is the secondary material generated by the phosphorous fertilizer industry from phosphate-containing sedimentary ...

  7. Organic-inorganic hybrid materials starting from the novel nanoscaled bismuth oxido methacrylate cluster [Bi38O45(OMc)24(DMSO)9]·2DMSO·7H2O.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Linda; Rüffer, Tobias; Mehring, Michael

    2011-06-14

    The reaction of the basic bismuth nitrate [Bi(6)O(4)(OH)(4)](NO(3))(6)·H(2)O with sodium methacrylate in DMSO gave [Bi(38)O(45)(OMc)(24)(DMSO)(9)]·2DMSO·7H(2)O (OMc = O(2)CC(3)H(5)), which is highly soluble in organic solvents. By copolymerization of the bismuth oxido cluster with methyl methacrylate transparent, radiopaque organic-inorganic hybrid materials were obtained. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  8. Recycling biosolids and lake-dredged materials to pasture-based animal agriculture: Alternative nutrient sources for forage productivity and sustainability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic sewage sludge or biosolids and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling and influencing the quantity, quality and chara...

  9. Alternative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefonek, Tom; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This special double issue focuses on the issue of alternative assessment and its place in educational reform. "Alternative Assessment: A National Perspective" (T. Stefonek) emphasizes that the fundamental purposes of new assessment methods are grounded in educational goals, meaningful outcomes, and curricular and instructional programs…

  10. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annett, Larry D.

    A model is presented for the categorizing of alternative schools, then the nature of the free school, which represents the essence of the alternative school movement, is examined. Strengths and weaknesses of court, legislative, and administrative approaches to resolve governance issues are set forth. This is followed by an analysis of three…

  11. Pleasant Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unks, Gerald

    1981-01-01

    The author feels that the current wave of political conservatism may prove beneficial to education if the national mood of decentralization and decontrol leads to a resurgence of community involvement and locally-developed alternatives. He cites several examples of successful urban alternative schools. (SJL)

  12. The GlueX Start Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooser, Eric; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The GlueX experiment will study meson photoproduction with unprecedented precision. This experiment will use the coherent bremsstrahlung technique to produce a 9 GeV linearly polarized photon beam incident on a liquid H2 target. A Start Counter detector has been fabricated to identify the accelerator electron beam buckets, approximately 2 ns apart, and to provide accurate timing information which is used in the level-1 trigger of the experiment. This detector is designed to operate at photon intensities of up to 108 γ / s in the coherent peak and provide a timing resolution < 350 ps so as to provide successful identification of the electron beam buckets to within 99 % accuracy. Furthermore, the Start Counter detector will provide excellent solid angle coverage, ~ 90 % of 4 π hermeticity , and a high degree of segmentation for background rejection. It consists of a cylindrical array of 30 scintillators with pointed ends that bend towards the beam at the downstream end. Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) detectors have been selected as the readout system. The physical properties of the Start Counter have been studied extensively. The results of theses studies are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, and Office of Nuclear Physics under Contracts DE-AC05-06OR23177 & DE-FG02-99ER41065.

  13. The GlueX Start Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooser, Eric; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The GlueX experiment will study meson photoproduction with unprecedented precision. This experiment will use the coherent bremsstrahlung technique to produce a 9 GeV linearly polarized photon beam incident on a liquid H2 target. A Start Counter detector has been fabricated to identify the accelerator electron beam buckets, approximately 2 ns apart, and to provide accurate timing information which is used in the level-1 trigger of the experiment. This detector is designed to operate at photon intensities of up to 108 γ / s in the coherent peak and provide a timing resolution < 350ps so as to provide successful identification of the electron beam buckets to within 99 % accuracy. Furthermore, the Start Counter detector will provide excellent solid angle coverage, ~ 90 % of 4 π hermeticity , and a high degree of segmentation for background rejection. It consists of a cylindrical array of 30 scintillators with pointed ends that bend towards the beam at the downstream end. Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) detectors have been selected as the readout system. The physical properties of the Start Counter have been studied extensively. The results of theses studies are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contracts DE-AC05-06OR23177 & DE-FG02-99ER41065.

  14. School start times for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes insufficient sleep in adolescents as an important public health issue that significantly affects the health and safety, as well as the academic success, of our nation's middle and high school students. Although a number of factors, including biological changes in sleep associated with puberty, lifestyle choices, and academic demands, negatively affect middle and high school students' ability to obtain sufficient sleep, the evidence strongly implicates earlier school start times (ie, before 8:30 am) as a key modifiable contributor to insufficient sleep, as well as circadian rhythm disruption, in this population. Furthermore, a substantial body of research has now demonstrated that delaying school start times is an effective countermeasure to chronic sleep loss and has a wide range of potential benefits to students with regard to physical and mental health, safety, and academic achievement. The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly supports the efforts of school districts to optimize sleep in students and urges high schools and middle schools to aim for start times that allow students the opportunity to achieve optimal levels of sleep (8.5-9.5 hours) and to improve physical (eg, reduced obesity risk) and mental (eg, lower rates of depression) health, safety (eg, drowsy driving crashes), academic performance, and quality of life.

  15. Starting apparatus for internal combustion engines

    DOEpatents

    Dyches, G.M.; Dudar, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report is a patent description for a system to start an internal combustion engine. Remote starting and starting by hearing impaired persons are addressed. The system monitors the amount of current being drawn by the starter motor to determine when the engine is started. When the engine is started the system automatically deactivates the starter motor. Five figures are included.

  16. Head Start Impact Study: First Year Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Lopez, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Congressionally-mandated Head Start Impact Study is being conducted across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies. Approximately 5,000 newly entering 3- and 4-year-old children applying for Head Start were randomly assigned to either a Head Start group that had access to Head Start program services or to a non-Head Start group…

  17. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 3: Energy conversion subsystems and components. Part 1: Bottoming cycles and materials of construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. P.; Solomon, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Energy conversion subsystems and components were evaluated in terms of advanced energy conversion systems. Results of the bottoming cycles and materials of construction studies are presented and discussed.

  18. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Stanley; Kimsey, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of the DeKalb Alternative School in Atlanta, Georgia, located in a renovated shopping center. Purchasing commercial land and renovating the existing building saved the school system time and money. (EV)

  19. Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids and Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids and Milk KidsHealth > For Parents > Formula Feeding FAQs: Starting Solids ... When can I start giving my baby cow's milk? Before their first birthday, babies still need the ...

  20. 48 CFR 252.216-7002 - Alternate A, Time-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements-Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price Competition... Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate Price Competition. As prescribed in 216.601(e...-and-Materials/Labor-Hour Proposal Requirements—Non-Commercial Item Acquisition With Adequate...

  1. Quantifying Variation in Head Start Effects on Young Children's Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Skills Using Data from the National Head Start Impact Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Howard S.; Weiland, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), a nationally representative multisite randomized trial, to quantify variation in effects of Head Start during 2002-2003 on children's cognitive and socio-emotional outcomes relative to the effects of other local alternatives, including parent care. We find that (1) treatment and control…

  2. ORC proteins: marking the start.

    PubMed

    Wigley, Dale B

    2009-02-01

    The DNA replication apparatus of archaea is more closely related to that of eukaryotes than eubacteria. Furthermore, recent work has shown that archaea, like eukaryotes, have multiple replication origins. Biochemical data are starting to reveal how archaeal origin binding proteins recognise and remodel origin DNA sequences. Crystal structures of archaeal replication origin binding proteins complexed with their DNA targets revealed details of how they interact with origins and showed that they introduce significant deformations of the DNA. Although these recent advances provide insight about the initial interactions of proteins at archaeal replication origins, the molecular mechanisms of origin assembly and firing still remain elusive.

  3. Getting started with electronic mail.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vuren, D D; Johnson, D E

    1985-01-01

    This paper gives suggestions to librarians on how to get started with electronic mail. It discusses the cost- and time-saving advantages of using electronic mail rather than TWX, United States mail, or telephones for communicating ILL requests and messages. For instance, preliminary cost data show that electronic mail is often half as expensive as TWX and costs no more than a 22 stamp. Key management concerns that must be considered when setting up electronic mail are discussed, including the need for subscribers to agree on one system. Also covered are the types of equipment that can be used with electronic mail, including print terminals. PMID:4027444

  4. Seal design alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sambeek, L.L.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

  5. Metallurgy: Starting and stopping dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Andrew M.

    2015-09-01

    A comparison of dislocation dynamics in two hexagonal close-packed metals has revealed that dislocation movement can vary substantially in materials with the same crystal structure, associated with how the dislocations relax when stationary.

  6. Investigations about Starting Cracks in DC Casting of 6063 Type Billets. Part I: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, W.; Jensen, E. K.

    Influence on starting crack tendency (hot cracks in billet center) of varying a number of casting parameters was studied by experiments (Part I) and by model calculations (Part II). Effects of varying the following factors were examined in detail: casting conditions, starting block material, insulating various parts of the starting block, starting block shape. Both experiments and calculations pointed to starting block shape as a most important single factor controlling starting cracks. By using the in experiments determined and calculated depth of the liquid sump as a criterion, a proper shape was found that practically eliminates the starting crack problems in billets of the AA 606 3 type alloys.

  7. Starting a nursing consultation practice.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    Because the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role has been changed or eliminated in many hospital organizations, many CNSs in career transition are considering establishing collaborative or independent nursing consultation practices. Opportunities for consultants exist in diverse practice settings and specialties. Before starting a consultation practice, the CNS should carefully examine goals, identify resources, and begin contacting potential referral sources. He or she must also decide what form of business organization to establish and write a business plan to solidify ideas and prepare for the unexpected. Most CNS consultants rely on personal savings to cover initial business and personal expenses, and many continue working as a CNS until the consultation practice is established. Fees can be set based on community standards, what the market will bear, desired projected income, or a third-party payor's fee schedule. The consultation practice can be marketed by word of mouth, inexpensive advertising techniques such as distributing flyers and business cards, direct mall, and media advertising. In today's healthcare marketplace, opportunities abound for the CNS risk-taker interested in starting a nursing consultation practice.

  8. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  9. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 2: Materials considerations. [materials used in boilers and heat exchangers of energy conversion systems for electric power plants using coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Extensive studies are presented which were carried out on materials behavior in nine advanced energy conversion systems employing coal and coal-derived fuels. The areas of materials behavior receiving particular attention in this regard are: (1) fireside corrosion and erosion in boiler and heat exchanger materials, (2) oxidation and hot corrosion of gas turbine materials, (3) liquid metal corrosion and mass transport, (4) high temperature steam corrosion, (5) compatability of materials with coal slag and MHD seed, (6) reaction of materials with impure helium, (7) allowable stresses for boiler and heat exchanger materials, (8) environmental effects on mechanical properties, and (9) liquid metal purity control and instrumentation. Such information was then utilized in recommending materials for use in the critical components of the power systems, and at the same time to identify materials problem areas and to evaluate qualitatively the difficulty of solving those problems. Specific materials recommendations for critical components of the nine advanced systems under study are contained in summary tables.

  10. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a ``state routing agency,`` defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  11. State alternative route designations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select alternative routes. First,the state must establish a state routing agency,'' defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice of DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective.

  12. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  13. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1913 - Starting aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Starting aids. 75.1913 Section 75.1913 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment § 75.1913 Starting aids. (a) Volatile fuel starting aids shall be used in accordance with recommendations provided by the starting...

  18. The Home Start Demonstration Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of the Home Start program and its evaluation plan, the 16 Office of Child Development-funded Home Start projects in the United States are described. Home start is a 3-year Head Start demonstration program, aimed at the 3-5 years of age range, which focuses on enhancing the quality of children's lives by building upon…

  19. How to Start Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ghanaati, Hossein; Firouznia, Kavous; Jalali, Amir Hossein; Shakiba, Madjid

    2013-01-01

    Interventional techniques aim to find safer and better ways to treat vascular diseases even in many instances, the interventional radiology solutions has been considered the only treatment option for the patients. Interventional radiologists are specialists who perform minimally invasive procedures instead of surgery or other treatments. These procedures apply various imaging and catheterization procedures in order to diagnose and treat diseases. In each country, interventional radiology practice establishment of varies according to local factors, but following a standard strategy seems better to set up this facility. According to above mentioned points, we decided to establish this specialty in our hospital since 2001 as the pioneer center in Iran. In this presentation we will discuss about our experience for start interventional radiology. PMID:24693402

  20. Ingredients: where pet food starts.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Angele

    2008-08-01

    Every clinician is asked "What should I feed my pet?" Understanding the ingredients in pet food is an important part of making the best recommendation. Pet food can be as simple as one ingredient or as complicated as containing more than 60 ingredients. Pet food and its ingredients are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and state feed officials. Part of that regulation is the review and definition of ingredients. Existing ingredients change and new ingredients become available so the need for ingredient definitions grows. Ingredients for product formulations are chosen based on their nutrient content, digestibility, palatability, functionality, availability, and cost. As an example, a typical, nutritionally complete dry dog food with 42 ingredients is examined and the ingredients are discussed here. Safe, healthy pet food starts with safe ingredients sourced from well-monitored suppliers. The ultimate goal of both veterinarians and pet food manufacturers is the same--long healthy lives for dogs and cats.

  1. Starting earthquakes under horizontal action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeshko, V. A.; Evdokimova, O. V.; Babeshko, O. M.

    2017-06-01

    The vector case of the static problem for semi-infinite lithospheric plates with rectilinear boundaries parallel to each other in two states is considered. In the first case, the distance between the plate ends is different from zero; in the second case, it is zero although the plates do not interact with each other. It is assumed that the horizontal actions on the plates (which, as is well known, move very slowly) are so strong that the vertical components of contact stresses can be neglected. In this work, it is shown that, even in this case, contact stresses at the edges of approaching plates acquire singular concentrations capable of leading to starting earthquakes. It has been shown that the theoretical calculation of the consequences of such earthquakes on the Earth's surface yields a coincidence with their real consequences.

  2. Remarkable proanthocyanidin adsorption properties of monastrell pomace cell wall material highlight its potential use as an alternative fining agent in red wine production.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Marín, Fátima; Molero, Noelia; Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2015-01-21

    The existence of interactions between the polysaccharides of vegetal cell walls and proanthocyanins makes this cell wall material an interesting option for its use as a fining agent to reduce the level of proanthocyanins in wines. Pomace wastes from the winery are widely available and a source of cell wall material, and the identification of varieties whose pomace cell walls present high proanthocyanin binding capacity and of processing methods that could enhance their adsorption properties could be of great interest. This study compared the proanthocyanin adsorption properties of pomace cell wall material from three different grape varieties (Monastrell, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah), and the results were compared with those obtained using fresh grape cell walls. Also, the effect of the vinification method has been studied. Analysis of the proanthocyanidins in the solution after reaction with the cell wall material, using phloroglucinolysis and size exclusion chromatography, provided quantitative and qualitative information on the adsorbed and nonadsorbed compounds. A highlight of this study was the observation that Monastrell pomace cell wall material showed a strong affinity for proanthocyanidins, with values similar to that obtained for fresh grapes cell walls, and a preferential binding of high molecular mass proanthocyanidins, so these pomace cell walls could be used in wines to reduce astringency. The use of maceration enzymes during vinification had little effect on the retention capacity of the pomace cell walls obtained from this vinification, although an increase in the retention of low molecular mass proanthocyanidins was observed, and this might have implications for wine sensory properties.

  3. Summary report of the screening process to determine reasonable alternatives for long-term storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-29

    Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials (primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium) have become surplus to national defense needs both in the US and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety and health consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. As announced in the Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Department of Energy is currently conducting an evaluation process for disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials determined surplus to National Security needs, and long-term storage of national security and programmatic inventories, and surplus weapons-usable fissile materials that are not able to go directly from interim storage to disposition. An extensive set of long-term storage and disposition options was compiled. Five broad long-term storage options were identified; thirty-seven options were considered for plutonium disposition; nine options were considered for HEU disposition; and eight options were identified for Uranium-233 disposition. Section 2 discusses the criteria used in the screening process. Section 3 describes the options considered, and Section 4 provides a detailed summary discussions of the screening results.

  4. ALTERNATIVE OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reports on the efforts of the USEPA to study chloramines, chlorine dioxide and ozone as alternative oxidants/disinfectants to chlorine for the control of disinfection by-rpdocuts (DBPs) in drinking water. It examines the control of DBPs like trihalomethanes and haloa...

  5. Alternative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Explains how advances in diesel and alternative fuels has caused schools to reconsider their use for their bus fleets. Reductions in air pollution emissions, cost-savings developments, and the economies experienced from less downtime and maintenance requirements are explored. (GR)

  6. Alternative Conceptualizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; O'Reilly, Patricia, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains five articles devoted to the topic of "Alternative Conceptualizations" of the foundations of education. In "The Concept of Place in the New Sociology of Education," Paul Theobald examines the notion of place in educational theory and practice. Janice…

  7. Alternative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Explains how advances in diesel and alternative fuels has caused schools to reconsider their use for their bus fleets. Reductions in air pollution emissions, cost-savings developments, and the economies experienced from less downtime and maintenance requirements are explored. (GR)

  8. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  9. Getting Started in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The material-tool approach of the statewide program, Technology for Children, for grades kindergarten through six (K-6) is described in this teaching guide. This approach, which encourages a workshop-laboratory-classroom learning environment, is integrated among subject areas and is thematic in nature. The program operates under three goals: (1)…

  10. Let's Start Leveling about Leveling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasswell, Kath; Ford, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a revised way of thinking about reading levels, one that promotes a wider and more flexible view of teacher decision making about the use of leveled texts in classrooms. They share five key principles to consider when looking at the use of instruction that involves matching leveled materials with readers.…

  11. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  12. Chitosan as a starting material for wound healing applications.

    PubMed

    Patrulea, V; Ostafe, V; Borchard, G; Jordan, O

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives have attracted great attention due to their properties beneficial for application to wound healing. The main focus of the present review is to summarize studies involving chitosan and its derivatives, especially N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (TMC), N,O-carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) and O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (CMTMC), used to accelerate wound healing. Moreover, formulation strategies for chitosan and its derivatives, as well as their in vitro, in vivo and clinical applications in wound healing are described.

  13. Recent Developments in Amide Synthesis Using Nonactivated Starting Materials.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Porras, Andrea; Gamba-Sánchez, Diego

    2016-12-02

    Amides are unquestionably one of the most important functional groups in organic chemistry because of their presence in numerous interesting molecules such as peptides, pharmaceutical agents, naturally occurring molecules, proteins and alkaloids, among others. This synopsis surveys the diverse recent approaches to amide synthesis from nonactivated carboxylic acids and derivatives as well as noncarboxylic compounds, highlighting the most innovative methodologies and those that are more eco-friendly compared to traditional methods while focusing on recent developments during the past two years.

  14. Combustion of an oil palm residue with elevated potassium content in a fluidized-bed combustor using alternative bed materials for preventing bed agglomeration.

    PubMed

    Ninduangdee, Pichet; Kuprianov, Vladimir I

    2015-04-01

    Palm kernel shell (PKS) was burned at 45 kg/s and excess air of 20-80% in a fluidized-bed combustor using alumina, dolomite, and limestone as the bed material. Temperature and gas concentrations were recorded along the reactor centerline as well as at stack. A SEM-EDS analysis was performed to investigate morphology and elemental composition of bed particles. An X-ray fluorescence method was used to determine the composition of used/reused bed materials and PM emitted from the combustor at different operating times. Excess air of 40% seems to be most appropriate for burning PKS in this combustor with an alumina bed, whereas 60% excess air is more suitable when using dolomite and limestone, as ensuring high (98.6-98.9%) combustion efficiency and acceptable CO and NO emissions. By using the selected bed materials, bed agglomeration can be prevented in this combustor. However, the bed materials exhibit substantial time-domain changes in physical and chemical properties.

  15. 49 CFR Table 3 of Subpart B to... - Alternative Schedule for Application of Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) 3 Table 3 of Subpart B to Part 224... Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) (A) 1 (B)(percent) November 28, 2007 20 November 28, 2008 30 November... of an owner's freight cars specified in column (B) must be equipped with retroreflective...

  16. 49 CFR Table 3 of Subpart B to... - Alternative Schedule for Application of Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) 3 Table 3 of Subpart B to Part 224... Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) (A) 1 (B)(percent) November 28, 2007 20 November 28, 2008 30 November... of an owner's freight cars specified in column (B) must be equipped with retroreflective...

  17. 49 CFR Table 3 of Subpart B to... - Alternative Schedule for Application of Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Retroreflective Material to Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) 3 Table 3 of Subpart B to Part 224... Freight Cars per § 224.107(a)(2)(ii) (A) 1 (B)(percent) November 28, 2007 20 November 28, 2008 30 November... of an owner's freight cars specified in column (B) must be equipped with retroreflective...

  18. Alternatives. How to Avoid ID.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajan, Sivasailam

    1984-01-01

    Three alternatives to instructional development are briefly described: shifting more instructional responsibility from developer to learner; implementing an instructional system utilizing paraprofessionals, content experts, and peers; and selecting and adapting existing instructional materials. (MBR)

  19. Alternatives. How to Avoid ID.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajan, Sivasailam

    1984-01-01

    Three alternatives to instructional development are briefly described: shifting more instructional responsibility from developer to learner; implementing an instructional system utilizing paraprofessionals, content experts, and peers; and selecting and adapting existing instructional materials. (MBR)

  20. Ultrahigh frequency voltammetry: effect of electrode material and frequency of alternating potential modulation on mass transport at hot-disk microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Baranski, Andrzej S; Boika, Aliaksei

    2012-02-07

    Ultrahigh frequency voltammetry involves low scan rate voltammetric measurements with microelectrodes polarized by high-frequency large-amplitude alternating potential. The method provides a simple means for studying electrothermal and dielectrophoretic effects, which are important in micro and nanofluidic systems. The method also allows for indirect measurements of electrode impedance at gigahertz frequencies. This increases the upper frequency limit in impedance measurements about 1000 times. In this work we demonstrated, for the first time, that the effect of dielectric relaxation of water can be observed in a simple voltammetric experiment. The paper focuses on the description of electrothermal convection at ac heated disk microelectrodes as a function of frequency and provides a comparison of numerical simulations with experimental results. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Alternative diets.

    PubMed

    Berschneider, Helen M

    2002-02-01

    As pet owners become more conscious of their own diets and the impact it has on their health, they naturally become more interested in what their animal companions are eating and how that might be affecting their pet's health. Many are exploring alternatives to standard commercial pet foods, and some are asking their veterinarians for advice. Small-animal nutrition is an ever-changing field. What veterinarians were taught 10 years ago may no longer be sound advice. This article explores some of the reasoning behind the development of both conventional commercial pet foods and the alternative foods and diets. It questions some of the conventional dogma as well as some of the trendy assumptions in the current marketplace. The intent is to provide the veterinarian with some balanced information on which to base nutritional advice to clients, and to begin forming new opinions or at least asking new questions. Guidelines on formulating a homemade diet for dogs are included.

  2. Alternative Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    JP-8 BACK-UP SLIDES Unclassified 19 What Are Biofuels ? Cellulose “first generation”“second generation” C18:0 C16:1 Triglycerides (fats, oils ...equipment when supplying jet fuel not practicable or cost effective Unclassified 5 erna ve ue s ocus Petroleum Crude Oil (declining discovery / production...on Jet A/A-1 Approved fuels, DXXXX Unclassified 6 JP-8/5 (Commercial Jet Fuel, ASTM Spec) DARPA Alternative Jet Fuels • Agricultural crop oils

  3. Starting a Lung Transplant Program

    PubMed Central

    Eberlein, Michael; Geist, Lois; Keech, John; Zabner, Joseph; Gruber, Peter J.; Iannettoni, Mark D.; Parekh, Kalpaj

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is an effective therapy for many patients with end-stage lung disease. Few centers across the United States offer this therapy, as a successful lung transplant program requires significant institutional resources and specialized personnel. Analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database reveals that the failure rate of new programs exceeds 40%. These data suggest that an accurate assessment of program viability as well as a strategy to continuously assess defined quality measures is needed. As part of strategic planning, regional availability of recipient and donors should be assessed. Additionally, analysis of institutional expertise at the physician, support staff, financial, and administrative levels is necessary. In May of 2007, we started a new lung transplant program at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and have performed 101 transplants with an average recipient 1-year survival of 91%, placing our program among the top in the country for the past 5 years. Herein, we review internal and external factors that impact the viability of a new lung transplant program. We discuss the use of four prospectively identified quality measures: volume, recipient outcomes, financial solvency, and academic contribution as one approach to achieve programmatic excellence. PMID:25940255

  4. Are There Feasible Alternatives to Laboratory Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses several alternatives to the use of laboratory animals in investigating biomedical problems. Alternatives include tissue culture, use of plant and bacterial material, redesigning experiments, and construction of mathematical and computer models. (CS)

  5. Are There Feasible Alternatives to Laboratory Animals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses several alternatives to the use of laboratory animals in investigating biomedical problems. Alternatives include tissue culture, use of plant and bacterial material, redesigning experiments, and construction of mathematical and computer models. (CS)

  6. An alternative method for the treatment of waste produced at a dye and a metal-plating industry using natural and/or waste materials.

    PubMed

    Fatta, Despo; Papadopoulos, Achilleas; Stefanakis, Nikos; Loizidou, Maria; Savvides, Chrysanthos

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop cost-effective, appropriate solidification technologies for treating hazardous industrial wastes that are currently disposed of in ways that may threaten the quality of local groundwater. One major objective was to use materials other than cement, and preferably materials that are themselves wastes, as the solidification additives, namely using wastes to treat wastes or locally available natural material. This research examines the cement-based and lime-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) techniques applied for waste generated at a metal-plating industry and a dye industry. For the lime-based S/S process the following binder mixtures were used: cement kiln dust/ lime, bentonite/lime and gypsum/lime. For the cement-based S/S process three binder mixtures were used: cement kiln dust/cement, bentonite/cement and gypsum/cement. The leachability of the wastes was evaluated using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. The applicability and optimum weight ratio of the binder mixtures were estimated using the unconfined compressive strength test. The optimum ratio mixtures were mixed with waste samples in different ratios and cured for 28 days in order to find the S/S products with the highest strength and lowest leachability at the same time. The results of this work showed that the cement-and lime-based S/S process, using cement kiln dust and bentonite as additives can be effectively used in order to treat industrial waste.

  7. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River Estuary Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Report 8. Compatibility of Liner Systems with New Bedford Harbor Dredged Material Contaminants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    liner material has poor resistance, reaction with or absorption of the chemical will occur, with resulting degradation of the desirable physi- cal...liner materials (i.e., HDPE through EPDM (ethylene/propylene/diene terpolymer)) are one to two orders of magnitude better barriers to water (on a per...found to indicate that the HDPE liner lost its integrity. All visible seams appeared secure. The only evidence of liner degradation was mechanical dam

  8. Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

    2006-09-01

    Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature

  9. Spatial and spectral resolution of carbonaceous material from hematite (α-Fe2O3) using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) with Raman microspectroscopic mapping: implications for the search for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph P; Smith, Frank C; Booksh, Karl S

    2017-08-21

    The search for evidence of extant or past life on Mars is a primary objective of both the upcoming Mars 2020 rover (NASA) and ExoMars 2020 rover (ESA/Roscosmos) missions. This search will involve the detection and identification of organic molecules and/or carbonaceous material within the Martian surface environment. For the first time on a mission to Mars, the scientific payload for each rover will include a Raman spectrometer, an instrument well-suited for this search. Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is a widespread mineral on the Martian surface. The 2LO Raman band of hematite and the Raman D-band of carbonaceous material show spectral overlap, leading to the potential misidentification of hematite as carbonaceous material. Here we report the ability to spatially and spectrally differentiate carbonaceous material from hematite using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) applied to Raman microspectroscopic mapping under both 532 nm and 785 nm excitation. For this study, a sample comprised of hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy in spatially distinct domains was constructed. Principal component analysis (PCA) reveals that both 532 nm and 785 nm excitation produce representative three-phase systems of hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy in the analyzed sample. MCR-ALS with Raman microspectroscopic mapping using both 532 nm and 785 nm excitation was able to resolve hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy by generating spatially-resolved chemical maps and corresponding Raman spectra of these spatially distinct chemical species. Moreover, MCR-ALS applied to the combinatorial data sets of 532 nm and 785 nm excitation, which contain hematite and carbonaceous material within the same locations, was able to resolve hematite, carbonaceous material, and substrate-adhesive epoxy. Using multivariate analysis with Raman microspectroscopic mapping, 785 nm excitation more effectively

  10. Iodine confinement into metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-low temperature sintering glasses to form novel glass composite material (GCM) alternative waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Sava, Dorina Florentina

    2010-11-01

    The safe handling of reprocessed fuel addresses several scientific goals, especially when considering the capture and long-term storage of volatile radionuclides that are necessary during this process. Despite not being a major component of the off-gas, radioiodine (I{sub 2}) is particularly challenging, because it is a highly mobile gas and {sup 129}I is a long-lived radionuclide (1.57 x 10{sup 7} years). Therefore, its capture and sequestration is of great interest on a societal level. Herein, we explore novel routes toward the effective capture and storage of iodine. In particular, we report on the novel use of a new class of porous solid-state functional materials (metal-organic frameworks, MOFs), as high-capacity adsorbents of molecular iodine. We further describe the formation of novel glass-composite material (GCM) waste forms from the mixing and sintering of the I{sub 2}-containing MOFs with Bi-Zn-O low-temperature sintering glasses and silver metal flakes. Our findings indicate that, upon sintering, a uniform monolith is formed, with no evidence of iodine loss; iodine is sequestered during the heating process by the in situ formation of AgI. Detailed materials characterization analysis is presented for the GCMs. This includes powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), thermal analysis (thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)), and chemical durability tests including aqueous leach studies (product consistency test (PCT)), with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of the PCT leachate.

  11. Geometry and bond-length alternation in nonlinear optical materials. II. Effects of donor strength in two push-pull molecules.

    PubMed

    Gainsford, Graeme J; Bhuiyan, M Delower H; Kay, Andrew J

    2008-04-01

    The compounds N-[2-(4-cyano-5-dicyanomethylene-2,2-dimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-3-yl)vinyl]-N-phenylacetamide, C(20)H(16)N(4)O(2), (I), and 2-{3-cyano-5,5-dimethyl-4-[2-(piperidin-1-yl)vinyl]-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-ylidene}malononitrile 0.376-hydrate, C(17)H(18)N(4)O x 0.376 H(2)O, (II), are novel push-pull molecules. The significant bonding changes in the polyene chain compared with the parent molecule 2-dicyanomethylene-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihyrofuran-3-carbonitrile are consistent with the relative electron-donating properties of the acetanilido and piperidine groups. The packing of (I) utilizes one phenyl-cyano C-H...N and two phenyl-carbonyl C-H...O hydrogen bonds. Compound (II) crystallizes with a partial water molecule (0.376H(2)O), consistent with cell packing that is dominated by attractive C-H...N(cyano) interactions. These compounds are precursors to novel nonlinear optical chromophores, studied to assess the impact of donor strength and the extent of conjugation on bond-length alternation, crystal packing and aggregation.

  12. Polystyrene beads as an alternative support material for epitope identification of a prion-antibody interaction using proteolytic excision-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Tatiana; Meier, Lukas; Roschitzki, Bernd; Paraschiv, Gabriela; Przybylski, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-11-01

    The binding epitope structure of a protein specifically recognized by an antibody provides key information to prevent and treat diseases with therapeutic antibodies and to develop antibody-based diagnostics. Epitope structures of antigens can be effectively identified by the proteolytic epitope excision-mass spectrometry (MS) method, which involves (1) immobilization of monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies, e.g., on N-hydroxysuccinimide-activated sepharose, (2) affinity binding of the antigen followed by limited proteolytic digestion of the immobilized immune complex, and (3) elution and mass spectrometric analysis of the remaining affinity-bound peptide(s). In the epitope analysis of recombinant cellular bovine prion protein (bPrP(C)) to a monoclonal antibody (mAb3E7), we found that epitope excision experiments resulted in extensive nonspecific binding of bPrP to a standard sepharose matrix employed. Here, we show that the use of amino-modified polystyrene beads with aldehyde functionality is an efficient alternative support for antibody immobilization, suitable for epitope excision-MS, with complete suppression of nonspecific bPrP binding.

  13. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  14. Method for starting operation of a resistance melter

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Christopher Charles

    1977-01-01

    A method for starting the operation of a resistance furnace, where heating occurs by passing a current through the charge between two furnace electrodes and the charge is a material which is essentially electrically nonconductive when in a solid physical state but which becomes more electrically conductive when in a molten physical state, by connecting electrical resistance heating wire between the furnace electrodes, placing the wire in contact with the charge material between the electrodes and passing a current through the wire to heat the wire to a temperature sufficient to melt the material between the furnace electrodes so that as the material melts, current begins to pass between the electrodes through the melted material, further heating and melting more material until all current between the electrodes passes through the charge material without the aid or presence of the resistance element.

  15. SO YOU WANT TO START A CENTRALIZED ELEMENTARY LIBRARY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOBER, VIRGINIA

    THIS DOCUMENT PRESENTS THE NECESSARY INFORMATION FOR STARTING A CENTRALIZED ELEMENTARY LIBRARY. THE FOLLOWING ARE DISCUSSED IN DETAIL--SOURCES OF PROFESSIONAL AND NONPROFESSIONAL HELP, ORGANIZATIONS AND COMPANIES TO CONTACT FOR CATALOGS AND SUPPLIES, HOW TO SURVEY THE PHYSICAL RESOURCES AND UTILIZE THEM, TYPES OF MATERIAL FOUND IN AN ELEMENTARY…

  16. Classification and Attention Training Curricula for Head Start Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earhart, Eileen M.

    The needs and capabilities of 4-year-old Head Start children were considered in development of classification and attention training curricula, including: (1) sensory exploration through object manipulation, (2) variety of high-interest materials, (3) change of pace during the lesson, (4) presentation of learning activities as games, (5) relating…

  17. The New Youth Entrepreneur: Money To Get Started. Module 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kourilsky, Marilyn; And Others

    The New Youth Entrepreneur curriculum is a series of 12 youth-oriented educational modules containing instructional materials, learning activities, and checkup exercises designed to teach students key elements of entrepreneurship. This document is the fifth module, and introduces students to the financial issues involved in starting a business,…

  18. Steps to Starting a Small Business. Teacher Guide. Entrepreneurship Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Vocational Studies Center.

    This teacher guide provides materials for a high school course designed to acquaint students with the theory of the marketplace and the U.S. free enterprise system while allowing them to have hands-on activities that could lead them to starting a small business. A major portion of the content is delivered by community business resource persons…

  19. Sequencing Higher Eukaryotes from Ultra-Low Starting Concentrations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High Throughput Sequencing produces Gigabases of inexpensive sequence data. A limiting factor is the amount of starting material required; Illumina's Paired-End Sample Prep Guide (Feb. 2010) suggests using 1- 5 micrograms of isolated DNA for library preparation. Isolation of this amount of genomic m...

  20. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.