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Sample records for alternatives glass jars

  1. Determination of polyadipates migrating from lid gaskets of glass jars. Hydrolysis to adipic acid and measurement by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Driffield, M; Bradley, E L; Harmer, N; Castle, L; Klump, S; Mottier, P

    2010-10-01

    Polyadipate plasticizers can be present in the polyvinylchloride (PVC) gaskets used to seal the lids of glass jars. As the gaskets can come into direct contact with the foodstuffs inside the jar, the potential exists for polyadipate migration into the food. The procedure and performance characteristics of a test method for the analysis of polyadipates in food simulants (3% aqueous acetic acid and 10% aqueous ethanol) and the volatile test media used in substitute fat tests (isooctane and 95% aqueous ethanol) are described. The PVC gaskets were exposed to the food simulants or their substitutes under standard test conditions. Studies were initially carried out using direct measurement of the polyadipate oligomers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (LC-TOF-MS) but this was not practical due to the number of peaks detected. Instead, the migrating polyadipates were hydrolysed to adipic acid and measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS/MS). The amount of polyadipate that this measurement of adipic acid represents was then calculated. Method performance was assessed by analysis of gaskets from two types of jar lids by single-laboratory validation. Linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, intermediate reproducibility and recovery were determined to be suitable for checking compliance with the 30 mg/kg specific migration limits for polyesters of 1,2-propane diol and/or 1,3- and/or 1,4-butanediol and/or polypropylene-glycol with adipic acid, which may be end-capped with acetic acid or fatty acids C(12)-C(18) or n-octanol and/or n-decanol. The method was found to be much quicker than previous methods involving extraction, clean-up, hydrolysis, esterification, derivatisation and GC measurement, consequently saving time and money.

  2. Striped Bass, morone saxatilis, egg incubation in large volume jars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.; Wrege, B.M.; Jeffery, Isely J.

    2010-01-01

    The standard McDonald jar was compared with a large volume jar for striped bass, Morone saxatilis, egg incubation. The McDonald jar measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. The experimental jar measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. The hypothesis is that there is no difference in percent survival of fry hatched in experimental jars compared with McDonald jars. Striped bass brood fish were collected from the Coosa River and spawned using the dry spawn method of fertilization. Four McDonald jars were stocked with approximately 150 g of eggs each. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96, and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg loading rate (??1 SE) in McDonald jars of 21.9 ?? 0.03 eggs/mL and in experimental jars of 10.9 ?? 0.57 eggs/mL. The major finding of this study was that average fry survival was 37.3 ?? 4.49% for McDonald jars and 34.2 ?? 3.80% for experimental jars. Although survival in experimental jars was slightly less than in McDonald jars, the effect of container volume on survival to 48 h (F = 6.57; df = 1,5; P > 0.05), 96 h (F = 0.02; df = 1, 4; P > 0.89), and 144 h (F = 3.50; df = 1, 4; P > 0.13) was not statistically significant. Mean survival between replicates ranged from 14.7 to 60.1% in McDonald jars and from 10.1 to 54.4% in experimental jars. No effect of initial stocking rate on survival (t = 0.06; df = 10; P > 0.95) was detected. Experimental jars allowed for incubation of a greater number of eggs in less than half the floor space of McDonald jars. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental jars offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing labor and operations cost. As survival was similar to McDonald jars, the experimental jar is suitable for striped bass egg incubation. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2010.

  3. Cola Canopic Jars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epps, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Each year, the first-year high-school art students at Surry County High School in Dendron, Virginia, complete a three-dimensional project that attempts to re-create an artifact from the Old Kingdom. In this article, the author describes how the students made canopic jars from recycled 2-liter soda bottles and newspapers for this year's art…

  4. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mahony, Aileen, E-mail: aom@incomusa.com; Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.

    2016-01-15

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstratedmore » due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)« less

  5. Uranium Glass: A Glowing Alternative to Conventional Sources of Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, Roeland

    2017-01-01

    There is a relatively simple way of using radioactive material in classroom experiments: uranium glass, which provides teachers with a suitable substance. By using the right computer software and a radiation sensor, it can be demonstrated that uranium glass emits radiation at a greater rate than the background radiation and with the aid of UV…

  6. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  7. Remotely adjustable fishing jar and method for using same

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, W.B.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a method for providing a jarring force to dislodge objects stuck in well bores, the method it comprises: connecting a jarring tool between an operating string and an object in a well bore; selecting a jarring force to be applied to the object; setting the selected reference jarring force into a mechanical memory mechanism by progressively engaging a first latch body and a second latch body; retaining the reference jarring force in the mechanical memory mechanism during diminution of tensional force applied by the operating string; and initiating an upwardly directed impact force within the jarring toolmore » by increasing tensional force on the operating string to a value greater than the tensional force corresponding with the selected jarring force. This patent also describes a remotely adjustable downhole fishing jar apparatus comprising: an operating mandrel; an impact release spring; a mechanical memory mechanism; and releasable latching means.« less

  8. Plasmonic Glasses and Films Based on Alternative Inexpensive Materials for Blocking Infrared Radiation.

    PubMed

    V Besteiro, Lucas; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Wang, Zhiming; Rosei, Federico; Govorov, Alexander O

    2018-04-16

    The need for energy-saving materials is pressing. This Letter reports on the design of energy-saving glasses and films based on plasmonic nanocrystals that efficiently block infrared radiation. Designing such plasmonic composite glasses is nontrivial and requires taking full advantage of both material and geometrical properties of the nanoparticles. We compute the performance of solar plasmonic glasses incorporating a transparent matrix and specially shaped nanocrystals. This performance depends on the shape and material of such nanocrystals. Glasses designed with plasmonic nanoshells are shown to exhibit overall better performances as compared to nanorods and nanocups. Simultaneously, scalable synthesis of plasmonic nanoshells and nanocups is technologically feasible using gas-phase fabrication methods. The computational simulations were performed for noble metals (gold and silver) as well as for alternative plasmonic materials (aluminum, copper, and titanium nitride). Inexpensive plasmonic materials (silver, copper, aluminum, and titanium nitride) show an overall good performance in terms of the commonly used figures of merit of industrial glass windows. Together with numerical data for specific materials, this study includes a set of general rules for designing efficient plasmonic IR-blocking media. The plasmonic glasses proposed herein are good candidates for the creation of cheap optical media, to be used in energy-saving windows in warm climates' housing or temperature-sensitive infrastructure.

  9. Reproductive technologies: the two sides of the glass jar.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, A F

    1987-01-01

    From our knowledge of fertilization and implantation, new methods of reproduction have been developed. These new reproductive technologies make possible new parenting arrangements, resetting the biological clock for women, selecting the timing of birth, sex and number of children, pre-implantation diagnosis and gene replacement. The new ways of making babies present us with a myriad of ethical, legal, social and psychological concerns.

  10. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials.

    PubMed

    Gorni, Giulio; Velázquez, Jose J; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-30

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF₄ glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO₂ precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  11. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gorni, Giulio; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications. PMID:29385706

  12. ``Peeps,'' cream, heads, and food coloring in a vacuum jar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePino, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    This note describes some methods of adding interest to the standard vacuum jar demonstrations. Marshmallow animals, shaving cream, doll heads, and food coloring add some spark to these demos. These new twists have been well received by the students.

  13. [The decoration of Italian Renaissance drug jars after engravings].

    PubMed

    Drey, R E

    1994-01-01

    Although Italian drug jar painters generally devised original compositions for the ornamentation of their products, on occasion they derived their subjects from printed sources. Printed sources used by drug jar artists of the Renaissance include wood-engraved Italian tarot cards and wood-engraved illustrations by Hans Sebald Beham and Bernard Salomon in miniature bibles published in the sixteenth century in Frankfurt and in Lyons respectively.

  14. Jar Test. Training Module 5.230.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonte, John L.; Davidson, Arnold C.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the jar test and its application to the coagulation, floculation and sedimentation processes, and the chemical precipitation process. Included are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts, and transparency masters. A video…

  15. First paleoparasitological study of an embalming rejects jar found in Saqqara, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Harter, Stéphanie; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Janot, Francis; Bouchet, Françoise

    2003-01-01

    For the first time, a jar of embalming rejects was studied in search for helminth parasite eggs. This kind of jar was used to put discarded material by Egyptian embalmers during mummification process. Ascaris lumbricoides and Taenia saginata eggs were found in the linen and strip fragment contents of the jar, dated of 2,715-2,656 years ago.

  16. How Many Jelly Beans Are in the Jar?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, George J.; Hodges, Thomas E.; Graul, LuAnn

    2016-01-01

    Who will make a better estimate concerning the number of jelly beans in a jar, a single person or a group of people? On one side of the debate is the notion that a person would make a better decision because he or she uses unique knowledge that the group may not possess. On the opposite side of the argument is the claim that because of their…

  17. Optimum coagulant forecasting by modeling jar test experiments using ANNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiri, Sadaf; Daghighi, Amin; Moharramzadeh, Sina

    2018-01-01

    Currently, the proper utilization of water treatment plants and optimizing their use is of particular importance. Coagulation and flocculation in water treatment are the common ways through which the use of coagulants leads to instability of particles and the formation of larger and heavier particles, resulting in improvement of sedimentation and filtration processes. Determination of the optimum dose of such a coagulant is of particular significance. A high dose, in addition to adding costs, can cause the sediment to remain in the filtrate, a dangerous condition according to the standards, while a sub-adequate dose of coagulants can result in the reducing the required quality and acceptable performance of the coagulation process. Although jar tests are used for testing coagulants, such experiments face many constraints with respect to evaluating the results produced by sudden changes in input water because of their significant costs, long time requirements, and complex relationships among the many factors (turbidity, temperature, pH, alkalinity, etc.) that can influence the efficiency of coagulant and test results. Modeling can be used to overcome these limitations; in this research study, an artificial neural network (ANN) multi-layer perceptron (MLP) with one hidden layer has been used for modeling the jar test to determine the dosage level of used coagulant in water treatment processes. The data contained in this research have been obtained from the drinking water treatment plant located in Ardabil province in Iran. To evaluate the performance of the model, the mean squared error (MSE) and correlation coefficient (R2) parameters have been used. The obtained values are within an acceptable range that demonstrates the high accuracy of the models with respect to the estimation of water-quality characteristics and the optimal dosages of coagulants; so using these models will allow operators to not only reduce costs and time taken to perform experimental jar tests

  18. Lunar Simulation in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2007-01-01

    The Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar has been assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide a high fidelity lunar simulation facility to test the interactions of lunar dust and lunar dust simulant with candidate aerospace materials and coatings. It has a sophisticated design which enables it to treat dust in a way that will remove adsorbed gases and create a chemically reactive surface. It can simulate the vacuum, thermal, and radiation environments of the Moon, including proximate areas of illuminated heat and extremely cold shadow. It is expected to be a valuable tool in the development of dust repellant and cleaning technologies for lunar surface systems.

  19. Applications of the JARS method to study levee sites in southern Texas and southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Dunbar, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    We apply the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method to several sites and compare its results to traditional refraction-tomography methods in efforts of finding a more realistic solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem. The JARS method uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. In all of the cases JARS estimates appear more realistic than those from the conventional refraction-tomography methods. As a result, we consider, the JARS algorithm as the preferred method for finding solutions to the inverse refraction-tomography problems. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  20. The Jar Magic--Instructional Activities for Teaching Air Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Bing-Hong; Chen, Chyong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of impressive activities designed for teaching the concept of air pressure to junior high school students. Water, glasses, balloons, plastic bottles, and suction cups are some of the items commonly used in these experiments. For example, if we take a glass of water, cover it with a piece of cardboard, and invert the glass,…

  1. Bars to jars: bamboo value chains in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Verina; Tieguhong, Julius Chupezi

    2013-04-01

    Bamboo is a well know and versatile material, which is a common sight across Cameroon's diverse ecosystems, from dry to humid tropical and Afromontane forests. Its numerous uses range from storage jars to decorating restaurant-bars, beehives to knives, fences, fodder, and fuel. Responding to the paucity of data on species and uses, the value chain for bamboo in Cameroon was analyzed. Based on 171 interviews and field observations, two African indigenous species (alpine Yushania alpina and savannah Oxytenanthera abyssinica) and exotic (Bambusa vulgaris spp.) bamboos were identified as most utilized. They were tracked from major production zones to final consumers. The ecological, socio-economic, institutional, and governance contexts and impacts are described and analyzed. Issues for research, conservation, and development are highlighted. These include the ambiguous regulatory status, the relationship between tenure and management, threats and conservation of African species and options to increase the sustainable livelihoods for stakeholders dependent upon bamboo.

  2. Drilling jar for use in a downhole network

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; McPherson, James; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-01-31

    Apparatus and methods for integrating transmission cable into the body of selected downhole tools, such as drilling jars, having variable or changing lengths. A wired downhole-drilling tool is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including a housing and a mandrel insertable into the housing. A coiled cable is enclosed within the housing and has a first end connected to the housing and a second end connected to the mandrel. The coiled cable is configured to stretch and shorten in accordance with axial movement between the housing and the mandrel. A clamp is used to fix the coiled cable with respect to the housing, the mandrel, or both, to accommodate a change of tension in the coiled cable.

  3. What Can You do with a Jelly Jar: A Coloring Activity on Reuse for Kids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Space creatures might think the idea of reusing containers is an alien concept, but here on Earth it’s easy to keep an old jar out of the trash and give it new life. Follow these tips to keep a jar in use and out of orbit.

  4. Development of Conductivity Method as an Alternative to Titration for Hydrolytic Resistance Testing Used for Evaluation of Glass Vials Used in Pharmaceutical Industry.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Lee, Hans; Phillips, Joseph; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser

    The European Pharmacopeia surface test to analyze the hydrolytic resistance is a common industrial method to understand and ensure the quality of produced glass vials. Hydrolytic resistance is evaluated by calculating the alkalinity of water extract from autoclaved vials by titration. As an alternative to this titration technique, a conductivity technique was assessed, which directly measures the ions in the water extract. A conductivity meter with a 12 mm diameter electrode was calibrated with a 100 μS/cm conductivity standard and carryover minimized by rinsing the probe in a water beaker per analysis. The limit of quantification at 1 μS/cm was determined as having a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 compared with the water blank. The conductivity method was selective for glass-composing elements (boron, sodium, aluminum, silicon, potassium, and calcium) within the vial extract. Accuracies of spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm were ±7% and had linearity with coefficient of determination (R 2 ) of ≥0.9999. Intraday precision had a relative standard deviation (RSD) (n = 5) of ≤6% for spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm. Interday precision had a RSD (n = 4) of ≤6% for 10 vials from three glass vial lots. Conductivity of water extracts from nine sets of seven lots of glass vials had a precise linear relationship [R 2 = 0.9876, RSD = 1% (n = 9)] with titration volumes of the same lots. Conductivity results in μS/cm could be converted to titration volumes in milliliters by a conversion factor of 0.0275. The simplicity, sample stability, and individual vial analysis of the conductivity technique were more advantageous than the current titration technique. The quality of glass vials used as primary containers in the pharmaceutical industry is of concern due to recent observations of glass flake-like delamination, or lamellae, under specific storage conditions. The current European Pharmacopoeia method to assess

  5. Jar Test. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arasmith, E. E.

    The jar test is used to determine the proper chemical dosage required for good coagulation and flocculation of water. The test is commonly used in potable water, secondary effluent prior to advanced wastewater treatment, secondary clarifier influent, and sludge conditioning practice. Designed for individuals who have completed National Pollutant…

  6. Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism Associated with Improperly Jarred Pesto--Ohio and California, 2014.

    PubMed

    Burke, Patrick; Needham, Michael; Jackson, Brendan R; Bokanyi, Rick; St Germain, Eric; Englender, Steven J

    2016-02-26

    On July 28, 2014, the Cincinnati Health Department was notified of suspected cases of foodborne botulism in two women admitted to the same hospital 12 days apart. Patient A had been treated for 12 days for suspected autoimmune disease. When patient B, the roommate of patient A, was evaluated at the same medical center for similar symptoms, it was learned that on July 13, patient A and patient B had shared a meal that included prepackaged pesto from a jar; clinicians suspected botulism and notified the local health department. The pesto had been purchased from company A's farm stand in San Clemente, California. Laboratory testing detected botulinum toxin type B by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in leftovers of pasta with pesto. A culture of these food samples yielded Clostridium spp. that produced botulinum toxin type B; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing also was positive for type B toxin gene. Environmental assessment of company A identified improper acidification and pressurization practices and lack of licensure to sell canned products commercially, including products in hermetically-sealed jars. On July 30, the vendor voluntarily recalled all jarred products, and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) warned the public not to consume company A's jarred foods. This report describes the two cases and the public health investigation that traced the source of the outbreak.

  7. "Life in a Jar": A National History Day Project that Touched the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conard, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Few had heard of Irena Sendlerowa in 1999. Now, after more than 290 presentations of the student play "Life in a Jar," as well as a website with high traffic, and worldwide media attention, Irena is known to the world. Irena Sendler (as she became known), a social worker, believed in standing up for others. Her father, who was a doctor,…

  8. 78 FR 68687 - Final Additional Airworthiness Design Standards: Advanced Avionics Under the Special Class (JAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...-3. FAA policy expressed in AC 23-11B and AC 21.17-3 limits JAR-VLA and CS-VLA aircraft approved... design criteria notification. The FAA has concluded that it is acceptable to allow advanced integrated... in the basic certification. A redesign of that kind, postulated by a change of instruments from...

  9. Glass-to-Metal Seal Against Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Gatewood, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Simple compression joint with indium gasket forms demountable seal for superfluids. Seal developed for metal lid on glass jar used in experiments on liquid helium. Glass container allows contents to be viewed for such purposes as calibration of liquid-level detectors and adjustments of displacement plungers. Seal contains liquid helium even when temperature drops below 2.19K. Made from inexpensive, commercially available materials and parts.

  10. Effect of Olyset Net on Mosquito Larvae and Their Heteroptera Predators in Water Jars in Southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shin-Ya; Huynh, Trang T; Kawada, Hitoshi; Le, Loan Luu; Ngoc, Huu Tran; Hoang, San Le; Takagi, Masahiro

    2016-05-20

    Residents of Vietnam living in areas with water shortages collect and store tap water, when it is available, in containers, such as jars, which is then used for their daily activities. Although these water jars are important breeding sites for mosquitoes, Vietnam legislation prohibits the use of chemical larvicides in such containers. The effect of Olyset Net on the abundance of mosquito larvae and their Heteroptera predators (Micronecta spp. and Veliidae) in jars was evaluated via field experiments conducted in Tan Chanh, Long An, Vietnam. The number of Aedes larvae decreased when the jars were covered with the Olyset Net, while the numbers of non-Aedes mosquito larvae (Culex and Anopheles), and those of Micronecta and Veliidae, did not vary until the end of the experiment. However, Micronecta population increased after removing the Olyset Net from the jars, and consequently Aedes larvae decreased due to these changes in the Micronecta, 26 days after the Olyset Net was removed. Incomplete use of Olyset Net failed to control mosquitoes in water jars based on the invasion of adult mosquitoes, and in water transferred by residents among the jars, which might contain larvae. These results suggest that Micronecta, as well as Olyset Net, can be considered as control agents for mosquito larvae.

  11. Alternating copolymerization of propylene oxide with biorenewable terpene-based cyclic anhydrides: a sustainable route to aliphatic polyesters with high glass transition temperatures.

    PubMed

    Van Zee, Nathan J; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2015-02-23

    The alternating copolymerization of propylene oxide with terpene-based cyclic anhydrides catalyzed by chromium, cobalt, and aluminum salen complexes is reported. The use of the Diels-Alder adduct of α-terpinene and maleic anhydride as the cyclic anhydride comonomer results in amorphous polyesters that exhibit glass transition temperatures (Tg ) of up to 109 °C. The polymerization conditions and choice of catalyst have a dramatic impact on the molecular weight distribution, the relative stereochemistry of the diester units along the polymer chain, and ultimately the Tg of the resulting polymer. The aluminum salen complex exhibits exceptional selectivity for copolymerization without transesterification or epimerization side reactions. The resulting polyesters are highly alternating and have high molecular weights and narrow polydispersities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Quality assessment of commercially supplied drinking jar water in Chittagong City, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mina, Sohana Akter; Marzan, Lolo Wal; Sultana, Tasrin; Akter, Yasmin

    2018-03-01

    Chittagong is the second most populated city in Bangladesh where drinking water is supplied using small jar. Water quality is an important concern for the consumers and, therefore, the present study was done by collecting 38 drinking jar water samples from Chittagong City, Bangladesh to determine the microbial contamination and physiochemical properties. Molecular study was done by the PCR amplification of 16SrDNA, LacZ and uidA gene for the identification of bacteria, coliform and fecal coliform. TVC, MPN and different biochemical test were done for enumeration and identification. TDS, pH, and metals (Fe, As, Pb and Cr) concentration were also measured. No heavy metal (As, Pb and Cr) was found in any of the water samples but Fe was detected in low concentrations (0.02-0.05 mg/l). TDS and pH level were normal in all samples. But microbial contaminations were (60.53 and 50%) recorded in molecular and biochemical test, respectively. The range of total bacterial count was (1.5 × 102-1.6 × 104) cfu/ml. The total coliform count (TCCm) was recorded (14-40) in 100 ml of water samples. The presence of total coliform and fecal coliform was 26.32 and 18.42%, respectively, in PCR analysis but in biochemical test those were 18.42 and 15.78%, respectively. A total of 11 bacterial species: Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherrichia coli, Aeromonas, Bacillus sp., Cardiobacterium, Corynebacterium, Clostridium, Klebsiella sp., Lactobacillus, Micrococcus sp., Pseudomonas sp. were found. This study indicates that some of the drinking jar water samples were of poor quality which may increase the risk of water-borne disease. Hence, the producer of drinking jar water has to implement necessary quality control steps.

  13. Method for making glass nonfogging

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Carter, Gary W.; Petrini, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    A method for rendering glass nonfogging (to condensation fog) by sandwiching the glass between two electrodes such that the glass functions as the dielectric of a capacitor, a large alternating current (AC) voltage is applied across the electrodes for a selected time period causing the glass to absorb a charge, and the electrodes are removed. The glass absorbs a charge from the electrodes rendering it nonfogging. The glass surface is undamaged by application of the AC voltage, and normal optical properties are unaffected. This method can be applied to optical surfaces such as lenses, auto windshields, mirrors, etc., wherever condensation fog on glass is a problem.

  14. Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum BPR2001 using molasses medium in a jar fermentor.

    PubMed

    Bae, S O; Shoda, M

    2005-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Acetobacter xylinum subsp. sucrofermentans BPR2001 using molasses medium was carried out in a jar fermentor. When molasses was subjected to H(2)SO(4)-heat treatment, the maximum BC concentration increased to 76% more than that achieved using untreated molasses, and the specific growth rate increased 2-fold. When the initial sugar concentrations in the H(2)SO(4)-heat treated molasses were varied from 23 g/l to 72 g/l, BC concentration, production rate, and yield were maximum at sugar concentrations of 23 g/l and 37 g/l, and production of by-products, such as polysaccharides and CO(2), was lower than at sugar concentrations of 48 g/l and 72 g/l, indicating that maintaining a lower molasses concentration is essential for efficient BC production in jar fermentors, this being due mainly to the complex nature of molasses. Molasses has a clear advantage over pure sugars as a carbon source from an economic viewpoint.

  15. Water Ingress Testing of the Turbula Jar and U-233 Lead Pig Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Kirk Patrick; Karns, Tristan; Smith, Paul Herrick

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the water ingress behavior of containers used at the TA-55 Plutonium Facility has significant implications for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to document the water ingress behavior of the Turbula Jar with Bakelite lid and Viton gaskets (Turbula Jar) used in oxide blending operations and the U-233 lead pig container used to store and transport U-233 material. The technical basis for water resistant containers at TA-55 is described in LA-UR-15-22781, “Water Resistant Container Technical Basis Document for the TA-55 Criticality Safety Program.” Testing of the water ingress behavior of various containers is described in LA-CP-13-00695, “Watermore » Penetration Tests on the Filters of Hagan and SAVY Containers,” LA-UR-15-23121, “Water Ingress into Crimped Convenience Containers under Flooding Conditions,” and in LA-UR- 16-2411, “Water Ingress Testing for TA-55 Containers.” Water ingress criteria are defined in TA55-AP-522 “TA-55 Criticality Safety Program”, and in PA-RD-01009 “TA55 Criticality Safety Requirements.” The water ingress criteria for submersion is no more than 50 ml of water ingress at a 6” water column height for a period of 2 hours.« less

  16. Mothers prefer fresh fruits and vegetables over jarred baby fruits and vegetables in the new Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children food package.

    PubMed

    Kim, Loan P; Whaley, Shannon E; Gradziel, Pat H; Crocker, Nancy J; Ritchie, Lorrene D; Harrison, Gail G

    2013-01-01

    This study examined Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participant use and satisfaction with jarred baby foods, assessed preference for cash value vouchers (CVVs) for fruits and vegetables vs jarred baby foods, and examined whether preferences varied among selected ethnic groups. A survey of California WIC participants and statewide redemption data were used. Participants reported high satisfaction with the CVV for fruits and vegetables and jarred baby foods, with statistically significant variation across ethnic groups. About two thirds of all participants reported a preference for CVVs for fruits and vegetables over jarred baby foods. Redemption data indicated declining redemption rates for jarred fruits and vegetables with increasing age of the infant across all ethnic groups. Although the addition of jarred fruits and vegetables to the food package for infants ages 6-11 months was well received, many caregivers want the option to choose between jarred foods and fresh fruits and vegetables. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  17. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M.G.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10-8 Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust stimulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove absorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions, and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples

  18. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10(exp -8) Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust simulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove adsorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples.

  19. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10(exp -8) Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust simulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove adsorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples.

  20. Six centuries of geomagnetic intensity variations recorded by royal Judean stamped jar handles.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yosef, Erez; Millman, Michael; Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Lipschits, Oded

    2017-02-28

    Earth's magnetic field, one of the most enigmatic physical phenomena of the planet, is constantly changing on various time scales, from decades to millennia and longer. The reconstruction of geomagnetic field behavior in periods predating direct observations with modern instrumentation is based on geological and archaeological materials and has the twin challenges of ( i ) the accuracy of ancient paleomagnetic estimates and ( ii ) the dating of the archaeological material. Here we address the latter by using a set of storage jar handles (fired clay) stamped by royal seals as part of the ancient administrative system in Judah (Jerusalem and its vicinity). The typology of the stamp impressions, which corresponds to changes in the political entities ruling this area, provides excellent age constraints for the firing event of these artifacts. Together with rigorous paleomagnetic experimental procedures, this study yielded an unparalleled record of the geomagnetic field intensity during the eighth to second centuries BCE. The new record constitutes a substantial advance in our knowledge of past geomagnetic field variations in the southern Levant. Although it demonstrates a relatively stable and gradually declining field during the sixth to second centuries BCE, the new record provides further support for a short interval of extreme high values during the late eighth century BCE. The rate of change during this "geomagnetic spike" [defined as virtual axial dipole moment > 160 ZAm 2 (10 21 Am 2 )] is further constrained by the new data, which indicate an extremely rapid weakening of the field (losing ∼27% of its strength over ca. 30 y).

  1. Dissolution improvement of poorly water-soluble drug by cogrinding method using jar mill.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanlong; Mao, Lijuan; Li, Xueming; Wang, Yonglu; Wei, Ping

    2013-05-01

    As a representative proton pump inhibitor, Lansoprazole was poorly soluble in water which caused the low oral bioavailability. The present study was carried out to enhance the dissolution of lansoprazole by cogrinding with some commonly used hydrophilic polymers (β-CD, PVP, HPMC, L-HPC, CS, PEG and PVPP) in the weight ratio of 1:1 for 2 h in the jar mill. Samples of coground mixture, micronised drug, and physical mixture were characterized by XRPD, and DSC, the results showed that the drug crystallinity reduced in the coground process. The amount of drug released from the coground mixtures in PBS (pH 6.8, 37°C) in 30 min was 100% approximately (except the coground mixtures prepared with VPP or PEG) while released from the micronised drug was just about 20%. Increasing the hydrophilicity and diminishing the size of drug particles by cogrinding were the main causes for enhancing the dissolution of the drug. The results of the stability study of lansoprazole in coground mixture showed that there were no significant changes in the drug content and dissolution characteristics 6 months later. It is clear that the cogrinding method described in the article is very effective for enhancing the dissolution of the poorly soluble drugs, and it is easy for industrialization, showing a strong potential for future applications.

  2. Re-examining the early history of the Leiden jar: Stabilization and variation in transforming a phenomenon into a fact.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cibelle Celestino; Heering, Peter

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the period that immediately followed the invention of the Leiden jar. Historians of science have developed narrations that emphasize the role of grounding during the process of charging the jar. In this respect, this episode shows significant aspects that can be used to characterize science, scientific knowledge production, and the nature of science. From our own experimentation, we learned that grounding was not necessary in order to produce the effect. These experiences inspired us to go back to primary sources. In doing so, we came to a new understanding of the early period after Kleist's and Musschenbroek's initial creation of the effect. From our analysis, we conclude that it is not the grounding which was perceived as a major innovation (as well as a challenge) during this early period of the discussion but the concept of an electrical circuit. This understanding was fundamental in characterizing the Leiden jar as a new device challenging the then current knowledge of experimental practices in the field of electricity.

  3. Organotin compounds cause structure-dependent induction of progesterone in human choriocarcinoma Jar cells.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, Youhei; Yui, Hiroki; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nagase, Hisamitsu; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals because they cause masculinization in female mollusks. In addition, previous studies have suggested that the endocrine disruption by organotin compounds leads to activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and retinoid X receptor (RXR). However, whether organotin compounds cause crucial toxicities in human development and reproduction is unclear. We here investigated the structure-dependent effect of 12 tin compounds on mRNA transcription of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (3β-HSD I) and progesterone production in human choriocarcinoma Jar cells. TBT, TPT, dibutyltin, monophenyltin, tripropyltin, and tricyclohexyltin enhanced progesterone production in a dose-dependent fashion. Although tetraalkyltin compounds such as tetrabutyltin increased progesterone production, the concentrations necessary for activation were 30-100 times greater than those for trialkyltins. All tested active organotins increased 3β-HSD I mRNA transcription. We further investigated the correlation between the agonistic activity of organotin compounds on PPARγ and their ability to promote progesterone production. Except for DBTCl2, the active organotins significantly induced the transactivation function of PPARγ. In addition, PPARγ knockdown significantly suppressed the induction of mRNA transcription of 3β-HSD I by all active organotins except DBTCl2. These results suggest that some organotin compounds promote progesterone biosynthesis in vitro by inducing 3β-HSD I mRNA transcription via the PPARγ signaling pathway. The placenta represents a potential target organ for these compounds, whose endocrine-disrupting effects might cause local changes in progesterone concentration in pregnant women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Six centuries of geomagnetic intensity variations recorded by royal Judean stamped jar handles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yosef, Erez; Millman, Michael; Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Lipschits, Oded

    2017-02-01

    Earth’s magnetic field, one of the most enigmatic physical phenomena of the planet, is constantly changing on various time scales, from decades to millennia and longer. The reconstruction of geomagnetic field behavior in periods predating direct observations with modern instrumentation is based on geological and archaeological materials and has the twin challenges of (i) the accuracy of ancient paleomagnetic estimates and (ii) the dating of the archaeological material. Here we address the latter by using a set of storage jar handles (fired clay) stamped by royal seals as part of the ancient administrative system in Judah (Jerusalem and its vicinity). The typology of the stamp impressions, which corresponds to changes in the political entities ruling this area, provides excellent age constraints for the firing event of these artifacts. Together with rigorous paleomagnetic experimental procedures, this study yielded an unparalleled record of the geomagnetic field intensity during the eighth to second centuries BCE. The new record constitutes a substantial advance in our knowledge of past geomagnetic field variations in the southern Levant. Although it demonstrates a relatively stable and gradually declining field during the sixth to second centuries BCE, the new record provides further support for a short interval of extreme high values during the late eighth century BCE. The rate of change during this “geomagnetic spike” [defined as virtual axial dipole moment > 160 ZAm2 (1021 Am2)] is further constrained by the new data, which indicate an extremely rapid weakening of the field (losing ˜27% of its strength over ca. 30 y).

  5. Six centuries of geomagnetic intensity variations recorded by royal Judean stamped jar handles

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yosef, Erez; Millman, Michael; Shaar, Ron; Lipschits, Oded

    2017-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field, one of the most enigmatic physical phenomena of the planet, is constantly changing on various time scales, from decades to millennia and longer. The reconstruction of geomagnetic field behavior in periods predating direct observations with modern instrumentation is based on geological and archaeological materials and has the twin challenges of (i) the accuracy of ancient paleomagnetic estimates and (ii) the dating of the archaeological material. Here we address the latter by using a set of storage jar handles (fired clay) stamped by royal seals as part of the ancient administrative system in Judah (Jerusalem and its vicinity). The typology of the stamp impressions, which corresponds to changes in the political entities ruling this area, provides excellent age constraints for the firing event of these artifacts. Together with rigorous paleomagnetic experimental procedures, this study yielded an unparalleled record of the geomagnetic field intensity during the eighth to second centuries BCE. The new record constitutes a substantial advance in our knowledge of past geomagnetic field variations in the southern Levant. Although it demonstrates a relatively stable and gradually declining field during the sixth to second centuries BCE, the new record provides further support for a short interval of extreme high values during the late eighth century BCE. The rate of change during this “geomagnetic spike” [defined as virtual axial dipole moment > 160 ZAm2 (1021 Am2)] is further constrained by the new data, which indicate an extremely rapid weakening of the field (losing ∼27% of its strength over ca. 30 y). PMID:28193874

  6. Making a Better Beer Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffer, Alan R.

    1982-01-01

    A class activity is detailed in which alternative designs for glasses are examined. The goal is to design a glass which is built tilted, so that beer can be poured in without creating a foam problem. The activity is viewed as one leading to interesting questions. (MP)

  7. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Glass-state conversion reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Kercher, Andrew K.; Kolopus, James A.; Carroll, Kyler; ...

    2015-11-10

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses can undergo glass-state conversion (GSC) reactions to provide an alternate class of high-capacity cathode materials. GSC reactions have been demonstrated in phosphate/vanadate glasses with Ag, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni cations. These MP glasses provided high capacity and good high power performance, but suffer from moderate voltages, large voltage hysteresis, and significant capacity fade with cycling. Details of the GSC reaction have been revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of ex situ cathodes at key states of charge. Using the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), a computational thermodynamic model hasmore » been developed to predict the near-equilibrium voltages of glass-state conversion reactions in MP glasses.« less

  8. Cultural condition affecting the growth and production of beta-galactosidase by Bifidobacterium longum CCRC 15708 in a jar fermenter.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C A; Yu, R C; Lee, S L; Chou, C C

    2007-05-01

    In the present study, the growth and production of beta-galactosidase by Bifidobacterium longum CCRC 15708 in a 5-L jar fermenter as influenced by cultivation temperature (27-42 degrees C), medium pH (4.5-7.5) and agitation speed (5-200 rpm) were evaluated. In general, it was found that a cultivation temperature of 37 degrees C proved optimal for both growth and beta-galactosidase production by the test organism. Although the growth of the test organism was the highest in the culture with pH controlled at 4.5-6.5, the culture with pH controlled at 6.5 resulted in the highest production of beta-galactosidase. Further, agitation at 100 rpm or more was found to enhance both the growth and production of beta-galactosidase. Fermentation conducted in a jar fermenter having the pH of the culture medium, the cultivation temperature, and the agitation speed controlled at 6.5, 37 degrees C, and 100 rpm, respectively, a maximum beta-galactosidase activity of 36.7 U/ml and a maximum transgalactosylation activity of 0.49 U/ml was achieved in 10 h of fermentation. There are ca 2.0 and 12.3 fold greater than the reported maximum beta-galactosidase and transgalactosylation activity, respectively, produced by B. longum CCRC 15708 in a flask culture system.

  9. Optimizing the coagulation process in a drinking water treatment plant -- comparison between traditional and statistical experimental design jar tests.

    PubMed

    Zainal-Abideen, M; Aris, A; Yusof, F; Abdul-Majid, Z; Selamat, A; Omar, S I

    2012-01-01

    In this study of coagulation operation, a comparison was made between the optimum jar test values for pH, coagulant and coagulant aid obtained from traditional methods (an adjusted one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method) and with central composite design (the standard design of response surface methodology (RSM)). Alum (coagulant) and polymer (coagulant aid) were used to treat a water source with very low pH and high aluminium concentration at Sri-Gading water treatment plant (WTP) Malaysia. The optimum conditions for these factors were chosen when the final turbidity, pH after coagulation and residual aluminium were within 0-5 NTU, 6.5-7.5 and 0-0.20 mg/l respectively. Traditional and RSM jar tests were conducted to find their respective optimum coagulation conditions. It was observed that the optimum dose for alum obtained through the traditional method was 12 mg/l, while the value for polymer was set constant at 0.020 mg/l. Through RSM optimization, the optimum dose for alum was 7 mg/l and for polymer was 0.004 mg/l. Optimum pH for the coagulation operation obtained through traditional methods and RSM was 7.6. The final turbidity, pH after coagulation and residual aluminium recorded were all within acceptable limits. The RSM method was demonstrated to be an appropriate approach for the optimization and was validated by a further test.

  10. Thiol-ene immobilisation of carbohydrates onto glass slides as a simple alternative to gold-thiol monolayers, amines or lipid binding.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Caroline I; Edmondson, Steve; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are a vital tool in studying infection, probing the mechanisms of bacterial, viral and toxin adhesion and the development of new treatments, by mimicking the structure of the glycocalyx. Current methods rely on the formation of monolayers of carbohydrates that have been chemically modified with a linker to enable interaction with a functionalised surface. This includes amines, biotin, lipids or thiols. Thiol-addition to gold to form self-assembled monolayers is perhaps the simplest method for immobilisation as thiolated glycans are readily accessible from reducing carbohydrates in a single step, but are limited to gold surfaces. Here we have developed a quick and versatile methodology which enables the use of thiolated carbohydrates to be immobilised as monolayers directly onto acrylate-functional glass slides via a 'thiol-ene'/Michael-type reaction. By combining the ease of thiol chemistry with glass slides, which are compatible with microarray scanners this offers a cost effective, but also useful method to assemble arrays.

  11. Comparison of atmospheres of incubation for primary isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni from animal specimens: 5% oxygen versus candle jar.

    PubMed Central

    Luechtefeld, N W; Reller, L B; Blaser, M J; Wang, W L

    1982-01-01

    An atmosphere with reduced oxygen tension is required for the primary isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni. Therefore, we compared use of the conventional atmosphere of 5% oxygen and 8% carbon dioxide with use of a candle jar (17% oxygen and 3% carbon dioxide) for primary isolation of C. fetus subsp. jejuni from 263 positive canine, cattle, and turkey fecal or cecal specimens. At an incubation temperature of 42 degrees C, the atmosphere with 5% oxygen resulted in more Campylobacter colonies per plate (P less than 0.005) and consistently larger Campylobacter colonies (P less than 0.005) than did the candle jar, whereas the growth of interfering flora was similar. Overall, 96% of the 263 specimens were positive for C. fetus subsp. jejuni with 5% oxygen, and 90% were positive with the candle jar (P less than 0.02). More striking differences in isolation rates were seen when both the temperature and the atmosphere were varied: 5% oxygen at 42 degrees C enabled recovery of 93% of the isolates from 70 positive specimens, versus 46% recovery with the candle jar at 37 degrees C. Results with 5% oxygen at 37 degrees C were intermediate. The addition of FBP supplement (0.25% each of ferrous sulfate, sodium metabisulfite, and sodium pyruvate) to Campy-BAP selective medium made no improvement over unsupplemented medium at 42 degrees C (whether in 5% oxygen or in the candle jar), but there was significant improvement over unsupplemented medium when both media were incubated at 37 degrees in the candle jar. PMID:6764778

  12. MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  13. Magnetic resonance of hearts in a jar: breathing new life into old pathological specimens.

    PubMed

    Jutras, Luc C

    2010-06-01

    Specimens of the normal and congenitally abnormal heart have been long preserved, collected, and studied. It is increasingly difficult to add to such pathological collections. These museum pieces are often inaccessible for teaching purposes. Magnetic resonance imaging of old pathological specimens could produce high-resolution unalterable datasets that could be processed to create three-dimensional reconstructions using inexpensive systems that could be used by untrained individuals. To our knowledge, the concept of "Virtual Autopsy" has not been applied to cardiac specimens of museum collections. To determine optimal sequences and assure specimen safety, five different pulse sequences designed to create three-dimensional datasets were tried on a uterus specimen suspended in a fluid-filled glass container, using a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an eight-channel phased-array coil. Having found the best sequences and established specimen integrity, we scanned six historical heart specimens in their original fluid-filled glass containers. The datasets were processed on a laptop with a DICOM viewer available as freeware. All specimens were successfully scanned. The best image quality was obtained by using a three-dimensional FSPGR and the BRAVO pulse sequences. High-resolution three-dimensional and multi-planar image processing was possible for all datasets. Detailed examination of the specimens could be easily performed. Pathological specimens can successfully be scanned in minutes resulting in unalterable and portable high-resolution three-dimensional datasets that can be processed by using inexpensive readily available software. The final cardiac reconstructions can be widely shared for educational and scientific purposes and ensure a lasting access to pathological specimens.

  14. GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Fibrous glass fillers Binders used in the glass plastic industry Method of manufacturing glass plastics and glass plastic articles Properties of fiberglass Primary areas for use of glass fibre reinforced plastics

  15. FIN219/JAR1 and cryptochrome1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenesis under blue light in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Plant development is affected by the integration of light and phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs). To address the molecular mechanisms of possible interactions between blue light and JA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used molecular and transgenic approaches to understand the regulatory relationships between FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT1 (JAR1) and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome1 (CRY1). FIN219 overexpression in the wild type resulted in a short-hypocotyl phenotype under blue light. However, FIN219 overexpression in cry1, cry2 and cry1cry2 double mutant backgrounds resulted in phenotypes similar to their respective mutant backgrounds, which suggests that FIN219 function may require blue light photoreceptors. Intriguingly, FIN219 overexpression in transgenic plants harboring ectopic expression of the C terminus of CRY1 (GUS-CCT1), which exhibits a hypersensitive short-hypocotyl phenotype in all light conditions including darkness, led to a rescued phenotype under all light conditions except red light. Further expression studies showed mutual suppression between FIN219 and CRY1 under blue light. Strikingly, FIN219 overexpression in GUS-CCT1 transgenic lines (FIN219-OE/GUS-CCT1) abolished GUS-CCT1 fusion protein under blue light, whereas GUS-CCT1 fusion protein was stable in the fin219-2 mutant background (fin219-2/GUS-CCT1). Moreover, FIN219 strongly interacted with COP1 under blue light, and methyl JA (MeJA) treatment enhanced the interaction between FIN219 and GUS-CCT1 under blue light. Furthermore, FIN219 level affected GUS-CCT1 seedling responses such as anthocyanin accumulation and bacterial resistance under various light conditions and MeJA treatment. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 and CRY1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenic development of seedlings and stress responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:29561841

  16. FIN219/JAR1 and cryptochrome1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenesis under blue light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai-Ju; Fu, Tsu-Yu; Yang, Shao-Li; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2018-03-01

    Plant development is affected by the integration of light and phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs). To address the molecular mechanisms of possible interactions between blue light and JA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used molecular and transgenic approaches to understand the regulatory relationships between FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT1 (JAR1) and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome1 (CRY1). FIN219 overexpression in the wild type resulted in a short-hypocotyl phenotype under blue light. However, FIN219 overexpression in cry1, cry2 and cry1cry2 double mutant backgrounds resulted in phenotypes similar to their respective mutant backgrounds, which suggests that FIN219 function may require blue light photoreceptors. Intriguingly, FIN219 overexpression in transgenic plants harboring ectopic expression of the C terminus of CRY1 (GUS-CCT1), which exhibits a hypersensitive short-hypocotyl phenotype in all light conditions including darkness, led to a rescued phenotype under all light conditions except red light. Further expression studies showed mutual suppression between FIN219 and CRY1 under blue light. Strikingly, FIN219 overexpression in GUS-CCT1 transgenic lines (FIN219-OE/GUS-CCT1) abolished GUS-CCT1 fusion protein under blue light, whereas GUS-CCT1 fusion protein was stable in the fin219-2 mutant background (fin219-2/GUS-CCT1). Moreover, FIN219 strongly interacted with COP1 under blue light, and methyl JA (MeJA) treatment enhanced the interaction between FIN219 and GUS-CCT1 under blue light. Furthermore, FIN219 level affected GUS-CCT1 seedling responses such as anthocyanin accumulation and bacterial resistance under various light conditions and MeJA treatment. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 and CRY1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenic development of seedlings and stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  17. Development of an Alternative Mixed Odor Delivery Device (MODD) for Canine Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-10

    3 Figure 3. Diagram of LS-MODD containing four 16-oz glass jars with cut-away to expose lower mixing chamber, upper chamber and...set-up with a single odor source in the lower portion of the LS-MODD (left) and two SPME fibers (one above from the odor and one across) at the device...lower portion of the LS- MODD (left) and a single SPME fibers centered at the device outlet (right). .............................. 20 Figure 13

  18. Basic Research on Oxynitride Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    Thus, 4 F 1t nitrogen incorporation represents one of the few methods of achieving compositional substitution in the anion portion of oxide glass...former case, the gases apparently react with the melt only very slowly, and the levels of nitrogen attained are much lower than with other methods . Dancy...Alternatively, It Is conceivable that a sol-gel method aiht be devised to prepare a 31-O-1 glass that would permit densification at temperatures lomr than

  19. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    PubMed

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  20. Pinhole Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole glasses really give better vision? Some ways to use this question for motivation in teaching optics have been discussed. For this column we include a series of experiments that students can complete using a model of the eye and demonstrate issues related to pinhole vision correction.

  1. Long-term bond of glass ceramic and resin cement: evaluation of titanium tetrafluoride as an alternative etching agent for lithium disilicate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Klosa, Karsten; Boesch, Ineke; Kern, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate in vitro the effect of using titanium tetrafluoride as an alternative etchant prior to the silanization of the bonding surface on the long-term resin bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramic. Disk-shaped specimens made of lithium disilicate ceramic were ground with abrasive paper, then etched with aqueous solutions (2.5% and 5%) of titanium tetrafluoride for 60 s, 120 s and 240 s. Positive control specimens were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and negative control specimens were not etched. Afterwards, bonding surfaces of all specimens were silanized. Plexiglas tubes filled with a composite resin were bonded to the specimens using an alignment apparatus and a composite luting resin. After storage in 37°C tap water for three days (n = 8) and after storage in 37°C tap water for 150 days interrupted by 5 x 7500 thermal cycles (n = 8), tensile bond strength (TBS) was measured in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. After artificial aging, all specimens etched with titanium tetrafluoride debonded spontaneously resulting in a TBS of 0 MPa. Therefore, statistical analysis revealed a highly significant difference between the positive control and the test groups after 150 days storage. Etching the bonding surface of lithium disilicate ceramic restorations with hydrofluoric acid is still a "gold standard" and cannot be replaced by titanium tetrafluoride.

  2. Pinhole Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole…

  3. Some Hardware and Instrumentation Aspects of the Development of an Automation System for Jar Tests in Drinking Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Antonio José; González, Isaías

    2017-10-11

    The so-called Jar Test (JT) plays a vital role in the drinking water and wastewater treatments for establishing the dosage of flocculants and coagulant. This test is a well-proved laboratory instrumental procedure performed by trained personnel. In this work, a completely novel system for the automation and monitoring of a JT devoted to drinking water treatment is presented. It has been implemented using an industrial programmable controller and sensors and instruments specifically selected for this purpose. Once the parameters of the test have been entered, the stages that compose the JT (stirring, coagulant addition, etc.) are sequentially performed without human intervention. Moreover, all the involved measurements from sensors are collected and made accessible for continuous monitoring of the process. By means of the proposed system, the JT procedure is conducted fully automatically and can be locally and remotely monitored in real-time. Furthermore, the developed system constitutes a portable laboratory that offers advantageous features like scalability and transportability. The proposed system is described focusing on hardware and instrumentation aspects, and successful results are reported.

  4. Some Hardware and Instrumentation Aspects of the Development of an Automation System for Jar Tests in Drinking Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The so-called Jar Test (JT) plays a vital role in the drinking water and wastewater treatments for establishing the dosage of flocculants and coagulant. This test is a well-proved laboratory instrumental procedure performed by trained personnel. In this work, a completely novel system for the automation and monitoring of a JT devoted to drinking water treatment is presented. It has been implemented using an industrial programmable controller and sensors and instruments specifically selected for this purpose. Once the parameters of the test have been entered, the stages that compose the JT (stirring, coagulant addition, etc.) are sequentially performed without human intervention. Moreover, all the involved measurements from sensors are collected and made accessible for continuous monitoring of the process. By means of the proposed system, the JT procedure is conducted fully automatically and can be locally and remotely monitored in real-time. Furthermore, the developed system constitutes a portable laboratory that offers advantageous features like scalability and transportability. The proposed system is described focusing on hardware and instrumentation aspects, and successful results are reported. PMID:29019943

  5. Flow Cytometry: The Glass Is Half Empty.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Howard M

    2018-01-01

    In hopes of broadening the reader's perspective, this closing chapter discusses what flow cytometry cannot do; hence, the glass is half empty. Alternative methods using affordable and sustainable simple imaging cytometers are presented.

  6. Permutation glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mobolaji

    2018-01-01

    The field of disordered systems in statistical physics provides many simple models in which the competing influences of thermal and nonthermal disorder lead to new phases and nontrivial thermal behavior of order parameters. In this paper, we add a model to the subject by considering a disordered system where the state space consists of various orderings of a list. As in spin glasses, the disorder of such "permutation glasses" arises from a parameter in the Hamiltonian being drawn from a distribution of possible values, thus allowing nominally "incorrect orderings" to have lower energies than "correct orderings" in the space of permutations. We analyze a Gaussian, uniform, and symmetric Bernoulli distribution of energy costs, and, by employing Jensen's inequality, derive a simple condition requiring the permutation glass to always transition to the correctly ordered state at a temperature lower than that of the nondisordered system, provided that this correctly ordered state is accessible. We in turn find that in order for the correctly ordered state to be accessible, the probability that an incorrectly ordered component is energetically favored must be less than the inverse of the number of components in the system. We show that all of these results are consistent with a replica symmetric ansatz of the system. We conclude by arguing that there is no distinct permutation glass phase for the simplest model considered here and by discussing how to extend the analysis to more complex Hamiltonians capable of novel phase behavior and replica symmetry breaking. Finally, we outline an apparent correspondence between the presented system and a discrete-energy-level fermion gas. In all, the investigation introduces a class of exactly soluble models into statistical mechanics and provides a fertile ground to investigate statistical models of disorder.

  7. Children's Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerskog, Gunnar; Soderlund, Jan

    1980-07-01

    There is a common opinion among eye specialists and opticians that children's glasses often are not shaped for optimal fitting. A fundamental reason for this is the lack of data for the shaping of the bows, with the result that most children's glasses are reduced copies of adult's glasses. This report describes a photogrammetric method for collection of primary data for manufac-turing bows for children. An ordinary amateur camera was equipped with a stereo-adapter. With a few arrangements, such as projecting a pattern on the face and keeping the hair away from the ears, 600 children were photographed. A calibration photograph was exposed at the beginning and end of each film or when the equipment had been transported or otherwise disturbed. The photographs were measured in a stereocomparator and the coordinates analytically corrected for distortion. After determination of model coordinates the requested geometric information, such as pupillar distance, eye-ear distance, location of the bridge of the nose etc, was calculated. The shapes of average noses were presented as profile plots.

  8. Formulation of portland composite cement using waste glass as a supplementary cementitious material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manullang, Ria Julyana; Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Utilization of waste glass in cement is an attractive options because of its pozzolanic behaviour and the market of glass-composite cement is potentially available. The objective of this research is to evaluate the formulation of waste glass as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) by an extreme vertices mixture experiment, in which clinker, waste glass and gypsum proportions are chosen as experimental variables. The composite cements were synthesized by mixing all of powder materials in jar mill. The compressive strength of the composite cement mortars after being cured for 28 days ranges between 229 to 268 kg/cm2. Composite cement mortars exhibit lower compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars but is still capable of meeting the SNI 15-7064-2004 standards. The highest compressive strength is obtained by shifting the cement blend composition to the direction of increasing clinker and gypsum proportions as well as reducing glass proportion. The lower compressive strength of composite cement is caused by expansion due to ettringite and ASR gel. Based on the experimental result, the composite cement containing 80% clinker, 15% glass and 5% gypsum has the highest compressive strength. As such, the preliminary technical feasibility of reuse of waste glass as SCM has been confirmed.

  9. FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219/JAR1 Contributes to Shade Avoidance Responses of Arabidopsis Seedlings by Modulating Key Shade Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Swadhin; Jiang, Han-Wei; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2017-01-01

    To receive an ample amount of light, plants use elongation growth in response to vegetation shade. The combined interaction of light and hormones, including jasmonic acid (JA) signaling controls this elongation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the response are still emerging. FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219/JASMONATE RESISTANCE 1 (FIN219/JAR1), a cytoplasmic localized JA-conjugating enzyme, integrates far-red light and JA signaling. Here, we report that FIN219/JAR1 negatively regulates shade-induced hypocotyl elongation and gene expression in Arabidopsis seedlings in response to shade. In turn, simulated shade reduces FIN219 protein accumulation. Analysis of phyA 211 fin219-2 double mutants indicated that FIN219 and phyA are synergistic in regulating shade-induced hypocotyl elongation and gene expression. Moreover, FIN219 differentially affected the expression of the shade-signaling bHLH factors PIF5 and PAR1, thereby increasing the expression of the auxin-response genes IAA29 and SAUR68 on exposure to shade. Furthermore, the protein level of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) was affected in both fin219 mutants and overexpression lines as compared with the wild type under shade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of FIN219 inhibited the nuclear accumulation of COP1 in response to shade. Further co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that FIN219 interacted with COP1 and phyA under shade. Therefore, FIN219/JAR1 may play a vital role in modulating the Arabidopsis response to simulated shade via multiple layers of molecular mechanisms. PMID:29163619

  10. Bioactive Glasses: Frontiers and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hench, Larry L.; Jones, Julian R.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass–ceramics. In the 1980s, it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs. PMID:26649290

  11. Chemical Principles Revisited: The Chemistry of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a detailed discussion on the chemistry of glass. Topics discussed include: natural glass, early history, modern glass composition, raw materials for glass melting, chemically modified glasses, modern glass forming, glass ceramics, and new developments in glass research. (BT)

  12. A chemical study of individual green glasses and brown glasses from 15426 - Implications for their petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, M.-S.; Liu, Y.-G.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Systematic chemical analyses of individual Apollo 15 green glasses were performed in order to: (1) study chemical variations among them; (2) understand their petrogenesis and source region; and (3) study their possible relationships with mare basalts in general. Brown glasses were also analyzed in order to study their chemical variations and their petrogenetic relationships to green glasses and mare basalts. The chemical composition of green and brown glasses is shown and variation diagrams of Sc, Cr2O3, FeO, and Co abundances in green glasses are presented. Igneous fractionation, two component magma mixing, and partial melting of heterogeneous source materials are alternate scenarios to explain strong observed correlations. The composition of green glasses indicates that they were derived by partial melting of the fractionated cumulate source materials formed from a magma ocean which had experienced certain degrees of olivine and plagioclase fractional crystallization.

  13. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    DOEpatents

    McConnell, Robert D.; Vansant, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  14. Inverted glass harp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Daniel B.; Rosenberg, Brian J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an analytical treatment of the acoustics of liquid-filled wine glasses, or "glass harps." The solution is generalized such that under certain assumptions it reduces to previous glass harp models, but also leads to a proposed musical instrument, the "inverted glass harp," in which an empty glass is submerged in a liquid-filled basin. The versatility of the solution demonstrates that all glass harps are governed by a family of solutions to Laplace's equation around a vibrating disk. Tonal analyses of recordings for a sample glass are offered as confirmation of the scaling predictions.

  15. Alternate seal configuration for lithium primary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of glass degradation in the glass-to-metal seals in lithium/sulfur dioxide cells is discussed. The glass degradation mechanism is attributed to lithium reacting with glass which is a result of deposition of lithium at the glass/metal/electrolyte interface. The worst degradation was observed when cells were stored in the inverted position. Alternate sealing methods were examined and a modified Ziegler seal is considered to be one of the best possible methods. The seal consists of a crimp type soft seal using a plastic annulus and a metal tube. Results of degradation tests are presented.

  16. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  17. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  18. Levitation yields purer glass.

    PubMed

    Flinn, Edward D

    2004-02-01

    Recent developments regarding the development of REA1 Glass, a new glass which can be used in laser and optical communicatoins applications, are reviewed. The glass contains rare earth oxides, aluminum oxides, and silicon dioxide and is formulated in the Electrostatic Levitator at NASA Marshall Space Center. Because a variety of rare-earth elements can be incorporated into the glass, glasses with specific properties for specific tasks can be crafted.

  19. Picture Wall (Glass Structures)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Photo shows a subway station in Toronto, Ontario, which is entirely glass-enclosed. The all-glass structure was made possible by a unique glazing concept developed by PPG Industries, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of flat glass. In the TVS glazing system, transparent glass "fins" replace conventional vertical support members used to provide support for wind load resistance. For stiffening, silicone sealant bonds the fins to adjacent glass panels. At its glass research center near Pittsburgh, PPG Industries uses the NASTRAN computer program to analyze the stability of enclosures made entirely of glass. The company also uses NASTRAN to simulate stresses on large containers of molten glass and to analyze stress effects of solar heating on flat glass.

  20. Alternative High-Performance Ceramic Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    This final report (M5NU-12-NY-AU # 0202-0410) summarizes the results of the project titled “Alternative High-Performance Ceramic Waste Forms,” funded in FY12 by the Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP Project # 12-3809) being led by Alfred University in collaboration with Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The overall focus of the project is to advance fundamental understanding of crystalline ceramic waste forms and to demonstrate their viability as alternative waste forms to borosilicate glasses. We processed single- and multiphase hollandite waste forms based on simulated waste streams compositions provided by SRNL based on the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI) aqueous separation process developed in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D). For multiphase simulated waste forms, oxide and carbonate precursors were mixed together via ball milling with deionized water using zirconia media in a polyethylene jar for 2 h. The slurry was dried overnight and then separated from the media. The blended powders were then subjected to melting or spark plasma sintering (SPS) processes. Microstructural evolution and phase assemblages of these samples were studied using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion analysis of x-rays (EDAX), wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS), transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM), selective area x-ray diffraction (SAXD), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). These results showed that the processing methods have significant effect on the microstructure and thus the performance of these waste forms. The Ce substitution into zirconolite and pyrochlore materials was investigated using a combination of experimental (in situ XRD and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES)) and modeling techniques to study these single phases independently. In zirconolite materials, a transition from the 2M to the 4M polymorph was observed with increasing Ce content. The resulting

  1. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, R D

    1993-01-01

    Bioactive materials are designed to induce a specific biological activity; in most cases the desired biological activity is one that will give strong bonding to bone. A range of materials has been assessed as being capable of bonding to bone, but this paper is solely concerned with bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. Firstly, the structure and processing of glasses and glass-ceramics are described, as a basic knowledge is essential for the understanding of the development and properties of the bioactive materials. The effect of composition and structure on the bioactivity is then discussed, and it will be shown that bioactivity is associated with the formation of an apatite layer on the surface of the implant. A survey of mechanical performance demonstrates that the structure and mechanical properties of glass-ceramics depend upon whether the processing involves casting or sintering and that the strength and toughness of glass-ceramics are superior to those of glasses. Attempts to further improve the mechanical performance by the use of non-monolithic components, i.e. bioactive coatings on metal substrates and glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites, are also reviewed and are shown to have varying degrees of success. Finally, some miscellaneous applications, namely bioactive bone cements and bone fillers, are briefly covered.

  2. Reaction cured glass and glass coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B.; Katvala, V. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to reaction cured glass and glass coatings prepared by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, other boron silicides, boron and mixtures with a reactive glass frit composed of a porous high silica borosilicate glass and boron oxide. The glassy composites of the present invention are useful as coatings on low density fibrous porous silica insulations used as heat shields and for articles such as reaction vessels that are subjected to high temperatures with rapid heating and cooling and that require resistance to temperature and repeated thermal shock at temperatures up to about 1482C (2700PF).

  3. 6. Looking glass aircraft in the project looking glass historic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Looking glass aircraft in the project looking glass historic district. View to north. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  4. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  5. Stretched exponential relaxation in molecular and electronic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    1996-09-01

    Stretched exponential relaxation, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img1, fits many relaxation processes in disordered and quenched electronic and molecular systems, but it is widely believed that this function has no microscopic basis, especially in the case of molecular relaxation. For electronic relaxation the appearance of the stretched exponential is often described in the context of dispersive transport, where 0034-4885/59/9/003/img2 is treated as an adjustable parameter, but in almost all cases it is generally assumed that no microscopic meaning can be assigned to 0034-4885/59/9/003/img3 even at 0034-4885/59/9/003/img4, a glass transition temperature. We show that for molecular relaxation 0034-4885/59/9/003/img5 can be understood, providing that one separates extrinsic and intrinsic effects, and that the intrinsic effects are dominated by two magic numbers, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img6 for short-range forces, and 0034-4885/59/9/003/img7 for long-range Coulomb forces, as originally observed by Kohlrausch for the decay of residual charge on a Leyden jar. Our mathematical model treats relaxation kinetics using the Lifshitz - Kac - Luttinger diffusion to traps depletion model in a configuration space of effective dimensionality, the latter being determined using axiomatic set theory and Phillips - Thorpe constraint theory. The experiments discussed include ns neutron scattering experiments, particularly those based on neutron spin echoes which measure S( Q,t) directly, and the traditional linear response measurements which span the range from 0034-4885/59/9/003/img8 to s, as collected and analysed phenomenologically by Angell, Ngai, Böhmer and others. The electronic materials discussed include a-Si:H, granular 0034-4885/59/9/003/img9, semiconductor nanocrystallites, charge density waves in 0034-4885/59/9/003/img10, spin glasses, and vortex glasses in high-temperature semiconductors. The molecular materials discussed include polymers, network glasses, electrolytes and alcohols, Van

  6. Analytical investigation of Mudéjar polychrome on the carpentry in the Casa de Pilatos palace in Seville using non-destructive XRF and complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrote, M. A.; Robador, M. D.; Perez-Rodriguez, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    The pigments, execution technique and repainting used on the polychrome wood ceilings and doors in the Casa de Pilatos (Seville, Spain) were studied using portable X-ray fluorescence equipment. Cross-sections of small samples were also analysed by optical microscopy, SEM with EDX analysis, micro-Raman and micro-infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These carpentry works are magnificent examples of the Mudéjar art made in Spain in the early 16th century. Portable X-ray fluorescence gave good information on the different components of the polychrome. The SEM-EDX study of the surfaces of small samples gave information on their components and also characterized the compounds that had been deposited or formed by environmental contamination or by the alteration of some pigments. The SEM-EDX study of cross-sections facilitated the characterization of all layers and pigments from the support to the most external layer. The following pigments were characterized: red (cinnabar/vermillion, lead oxide, iron oxides and orpiment/realgar), black (carbon black), white (white lead and titanium barium white), yellow-orange-red-brown (orpiment/realgar and iron oxides), green (chromium oxide), blue (indigo blue and ultramarine blue), and gilding (gold leaf on bole). False gold, bronze and brass were also found. The pigments were applied with the oil painting technique over a support layer that had been primed with animal glue. This support layer was gypsum in some cases and white lead in others. This study is essential to the polychrome conservation of the studied artwork, and it will help clarify uncertainties in the history and painting of Mudéjar art.

  7. Glass in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Neville

    2005-01-01

    Glass is reviewed from fabrication to application, laying emphasis on the wide-ranging physics involved. This begins with liquids and solids and the way in which glasses are defined and can be demonstrated in the classroom. At the atomic level the regular structure of crystals and their irregular counterparts in glasses are explained through…

  8. Technique for Machining Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Process for machining glass with conventional carbide tools requires a small quantity of a lubricant for aluminum applied to area of glass to be machined. A carbide tool is then placed against workpiece with light pressure. Tool is raised periodically to clear work of glass dust and particles. Additional lubricant is applied as it is displaced.

  9. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  10. Oxynitride glass production procedure

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Schuetz, Stanley T.; O'Brien, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the preparation of high quality oxynitride glasses without resorting to high pressures. Nitrogen-containing compounds such as Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are first encapsulated in a low melting temperature glass. Particles of the encapsulated nitrogen-containing compound are mixed with other oxide glass-formers and melted in an atmosphere of flowing nitrogen and in the presence of buffering gas to form the oxynitride glass. Glasses containing up to 15 at % nitrogen have been prepared by this method.

  11. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  12. Acoustics of glass harmonicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    2004-05-01

    Glass musical instruments are probably as old as glassmaking. At least as early as the 17th century it was discovered that wine glasses, when rubbed with a wet finger, produced a musical tone. A collection of glasses played in this manner is called a glass harp. Another type of glass harmonica, called the armonica by its inventor Benjamin Franklin, employs glass bowls or cups turned by a horizontal axle, so the performer need only touch the rim of the bowls as they rotate to set them into vibration. We discuss the modes of vibration of both types of glass harmonica, and describe the different sounds that are emitted by rubbing, tapping, or bowing them. Rubbing with a wet finger tends to excite only the (2,0) mode and its harmonics through a ``stick-slip'' process, while tapping excites the other modes as well.

  13. Comprehensive Chemical Characterisation of Byzantine Glass Weights

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine; Meek, Andrew; Tobias, Bendeguz; Entwistle, Chris; Avisseau-Broustet, Mathilde; Da Mota, Henrique; Gratuze, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the glass trade in the first millennium CE relies on the characterisation of well-dated compositional groups and the identification of their primary production sites. 275 Byzantine glass weights from the British Museum and the Bibliothèque nationale de France dating to the sixth and seventh century were analysed by LA-ICP-MS. Multivariate statistical and graphical data analysis discriminated between six main primary glass types. Primary glass sources were differentiated based on multi-dimensional comparison of silica-derived elements (MgO, Al2O3, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ZrO2) and components associated with the alkali source (Li2O, B2O3). Along with Egyptian and Levantine origins of the glassmaking sands, variations in the natron source possibly point to the exploitation of two different natron deposits. Differences in strontium to calcium ratios revealed variations in the carbonate fractions in the sand. At least two cobalt sources were employed as colouring agents, one of which shows strong correlations with nickel, indicating a specific post-Roman cobalt source. Typological evidence identified chronological developments in the use of the different glass groups. Throughout the sixth century, Byzantine glass weights were predominately produced from two glasses that are probably of an Egyptian origin (Foy-2 and Foy-2 high Fe). Towards the second half of the sixth century a new but related plant-ash glass type emerged (Magby). Levantine I was likewise found among the late sixth- to early seventh-century samples. The use of different dies for the same batch testifies to large-scale, centralised production of the weights, while the same die used for different primary production groups demonstrates the co-existence of alternative sources of supply. Given the comprehensive design of our study, these results can be extrapolated to the wider early Byzantine glass industry and its changes at large. PMID:27959963

  14. Comprehensive Chemical Characterisation of Byzantine Glass Weights.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine; Meek, Andrew; Tobias, Bendeguz; Entwistle, Chris; Avisseau-Broustet, Mathilde; Da Mota, Henrique; Gratuze, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the glass trade in the first millennium CE relies on the characterisation of well-dated compositional groups and the identification of their primary production sites. 275 Byzantine glass weights from the British Museum and the Bibliothèque nationale de France dating to the sixth and seventh century were analysed by LA-ICP-MS. Multivariate statistical and graphical data analysis discriminated between six main primary glass types. Primary glass sources were differentiated based on multi-dimensional comparison of silica-derived elements (MgO, Al2O3, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ZrO2) and components associated with the alkali source (Li2O, B2O3). Along with Egyptian and Levantine origins of the glassmaking sands, variations in the natron source possibly point to the exploitation of two different natron deposits. Differences in strontium to calcium ratios revealed variations in the carbonate fractions in the sand. At least two cobalt sources were employed as colouring agents, one of which shows strong correlations with nickel, indicating a specific post-Roman cobalt source. Typological evidence identified chronological developments in the use of the different glass groups. Throughout the sixth century, Byzantine glass weights were predominately produced from two glasses that are probably of an Egyptian origin (Foy-2 and Foy-2 high Fe). Towards the second half of the sixth century a new but related plant-ash glass type emerged (Magby). Levantine I was likewise found among the late sixth- to early seventh-century samples. The use of different dies for the same batch testifies to large-scale, centralised production of the weights, while the same die used for different primary production groups demonstrates the co-existence of alternative sources of supply. Given the comprehensive design of our study, these results can be extrapolated to the wider early Byzantine glass industry and its changes at large.

  15. Alternative security

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview.

  16. Glass and glass-ceramic photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zur, Lidia; Thi Ngoc Tran, Lam; Meneghetti, Marcello; Varas, Stefano; Armellini, Cristina; Ristic, Davor; Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Pelli, Stefano; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Boulard, Brigitte; Zonta, Daniele; Dorosz, Dominik; Lukowiak, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The development of optically confined structure is a major topic in both basic and applied physics not solely ICT oriented but also concerning lighting, laser, sensing, energy, environment, biological and medical sciences, and quantum optics. Glasses and glass-ceramics activated by rare earth ions are the bricks of such structures. Glass-ceramics are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing developing new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. The dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the fabrication protocol still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters. This paper presents some results obtained by our consortium regarding glass-based photonics systems. We will comment the energy transfer mechanism in transparent glass ceramics taking as examples the up and down conversion systems and the role of SnO2 nanocrystals as sensitizers. Coating of spherical resonators by glass ceramics, 1D-Photonic Crystals for luminescence enhancement, laser action and disordered 1-D photonic structures will be also discussed. Finally, RF-Sputtered rare earth doped P2O5- SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Er2O3 planar waveguides, will be presented.

  17. Dissolution Kinetics of Hot Compressed Oxide Glasses.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Nerea; Bauchy, Mathieu; Fierro, José Luis G; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M

    2017-09-28

    The chemical durability of oxide glasses is an important property for a wide range of applications and can in some cases be tuned through composition optimization. However, these possibilities are relatively limited because around 3/5 of the atoms in most oxide glasses are oxygens. An alternative approach involves post-treatment of the glass. In this work, we focus on the effect of hot compression on dissolution kinetics because it is known to improve, for example, elastic moduli and hardness, whereas its effect on chemical durability is poorly understood. Specifically, we study the bulk glass dissolution rate of phosphate, silicophosphate, borophosphate, borosilicate, and aluminoborosilicate glasses, which have been compressed at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 GPa at the glass transition temperature (T g ). We perform weight loss and supplementary modifier leaching measurements of bulk samples immersed in acid (pH 2) and neutral (pH 7) solutions. Compression generally improves the chemical durability as measured from weight loss, but the effect is highly composition- and pressure-dependent. As such, we show that the dissolution mechanisms depend on the topological changes induced by permanent densification, which in turn are a function of the changes in the number of nonbridging oxygens and the network cross-linking. We also demonstrate a direct relationship between the chemical durability and the number of chemical topological constraints per atom (n c ) acting within the molecular network.

  18. Apollo 15 green glasses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, W. I.; Reid, A. M.; Warner, J. L.; Brown, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The samples analyzed include 28 spheres, portions of spheres, and angular fragments from soil 15101. Emerald green glasses from other soils are identical to those from 15101. The composition of the green glass is unlike that of any other major lunar glass group. The Fe content is comparable to that in mare basalts, but Ti is much lower. The Mg content is much higher than in most lunar materials analyzed to date, and the Cr content is also high. The low Al content is comparable to that of mare basalt glasses.

  19. Glass--Sand + Imagination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris K.

    2000-07-01

    Glass is older than recorded history, and yet it is as new as tomorrow! How, when, or where man first learned to make glass is not known, but we do know that the ancient Egyptians were making glass articles as early as 2,600 B.C.E. (The making of glass beads may have begun as much as 3000 years earlier.) They used it to make jewelry and luxury items, such as decorative bowls and perfume bottles, available only to the wealthy.

  20. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  1. Dramatic Stained Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prater, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-glass windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-glass windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)

  2. Getting Started with Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The metamorphosis of glass when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with glass in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…

  3. Surface Conductive Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  4. Method for making glass

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-12-31

    A method for making better quality molten (borosilicate and other) glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the a ass constituents that are fed into the melterin accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter`s operating temperature until they meltmore » and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a ``non-bridging oxygen`` term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.« less

  5. Method for making glass

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    A method for making better quality molten (borosilicate and other) glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the a ass constituents that are fed into the melterin accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they meltmore » and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.« less

  6. Photoprotection by window glass, automobile glass, and sunglasses.

    PubMed

    Tuchinda, Chanisada; Srivannaboon, Sabong; Lim, Henry W

    2006-05-01

    In daily activity, much time is spent indoors and in vehicles. Although the adverse effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation is now well recognized and active public education programs on photoprotection have been undertaken, the role of window glass in photoprotection has been rarely addressed. It has been known for some time that window glass filters out UVB and transmits UVA and visible light. Recent developments in the glass industry have resulted in glass that provides broad UV protection without the historically associated loss of visible light transmission. Factors affecting UV-protective properties of glass are glass type, glass color, interleave between glass, and glass coating. In this article, photoprotection by window glass, automobile glass, and sunglasses is reviewed.

  7. Mixed effects modelling for glass category estimation from glass refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Lucy, David; Zadora, Grzegorz

    2011-10-10

    520 Glass fragments were taken from 105 glass items. Each item was either a container, a window, or glass from an automobile. Each of these three classes of use are defined as glass categories. Refractive indexes were measured both before, and after a programme of re-annealing. Because the refractive index of each fragment could not in itself be observed before and after re-annealing, a model based approach was used to estimate the change in refractive index for each glass category. It was found that less complex estimation methods would be equivalent to the full model, and were subsequently used. The change in refractive index was then used to calculate a measure of the evidential value for each item belonging to each glass category. The distributions of refractive index change were considered for each glass category, and it was found that, possibly due to small samples, members of the normal family would not adequately model the refractive index changes within two of the use types considered here. Two alternative approaches to modelling the change in refractive index were used, one employed more established kernel density estimates, the other a newer approach called log-concave estimation. Either method when applied to the change in refractive index was found to give good estimates of glass category, however, on all performance metrics kernel density estimates were found to be slightly better than log-concave estimates, although the estimates from log-concave estimation prossessed properties which had some qualitative appeal not encapsulated in the selected measures of performance. These results and implications of these two methods of estimating probability densities for glass refractive indexes are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Roche, Michael F.

    1985-01-01

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na.sub.2 O, ZrO.sub.2, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and SiO.sub.2 in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2.times.10.sup.-3 (ohm-cm).sup.-1 at 300.degree. C. and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500.degree. C.

  9. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

    1985-01-08

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

  10. Organotin compounds enhance 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I activity in human choriocarcinoma JAr cells: potential promotion of 17beta-estradiol biosynthesis in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Hiromori, Youhei; Yokoyama, Hideaki; Koyanagi, Mihoko; Itoh, Norio; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2006-04-28

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals because they cause masculinization in female mollusks. However, it remains unclear whether organotin compounds also cause crucial toxicities in human sexual development and reproductive functions. We investigated the effects of 17 tin compounds on the catalytic activity and mRNA expression of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (17beta-HSD I) in human choriocarcinoma JAr cells. At nontoxic concentrations, both trialkyltins with propyl, butyl or cyclohexyl substituents on the tin atom and triphenyltin (TPT) enhanced 17beta-HSD I mRNA transcription and enzyme activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Although tetraalkyltin compounds such as tetrabutyltin and tributylvinyltin also increased the mRNA expression and enzyme activity of 17beta-HSD I, the concentrations necessary for activation were >30-100 times greater than those for trialkyltins. Inorganic tin had no effect on the catalytic activity and mRNA expression of 17beta-HSD I. Interestingly, diphenyltin and monophenyltin, which are metabolites of TPT, enhanced 17beta-HSD I activity with a concomitant increase in mRNA expression, whereas dibutyltin and monobutyltin, which are metabolites of tributyltin, enhanced 17beta-HSD I activity without a concomitant increase in mRNA expression. These results suggest that organotin compounds are potent stimulators of 17beta-estradiol biosynthesis to enhance 17beta-HSD I activity in the human placenta in vitro; the placenta represents a potential target organ for these compounds, whose endocrine-disrupting effects might be the result of local changes in 17beta-estradiol concentrations in pregnant women.

  11. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  12. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  13. Metallic Spin Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Anirvan

    1998-03-01

    Metallic Spin-glasses have drawn much experimental and theoretical attention in recent years(A. M. Sengupta and A. Georges, Phys. Rev. B52, 10295 (1995); S. Sachdev, N. Read and R. Opperman, Phys. Rev. B52, 10286 (1995); F. Steglich, et al., J. Phys. Condens. Matter 8, 99099 (1996).). One particularly interesting aspect of this system is the non-fermi-liquid behavior near the zero temperature transition between paramagnetic phase and spin-glass phase. In this talk we discuss a local mean-field theory which addresses some of the main issues. We also point out some major differences between Ising Spin-glass and Heisenberg spin-glass near the transition, within this mean field theory.(A. M. Sengupta, preprint, Cond-Mat. 9707316.)

  14. Glass Stronger than Steel

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  15. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  16. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, Sherman; Volin, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  17. Metallic glass composition

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  18. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  19. Containerless synthesis of interesting glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    One aspect of containerless glass experimentation was thoroughly examined: glass forming ability. It is argued that although containerless processing will abet glass formation, other ground-based methods can do the job better. However, these methods have limitations, such as sample dimensions and concomitant ability to make property measurements. Most importantly, perhaps, is the observation that glass properties are a function of preparation procedure. Thus, it seems as though there still is an argument for use of containerless processing for glass forming.

  20. Glass microsphere lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  1. Paleomagnetism of Lonar Crater Impact Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Weiss, B. P.; Maloof, A. C.; Stewart, S. T.; Louzada, K. L.; Soule, S. A.; Swanson-Hysell, N.

    2006-12-01

    The source of magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies is largely unknown. There is particularly little information about magnetic fields on asteroids and the Moon for the last 3 billion years because most samples from these bodies predate this time. An exception is the small amount of impact-melt which has been continuously created by hypervelocity impactors over most of solar system history. Impact melt can be used to test the controversial hypothesis that magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies were predominantly the product of impact-produced plasmas rather than of core dynamos. However, to date only a small amount of impact melt has been analyzed paleomagnetically. To assess the quality of impact melts as recorders of magnetic fields, in January 2004 and January 2005 we collected thousands of samples of basaltic glass from the perimeter of Lonar Crater, a 1.8 km diameter impact crater which formed approximately 50,000 years ago in the Deccan Traps in Maharashtra, India. Lonar crater is a unique extraterrestrial analog because it is the only fresh impact crater on the Earth in a basaltic target. Most glass samples have rounded features and are between 0.01 and 1 cm in size, indicating that they are fladen and impact spherules (microtektites) formed from molten ejecta that cooled in mid-air while subject to rotational and aerodynamic forces. We have found that both types of glasses are strongly magnetic (saturation remanence of ~2 A m-1), contain ferromagnetic crystals that are predominantly single domain in size, and have no significant remanence anisotropy. The glasses also carry a natural remanent magnetization (NRM) presumably acquired just after the impact. However, alternating field demagnetization results in large directional changes of the magnetic moment, with little decrease in moment intensity. We interpret this unusual behavior as progressive removal of different coercivity components that cooled while the orientation of the spinning glasses

  2. Microfluidic devices obtained by thermal toner transferring on glass substrate.

    PubMed

    do Lago, Claudimir L; Neves, Carlos A; Pereira de Jesus, Dosil; da Silva, Heron D T; Brito-Neto, José G A; Fracassi da Silva, José A

    2004-11-01

    A new process for the manufacture of microfluidic devices based on deposition of laser-printing toner on glass substrates is described. It is an alternative method to the toner on polyester film (toner-polyester) one, previously introduced. Commercial laser printers cannot print directly on glass, thus the toner must first be printed on a special paper and then transferred by heating under pressure to the glass surface. Although this procedure is more complex than the toner-polyester one, it can be repeated several times, yielding multiple toner layers. Even without special alignment equipment, up to four layers could be satisfactorily piled up. Characterization tests revealed that the toner-glass devices have similar behavior as toner-polyester ones regarding the toner layer porosity. The main advantages of the toner-glass technology are improved mechanical stability, possibility of multiple toner layers, augmented electroosmotic flow (EOF), and improved heat transfer. On the other hand, toner adhesion to glass is weaker than to polyester, which limits the device lifetime and usable liquid media. The measured EOF mobility (3.5 x 10(-4) cm2.V(-1).s(-1) for pH 7) suggests that it is mainly determined by the glass surface, being little influenced by the toner walls. Microchip electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection and photometric detection were implemented using toner-glass devices.

  3. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glassmore » beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to

  4. Active faults, seismicity and stresses in an internal boundary of a tectonic arc (Campo de Dalías and Níjar, southeastern Betic Cordilleras, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis Roberto; Serrano, Inmaculada; Pedrera, Antonio

    2005-02-01

    The Betic-Rif Cordilleras, formed by the interaction of NW-SE convergence between the Eurasian and African plates and the westward motion of their Internal Zones, provide a good example of an active tectonic arc. The Campo de Dalías and Campo de Níjar constitute outcropping sectors of Neogene and Quaternary rocks located in the southeastern border of the Betic Cordilleras and allow us to study the recent deformations developed in the internal border of this tectonic arc. The main active faults with related seismicity, representing a moderate seismic hazard, associated to the southeastern Betic Cordilleras boundary, include high-angle NW-SE-oriented normal faults that affect, at least, the upper part of the crust, a main detachment located at 10 km depth, and probably another detachment at 20 km as well. Seismite structures, recent fault scarps with associated colluvial wedges that deform the drainage network and the alignment of the coastline, indicate that the high-angle faults have been active at least since the Quaternary. Paleostresses determined from microfault analysis in Quaternary deposits generally show an ENE-WSW trend of extension. Present-day earthquake focal mechanisms include normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting. Normal and strike-slip focal mechanisms generally indicate ENE-WSW extension, and strike-slip and reverse focal mechanisms are related to NNW-SSE compression. The maximum horizontal compression has a consistently NNW-SSE trend. The deep activity of detachments and reverse faults determines the NNW-SSE crustal shortening related to the Eurasian-African plate convergence. At surface, however, the predominance of normal faults is probably produced by the increase in the relative weight of the vertical stress axis, which in turn may be related to relief uplift and subsequent horizontal spreading. The internal mountain front boundary of the Betic Cordilleras developed through the activity of a set of structures that is more complex than a

  5. Glass matrix armor

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  6. Damage characterization of E-glass and C-glass fibre polymer composites after high velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, N.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Cardona, F.; Jawaid, M.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to identify impact damage on glass fibre reinforced polymer composite structures after high velocity impact. In this research, Type C-glass (600 g/m2) and Type E-glass (600 g/m2) were used to fabricate Glass Fibre-Reinforced Polymer composites (GFRP) plates. The panels were fabricated using a vacuum bagging and hot bounder method. Single stage gas gun (SSGG) was used to do the testing and data acquisition system was used to collect the damage data. Different types of bullets and different pressure levels were used for the experiment. The obtained results showed that the C-glass type of GFRP experienced more damage in comparison to E-glass type of materials based on the amount of energy absorbed on impact and the size of the damage area. All specimens underwent a partial fibre breakage but the laminates were not fully penetrated by the bullets. This indicated that both types of materials have high impact resistance even though the applied pressures of the gas gun were on the high range. We concluded that within the material specifications of the laminates including the type of glass fibre reinforcement and the thickness of the panels, those composite materials are safe to be applied in structural and body armour applications as an alternative to more expensive materials such as Kevlar and type S-glass fibre based panels.

  7. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    DOEpatents

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  8. Glass formation - A contemporary view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhlmann, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The process of glass formation is discussed from several perspectives. Particular attention is directed to kinetic treatments of glass formation and to the question of how fast a given liquid must be cooled in order to form a glass. Specific consideration is paid to the calculation of critical cooling rates for glass formation, to the effects of nucleating heterogeneities and transients in nucleation on the critical cooling rates, to crystallization on reheating a glass, to the experimental determination of nucleation rates and barriers to crystal nucleation, and to the characteristics of materials which are most conducive to glass formation.

  9. Porous vycor glass tube joined to borosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shinichi; Kikuchi, Takemitsu; Onodera, Shinji

    1992-09-01

    Porous glass can absorb various size of molecules with large surface area even in high temperature. However, it is difficult to use porous glass tubes at high-temperature, for example as a separation membrane for hydrogen condensation, because adhesives at joining sites could be damaged. In this study, welding of a porous glass tube and a glass tube was attempted to develop a gas separation membrane used at 500 C. Since forms present in porous glass may cause crack at high temperature, it is necessary to remove such forms by heat processing. Such porous glass is called to be porous vycor glass, which contains quartz 6 percents, and can be joined with a quartz tube. As a result, a gas separator with porous glass membrane which is joined by this process could endure high temperature up to 600 C and could maintain high vacuum.

  10. Glass and ceramics. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of glasses and ceramics can be produced from bulk lunar materials or from separated components. Glassy products include sintered regolith, quenched molten basalt, and transparent glass formed from fused plagioclase. No research has been carried out on lunar material or close simulants, so properties are not known in detail; however, common glass technologies such as molding and spinning seem feasible. Possible methods for producing glass and ceramic materials are discussed along with some potential uses of the resulting products.

  11. Shimmering Stained Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Gail Murray

    1998-01-01

    Presents an art lesson for fifth- and sixth-graders where they create a translucent design of colored cellophane on black paper inspired by the stained-glass windows of the Middle Ages and the artwork of Lewis Comfort Tiffany. Enables the students to become crafts people rather than just observers of the past. (CMK)

  12. Glasses for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... may play an important role in ensuring normal development of vision. The main reasons a child may need glasses are: • To provide better vision, so that a child may function better in his/her environment • To help straighten the eyes when they are ...

  13. Glass-matrix biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Verné, E; Brovarone, C V; Milanese, D

    2000-01-01

    CaO-SiO(2) base glass-matrix/Ti particle biocomposite coatings on Ti6Al4V substrates have been prepared by means of Vacuum Plasma Spray. The base glass is considered bioactive, because, when soaked in a fluid that simulates the inorganic ion concentration of human plasma (SBF), it develops a bonelike apatite layer on its surface. The aim of this research activity was to toughen this brittle bioactive material and to broaden its biomedical applications. Pure titanium was chosen as toughening phase because of its well-known biocompatibility, and Ti6Al4V alloy as substrate because of both its biocompatibility and its mechanical reliability. At first the composites were prepared as bulk materials, by means of a simple sintering process. Then, by ball-milling the sintered composite, the as-obtained "composite powders" were sprayed by Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) on the substrate. By means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), the characteristic temperatures of the base glasses were determined. The thermal properties of mixtures of glass powders and different vol% Ti particles were studied by means of DTA, DSC, hot-stage microscopy, and dilatometry, with the aim of optimizing the sintering conditions. Both the bulk and the coated samples have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), compositional analysis (EDS), Vickers indentations, and leaching tests after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  15. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  16. Stained-Glass Pastels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    The author has always liked the look of stained-glass windows. Usually the designs are simplified and the shapes are easier for younger students to draw. This technique seemed to be the perfect place for her fifth-graders to try their hand at color mixing. The smaller spaces and simple shapes were just what she needed for this group. Her students…

  17. Alternative metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    As the old 'publish or perish' adage is brought into question, additional research-impact indices, known as altmetrics, are offering new evaluation alternatives. But such metrics may need to adjust to the evolution of science publishing.

  18. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  19. Approaching the ideal elastic limit of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lin; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Wang, Cheng-Cai; Han, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2012-01-01

    The ideal elastic limit is the upper bound to the stress and elastic strain a material can withstand. This intrinsic property has been widely studied for crystalline metals, both theoretically and experimentally. For metallic glasses, however, the ideal elastic limit remains poorly characterized and understood. Here we show that the elastic strain limit and the corresponding strength of submicron-sized metallic glass specimens are about twice as high as the already impressive elastic limit observed in bulk metallic glass samples, in line with model predictions of the ideal elastic limit of metallic glasses. We achieve this by employing an in situ transmission electron microscope tensile deformation technique. Furthermore, we propose an alternative mechanism for the apparent 'work hardening' behaviour observed in the tensile stress–strain curves. PMID:22215084

  20. Google glass based immunochromatographic diagnostic test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Steve; Caire, Romain; Cortazar, Bingen; Turan, Mehmet; Wong, Andrew; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Integration of optical imagers and sensors into recently emerging wearable computational devices allows for simpler and more intuitive methods of integrating biomedical imaging and medical diagnostics tasks into existing infrastructures. Here we demonstrate the ability of one such device, the Google Glass, to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis of immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) using a voice-commandable hands-free software-only interface, as an alternative to larger and more bulky desktop or handheld units. Using the built-in camera of Glass to image one or more RDTs (labeled with Quick Response (QR) codes), our Glass software application uploads the captured image and related information (e.g., user name, GPS, etc.) to our servers for remote analysis and storage. After digital analysis of the RDT images, the results are transmitted back to the originating Glass device, and made available through a website in geospatial and tabular representations. We tested this system on qualitative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) RDTs. For qualitative HIV tests, we demonstrate successful detection and labeling (i.e., yes/no decisions) for up to 6-fold dilution of HIV samples. For quantitative measurements, we activated and imaged PSA concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL and generated calibration curves relating the RDT line intensity values to PSA concentration. By providing automated digitization of both qualitative and quantitative test results, this wearable colorimetric diagnostic test reader platform on Google Glass can reduce operator errors caused by poor training, provide real-time spatiotemporal mapping of test results, and assist with remote monitoring of various biomedical conditions.

  1. Bioactive calcium pyrophosphate glasses and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Calcium phosphate glass-based materials in the pyrophosphate region are briefly reviewed. Calcium pyrophosphate glasses can be prepared by including a small amount of TiO(2) (glasses in simulated body fluid. By heating powder-compacts of the glasses, they are crystallized and subsequently are sintered, resulting in fabrication of high-strength glass-ceramics with machinability; they are easier to be machined using conventional tools in comparison with conventional calcium phosphate ceramics. beta-Ca(2)P(2)O(7) crystal formed in the glass-ceramics plays an important role in the machinability. Their apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid is drastically enhanced after autoclaving in distilled water. The glass-ceramics can be easily coated on a new beta-type titanium alloy using a conventional glazing technique.

  2. U-based metallic glasses with superior glass forming ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongyang; Ke, Haibo; Huang, Huogen; Zhang, Pengguo; Pu, Zhen; Zhang, Pei; Liu, Tianwei

    2018-02-01

    By using Al as the third and B as the fourth but minor alloying elements for the U66.7Co33.3 basic metallic glass, a series of U-Co-Al(-B) alloys were designed. The quaternary U-Co-Al-B alloys exhibit significantly improved glass-forming ability (GFA) than previously reported U-based metallic glasses. Low fragility (∼24) is found for these new U-based metallic glasses. The improvement in GFA would result from denser atomic packing in the undercooled liquids due to the presence of small B atoms. Some U-Co-Al(-B) glasses showed corrosion resistance comparable to that of U64Co34Al2 glass, known for premium anti-corrosive performance among the unveiled U-based glasses.

  3. Profiles in garbage glass containers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1997-09-01

    Glass containers are made from sand, limestone, soda ash, cullet (crushed bottles), and various additives, including those used to color brown, green, or blue bottles. Sixty percent of the glass used in the US is clear (flint) and one-fourth is brown (amber). Almost half of the green bottles are imported wind and beer bottles. Other glass products include flat glass such as windows; fiberglass insulation; and glassware. These products use different manufacturing processes and different additives than container glass. This profile covers only container glass. Glass bottles are commonly collected in curb-side programs. Losses due to breakage and the abrasivenessmore » of glass during collection and processing offset their low collection and processing costs. Breakage solutions include installation of interior baffles or nets in the collection trucks, special glass-only truck compartments, and limiting the number of times glass is transferred after collection before final processing. Ten states require deposits on glass bottles for beer and soft drinks and related items.« less

  4. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  5. Fun with singing wine glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency against water volume percent are made using a spreadsheet. Students can also play combinations of pitches with several glasses. A video (Ruiz 2018 Video: Singing glasses http://mjtruiz.com/ped/wineglasses/) is provided which includes an excerpt of a beautiful piece written for singing glasses and choir: Stars by Latvian composer Ēriks Ešenvalds.

  6. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  7. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  8. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.

  9. Spin Glass Patch Planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Mandra, Salvatore; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a patch planting method for creating arbitrarily large spin glass instances with known ground states. The scaling of the computational complexity of these instances with various block numbers and sizes is investigated and compared with random instances using population annealing Monte Carlo and the quantum annealing DW2X machine. The method can be useful for benchmarking tests for future generation quantum annealing machines, classical and quantum mechanical optimization algorithms.

  10. Picritic glasses from Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Weber, W.S.; Dixon, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    ESTIMATES of the MgO content of primary Hawaiian tholeiitic melts range from 8wt% to as high as 25wt% (refs 1, 2). In general, these estimates are derived from analysis of the whole-rock composition of lavas, coupled with the compositions of the most magnesian olivine phenocrysts observed. But the best estimate of magma composition comes from volcanic glass, as it represents the liquid composition at the time of quenching; minimal changes occur during the quenching process. Here we report the discovery of tholeiitic basalt glasses, recovered offshore of Kilauea volcano, that contain up to 15.0 wt% MgO. To our knowledge, these are the most magnesian glasses, and have the highest eruption temperatures (??? 1,316 ??C), yet found. The existence of these picritic (high-MgO) liquids provides constraints on the temperature structure of the upper mantle, magma transport and the material and thermal budgets of the Hawaiian volcanoes. Furthermore, picritic melts are affected little by magma-reservoir processes, and it is therefore relatively straightforward to extrapolate back to the composition of the primary melt and its volatile contents.

  11. Alternative Conceptualizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; O'Reilly, Patricia, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains five articles devoted to the topic of "Alternative Conceptualizations" of the foundations of education. In "The Concept of Place in the New Sociology of Education," Paul Theobald examines the notion of place in educational theory and practice. Janice…

  12. Magnetostrictive Alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger; Bruder, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This innovation replaces the linear alternator presently used in Stirling engines with a continuous-gradient, impedance-matched, oscillating magnetostrictive transducer that eliminates all moving parts via compression, maintains high efficiency, costs less to manufacture, reduces mass, and eliminates the need for a bearing system. The key components of this new technology are the use of stacked magnetostrictive materials, such as Terfenol-D, under a biased magnetic and stress-induced compression, continuous-gradient impedance-matching material, coils, force-focusing metallic structure, and supports. The acoustic energy from the engine travels through an impedancematching layer that is physically connected to the magnetostrictive mass. Compression bolts keep the structure under compressive strain, allowing for the micron-scale compression of the magnetostrictive material and eliminating the need for bearings. The relatively large millimeter displacement of the pressure side of the impedance-matching material is reduced to micron motion, and undergoes stress amplification at the magnetostrictive interface. The alternating compression and expansion of the magnetostrictive material creates an alternating magnetic field that then induces an electric current in a coil that is wound around the stack. This produces electrical power from the acoustic pressure wave and, if the resonant frequency is tuned to match the engine, can replace the linear alternator that is commonly used.

  13. Alternative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Explains how advances in diesel and alternative fuels has caused schools to reconsider their use for their bus fleets. Reductions in air pollution emissions, cost-savings developments, and the economies experienced from less downtime and maintenance requirements are explored. (GR)

  14. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University ofmore » Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.« less

  15. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  16. Mixed Glass Former Effect In Silver Molybdophosphate and Borophosphate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, B.; Kabi, S.; Ghosh, A.

    2011-07-01

    We report the study of electrical properties of some silver ion conducting molybdophosphate and borophosphate mixed network former glasses in a wide frequency and temperature range. The dc conductivity of the mixed network former glasses is higher than that of the single network former glasses. The ac conductivity spectra show a power law type dependence on frequency. The frequency exponent obtained from ac conductivity is observed to be independent of both temperature and composition.

  17. Tellurium based glasses: A ruthless glass to crystal competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Bruno; Danto, Sylvain; Ma, Hong Li; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Zhang, Xiang Hua; Lucas, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    Although selenium and tellurium are very close in the periodic table, their ability to form glasses is totally different. Indeed, selenium based glasses are very common and stable whereas pure tellurium glasses need an extremely fast quenching such as splash cooling. Consequently, tellurium glasses are very suitable for the fast and reversible glass to crystal transformation for optical storage applications. In particular, glasses of the ternary system Ge/Sb/Te are the most appropriate to observe phase transformation under laser beam irradiation for the Digital Versatile Disk (DVD) technology. Also, Te based glasses could be very interesting to produce optics for the far infrared, thanks to their low phonon character due to the high atomic weight of Te. Especially, some new tellurium glasses of the system Ge/Ga/Te/I are currently in development for infrared detection of exoplanet within the framework of the Darwin mission. In this contribution an overview covering the past two decades is proposed on the chemistry and the potential applications of these original glasses.

  18. Complexity of Curved Glass Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosić, T.; Svetel, I.; Cekić, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Despite the increasing number of research on the architectural structures of curvilinear forms and technological and practical improvement of the glass production observed over recent years, there is still a lack of comprehensive codes and standards, recommendations and experience data linked to real-life curved glass structures applications regarding design, manufacture, use, performance and economy. However, more and more complex buildings and structures with the large areas of glass envelope geometrically complex shape are built every year. The aim of the presented research is to collect data on the existing design philosophy on curved glass structure cases. The investigation includes a survey about how architects and engineers deal with different design aspects of curved glass structures with a special focus on the design and construction process, glass types and structural and fixing systems. The current paper gives a brief overview of the survey findings.

  19. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solar concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses. Previously announced in STAR as N82-11209

  20. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  1. Alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Denghui

    2009-01-01

    Based on comparative genome analyses, the increases in protein-coding gene number could not account for the increases of morphological and behavioral complexity of higher eukaryotes. Transcriptional regulations, alternative splicing and the involvement of non-coding RNA in gene expression regulations have been credited for the drastic increase of transcriptome complexity. However, an emerging theme of another mechanism that contributes to the formation of alternative mRNA 3′-ends is alternative polyadenylation (APA). First, recent studies indicated that APA is a wide spread phenomenon across the transcriptomes of higher eukaryotes and being regulated by developmental and environmental cues. Secondly, our characterization of the Arabidopsis polyadenylation factors suggested that plant polyadenylation has also evolved to regulate the expression of specific genes by means of APA and therefore the specific biological functions. Finally, Phylogenetic analyses of eukaryotic polyadenylation factors from several organisms revealed that the number of polyadenylation factors tends to increase in higher eukaryotes, which provides the potential for their functional differentiation in regulating gene expression through APA. Based on above evidence, we, thus, hypothesize that APA, serving as an additional mechanism, contributes to the complexity of higher eukaryotes. PMID:19816115

  2. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  3. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Manuel Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.

    2016-03-29

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  4. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  5. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  6. Glass corrosion in natural environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.

    1989-01-01

    A series of studies of the effects of solutes which appear in natural aqueous environments, specifically Mg and Al, under controlled conditions, permit characterization of the retardation of silicate glass leaching in water containing such solutes. In the case of Mg the interaction with the glass appears to consist of exchange with alkali ions present in the glass to a depth of several microns. The effect of Al can be observed at much lower levels, indicating that the mechanism in the case of Al involves irreversible formation of aluminosilicate species at the glass surface.

  7. Glass corrosion in natural environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.; Barkatt, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Experiments carried out during the progress period are summarized. Experiments carried out involving glass samples exposed to solutions of Tris have shown the appearance of 'spikes' upon monitoring glass dissolution as a function of time. The periodic 'spikes' observed in Tris-based media were interpreted in terms of cracking due to excessive stress in the surface region of the glass. Studies of the interactions of silicate glasses with metal ions in buffered media were extended to systems containing Al. Caps buffer was used to establish the pH. The procedures used are described and the results are given. Preliminary studies were initiated as to the feasibility of adding a slowly dissolving solid compound of the additive to the glass-water system to maintain a supply of dissolved additive. It appears that several magnesium compounds have a suitable combination of solubility and affinity towards silicate glass surfaces to have a pronounced retarding effect on the extraction of uranium from the glass. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that introducing a magnesium source into geologic repositories for nuclear waste glass in the form of a sparingly soluble Mg-based backfill material may cause a substantial reduction in the extent of long-term glass corrosion. The studies described also provide mechanistic understanding of the roles of various metal solutes in the leachant. Such understanding forms the basis for developing long-term predictions of nuclear waste glass durability under repository conditions. From what is known about natural highly reduced glasses such as tektites, it is clear that iron is dissolved as ferrous iron with little or no ferric iron. The reducing conditions were high enough to cause metallic iron to exsolve out of the glass in the form of submicroscopic spherules. As the nuclear waste glass is much less reduced, a study was initiated on other natural glasses in addition to the nuclear waste glass. Extensive measurements were

  8. Water sprints uphill on glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2010-12-01

    As a material, glass has been widely used in traditional fluidic devices and more recently in micro- and nanofluidic devices, and its wetting properties are crucially important in these applications. In this work, by using a high-intensity femtosecond laser structuring technique, we create a unique surface pattern on glass that transfer a regular glass surface to superwicking. As a result, water defies the gravity and sprints vertically uphill along the structured glass surface at an unprecedented velocity of 3.8 cm/sec. Our study shows that the dynamics of this fast self-propelled water flow follows a square root of time dependence.

  9. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  10. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker

    1998-01-01

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

  11. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

  12. Retention of posts with resin, glass ionomer and hybrid cements.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Purton, D G

    1998-09-01

    To measure and compare the retention of serrated root canal posts cemented with glass ionomer, resin and resin-modified glass ionomer (hybrid) cements. Fifty single-rooted human teeth were decoronated, treated endodontically and then embedded in resin blocks. Standard post-holes, 10 mm long, were prepared to receive 1.5 mm serrated stainless steel posts. Five equal-sized groups of roots had posts cemented using either a glass ionomer cement, one of two resin cements or one of two resin-modified glass ionomer luting cements. The cements were prepared and used according to the manufacturers' instructions. The tensile force required to dislodge the cemented posts in a testing machine was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U-tests at the 99.9% confidence level. Statistical analysis revealed that posts cemented with resin A were significantly better retained (340.06 N+/-23.13 N) than those cemented with resin B (212.56 N+/-67.62 N), or either of the two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (53.90 N+/-28.42 N, 25.97 N+/-14.70 N), but not statistically better than posts cemented with the glass ionomer cement (286.16 N+/-38.71 N). The retention of posts cemented with either resin B or the glass ionomer cement was significantly better than with either hybrid cement. There was no significant difference in retention between the hybrid cements. The performance of the resin-modified glass ionomer cements was significantly below that of alternative cements in this study. Possible explanations for this finding are discussed. Dentists should be cautious in adopting this new cementing regime.

  13. Spherical resonators coated by glass and glass-ceramic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Davor; Chiappini, Andrea; Chiasera, Alessandro; Armellini, Cristina; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Mazzola, Maurizio; Moser, Enrico; Varas, Stefano; Berneschi, Simone; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Soria, Silvia; Speranza, Giorgio; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Prudenzano, Francesco; Feron, Patrice; Ivanda, Mile; Cibiel, Gilles; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    Coating of spherical microresonators is a very promising technique for optimizing their optical properties. Optical coatings are constituted by glasses, polymer, and glass ceramics, passive or activated by luminescent species, Glass ceramic activated by rare earth ions are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing to develop interesting new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. At the state of art the fabrication techniques based on bottom-up and top-down approaches appear to be viable although a specific effort is required to achieve the necessary reliability and reproducibility of the preparation protocols. In particular, the dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the employed synthesis still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including coating of spherical microresonators. Here we present a review regarding spherical microresonators coated by glass and glass-ceramic film activated by Er3+ ions. Er3+ ions appear to be embedded in a crystalline or amorphous environment and the lifetime dynamic is influenced by the geometry and by the morphology of the system. Photoluminescence results and morphologic properties are discussed for both amorphous and glass ceramic films.

  14. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell wasmore » issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order

  15. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

  16. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  17. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  18. Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-24

    Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials Matthew T. Moberg, Maj, USAF...DC Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials Major Matthew T. Moberg...Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials is appropriately acknowledged

  19. New glasses for optics and optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morian, Hans F.

    1991-03-01

    Optical glasses, due to their high homogeneity regarding physical properties, and the ability to tailor key characteristics to meet the desired performance, find new applications in the wide fields of optics and optoelectronics. In the optical glass field the general development goals are: optical glasses with anomalous partial dispersion characteristics for apochromatic color corrections; glasses with reduced weight, so called lightweight glasses; glasses with improved UV- transmittance; new glass types for deep UV-applications; optical glasses with high homogeneity in diameter up to 1555 mm; highly prestressed windows dia. 930 mm for bubble chambers; the latest results will be presented. For radioactive environments and for space applications a variety of stabilized optical glasses have been developed. These glasses have been testes with electron-, proton-, neutron- and gamma radiation. Special glasses exist for the use in Cerenkov and Scintillation counters for particle research. Nonlinear optical effects in semiconductor doped glasses are under investigation.

  20. Training Guidelines: Glass Furnace Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    Technological development in the glass industry is constantly directed towards producing high quality glass at low operating costs. Particularly, changes have taken place in melting methods which mean that the modern furnace operator has greater responsibilities than any of his predecessors. The complexity of control systems, melting rates, tank…

  1. Holder for rotating glass body

    DOEpatents

    Kolleck, Floyd W.

    1978-04-04

    A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

  2. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  3. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  4. Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-07-01

    One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the factmore » that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.« less

  5. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass-based materials for structural and functional applications.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna; Bernardo, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass-based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass-ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica-rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron-rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass-based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste-derived glasses into glass-ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low-cost alternative for glass-ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up-to-date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste-derived, glass-based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Bioactive glass/polymer composites for bone and nerve repair and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadkhah, Ali

    Bioactive glasses have several attractive properties in hard and soft tissue repair but their brittleness limited their use, as scaffolding materials, for applications in load-bearing hard tissue repair. At the same time, because of their bioactive properties, they are being studied more often for soft tissue repair. In the present work, a new glass/polymer composite scaffold was developed for the repair of load-bearing bones with high flexural strength and without brittle behavior. The new composites have 2.5 times higher flexural strength and ˜100 times higher work of fracture (without catastrophic failure) compared to a similar bare glass scaffold. Also the use of two known bioactive glasses (13-93-B3 and 45S5) was investigated in developing glass/Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) composite films for peripheral nerve repair. It was found that a layer of globular hydroxyapatite (HA) formed on both sides of the composites. The borate glass in the composites was fully reacted in SBF and different ions were released into the solution. The addition of bioactive glass particles to the PCL lowered its elastic modulus and yield strength, but the composites remained intact after the 14 day period in SBF at 37°C. Finally, in an effort to design a better bioactive glass, new borosilicate glass compositions were developed that possess advantages of borate and silicate bioactive glasses at the same time. It was found that replacing small amounts of B2O3 with SiO2 improved glass formation, resistance to nucleation and crystallization, and increased the release rate of boron and silicon in vitro. This new borosilicate glass could be a good alternative to existing silicate and borate bioactive glasses.

  7. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.

    2010-09-23

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development ofmore » a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both

  8. Colorless Optical Glass.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-18

    flint TKI7 1,6279 0,01058 glasses TK20, TK120 1,6220 0.01097 TK21, TK121 1,.6568 0.01285 T5603 I1 .7557 I0,01837 TK23 1,5891 0,00962 T604 1.7786...TM2l 0 3 1 K I I 3m, 2 - A-B B A-B 15 g TK121 1 3 1 iK I I 3 24UA-B 6, B I-E " TK23 1 3 1 I 1 1 I 3K, 2 4 A-B , B r-, * TK123 1 3 1 1K 1 2 1 2K, 2 4 A

  9. LUBRICATING AND SIZING AGENT FOR GLASS FIBER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GLASS TEXTILES, SURFACE PROPERTIES), (*LUBRICANTS, GLASS TEXTILES), FIBERS , POLYVINYL ALCOHOL, STEARATES, CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, MIXTURES, LACTATES, TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, USSR

  10. Intrinsic and radiation-induced defects in silica and germania glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, B.

    1987-01-01

    Thermally stimulated polarization and depolarization current (TSPC/TSDC) measurements were conducted on GeO/sub 2/ and SiO/sub 2/ glasses to investigate their defect properties and mechanisms of charge transport. The TSPC data of these glasses were found to be their D.C. conductivity. One TSDC peak was observed in GeO/sub 2/ and SiO/sub 2/ (Spectrosil) glasses. Spectrosil-WF (silica glass specially treated to reduce its water content) exhibited two TSDC peaks. The only TSDC peak in GeO/sub 2/ and Spectrosil glasses and the low-temperature TSDC peak in Spectrosil-WF are ascribed to the orientation polarization of intrinsic defects labeled as Intimate Valence Alternation Pairs (IVAP's).more » The origin of the high-temperature TSDC peak in Spectrosil-WF is uncertain. TSPC/TSDC measurements were also conducted on lead silicate glasses with and without halogen ions to investigate the role of halogen ions in the charge-transport processes. Transport in the binary glasses attributed to the lead ions. Two TSDC peaks have been observed in the binary lead silicate glasses. The low-temperature TSDC peak in these glasses in ascribed to short-range movement of lead ions and the high-temperature peak is attributed to space-charge polarization due to lead-ion motion.« less

  11. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    DOEpatents

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  12. Degradation of partially immersed glass: A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnam, R. K.; Fossati, P. C. M.; Lee, W. E.

    2018-05-01

    The International Simple Glass (ISG) is a six-component borosilicate glass which was developed as a reference for international collaborative studies on high level nuclear waste encapsulation. Its corrosion behaviour is typically examined when it is immersed in a leaching solution, or when it is exposed to water vapour. In this study, an alternative situation is considered in which the glass is only partially immersed for 7 weeks at a temperature of 90 °C. In this case, half of the glass sample is directly in the solution itself, and the other half is in contact with a water film formed by condensation of water vapour that evaporated from the solution. This results in a different degradation behaviour compared to standard tests in which the material is fully immersed. In particular, whilst in standard tests the system reaches a steady state with a very low alteration rate thanks to the formation of a protective gel layer, in partially-immersed tests this steady state could not be reached because of the continuous alteration from the condensate water film. The constant input of ions from the emerged part of the sample caused a supersaturation of the solution, which resulted in early precipitation of secondary crystalline phases. This setup mimics storage conditions once small amounts of water have entered a glass waste form containing canister. It offers a more realistic outlook of corrosion mechanisms happening in such situations than standard fully-immersed corrosion tests.

  13. Ball lightning passage through a glass without breaking it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Vladimir L.; Nikitin, Anatoly I.; Ivanenko, Ilia P.; Nikitina, Tamara F.; Velichko, Alexander M.; Nosikov, Igor A.

    2016-12-01

    In long history of ball lightning (BL) theory development there is a struggle of two concepts. According to the first one, BL - is a high frequency electrical discharge, burning in the air due to action of alternating electric field or a continuous current generated by an external source of energy. According to the second one, the BL is a material body, storing energy within itself. Data banks of BL observations give evidence that BL can pass through glasses, leaving no traces on them. Supporters of the first concept consider this as the proof of the correctness of the "electric field" BL nature. Representation of BL as a material body with internal source of energy explains most of its features, but has difficulties in explanation of BL penetration through glasses. We describe results of research of the glass, through which BL freely passed, that was observed by one of the authors. They proved the presence of traces left by BL. With a help of optical and scanning microscopes and laser beam probing of the glass, that experienced action of 20 cm BL, we have found traces in it: in the glass we found a region of 1-2 mm, at the center of which a cavity of 0.24 mm diameter is located. This gives evidence to a "material" nature of BL. BL possibility to pass through small holes and its ability to "make" such holes poses a number of difficult issues to researchers indicated in the article.

  14. Method for manufacturing glass frit

    DOEpatents

    Budrick, Ronald G.; King, Frank T.; Nolen, Jr., Robert L.; Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of manufacturing a glass frit for use in the manufacture of uniform glass microspheres to serve as containers for laser fusion fuel to be exposed to laser energy which includes the formation of a glass gel which is then dried, pulverized, and very accurately sized to particles in a range of, for example, 125 to 149 micrometers. The particles contain an occluded material such as urea which expands when heated. The sized particles are washed, dried, and subjected to heat to control the moisture content prior to being introduced into a system to form microspheres.

  15. The molten glass sewing machine.

    PubMed

    Brun, P-T; Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-05-13

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model-and a methodology-to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties.This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. The molten glass sewing machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, P.-T.; Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-04-01

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model-and a methodology-to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications'.

  17. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in <1 week, without causing any detectable joint damage. The combination of dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres and EDTA chelation therapy provides an unique "tool" for the medical community, which can deliver a large dose (>100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass

  18. Galactic Hearts of Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger graph

    This artist's concept shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected more than 20 bright and dusty galactic mergers like the one depicted here, all teeming with the tiny gem-like crystals.

    When galaxies collide, they trigger the birth of large numbers of massive stars. Astronomers believe these blazing hot stars act like furnaces to produce silicate crystals in the same way that glass is made from sand. The stars probably shed the crystals as they age, and as they blow apart in supernovae explosions.

    At the same time the crystals are being churned out, they are also being destroyed. Fast-moving particles from supernova blasts easily convert silicates crystals back to their amorphous, or shapeless, form.

    How is Spitzer seeing the crystals if they are rapidly disappearing? Astronomers say that, for a short period of time at the beginning of galactic mergers, massive stars might be producing silicate crystals faster than they are eliminating them. When our own galaxy merges with the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years, a similar burst of massive stars and silicate crystals might occur.

    Crystal Storm in Distant Galaxy The graph (see inset above) of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant galaxy called IRAS 08752+3915 is experiencing a storm of tiny crystals made up of silicates. The crystals are similar to the glass-like grains of sand found on Earth's many beaches.

    The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light open to reveal its rainbow-like components. The resulting spectrum shown here reveals the signatures of both crystalline (green) and non-crystalline (brown) silicates.

    Spitzer detected the same

  19. Glass-glass transition during aging of a colloidal clay.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Roberta; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; de Melo Marques, Flavio Augusto; Sztucki, Michael; Fluerasu, Andrei; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Ruzicka, Barbara

    2014-06-02

    Colloidal suspensions are characterized by a variety of microscopic interactions, which generate unconventional phase diagrams encompassing fluid, gel and glassy states and offer the possibility to study new phase and/or state transitions. Among these, glass-glass transitions are rare to be found, especially at ambient conditions. Here, through a combination of dilution experiments, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, small angle X-ray scattering, rheological measurements and Monte Carlo simulations, we provide evidence of a spontaneous glass-glass transition in a colloidal clay. Two different glassy states are distinguished with evolving waiting time: a first one, dominated by long-range screened Coulombic repulsion (Wigner glass) and a second one, stabilized by orientational attractions (Disconnected House of Cards glass), occurring after a much longer time. These findings may have implications for heterogeneously charged systems out-of-equilibrium and for applications where a fine control of the local order and/or long term stability of the amorphous materials are required.

  20. Potential and challenges of interdisciplinary research on historical window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trümpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Kessler, Cordula; Goll, Jürg

    The interdisciplinary study of ancient materials has become an increasingly common strategy, mainly because it has proved to be a highly rewarding approach to studying the age, provenance and production of archaeological objects. The results of such an approach sometimes also provide answers to questions relating not only to socio-cultural, economic or technological developments in a particular region or period (trade, innovation, production etc.), but also the conservation of the materials or artefacts in question. A number of analytical methods, ranging from microscopic to elementary analyses, have been successfully applied to determine the nature of materials and technologies used in the production, as well as to identify the provenance of ancient glass. As far as window glass and stained glass is concerned, the study of architectural context and art history - as well as the technological characteristics of materials - has proved to be most helpful in determining history, production and artistic importance of the objects under study. This paper discusses some of the multidisciplinary studies that the Vitrocentre Romont has conducted on early medieval window glass, stained glass and reverse glass paintings and illustrates the potential of a holistic approach in solving questions about materials, techniques, window design and conservation. It also addresses the limitations of the approach, which are often related to finding appropriate (i.e. non-destructive and possibly portable) methods for the analysis of sometimes extremely fragile stained glass windows.

  1. Formation of silica iron oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bawab, Abeer F.

    The microemulsion-gel method was developed as an alternative process in the production of room temperature glasses. This method is based on the formation of a microemulsion, to which is added a metal alkoxide that undergoes hydrolysis and condensation to form an oxide network, which is dried into glass. The goal of this work is to understand the sol-gel process upon addition of hydrate metal salts. The thermal transitions of the silica containing ferric nitrate hydrate were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The glasses with a less than 30 mol % iron nitrate were amorphous, while those higher concentration were crystalline. Based on XRD the thermal transitions did not alter the crystallinity. The IR spectra indicated the existence of Si-O-Fe bonds. Thermal analysis indicated similar transitions as exhibited by pure iron nitrate with minor modifications due to interactions with the silica. The reaction between tetraethoxysilane and chloral hydrate in ethanol was followed by NMR of the sp{29}Si nucleus at two different pHs. The sp{29}Si NMR spectra were similar to those reported for the reactions in alcohol between tetraethoxysilane and water of low pH, and for the reactions in the presence of inorganic hydrate. At pH 4, monomene silicon species were detected where at pH 2 the reaction was sufficiently rapid that multi hydroxy monomers were not detected as expected from the catalysts. The reaction proceeded without adding water. The reaction between aluminum chloride and methoxydimethyloctylsilane was investigated at room temperature using NMR and IR spectroscopy in addition to a molecular weight determination from the freezing point reduction in benzene. The structure as deduced from the experimental results was found to be a dimer containing two silicon atoms and two aluminum atoms of which the latter were tetrahedrally coordinated.

  2. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis and characterization of degradation pathologies of Roman glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomar, T.; Oujja, M.; García-Heras, M.; Villegas, M. A.; Castillejo, M.

    2013-09-01

    The feasibility and possibilities of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in the full study of non-destructible historic glasses have been explored in the present work. Thirteen Roman glass samples, including seven entire glass beads, from the ancient town of Augusta Emerita (SW Spain) were characterized by LIBS in combination with other conventional techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. LIBS stratigraphic analysis, carried out by the application of successive laser pulses on the same spot, has been mainly targeted at characterizing particular features of non-destructible historic glasses, such as bulk chemical composition, surface degradation pathologies (dealkalinization layers and deposits), chromophores, and opacifying elements. The obtained data demonstrate that LIBS can be a useful and alternative technique for spectroscopic studies of historical glasses, especially for those conserved under burial conditions and when it deals with studying non-destructible samples.

  3. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  4. EVA-glass interface bond stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The ethylene vinyl acetate/glass interface bond stability was investigated. Special methods to determine the structure of polymer/glass interface were developed. Structural changes related to hydrothermal degradation of polymer/glass interface are examined. Methods to inhibit the degradation reaction which occur at polymer/glass interface are developed.

  5. Properties Of Soda/Yttria/Silica Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, Paul W.; Hann, Raiford E.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental study of glass-formation compositional region of soda/ yttria/silicate system and of selected physical properties of glasses within compositional region part of continuing effort to identify glasses with high coefficients of thermal expansion and high softening temperatures, for use as coatings on superalloys and as glass-to-metal seals.

  6. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  7. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  8. Taylor impact of glass bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Natalie; Bourne, Neil; Field, John

    1997-07-01

    Brar and Bless pioneeered the use of plate impact upon bars as a technique for investigating the 1D stress loading of glass. We wish to extend this technique by applying VISAR and embedded stress gauge measurements to a symmetrical version of the test. In this configuration two rods impact one upon the other in a symmetrical version of the Taylor test geometry in which the impact is perfectly rigid in the centre of mass frame. Previous work in the laboratory has characterised the three glass types (float, borosilicate and a high density lead glass). These experiments will identify the 1D stress failure mechanisms from high-speed photography and the stress and particle velocity histories will be interpreted in the light of these results. The differences in response of the three glasses will be highlighted.

  9. Luminescence of powdered uranium glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, A. G.; Mcgarrity, J. M.; Silverman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence efficiencies in powdered borosilicate glasses having different particle size and different uranium content. Excitation with 100 to 350 keV electrons and with 253.7 nm light was found to produce identical absolute radiant exitance spectra in powdered samples. The most efficient glass was one containing 29.4 wt% B2O3, 58.8 wt% SiO2, 9.8 wt% Na2O and 2.0 wt% UO2.

  10. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses.

    PubMed

    Ediger, M D

    2017-12-07

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  11. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  12. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility. PMID:24961911

  13. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    DOEpatents

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  14. Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Elsholz, William E.

    1984-01-01

    A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

  15. Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Elsholz, W.E.

    1982-09-30

    A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

  16. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information availablemore » on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.« less

  17. Glass: Kohlrausch exponent, fragility, anharmonicity.

    PubMed

    Rault, J

    2012-04-01

    The thermodynamical and mechanical properties of (fragile and strong) glass are modeled based on a generalised activation energy relationship log( τ ) = ΔG ( β )/RTn(T') process of glass-forming liquids. This cooperative process involves 1/n(T') elementary β motions of activation Gibbs energy ΔG ( β ) dependent on the equivalent temperature T', the temperature of the liquid in equilibrium having the volume of the glass, function of temperature and aging conditions. From this modified VFT law the relaxation of any properties (V , H , stress, creep) can be calculated and approximated by the Kohlrausch function. This model predicts consistency relationships for: a) the temperature (and aging time) variation of the Kohlrausch exponent; b) the temperature dependence of the stabilisation time domain of strong and fragile glass; c) the linear relation between the activation parameters (E (*) energy, S (*) entropy, V (*) volume) of the α and β transition. The Lawson and Keyes (LK) relations are recalled and it is shown that these relations (somewhat equivalant to the compensation law or Meyer-Neldel rule) are observed generally in glass. Morever the (macroscopic) ratios ΔH/ΔV observed during aging or after a temperature jump and the (microscopic) ratio E (*)/V (*) are found equal to κγ (κ compressibily, γ Grüneisen parameter), in agreement with the LK predictions. From various experiments and in agreement with predictions of this model we conclude that the Grüneisen parameter γ ( B ) (pressure derivative of the bulk modulus) and the Mean Square Displacement (MSD) characterising the anharmonicity of solids (and liquids) are the main parameters which govern the relaxation properties of the glass state. Linear relations between the parameters γ ( B ), the fragility m, and the Kohlrausch exponent n ( g ) at T ( g ) are explained. These correlations underscore a strong relationship between the fragilty of glass formers and the extent of the anharmonicity in

  18. Fast production of microfluidic devices by CO2 laser engraving of wax-coated glass slides.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Eric T; Santos, Mauro S F; Jiao, Hong; do Lago, Claudimir L; Gutz, Ivano G R; Garcia, Carlos D

    2016-07-01

    Glass is one of the most convenient materials for the development of microfluidic devices. However, most fabrication protocols require long processing times and expensive facilities. As a convenient alternative, polymeric materials have been extensively used due their lower cost and versatility. Although CO2 laser ablation has been used for fast prototyping on polymeric materials, it cannot be applied to glass devices because the local heating causes thermal stress and results in extensive cracking. A few papers have shown the ablation of channels or thin holes (used as reservoirs) on glass but the process is still far away from yielding functional glass microfluidic devices. To address these shortcomings, this communication describes a simple method to engrave glass-based capillary electrophoresis devices using standard (1 mm-thick) microscope glass slides. The process uses a sacrificial layer of wax as heat sink and enables the development of both channels (with semicircular shape) and pass-through reservoirs. Although microscope images showed some small cracks around the channels (that became irrelevant after sealing the engraved glass layer to PDMS) the proposed strategy is a leap forward in the application of the technology to glass. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the approach, the separation of dopamine, catechol and uric acid was accomplished in less than 100 s. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-07

    This paper describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the “ideal glass”. Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquidsmore » are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.« less

  20. Glass matrix composites. I - Graphite fiber reinforced glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program is described in which graphite fibers of Hercules HMS and HTS, Thornel 300, and Celanese DG-12 were used to reinforce, both uniaxially and biaxially, borosilicate pyrex glass. Composite flexural strength distribution, strength as a function of test temperature, fracture toughness and oxidative stability were determined and shown to be primarily a function of fiber type and the quality of fiber-matrix bond formed during composite fabrication. It is demonstrated that the graphite fiber reinforced glass system offers unique possibilities as a high performance structural material.

  1. Alternative Fuel Guidelines for Alternative Transportation Systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-31

    The Volpe Center documented the increased use of alternative fuels on vehicles owned and operated by federal land management agencies. For each alternative fuel type, the Volpe Center documented the availability of vehicles, fueling mechanisms and pr...

  2. Covalent attachment of DNA oligonucleotides to glass.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Deutsch, J; Fineberg, J; Levine, A

    1997-01-01

    A method for synthesizing DNA directly on glass is presented. The process is based on pretreatment of glass with boiling hydrochloric acid, thus exposing the hydroxyl groups of the glass. Phosphite-triester chemistry was used to directly attach the first nucleotide to a glass plate via a covalent bond between the hydroxyl group of the glass and the phosphate group of the protected deoxyribonucleotide. Standard molecular biology procedures, such as ligation and restriction digest, were efficiently performed on the glass synthesized oligonucleotide, with the added benefit of extreme ease of handling. PMID:9016646

  3. Are people adapted to their own glasses?

    PubMed

    Schot, Willemijn D; Brenner, Eli; Sousa, Rita; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2012-01-01

    Negative lenses, either in the form of glasses or contact lenses, can correct nearsightedness. Unlike contact lenses, glasses do not only correct, but also induce optic distortions. In the scientific literature, it has often been assumed that people who wear corrective glasses instantaneously account for these distortions when they put their glasses on. We tested this assumption and found that, when people switched between their contact lenses and their glasses, they made the errors that one would predict based on the optics. This shows that people are not immediately adapted to their own glasses when they put them on.

  4. Study Of Phase Separation In Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.; Smith, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes an experimental study of effect of hydroxide content on phase separation in soda/silica glasses. Ordinary and gel glasses melted at 1,565 degree C, and melts stirred periodically. "Wet" glasses produced by passing bubbles of N2 saturated with water through melts; "dry" glasses prepared in similar manner, except N2 dried before passage through melts. Analyses of compositions of glasses performed by atomic-absorption and index-of-refraction measurements. Authors conclude hydroxide speeds up phase separation, regardless of method (gel or ordinary) by which glass prepared. Eventually helps material scientists to find ways to control morphology of phase separation.

  5. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Sushko, Peter V; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-09-06

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32](2+) ⋅ (e(-))2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. The concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: It invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a unique avenue in rational materials design.

  6. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Sushko, Peter V.; Tomota, Yudai

    2016-08-24

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca 12Al 14O 32] 2+ ∙ (e –) 2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass-modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. Concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: it invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a new avenue in rational materials design.

  7. Disaster medicine through Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Carenzo, Luca; Barra, Federico Lorenzo; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Colombo, Davide; Costa, Alessandro; Della Corte, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Nontechnical skills can make a difference in the management of disasters and mass casualty incidents and any tool helping providers in action might improve their ability to respond to such events. Google Glass, released by Google as a new personal communication device, could play a role in this field. We recently tested Google Glass during a full-scale exercise to perform visually guided augmented-reality Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment triage using a custom-made application and to identify casualties and collect georeferenced notes, photos, and videos to be incorporated into the debriefing. Despite some limitations (battery life and privacy concerns), Glass is a promising technology both for telemedicine applications and augmented-reality disaster response support to increase operators' performance, helping them to make better choices on the field; to optimize timings; and finally represents an excellent option to take professional education to a higher level.

  8. Google Glass: An Evolution in Education or the Next Segway?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    When the Segway was unveiled in 2001, amid a cloud of internet buzz, it was supposed to revolutionize personal transportation. There is no denying the Segway is a remarkable piece of technological engineering but that ingenuity never transformed into sales or integration into society outside of security guards and tour guides. When Google announced Glass in 2012, to date the most high profile development from their "moonshot thinking" Project X engineering think-tank, similar life changing proclamations were made. Whether Google Glass will permeate everyday society is still unknown as the device has yet to be made available to the general public, and currently there are fewer than 10,000 pairs in circulation worldwide. However, the possibilities remain intriguing, particularly in the area of educational technology and understanding of student learning. The concept of virtual fieldtrips is well established, but the idea that Glass (using Google Hangouts) can be used to present in and connect to classrooms anywhere in the world, whilst showing views directly from a teacher's perspective is exciting. Alternatively, the idea that a teacher can follow the actions and movements of a student working on an assignment from that student's viewpoint offers huge potential for understanding cognitive learning. This presentation will pose some of the question surrounding Google Glass in education, and seek answers and opinions from others. The device itself will also be demonstrated, and the pros and cons of its design discussed.

  9. Arctic Glass: Innovative Consumer Technology in Support of Arctic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthkoski, T.

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of cyberinfrastructure on the North Slope of Alaska is drastically limited by location-specific conditions, including: unique geophysical features, remoteness of location, and harsh climate. The associated cost of maintaining this unique cyberinfrastructure also becomes a limiting factor. As a result, field experiments conducted in this region have historically been at a technological disadvantage. The Arctic Glass project explored a variety of scenarios where innovative consumer-grade technology was leveraged as a lightweight, rapidly deployable, sustainable, alternatives to traditional large-scale Arctic cyberinfrastructure installations. Google Glass, cloud computing services, Internet of Things (IoT) microcontrollers, miniature LIDAR, co2 sensors designed for HVAC systems, and portable network kits are several of the components field-tested at the Toolik Field Station as part of this project. Region-specific software was also developed, including a multi featured, voice controlled Google Glass application named "Arctic Glass". Additionally, real-time sensor monitoring and remote control capability was evaluated through the deployment of a small cluster of microcontroller devices. Network robustness was analyzed as the devices delivered streams of abiotic data to a web-based dashboard monitoring service in near real time. The same data was also uploaded synchronously by the devices to Amazon Web Services. A detailed overview of solutions deployed during the 2015 field season, results from experiments utilizing consumer sensors, and potential roles consumer technology could play in support of Arctic science will be discussed.

  10. Glasses for seeing beyond visible.

    PubMed

    Zhang, XiangHua; Bureau, Bruno; Lucas, Pierre; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Lucas, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Conventional glasses based on oxides have a transparency limited by phonon absorption in the near IR region and have a limited interest for analyzing information located far beyond the visible. The IR spectral domain is nevertheless of prime interest, since it covers fundamental wavelength ranges used for thermal imaging as well as molecular vibrational signatures. Besides spectacular advances in the field of IR detectors, the main significant progresses are related to the development of IR glass optics, such as lenses or IR optical fibres. The field of IR glasses is almost totally dominated by glasses formed from heavy atoms such as the chalcogens S, Se and Te. Their transparency extends up to 12, 16 and 28 microm for sulfide-, selenide- and the new generation of telluride-based glasses, respectively. They cover the atmospheric transparency domains, 3-5 and 8-13 microm, respectively, at which the IR radiation can propagate allowing thermal imaging and night-vision operations through thick layers of atmosphere. The development of new glass compositions will be discussed on the basis of structural consideration with the objective of moulding low-cost lenses for IR cameras used, for instance, in car-driving assistance. Additionally, multimode, single-index, optical fibres operating in the 3 to 12 microm window developed for in situ remote evanescent-wave IR spectroscopy will also be mentioned. The detection of molecular IR signatures is applied to environmental monitoring for investigating the pollution of underground water with toxic molecules. The extension of this technique to the investigation of biomolecules in three different studies devoted to liver tissues analysis, bio-film formation, and cell metabolism will also be discussed. Finally we will mention the developments in the field of single-mode fibres operating around 10 mum for the Darwin space mission, which is aiming at discovering, signs of biological life in telluric earth-like exoplanets throughout

  11. Experimental studies of glass refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.; Kondos, P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic components of the experimental apparatus were selected and acquired. Techniques were developed for the fabrication of the special crucibles necessary for the experiments. Arrangements were made for the analysis of glass and gas bubble samples for composition information. Donations of major equipment were received for this project from Owens, Illinois where a similar study had been conducted a few year ago. Decisions were made regarding the actual glass composition to be used, the gas to be used in the first experiments, and the temperatures at which the experiments should be conducted. A microcomputer was acquired, and work was begun on interfacing the video analyzer to it.

  12. Antiferromagnetic inclusions in lunar glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Briggs, Charles; Alexander, Corrine

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 fines and two specimens of a relatively large glass spherical shell were studied as a function of temperature from room temperature to liquid helium temperatures. All but one specimen showed the presence of antiferromagnetic inclusions. Closely spaced temperature measurements of the magnetic susceptibility below 77 K on five of the specimens showed antiferromagnetic temperature transitions (Ne??el transitions). With the exception of ilmenite in one specimen, these transitions did not correspond to any transitions in known antiferromagnetic compounds. ?? 1974.

  13. Hollow glass fibers in reinforcing glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka; Lassila, Lippo

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the reinforcing effect of hollow and solid discontinuous glass fiber fillers with two different loading fractions on select mechanical properties of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements (GICs). Experimental fiber reinforced GIC was prepared by adding discontinuous glass fiber (hollow/solid) of 0.5mm in length to the powder of commercial GICs (GC Fuji IX and II LC) with two different weight ratios (5 and 10wt%) using a high speed mixing machine. Fracture toughness, work of fracture, flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength and diametral tensile strength were determined for each experimental and control material. The specimens (n=7) were wet stored (37°C for one day) before testing. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the microstructure of the experimental fiber reinforced GICs. Fiber length analysis was carried out to investigate the fiber length distribution of experimental GICs. The results were analyzed statistically using ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. An increase in fracture toughness (280 and 200%) and flexural strength (170 and 140%) of hollow discontinuous glass fiber reinforced (10wt%) conventional and resin modified GICs respectively, were achieved compared to unreinforced materials (p<0.05). Compressive strength did not show any significant differences (p>0.05) between the fiber reinforced and unreinforced GICs. The use of hollow discontinuous glass fiber fillers with conventional and resin modified GIC matrix is a novel reinforcement. It yielded superior toughening and flexural performance compared to the particulate GICs used. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Safety assessment and risk-benefit analysis of the use of azodicarbonamide in baby food jar closure technology: putting trace levels of semicarbazide exposure into perspective--a review.

    PubMed

    Nestmann, E R; Lynch, B S; Musa-Veloso, K; Goodfellow, G H; Cheng, E; Haighton, L A; Lee-Brotherton, V M

    2005-09-01

    The discovery of trace levels of semicarbazide (SEM) in bottled foods (especially baby foods) led to a consideration of the safety of this hydrazine compound by regulatory agencies worldwide. Azodicarbonamide, which is used in the jar-sealing technology known as Press On-Twist Off (or Push-Twist/PT) closures for the formation of a hermetic, plastisol seal, partially degrades with the heat of processing to form trace amounts of SEM. This review has evaluated the potential toxicological risks of resulting exposure to SEM and also the benefit of the PT technology (with azodicarbonamide) in the context of possible microbial contamination. It also considers the potential impact on infant nutrition if parents come to the conclusion that commercial baby foods are unsafe. SEM shows limited genotoxicity in vitro that is largely prevented by the presence of mammalian metabolic enzymes. Negative results were found in vivo in DNA alkaline elution, unscheduled DNA synthesis and micronucleus assays. This pattern is in contrast to the genotoxic hydrazines that also have been shown to cause tumours. Carcinogenicity studies of SEM are of limited quality, show a questionable weak effect in mice at high doses, which are not relevant to human exposure at trace levels, and show no effect in the rat. The IARC has assigned SEM as Group 3, 'Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans'. Based on estimates of exposure to infants consuming baby foods (with the assumption of SEM levels at the 95th percentile of 20 ng g(-1) in all of the consumed 'ready-to-eat' foods) compared with a no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) in developmental toxicity studies, the margin of safety is more than 21 000. Since the risk of an adverse effect is negligible, it is clear that any theoretical risk is outweighed by the benefits of continuing use of the PT closure (with azodicarbonamide blowing agent) to ensure both the microbial integrity and availability of commercial baby foods as a valuable

  15. [Plastics or glass for children's eyeglasses?].

    PubMed

    Grützner, P

    1977-09-08

    Up to +5 dpt glass should be used in spectacles for children. There is more protection for the eye than danger of injury. Glasses out of plastic material are scratched very quickly, also they are more expensive.

  16. Large Area Sputter Coating on Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yoshihito

    Large glass has been used for commercial buildings, housings and vehicles for many years. Glass size for flat displays is getting larger and larger. The glass for the 8th generation is more than 5 m2 in area. Demand of the large glass is increasing not only in these markets but also in a solar cell market growing drastically. Therefore, large area coating is demanded to plus something else on glass more than ever. Sputtering and pyrolysis are the major coating methods on large glass today. Sputtering process is particularly popular because it can deposit a wide variety of materials in good coating uniformity on the glass. This paper describes typical industrial sputtering system and recent progress in sputtering technology. It also shows typical coated glass products in architectural, automotive and display fields and comments on their functions, film stacks and so on.

  17. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Starr, Francis W.

    2014-03-21

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition),more » (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T “phase diagram” for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are

  18. 3. General view showing rear of looking glass aircraft. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view showing rear of looking glass aircraft. View to north. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  19. 4. View showing underside of wing, looking glass aircraft. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View showing underside of wing, looking glass aircraft. View to north. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  20. 5. Headon view of looking glass aircraft. View to southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Head-on view of looking glass aircraft. View to southwest. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  1. Crystallization of a barium-aluminosilicate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, C. H., III; Lee, W. E.; Bansal, N. P.; Hyatt, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    The crystallization of a celsian glass composition was investigated as a possible high-temperature ceramic matrix material. Heat treatments invariably resulted in crystallization of the hexaclesian phase unless a flux, such as lithia, was added or a nucleating agent used (e.g., celsian seeds). TEM analysis revealed complex microstructures. Glasses with Mo additions contained hexacelsian, mullite, and an Mo-rich glass. Li2O additions stabilized celsian but mullite and Mo-rich glass were still present.

  2. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  3. Quantum Spin Glasses, Annealing and Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shu; Tamura, Ryo; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2017-05-01

    List of tables; List of figures, Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. Quantum Spin Glass, Annealing and Computation: 2. Classical spin models from ferromagnetic spin systems to spin glasses; 3. Simulated annealing; 4. Quantum spin glass; 5. Quantum dynamics; 6. Quantum annealing; Part II. Additional Notes: 7. Notes on adiabatic quantum computers; 8. Quantum information and quenching dynamics; 9. A brief historical note on the studies of quantum glass, annealing and computation.

  4. VDT's through Rose Colored Glasses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    Students using microcomputers for extensive periods of time are prone to the same problems as those experienced by video display terminal operators. Suggested guidelines include adjustable furniture and equipment, avoidance of eye strain, control of screen brightness and contrast, and specially prescribed glasses. (MLF)

  5. Printing Silver Nanogrids on Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Wesley C.; Valcarce, Ron; Iles, Peter; Smith, James S.; Glass, Gabe; Gomez, Jesus; Johnson, Glen; Johnston, Dan; Morham, Maclaine; Befus, Elliot; Oz, Aimee; Tomaraei, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes a laboratory experiment that provides students with an opportunity to create conductive silver nanogrids using polymeric templates. A microcontact-printed polyvinylpyrrolidone grid directs the citrate-induced reduction of silver ions for the fabrication of silver nanogrids on glass substrates. In addition to…

  6. Penetration Physics of Armor Glass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-30

    8 Figure 7. Size distribution of fragments in the < 30 µm at four locations within the tunnel of a...only ..................................................................18 UNCLASSIFIED vi UNCLASSIFIED List of Figures (Cont’d) Page Figure 4. Size ...partially penetrated target block. Projectiles of different sizes , shapes, and materials were accelerated against monolithic and laminated glass targets at

  7. Digimarc Discover on Google Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Eliot; Rodriguez, Tony; Lord, John; Alattar, Adnan

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of the Digimarc® Discover platform on Google Glass, enabling the reading of a watermark embedded in a printed material or audio. The embedded watermark typically contains a unique code that identifies the containing media or object and a synchronization signal that allows the watermark to be read robustly. The Digimarc Discover smartphone application can read the watermark from a small portion of printed image presented at any orientation or reasonable distance. Likewise, Discover can read the recently introduced Digimarc Barcode to identify and manage consumer packaged goods in the retail channel. The Digimarc Barcode has several advantages over the traditional barcode and is expected to save the retail industry millions of dollars when deployed at scale. Discover can also read an audio watermark from ambient audio captured using a microphone. The Digimarc Discover platform has been widely deployed on the iPad, iPhone and many Android-based devices, but it has not yet been implemented on a head-worn wearable device, such as Google Glass. Implementing Discover on Google Glass is a challenging task due to the current hardware and software limitations of the device. This paper identifies the challenges encountered in porting Discover to the Google Glass and reports on the solutions created to deliver a prototype implementation.

  8. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary means...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary means...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary means...

  11. Chalcogenide glass thin-film optics for infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Janardan; Panjwani, Deep; Peale, R. E.; Musgraves, J. D.; Wachtel, Pete; McKinley, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are increasingly used in infrared-transparent optical systems for space applications due to their relatively low density (compared to Ge or ZnSe), tunable spectral and thermo-mechanical properties, and molding capability. Remaining challenges include their application to thin-film optics and coatings. The high refractive indices of chalcogenide glasses (n ˃ 2.7) suggest the possibility for high reflecting coatings based on few periods of alternating layers with high index contrast. As2Se3 thin film deposited by thermal evaporation is investigated using ellipsometry which show optical properties consistent with bulk material. Also we demonstrate a novel method for fabrication of antireflection coating using porous chalcogenide. Possibility of negligible extinction coefficient and low refractive index of this porous coating promises broadband suppression of undesired Fresnel reflections at the interface from infrared optics.

  12. Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, G.G.; Livingston, R.R.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-06-10

    A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications is described. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagent strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping. 12 figs.

  13. Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Baylor, Lewis C.; Whitaker, Michael J.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1997-01-01

    A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagant strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping.

  14. High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2006-08-31

    Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relatemore » Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.« less

  15. 7 CFR 3201.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 3201.30 Section 3201.30 Agriculture... Items § 3201.30 Glass cleaners. (a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in cleaning glass surfaces, such as windows, mirrors, car windows, and computer monitors. (b) Minimum biobased...

  16. 7 CFR 3201.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 3201.30 Section 3201.30 Agriculture... Items § 3201.30 Glass cleaners. (a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in cleaning glass surfaces, such as windows, mirrors, car windows, and computer monitors. (b) Minimum biobased...

  17. 7 CFR 3201.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 3201.30 Section 3201.30 Agriculture... Items § 3201.30 Glass cleaners. (a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in cleaning glass surfaces, such as windows, mirrors, car windows, and computer monitors. (b) Minimum biobased...

  18. Method for milling and drilling glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, S. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A process for machining glass by placing a rotating carbide working surface under minimum pressure against an area of glass to be worked is described. Concurrently the region between the working surface and the area of glass is wet with a lubricant consisting essentially of a petroleum carrier, a complex mixture of esters and a complex mixture of naturally occurring aromatic oils.

  19. Nickel-iron spherules from aouelloul glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Dwornik, E.J.; Merrill, C.W.

    1966-01-01

    Nickel-iron spherules, ranging from less than 0.2 to 50 microns in diameter and containing 1.7 to 9.0 percent Ni by weight, occur in glass associated with the Aouelloul crater. They occur in discrete bands of siliceous glass enriched in dissolved iron. Their discovery is significant tangible evidence that both crater and glass originated from terrestrial impact.

  20. Carbonate formation on bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Cerruti, Marta; Morterra, Claudio

    2004-07-20

    The system termed 58S is a sol-gel-synthesized bioactive glass composed of SiO2, CaO, and P2O5, used in medicine as bone prosthetic because, when immersed in a physiological fluid, a layer of hydroxycarbonate apatite is formed on its surface. The mechanism of bioactive glass 58S carbonation was studied in the vacuum by means of in-situ FTIR spectroscopy with the use of CO2, H2O, and CD3CN as probe molecules. The study in the vacuum was necessary to identify both the molecules specifically involved in the carbonation process and the type of carbonates formed. Bioactive glass 58S was compared to a Ca-doped silica and to CaO. On CaO, ionic carbonates could form by contact with CO2 alone, whereas on 58S and on Ca-doped silica carbonation occurred only if both CO2 and an excess of H2O were present on the sample. The function of H2O was not only to block surface cationic sites, so that CO2 could not manifest its Lewis base behavior, but also to form a liquid-like (mono)layer that allowed the formation of carbonate ions. The presence of H2O is also supposed to promote Ca2+ migration from the bulk to the surface. Carbonates formed at the surface of CaO and of Ca-bearing silicas (thus including bioactive glasses) are of the same type, but are produced through two different mechanisms. The finding that a water excess is necessary to start heavy carbonation on bioactive glasses seemed to imply that the mechanism leading to in-situ carbonation simulates, in a simplified and easy-to-reproduce system, what happens both in solution, when carbonates are incorporated in the apatite layer, and during sample shelf-aging. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  1. Glass transition temperature and topological constraints of sodium borophosphate glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi; Zeng, Huidan; Liu, Zhao; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi; Zhao, Donghui

    2013-09-28

    Sodium borophosphate glasses exhibit intriguing mixed network former effect, with the nonlinear compositional dependence of their glass transition temperature as one of the most typical examples. In this paper, we establish the widely applicable topological constraint model of sodium borophosphate mixed network former glasses to explain the relationship between the internal structure and nonlinear changes of glass transition temperature. The application of glass topology network was discussed in detail in terms of the unified methodology for the quantitative distribution of each coordinated boron and phosphorus units and glass transition temperature dependence of atomic constraints. An accurate prediction of composition scaling of the glass transition temperature was obtained based on topological constraint model.

  2. Glass transition temperature and topological constraints of sodium borophosphate glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qi; Zeng, Huidan; Liu, Zhao; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi; Zhao, Donghui

    2013-09-01

    Sodium borophosphate glasses exhibit intriguing mixed network former effect, with the nonlinear compositional dependence of their glass transition temperature as one of the most typical examples. In this paper, we establish the widely applicable topological constraint model of sodium borophosphate mixed network former glasses to explain the relationship between the internal structure and nonlinear changes of glass transition temperature. The application of glass topology network was discussed in detail in terms of the unified methodology for the quantitative distribution of each coordinated boron and phosphorus units and glass transition temperature dependence of atomic constraints. An accurate prediction of composition scaling of the glass transition temperature was obtained based on topological constraint model.

  3. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  4. Structure and the physicochemical properties of glasses and glass melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Ahmet

    1999-11-01

    A user friendly experimental procedure (sessile and pendant drop arrangements) and calculation routine were developed to measure the physicochemical properties such as density, surface tension, and volatilization of glasses and glass melts at the temperature range of 500 to 1500°C. The influence of volatilization on the composition, density and surface tension of potassium, sodium silicate and soda lime silica melts at 1400°C was investigated using the sessile and pendant drop arrangements, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform spectrometry and electronic-balance. Volatilization of alkali from the melts was modeled as a combined mechanism that included diffusion of volatile species from bulk to surface and chemical decomposition reaction of alkali oxide on the surface. The surface tension of experimental and commercial glass melts, some containing iron, was measured under various atmospheres including 4%H 2/96%Ar, dry argon, dry air and wet air using the sessile drop and pendant drop arrangements. In general, the surface tension of the melts decreased in the given order: argon, dry air and wet air. OH groups from water vapor in the atmosphere behave as a surface active species according to the Gibbs adsorption equation and form a mono-layer on the surface with certain number of molecules according to the Langmuir adsorption theorem. The number of OH-like molecules in the monolayer is higher for the melts containing high ionic strength ions. Iron containing melts have higher surface tension and density for higher Fe2+/Fe3+ ratios. The presence of four-coordinated Fe3+ ions rather than six-coordinated Fe 2+ in the surface of iron bearing glass melts was found to be energetically more favorable. The structures of potassium and lithium silicate glasses and melts were modeled using the molecular dynamics simulation at 300 K and 1700 K, respectively. Despite of the excellent agreement between modeled and experimentally determined structure in the short range, modeled

  5. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmit, Žiga; Knific, Timotej; Jezeršek, David; Istenič, Janka

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  6. Alternate nozzle ablative materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    Four subscale solid rocket motor tests were conducted successfully to evaluate alternate nozzle liner, insulation, and exit cone structural overwrap components for possible application to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle asasembly. The 10,000 lb propellant motor tests were simulated, as close as practical, the configuration and operational environment of the full scale SRM. Fifteen PAN based and three pitch based materials had no filler in the phenolic resin, four PAN based materials had carbon microballoons in the resin, and the rest of the materials had carbon powder in the resin. Three nozzle insulation materials were evaluated; an aluminum oxide silicon oxide ceramic fiber mat phenolic material with no resin filler and two E-glass fiber mat phenolic materials with no resin filler. It was concluded by MTI/WD (the fabricator and evaluator of the test nozzles) and NASA-MSFC that it was possible to design an alternate material full scale SRM nozzle assembly, which could provide an estimated 360 lb increased payload capability for Space Shuttle launches over that obtainable with the current qualified SRM design.

  7. Precision glass molding technology for low Tg glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Feng; Tian, Minqiang; Shao, Xinzheng

    2017-02-01

    Precision glass molding (PGM) technology is a cost-effective manufacturing process for high precision optical elements with complex surfaces. With this processing technology, one or more pieces of lenses may be produced through one-step molding. Due to the high efficiency of the replicative process, PGM has found wide applications in high volume production of optical elements. At present, it has been well developed and widely used in mass industry production in Japan and South Korea, but in China PGM technology research is still in the elementary stage. To develop the PGM technology, we need to conquer several technical difficulties, such as the melting technology of low Tg glasses, highprecision mold design and the corresponding machining technology and the coating technology for the molds. In this paper, we discussed the PGM technology as a complete manufacturing process, focused on the technical difficulties mentioned above, and introduced the development directions for this technology in China.

  8. Differences in Radiation Activity Between Glass and Resin 90Y Microspheres in Treating Unresectable Hepatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    James, Trent; Hill, Jacqueline; Fahrbach, Thomas; Collins, Zachary

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the difference in prescribed radiation activity between glass and resin yttrium-90 (Y) microspheres for radioembolization of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastases at a tertiary care teaching institution. The authors performed a retrospective analysis on 126 patients with primary HCC and hepatic metastatic disease from extrahepatic primary cancers who underwent radioembolization with glass or resin particles between 2008 and 2013 at their institution. Radiation activity estimates for prescribed treatments, as well as for the alternate embolization particles, were calculated using commonly employed formulae for both glass and resin particles for all treatments. A total of 217 treatments were performed on 126 patients, with 136 (62.7%) using glass particles and 81 (37.3%) using resin particles. Forty-six (36.5%) patients had metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), 51 (40.5%) had primary HCC, while 11 (8.7%) had neuroendocrine carcinoma, and 18 (14.3%) had metastases from other primary tumors. The average prescribed activity was 2.66 GBq for glass treatments and 1.06 GBq for resin treatments across all cancer types. When the alternative treatment activity was calculated, activities were projected to decrease by an average of 1.52 GBq per treatment if resin microspheres were used instead of glass microspheres (-52.5%), while activities were projected to increase by an average of 1.57 GBq per treatment if glass microspheres were used instead of resin microspheres (148.9%; p < 0.001). Similar results were seen within each malignancy type and all projected changes were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, prescribed radiation activity for radioembolization of unresectable hepatic cancer was significantly lower for resin compared to glass microspheres.

  9. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod

    2014-02-12

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–22.7CeO{sub 2}–11.7La{submore » 2}O{sub 3}–10.9PrO{sub 2}–1.3Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1.3Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–8.1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–4.8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO{sub 2}–16.0B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–12.6Na{sub 2}O–3.8Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–5.7CaO–1.7ZrO{sub 2}. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO{sub 5}) and oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) were found in glasses containing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} and NaNd{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while T{sub L} was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for

  10. Candidate Low-Temperature Glass Waste Forms for Technetium-99 Recovered from Hanford Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mei; Tang, Ming; Rim, Jung Ho

    2017-07-24

    Alternative treatment and disposition options may exist for technetium-99 (99Tc) in secondary liquid waste from the Hanford Direct-Feed Low-Activity Waste (DFLAW) process. One approach includes development of an alternate glass waste form that is suitable for on-site disposition of technetium, including salts and other species recovered by ion exchange or precipitation from the EMF evaporator concentrate. By recovering the Tc content from the stream, and not recycling the treated concentrate, the DFLAW process can potentially be operated in a more efficient manner that lowers the cost to the Department of Energy. This report provides a survey of candidate glass formulationsmore » and glass-making processes that can potentially incorporate technetium at temperatures <700 °C to avoid volatilization. Three candidate technetium feed streams are considered: (1) dilute sodium pertechnetate loaded on a non-elutable ion exchange resin; (2) dilute sodium-bearing aqueous eluent from ion exchange recovery of pertechnetate, or (3) technetium(IV) oxide precipitate containing Sn and Cr solids in an aqueous slurry. From the technical literature, promising candidate glasses are identified based on their processing temperatures and chemical durability data. The suitability and technical risk of three low-temperature glass processing routes (vitrification, encapsulation by sintering into a glass composite material, and sol-gel chemical condensation) for the three waste streams was assessed, based on available low-temperature glass data. For a subset of candidate glasses, their long-term thermodynamic behavior with exposure to water and oxygen was modeled using Geochemist’s Workbench, with and without addition of reducing stannous ion. For further evaluation and development, encapsulation of precipitated TcO2/Sn/Cr in a glass composite material based on lead-free sealing glasses is recommended as a high priority. Vitrification of pertechnetate in aqueous anion exchange eluent

  11. Nonideal Behavior of Glass and Crystal.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Yashika; Murugavel, Sevi

    2017-05-18

    We report deviations from an ideal behavior of binary chalcogenide glass composition Ge 20 Te 80 with respect to its quenching rate on mass density and thermal parameters, including glass transition temperature. In an ideal glass, the increase in quenching rate will decrease the characteristic relaxation time and correspondingly shift in the glass transition temperature (T g ) to higher temperature and result in lower density. This, however, holds only when the liquid structure remains the same as in equilibrium glass structure independent of their quenching rate. We find Ge 20 Te 80 glass composition with higher quenching rate is found to possess larger density and lower T g than the lower rate quenched or well annealed glass specimen. In contrast to conventional glass forming liquids, the anomalous behavior of Ge 20 Te 80 glass with respect to quenching rate is closely related to the change in the local atomic structure with thermal history. Additionally, we found that crystal derived from the Ge 20 Te 80 glass with different thermal history but with identical annealing conditions leads to different mass density, specific heat capacity, and local atomic structure. Thus, the observed unusual variations in the mass density and various thermal properties of Ge 20 Te 80 glass and crystal are mainly determined by the resulting local atomic structure and concentration of defect states associated with each state.

  12. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  13. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (<0.5 ppm/°C) and high thermal-shock resistance to be used as windows and domes for high speed flight. The material is an inorganic, non-porous glass ceramic, characterized by crystalline phases of evenly distributed nano-crystals in a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase is zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  14. Recycled crushed glass in road work applications.

    PubMed

    Disfani, M M; Arulrajah, A; Bo, M W; Hankour, R

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive suite of geotechnical laboratory tests was undertaken on samples of recycled crushed glass produced in Victoria, Australia. Three types of recycled glass sources were tested being coarse, medium and fine sized glass. Laboratory testing results indicated that medium and fine sized recycled glass sources exhibit geotechnical behavior similar to natural aggregates. Coarse recycled glass was however found to be unsuitable for geotechnical engineering applications. Shear strength tests indicate that the fine and medium glass encompass shear strength parameters similar to that of natural sand and gravel mixtures comprising of angular particles. Environmental assessment tests indicated that the material meets the requirements of environmental protection authorities for fill material. The results were used to discuss potential usages of recycled glass as a construction material in geotechnical engineering applications particularly road works. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  16. Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Guerrero, Hector [Evans, GA; Bickford, Dennis [Folly Beach, SC

    2007-06-05

    A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

  17. Crystallization of cerium containing iron borophosphate glasses/glass-ceramics and their spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Liao, Qilong; Zhu, Hanzhen; Dai, Yunya; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The crystallization behaviors of CeO2 containing 36Fe2O3-10B2O3-54P2O5 glasses/glass-ceramics (IBP glasses/glass-ceramics) and the effect of CeO2 addition on the structure of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics annealed at 850 °C for 10 h were investigated by XRD, SEM and FTIR. The results show that Fe4(PO4)2O and Fe2(PO4)O phases are detected in the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics annealed at 650 °C for 10 h, and traces of FePO4 crystal is also detected when the CePO4 crystallite pre-exists in the unannealed IBP glass-ceramics. When the glasses/glass-ceramics are heat-treated at 850 °C for 10 h, Fe4(PO4)2O, Fe2(PO4)O and a small amount of FePO4 phase are detected. Meanwhile, CePO4 phase also appears in the crystallized IBP glasses/glass-ceramics containing more than 6 mol% (including 6 mol%) CeO2. Moreover, the main structural units of the crystallized glasses/glass-ceramics are [PO4] and [BO4] tetrahedron. [CeO4] tetrahedron also exists in the structure of the crystallized IBP glasses/glass-ceramics containing CeO2. CeO2 addition and the pre-existing CePO4 crystallite improve the resistance of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics to crystallization, which makes the infrared bands associated with the vibration of [PO4] group increase in intensity and shift to high wave number.

  18. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    SciTech Connect

    Koperwas, K., E-mail: kkoperwas@us.edu.pl; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.

    2015-07-14

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since thismore » relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition.« less

  19. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Bioactive glass particles (left) with a microporous surface (right) are widely accepted as a synthetic material for periodontal procedures. Using the particles to grow three-dimensional tissue cultures may one day result in developing an improved, more rugged bone tissue that may be used to correct skeletal disorders and bone defects. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research.

  20. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-12-14

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

  1. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

  2. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  3. Mercury sulphide dimorphism in glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Kassem, Mohammad; Sokolov, Anton; Cuisset, Arnault; ...

    2016-05-23

    Crystals usually exist in several polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram. Glasses and liquids also reveal density- or entropy-driven polyamorphism when e.g. an amorphous molecular solid or liquid transforms into a network polymorph. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that mercury sulphide exists simultaneously in two polymorphic modifications in a glass network forming chain-like and tetrahedral motifs. DFT simulations of 4-fold coordinated mercury species and RMC modelling of high-resolution diffraction data provide additional details on local Hg environment and connectivity implying the (HgS2/2)m oligomeric chains (1 m 6) are acting as a network former whilemore » the HgS4/4-related mixed agglomerated units behave as a modifier« less

  4. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.

    2005-08-08

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5 mm in the best glassformer. Au{sub 49}Ag{sub 5.5}Pd{sub 2.3}Cu{sub 26.9}Si{sub 16.3} has a liquidus temperature of 644 K, a glass transition temperature of 401 K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58 K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is {approx}350 Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractivemore » for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.« less

  5. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  6. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  7. Electrophoretic Deposition of Chitosan/45S5 Bioactive Glass Composite Coatings Doped with Zn and Sr.

    PubMed

    Miola, Marta; Verné, Enrica; Ciraldo, Francesca Elisa; Cordero-Arias, Luis; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-01-01

    In this research work, the original 45S5 bioactive glass was modified by introducing zinc and/or strontium oxide (6 mol%) in place of calcium oxide. Sr was added for its ability to stimulate bone formation and Zn for its role in bone metabolism, antibacterial properties, and anti-inflammatory effect. The glasses were produced by means of melting and quenching process. SEM and XRD analyses evidenced that Zr and Sr introduction did not modify the glass structure and morphology while compositional analysis (EDS) demonstrated the effective incorporation of these elements in the glass network. Bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) up to 1 month evidenced a reduced bioactivity kinetics for Zn-doped glasses. Doped glasses were combined with chitosan to produce organic/inorganic composite coatings on stainless steel AISI 316L by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Two EPD processes were considered for coating development, namely direct current EPD (DC-EPD) and alternating current EPD (AC-EPD). The stability of the suspension was analyzed and the deposition parameters were optimized. Tape and bending tests demonstrated a good coating-substrate adhesion for coatings containing 45S5-Sr and 45S5-ZnSr glasses, whereas the adhesion to the substrate decreased by using 45S5-Zn glass. FTIR analyses demonstrated the composite nature of coatings and SEM observations indicated that glass particles were well integrated in the polymeric matrix, the coatings were fairly homogeneous and free of cracks; moreover, the AC-EPD technique provided better results than DC-EPD in terms of coating quality. SEM, XRD analyses, and Raman spectroscopy, performed after bioactivity test in SBF solution, confirmed the bioactive behavior of 45S5-Sr-containing coating while coatings containing Zn exhibited no hydroxyapatite formation.

  8. Electrophoretic Deposition of Chitosan/45S5 Bioactive Glass Composite Coatings Doped with Zn and Sr

    PubMed Central

    Miola, Marta; Verné, Enrica; Ciraldo, Francesca Elisa; Cordero-Arias, Luis; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    In this research work, the original 45S5 bioactive glass was modified by introducing zinc and/or strontium oxide (6 mol%) in place of calcium oxide. Sr was added for its ability to stimulate bone formation and Zn for its role in bone metabolism, antibacterial properties, and anti-inflammatory effect. The glasses were produced by means of melting and quenching process. SEM and XRD analyses evidenced that Zr and Sr introduction did not modify the glass structure and morphology while compositional analysis (EDS) demonstrated the effective incorporation of these elements in the glass network. Bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) up to 1 month evidenced a reduced bioactivity kinetics for Zn-doped glasses. Doped glasses were combined with chitosan to produce organic/inorganic composite coatings on stainless steel AISI 316L by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Two EPD processes were considered for coating development, namely direct current EPD (DC-EPD) and alternating current EPD (AC-EPD). The stability of the suspension was analyzed and the deposition parameters were optimized. Tape and bending tests demonstrated a good coating-substrate adhesion for coatings containing 45S5-Sr and 45S5-ZnSr glasses, whereas the adhesion to the substrate decreased by using 45S5-Zn glass. FTIR analyses demonstrated the composite nature of coatings and SEM observations indicated that glass particles were well integrated in the polymeric matrix, the coatings were fairly homogeneous and free of cracks; moreover, the AC-EPD technique provided better results than DC-EPD in terms of coating quality. SEM, XRD analyses, and Raman spectroscopy, performed after bioactivity test in SBF solution, confirmed the bioactive behavior of 45S5-Sr-containing coating while coatings containing Zn exhibited no hydroxyapatite formation. PMID:26539431

  9. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  10. Transport phenomena in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasvári, Béla

    Recent experimental and theoretical results about the temperature and compostion dependence of electrical properties of transition metallic glasses are reviewed. Special attention is paid to the effect of weak localization and electron-electron interaction at lower temperatures as well as to the saturation phenomena at higher temperatures. In the case of magnetic alloys the evidences for the existence of significant magnetic contributions besides the dominant structural contributions are also discussed.

  11. Effects of glass scraps powder and glass fiber on mechanical properties of polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsakul, K.; Boongsood, W.

    2017-11-01

    One concern in bus manufacturing is the high cost of glass fiber reinforced in polyester composites parts. The composites of glass fiber and polyester are low elongation and high strength, and glass scraps powder displays high hardness and good chemical compatibility with the polymer matrix and glass fiber. This research aimed to study the effects of glass scraps powder and glass fiber on mechanical performance of polyester composites. Glass fiber was randomly oriented fiber and used as new. Glass scraps were obtained from a bus factory and crushed to powder sizes of 120 and 240 μm by a ball mill. Polyester composites were prepared using Vacuum Infusion Process (VIP).Polyester reinforced with 3 layers of glass fiber was an initial condition. Then, one layer of glass fiber was replaced with glass scraps powder. Flexural strength, tensile strength, impact strength and hardness of the polyester composites were determined. Hardness was increased with a combination of smaller size and higher volume of glass scraps powder. Pictures of specimens obtained by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) confirmed that the powder of glass scraps packed in the layers of glass fiber in polyester composites.

  12. Hollow glass waveguides: New variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel Joseph

    This study is an effort to develop new variations on the infrared silver-silver iodide hollow glass waveguide (HGW) with application specific properties. Four variations are presented: a HGW with a long, gradual taper, a HGW with a rectangular cross-section, curved HGW tips and a new all-dielectric hollow waveguide based on photonic bandgap guidance principles. A hollow glass waveguide tapered over its entire length offers ease of coupling at the proximal end and excellent flexibility at the distal end. Waveguides tapered from 1000 to 500 mum and 700 to 500 mum over 1.5 m were fabricated in this study. Compared to similarly sized non-tapered waveguides, laser losses for the tapered guides were high but decreased when bent. This behavior is contrary to that of non-tapered guides and an iterative ray tracing model was also developed to explain the observed loss characteristics of tapered hollow waveguides. Hollow glass waveguides with round profiles do not maintain the polarization state of the delivered radiation to any appreciable degree. HGWs with large- and small-aspect ratio rectangular cross sections were developed and shown to preserve polarization up to 96%, even when bent. The large aspect ratio guide was able to effectively rotate the transmitted polarization when twisted along its axis. Curved distal tips for medical and dental laser applications were developed by removing the low-OH silica fiber from commercially available stainless steel dental tips, and inserting HGWs of various sizes. The optical performances and heating profiles of the various configurations indicate the tips are suitable for certain medical applications, but the minimum bending radius is limited by the mechanical properties of the glass substrate. A small radii bending loss study confirms that propagating modes periodically couple as the radius of curvature is reduced. Through the application of the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance, hollow waveguides can be made entirely from

  13. Additive manufacturing of borosilicate glass (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2017-02-01

    Glasses including have significant scientific and engineering applications including optics, communications, electronics, and hermetic seals. This paper investigates a filament fed process for Additive Manufacturing (AM) of borosilicate glasses. Compared to soda-lime glasses, borosilicate glasses have improved coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and are widely used because of thermal shock resistance. In this work, borosilicate glass filaments are fed into a CO2 laser generated melt pool, smoothly depositing material onto the workpiece. Single tracks are printed to explore the effects that different process parameters have on the morphology of printed glass as well as the residual stress trapped in the glass. The transparency of glass allows residual stress to be measured using a polariscope. The effect of the substrate as well and substrate temperature are analyzed. We show that if fracture due to thermal shock can be avoided during deposition, then the residual stress can be relieved with an annealing step, removing birefringence. When combined with progress toward avoiding bubble entrapment in printed glass, we show the AM approach has the potential to produce high quality optically transparent glass for optical applications.

  14. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker; Sitzman, Gary W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet.

  15. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

    1998-10-27

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

  16. A review of glass-ionomers: From conventional glass-ionomer to bioactive glass-ionomer

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Keshani, Fateme

    2013-01-01

    Materials used in the body, especially the materials used in various oral cavity regions should be stable and passive without any interactions with the body tissues or fluids. Dental amalgam, composite resins and dental cements are the materials of choice with such properties. The first attempts to produce active materials, which could interact with the human body tissues and fluids were prompted by the concept that fluoride-releasing materials exert useful effects in the body. The concept of using the “smart” materials in dentistry has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Conventional glass-ionomer (GI) cements have a large number of applications in dentistry. They are biocompatible with the dental pulp to some extent. GI is predominantly used as cements in dentistry; however, they have some disadvantages, the most important of which is lack of adequate strength and toughness. In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of the conventional GI, resin-modified glass-ionomers have been marketed, with hydrophilic monomers, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylated (HEMA). Some recent studies have evaluated GI with bioactive glass in its structure to validate the claims that such a combination will improve tooth bioactivity, regeneration capacity and restoration. There is ever-increasing interest in the application of bioactive materials in the dental field in an attempt to remineralize affected dentin. The aim of this review article is to evaluate these materials and their characteristics and applications. PMID:24130573

  17. Reconstruction of orbital wall defects with bioactive glass plates.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Matti; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Aitasalo, Kalle

    2008-04-01

    Synthetic bioactive glass (BAG) is used in many surgical applications. Special bioactive glasses do not favor microbial growth. This study evaluated the clinical outcome of bioactive glass plates in reconstructive orbital surgery. In a retrospective series of 49 patients, 35 orbital floors and 6 orbital medial and superior walls were reconstructed after fronto-orbital trauma, and 8 patients were treated with BAG plates after fronto-orbital tumor resection. These patients were evaluated in terms of reconstruction materials, complications, and functional outcomes. During the 2-year follow-up, 3 of the 35 orbital floor trauma reconstructions were reoperated (9%) because of diplopia, and new reconstructions with BAG were performed. In all of the 8 patients with tumors and in 6 of the patients undergoing orbital wall reconstruction, the plates were in the correct position after reconstruction, and none had to be removed. One patient with a benign tumor and 7 of the 8 patients with malignant tumors survived to the 2-year follow-up. Reconstructive surgery of the orbit is one of the most demanding challenges in head and neck surgery. In orbital defect reconstruction, a BAG plate seems to be a well-tolerated and reliable reconstruction material alternative; however, BAG plates are brittle and rigid, and cannot be molded and shaped by a surgeon. The use of a stainless steel template of equal shape and size to a BAG plate is recommended to ameliorate this deficiency.

  18. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  19. Bus Propulsion Alternatives Overview

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-04-01

    The Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) is currently investigating propulsion alternatives which would conserve petroleum-based fuels and would be practical for use by U.S. transit operators. A discussion of these alternatives (electric p...

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Educators Search English Español Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth / For Teens / Complementary and Alternative Medicine What's ... a replacement. How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  1. Origin of embrittlement in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Glenn R; Demetriou, Marios D; Launey, Maximilien E; Johnson, William L

    2016-09-13

    Owing to their glassy nature, metallic glasses demonstrate a toughness that is extremely sensitive to the frozen-in configurational state. This sensitivity gives rise to "annealing embrittlement," which is often severe and in many respects limits the technological advancement of these materials. Here, equilibrium configurations (i.e., "inherent states") of a metallic glass are established around the glass transition, and the configurational properties along with the plane-strain fracture toughness are evaluated to associate the intrinsic glass toughness with the inherent state properties and identify the fundamental origin of embrittlement. The established correlations reveal a one-to-one correspondence between toughness and shear modulus continuous over a broad range of inherent states, suggesting that annealing embrittlement is controlled almost solely by an increasing resistance to shear flow. This annealing embrittlement sensitivity is shown to vary substantially between metallic glass compositions, and appears to correlate well with the fragility of the metallic glass.

  2. Refraction and UV Absorption in Optical Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiles, Eugene; Smith, David

    2004-03-01

    The optical polarizability of materials transparent in the visible is determined primarily by electronic processes with absorptions in the ultraviolet. We have used this connection of virtual visible processes to real uv processes to predict the visible index of optical glass from the glass' uv spectrum. The reflectivities of representative glasses were first analyzed to obtain their uv absorption. Then, the generalized Cauchy dispersion series for the index [Rad. Effects & Defects in Sol. 157, 823 (2002)] was evaluated using spectral moments of the absorption. The first few inverse absorption moments give an excellent representation of the frequency-dependent index as measured independently with visible light. This approach illuminates the role of glass-modifier ions in determining the refractive index. Processes include introduction of ion-specific absorptions, i.e., uv color centers; changes in the strength and distribution of glass-former absorptions; and alteration of the density and structure of the glass network.

  3. Borosilicate glass for gamma irradiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydogan, N.; Tugrul, A. B.

    2012-11-01

    Four different types of silicate glass specimens were irradiated with gamma radiation using a Co-60 radioisotope. Glass specimens, with four different chemical compositions, were exposed to neutron and mixed neutron/gamma doses in the central thimble and tangential beam tube of the nuclear research reactor. Optical variations were determined in accordance with standardisation concept. Changes in the direct solar absorbance (αe) of borosilicate glass were examined using the increase in gamma absorbed dose, and results were compared with the changes in the direct solar absorbance of the three different type silicate glass specimens. Solar absorption decreased due to decrease of penetration with absorbed dose. αe of borosilicate increased considerably when compared with other glass types. Changes in optical density were evaluated as an approach to create dose estimation. Mixed/thermal neutron irradiation on glass caused to increse αe.

  4. Unusual fast secondary relaxation in metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Zhang, S.T.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y.D.; Liu, C.T.; Lu, J.

    2015-01-01

    The relaxation spectrum of glassy solids has long been used to probe their dynamic structural features and the fundamental deformation mechanisms. Structurally complicated glasses, such as molecular glasses, often exhibit multiple relaxation processes. By comparison, metallic glasses have a simple atomic structure with dense atomic packing, and their relaxation spectra were commonly found to be simpler than those of molecular glasses. Here we show the compelling evidence obtained across a wide range of temperatures and frequencies from a La-based metallic glass, which clearly shows two peaks of secondary relaxations (fast versus slow) in addition to the primary relaxation peak. The discovery of the unusual fast secondary relaxation unveils the complicated relaxation dynamics in metallic glasses and, more importantly, provides us the clues which help decode the structural features serving as the ‘trigger' of inelasticity on mechanical agitations. PMID:26204999

  5. Glass-rich chondrules in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Rubin, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    There are two types of glass-rich chondrules in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (OC): (1) porphyritic chondrules containing 55-85 vol% glass or microcrystalline mesostasis and (2) nonporphyritic chondrules, containing 90-99 vol% glass. These two types are similar in mineralogy and bulk composition to previously described Al-rich chondrules in OC. In addition to Si-, Al- and Na-rich glass or Ca-Al-rich microcrystalline mesostasis, glass-rich chondrules contain dendritic and skeletal crystals of olivine, Al2O3-rich low-Ca pyroxene and fassaite. Some chondrules contain relict grains of forsterite +/- Mg-Al spinel. We suggest that glass-rich chondrules were formed early in nebular history by melting fine-grained precursor materials rich in refractory (Ca, Al, Ti) an moderately volatite (Na, K) components (possibly related to Ca-Al-rich inclusions) admixed with coarse relict forsterite and spinel grains derived from previously disrupted type-I chondrules.

  6. Pristine lunar glasses - Criteria, data, and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The examination of glasses from all of the Apollo landing sites has led to the identification of 25 groups of pristine glass. The nickel found in these glasses is shown to be indigenous, not meteoritic contamination, and to be correlated with Mg. Chemical data indicate that these glasses are more suitable for primary magma than most crystalline mare basalts. In addition, these pristine glasses support the view that assimilative processes involving two cumulative systems in the differentiated mantle operated during mare petrogenesis. Two linear arrays found among the chemistries of the glasses attest to the existence of these interactions. Data suggest that these cumulate components in the mantle continue for 1000 km (laterally) and therefore are likely to be products of a magma ocean that existed early in lunar history.

  7. Chalcogenide glasses for infrared applications: New synthesis routes and rare earth doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Mathieu

    Chalcogenide glasses and glass-ceramics present a high interest for the production of thermal imaging lenses transparent in the 3--5 microm and 8--12 microm windows. However, chalcogenide glasses are conventionally synthesized utilizing expensive and single use silica ampoules sealed under vacuum. The present work addresses the development of innovative synthesis methods for chalcogenide glasses that can present an alternative to the silica tube route. The first approach assessed by melting the raw starting elements in reusable silica containers appears inadequate for synthesis of glasses from the system Ge-Ga-Se. The second synthesis approach consists of the preparation of amorphous chalcogenide powders by ball milling of raw elements (mechanosynthesis) followed by consolidation of the as-prepared powders. Hot Uniaxial Pressing is suitable for sintering of powders with compositions stable against crystallization but uncontrolled crystallization occurs for the unstable compositions. In contrast, consolidation through Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) allows production of bulk glasses with large dimensions in a short duration and at relatively low temperatures. Moreover, increased SPS treatment duration yields infrared transparent glass-ceramics with enhanced mechanical properties. This innovative synthesis method combining mechanosynthesis and SPS has been patented in the framework if this study. The controlled etching of 80GeSe2-20Ga2Se 3 glass-ceramics in acid solution yields nanoporous materials with enhanced surface area. The porous layer created on the surface of the glass-ceramic plays the role of anti-reflection coating and increases the optical transmission in the infrared range by 10%. These materials present potential for the production of sensors with increased sensitivity. The influence of indium and lead addition on the thermal and optical properties of the 80GeSe2-20Ga2Se3 glass is also assessed. Increased In or Pb contents tend to decrease the Tg and

  8. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, David K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2015-11-01

    throughout the WTP flowsheet and the underlying mechanisms that dictate its partitioning between streams within the LAW vitrification facility. These studies are aimed at increasing the single-pass Tc retention in glass and the potential use of high-temperature mineral phases to capture Tc. The Tc-bearing mineral phases would be thermally stable and resistant to Tc release during feed melting reactions or they could serve as alternative waste forms. The LAW glass research and development is focused on reducing the total volume of LAW glass produced and minimizing the impact of (or potentially eliminating) the need for recycle.« less

  9. Comparison of bioactive glass coated and hydroxyapatite coated titanium dental implants in the human jaw bone.

    PubMed

    Mistry, S; Kundu, D; Datta, S; Basu, D

    2011-03-01

    Current trends in clinical dental implant therapy include modification of titanium surfaces for the purpose of improving osseointegration by different additive (bioactive coatings) and subtractive processes (acid etching, grit-blasting). The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the behaviour of hydroxyapatite and the newly developed bioactive glass coated implants (62 implants) in osseous tissue following implantation in 31 patients. Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite was suitably coated on titanium alloy. Hydroxyapatite coating was applied on the implant surface by air microplasma spray technique and bioactive glass coating was applied by vitreous enamelling technique. The outcome was assessed up to 12 months after prosthetic loading using different clinical and radiological parameters. Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were non-toxic and biocompatible. Overall results showed that bioactive glass coated implants were as equally successful as hydroxyapatite in achieving osseointegration and supporting final restorations. The newly developed bioactive glass is a good alternative coating material for dental implants. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  10. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  11. Surface Coatings on Lunar Volcanic Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas,-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    We are undertaking a detailed study of surface deposits on lunar volcanic glass beads. These tiny deposits formed by vapor condensation during cooling of the gases that drove the fire fountain eruptions responsible for the formation of the beads. Volcanic glass beads are present in most lunar soil samples in the returned lunar collection. The mare-composition beads formed as a result of fire-fountaining approx.3.4-3.7 Ga ago, within the age range of large-scale mare volcanism. Some samples from the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 landing sites are enriched in volcanic spherules. Three major types of volcanic glass bead have been identified: Apollo 15 green glass, Apollo 17 orange glass, and Apollo 17 "black" glass. The Apollo 15 green glass has a primitive composition with low Ti. The high-Ti compositions of the orange and black glasses are essentially identical to each other but the black glasses are opaque because of quench crystallization. A poorly understood feature common to the Apollo 15 and 17 volcanic glasses is the presence of small deposits of unusual materials on their exterior surfaces. For example, early studies indicated that the Apollo 17 orange glasses had surface enrichments of In, Cd, Zn, Ga, Ge, Au, and Na, and possible Pb- and Zn-sulfides, but it was not possible to characterize the surface features in detail. Technological advances now permit us to examine such features in detail. Preliminary FE-TEM/X-ray studies of ultramicrotome sections of Apollo 15 green glass indicate that the surface deposits are heterogeneous and layered, with an inner layer consisting of Fe with minor S and an outer layer of Fe and no S, and scattered Zn enrichments. Layering in surface deposits has not been identified previously; it will be key to defining the history of lunar fire fountaining.

  12. Stability of Glass Fiber-Plastic Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    investigated. 1. S-Glass The formation of S-g1ass 1s proprietary and differs between the two main sources ( Owens - Corning and Ferro Corporation) from...which samples were obtained for this research program. However, according to published work by Humphrey (8) of Owens - Corning , the approximate...of the glass fibers. S-glass fibers furnished by both Owens - Corning and Ferro Cor- poration were utilized and the results analyzed using scanning

  13. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

    1980-01-28

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  14. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Buckwalter, Jr., Charles Q.

    1981-01-01

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  15. Cooling rates of lunar volcanic glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, H.; Hess, K. U.; Zhang, Y.; Peslier, A. H.; Lange, R. A.; Dingwell, D. B.; Neal, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  16. Alternative Waste Forms for Electro-Chemical Salt Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Brian J.

    2009-10-28

    This study was undertaken to examine alternate crystalline (ceramic/mineral) and glass waste forms for immobilizing spent salt from the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) electrochemical separations process. The AFCI is a program sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a process for recycling spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The electrochemical process is a molten salt process for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in an electrorefiner and generates spent salt that is contaminated with alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanide fission products (FP) that must either be cleaned of fission products or eventually replaced with new salt tomore » maintain separations efficiency. Currently, these spent salts are mixed with zeolite to form sodalite in a glass-bonded waste form. The focus of this study was to investigate alternate waste forms to immobilize spent salt. On a mole basis, the spent salt is dominated by alkali and Cl with minor amounts of alkaline earth and lanthanides. In the study reported here, we made an effort to explore glass systems that are more compatible with Cl and have not been previously considered for use as waste forms. In addition, alternate methods were explored with the hope of finding a way to produce a sodalite that is more accepting of as many FP present in the spent salt as possible. This study was done to investigate two different options: (1) alternate glass families that incorporate increased concentrations of Cl; and (2) alternate methods to produce a mineral waste form.« less

  17. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  18. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition modelsmore » were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.« less

  19. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  1. 3D-Printed Transparent Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Du T.; Meyers, Cameron; Yee, Timothy D.

    2017-04-28

    In this study, silica inks are developed, which may be 3D printed and thermally processed to produce optically transparent glass structures with sub-millimeter features in forms ranging from scaffolds to monoliths. The inks are composed of silica powder suspended in a liquid and are printed using direct ink writing. The printed structures are then dried and sintered at temperatures well below the silica melting point to form amorphous, solid, transparent glass structures. This technique enables the mold-free formation of transparent glass structures previously inaccessible using conventional glass fabrication processes.

  2. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  3. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

    1986-04-17

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with an ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

  4. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Bloom, Ira D.; Roche, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

  5. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

    1987-04-21

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material. 6 figs.

  6. Dehydration Processes of Sugar Glasses and Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2006-05-01

    The dehydration processes of sugar glasses and sugar crystals were studied by using Thermogravimetry — Differential Thermal Analysis method. We used three monosaccharide sugars (fructose, galactose, and glucose) and three disaccharide sugars (sucrose, maltose and trehalose). It was found that a trehalose showed different dehydration process compared to the other sugars. The amount of mass reductions in sugar glasses is larger than that in sugar crystals. However, in the case of trehalose, the amount of mass reduction in trehalose glasses is smaller than that in trehalose crystals. It seems to be possible that this unique dehydration property of trehalose glasses maybe relate to the cell protection ability during an anhydrobiosis process.

  7. Apparatus Splits Glass Tubes Longitudinally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Ernest; Manahan, Robert O'neil

    1993-01-01

    Tubes split into half cylinders by hot-wire/thermal-shock method. Tube to be cut placed on notched jig in apparatus. Nichrome wire stretched between arms of pivoted carriage and oriented parallel to notch. Wire heated by electrical current while resting on tube. After heating for about 1 minute for each millimeter of thickness of glass, tube quenched in water and split by resulting thermal shock. Apparatus used to split tubes in sizes ranging from 3/8 in. in diameter by 1 in. long to 1 1/2 in. in diameter by 4 in. long.

  8. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobrist, B.; Marcolli, C.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2008-09-01

    A new process is presented by which water soluble organics might influence ice nucleation, ice growth, chemical reactions and water uptake of aerosols in the upper troposphere: the formation of glassy aerosol particles. Glasses are disordered amorphous (non-crystalline) solids that form when a liquid is cooled without crystallization until the viscosity increases exponentially and molecular diffusion practically ceases. The glass transition temperatures, Tg, homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures, Thom, and ice melting temperatures, Tm, of various aqueous inorganic, organic and multi-component solutions are investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter. The investigated solutes are: various polyols, glucose, raffinose, levoglucosan, an aromatic compound, sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulfate and mixtures of dicarboxylic acids (M5), of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate (M5AS), of two polyols, of glucose and ammonium nitrate, and of raffinose and M5AS. The results indicate that aqueous solutions of the investigated inorganic solutes show Tg values that are too low to be of atmospheric importance. In contrast, aqueous organic and multi-component solutions readily form glasses at low but atmospherically relevant temperatures (≤230 K). To apply the laboratory data to the atmospheric situation, the measured phase transition temperatures were transformed from a concentration to a water activity scale by extrapolating water activities determined between 252 K and 313 K to lower temperatures. The obtained state diagrams reveal that the higher the molar mass of the aqueous organic or multi-component solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. To a lesser extent, Tg also depends on the hydrophilicity of the organic solutes. Therefore, aerosol particles containing larger (≳150 g mol-1) and more hydrophobic organic molecules are more likely to form glasses at intermediate to high relative humidities in the upper troposphere

  9. Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobrist, B.; Marcolli, C.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2008-05-01

    A new process is presented by which water-soluble organics might influence ice nucleation, ice growth, chemical reactions and water uptake of aerosols in the upper troposphere: the formation of glassy aerosol particles. Glasses are disordered amorphous (non-crystalline) solids that form when a liquid is cooled without crystallization until the viscosity increases exponentially and molecular diffusion practically ceases. The glass transition temperatures, Tg, homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures, Thom, and ice melting temperatures, Tm, of various aqueous inorganic, organic and multi-component solutions are investigated with a differential scanning calorimeter. The investigated solutes are: various polyols, glucose, raffinose, levoglucosan, an aromatic compound, sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulphate and mixtures of dicarboxylic acids (M5), of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate (M5AS), of two polyols, of glucose and ammonium nitrate, and of raffinose and M5AS. The results indicate that aqueous solutions of the investigated inorganic solutes show Tg-values that are too low to be of atmospheric importance. In contrast, aqueous organic and multi-component solutions readily form glasses at low but atmospherically relevant temperatures (≤230 K). To apply the laboratory data to the atmospheric situation, the measured phase transition temperatures were transformed from a concentration to a water activity scale by extrapolating water activities determined between 252 K and 313 K to lower temperatures. The obtained state diagrams reveal that the higher the molar mass of the aqueous organic or multi-component solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. To a lesser extent, Tg also depends on the hydrophilicity of the organic solutes. Therefore, aerosol particles containing larger and more hydrophobic organic molecules (≳150 g mol-1) are more likely to form glasses at intermediate to high relative humidities in the upper troposphere

  10. Glass-bead peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Peen plating of aluminum, copper, and nickel powders was investigated. Only aluminum was plated successfully within the range of peen plating conditions studied. Optimum plating conditions for aluminum were found to be: (1) bead/powder mixture containing 25 to 35% powder by weight, (2) peening intensity of 0.007A as measured by Almen strip, and (3) glass impact bead diameter of at least 297 microns (0.0117 inches) for depositing-100 mesh aluminum powder. No extensive cleaning or substrate preparation is required beyond removing loose dirt or heavy oil.

  11. Dynamic fracture toughness of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.; Liaw, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    Experimentally determined dynamic crack propagation histories in wedge-loaded, modified tapered, and rectangular double cantilever beam specimens were used to drive a dynamic finite element code in its generation phase. The resultant dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relation, during the initial crack acceleration phase of these dynamic fracture specimens, was erratic but followed the standard Gamma-shaped curves of brittle polymers and metals during subsequent crack propagation at terminal velocity and crack deceleration phases. The distinct initiation phase of dynamic crack propagation, which was not observed in dynamic fracture of brittle polymer and metal specimens, is attributed to the lower stored energy in the glass specimen.

  12. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  13. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  14. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  15. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  16. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  17. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  18. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  19. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  20. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  1. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used in...

  2. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used in...

  3. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used in...

  5. Synthesis for Lunar Simulants: Glass, Agglutinate, Plagioclase, Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Michael; Wilson, Stephen A.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Stoeser, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The video describes a process for making glass for lunar regolith simulants that was developed from a patented glass-producing technology. Glass composition can be matched to simulant design and specification. Production of glass, pseudo agglutinates, plagioclase, and breccias is demonstrated. The system is capable of producing hundreds of kilograms of high quality glass and simulants per day.

  6. Laceration and Ejection Dangers of Automotive Glass, and the Weak Standards Involved. The Strain Fracture Test.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Carl C.; Yudenfriend, Herbert; Redner, Alex S.

    2000-01-01

    Glazing types are historically described, with the laceration injuries and ejection deaths associated with present glazing. Sixty tempered glass windows manufactured at nominally four temper levels were tested for uncracked fracture fragment size and weight and length by the American and European standards, which fracture the glass without strain, and our preliminary strain fracture test, which produces longer uncracked fragments and heavier clusters of fragments. Our study relates the results by the three methods to the temper measurements using birefringence, with a discussion of alternate safer glazing and the inadequacy of present standards for reducing laceration and ejection dangers. PMID:11558078

  7. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  8. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  9. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. Here, five new glasses with high Na2O contents were designed to generate waste forms having higher sodalite contents and fewer stress fractures. The structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the new glasses were measured using variety of analytical techniques. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with surrogate salt waste. The materials made using the glasses developed during this study were formulated to generate more sodalite than materialsmore » made with previous baseline glasses used. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature. These improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability. Additionally, a model generated during this study for predicting softening temperature of silicate binder glasses is presented.« less

  10. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Even in normal gravity, bioactive glass particles enhance bone growth in laboratory tests with flat tissue cultures. Ducheyne and his team believe that using the bioactive microcarriers in a rotating bioreactor in microgravity will produce improved, three-dimensional tissue cultures. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering.

  11. Optically responsive supramolecular polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkenende, Diederik W. R.; Monnier, Christophe A.; Fiore, Gina L.; Weder, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    The reversible and dynamic nature of non-covalent interactions between the constituting building blocks renders many supramolecular polymers stimuli-responsive. This was previously exploited to create thermally and optically healable polymers, but it proved challenging to achieve high stiffness and good healability. Here we present a glass-forming supramolecular material that is based on a trifunctional low-molecular-weight monomer ((UPyU)3TMP). Carrying three ureido-4-pyrimidinone (UPy) groups, (UPyU)3TMP forms a dynamic supramolecular polymer network, whose properties are governed by its cross-linked architecture and the large content of the binding motif. This design promotes the formation of a disordered glass, which, in spite of the low molecular weight of the building block, displays typical polymeric behaviour. The material exhibits a high stiffness and offers excellent coating and adhesive properties. On account of reversible dissociation and the formation of a low-viscosity liquid upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, rapid optical healing as well as (de)bonding on demand is possible.

  12. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.; Nolen, R. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres (shells), which are used for inertial confinement fusion targets, were formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a vertical furnace. As a result of the rapid pyrolysis caused by the furnace, the gel is transformed to a shell in five distinct stages: (a) surface closure of the porous gel; (b) generation of a closed-cell foam structure in the gel; (c) spheridization of the gel and further expansion of the foam; (d) coalescence of the closed-cell foam to a single-void shell; and (e) fining of the glass shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the falling gel particle was modeled to determine the effective heating rate of the gel. The model predicts the temperature history for a particle as a function of mass, dimensions, specific heat, and absorptance as well as furnace temperature profile and thermal conductivity of the furnace gas. A model was developed that predicts the gravity-induced degradation of shell concentricity in falling molten shells as a function of shell characteristics and time.

  13. Protein adsorption to multi-component glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew Micah

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) to sodium silicate, soda lime silicate (SLS), and sodium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass microspheres was investigated using sodiumdodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in conjunction with a colloidal silver stain for visualization. The 30 Na2O·70 SiO2 composition could not be evaluated due to an apparent chemical interference that occurred during silver staining. This inhibitory effect was attributed to the extensive corrosion that occurred during the protein elution and caused an elevation in the pH of the solution. The remaining glass compositions were sufficiently durable for further study. The HSA adsorption capacity of SLS glass microspheres containing 70 and 80 mol% SiO2 increased as CaO was substituted for Na2O. An abrupt decrease in the HSA adsorption capacity was observed for SLS glasses containing 60 mol% SiO2. A similar trend was observed for the SAS glass microspheres, although the SAS glasses adsorbed less HSA than the SLS glasses containing equivalent molar percentages of SiO2. The initial increase in HSA adsorption capacity for SLS and SAS glasses containing 70 and 80 MOM SiO2 was attributed to the introduction of positive charges into the glass surfaces via Ca2+ and Al3+ cations. The decrease in HSA adsorption capacity for SLS and SAS glasses containing 60 mol% SiO2 may be due to an enhanced affinity between the glasses and HSA, resulting in a "flattened" conformation that limits the total accessible area for adsorption.

  14. Nucleation and crystal growth behavior of nepheline in simulated high-level waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Amoroso, J.; Mcclane, D.

    2017-09-26

    composition using optical microscopy. This research establishes a viable alternative to more traditional techniques for evaluating nepheline crystallization in large numbers of glasses, which are prohibitively time consuming or otherwise impractical. The ultimate objective is to combine the nucleation and growth information obtained from DSC, like that presented in this report, with computer simulations of glass cooling within the canister to accurately predict nepheline crystallization in HLW during processing through WTP.« less

  15. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  16. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  17. The Glass Ceiling Initiative. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

    While minorities and women have made considerable gains in entering the workforce in the last few decades, there remains a dearth of minorities and women at management levels. This phenomenon has come to be known as the "glass ceiling." The Department of Labor defines the glass ceiling as those artificial barriers based on attitudinal or…

  18. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

  19. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, Ray F.

    1994-01-01

    A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

  20. Universality in bipartite mean field spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we give a proof of universality with respect to the choice of the statistical distribution of the quenched noise, for mean field bipartite spin glasses. We use mainly techniques of spin glasses theory, as Guerra's interpolation and the cavity approach.

  1. Fatigue Behavior of Glass Fiber Reinforced Polybutyleneterephthalate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    the response. Short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been chosen as a suitable system for this analysis. Among the linear... polybutylene terephthalate composites containing 20 (±1) percent by volume glass fiber were obtained from the Hooker Chemical Company. In addition...polyesters of terephthalic acid, PBT is currently experiencing rapid growth as an injec- tion moldable engineering thermoplastic. Its high

  2. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  3. The Glass Ceiling: Progress and Persistent Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLlwain, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been written that since 2001, there has not been any significant progress and the glass ceiling is still intact. Women are still underrepresented in top positions (Anonymous, 2004). If this is true, the glass ceiling presents a major barrier between women and their desire to advance into executive or senior management positions. In addition…

  4. Thin transparent films formed from powdered glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Glass film less than five mils thick is formed from powdered glass dispersed in an organic liquid, deposited on a substrate, and fused into place. The thin films can be cut and shaped for contact lenses, optical filters and insulating layers.

  5. Antibacterial properties of laser spinning glass nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Echezarreta-López, M M; De Miguel, T; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Landin, M

    2014-12-30

    A laser-spinning technique has been used to produce amorphous, dense and flexible glass nanofibers of two different compositions with potential utility as reinforcement materials in composites, fillers in bone defects or scaffolds (3D structures) for tissue engineering. Morphological and microstructural analyses have been carried out using SEM-EDX, ATR-FTIR and TEM. Bioactivity studies allow the nanofibers with high proportion in SiO2 (S18/12) to be classified as a bioinert glass and the nanofibers with high proportion of calcium (ICIE16) as a bioactive glass. The cell viability tests (MTT) show high biocompatibility of the laser spinning glass nanofibers. Results from the antibacterial activity study carried out using dynamic conditions revealed that the bioactive glass nanofibers show a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on Sthaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) while the bioinert glass nanofibers show a bacteriostatic effect also dose-dependent. The antibacterial activity has been related to the release of alkaline ions, the increase of pH of the medium and also the formation of needle-like aggregates of calcium phosphate at the surface of the bioactive glass nanofibers which act as a physical mechanism against bacteria. The antibacterial properties give an additional value to the laser-spinning glass nanofibers for different biomedical applications, such as treating or preventing surgery-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  7. Phase Stability Determinations of DWPF Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, S.L.

    1999-10-22

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. To fulfill this requirement, glass samples were heat treated at various times and temperatures. These results will provide guidance to the repository program about conditions to be avoided during shipping, handling and storage of DWPF canistered waste forms.

  8. Nonlinear physics: Glass transitions in plane view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrowell, Peter

    2006-03-01

    In Flatland, glasses reproduce all the behaviour of their three-dimensional relatives. A simulation of a two-dimensional molecular glass-forming liquid takes advantage of the unimpeded view, and shows how fluctuations in structure can produce domains of slow molecules on cooling.

  9. Plastic Deformation of Pressured Metallic Glass

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun; Peng, Chuanxiao; Zhang, Zhenting; Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Shengzhong; Wang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Although pressured metallic glass (MG) has been reported in the literature; there are few studies focusing on pressure effects on the structure; dynamics and its plastic deformation. In this paper; we report on and characterize; via molecular dynamics simulation, the structure and dynamics heterogeneity of pressured MGs, and explore a causal link between local structures and plastic deformation mechanism of pressured glass. The results exhibit that the dynamical heterogeneity of metallic liquid is more pronounced at high pressure, while the MGs were less fragile after the release of external pressure, reflected by the non-Gaussian parameter (NGP). High pressure glass shows better plastic deformation; and the local strain zone distributed more uniformly than of in normal glass. Further research indicates that although the number of icosahedrons in pressured glass was much larger than that in normal glass, while the interpenetrating connections of icosahedra (ICOI) exhibited spatial correlations were rather poor; In addition, the number of ‘fast’ atoms indexed by the atoms’ moving distance is larger than that in normal glass; leading to the sharp decreasing in number of icosahedrons during deformation. An uniform distribution of ‘fast’ atoms also contributed to better plastic deformation ability in the pressured glass. These findings may suggest a link between the deformation and destruction of icosahedra with short-range order. PMID:29186885

  10. Particle size variations in the glass component of glass-ionomer dental cements.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Kefi

    2012-01-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (glass ionomer cements) are widely used in restorative dentistry and now a day the material of choice for bone cements. The aim of the study is to examine the variations produced by exposure to acid for dental Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) glass particles of different composition. It also involves the study of the effect of replacing Ca by Sr in glass ionomer glasses on the particle size distribution. This study was carried out in a Malvern Mastersizer/E. This uses LASER-diffraction and was in reverse-Fourier mode (0.1-80 microm). Ultrasound was used to break up any agglomerates. Also, some samples were treated as above but instead of particle size analyser, the slurries were centrifuged and the glass washed and dried to constant weight to determine mass loss. The mass loss for LG26Sr in acid washing was comparatively greater whereas LG26 showed less mass loss. When statistically evaluated LG series and AH2 were found to differ significantly p = 0.008. There was, however, no significant difference between other combinations of glasses in acid was treatment. The pseudo-cement formation in all the glasses suffered significant mass loss p = < 0.008. By changing the different chemical composition of glass ionomer glasses the mass loss was substantially greater during the cement formation process as compare to acid washing.

  11. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na 2O-B 2O 3-SiO 2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. In this paper, five new glasses with ~20 mass% Na 2O were designed to generate waste forms with high sodalite. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with a surrogate salt waste. The waste forms made using these new glasses were formulated to generate more sodalite than those made with previous baseline glasses for this type of waste. The coefficients of thermal expansion formore » the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature than previous binder glasses used. Finally, these improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability.« less

  12. Modification of resin modified glass ionomer cement by addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Valanezhad, Alireza; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Udoh, Koichi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Sawase, Takashi; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, sol-gel derived nanoparticle calcium silicate bioactive glass was added to the resin-modified light cure glass-ionomer cement to assess the influence of additional bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. The fabricated bioactive glass nanoparticles added resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (GICs) were immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 28 days to mimic real condition for the mechanical properties. Resin-modified GICs containing 3, 5 and 10 % bioactive glass nanoparticles improved the flexural strength compared to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and the samples containing 15 and 20 % bioactive glass nanoparticles before and after immersing in the phosphate buffer solution. Characterization of the samples successfully expressed the cause of the critical condition for mechanical properties. Cell study clarified that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement with high concentrations of bioactive glass nanoparticles has higher cell viability and better cell morphology compare to control groups. The results for mechanical properties and toxicity approved that the considering in selection of an optimum condition would have been a more satisfying conclusion for this study.

  13. Alternative Certification Isn't Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kate; Jacobs, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    While nearly all states now have something on their books labeled "alternate route to certification," these programs defy standard definition due to their enormous variability. States differ in the types of candidates allowed to apply (e.g., career changers or recent college graduates) and in the academic backgrounds these individuals must…

  14. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-12-02

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

  15. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  16. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantialmore » investments.« less

  17. Adsorption of monoclonal antibodies to glass microparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoehne, Matthew; Samuel, Fauna; Dong, Aichun; Wurth, Christine; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2011-01-01

    Microparticulate glass represents a potential contamination to protein formulations that may occur as a result of processing conditions or glass types. The effect of added microparticulate glass to formulations of three humanized antibodies was tested. Under the three formulation conditions tested, all three antibodies adsorbed irreversibly at near monolayer surface coverages to the glass microparticles. Analysis of the secondary structure of the adsorbed antibodies by infrared spectroscopy reveal only minor perturbations as a result of adsorption. Likewise, front-face fluorescence quenching measurements reflected minimal tertiary structural changes upon adsorption. In contrast to the minimal effects on protein structure, adsorption of protein to suspensions of glass microparticles induced significant colloidal destabilization and flocculation of the suspension. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  18. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature tomore » guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.« less

  19. Predicting Shear Transformation Events in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Falk, Michael L.; Li, J. F.; Kong, L. T.

    2018-03-01

    Shear transformation is the elementary process for plastic deformation of metallic glasses, the prediction of the occurrence of the shear transformation events is therefore of vital importance to understand the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. In this Letter, from the view of the potential energy landscape, we find that the protocol-dependent behavior of shear transformation is governed by the stress gradient along its minimum energy path and we propose a framework as well as an atomistic approach to predict the triggering strains, locations, and structural transformations of the shear transformation events under different shear protocols in metallic glasses. Verification with a model Cu64 Zr36 metallic glass reveals that the prediction agrees well with athermal quasistatic shear simulations. The proposed framework is believed to provide an important tool for developing a quantitative understanding of the deformation processes that control mechanical behavior of metallic glasses.

  20. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr).more » Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.« less

  1. Impact of glass plates rigidity on load sharing in an aerogel composited glass unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunzhen; Yang, Weijun

    2018-03-01

    An aerogel composited glass unit consists of two glass sheets and an interlayer filled with aerogel granules. When it is subjected to a uniformly distributed load, part of the load is transferred to the leeward glass sheet through the interlayer. A numerical analysis method is employed to describe the effect of glass plates rigidity on load sharing of two glass plates and an experimental research is conducted to verify the validity of the numerical method. The experimental results suggested that the assumptions which were employed in the numerical method are valid when the difference of glass sheets rigidity is small, but it becomes inapplicable when the difference of glass sheets rigidity becomes much greater.

  2. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  3. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    PubMed Central

    Ponsot, Inès M. M. M.; Pontikes, Yiannis; Baldi, Giovanni; Chinnam, Rama K.; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Bernardo, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C), whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C). The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests. PMID:28788146

  4. Method for heating and forming a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker

    1997-01-01

    A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration.

  5. Method for heating and forming a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.

    1997-08-12

    A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration. 5 figs.

  6. Crack tip fracture toughness of base glasses for dental restoration glass-ceramics using crack opening displacements.

    PubMed

    Deubener, J; Höland, M; Höland, W; Janakiraman, N; Rheinberger, V M

    2011-10-01

    The critical stress intensity factor, also known as the crack tip toughness K(tip), was determined for three base glasses, which are used in the manufacture of glass-ceramics. The glasses included the base glass for a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, the base glass for a fluoroapatite glass-ceramic and the base glass for a leucite glass-ceramic. These glass-ceramic are extensively used in the form of biomaterials in restorative dental medicine. The crack tip toughness was established by using crack opening displacement profiles under experimental conditions. The crack was produced by Vickers indentation. The crack tip toughness parameters determined for the three glass-ceramics differed quite significantly. The crack tip parameters of the lithium disilicate base glass and the leucite base glass were higher than that of the fluoroapatite base glass. This last material showed glass-in-glass phase separation. The discussion of the results clearly shows that the droplet glass phase is softer than the glass matrix. Therefore, the authors conclude that a direct relationship exists between the chemical nature of the glasses and the crack tip parameter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Alternatives to Certain Phthalates Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The alternatives assessment partnership project on alternatives to certain phthalates seeks to eplore the human health and environmental profiles of eight action plan phthalates and functional alternatives

  8. Alternative Auditing Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, Alicen J

    2017-09-15

    This presentation for the 2017 Energy Exchange in Tampa, Florida, offers information about advanced auditing technologies and techniques including alternative auditing approaches and considerations and caveats.

  9. Alternator insulation evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, W. B.; Schaefer, R. F.; Balke, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to predict the remaining electrical insulation life of a 60 KW homopolar inductor alternator following completion of NASA turbo-alternator endurance tests for SNAP-8 space electrical power systems application. The insulation quality was established for two alternators following completion of these tests. A step-temperature aging test procedure was developed for insulation life prediction and applied to one of the two alternators. Armature winding insulation life of over 80,000 hours for an average winding temperature of 248 degrees C was predicted using the developed procedure.

  10. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-09-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  11. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  12. Mechanical behavior of glass fiber polyester hybrid composite filled with natural fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G.; Gupta, A.; Dhanola, A.; Raturi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Now-a-days, the natural fibers and fillers from renewable natural resources offer the potential to act as a reinforcing material for polymer composite material alternative to the use of synthetic fiber like as; glass, carbon and other man-made fibers. Among various natural fibers and fillers like banana, wheat straw, rice husk, wood powder, sisal, jute, hemp etc. are the most widely used natural fibers and fillers due to its advantages like easy availability, low density, low production cost and reasonable physical and mechanical properties This research work presents the effect of natural fillers loading with 5%, 10% and 15% on mechanical behavior of polyester based hybrid composites. The result of test depicted that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under impact and flexural loads. However it is found that the hybrid composite have better strength as compared to single glass fibre composites.

  13. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  14. Crystallization phenomenon in different glass-ceramic and glass materials under CO II laser action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Ignatyev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Yakovlev, E. B.; Orlov, D. V.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally known that every commercial glass has its own crystallization ability it means that a certain temperature interval exists and glasses can crystallize in this interval. We have to know the crystallization ability and crystallization speed to choose the proper regime for glass melting, manufacturing of different articles and for thermal processing in glass-ceramics manufacture. Crystallization character depends on relation between crystallization centers formation rate, crystal growing rate from this centers and viscosity. The larger the interval between peak rates of crystal growth and formation of crystallization centers, and lower the rates themselves, the lower the tendency of glass to crystallization. Crystallization of glass materials depends on several factors: chemical composition and viscosity of glass, basic material, mutual solubility of every component, duration of exposure on proper temperatures, existence of crystallization catalysts and conditions of thermal processing of glass. To get crystallization conditions one have to provide slow passing through the temperature interval 1000-1200°C. Earlier the possibility of glass-ceramic crystallization under that CO II laser action was experimentally shown. But even now it is not clear enough how crystallization centers can form and grow in such a small period of time (several seconds) and what role do impurity materials play (i.e. Au, Ag, etc.). It is known that their atoms play role of crystallization centers in conventional regimes of glass-ceramic crystallization. So, to make a step forward in understanding the laser crystallization process of different glasses we decided to check the assumption of vacancy model that any glass can be crystallized during several seconds regardless of above mentioned impurity materials presence. We decided to choose a glass material for our experiment with large crystallization temperature interval and without any impurity materials like Au, Ag or Ti: Li

  15. Late Byzantine Mineral Soda High Alumina Glasses from Asia Minor: A New Primary Glass Production Group

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor. PMID:21526144

  16. Glass for sealing lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Leedecke, C.J.

    1981-08-28

    Glass compositions resistant to corrosion by lithium cell electrolyte and having an expansion coefficient of 45 to 85 x 10/sup -70/C/sup -1/ have been made with SiO/sub 2/, 25 to 55% by weight; B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 5 to 12%; Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 12 to 35%; CaO, 5 to 15%; MgO, 5 to 15%; SrO, 0 to 10%; and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0 to 5%. Preferred compositions within that range contain 3 to 8% SrO and 0.5 to 2.5% La/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  17. The effect of aqueous media on the mechanical properties of fluorapatite-mullite glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Mollazadeh, S; Ajalli, Siamak; Kashi, Tahereh S Jafarzadeh; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhai; Javadpour, Jafar; Jafari, S; Youssefi, Abbas; Fazel, Akbar

    2015-11-01

    To verify the effects of alternating thermal changes in aqueous media and chemical composition on mechanical properties of apatite-mullite glass-ceramics and to investigate concentration of ions eluted from glass-ceramics in aqueous media. The glass compositions were from SiO2Al2O3P2O5CaOTiO2BaOZrO2CaF2 system. Glass-ceramics were prepared by heat-treating at 1100°C for 3h samples alternately immersed in water at 5 and 60°C. The 3-point bending strength (n=10) were determined using 3×4×25mm/bar and a universal testing machine, at a cross-head speed of 0.1mm/min. Vickers micro hardness were evaluated by applying a total of 15-20 indentations under a 100g load for 30s. Concentrations of ions eluted from glass-ceramics immersed in 60±5°C double distilled water were determined by ion chromatography. The toxicity of glass-ceramics was assessed by seeding the osteosarcoma cells (MG63) on powder for different days and their cell proliferation assessment was investigated by MTT assay. The data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance and the means were compared by Tukey's test (5% significance level). The highest flexural strength and hardness values after thermal changes belonged to TiO2 and ZrO2 containing glass-ceramics which contained lower amount of released ions. BaO containing glass-ceramic and sample with extra amount of silica showed the highest amount of reduction in their mechanical strength values. These additives enhanced the concentration of eluted ions in aqueous media. MTT results showed that glass-ceramics were almost equivalent concerning their in-vitro biological behavior. Thermal changes and chemical compositions had significant effects on flexural strength and Vickers micro-hardness values. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The peculiar behavior of the glass transition temperature of amorphous drug-polymer films coated on inert sugar spheres.

    PubMed

    Dereymaker, Aswin; Van Den Mooter, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Fluid bed coating has been proposed in the past as an alternative technology for manufacturing of drug-polymer amorphous solid dispersions, or so-called glass solutions. It has the advantage of being a one-step process, and thus omitting separate drying steps, addition of excipients, or manipulation of the dosage form. In search of an adequate sample preparation method for modulated differential scanning calorimetry analysis of beads coated with glass solutions, glass transition broadening and decrease of the glass transition temperature (Tg ) were observed with increasing particle size of crushed coated beads and crushed isolated films of indomethacin (INDO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Substituting INDO with naproxen gave comparable results. When ketoconazole was probed or the solvent in INDO-PVP films was switched to dichloromethane (DCM) or a methanol-DCM mixture, two distinct Tg regions were observed. Small particle sizes had a glass transition in the high Tg region, and large particle sizes had a glass transition in the low Tg region. This particle size-dependent glass transition was ascribed to different residual solvent amounts in the bulk and at the surface of the particles. A correlation was observed between the deviation of the Tg from that calculated from the Gordon-Taylor equation and the amount of residual solvent at the Tg of particles with different sizes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Silicate Based Glass Formulations for Immobilization of U.S. Defense Wastes Using Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gary L.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2014-05-22

    The cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) is an alternative technology to the currently deployed liquid-fed, ceramic-lined, Joule-heated melter for immobilizing of U.S. tank waste generated from defense related reprocessing. In order to accurately evaluate the potential benefits of deploying a CCIM, glasses must be developed specifically for that melting technology. Related glass formulation efforts have been conducted since the 1990s including a recent study that is first documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to summarize the silicate base glass formulation efforts for CCIM testing of U.S. tank wastes. Summaries of phosphate based glass formulation and phosphatemore » and silicate based CCIM demonstration tests are reported separately (Day and Ray 2013 and Marra 2013, respectively). Combined these three reports summarize the current state of knowledge related to waste form development and process testing of CCIM technology for U.S. tank wastes.« less

  20. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates overmore » the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington

  1. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates overmore » the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  3. Alternative Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Kerri L.

    2004-01-01

    Employers are feeling the strain of needing to offer alternative work arrangements to retain and recruit employees. Due to a change in demographics, dual-career couples and increased technology; people are demanding a transformation in the workplace environment. Two alternatives, which are being offered by employers, are flextime and…

  4. Funding an Alternative School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alternate Learning Project, Providence, RI.

    Several types of funding for alternative schools such as list books on Federal grants, foundations, and other sources of money are described in this paper, along with explanations about some of the ways in which an alternative school budget differs from that of a traditional school. Probably the best option from the point of view of stability is…

  5. Alternatives: Project Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brier, Norman

    Alternatives is a project designed for youngsters, ages 11-15, who display serious conduct problems and severe learning deficiencies. The primary goal of the project is to prevent the development of a chronic antisocial orientation among youngsters who are at high risk for such an outcome. The interventions employed at Alternatives are based on…

  6. Choosing an inferior alternative.

    PubMed

    Russo, J Edward; Carlson, Kurt A; Meloy, Margaret G

    2006-10-01

    We show how decision makers can be induced to choose a personally inferior alternative, a strong violation of rational decision making. First, the inferior alternative is installed as the leading option by starting with information that supports this alternative. Then, the decision maker uses the natural process of distorting new information to support whichever alternative is leading. This leader-supporting distortion overcomes the inherent advantages of the superior alternative. The end result is a tendency to choose the self-identified inferior alternative. We trace the choice process to reveal the amount of distortion and its influence on preference. Self-reported awareness of distortion to support the inferior alternative is not related to the amount of distortion. The absence of valid awareness suggests that the manipulation that produces this preference violation is unlikely to be detected and that the distortion is unlikely to be corrected by the decision maker. As expected, given the lack of awareness, final confidence is just as high when the inferior alternative is chosen as when the superior one is. The discussion considers how to prevent an adversary from manipulating one's decisions using this technique.

  7. Observations on Alternant Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackney, Larry

    1986-01-01

    Responds to Knoop and Wagner by citing higher education as an organization that has used "alternant leadership" without system change. States that alternant leadership could result in a psychological dislocation for many individuals, and proposes a performance contract that is renewed annually. Related articles are EA 519 582 and 584.…

  8. Alternative Automobile Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David Gordon

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for cleaner and more efficient engines have stimulated a search for alternatives to the conventional spark-ignition engine. So far, the defects of the alternative engines are clearer than the virtues. The following engines are compared: spark ignition, diesel, vapor-cycle, Stirling, and gas turbine. (Author/MA)

  9. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinska, Kris; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    The primary goal of this project is to fabricate and investigate different glass systems and glass-derived nanocrystalline composite materials. These glass-based, two-phased materials will contain nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen and be of potential interest as hydrogen storage media. The glass materials with intrinsic void spaces that are able to precipitate functional nanocrystals capable to attract hydrogen are of particular interest. Proposed previously, but never practically implemented, one of promising concepts for storing hydrogen are micro-containers built of glass and shaped into hollow microspheres. The project expanded this concept to the exploration of glass-derived nanocrystalline composites as potential hydrogen storagemore » media. It is known that the most desirable materials for hydrogen storage do not interact chemically with hydrogen and possess a high surface area to host substantial amounts of hydrogen. Glasses are built of disordered networks with ample void spaces that make them permeable to hydrogen even at room temperature. Glass-derived nanocrystalline composites (two-phased materials), combination of glasses (networks with ample voids) and functional nanocrystals (capable to attract hydrogen), appear to be promising candidates for hydrogen storage media. Key advantages of glass materials include simplicity of preparation, flexibility of composition, chemical durability, non-toxicity and mechanical strength, as well as low production costs and environmental friendliness. This project encompasses a fundamental research into physics and chemistry of glasses and nanocrystalline composite materials, derived from glass. Studies are aimed to answer questions essential for considering glass-based materials and composites as potential hydrogen storage media. Of particular interest are two-phased materials that combine glasses with intrinsic voids spaces for physisorption of hydrogen and nanocrystals capable of chemisorption. This project

  10. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of Tg for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low Tgs have become available only recently.

  11. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO₄) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe,Cr)₂O₄), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside of HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscositymore » arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies.« less

  12. Current status of photoprotection by window glass, automobile glass, window films, and sunglasses.

    PubMed

    Almutawa, Fahad; Vandal, Robert; Wang, Steven Q; Lim, Henry W

    2013-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has known adverse effects on the skin and eyes. Practitioners are becoming more aware of the importance of outdoor photoprotection. However, little attention is directed to the exposure of the skin and eyes to UVR through the window glass or sunglasses. The amount of ultraviolet transmission through glass depends mainly on the type of the glass. All types of commercial and automobile glass block the majority of ultraviolet-B; however, the degree of ultraviolet-A transmission depends on the type of glass. Laminated glass offers better UVA protection than tempered glass; new safety regulations for automobiles may result in increased use of laminated glass for side windows. Window films can be applied to glass to increase UVR protection. Sunglasses need to be compliant with one of the national standards; a wraparound style or side shields offer the best protection. Increased understanding by practitioners on the transmission of UVR through glass, window films, and sunglasses would allow them to better educate the public and to better manage photosensitive patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. H.

    2015-08-18

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO 4) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr) 2O 4), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic,more » thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies. Higher waste loadings and more efficient processing strategies will reduce the overall HLW Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vitrification facilities mission life.« less

  14. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-02-10

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (T(g)) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of T(g) for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low T(g)s have become available only recently.

  15. A simple method for tuning the glass transition process in inorganic phosphate glasses

    PubMed Central

    Fulchiron, René; Belyamani, Imane; Otaigbe, Joshua U.; Bounor-Legaré, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The physical modification of glass transition temperature (Tg) and properties of materials via blending is a common practice in industry and academia and has a large economic advantage. In this context, simple production of hitherto unattainable new inorganic glass blends from already existing glass compositions via blending raises much hope with the potential to provide new glasses with new and improved properties, that cannot be achieved with classical glass synthesis, for a plethora of applications such as computers screens, glass-to-metal seals, and storage materials for nuclear wastes. Here, we demonstrate that blends of the specific glass compositions studied are miscible in all proportions, an unreported phenomenon in hard condensed matter like glass. Interestingly, excellent agreement was found between the obtained data and calculated Tgs from theoretical equations (Supplementary information) for predicting the composition dependence of Tg for miscible blends with weak but significant specific interactions between the blend components. That this blending method is at present not applied to inorganic glasses reflects the fact that water and chemically resistant phosphate glasses with relatively low Tgs have become available only recently. PMID:25666949

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    SciTech Connect

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healingmore » seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.« less

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    DOEpatents

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  18. Glass ceramic-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-19

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65 to 80% SiO/sub 2/, 8 to 16% Li/sub 2/O, 2 to 8% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 1 to 8% K/sub 2/O, 1 to 5% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and 1.5 to 7% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to caus growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  19. Clinical and surgical applications of smart glasses.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Stefan; Camacho, Elvis; Trivedi, Nirali; Logan, Julia; Campbell, Colson; Zilinyi, Robert; Lieber, Bryan; Bruce, Eliza; Taylor, Blake; Martineau, David; Dumont, Emmanuel L P; Appelboom, Geoff; Connolly, E Sander

    2015-01-01

    With the increased efforts to adopt health information technology in the healthcare field, many innovative devices have emerged to improve patient care, increase efficiency, and decrease healthcare costs. A recent addition is smart glasses: web-connected glasses that can present data onto the lenses and record images or videos through a front-facing camera. In this article, we review the most salient uses of smart glasses in healthcare, while also denoting their limitations including practical capabilities and patient confidentiality. Using keywords including, but not limited to, ``smart glasses'', ``healthcare'', ``evaluation'', ``privacy'', and ``development'', we conducted a search on Ovid-MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar. A total of 71 studies were included in this review. Smart glasses have been adopted into the healthcare setting with several useful applications including, hands-free photo and video documentation, telemedicine, Electronic Health Record retrieval and input, rapid diagnostic test analysis, education, and live broadcasting. In order for the device to gain acceptance by medical professionals, smart glasses will need to be tailored to fit the needs of medical and surgical sub-specialties. Future studies will need to qualitatively assess the benefits of smart glasses as an adjunct to the current health information technology infrastructure.

  20. Laser glass marking: influence of pulse characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolo, Ana; Coelho, João; Pires, Margarida

    2005-09-01

    Laser glass marking is currently used in several glass materials for different purposes, such as bar codes for product tracking, brand logos or just decoration. Systems with a variety of different laser sources, with inherent power ranges, wavelengths and pulse regimes have been used, namely CO2, Nd:YAG, Excimer, Ti-Sapphire lasers. CO2 Lasers systems, although being a reliable tool for materials processing, and very compact in the case of sealed low power lasers, are usually associated with a localized thermal loading on the material, causing brittle materials like glass to crack around the irradiated area. In this experimental study a pulsed CO2 laser was used to direct marking the glass surface. The temporal characteristics of the laser pulse--pulse length, period and duty cycle were varied, and glass materials with different thermal properties were used in order to correlate the marking process--cracking or softening with or without material removal with the laser and material characteristics. Glass materials with major industrial application, such as soda-lima, borosilicate (PYREX) glasses and crystal have been investigated. Laser marked areas have been characterized in terms of surface optical properties, like diffuse and direct reflectance and transmittance for white light, directly related with marked surface quality.

  1. Dynamics and thermodynamics of polymer glasses.

    PubMed

    Cangialosi, D

    2014-04-16

    The fate of matter when decreasing the temperature at constant pressure is that of passing from gas to liquid and, subsequently, from liquid to crystal. However, a class of materials can exist in an amorphous phase below the melting temperature. On cooling such materials, a glass is formed; that is, a material with the rigidity of a solid but exhibiting no long-range order. The study of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming systems is the subject of continuous research. Within the wide variety of glass formers, an important sub-class is represented by glass forming polymers. The presence of chain connectivity and, in some cases, conformational disorder are unfavourable factors from the point of view of crystallization. Furthermore, many of them, such as amorphous thermoplastics, thermosets and rubbers, are widely employed in many applications. In this review, the peculiarities of the thermodynamics and dynamics of glass-forming polymers are discussed, with particular emphasis on those topics currently the subject of debate. In particular, the following aspects will be reviewed in the present work: (i) the connection between the pronounced slowing down of glassy dynamics on cooling towards the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the thermodynamics; and, (ii) the fate of the dynamics and thermodynamics below Tg. Both aspects are reviewed in light of the possible presence of a singularity at a finite temperature with diverging relaxation time and zero configurational entropy. In this context, the specificity of glass-forming polymers is emphasized.

  2. Enthalpy landscapes and the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Varshneya, Arun K.; Gupta, Prabhat K.

    A fundamental understanding of the glass transition is essential for enabling future breakthroughs in glass science and technology. In this paper, we review recent advances in the modeling of glass transition range behavior based on the enthalpy landscape approach. We also give an overview of new simulation techniques for implementation of enthalpy landscape models, including techniques for mapping the landscape and computing the long-time dynamics of the system. When combined with these new computational techniques, the enthalpy landscape approach can provide for the predictive modeling of glass transition and relaxation behavior on a laboratory time scale. We also discuss new insights from the enthalpy landscape approach into the nature of the supercooled liquid and glassy states. In particular, the enthalpy landscape approach provides for natural resolutions of both the Kauzmann paradox and the question of residual entropy of glass at absolute zero. We further show that the glassy state cannot be described in terms of a mixture of equilibrium liquid states, indicating that there is no microscopic basis for the concept of a fictive temperature distribution and that the glass and liquid are two fundamentally different states. We also discuss the connection between supercooled liquid fragility and the ideal glass transition.

  3. Enthalpy landscapes and the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Varshneya, Arun K.; Gupta, Prabhat K.

    2008-04-01

    A fundamental understanding of the glass transition is essential for enabling future breakthroughs in glass science and technology. In this paper, we review recent advances in the modeling of glass transition range behavior based on the enthalpy landscape approach. We also give an overview of new simulation techniques for implementation of enthalpy landscape models, including techniques for mapping the landscape and computing the long-time dynamics of the system. When combined with these new computational techniques, the enthalpy landscape approach can provide for the predictive modeling of glass transition and relaxation behavior on a laboratory time scale. We also discuss new insights from the enthalpy landscape approach into the nature of the supercooled liquid and glassy states. In particular, the enthalpy landscape approach provides for natural resolutions of both the Kauzmann paradox and the question of residual entropy of glass at absolute zero. We further show that the glassy state cannot be described in terms of a mixture of equilibrium liquid states, indicating that there is no microscopic basis for the concept of a fictive temperature distribution and that the glass and liquid are two fundamentally different states. We also discuss the connection between supercooled liquid fragility and the ideal glass transition.

  4. Relationship between topological order and glass forming ability in densely packed enstatite and forsterite composition glasses

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, S.; Akola, J.; Morita, H.; Suzuya, K.; Weber, J. K. R.; Wilding, M. C.; Benmore, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    The atomic structures of magnesium silicate melts are key to understanding processes related to the evolution of the Earth’s mantle and represent precursors to the formation of most igneous rocks. Magnesium silicate compositions also represent a major component of many glass ceramics, and depending on their composition can span the entire fragility range of glass formation. The silica rich enstatite (MgSiO3) composition is a good glass former, whereas the forsterite (Mg2SiO4) composition is at the limit of glass formation. Here, the structure of MgSiO3 and Mg2SiO4 composition glasses obtained from levitated liquids have been modeled using Reverse Monte Carlo fits to diffraction data and by density functional theory. A ring statistics analysis suggests that the lower glass forming ability of the Mg2SiO4 glass is associated with a topologically ordered and very narrow ring distribution. The MgOx polyhedra have a variety of irregular shapes in MgSiO3 and Mg2SiO4 glasses and a cavity analysis demonstrates that both glasses have almost no free volume due to a large contribution from edge sharing of MgOx-MgOx polyhedra. It is found that while the atomic volume of Mg cations in the glasses increases compared to that of the crystalline phases, the number of Mg-O contacts is reduced, although the effective chemical interaction of Mg2+ remains similar. This unusual structure-property relation of Mg2SiO4 glass demonstrates that by using containerless processing it may be possible to synthesize new families of dense glasses and glass ceramics with zero porosity. PMID:21873237

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of rare-earth-doped glasses: a step toward lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, R.; Fernandez, J.; Balda, R.; Gonzalo, J.

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is used to produce Er-doped lead-niobium germanate (PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2) and fluorotellurite (TeO2-ZnO-ZnF2) thin film glasses. Films having high refractive index, low absorption and large transmission are obtained in a narrow processing window that depends on the actual PLD configuration (O2 pressure ˜a few Pa, Laser energy density ˜2-3 J cm-2 for the results presented in this work). However, Er-doped thin film glasses synthetized at room temperature using these experimental parameters show poor photoluminescence (PL) performance due to non-radiative decay channels, such as a large OH- concentration. Thermal annealing allows improving PL intensity and lifetime (τPL), the latter becoming close to that of the parent Er-doped bulk glass. In addition, the use of alternate PLD from host glass and rare-earth targets allows the synthesis of nanostructured thin film glasses with a controlled rare-earth concentration and in-depth distribution, as it is illustrated for Er-doped PbO-Nb2O5-GeO2 film glasses. In this case, PL intensity at 1.53 μm increases with the spacing between Er-doped layers to reach a maximum for a separation between Er-doped layers >= 5 nm, while τPL is close to the bulk value independently of the spacing. Finally, the comparison of these results with those obtained for films grown by standard PLD from Er-doped glass targets suggests that nanostructuration allows reducing rare-earth clustering and concentration quenching effects.

  6. New laser glass for short pulsed laser applications: the BLG80 (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Simi A.

    2017-03-01

    For achieving highest peak powers in a solid state laser (SSL) system, significant energy output and short pulses are necessary. For mode-locked lasers, it is well-known from the Fourier theorem that the largest gain bandwidths produce the narrowest pulse-widths; thus are transform limited. For an inhomogeneously broadened line width of a laser medium, if the intensity of pulses follow a Gaussian function, then the resulting mode-locked pulse will have a Gaussian shape with the emission bandwidth/pulse duration relationship of pulse ≥ 0.44?02/c. Thus, for high peak power SSL systems, laser designers incorporate gain materials capable of broad emission bandwidths. Available energy outputs from a phosphate glass host doped with rare-earth ions are unparalleled. Unfortunately, the emission bandwidths achievable from glass based gain materials are typically many factors smaller when compared to the Ti:Sapphire crystal. In order to overcome this limitation, a hybrid "mixed" laser glass amplifier - OPCPA approach was developed. The Texas petawatt laser that is currently in operation at the University of Texas-Austin and producing high peak powers uses this hybrid architecture. In this mixed-glass laser design, a phosphate and a silicate glass is used in series to achieve a broader bandwidth required before compression. Though proven, this technology is still insufficient for the future compact petawatt and exawatt systems capable of producing high energies and shorter pulse durations. New glasses with bandwidths that are two and three times larger than what is now available from glass hosts is needed if there is to be an alternative to Ti:Sapphire for laser designers. In this paper, we present new materials that may meet the necessary characteristics and demonstrate the laser and emission characteristics these through the internal and external studies.

  7. Containerless Processing of a Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranasinghe, Kisa; Ray, Chandra S.; Day, Delbert E.; Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Glasses of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2), and LS2 doped with 0.001wt% platinum (LS2 + 0.001 wt% Pt) compositions were melted, cooled and reheated at controlled rates while levitated (containerless) inside an Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) furnace at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL. The experiments were conducted in vacuum (approximately 10(exp -5) Pa) using spherical, 2.5 to 3 millimeter diameter, glass samples. The measured critical cooling rate for glass formation, R(sub c), for the LS2 and LS2+0.001 wt% Pt glasses processed at ESL were 14 plus or minus 2 Celsius per minute and 130 plus or minus 5 Celsius per minute, respectively. The values of R(sub c), for the same LS2 and LS2 + 0.001 wt% Pt glasses processed in a container were 62 plus or minus 3 Celsius per minute and 162 plus or minus 5 Celsius per minute, respectively. The effective activation energy for crystallization, E, for this LS2 glass processed without a container at ESL, 392 plus or minus 15 kiloJoules per mole, was higher than that, 270 plus or minus 15 kiloJoules per mole, for an identical glass processed in a container. These results suggest that the glass formation tendency for a containerless LS2 melt is significantly increased compared to an identical melt in contact with a container. The absence of heterogeneous nucleation sites that are inherently present in all melts held in containers, and or a change in the surface composition due to evaporation of Li2O during processing at ESL are likely reasons for the increased glass forming tendency of this containerless LS2 melt.

  8. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaodong; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Yanqi; Peng, MingYing; Skibsted, Jørgen; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and related analytical techniques have been widely used to study the microstructure of different materials. However, few research works have been performed in the field of glasses, possibly due to the electron-beam irradiation damage. In this paper, we have developed a method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data acquisition and analyses, which enables determination of the boron speciation in a series of ternary alkali borosilicate glasses with constant molar ratios. A script for the fast acquisition of EELS has been designed, from which the fraction of BO4 tetrahedra can be obtained by fitting the experimental data with linear combinations of the reference spectra. The BO4 fractions (N4) obtained by EELS are consistent with those from 11B MAS NMR spectra, suggesting that EELS can be an alternative and convenient way to determine the N4 fraction in glasses. In addition, the boron speciation of a CeO2 doped potassium borosilicate glass has been analyzed by using the time-resolved EELS spectra. The results clearly demonstrate that the BO4 to BO3 transformation induced by the electron beam irradiation can be efficiently suppressed by doping CeO2 to the borosilicate glasses. PMID:26643370

  9. Freeze-drying of proteins in glass solids formed by basic amino acids and dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Kadoya, Saori; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce and characterize glass-state amorphous solids containing amino acids and organic acids that protect co-lyophilized proteins. Thermal analysis of frozen solutions containing a basic amino acid (e.g., L-arginine, L-lysine, L-histidine) and a hydroxy di- or tricarboxylic acid (e.g., citric acid, L-tartaric acid, DL-malic acid) showed glass transition of maximally freeze-concentrated solute at temperatures (T'g) significantly higher than those of the individual solute solutions. Mixing of the amino acid with some dicarboxylic acids (e.g., oxalic acid) also suggested an upward shift of the transition temperature. Contrarily, combinations of the amino acid with monocarboxylic acids (e.g., acetic acid) had T'gs between those of the individual solute solutions. Co-lyophilization of the basic amino acids and citric acid or L-tartaric acid resulted in amorphous solids that have glass transition temperatures (Tg) higher than the individual components. Mid- and near-infrared analysis indicated altered environment around the functional groups of the consisting molecules. Some of the glass-state excipient combinations protected an enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH) from inactivation during freeze-drying. The glass-state excipient combinations formed by hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction network would be potent alternative to stabilize therapeutic proteins in freeze-dried formulations.

  10. Experimental Investigations on the effect of Additive on the Tensile Properties of Fiber Glass Fabric Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava Sai Divya, A.; Raghu Kumar, B., Dr; Lakshmi Narayana, G., Dr

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the effect of additives on tensile behaviour of fiber glass fabric at lamina level to explore an alternative skin material for the outer body of aerospace applications and machines. This experimental work investigates the effect of silica concentration in epoxy resin lapox L-12 on the tensile properties of glass fabric lamina of 4H-satin weave having 3.6 mm thickness. The lamina was prepared by using hand lay-up method and tests were conducted on it. Various tensile properties values obtained from experimentation were compared for four glass fiber lamina composites fabricated by adding the silica powder to resin bath. The effect of variations in silica concentration (0% SiO2, 5% SiO2, 10% SiO2 and 15% SiO2) on the tensile properties of prepared material revealed that maximum stiffness was obtained at 15% and yield strength at 10% SiO2 concentration in glass fiber lamina. Increasing the silica concentration beyond 10% had led to deterioration in the material properties. The experimentation that was carried out on test specimen was reasonably successful as the effect of silica powder as an additive in glass fiber lamina enhanced the mechanical properties up to certain limit. The underpinning microscopic behaviour at the source of these observations will be investigated in a follow up work.

  11. Comparison of material properties between ultra low thermal expansion ceramics and conventional low thermal expansion glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Tadahito

    2017-09-01

    The material characteristics of various optical materials that are known to possess a low thermal expansion property were studied for mechanically and thermally ultra-stable optical applications. In this comparative study on material selection, the key mechanical and thermal properties of four potential low thermal expansion ceramics and three conventional low thermal expansion glass were evaluated under exactly the same testing configurations. This paper describes the results of basic material testing and outlines a comparison of material properties between the potential ceramics and conventional glass. The material testing results showed that the elastic modulus and thermal conductivity of cordierite ceramics were one-and-a-half or more times higher than those of conventional low thermal expansion glass, while ensuring the thermal expansion coefficient roughly matching that of compared glass materials. It was therefore revealed that the cordierite ceramics had most favorable physical properties and could be advantageous alternative materials to the conventional low thermal expansion glass for ultra-lightweight and thermally-stable optical applications.

  12. Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass surfaces for fiber reinforced composite implants via surface ablation by Excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Kulkova, Julia; Moritz, Niko; Huhtinen, Hannu; Mattila, Riina; Donati, Ivan; Marsich, Eleonora; Paoletti, Sergio; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2017-11-01

    In skeletal reconstructions, composites, such as bisphenol-A-glycidyldimethacrylate resin reinforced with glass fibers, are potentially useful alternatives to metallic implants. Recently, we reported a novel method to prepare bioactive surfaces for these composites. Surface etching by Excimer laser was used to expose bioactive glass granules embedded in the resin. The purpose of this study was to analyze two types of bioactive surfaces created by this technique. The surfaces contained bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite granules. The selected processing parameters were adequate for the creation of the surfaces. However, the use of porous hydroxyapatite prevented the complete exposure the granules. In cell culture, for bioactive glass coatings, the pattern of proliferation of MG63 cells was comparable to that in the positive control group (Ti6Al4V) while inferior cell proliferation was observed on the surfaces containing hydroxyapatite granules. Scanning electron microscopy revealed osteointegration of implants with both types of surfaces. The technique is suitable for the exposure of solid bioactive glass granules. However, the long-term performance of the surfaces needs further assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure-solubility relationships in fluoride-containing phosphate based bioactive glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaharyar, Yaqoot

    The dissolution of fluoride-containing bioactive glasses critically affects their biomedical applications. Most commercial fluoride-releasing bioactive glasses have been designed in the soda-lime-silica system. However, their relatively slow chemical dissolution and the adverse effect of fluoride on their bioactivity are stimulating the study of novel biodegradable materials with higher bioactivity, such as biodegradable phosphate-based bioactive glasses, which can be a viable alternative for applications where a fast release of active ions is sought. In order to design new biomaterials with controlled degradability and high bioactivity, it is essential to understand the connection between chemical composition, molecular structure, and solubility in physiological fluids.Accordingly, in this work we have combined the strengths of various experimental techniques with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, to elucidate the impact of fluoride ions on the structure and chemical dissolution of bioactive phosphate glasses in the system: 10Na2O - (45-x) CaO - 45P2O5 - xCaF2, where x varies between 0 -- 10 mol.%. NMR and MD data reveal that the medium-range atomic-scale structure of thse glasses is dominated by Q2 phosphate units followed by Q1 units, and the MD simulations further show that fluoride tends to associate with network modifier cations to form alkali/alkaline-earth rich ionic aggregates. On a macroscopic scale, we find that incorporating fluoride in phosphate glasses does not affect the rate of apatite formation on the glass surface in simulated body fluid (SBF). However, fluoride has a marked favorable impact on the glass dissolution in deionized water. Similarly, fluoride incorporation in the glasses results in significant weight gain due to adsorption of water (in the form of OH ions). These macroscopic trends are discussed on the basis of the F effect on the atomistic structure of the glasses, such as the F-induced phosphate network re-polymerization, in a

  14. Integral Glass Covers for Silicon Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-31

    ZnO.B-20 3 .GeO 2 . Both types also contained A12 03 and Ta?05 as modifier oxides and some of the glasses included CeO2 or Ti0 2 for radiation resistance...irradiation 21 12. The effect of 0. 5 weight perc 3nt ceria addition on the radiation resistance of glass No. 1 24 13. The effect of replacing CeO2 ...with Ii0Z on the pre- irradiation transmission -3 glass GE-51773 25 14. The effect of replacing CeO2 with TiO2 on the post- irradiation transmission of

  15. Refraction and dispersion in optical glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. Y.; Shiles, E.; Inokuti, Mitio

    2004-06-01

    The reflectivity spectra of representative glasses were analyzed to obtain their uv absorption spectra. From these, we show that the first few inverse moments of the absorption give a good representation of the refractive index for visible light when used with the generalized Cauchy dispersion formula [Radiat. Eff. Def. Sol. 157 (2002) 823]. The absorption spectra also illustrate the roles of modifier ions in determining the visible refractive index. These include introduction of ion-specific absorptions (uv color centers); broadening, shifting and altering the strength of glass-former absorptions; and alteration of the density and structure of the glass' random network.

  16. GLASS COMPOSITION AND PROCESS OF MAKING

    DOEpatents

    Bishay, A.M.

    1962-09-01

    Glass compositions are described which are suitable for scintillators of thermal-neutron counters. The glass consists of from 70 to 75 mole% of B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, from 7 to 9 mole% of Ce/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and from 23 to 16 mole% of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ plus Na/sub 2 /O in a mole ratio of 1 to 1.5. The process of making the glass from cerous oxalate, ammonium pentaborate, sodium carbonate, and hydrated alumina in a nonoxidizing atmosphere at 1400-1500 deg C is given. (AEC)

  17. Germanate Glass Fiber Lasers for High Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0020 Germanate glass fiber lasers for high power David Lancaster THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE Final Report 01/04/2016...COVERED (From - To) 01-07-2014 to 30-06-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Germanate glass fiber lasers for high power 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER...explain the poor performance of all published germanate fiber lasers. The research team have found a composition of this glass which shows minimal

  18. Effects of Gravity on ZBLAN Glass Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Ethridge, Edwin C.; Smith, Guy A.; Workman, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the crystallization of ZrF(4)-BaF(2)-LaF(3)-AIF(3)-NaF glasses have been studied using the NASA KC-135 and a sounding rocket. Fibers and cylinders of ZBLAN glass were heated to the crystallization temperature in unit and reduced gravity. When processed in unit gravity the glass crystallized, but when processed in reduced gravity, crystallization was suppressed. A possible explanation involving shear thinning is presented to explain these results.

  19. Glass melter off-gas system

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

  20. Novel lead-iron phosphate glass

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    The invention described and claimed in the specification relates to the discovery that effective addition of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 to a lead phosphate glass results in a glass having enhanced chemical durability and physical stability, and consists essentially of the glass resulting from melting a mixture consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 40-66 percent PbO, 30-55 percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and an effective concentration up to 12 percent Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  1. Integral glass encapsulation for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding has been used to join silicon solar cells to borosilicate glass without the aid of any organic binders or adhesives. The results of this investigation have been to demonstrate, without question, the feasibility of this process as an encapsulation technique. The potential of ESB for terrestrial solar arrays was clearly shown. The process is fast, reproducible, and produces a permanent bond between glass and silicon that is stronger than the silicon itself. Since this process is a glass sealing technique requiring no organics it makes moisture tight sealing of solar cells possible.

  2. Novel lead-iron phosphate glass

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1989-07-11

    The invention described and claimed in the specification relates to the discovery that effective addition of Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] to a lead phosphate glass results in a glass having enhanced chemical durability and physical stability, and consists essentially of the glass resulting from melting a mixture consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 40--66 percent PbO, 30--55 percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and an effective concentration up to 12 percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3].

  3. Function of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Olga; Convertini, Paolo; Zhang, Zhaiyi; Wen, Yuan; Shen, Manli; Falaleeva, Marina; Stamm, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Almost all polymerase II transcripts undergo alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we review the functions of alternative splicing events that have been experimentally determined. The overall function of alternative splicing is to increase the diversity of mRNAs expressed from the genome. Alternative splicing changes proteins encoded by mRNAs, which has profound functional effects. Experimental analysis of these protein isoforms showed that alternative splicing regulates binding between proteins, between proteins and nucleic acids as well as between proteins and membranes. Alternative splicing regulates the localization of proteins, their enzymatic properties and their interaction with ligands. In most cases, changes caused by individual splicing isoforms are small. However, cells typically coordinate numerous changes in ‘splicing programs’, which can have strong effects on cell proliferation, cell survival and properties of the nervous system. Due to its widespread usage and molecular versatility, alternative splicing emerges as a central element in gene regulation that interferes with almost every biological function analyzed. PMID:22909801

  4. Bioactive Glass and Glass-Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Lutz-Christian; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, bioactive glasses have been used to fill and restore bone defects. More recently, this category of biomaterials has become an emerging research field for bone tissue engineering applications. Here, we review and discuss current knowledge on porous bone tissue engineering scaffolds on the basis of melt-derived bioactive silicate glass compositions and relevant composite structures. Starting with an excerpt on the history of bioactive glasses, as well as on fundamental requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds, a detailed overview on recent developments of bioactive glass and glass-ceramic scaffolds will be given, including a summary of common fabrication methods and a discussion on the microstructural-mechanical properties of scaffolds in relation to human bone (structure-property and structure-function relationship). In addition, ion release effects of bioactive glasses concerning osteogenic and angiogenic responses are addressed. Finally, areas of future research are highlighted in this review. PMID:28883315

  5. Impact damage resistance of flat glass/cellular glass solar mirror experimental panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varner, J. R.; Akbar Ali, M.; Adams, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to characterize the hail-impact behavior of a solar concentrator structural material which consists of thin, second-surface silvered glass sheets bonded to structural support panels of cellular glass. The resulting glass/cellular glass panel can be described as a thin, brittle plate supported by an elastic foundation, with the adhesive bonding the two as a third component. The plate will bend during impact. Attention is experimentally given to how variations in the characteristics or geometry of the flat glass, adhesive and cellular glass affect hail-impact damage resistance. The critical energy needed to cause impact damage is calculated from the critical velocity of the iceball by means of the kinetic energy formula. The complexity of this structural system and the variability of the specimens render it impossible to completely develop an analytical treatment for the prediction of impact damage resistance.

  6. Thermodynamic glass transition in a spin glass without time-reversal symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Baños, Raquel Alvarez; Cruz, Andres; Fernandez, Luis Antonio; Gil-Narvion, Jose Miguel; Gordillo-Guerrero, Antonio; Guidetti, Marco; Iñiguez, David; Maiorano, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo; Martin-Mayor, Victor; Monforte-Garcia, Jorge; Muñoz Sudupe, Antonio; Navarro, Denis; Parisi, Giorgio; Perez-Gaviro, Sergio; Ruiz-Lorenzo, Juan Jesus; Schifano, Sebastiano Fabio; Seoane, Beatriz; Tarancon, Alfonso; Tellez, Pedro; Tripiccione, Raffaele; Yllanes, David

    2012-01-01

    Spin glasses are a longstanding model for the sluggish dynamics that appear at the glass transition. However, spin glasses differ from structural glasses in a crucial feature: they enjoy a time reversal symmetry. This symmetry can be broken by applying an external magnetic field, but embarrassingly little is known about the critical behavior of a spin glass in a field. In this context, the space dimension is crucial. Simulations are easier to interpret in a large number of dimensions, but one must work below the upper critical dimension (i.e., in d < 6) in order for results to have relevance for experiments. Here we show conclusive evidence for the presence of a phase transition in a four-dimensional spin glass in a field. Two ingredients were crucial for this achievement: massive numerical simulations were carried out on the Janus special-purpose computer, and a new and powerful finite-size scaling method. PMID:22493229

  7. [Quantitative determination of glass content in monazite glass-ceramics by IR technique].

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Zhang, Bao-min

    2003-04-01

    Monazite glass-ceramics consist of both monazite and metaphoshate glass phases. The absorption bands of both phases do not overlap each other, and the absorption intensities of bands 1,275 and 616 cm-1 vary with the glass contents. The correlation coefficient between logarithmic absorbance ratio of the two bands and glass contents was r = 0.9975 and its regression equation was y = 48.356 + 25.93x. The absorbance ratio of bands 952 and 616 cm-1 also varied with different ratios of Ce2O3/La2O3 in synthetic monazites, with r = 0.9917 and a regression equation y = 0.2211 exp (0.0221x). High correlation coefficients show that the IR technique could find new application in the quantitative analysis of glass content in phosphate glass-ceramics.

  8. DSB:Ce3+ scintillation glass for future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Akchurin, N.; Benaglia, A.; Borisevich, A.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dormenev, V.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P.; Korjik, M.; Kozlov, D.; Kunori, S.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lucchini, M.; Mechinsky, V.; Pauwels, K.

    2015-02-01

    One of the main challenges for detectors at future high-energy collider experiments is the high precision measurement of hadron and jet energy and momentum. One possibility to achieve this is the dual-readout technique, which allows recording simultaneously scintillation and Cherenkov light in an active medium in order to extract the electromagnetic fraction of the total shower energy on an event- by-event basis. Making use of this approach in the high luminosity LHC, however, puts stringent requirements on the active materials in terms of radiation hardness. Consequently, the R&D carried out on suitable scintillating materials focuses on the detector performance as well as on radiation tolerance. Among the different scintillating materials under study, scintillating glasses can be a suitable solution due to their relatively simple and cost effective production. Recently a new type of inorganic scintillating glass: Cerium doped DSB has been developed by Radiation Instruments and New Components LLC in Minsk for oil logging industry. This material can be produced either in form of bulk or fiber shape with diameter 0.3-2mm and length up to 2000 mm. It is obtained by standard glass production technology at temperature 1400°C with successive thermal annealing treatment at relatively low temperature. The production of large quantities is relatively easy and the production costs are significantly lower compared to crystal fibers. Therefore, this material is considered as an alternative and complementary solution to crystal fibers in view of a production at industrial scale, as required for a large dual readout calorimeter. In this paper, the first results on optical, scintillation properties as well as the radiation damage behaviour obtained on different samples made with different raw materials and various cerium concentrations will be presented.

  9. Radiation-induced surface deformation in low-thermal-expansion glasses and glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rajaram, M.; Tsai, Tsungein; Friebele, E.J.

    1988-11-01

    The surface deformation induced in various low-thermal-expansion glasses and glass-ceramics by 2-MeV electron irradiation was measured and found to be significantly greater in the glass-ceramics. Sublinear growth of the deformation occurred at doses > 10{sup 7} rd; the deformation decreased with increasing sample thickness for a given dose. Temperatures > 500{degree}C were required to fully anneal the deformation in all samples.

  10. Copper foil adhesion within polyimide/glass multilayer printed wiring boards: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, J.W.

    1987-04-01

    Copper foil adhesion to polyimide/glass prepreg was evaluated. Typical peel strength obtained between prepreg and the smooth side of the copper foil was 1 to 3 lb./in. width. Peel strength between prepreg and the rough side of the copper foil ranged between 6 and 7 lb./in. width. An alternate test for evaluating the integrity of multilayer printed wiring boards is described.

  11. 5. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project looking glass historic district. View to north. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  12. 2. Looking glass aircraft with open main entry door and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Looking glass aircraft with open main entry door and cockpit hatch. View to south. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. 3. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project looking glass historic district. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. 2. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project looking glass historic district. View to south. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. 4. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project looking glass historic district. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  16. 1. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of looking glass aircraft in the project looking glass historic district. View to southeast. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  17. Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    identifying and mapping flaw size distributions on glass surfaces for predicting mechanical response. International Journal of Applied Glass ...ARL-TN-0756 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation...Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation by Clayton M Weiss Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

  18. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73981, Dec. 9, 2013. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the...

  19. Polymeric, Metallic, and Other Glasses in Introductory Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Non-ceramic glasses are not adequately discussed in introductory chemistry. Such glasses include polycarbonate, which many corrective lenses are made of, amber, enamel, gelatin, hard candy, coal, refrigerated glycerol, and metallic glasses that have been marketed in recent decades. What is usually discussed in elementary texts is siliceous glass,…

  20. Glass/polymer composites and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Samuels, W.D.; Exarhos, G.J.

    1995-06-06

    The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

  1. Glass/polymer composites and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Samuels, W. D.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

  2. 16. MAN LADLING GLASS FROM POT. STEAM IS CAUSED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. MAN LADLING GLASS FROM POT. STEAM IS CAUSED BY WATER COOLING MOLTEN GLASS IN POT. NOTE GLASS THAT HAS POURED OVER THE SIDE OF THE POT. - Seneca Glass Company Factory, Beechurst Avenue between Sixth & Eighth Streets, Morgantown, Monongalia County, WV

  3. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2017-02-01

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface.

  4. GaN-on-glass success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    The successful growth of GaN-based LEDs on amorphous glass avoids the size and cost limitations of a sapphire substrate, says Jun Hee Choi from the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology in South Korea.

  5. Computer Simulations of Supercooled Liquids and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kob, Walter

    Glasses are materials that are ubiquitous in our daily life. We find them in such diverse items as window pans, optical fibers, computer chips, ceramics, all of which are oxide glasses, as well as in food, foams, polymers, gels, which are mainly of organic nature. Roughly speaking glasses are solid materials that have no translational or orientational order on the scale beyond O(10) diameters of the constituent particles (atoms, colloids, …) [1]. Note that these materials are not necessarily homogeneous since, e.g., alkali-glasses such as Na2O-SiO2 show (disordered!) structural features on the length scale of 6-10 Å (compare to the interatomic distance of 1-2 Å) and gels can have structural inhomogeneities that extend up to macroscopic length scales.

  6. Dental caries under glass ionomer restorations.

    PubMed

    van Amerongen, W E

    1996-01-01

    The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) technique has two potential limitations. Because only hand instruments are used, dental caries can be left during cavity preparation. Beyond this limitation, the glass ionomer filling material currently used has some unfavorable mechanical properties with respect to its strength, wear resistance, and shrinkage during setting. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of changes that can be expected in carious dentin when a glass ionomer restoration is placed. Restriction of the substrate supply and the release of different components from the glass ionomer have an inhibiting effect on cariogenic microorganisms. Whether this influence is sufficient to completely arrest the caries process is doubtful. The influence of glass ionomers on the remineralization of carious dentin needs further research.

  7. Anti-Aging in Ultrastable Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüttich, Martin; Giordano, Valentina M.; Le Floch, Sylvie; Pineda, Eloi; Zontone, Federico; Luo, Yuansu; Samwer, Konrad; Ruta, Beatrice

    2018-03-01

    As ultrastable metallic glasses (UMGs) are promising candidates to solve the stability issues of conventional metallic glasses, their study is of exceptional interest. By means of x -ray photon correlation spectroscopy, we have investigated the stability of UMGs at the atomic level. We find a clear signature of ultrastability at the atomic level that results in slower relaxation dynamics of UMGs with respect to conventional (rapidly quenched) metallic glasses, and in a peculiar acceleration of the dynamics by near Tg annealing. This surprising phenomenon, called here anti-aging, can be understood in the framework of the potential energy landscape. For all samples, the structural relaxation process can be described with a highly compressed shape of the density fluctuations, unaffected by thermal treatments and regardless of the ultrastability of the glass.

  8. Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.

    2000-02-17

    This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

  9. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3-SrO-Na2O-K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O-P2O5-F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F - pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F - Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite - pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). These

  10. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase’s size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses. PMID:23863967

  11. Shock-produced olivine glass: First observation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeanloz, R.; Ahrens, T.J.; Lally, J.S.; Nord, G.L.; Christie, J.M.; Heuer, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations of an experimentally shock-deformed single crystal of natural peridot, (Mg0.88Fe 0.12SiO4 recovered from peak pressures of about 56 ?? 109 pascals revealed the presence of amorphous zones located within crystalline regions with a high density of tangled dislocations. This is the first reported observation ofolivine glass. The shocked sample exhibits a wide variation in the degree of shock deformation on a small scale, and the glass appears to be intimately associated with the highest density of dislocations. This study suggests that olivine glass may be formed as a result of shock at pressures above about 50 to 55 ?? 109 pascals and that further TEM observations of naturally shocked olivines may demonstrate the presence of glass.

  12. [Pitfalls in the prescription of reading glasses].

    PubMed

    Krause, H-K

    2011-04-01

    People in the second half of their lives often require reading glasses. A basic requirement for determining suitable reading glasses is measurement of the patient's accommodation, which describes the change in the eye's optical power caused by the attempt to clearly focus on an object at a certain distance. The maximum accommodation performance of a person already begins to decline from the age of 40 onwards. When it becomes increasingly difficult to adjust to the typical reading distance of 40 cm, one speaks of presbyopia: age-related farsightedness. This contribution describes two appropriate methods for determining the strength of reading glasses: determination of the maximum accommodation performance by measuring the near point distance and determination of the maximum accommodation effort by measuring the relative positive and negative accommodation. Optimal reading glasses enable the patient to focus sharply on something from the working distance that is closer but also on something that is further away.

  13. Studies on boro cadmium tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayathri Pavani, P.; Suresh, S.; Chandra Mouli, V.

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the modification effect of the modifier CdO on boro tellurite glass, a series of glasses with compositions (50 - x) CdO- xTeO 2-50B 2O 3 have been prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, IR and Raman structural studies are carried out on the glass system. The optical absorption studies revealed that the cutoff wave length and refractive index increase while optical band gap ( Eopt) and Urbach energy decreases with increase of CdO content. The IR and Raman studies revealed that structure of glass network consists of [TeO 3]/[TeO 3+1], [TeO 4], [BO 3], [BO 4] and [Cd-Te] linkages .The compositional dependence of different physical parameters such as density, molar volume, oxygen packing density, optical basicity, have been analyzed and discussed.

  14. Chemical variability and origin of agglutinitic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, A.; Mckay, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Over 600 energy dispersive X-ray analyses of pure glass in 32 large agglutinates from five different Apollo landing sites were performed, and the results are reported and discussed. Some agglutinates are found to contain remarkably homogeneous glass; these agglutinates tend to be optically homogeneous as well. Many of the more complex agglutinates contain glass domains that are relatively homogeneous but differ in composition from other domains in the same agglutinates. The variation in composition of different domains within a single agglutinate can exceed variation among average compositions of different agglutinates in a soil. The composition of individual glass domains is not generally on the line between the composition of a bulk soil and the composition of the finest size fractions of that soil. The average composition of all agglutinate domains in a soil lies close to that line and close to the composition of the finest fraction, in support of the F3 and similar models.

  15. Crystallization of heavy metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Bruce, Allan J.; Doremus, R. H.; Moynihan, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of crystallization of a number of fluorozirconate glasses were studied using isothermal and dynamic differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The addition of the fluorides LiF, NaF, AlF3, LaF3 to a base glass composition of ZrF4-BaF2 reduced the tendency to crystallize, probably by modifying the viscosity-temperature relation. ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF glass was the most stable against devitrification and perhaps is the best composition for optical fibers with low scattering loss. Some glasses first crystallize out into metastable beta-BaZr2F10 and beta-BaZrF6 phases, which transform into the most stable alpha-phases when heated to higher temperatures. The size of the crystallites was estimated to be about 600 A from X-ray diffraction.

  16. Diversity, culture and the glass ceiling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    A reference to the term, the glass ceiling, has come to embody more than gender equality among women and men. Today the term embraces the quest of all minorities and their journey towards equality in the workplace. The purpose of this article is to bring attention to the subject of diversity, culture, and the glass ceiling. The article will discuss the history of the glass ceiling and how its broadened meaning is relevant in today's workplace. It will also provide statistics showing how diversity and culture are lacking among the top echelon of today's executives, the barriers faced by minorities as they journey towards executive leadership, and how to overcome these barriers to truly shatter the glass ceiling.

  17. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  18. Women's Career Development at the Glass Ceiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Pamela L.

    1998-01-01

    For women, success in shattering the glass ceiling lies not in adapting to a male workplace culture but in using career strategies such as self-knowledge, multiple mentors, integration of body and soul, and fluid, customized careers. (SK)

  19. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-08-01

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  20. The universe through a glass darkly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commissariat, Tushna

    2017-04-01

    In The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars, author Dava Sobel tells the previously untold tale of the women who, from 1877, worked as human calculators to process astronomical data.

  1. Preparation of fullerene/glass composites

    DOEpatents

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; McBranch, Duncan W.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Love, Steven P.

    1995-01-01

    Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C.sub.60 in silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these "guests" in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C.sub.60. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C.sub.60 dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C.sub.60 in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

  2. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass

    PubMed Central

    Molgaard, Joshua J.; Auxier, John D.; Giminaro, Andrew V.; Oldham, Colton J.; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition. PMID:26779720

  3. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  4. Measuring Mechanical Properties Of Optical Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses mechanical tests measuring parameters of strength and fracture mechanics of optical glasses. To obtain required tables of mechanical properties of each glass of interest, both initial-strength and delayed-fracture techniques used. Modulus of rupture measured by well-known four-point bending method. Initial bending strength measured by lesser-known double-ring method, in which disk of glass supported on one face near edge by larger ring and pressed on its other face by smaller concentric ring. Method maximizes stress near center, making it more likely specimen fractures there, and thereby suppresses edge effects. Data from tests used to predict reliabilities and lifetimes of glass optical components of several proposed spaceborne instruments.

  5. Production of Synthetic Nuclear Melt Glass.

    PubMed

    Molgaard, Joshua J; Auxier, John D; Giminaro, Andrew V; Oldham, Colton J; Gill, Jonathan; Hall, Howard L

    2016-01-04

    Realistic surrogate nuclear debris is needed within the nuclear forensics community to test and validate post-detonation analysis techniques. Here we outline a novel process for producing bulk surface debris using a high temperature furnace. The material developed in this study is physically and chemically similar to trinitite (the melt glass produced by the first nuclear test). This synthetic nuclear melt glass is assumed to be similar to the vitrified material produced near the epicenter (ground zero) of any surface nuclear detonation in a desert environment. The process outlined here can be applied to produce other types of nuclear melt glass including that likely to be formed in an urban environment. This can be accomplished by simply modifying the precursor matrix to which this production process is applied. The melt glass produced in this study has been analyzed and compared to trinitite, revealing a comparable crystalline morphology, physical structure, void fraction, and chemical composition.

  6. Preparation of fullerene/glass composites

    DOEpatents

    Mattes, B.R.; McBranch, D.W.; Robinson, J.M.; Koskelo, A.C.; Love, S.P.

    1995-05-30

    Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites is described. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C{sub 60} in silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these ``guests`` in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C{sub 60}. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C{sub 60} dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C{sub 60} in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

  7. [Glass maze in women's leadership].

    PubMed

    Barberá Heredia, Ester; Ramos López, Amparo; Candela Agulló, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Psychological gender discrimination explanations have changed over the past thirty years, becoming more complex in order to obtain a better understanding of the social reality. At the present moment, one of the most interesting research areas is the one referring to the 'glass maze' phenomenon in women's management careers. The main purpose of this work is to reveal the theoretical evolution in an attempt to explain the leadership study from a gender perspective. The consecutive hypotheses, starting with the labour sexual division idea, are becoming more interactive in order to understand the current labour-social situation. Social psychology has underlined the role of beliefs, observed via gender stereotyped roles, prejudiced attitudes against women, sexist and neo-sexist ideology, or masculine, feminine and androgynous identity development. New psychological interpretations insist on the variability of the gender concept, where gender is sometimes observed through men and women's behaviours, and other times through those behaviour expectations. But gender is mainly observed though the power relations between men and women during social interactions in labour organizations.

  8. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.

    1993-11-16

    A glass composition is described for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na[sub 2]O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K[sub 2]O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B[sub 2]O[sub 3], has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2[times]10[sup [minus]7] and 2[times]10[sup [minus]9]g/cm[sup 2]-min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  9. Glass transition of soft colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Adrian-Marie; Truzzolillo, Domenico; Galvan-Myoshi, Julian; Dieudonné-George, Philippe; Trappe, Véronique; Berthier, Ludovic; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-04-01

    We explore the glassy dynamics of soft colloids using microgels and charged particles interacting by steric and screened Coulomb interactions, respectively. In the supercooled regime, the structural relaxation time τα of both systems grows steeply with volume fraction, reminiscent of the behavior of colloidal hard spheres. Computer simulations confirm that the growth of τα on approaching the glass transition is independent of particle softness. By contrast, softness becomes relevant at very large packing fractions when the system falls out of equilibrium. In this nonequilibrium regime, τα depends surprisingly weakly on packing fraction, and time correlation functions exhibit a compressed exponential decay consistent with stress-driven relaxation. The transition to this novel regime coincides with the onset of an anomalous decrease in local order with increasing density typical of ultrasoft systems. We propose that these peculiar dynamics results from the combination of the nonequilibrium aging dynamics expected in the glassy state and the tendency of colloids interacting through soft potentials to refluidize at high packing fractions.

  10. Nanopatterned Bulk Metallic Glass Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kinser, Emily R; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Yu, Roy; Corona, Sydney L; Li, Jinyang; Vaddiraju, Sagar; Legassey, Allen; Loye, Ayomiposi; Balestrini, Jenna; Solly, Dawson A; Schroers, Jan; Taylor, André D; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Herzog, Raimund I; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-12-22

    Nanopatterning as a surface area enhancement method has the potential to increase signal and sensitivity of biosensors. Platinum-based bulk metallic glass (Pt-BMG) is a biocompatible material with electrical properties conducive for biosensor electrode applications, which can be processed in air at comparably low temperatures to produce nonrandom topography at the nanoscale. Work presented here employs nanopatterned Pt-BMG electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase enzyme to explore the impact of nonrandom and highly reproducible nanoscale surface area enhancement on glucose biosensor performance. Electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric voltammetry (AV) were completed to compare the performance of 200 nm Pt-BMG electrodes vs Flat Pt-BMG control electrodes. Glucose dosing response was studied in a range of 2 mM to 10 mM. Effective current density dynamic range for the 200 nm Pt-BMG was 10-12 times greater than that of the Flat BMG control. Nanopatterned electrode sensitivity was measured to be 3.28 μA/cm 2 /mM, which was also an order of magnitude greater than the flat electrode. These results suggest that nonrandom nanotopography is a scalable and customizable engineering tool which can be integrated with Pt-BMGs to produce biocompatible biosensors with enhanced signal and sensitivity.

  11. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Kovacic, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A glass composition for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na.sub.2 O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K.sub.2 O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B.sub.2 O.sub.3, has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210.times.10-7/.degree.C. and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2.times.10.sup.- 7 and 2.times.10.sup.-9 g/cm.sup.2 -min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  12. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, D. E.; Kinser, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic.

  13. Compositional Models of Glass/Melt Properties and their Use for Glass Formulation

    DOE PAGES

    Vienna, John D.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-18

    Nuclear waste glasses must simultaneously meet a number of criteria related to their processability, product quality, and cost factors. The properties that must be controlled in glass formulation and waste vitrification plant operation tend to vary smoothly with composition allowing for glass property-composition models to be developed and used. Models have been fit to the key glass properties. The properties are transformed so that simple functions of composition (e.g., linear, polynomial, or component ratios) can be used as model forms. The model forms are fit to experimental data designed statistically to efficiently cover the composition space of interest. Examples ofmore » these models are found in literature. The glass property-composition models, their uncertainty definitions, property constraints, and optimality criteria are combined to formulate optimal glass compositions, control composition in vitrification plants, and to qualify waste glasses for disposal. An overview of current glass property-composition modeling techniques is summarized in this paper along with an example of how those models are applied to glass formulation and product qualification at the planned Hanford high-level waste vitrification plant.« less

  14. The Perfect Glass Paradigm: Disordered Hyperuniform Glasses Down to Absolute Zero.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Stillinger, F H; Torquato, S

    2016-11-28

    Rapid cooling of liquids below a certain temperature range can result in a transition to glassy states. The traditional understanding of glasses includes their thermodynamic metastability with respect to crystals. However, here we present specific examples of interactions that eliminate the possibilities of crystalline and quasicrystalline phases, while creating mechanically stable amorphous glasses down to absolute zero temperature. We show that this can be accomplished by introducing a new ideal state of matter called a "perfect glass". A perfect glass represents a soft-interaction analog of the maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings of hard particles. These latter states can be regarded as the epitome of a glass since they are out of equilibrium, maximally disordered, hyperuniform, mechanically rigid with infinite bulk and shear moduli, and can never crystallize due to configuration-space trapping. Our model perfect glass utilizes two-, three-, and four-body soft interactions while simultaneously retaining the salient attributes of the MRJ state. These models constitute a theoretical proof of concept for perfect glasses and broaden our fundamental understanding of glass physics. A novel feature of equilibrium systems of identical particles interacting with the perfect-glass potential at positive temperature is that they have a non-relativistic speed of sound that is infinite.

  15. The benefit of using chemical analysis in understanding archaeological glass. Case-study: Roman black glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosyns, P.; Cagno, S.; Janssens, K.; Nys, K.

    LA-ICP-MS is a well acquainted technique for the quantification of a wide range of minor and trace elements present in the glass matrix. The benefit to understand the changes in technological processes or the added value in assessing the provenance and chronology of the raw glass material is however rarely discussed. By selecting a set of 197 Roman black glass artifacts dating between the 1st and 5th century AD we aimed to contribute to this issue. The obtained data on the production of glass artifacts helps better understand the constantly evolving patterns in glass consumption throughout the Roman imperial period. The key trace elements linked with the sand generally show the use of Levantine and Egyptian raw glass to produce black glass artifacts and result in well defined clusters. These indications are evidence for the use of different raw glasses in the Roman Empire and therefore featuring the work of diverse workshops over time. Specific trace elements such as copper, cobalt and lead reflect the application of recycling glass in Roman times.

  16. Polymer brushes: a controllable system with adjustable glass transition temperature of fragile glass formers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shi-Jie; Qian, Hu-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2014-01-28

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations for coarse-grained polymer brushes in a wide temperature range to investigate the factors that affect the glass transition in these systems. We focus on the influences of free surface, polymer-substrate interaction strength, grafting density, and chain length not only on the change of glass transition temperature Tg, but also the fragility D of the glass former. It is found that the confinement can enhance the dependence of the Tg on the cooling rate as compared to the bulk melt. Our layer-resolved analysis demonstrates that it is possible to control the glass transition temperature Tg of polymer brushes by tuning the polymer-substrate interaction strength, the grafting density, and the chain length. Moreover, we find quantitative differences in the influence range of the substrate and the free surface on the density and dynamics. This stresses the importance of long range cooperative motion in glass formers near the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the string-like cooperative motion analysis demonstrates that there exists a close relation among glass transition temperature Tg, fragility D, and string length ⟨S⟩. The polymer brushes that possess larger string length ⟨S⟩ tend to have relatively higher Tg and smaller D. Our results suggest that confining a fragile glass former through forming polymer brushes changes not only the glass transition temperature Tg, but also the very nature of relaxation process.

  17. Consumer Health: Alternative Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... body connection techniques include meditation, prayer, relaxation and art therapies. Manipulation and body-based practices use human ... healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/alternative-medicine/art-20045267 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  18. SOLVENT WASTE REDUCTION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication contains edited versions of presentations on this subject made at five Technology Transfer seminars in 1988. Chapters are included on land disposal regulations and requirements; waste solvent disposal alternatives from various industries such as process equipment...

  19. Alternative disinfectant water treatments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternative disinfestant water treatments are disinfestants not as commonly used by the horticultural industry. Chlorine products that produce hypochlorous acid are the main disinfestants used for treating irrigation water. Chlorine dioxide will be the primary disinfestant discussed as an alternativ...

  20. GLOBAL ALTERNATIVE FUTURE SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One way to examine possible future outcomes for environmental protection is through the development and analysis of alternative future scenarios. This type of assessment postulates two or more different paths that social and environmental development might take, using correspond...