Science.gov

Sample records for alternatives glass jars

  1. Comparative evaluation of laboratory-scale silages using standard glass jar silages or vacuum-packed model silages.

    PubMed

    Hoedtke, Sandra; Zeyner, Annette

    2011-03-30

    The objective of this study was to compare the fermentation variables of laboratory-scale silages made in glass preserving jars (GLASS) and vacuum-packed plastic bags (Rostock model silages, ROMOS). Silages were prepared from perennial ryegrass (fresh and wilted, 151 g kg(-1) and 286 g kg(-1) dry matter (DM), respectively) and remoistened coarsely ground rye grain (650 g kg(-1) DM) either with or without the addition of a lactic acid bacteria inoculant (3×10(5) colony forming units (cfu) g(-1) , LAB). Quintuplicate silos were opened on days 2, 4, 8, 49 and 90. Silage pH (P=0.073), acetic acid content (P=0.608) and ethanol content (P=0.223) were not influenced by the ensiling method. The contents of DM (P<0.001) and propionic acid (P=0.008) were affected by the ensiling method, but mean differences were only marginal. In ROMOS the concentration of lactic acid was increased (P=0.007) whereas butyric acid was produced less (P=0.001) when compared to GLASS. This suggested slightly better ensiling conditions for ROMOS. ROMOS represents a reasonable alternative to glass jar silages and opens the possibility for further investigations, e.g. studying the impact of packing density as well as the quantitative and qualitative analysis of fermentation gases. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Determination of polyadipates migrating from lid gaskets of glass jars. Hydrolysis to adipic acid and measurement by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Driffield, M; Bradley, E L; Harmer, N; Castle, L; Klump, S; Mottier, P

    2010-10-01

    Polyadipate plasticizers can be present in the polyvinylchloride (PVC) gaskets used to seal the lids of glass jars. As the gaskets can come into direct contact with the foodstuffs inside the jar, the potential exists for polyadipate migration into the food. The procedure and performance characteristics of a test method for the analysis of polyadipates in food simulants (3% aqueous acetic acid and 10% aqueous ethanol) and the volatile test media used in substitute fat tests (isooctane and 95% aqueous ethanol) are described. The PVC gaskets were exposed to the food simulants or their substitutes under standard test conditions. Studies were initially carried out using direct measurement of the polyadipate oligomers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (LC-TOF-MS) but this was not practical due to the number of peaks detected. Instead, the migrating polyadipates were hydrolysed to adipic acid and measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS/MS). The amount of polyadipate that this measurement of adipic acid represents was then calculated. Method performance was assessed by analysis of gaskets from two types of jar lids by single-laboratory validation. Linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, intermediate reproducibility and recovery were determined to be suitable for checking compliance with the 30 mg/kg specific migration limits for polyesters of 1,2-propane diol and/or 1,3- and/or 1,4-butanediol and/or polypropylene-glycol with adipic acid, which may be end-capped with acetic acid or fatty acids C(12)-C(18) or n-octanol and/or n-decanol. The method was found to be much quicker than previous methods involving extraction, clean-up, hydrolysis, esterification, derivatisation and GC measurement, consequently saving time and money.

  3. Epoxidized soy bean oil migrating from the gaskets of lids into food packed in glass jars. Analysis by on-line liquid chromatography-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser-Noti, Anja; Fiselier, Katell; Biedermann-Brem, Sandra; Grob, Koni

    2005-08-05

    The migration of epoxidized soy bean oil (ESBO) from the gasket in the lids of glass jars into foods, particularly those rich in edible oil, often far exceeds the legal limit (60 mg/kg). ESBO was determined through a methyl ester isomer of diepoxy linoleic acid. Transesterification occurred directly in the homogenized food. From the extracted methyl esters, the diepoxy components were isolated by normal-phase LC and transferred on-line to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection using the on-column interface in the concurrent solvent evaporation mode. The method involves verification elements to ensure the reliability of the results for every sample analyzed. The detection limit is 2-5 mg/kg, depending on the food. Uncertainty of the procedure is below 10%.

  4. Striped Bass, morone saxatilis, egg incubation in large volume jars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, C.J.; Wrege, B.M.; Jeffery, Isely J.

    2010-01-01

    The standard McDonald jar was compared with a large volume jar for striped bass, Morone saxatilis, egg incubation. The McDonald jar measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. The experimental jar measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. The hypothesis is that there is no difference in percent survival of fry hatched in experimental jars compared with McDonald jars. Striped bass brood fish were collected from the Coosa River and spawned using the dry spawn method of fertilization. Four McDonald jars were stocked with approximately 150 g of eggs each. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96, and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg loading rate (??1 SE) in McDonald jars of 21.9 ?? 0.03 eggs/mL and in experimental jars of 10.9 ?? 0.57 eggs/mL. The major finding of this study was that average fry survival was 37.3 ?? 4.49% for McDonald jars and 34.2 ?? 3.80% for experimental jars. Although survival in experimental jars was slightly less than in McDonald jars, the effect of container volume on survival to 48 h (F = 6.57; df = 1,5; P > 0.05), 96 h (F = 0.02; df = 1, 4; P > 0.89), and 144 h (F = 3.50; df = 1, 4; P > 0.13) was not statistically significant. Mean survival between replicates ranged from 14.7 to 60.1% in McDonald jars and from 10.1 to 54.4% in experimental jars. No effect of initial stocking rate on survival (t = 0.06; df = 10; P > 0.95) was detected. Experimental jars allowed for incubation of a greater number of eggs in less than half the floor space of McDonald jars. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental jars offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing labor and operations cost. As survival was similar to McDonald jars, the experimental jar is suitable for striped bass egg incubation. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2010.

  5. Cola Canopic Jars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epps, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Each year, the first-year high-school art students at Surry County High School in Dendron, Virginia, complete a three-dimensional project that attempts to re-create an artifact from the Old Kingdom. In this article, the author describes how the students made canopic jars from recycled 2-liter soda bottles and newspapers for this year's art…

  6. Search for a more adequate test to predict the long-term migration from the PVC gaskets of metal lids into oily foods in glass jars.

    PubMed

    Graubardt, Nadine; Biedermann, Maurus; Fiselier, Katell; Bolzoni, Luciana; Pedrelli, Turno; Cavalieri, Chiara; Simoneau, Cathérine; Grob, Koni

    2009-07-01

    As shown previously, the conventional testing procedure for simulating long-term migration from the gaskets of metal closures into oily foods does not adequately reflect reality. It appears to be impossible to accelerate migration to the extent that the situation at the end of the shelf life of a product can be anticipated in a few days or weeks. Therefore, we investigated whether long-term migration could be extrapolated from migration rates determined for new lids. Jars were kept in the normal upright position. Since heat treatment may have a strong temporary impact, migration during the initial heating for pasteurization or sterilization and storage at ambient temperature were determined using different lids. Commercial products were recalled from sales points throughout Europe to determine the real migration over extended periods of time and for jars with differing histories. This migration was compared with data from the short-term testing to investigate whether an empirical relationship could be derived. The results show that the short-term test enables the comparison of lids and plasticizers in the initial phase of migration, but that long-term extrapolation presupposes more complex kinetic modeling. The results also demonstrate that the legal relevance of "official" testing methods should be reconsidered to avoid conflict when food contact materials comply with migration limits in the test but not in actual application.

  7. Pulverized glass as an alternative filter medium

    SciTech Connect

    Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

    1998-07-01

    A significant amount of low-value, recycled glass is stockpiled at recycling facilities or landfilled. This study was conducted to investigate the use of pulverized recycled glass as a filter medium in slow sand filtration. The glass was pulverized using a flail mill-type pulverizer. The size distribution of the pulverizer output was adjusted by sieving to meet the grain size requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media were compared to a fourth unit containing silica sand media. The filter influent was spiked with clay, coliform group bacteria and the cysts and oocyst of Giardia lamblia andmore » Cryptosporidium parvum. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good as or better than the silica sand, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; and 99.92% to 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. According to a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.« less

  8. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mahony, Aileen, E-mail: aom@incomusa.com; Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstratedmore » due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)« less

  9. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  10. Remotely adjustable fishing jar and method for using same

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, W.B.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a method for providing a jarring force to dislodge objects stuck in well bores, the method it comprises: connecting a jarring tool between an operating string and an object in a well bore; selecting a jarring force to be applied to the object; setting the selected reference jarring force into a mechanical memory mechanism by progressively engaging a first latch body and a second latch body; retaining the reference jarring force in the mechanical memory mechanism during diminution of tensional force applied by the operating string; and initiating an upwardly directed impact force within the jarring toolmore » by increasing tensional force on the operating string to a value greater than the tensional force corresponding with the selected jarring force. This patent also describes a remotely adjustable downhole fishing jar apparatus comprising: an operating mandrel; an impact release spring; a mechanical memory mechanism; and releasable latching means.« less

  11. Uranium Glass: A Glowing Alternative to Conventional Sources of Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, Roeland

    2017-01-01

    There is a relatively simple way of using radioactive material in classroom experiments: uranium glass, which provides teachers with a suitable substance. By using the right computer software and a radiation sensor, it can be demonstrated that uranium glass emits radiation at a greater rate than the background radiation and with the aid of UV…

  12. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gorni, Giulio; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF4 glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO2 precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications. PMID:29385706

  13. Transparent Glass-Ceramics Produced by Sol-Gel: A Suitable Alternative for Photonic Materials.

    PubMed

    Gorni, Giulio; Velázquez, Jose J; Mosa, Jadra; Balda, Rolindes; Fernández, Joaquin; Durán, Alicia; Castro, Yolanda

    2018-01-30

    Transparent glass-ceramics have shown interesting optical properties for several photonic applications. In particular, compositions based on oxide glass matrices with fluoride crystals embedded inside, known as oxyfluoride glass-ceramics, have gained increasing interest in the last few decades. Melt-quenching is still the most used method to prepare these materials but sol-gel has been indicated as a suitable alternative. Many papers have been published since the end of the 1990s, when these materials were prepared by sol-gel for the first time, thus a review of the achievements obtained so far is necessary. In the first part of this paper, a review of transparent sol-gel glass-ceramics is made focusing mainly on oxyfluoride compositions. Many interesting optical results have been obtained but very little innovation of synthesis and processing is found with respect to pioneering papers published 20 years ago. In the second part we describe the improvements in synthesis and processing obtained by the authors during the last five years. The main achievements are the preparation of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with a much higher fluoride crystal fraction, at least double that reported up to now, and the first synthesis of NaGdF₄ glass-ceramics. Moreover, a new SiO₂ precursor was introduced in the synthesis, allowing for a reduction in the treatment temperature and favoring hydroxyl group removal. Interesting optical properties demonstrated the incorporation of dopant ions in the fluoride crystals, thus obtaining crystal-like spectra along with higher efficiencies with respect to xerogels, and hence demonstrating that these materials are a suitable alternative for photonic applications.

  14. ``Peeps,'' cream, heads, and food coloring in a vacuum jar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePino, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    This note describes some methods of adding interest to the standard vacuum jar demonstrations. Marshmallow animals, shaving cream, doll heads, and food coloring add some spark to these demos. These new twists have been well received by the students.

  15. [The decoration of Italian Renaissance drug jars after engravings].

    PubMed

    Drey, R E

    1994-01-01

    Although Italian drug jar painters generally devised original compositions for the ornamentation of their products, on occasion they derived their subjects from printed sources. Printed sources used by drug jar artists of the Renaissance include wood-engraved Italian tarot cards and wood-engraved illustrations by Hans Sebald Beham and Bernard Salomon in miniature bibles published in the sixteenth century in Frankfurt and in Lyons respectively.

  16. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidatemore » alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining

  17. Hearing Outcome With the Use of Glass Ionomer Cement as an Alternative to Crimping in Stapedotomy.

    PubMed

    Elzayat, Saad; Younes, Ahmed; Fouad, Ayman; Erfan, Fatthe; Mahrous, Ali

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate early hearing outcomes using glass ionomer cement to fix the Teflon piston prosthesis onto the long process of incus to minimize residual conductive hearing loss after stapedotomy. Original report of prospective randomized control study. Tertiary referral center. A total of 80 consecutive patients with otosclerosis were randomized into two groups. Group A is a control group in which 40 patients underwent small fenestra stapedotomy using the classic technique. Group B included 40 patients who were subjected to small fenestra stapedotomy with fixation of the incus-prosthesis junction with glass ionomer bone cement. Stapedotomy with the classical technique in group A and the alternative technique in group B. The audiometric results before and after surgery. Analysis of the results was performed using the paired t test to compare between pre and postoperative results. χ test was used to compare the results of the two groups. A p value less than 0.05 was considered significant from the statistical standpoint. Significant postoperative improvement of both pure-tone air conduction thresholds and air-bone gaps were reported in the two studied groups. The postoperative average residual air-bone gap and hearing gain were statistically significant in group B (p < 0.05) compared with group A. The use of glass ionomer bone cement in primary otosclerosis surgery using the aforementioned prosthesis and the surgical technique is of significant value in producing maximal closure of the air-bone gap and better audiological outcomes.

  18. Jar Test. Training Module 5.230.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonte, John L.; Davidson, Arnold C.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the jar test and its application to the coagulation, floculation and sedimentation processes, and the chemical precipitation process. Included are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts, and transparency masters. A video…

  19. The Feminist Discourse of Sylvia Plath's "The Bell Jar."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budick, E. Miller

    1987-01-01

    Argues that Sylvia Plath not only perceives the world as competing male and female languages, but attempts to write in the feminine. Discusses how "The Bell Jar" might define, as a solution to sociological and psychological problems of women, a language and art to secure women against male domination. (MS)

  20. Long stroke jar bumper sub with safety sleeve

    SciTech Connect

    Downen, J.L.; Sutliff, W.N.

    1981-04-14

    A hydraulic jar apparatus to be disposed in a drilling string embodying inner and outer telescopically arranged elements. Overlapping portions of the elements provide an annual chamber confining an operating liquid by an annular seal fixed to the outer element at the lower end of the chamber and an annular polly pack seal fixed to the outer element at the upper end of the chamber. A piston is extended radially from the inner element into the chamber and the chamber is divided by a cylinder on the outer element into low and high pressure sections. Impact shoulders are provided onmore » the elements in axially opposed relation to produce a jarring blow and the elements are telescopically coupled by a hexagonal spline sub assembly.« less

  1. How Many Jelly Beans Are in the Jar?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, George J.; Hodges, Thomas E.; Graul, LuAnn

    2016-01-01

    Who will make a better estimate concerning the number of jelly beans in a jar, a single person or a group of people? On one side of the debate is the notion that a person would make a better decision because he or she uses unique knowledge that the group may not possess. On the opposite side of the argument is the claim that because of their…

  2. Alternating Current Electrophoretic Deposition of Antibacterial Bioactive Glass-Chitosan Composite Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Seuss, Sigrid; Lehmann, Maja; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2014-01-01

    Alternating current (AC) electrophoretic deposition (EPD) was used to produce multifunctional composite coatings combining bioactive glass (BG) particles and chitosan. BG particles of two different sizes were used, i.e., 2 μm and 20–80 nm in average diameter. The parameter optimization and characterization of the coatings was conducted by visual inspection and by adhesion strength tests. The optimized coatings were investigated in terms of their hydroxyapatite (HA) forming ability in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 21 days. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results showed the successful HA formation on the coatings after 21 days. The first investigations were conducted on planar stainless steel sheets. In addition, scaffolds made from a TiAl4V6 alloy were considered to show the feasibility of coating of three dimensional structures by EPD. Because both BG and chitosan are antibacterial materials, the antibacterial properties of the as-produced coatings were investigated using E. coli bacteria cells. It was shown that the BG particle size has a strong influence on the antibacterial properties of the coatings. PMID:25007822

  3. Optimum coagulant forecasting by modeling jar test experiments using ANNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiri, Sadaf; Daghighi, Amin; Moharramzadeh, Sina

    2018-01-01

    Currently, the proper utilization of water treatment plants and optimizing their use is of particular importance. Coagulation and flocculation in water treatment are the common ways through which the use of coagulants leads to instability of particles and the formation of larger and heavier particles, resulting in improvement of sedimentation and filtration processes. Determination of the optimum dose of such a coagulant is of particular significance. A high dose, in addition to adding costs, can cause the sediment to remain in the filtrate, a dangerous condition according to the standards, while a sub-adequate dose of coagulants can result in the reducing the required quality and acceptable performance of the coagulation process. Although jar tests are used for testing coagulants, such experiments face many constraints with respect to evaluating the results produced by sudden changes in input water because of their significant costs, long time requirements, and complex relationships among the many factors (turbidity, temperature, pH, alkalinity, etc.) that can influence the efficiency of coagulant and test results. Modeling can be used to overcome these limitations; in this research study, an artificial neural network (ANN) multi-layer perceptron (MLP) with one hidden layer has been used for modeling the jar test to determine the dosage level of used coagulant in water treatment processes. The data contained in this research have been obtained from the drinking water treatment plant located in Ardabil province in Iran. To evaluate the performance of the model, the mean squared error (MSE) and correlation coefficient (R2) parameters have been used. The obtained values are within an acceptable range that demonstrates the high accuracy of the models with respect to the estimation of water-quality characteristics and the optimal dosages of coagulants; so using these models will allow operators to not only reduce costs and time taken to perform experimental jar tests

  4. Lunar Simulation in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2007-01-01

    The Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar has been assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide a high fidelity lunar simulation facility to test the interactions of lunar dust and lunar dust simulant with candidate aerospace materials and coatings. It has a sophisticated design which enables it to treat dust in a way that will remove adsorbed gases and create a chemically reactive surface. It can simulate the vacuum, thermal, and radiation environments of the Moon, including proximate areas of illuminated heat and extremely cold shadow. It is expected to be a valuable tool in the development of dust repellant and cleaning technologies for lunar surface systems.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in literature: Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Charles H

    2013-01-01

    Sylvia Plath's well-known novel, The Bell Jar, recounts her experience of a severe depressive episode. In the novel, the protagonist is treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), as was Plath in life. The first ECT is given in the now-obsolete "unmodified" form, without general anesthesia. Later in the story, she receives ECT again, this time with full general anesthesia and muscle relaxation, as is the standard of care today. This chapter examines how the novelistic descriptions of the treatment compare with actual clinical practice. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Applications of the JARS method to study levee sites in southern Texas and southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Dunbar, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    We apply the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method to several sites and compare its results to traditional refraction-tomography methods in efforts of finding a more realistic solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem. The JARS method uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. In all of the cases JARS estimates appear more realistic than those from the conventional refraction-tomography methods. As a result, we consider, the JARS algorithm as the preferred method for finding solutions to the inverse refraction-tomography problems. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. The Jar Magic--Instructional Activities for Teaching Air Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Bing-Hong; Chen, Chyong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of impressive activities designed for teaching the concept of air pressure to junior high school students. Water, glasses, balloons, plastic bottles, and suction cups are some of the items commonly used in these experiments. For example, if we take a glass of water, cover it with a piece of cardboard, and invert the glass,…

  8. Drilling jar for use in a downhole network

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; McPherson, James; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-01-31

    Apparatus and methods for integrating transmission cable into the body of selected downhole tools, such as drilling jars, having variable or changing lengths. A wired downhole-drilling tool is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including a housing and a mandrel insertable into the housing. A coiled cable is enclosed within the housing and has a first end connected to the housing and a second end connected to the mandrel. The coiled cable is configured to stretch and shorten in accordance with axial movement between the housing and the mandrel. A clamp is used to fix the coiled cable with respect to the housing, the mandrel, or both, to accommodate a change of tension in the coiled cable.

  9. Bars to jars: bamboo value chains in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Verina; Tieguhong, Julius Chupezi

    2013-04-01

    Bamboo is a well know and versatile material, which is a common sight across Cameroon's diverse ecosystems, from dry to humid tropical and Afromontane forests. Its numerous uses range from storage jars to decorating restaurant-bars, beehives to knives, fences, fodder, and fuel. Responding to the paucity of data on species and uses, the value chain for bamboo in Cameroon was analyzed. Based on 171 interviews and field observations, two African indigenous species (alpine Yushania alpina and savannah Oxytenanthera abyssinica) and exotic (Bambusa vulgaris spp.) bamboos were identified as most utilized. They were tracked from major production zones to final consumers. The ecological, socio-economic, institutional, and governance contexts and impacts are described and analyzed. Issues for research, conservation, and development are highlighted. These include the ambiguous regulatory status, the relationship between tenure and management, threats and conservation of African species and options to increase the sustainable livelihoods for stakeholders dependent upon bamboo.

  10. What Can You do with a Jelly Jar: A Coloring Activity on Reuse for Kids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Space creatures might think the idea of reusing containers is an alien concept, but here on Earth it’s easy to keep an old jar out of the trash and give it new life. Follow these tips to keep a jar in use and out of orbit.

  11. Metallic alternative to glass mirrors (active mirrors in aluminium) - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozelot, Jean P.; Leblanc, Jean-M.

    1991-09-01

    Present-day glass mirrors for telescopes, including the most recent results obtained with aluminum mirrors developed within the European EUREKA procedure (LAMA program) are reviewed. The major advantages of the aluminum-alloy solution, which can be extrapolated today for large size, are discussed. It is shown that aluminum-alloy meniscus blanks, polished on a thin nickel coating, are appropriate to manufacture mirrors of astronomical quality. With the technique of electron-beam welding, large sizes can be envisaged. The development of active optics makes it possible to easily compensate for real-time deformations. The good thermal diffusivity of aluminum alloys leads to a better and faster thermal equilibrium than all other glass structures.

  12. [The tympanic thermometer in pediatrics as an alternative to the mercury-in-glass thermometer].

    PubMed

    Vertedor-Hurtado, María Victoria; Padín-López, Susana; Carreira-Pastor, María José; López-Martínez, Julia María

    2009-01-01

    To determine the behavior of a new and smaller model of infrared thermometer cone and to assess whether it is an appropriate alternative to determine fever in children under 14-years-old. We performed a cross-sectional, descriptive study comparing the temperatures taken with a mercury thermometer with those taken by an infrared thermometer in children under 14-years-old. The researchers followed the manufacturer's instructions for use for each thermometer. The overall sample of 400 children was divided into two age groups. Group I consisted of children aged less than 2 years and group II of 2-14-years-old. In group I the rectal mercury thermometer was placed in the rectum for 3 minutes and the tympanic thermometer was used in rectal mode and placed in the right ear. In group II, the axillary mercury thermometer was placed for 8 minutes in the right axilla and the tympanic thermometer was used in the axillary mode. To analyze intraobserver bias, 50 patients were selected from the sample and their temperatures were simultaneously taken by two nurses from the team. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used both to measure the reliability of the tympanic thermometer and to analyze intraobserver bias. Temperature measurements with both instruments showed an ICC of 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.94) for group I and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.87-0.92) for group II. The reproducibility of the measurements taken by the two nurses in 50 patients showed an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95-0.98) for the tympanic thermometer. The infrared thermometer is an appropriate device for rapidly measuring temperature in the emergency department. However, the measurements taken should be confirmed by another method when clinical decisions are based on temperature values.

  13. Ion-selective detection by plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membrane in glass nanopipette with alternating voltage modulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiao Long; Takami, Tomohide; Son, Jong Wan; Kang, Eun Ji; Kawai, Tomoji; Park, Bae Ho

    2013-08-01

    An alternating current (AC) voltage modulation was applied to ion-selective observations with plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes in glass nanopipettes. The liquid confronting the membranes in the nanopipettes, the conditioning process, and AC voltage modulation play important roles in the ion-selective detection. In the AC detection system developed by us, where distilled water was used as the liquid within the nanopipettes, potassium ions were selectively detected in the sample solution of sodium and potassium ions because sodium ions were captured at the membrane containing bis(12-crown-4) ionophores, before the saturation of the ionophores. The membrane lost the selectivity after the saturation. On using sodium chloride as the liquid within the nanopipette, the membrane selectively detected potassium and sodium ions before and after the saturation of ionophores, respectively. The ion-selective detection of our system can be explained by the ion extraction-diffusion-dissolution mechanism through the bis(12-crown-4) ionophores with AC voltage modulation.

  14. Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism Associated with Improperly Jarred Pesto--Ohio and California, 2014.

    PubMed

    Burke, Patrick; Needham, Michael; Jackson, Brendan R; Bokanyi, Rick; St Germain, Eric; Englender, Steven J

    2016-02-26

    On July 28, 2014, the Cincinnati Health Department was notified of suspected cases of foodborne botulism in two women admitted to the same hospital 12 days apart. Patient A had been treated for 12 days for suspected autoimmune disease. When patient B, the roommate of patient A, was evaluated at the same medical center for similar symptoms, it was learned that on July 13, patient A and patient B had shared a meal that included prepackaged pesto from a jar; clinicians suspected botulism and notified the local health department. The pesto had been purchased from company A's farm stand in San Clemente, California. Laboratory testing detected botulinum toxin type B by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in leftovers of pasta with pesto. A culture of these food samples yielded Clostridium spp. that produced botulinum toxin type B; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing also was positive for type B toxin gene. Environmental assessment of company A identified improper acidification and pressurization practices and lack of licensure to sell canned products commercially, including products in hermetically-sealed jars. On July 30, the vendor voluntarily recalled all jarred products, and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) warned the public not to consume company A's jarred foods. This report describes the two cases and the public health investigation that traced the source of the outbreak.

  15. "Life in a Jar": A National History Day Project that Touched the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conard, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Few had heard of Irena Sendlerowa in 1999. Now, after more than 290 presentations of the student play "Life in a Jar," as well as a website with high traffic, and worldwide media attention, Irena is known to the world. Irena Sendler (as she became known), a social worker, believed in standing up for others. Her father, who was a doctor,…

  16. Jar Test. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arasmith, E. E.

    The jar test is used to determine the proper chemical dosage required for good coagulation and flocculation of water. The test is commonly used in potable water, secondary effluent prior to advanced wastewater treatment, secondary clarifier influent, and sludge conditioning practice. Designed for individuals who have completed National Pollutant…

  17. Development of Conductivity Method as an Alternative to Titration for Hydrolytic Resistance Testing Used for Evaluation of Glass Vials Used in Pharmaceutical Industry.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Lee, Hans; Phillips, Joseph; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser

    The European Pharmacopeia surface test to analyze the hydrolytic resistance is a common industrial method to understand and ensure the quality of produced glass vials. Hydrolytic resistance is evaluated by calculating the alkalinity of water extract from autoclaved vials by titration. As an alternative to this titration technique, a conductivity technique was assessed, which directly measures the ions in the water extract. A conductivity meter with a 12 mm diameter electrode was calibrated with a 100 μS/cm conductivity standard and carryover minimized by rinsing the probe in a water beaker per analysis. The limit of quantification at 1 μS/cm was determined as having a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 compared with the water blank. The conductivity method was selective for glass-composing elements (boron, sodium, aluminum, silicon, potassium, and calcium) within the vial extract. Accuracies of spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm were ±7% and had linearity with coefficient of determination (R 2 ) of ≥0.9999. Intraday precision had a relative standard deviation (RSD) (n = 5) of ≤6% for spiked conductivity standard within the range of 1 to 100 μS/cm. Interday precision had a RSD (n = 4) of ≤6% for 10 vials from three glass vial lots. Conductivity of water extracts from nine sets of seven lots of glass vials had a precise linear relationship [R 2 = 0.9876, RSD = 1% (n = 9)] with titration volumes of the same lots. Conductivity results in μS/cm could be converted to titration volumes in milliliters by a conversion factor of 0.0275. The simplicity, sample stability, and individual vial analysis of the conductivity technique were more advantageous than the current titration technique. The quality of glass vials used as primary containers in the pharmaceutical industry is of concern due to recent observations of glass flake-like delamination, or lamellae, under specific storage conditions. The current European Pharmacopoeia method to assess

  18. NanoSIMS Imaging Alternation Layers of a Leached SON68 Glass Via A FIB-made Wedged Crater

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Chung; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-11-01

    Currently, nuclear wastes are commonly immobilized into glasses because of their long-term durability. Exposure to water for long periods of time, however, will eventually corrode the waste form and is the leading potential avenue for radionuclide release into the environment. Because such slow processes cannot be experimentally tested, the prediction of release requires a thorough understanding the mechanisms governing glass corrosion. In addition, due to the exceptional durability of glass, much of the testing must be performed on high-surface-area powders. A technique that can provide accurate compositional profiles with very precise depth resolution for non-flat samples would be a majormore » benefit to the field. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) depth profiling is an excellent tool that has long been used to examine corrosion layers of glass. The roughness of the buried corrosion layers, however, causes the corresponding SIMS depth profiles to exhibit erroneously wide interfaces. In this study, NanoSIMS was used to image the cross-section of the corrosion layers of a leached SON68 glass sample. A wedged crater was prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument to obtain a 5× improvement in depth resolution for NanoSIMS measurements. This increase in resolution allowed us to confirm that the breakdown of the silica glass network is further from the pristine glass than a second dissolution front for boron, another glass former. The existence of these two distinct interfaces, separated by only ~20 nm distance in depth, was not apparent by traditional ToF-SIMS depth profiling but has been confirmed also by atom probe tomography. This novel sample geometry will be a major benefit to efficient NanoSIMS sampling of irregular interfaces at the nanometer scale that would otherwise be obscured within ToF-SIMS depth profiles.« less

  19. Glass-to-Metal Seal Against Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Gatewood, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Simple compression joint with indium gasket forms demountable seal for superfluids. Seal developed for metal lid on glass jar used in experiments on liquid helium. Glass container allows contents to be viewed for such purposes as calibration of liquid-level detectors and adjustments of displacement plungers. Seal contains liquid helium even when temperature drops below 2.19K. Made from inexpensive, commercially available materials and parts.

  20. Quality assessment of commercially supplied drinking jar water in Chittagong City, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mina, Sohana Akter; Marzan, Lolo Wal; Sultana, Tasrin; Akter, Yasmin

    2018-03-01

    Chittagong is the second most populated city in Bangladesh where drinking water is supplied using small jar. Water quality is an important concern for the consumers and, therefore, the present study was done by collecting 38 drinking jar water samples from Chittagong City, Bangladesh to determine the microbial contamination and physiochemical properties. Molecular study was done by the PCR amplification of 16SrDNA, LacZ and uidA gene for the identification of bacteria, coliform and fecal coliform. TVC, MPN and different biochemical test were done for enumeration and identification. TDS, pH, and metals (Fe, As, Pb and Cr) concentration were also measured. No heavy metal (As, Pb and Cr) was found in any of the water samples but Fe was detected in low concentrations (0.02-0.05 mg/l). TDS and pH level were normal in all samples. But microbial contaminations were (60.53 and 50%) recorded in molecular and biochemical test, respectively. The range of total bacterial count was (1.5 × 102-1.6 × 104) cfu/ml. The total coliform count (TCCm) was recorded (14-40) in 100 ml of water samples. The presence of total coliform and fecal coliform was 26.32 and 18.42%, respectively, in PCR analysis but in biochemical test those were 18.42 and 15.78%, respectively. A total of 11 bacterial species: Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherrichia coli, Aeromonas, Bacillus sp., Cardiobacterium, Corynebacterium, Clostridium, Klebsiella sp., Lactobacillus, Micrococcus sp., Pseudomonas sp. were found. This study indicates that some of the drinking jar water samples were of poor quality which may increase the risk of water-borne disease. Hence, the producer of drinking jar water has to implement necessary quality control steps.

  1. Homogeneity of ball milled ceramic powders: Effect of jar shape and milling conditions.

    PubMed

    Broseghini, M; D'Incau, M; Gelisio, L; Pugno, N M; Scardi, P

    2017-02-01

    This paper contains data and supporting information of and complementary to the research article entitled " Effect of jar shape on high-energy planetary ball milling efficiency: simulations and experiments " (Broseghini et al.,) [1]. Calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) was ground using two jars of different shape (cylindrical and half-moon) installed on a planetary ball-mill, exploring different operating conditions (jar-to-plate angular velocity ratio and milling time). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images and X-Ray Powder Diffraction data (XRPD) were collected to assess the effect of milling conditions on the end-product crystallite size. Due to the inhomogeneity of the end product, the Whole Powder Pattern Model (WPPM, (Scardi, 2008) [2]) analysis of XRPD data required the hypothesis of a bimodal distribution of sizes - respectively ground (fine fraction) and less-to-not ground (coarse fraction) - confirmed by SEM images and suggested by the previous literature (Abdellatief et al., 2013) [3,4]. Predominance of fine fraction clearly indicates optimal milling conditions.

  2. The effect of serum from women with preeclampsia on JAR (trophoblast-like) cell line.

    PubMed

    Mahameed, Safa; Goldman, Shlomit; Gabarin, Diane; Weiss, Amir; Shalev, Eliezer

    2005-09-01

    Pathologic placentation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of preeclamsia. We sought to assess the effect serum obtained from women with preeclampsia would have on JAR human choriocarcinoma cells regarding growth, invasiveness, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion as compared to normotensive pregnant woman. Blood was collected from 11 healthy pregnant women and from10 patients with preeclampsia at 28-33 weeks of gestation. The JAR human choriocarcinoma cell line was cultured in the presence of 10% serum obtained from each group. Cell proliferation, invasiveness, and MMP secretion was measured using a cell proliferation kit, the Matrigel (BD Biosciences, Beit-Ha'Emek, Israel) invasion assay, and gel zymography, respectively. Cell growth increased by 6% when exposed to serum from patients with preeclampsia compared to 30% from controls (P <.01). Trophoblast invasion was significantly (P <.01) reduced in the preeclampsia group (21 +/- 1.9%) compared to controls (27 +/- 2.5%). Valid MMP-2 secretion was reduced by 51% in the preeclampsia group compared to controls (P <.05). Serum obtained from women with preeclampsia contains a factor or factors that exhibit an inhibitory effect on JAR trophoblast cell proliferation, invasiveness, and MMP-2 secretion. These factors may be involved in the pathologic placentation associated with the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  3. Use of JAR-Based Analysis for Improvement of Product Acceptance: A Case Study on Flavored Kefirs.

    PubMed

    Gere, Attila; Szabó, Zsófia; Pásztor-Huszár, Klára; Orbán, Csaba; Kókai, Zoltán; Sipos, László

    2017-05-01

    A common question of dairy product developments is the possible success of the new product. Several publications reported successful results using just-about-right (JAR) scales; although there is some debate about their advantages/disadvantages. This study highlights the limitations and opportunities of JAR scales and penalty analysis of fruit flavored kefirs. The first question is whether penalty analysis results help to improve the product and thus its overall liking (OAL)? The second question is what happens to those who rated the products "ideal" (JAR) before product development when evaluating the new products? Fruit flavored live-flora stirred-type kefir samples were formulated and evaluated by 92 consumers before and after the JAR-based product development. The OAL of two products significantly increased after product development. A new visualization tool is introduced, which shows what happens to those who rated the attribute as JAR but the attribute has been modified. A general product development scheme is also introduced for JAR-based kefir product development. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Seeing through The Bell Jar: investigating linguistic patterns of psychological disorder.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Daniel; Carter, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    As a means of conveying difficult personal experiences, illness narratives and their analysis have the potential to increase awareness of patients' lives and circumstances. Becoming sensitised to the linguistic texture of narrative offers readers a means of increasing narrative understanding. Using the fictional narrative of The Bell Jar, this paper outlines a novel method for exploring the language of illness narratives. Corpus stylistics provides new insights into narrative texture and demonstrates the importance of recurrent linguistic features in shaping meaning. The paper concludes by proposing the application of a similar methodology to non-fictional illness narratives in therapeutic contexts.

  5. Profiling of red pigment produced by Streptomyces sp. JAR6 and its bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jayanthi; Chauhan, Ritika

    2018-01-01

    Actinomycetes strain was isolated from leaf litter soil sample and was identified as Streptomyces sp. by conventional and molecular approaches. The biologically active compound responsible for antimicrobial and anticancer activity of the strain JAR6 was elucidated by solid state fermentation followed by subsequent chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis. Extraction, purification and structural confirmation of red pigment metabolite viz undecylprodigiosin were established on the basis of spectroscopic studies and comparing the data from the literature. The biologically active compound was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates and its minimum inhibitory concentration was recorded. The antimicrobial activity of undecylprodigiosin is more prominent against Salmonella sp., Proteus mirabilis , Shigella sp. and Enterococcus sp. whereas, it was less effective against Staphylococcus aureus , Klebsiella pneumonia and Escherichia coli . The anticancer activity of undecylprodigiosin was tested against HeLa cell lines and it exhibited commendable cytotoxicity effect with IC 50 value of 145 µg/ml. The present investigation reveals that undecylprodigiosin produced by Streptomyces strain JAR6 is a potent bioactive metabolite with effective pharmaceutical properties.

  6. Water Ingress Testing of the Turbula Jar and U-233 Lead Pig Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Kirk Patrick; Karns, Tristan; Smith, Paul Herrick

    Understanding the water ingress behavior of containers used at the TA-55 Plutonium Facility has significant implications for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to document the water ingress behavior of the Turbula Jar with Bakelite lid and Viton gaskets (Turbula Jar) used in oxide blending operations and the U-233 lead pig container used to store and transport U-233 material. The technical basis for water resistant containers at TA-55 is described in LA-UR-15-22781, “Water Resistant Container Technical Basis Document for the TA-55 Criticality Safety Program.” Testing of the water ingress behavior of various containers is described in LA-CP-13-00695, “Watermore » Penetration Tests on the Filters of Hagan and SAVY Containers,” LA-UR-15-23121, “Water Ingress into Crimped Convenience Containers under Flooding Conditions,” and in LA-UR- 16-2411, “Water Ingress Testing for TA-55 Containers.” Water ingress criteria are defined in TA55-AP-522 “TA-55 Criticality Safety Program”, and in PA-RD-01009 “TA55 Criticality Safety Requirements.” The water ingress criteria for submersion is no more than 50 ml of water ingress at a 6” water column height for a period of 2 hours.« less

  7. Method for making glass nonfogging

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Carter, Gary W.; Petrini, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    A method for rendering glass nonfogging (to condensation fog) by sandwiching the glass between two electrodes such that the glass functions as the dielectric of a capacitor, a large alternating current (AC) voltage is applied across the electrodes for a selected time period causing the glass to absorb a charge, and the electrodes are removed. The glass absorbs a charge from the electrodes rendering it nonfogging. The glass surface is undamaged by application of the AC voltage, and normal optical properties are unaffected. This method can be applied to optical surfaces such as lenses, auto windshields, mirrors, etc., wherever condensation fog on glass is a problem.

  8. Mothers prefer fresh fruits and vegetables over jarred baby fruits and vegetables in the new Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children food package.

    PubMed

    Kim, Loan P; Whaley, Shannon E; Gradziel, Pat H; Crocker, Nancy J; Ritchie, Lorrene D; Harrison, Gail G

    2013-01-01

    This study examined Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participant use and satisfaction with jarred baby foods, assessed preference for cash value vouchers (CVVs) for fruits and vegetables vs jarred baby foods, and examined whether preferences varied among selected ethnic groups. A survey of California WIC participants and statewide redemption data were used. Participants reported high satisfaction with the CVV for fruits and vegetables and jarred baby foods, with statistically significant variation across ethnic groups. About two thirds of all participants reported a preference for CVVs for fruits and vegetables over jarred baby foods. Redemption data indicated declining redemption rates for jarred fruits and vegetables with increasing age of the infant across all ethnic groups. Although the addition of jarred fruits and vegetables to the food package for infants ages 6-11 months was well received, many caregivers want the option to choose between jarred foods and fresh fruits and vegetables. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  9. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10(exp -8) Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust simulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove adsorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples.

  10. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M.G.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10-8 Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust stimulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove absorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions, and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples

  11. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10(exp -8) Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust simulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove adsorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples.

  12. Organotin compounds cause structure-dependent induction of progesterone in human choriocarcinoma Jar cells.

    PubMed

    Hiromori, Youhei; Yui, Hiroki; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nagase, Hisamitsu; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals because they cause masculinization in female mollusks. In addition, previous studies have suggested that the endocrine disruption by organotin compounds leads to activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and retinoid X receptor (RXR). However, whether organotin compounds cause crucial toxicities in human development and reproduction is unclear. We here investigated the structure-dependent effect of 12 tin compounds on mRNA transcription of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (3β-HSD I) and progesterone production in human choriocarcinoma Jar cells. TBT, TPT, dibutyltin, monophenyltin, tripropyltin, and tricyclohexyltin enhanced progesterone production in a dose-dependent fashion. Although tetraalkyltin compounds such as tetrabutyltin increased progesterone production, the concentrations necessary for activation were 30-100 times greater than those for trialkyltins. All tested active organotins increased 3β-HSD I mRNA transcription. We further investigated the correlation between the agonistic activity of organotin compounds on PPARγ and their ability to promote progesterone production. Except for DBTCl2, the active organotins significantly induced the transactivation function of PPARγ. In addition, PPARγ knockdown significantly suppressed the induction of mRNA transcription of 3β-HSD I by all active organotins except DBTCl2. These results suggest that some organotin compounds promote progesterone biosynthesis in vitro by inducing 3β-HSD I mRNA transcription via the PPARγ signaling pathway. The placenta represents a potential target organ for these compounds, whose endocrine-disrupting effects might cause local changes in progesterone concentration in pregnant women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Six centuries of geomagnetic intensity variations recorded by royal Judean stamped jar handles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yosef, Erez; Millman, Michael; Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Lipschits, Oded

    2017-02-01

    Earth’s magnetic field, one of the most enigmatic physical phenomena of the planet, is constantly changing on various time scales, from decades to millennia and longer. The reconstruction of geomagnetic field behavior in periods predating direct observations with modern instrumentation is based on geological and archaeological materials and has the twin challenges of (i) the accuracy of ancient paleomagnetic estimates and (ii) the dating of the archaeological material. Here we address the latter by using a set of storage jar handles (fired clay) stamped by royal seals as part of the ancient administrative system in Judah (Jerusalem and its vicinity). The typology of the stamp impressions, which corresponds to changes in the political entities ruling this area, provides excellent age constraints for the firing event of these artifacts. Together with rigorous paleomagnetic experimental procedures, this study yielded an unparalleled record of the geomagnetic field intensity during the eighth to second centuries BCE. The new record constitutes a substantial advance in our knowledge of past geomagnetic field variations in the southern Levant. Although it demonstrates a relatively stable and gradually declining field during the sixth to second centuries BCE, the new record provides further support for a short interval of extreme high values during the late eighth century BCE. The rate of change during this “geomagnetic spike” [defined as virtual axial dipole moment > 160 ZAm2 (1021 Am2)] is further constrained by the new data, which indicate an extremely rapid weakening of the field (losing ˜27% of its strength over ca. 30 y).

  14. Glass sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S.

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  15. Electrochromic Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  16. Detailed exposure assessment of dietary furan for infants consuming commercially jarred complementary food based on data from the DONALD study.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Maser, Elena; Kuballa, Thomas; Reusch, Helmut; Kersting, Mathilde; Alexy, Ute

    2012-07-01

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen regularly occurring in commercially jarred complementary foods. This paper will provide a detailed exposure assessment for babies consuming these foods considering different intake scenarios. The occurrence data on furan in complementary foods were based on our own headspace-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS) analytical results (n = 286). The average furan content in meals and menus was between 20 and 30 µg kg(-1), which is in excellent agreement with results from other European countries. Using measured food consumption data from the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study, the average exposures for consumers of commercially jarred foods ranged between 182 and 688 ng kg(-1) bw day(-1), with a worst case scenario for P95 consumers ranging between 351 and 1066 ng kg(-1) bw day(-1). The exposure data were then used to characterize risk using the margin of exposure method based on a benchmark dose lower confidence limit for a 10% response (BMDL10) of 1.28 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for hepatocellular tumours in rats. The margin of exposures (MOEs) were below the threshold of 10 000, which is often used to define public health risks, in all scenarios, ranging between 7022 and 1861 for average consumers and between 3642 and 1200 for the P95 consumers. Mitigative measures to avoid furan in complementary foods should be of high priority for risk management. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Making a Better Beer Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffer, Alan R.

    1982-01-01

    A class activity is detailed in which alternative designs for glasses are examined. The goal is to design a glass which is built tilted, so that beer can be poured in without creating a foam problem. The activity is viewed as one leading to interesting questions. (MP)

  18. Chemical processing of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Richard M.

    1990-11-01

    The development of chemical processing methods for the fabrication of glass and ceramic shapes for photonic applications is frequently Edisonian in nature. In part, this is because the numerous variables that must be optimized to obtain a given material with a specific shape and particular properties cannot be readily defined based on fundamental principles. In part, the problems arise because the basic chemistry of common chemical processing systems has not been fully delineated. The prupose of this paper is to provide an overview of the basic chemical problems associated with chemical processing. The emphasis will be on sol-gel processing, a major subset pf chemical processing. Two alternate approaches to chemical processing of glasses are also briefly discussed. One approach concerns the use of bimetallic alkoxide oligomers and polymers as potential precursors to mulimetallic glasses. The second approach describes the utility of metal carboxylate precursors to multimetallic glasses.

  19. Glass Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Several NASA technologies have played part in growth and cost containment of studio glass art, among them a foam type insulation developed to meet a need for lightweight material that would reduce flame spread in aircraft fire. Foam comes in several forms and is widely used by glass artists, chiefly as an insulator for the various types of ovens used in glass working. Another Spinoff is alumina crucibles to contain molten glass. Before alumina crucibles were used, glass tanks were made of firebrick which tended to erode under high temperatures and cause impurities; this not only improved quality but made the process more cost effective. One more NASA technology that found its way into glass art working is a material known as graphite board, a special form of graphite originally developed for rocket motor applications. This graphite is used to exact compound angles and creates molds for poured glass artworks of dramatic design.

  20. Laser Glass Frit Sealing for Encapsulation of Vacuum Insulation Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, H.; Gehlen, E.; Aden, M.; Olowinsky, A.; Gillner, A.

    Laser glass frit sealing is a joining method predestined in electronics for the sealing of engineered materials housings in dimensions of some 1 mm2 to several 10 mm2. The application field ranges from encapsulation of display panels to sensor housings. Laser glass frit sealing enables a hermetical closure excluding humidity and gas penetration. But the seam quality is also interesting for other applications requiring a hermetical sealing. One application is the encapsulation of vacuum insulation glass. The gap between two panes must be evacuated for reducing the thermal conductivity. Only an efficient encapsulating technique ensures durable tight joints of two panes for years. Laser glass frit sealing is an alternative joining method even though the material properties of soda lime glass like sensitivity to thermal stresses are much higher as known from engineered materials. An adapted thermal management of the process is necessary to prevent the thermal stresses within the pane to achieve crack free and tight glass frit seams.

  1. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Glass-state conversion reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Kercher, Andrew K.; Kolopus, James A.; Carroll, Kyler; ...

    2015-11-10

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses can undergo glass-state conversion (GSC) reactions to provide an alternate class of high-capacity cathode materials. GSC reactions have been demonstrated in phosphate/vanadate glasses with Ag, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni cations. These MP glasses provided high capacity and good high power performance, but suffer from moderate voltages, large voltage hysteresis, and significant capacity fade with cycling. Details of the GSC reaction have been revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of ex situ cathodes at key states of charge. Using the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), a computational thermodynamic model hasmore » been developed to predict the near-equilibrium voltages of glass-state conversion reactions in MP glasses.« less

  2. Glass Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Research efforts span three general areas of glass science: glass refining, gel-derived glasses, and nucleation and crystallization of glasses. Gas bubbles which are present in a glass product are defects which may render the glass totally useless for the end application. For example, optical glasses, laser host glasses, and a variety of other specialty glasses must be prepared virtually defect free to be employable. Since a major mechanism of bubble removal, buoyant rise, is virtually inoperative in microgravity, glass fining will be especially difficult in space. On the other hand, the suppression of buoyant rise and the ability to perform containerless melting experiments in space allows the opportunity to carry out several unique bubble experiments in space. Gas bubble dissolution studies may be performed at elevated temperatures for large bubbles with negligible bubble motion. Also, bubble nucleation studies may be performed without the disturbing feature of heterogeneous bubble nucleation at the platinum walls. Ground based research efforts are being performed in support of these potential flight experiments.

  3. The effects on tensile, shear, and adhesive mechanical properties when recycled epoxy/fiberglass is used as an alternative for glass microballoons in fiberglass foam core sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dru Matthew

    The problem of this study was to determine whether fiberglass foam core sandwiches made with recycled epoxy/fiberglass have equal or better flatwise tension, shear, and peel (adhesion) mechanical properties when compared with composite sandwiches made with industry standard glass microballoons. Recycling epoxy/fiberglass could save money by: (1) reusing cured composite materials, (2) consuming less virgin composite materials, (3) spending less on transportation and disposing of unusable composites, and (4) possibly enabling companies to sell their recycled composite powder to other manufacturers. This study used three mechanical property tests, which included: flatwise tensile test, shear test, and peel (adhesion) test. Each test used 300 samples for a combined total of 900 sandwich test samples for this study. A factorial design with three independent variables was used. The first variable, filler type, had three levels: no filler, microballoon filler, and recycled epoxy/fiberglass filler. The second variable, foam density, had four levels: 3 lb/ft³, 4 lb/ft³, 5 lb/ft³, and 6 lb/ft³. The third variable, filler percentage ratio, had eight levels: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70%. The results of this study revealed two primary conclusions. The first conclusion was that sandwich test panels produced with recycled epoxy/fiberglass powder were equal or significantly better in tensile, shear, and peel (adhesion) strength than sandwiches produced with hollow glass microballoons. The second conclusion was that sandwich test panels produced with recycled epoxy/fiberglass powder were equal or significantly lighter in weight than sandwiches produced with hollow glass microballoons.

  4. FIN219/JAR1 and cryptochrome1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenesis under blue light in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Plant development is affected by the integration of light and phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs). To address the molecular mechanisms of possible interactions between blue light and JA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used molecular and transgenic approaches to understand the regulatory relationships between FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT1 (JAR1) and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome1 (CRY1). FIN219 overexpression in the wild type resulted in a short-hypocotyl phenotype under blue light. However, FIN219 overexpression in cry1, cry2 and cry1cry2 double mutant backgrounds resulted in phenotypes similar to their respective mutant backgrounds, which suggests that FIN219 function may require blue light photoreceptors. Intriguingly, FIN219 overexpression in transgenic plants harboring ectopic expression of the C terminus of CRY1 (GUS-CCT1), which exhibits a hypersensitive short-hypocotyl phenotype in all light conditions including darkness, led to a rescued phenotype under all light conditions except red light. Further expression studies showed mutual suppression between FIN219 and CRY1 under blue light. Strikingly, FIN219 overexpression in GUS-CCT1 transgenic lines (FIN219-OE/GUS-CCT1) abolished GUS-CCT1 fusion protein under blue light, whereas GUS-CCT1 fusion protein was stable in the fin219-2 mutant background (fin219-2/GUS-CCT1). Moreover, FIN219 strongly interacted with COP1 under blue light, and methyl JA (MeJA) treatment enhanced the interaction between FIN219 and GUS-CCT1 under blue light. Furthermore, FIN219 level affected GUS-CCT1 seedling responses such as anthocyanin accumulation and bacterial resistance under various light conditions and MeJA treatment. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 and CRY1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenic development of seedlings and stress responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:29561841

  5. FIN219/JAR1 and cryptochrome1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenesis under blue light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai-Ju; Fu, Tsu-Yu; Yang, Shao-Li; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2018-03-01

    Plant development is affected by the integration of light and phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs). To address the molecular mechanisms of possible interactions between blue light and JA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used molecular and transgenic approaches to understand the regulatory relationships between FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT1 (JAR1) and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome1 (CRY1). FIN219 overexpression in the wild type resulted in a short-hypocotyl phenotype under blue light. However, FIN219 overexpression in cry1, cry2 and cry1cry2 double mutant backgrounds resulted in phenotypes similar to their respective mutant backgrounds, which suggests that FIN219 function may require blue light photoreceptors. Intriguingly, FIN219 overexpression in transgenic plants harboring ectopic expression of the C terminus of CRY1 (GUS-CCT1), which exhibits a hypersensitive short-hypocotyl phenotype in all light conditions including darkness, led to a rescued phenotype under all light conditions except red light. Further expression studies showed mutual suppression between FIN219 and CRY1 under blue light. Strikingly, FIN219 overexpression in GUS-CCT1 transgenic lines (FIN219-OE/GUS-CCT1) abolished GUS-CCT1 fusion protein under blue light, whereas GUS-CCT1 fusion protein was stable in the fin219-2 mutant background (fin219-2/GUS-CCT1). Moreover, FIN219 strongly interacted with COP1 under blue light, and methyl JA (MeJA) treatment enhanced the interaction between FIN219 and GUS-CCT1 under blue light. Furthermore, FIN219 level affected GUS-CCT1 seedling responses such as anthocyanin accumulation and bacterial resistance under various light conditions and MeJA treatment. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 and CRY1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenic development of seedlings and stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  6. Thiol-ene immobilisation of carbohydrates onto glass slides as a simple alternative to gold-thiol monolayers, amines or lipid binding.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Caroline I; Edmondson, Steve; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are a vital tool in studying infection, probing the mechanisms of bacterial, viral and toxin adhesion and the development of new treatments, by mimicking the structure of the glycocalyx. Current methods rely on the formation of monolayers of carbohydrates that have been chemically modified with a linker to enable interaction with a functionalised surface. This includes amines, biotin, lipids or thiols. Thiol-addition to gold to form self-assembled monolayers is perhaps the simplest method for immobilisation as thiolated glycans are readily accessible from reducing carbohydrates in a single step, but are limited to gold surfaces. Here we have developed a quick and versatile methodology which enables the use of thiolated carbohydrates to be immobilised as monolayers directly onto acrylate-functional glass slides via a 'thiol-ene'/Michael-type reaction. By combining the ease of thiol chemistry with glass slides, which are compatible with microarray scanners this offers a cost effective, but also useful method to assemble arrays.

  7. Extreme learning machine: a new alternative for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijian; Li, Hao; Tang, Xindong; Zhang, Xinyu; Lin, Fan; Cheng, Kewei

    2016-01-01

    Heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial indicators for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, wasting too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we previously used artificial neural networks and support vector machine to develop precise knowledge-based models for predicting the heat collection rates and heat loss coefficients of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters, setting the properties measured by "portable test instruments" as the independent variables. A robust software for determination was also developed. However, in previous results, the prediction accuracy of heat loss coefficients can still be improved compared to those of heat collection rates. Also, in practical applications, even a small reduction in root mean square errors (RMSEs) can sometimes significantly improve the evaluation and business processes. As a further study, in this short report, we show that using a novel and fast machine learning algorithm-extreme learning machine can generate better predicted results for heat loss coefficient, which reduces the average RMSEs to 0.67 in testing.

  8. Cluster-assembled metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A bottom-up approach to nanofabricate metallic glasses from metal clusters as building blocks is presented. Considering metallic glasses as a subclass of cluster-assembled materials, the relation between the two lively fields of metal clusters and metallic glasses is pointed out. Deposition of selected clusters or collections of them, generated by state-of-the-art cluster beam sources, could lead to the production of a well-defined amorphous material. In contrast to rapidly quenched glasses where only the composition of the glass can be controlled, in cluster-assembled glasses, one can precisely control the structural building blocks. Comparing properties of glasses with similar compositions but differing in building blocks and therefore different in structure will facilitate the study of structure–property correlation in metallic glasses. This bottom-up method provides a novel alternative path to the synthesis of glassy alloys and will contribute to improving fundamental understanding in the field of metallic glasses. It may even permit the production of glassy materials for alloys that cannot be quenched rapidly enough to circumvent crystallization. Additionally, gaining deeper insight into the parameters governing the structure–property relation in metallic glasses can have a great impact on understanding and design of other cluster-assembled materials. PMID:23899019

  9. GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Fibrous glass fillers Binders used in the glass plastic industry Method of manufacturing glass plastics and glass plastic articles Properties of fiberglass Primary areas for use of glass fibre reinforced plastics

  10. Some Hardware and Instrumentation Aspects of the Development of an Automation System for Jar Tests in Drinking Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Antonio José; González, Isaías

    2017-10-11

    The so-called Jar Test (JT) plays a vital role in the drinking water and wastewater treatments for establishing the dosage of flocculants and coagulant. This test is a well-proved laboratory instrumental procedure performed by trained personnel. In this work, a completely novel system for the automation and monitoring of a JT devoted to drinking water treatment is presented. It has been implemented using an industrial programmable controller and sensors and instruments specifically selected for this purpose. Once the parameters of the test have been entered, the stages that compose the JT (stirring, coagulant addition, etc.) are sequentially performed without human intervention. Moreover, all the involved measurements from sensors are collected and made accessible for continuous monitoring of the process. By means of the proposed system, the JT procedure is conducted fully automatically and can be locally and remotely monitored in real-time. Furthermore, the developed system constitutes a portable laboratory that offers advantageous features like scalability and transportability. The proposed system is described focusing on hardware and instrumentation aspects, and successful results are reported.

  11. Some Hardware and Instrumentation Aspects of the Development of an Automation System for Jar Tests in Drinking Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The so-called Jar Test (JT) plays a vital role in the drinking water and wastewater treatments for establishing the dosage of flocculants and coagulant. This test is a well-proved laboratory instrumental procedure performed by trained personnel. In this work, a completely novel system for the automation and monitoring of a JT devoted to drinking water treatment is presented. It has been implemented using an industrial programmable controller and sensors and instruments specifically selected for this purpose. Once the parameters of the test have been entered, the stages that compose the JT (stirring, coagulant addition, etc.) are sequentially performed without human intervention. Moreover, all the involved measurements from sensors are collected and made accessible for continuous monitoring of the process. By means of the proposed system, the JT procedure is conducted fully automatically and can be locally and remotely monitored in real-time. Furthermore, the developed system constitutes a portable laboratory that offers advantageous features like scalability and transportability. The proposed system is described focusing on hardware and instrumentation aspects, and successful results are reported. PMID:29019943

  12. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    PubMed

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  13. Pinhole Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole glasses really give better vision? Some ways to use this question for motivation in teaching optics have been discussed. For this column we include a series of experiments that students can complete using a model of the eye and demonstrate issues related to pinhole vision correction.

  14. Ecology in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corner, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    In a hands-on experiment to illustrate the concept of cycles in ecology, students use the Winogradsky column to explore the operation of the sulfur cycle and the interrelatedness of organisms in an environment. Lesson plans include materials needed and class procedures. (MDH)

  15. Pinhole Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut; Zollman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Eye aberrations are commonly corrected by lenses that restore vision by altering rays before they pass through the cornea. Some modern promoters claim that pinhole glasses are better than conventional lenses in correcting all kinds of refractive defects such as myopia (nearsighted), hyperopia (farsighted), astigmatisms, and presbyopia. Do pinhole…

  16. Permutation glass.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mobolaji

    2018-01-01

    The field of disordered systems in statistical physics provides many simple models in which the competing influences of thermal and nonthermal disorder lead to new phases and nontrivial thermal behavior of order parameters. In this paper, we add a model to the subject by considering a disordered system where the state space consists of various orderings of a list. As in spin glasses, the disorder of such "permutation glasses" arises from a parameter in the Hamiltonian being drawn from a distribution of possible values, thus allowing nominally "incorrect orderings" to have lower energies than "correct orderings" in the space of permutations. We analyze a Gaussian, uniform, and symmetric Bernoulli distribution of energy costs, and, by employing Jensen's inequality, derive a simple condition requiring the permutation glass to always transition to the correctly ordered state at a temperature lower than that of the nondisordered system, provided that this correctly ordered state is accessible. We in turn find that in order for the correctly ordered state to be accessible, the probability that an incorrectly ordered component is energetically favored must be less than the inverse of the number of components in the system. We show that all of these results are consistent with a replica symmetric ansatz of the system. We conclude by arguing that there is no distinct permutation glass phase for the simplest model considered here and by discussing how to extend the analysis to more complex Hamiltonians capable of novel phase behavior and replica symmetry breaking. Finally, we outline an apparent correspondence between the presented system and a discrete-energy-level fermion gas. In all, the investigation introduces a class of exactly soluble models into statistical mechanics and provides a fertile ground to investigate statistical models of disorder.

  17. Children's Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerskog, Gunnar; Soderlund, Jan

    1980-07-01

    There is a common opinion among eye specialists and opticians that children's glasses often are not shaped for optimal fitting. A fundamental reason for this is the lack of data for the shaping of the bows, with the result that most children's glasses are reduced copies of adult's glasses. This report describes a photogrammetric method for collection of primary data for manufac-turing bows for children. An ordinary amateur camera was equipped with a stereo-adapter. With a few arrangements, such as projecting a pattern on the face and keeping the hair away from the ears, 600 children were photographed. A calibration photograph was exposed at the beginning and end of each film or when the equipment had been transported or otherwise disturbed. The photographs were measured in a stereocomparator and the coordinates analytically corrected for distortion. After determination of model coordinates the requested geometric information, such as pupillar distance, eye-ear distance, location of the bridge of the nose etc, was calculated. The shapes of average noses were presented as profile plots.

  18. Formulation of portland composite cement using waste glass as a supplementary cementitious material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manullang, Ria Julyana; Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Utilization of waste glass in cement is an attractive options because of its pozzolanic behaviour and the market of glass-composite cement is potentially available. The objective of this research is to evaluate the formulation of waste glass as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) by an extreme vertices mixture experiment, in which clinker, waste glass and gypsum proportions are chosen as experimental variables. The composite cements were synthesized by mixing all of powder materials in jar mill. The compressive strength of the composite cement mortars after being cured for 28 days ranges between 229 to 268 kg/cm2. Composite cement mortars exhibit lower compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars but is still capable of meeting the SNI 15-7064-2004 standards. The highest compressive strength is obtained by shifting the cement blend composition to the direction of increasing clinker and gypsum proportions as well as reducing glass proportion. The lower compressive strength of composite cement is caused by expansion due to ettringite and ASR gel. Based on the experimental result, the composite cement containing 80% clinker, 15% glass and 5% gypsum has the highest compressive strength. As such, the preliminary technical feasibility of reuse of waste glass as SCM has been confirmed.

  19. GlassForm

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-16

    GlassForm is a software tool for generating preliminary waste glass formulas for a given waste stream. The software is useful because it reduces the number of verification melts required to develop a suitable additive composition. The software includes property models that calculate glass properties of interest from the chemical composition of the waste glass. The software includes property models for glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, and leach resistance as measured by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT).

  20. Detection of fire protection and mineral glasses in industrial recycling using Raman mapping spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasio, Martin; Arnold, Thomas; McGunnigle, Gerald; Kraft, Martin; Leitner, Raimund; Balthasar, Dirk; Rehrmann, Volker

    2011-06-01

    Recycling of glass requires the removal of specialist glasses, such as fireproof and mineral glasses, and glass ceramics, which are regarded as contaminants. The sorting must take place before melting for efficient glass recycling. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a real-time Raman mapping system for detecting and discriminating a range of industrially relevant glass contaminants in recovered glass streams. The components used are suitable for industrial conditions and the chemometric model is robust against imaging geometry and excitation intensity. The proposed approach is a novel alternative to established glass sorting sensors.

  1. Bioactive Glasses: Frontiers and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hench, Larry L.; Jones, Julian R.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass–ceramics. In the 1980s, it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass®. The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs. PMID:26649290

  2. Alternate seal configuration for lithium primary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of glass degradation in the glass-to-metal seals in lithium/sulfur dioxide cells is discussed. The glass degradation mechanism is attributed to lithium reacting with glass which is a result of deposition of lithium at the glass/metal/electrolyte interface. The worst degradation was observed when cells were stored in the inverted position. Alternate sealing methods were examined and a modified Ziegler seal is considered to be one of the best possible methods. The seal consists of a crimp type soft seal using a plastic annulus and a metal tube. Results of degradation tests are presented.

  3. Chemical Principles Revisited: The Chemistry of Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a detailed discussion on the chemistry of glass. Topics discussed include: natural glass, early history, modern glass composition, raw materials for glass melting, chemically modified glasses, modern glass forming, glass ceramics, and new developments in glass research. (BT)

  4. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    DOEpatents

    McConnell, Robert D.; Vansant, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  5. Alternative High-Performance Ceramic Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.

    This final report (M5NU-12-NY-AU # 0202-0410) summarizes the results of the project titled “Alternative High-Performance Ceramic Waste Forms,” funded in FY12 by the Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP Project # 12-3809) being led by Alfred University in collaboration with Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The overall focus of the project is to advance fundamental understanding of crystalline ceramic waste forms and to demonstrate their viability as alternative waste forms to borosilicate glasses. We processed single- and multiphase hollandite waste forms based on simulated waste streams compositions provided by SRNL based on the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI) aqueous separation process developed in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D). For multiphase simulated waste forms, oxide and carbonate precursors were mixed together via ball milling with deionized water using zirconia media in a polyethylene jar for 2 h. The slurry was dried overnight and then separated from the media. The blended powders were then subjected to melting or spark plasma sintering (SPS) processes. Microstructural evolution and phase assemblages of these samples were studied using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion analysis of x-rays (EDAX), wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS), transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM), selective area x-ray diffraction (SAXD), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). These results showed that the processing methods have significant effect on the microstructure and thus the performance of these waste forms. The Ce substitution into zirconolite and pyrochlore materials was investigated using a combination of experimental (in situ XRD and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES)) and modeling techniques to study these single phases independently. In zirconolite materials, a transition from the 2M to the 4M polymorph was observed with increasing Ce content. The resulting

  6. Biotin supply affects rates of cell proliferation, biotinylation of carboxylases and histones, and expression of the gene encoding the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter in JAr choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Sarah E R H; Griffin, Jacob B; White, Brett R; Toombs, Candice F; Camporeale, Gabriela; Said, Hamid M; Zempleni, Janos

    2004-02-01

    Placental transfer of nutrients and secretion of hormones is essential for normal fetal development. To determine whether biotin supply affects biotin homeostasis, proliferation rates, and progesterone secretion in placenta cells. JAr choriocarcinoma cells were cultured in media containing deficient (25 pmol/L), physiological (250 pmol/L), or pharmacological concentrations (10,000 pmol/L) of biotin for three weeks; markers for biotin homeostasis, proliferation, and hormone secretion were quantified. Biotin concentrations in culture media correlated negatively with expression of the biotin transporter SMVT, as judged by cellular transport rates of biotin, abundance of SMVT protein, and transcriptional activity of SMVT reporter-gene constructs. Notwithstanding this homeostatic mechanism, biotin concentrations in media correlated positively with activities of biotin-dependent propionyl-CoA carboxylase, abundance of biotinylated carboxylases, and with biotinylation of histones. Biotin deficiency was associated with decreased rates of thymidine uptake into JAr cells [pmol thymidine/( 10(6) cells x 24 h)]: 1.6 +/- 0.1 (25 pmol/L biotin) versus 2.3 +/- 0.2 (250 pmol/L biotin) versus 3.7 +/- 0.4 (10,000 pmol/L biotin), suggesting that cell proliferation depends on biotin. Secretion of progesterone was reduced in biotin-deficient cells; this effect was caused by reduced generation of new cells in deficient media rather than by an immediate effect of biotin on progesterone secretion at the singlecell-level. This study provides evidence that choriocarcinoma cells cannot maintain normal activities of biotin-dependent metabolic pathways if biotin concentrations in culture media are low. It is uncertain whether activities of biotin-dependent pathways in placenta affect fetal development in vivo.

  7. Analytical investigation of Mudéjar polychrome on the carpentry in the Casa de Pilatos palace in Seville using non-destructive XRF and complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Garrote, M A; Robador, M D; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2017-02-15

    The pigments, execution technique and repainting used on the polychrome wood ceilings and doors in the Casa de Pilatos (Seville, Spain) were studied using portable X-ray fluorescence equipment. Cross-sections of small samples were also analysed by optical microscopy, SEM with EDX analysis, micro-Raman and micro-infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These carpentry works are magnificent examples of the Mudéjar art made in Spain in the early 16th century. Portable X-ray fluorescence gave good information on the different components of the polychrome. The SEM-EDX study of the surfaces of small samples gave information on their components and also characterized the compounds that had been deposited or formed by environmental contamination or by the alteration of some pigments. The SEM-EDX study of cross-sections facilitated the characterization of all layers and pigments from the support to the most external layer. The following pigments were characterized: red (cinnabar/vermillion, lead oxide, iron oxides and orpiment/realgar), black (carbon black), white (white lead and titanium barium white), yellow-orange-red-brown (orpiment/realgar and iron oxides), green (chromium oxide), blue (indigo blue and ultramarine blue), and gilding (gold leaf on bole). False gold, bronze and brass were also found. The pigments were applied with the oil painting technique over a support layer that had been primed with animal glue. This support layer was gypsum in some cases and white lead in others. This study is essential to the polychrome conservation of the studied artwork, and it will help clarify uncertainties in the history and painting of Mudéjar art. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analytical investigation of Mudéjar polychrome on the carpentry in the Casa de Pilatos palace in Seville using non-destructive XRF and complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrote, M. A.; Robador, M. D.; Perez-Rodriguez, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    The pigments, execution technique and repainting used on the polychrome wood ceilings and doors in the Casa de Pilatos (Seville, Spain) were studied using portable X-ray fluorescence equipment. Cross-sections of small samples were also analysed by optical microscopy, SEM with EDX analysis, micro-Raman and micro-infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. These carpentry works are magnificent examples of the Mudéjar art made in Spain in the early 16th century. Portable X-ray fluorescence gave good information on the different components of the polychrome. The SEM-EDX study of the surfaces of small samples gave information on their components and also characterized the compounds that had been deposited or formed by environmental contamination or by the alteration of some pigments. The SEM-EDX study of cross-sections facilitated the characterization of all layers and pigments from the support to the most external layer. The following pigments were characterized: red (cinnabar/vermillion, lead oxide, iron oxides and orpiment/realgar), black (carbon black), white (white lead and titanium barium white), yellow-orange-red-brown (orpiment/realgar and iron oxides), green (chromium oxide), blue (indigo blue and ultramarine blue), and gilding (gold leaf on bole). False gold, bronze and brass were also found. The pigments were applied with the oil painting technique over a support layer that had been primed with animal glue. This support layer was gypsum in some cases and white lead in others. This study is essential to the polychrome conservation of the studied artwork, and it will help clarify uncertainties in the history and painting of Mudéjar art.

  9. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  10. Inverted glass harp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Daniel B.; Rosenberg, Brian J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an analytical treatment of the acoustics of liquid-filled wine glasses, or "glass harps." The solution is generalized such that under certain assumptions it reduces to previous glass harp models, but also leads to a proposed musical instrument, the "inverted glass harp," in which an empty glass is submerged in a liquid-filled basin. The versatility of the solution demonstrates that all glass harps are governed by a family of solutions to Laplace's equation around a vibrating disk. Tonal analyses of recordings for a sample glass are offered as confirmation of the scaling predictions.

  11. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  12. Picture Wall (Glass Structures)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Photo shows a subway station in Toronto, Ontario, which is entirely glass-enclosed. The all-glass structure was made possible by a unique glazing concept developed by PPG Industries, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of flat glass. In the TVS glazing system, transparent glass "fins" replace conventional vertical support members used to provide support for wind load resistance. For stiffening, silicone sealant bonds the fins to adjacent glass panels. At its glass research center near Pittsburgh, PPG Industries uses the NASTRAN computer program to analyze the stability of enclosures made entirely of glass. The company also uses NASTRAN to simulate stresses on large containers of molten glass and to analyze stress effects of solar heating on flat glass.

  13. Stretched exponential relaxation in molecular and electronic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    1996-09-01

    Stretched exponential relaxation, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img1, fits many relaxation processes in disordered and quenched electronic and molecular systems, but it is widely believed that this function has no microscopic basis, especially in the case of molecular relaxation. For electronic relaxation the appearance of the stretched exponential is often described in the context of dispersive transport, where 0034-4885/59/9/003/img2 is treated as an adjustable parameter, but in almost all cases it is generally assumed that no microscopic meaning can be assigned to 0034-4885/59/9/003/img3 even at 0034-4885/59/9/003/img4, a glass transition temperature. We show that for molecular relaxation 0034-4885/59/9/003/img5 can be understood, providing that one separates extrinsic and intrinsic effects, and that the intrinsic effects are dominated by two magic numbers, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img6 for short-range forces, and 0034-4885/59/9/003/img7 for long-range Coulomb forces, as originally observed by Kohlrausch for the decay of residual charge on a Leyden jar. Our mathematical model treats relaxation kinetics using the Lifshitz - Kac - Luttinger diffusion to traps depletion model in a configuration space of effective dimensionality, the latter being determined using axiomatic set theory and Phillips - Thorpe constraint theory. The experiments discussed include ns neutron scattering experiments, particularly those based on neutron spin echoes which measure S( Q,t) directly, and the traditional linear response measurements which span the range from 0034-4885/59/9/003/img8 to s, as collected and analysed phenomenologically by Angell, Ngai, Böhmer and others. The electronic materials discussed include a-Si:H, granular 0034-4885/59/9/003/img9, semiconductor nanocrystallites, charge density waves in 0034-4885/59/9/003/img10, spin glasses, and vortex glasses in high-temperature semiconductors. The molecular materials discussed include polymers, network glasses, electrolytes and alcohols, Van

  14. Reaction cured glass and glass coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B.; Katvala, V. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to reaction cured glass and glass coatings prepared by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, other boron silicides, boron and mixtures with a reactive glass frit composed of a porous high silica borosilicate glass and boron oxide. The glassy composites of the present invention are useful as coatings on low density fibrous porous silica insulations used as heat shields and for articles such as reaction vessels that are subjected to high temperatures with rapid heating and cooling and that require resistance to temperature and repeated thermal shock at temperatures up to about 1482C (2700PF).

  15. Analysis of form deviation in non-isothermal glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreilkamp, H.; Grunwald, T.; Dambon, O.; Klocke, F.

    2018-02-01

    Especially in the market of sensors, LED lighting and medical technologies, there is a growing demand for precise yet low-cost glass optics. This demand poses a major challenge for glass manufacturers who are confronted with the challenge arising from the trend towards ever-higher levels of precision combined with immense pressure on market prices. Since current manufacturing technologies especially grinding and polishing as well as Precision Glass Molding (PGM) are not able to achieve the desired production costs, glass manufacturers are looking for alternative technologies. Non-isothermal Glass Molding (NGM) has been shown to have a big potential for low-cost mass manufacturing of complex glass optics. However, the biggest drawback of this technology at the moment is the limited accuracy of the manufactured glass optics. This research is addressing the specific challenges of non-isothermal glass molding with respect to form deviation of molded glass optics. Based on empirical models, the influencing factors on form deviation in particular form accuracy, waviness and surface roughness will be discussed. A comparison with traditional isothermal glass molding processes (PGM) will point out the specific challenges of non-isothermal process conditions. Furthermore, the underlying physical principle leading to the formation of form deviations will be analyzed in detail with the help of numerical simulation. In this way, this research contributes to a better understanding of form deviations in non-isothermal glass molding and is an important step towards new applications demanding precise yet low-cost glass optics.

  16. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  17. Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-24

    racteristics. 7•13•14 These modifications have included the use of alternative polyacids, 7•15•16 water- activated dehydrated polyacid powders, 7•15•17...cermets, 18 metal additions, 19’ 21 smaller glass particle size, 22 antibacterial agent s, n.24 different glass compositions, 15•25 and most recently...methacrylate (HEMA) or is uniquely grafted on the polyalkenoate acid chain. These monomers polymerize either by external photo activation or by an

  18. Glass in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Neville

    2005-01-01

    Glass is reviewed from fabrication to application, laying emphasis on the wide-ranging physics involved. This begins with liquids and solids and the way in which glasses are defined and can be demonstrated in the classroom. At the atomic level the regular structure of crystals and their irregular counterparts in glasses are explained through…

  19. Alternative security

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, B.H.

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview.

  20. Oxynitride glass production procedure

    DOEpatents

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Schuetz, Stanley T.; O'Brien, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the preparation of high quality oxynitride glasses without resorting to high pressures. Nitrogen-containing compounds such as Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 are first encapsulated in a low melting temperature glass. Particles of the encapsulated nitrogen-containing compound are mixed with other oxide glass-formers and melted in an atmosphere of flowing nitrogen and in the presence of buffering gas to form the oxynitride glass. Glasses containing up to 15 at % nitrogen have been prepared by this method.

  1. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  2. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  3. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-30

    Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Acoustics of glass harmonicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    2004-05-01

    Glass musical instruments are probably as old as glassmaking. At least as early as the 17th century it was discovered that wine glasses, when rubbed with a wet finger, produced a musical tone. A collection of glasses played in this manner is called a glass harp. Another type of glass harmonica, called the armonica by its inventor Benjamin Franklin, employs glass bowls or cups turned by a horizontal axle, so the performer need only touch the rim of the bowls as they rotate to set them into vibration. We discuss the modes of vibration of both types of glass harmonica, and describe the different sounds that are emitted by rubbing, tapping, or bowing them. Rubbing with a wet finger tends to excite only the (2,0) mode and its harmonics through a ``stick-slip'' process, while tapping excites the other modes as well.

  5. Comprehensive Chemical Characterisation of Byzantine Glass Weights

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine; Meek, Andrew; Tobias, Bendeguz; Entwistle, Chris; Avisseau-Broustet, Mathilde; Da Mota, Henrique; Gratuze, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the glass trade in the first millennium CE relies on the characterisation of well-dated compositional groups and the identification of their primary production sites. 275 Byzantine glass weights from the British Museum and the Bibliothèque nationale de France dating to the sixth and seventh century were analysed by LA-ICP-MS. Multivariate statistical and graphical data analysis discriminated between six main primary glass types. Primary glass sources were differentiated based on multi-dimensional comparison of silica-derived elements (MgO, Al2O3, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ZrO2) and components associated with the alkali source (Li2O, B2O3). Along with Egyptian and Levantine origins of the glassmaking sands, variations in the natron source possibly point to the exploitation of two different natron deposits. Differences in strontium to calcium ratios revealed variations in the carbonate fractions in the sand. At least two cobalt sources were employed as colouring agents, one of which shows strong correlations with nickel, indicating a specific post-Roman cobalt source. Typological evidence identified chronological developments in the use of the different glass groups. Throughout the sixth century, Byzantine glass weights were predominately produced from two glasses that are probably of an Egyptian origin (Foy-2 and Foy-2 high Fe). Towards the second half of the sixth century a new but related plant-ash glass type emerged (Magby). Levantine I was likewise found among the late sixth- to early seventh-century samples. The use of different dies for the same batch testifies to large-scale, centralised production of the weights, while the same die used for different primary production groups demonstrates the co-existence of alternative sources of supply. Given the comprehensive design of our study, these results can be extrapolated to the wider early Byzantine glass industry and its changes at large. PMID:27959963

  6. Comprehensive Chemical Characterisation of Byzantine Glass Weights.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine; Meek, Andrew; Tobias, Bendeguz; Entwistle, Chris; Avisseau-Broustet, Mathilde; Da Mota, Henrique; Gratuze, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the glass trade in the first millennium CE relies on the characterisation of well-dated compositional groups and the identification of their primary production sites. 275 Byzantine glass weights from the British Museum and the Bibliothèque nationale de France dating to the sixth and seventh century were analysed by LA-ICP-MS. Multivariate statistical and graphical data analysis discriminated between six main primary glass types. Primary glass sources were differentiated based on multi-dimensional comparison of silica-derived elements (MgO, Al2O3, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ZrO2) and components associated with the alkali source (Li2O, B2O3). Along with Egyptian and Levantine origins of the glassmaking sands, variations in the natron source possibly point to the exploitation of two different natron deposits. Differences in strontium to calcium ratios revealed variations in the carbonate fractions in the sand. At least two cobalt sources were employed as colouring agents, one of which shows strong correlations with nickel, indicating a specific post-Roman cobalt source. Typological evidence identified chronological developments in the use of the different glass groups. Throughout the sixth century, Byzantine glass weights were predominately produced from two glasses that are probably of an Egyptian origin (Foy-2 and Foy-2 high Fe). Towards the second half of the sixth century a new but related plant-ash glass type emerged (Magby). Levantine I was likewise found among the late sixth- to early seventh-century samples. The use of different dies for the same batch testifies to large-scale, centralised production of the weights, while the same die used for different primary production groups demonstrates the co-existence of alternative sources of supply. Given the comprehensive design of our study, these results can be extrapolated to the wider early Byzantine glass industry and its changes at large.

  7. Glass and glass-ceramic photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zur, Lidia; Thi Ngoc Tran, Lam; Meneghetti, Marcello; Varas, Stefano; Armellini, Cristina; Ristic, Davor; Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Pelli, Stefano; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Boulard, Brigitte; Zonta, Daniele; Dorosz, Dominik; Lukowiak, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The development of optically confined structure is a major topic in both basic and applied physics not solely ICT oriented but also concerning lighting, laser, sensing, energy, environment, biological and medical sciences, and quantum optics. Glasses and glass-ceramics activated by rare earth ions are the bricks of such structures. Glass-ceramics are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing developing new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. The dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the fabrication protocol still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters. This paper presents some results obtained by our consortium regarding glass-based photonics systems. We will comment the energy transfer mechanism in transparent glass ceramics taking as examples the up and down conversion systems and the role of SnO2 nanocrystals as sensitizers. Coating of spherical resonators by glass ceramics, 1D-Photonic Crystals for luminescence enhancement, laser action and disordered 1-D photonic structures will be also discussed. Finally, RF-Sputtered rare earth doped P2O5- SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Er2O3 planar waveguides, will be presented.

  8. VIS-IR transmitting BGG glass windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayya, Shyam S.; Chin, Geoff D.; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.

    2003-09-01

    BaO-Ga2O3-GeO2 (BGG) glasses have the desired properties for various window applications in the 0.5-5 μm wavelength region. These glasses are low cost alternatives to the currently used window materials. Fabrication of a high optical quality 18" diameter BGG glass window has been demonstrated with a transmitted wave front error of λ/10 at 632 nm. BGG substrates have also been successfully tested for environmental weatherability (MIL-F-48616) and rain erosion durability up to 300 mph. Preliminary EMI grids have been successfully applied on BGG glasses demonstrating attenuation of 20dB in X and Ku bands. Although the mechanical properties of BGG glasses are acceptable for various window applications, it is demonstrated here that the properties can be further improved significantly by the glassceramization process. The ceramization process does not add any significant cost to the final window material. The crystallite size in the present glass-ceramic limits its transmission to the 2-5 μm region.

  9. Reversing Glass Wettability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, J. E., Jr.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment reverses wettability of glassware: Liquids that normally wet glass no longer do, and those that do not wet glass are made to do so. Useful in research on container effects in nucleation and growth of secondary phase from solution. Treatment consists of spreading 3 percent (by weight) solution of silicone oil in hexane isomers over glass, drying in air, and curing at 300 degrees C in vacuum for one hour.

  10. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  11. Nonequilibrium viscosity of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Allan, Douglas C.; Potuzak, Marcel

    2009-09-01

    Since glass is a nonequilibrium material, its properties depend on both composition and thermal history. While most prior studies have focused on equilibrium liquid viscosity, an accurate description of nonequilibrium viscosity is essential for understanding the low temperature dynamics of glass. Departure from equilibrium occurs as a glass-forming system is cooled through the glass transition range. The glass transition involves a continuous breakdown of ergodicity as the system gradually becomes trapped in a subset of the available configurational phase space. At very low temperatures a glass is perfectly nonergodic (or “isostructural”), and the viscosity is described well by an Arrhenius form. However, the behavior of viscosity during the glass transition range itself is not yet understood. In this paper, we address the problem of glass viscosity using the enthalpy landscape model of Mauro and Loucks [Phys. Rev. B 76, 174202 (2007)] for selenium, an elemental glass former. To study a wide range of thermal histories, we compute nonequilibrium viscosity with cooling rates from 10-12 to 1012K/s . Based on these detailed landscape calculations, we propose a simplified phenomenological model capturing the essential physics of glass viscosity. The phenomenological model incorporates an ergodicity parameter that accounts for the continuous breakdown of ergodicity at the glass transition. We show a direct relationship between the nonequilibrium viscosity parameters and the fragility of the supercooled liquid. The nonequilibrium viscosity model is validated against experimental measurements of Corning EAGLE XG™ glass. The measurements are performed using a specially designed beam-bending apparatus capable of accurate nonequilibrium viscosity measurements up to 1016Pas . Using a common set of parameters, the phenomenological model provides an accurate description of EAGLE XG™ viscosity over the full range of measured temperatures and fictive temperatures.

  12. Glass--Sand + Imagination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris K.

    2000-07-01

    Glass is older than recorded history, and yet it is as new as tomorrow! How, when, or where man first learned to make glass is not known, but we do know that the ancient Egyptians were making glass articles as early as 2,600 B.C.E. (The making of glass beads may have begun as much as 3000 years earlier.) They used it to make jewelry and luxury items, such as decorative bowls and perfume bottles, available only to the wealthy.

  13. Apollo 15 green glasses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, W. I.; Reid, A. M.; Warner, J. L.; Brown, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The samples analyzed include 28 spheres, portions of spheres, and angular fragments from soil 15101. Emerald green glasses from other soils are identical to those from 15101. The composition of the green glass is unlike that of any other major lunar glass group. The Fe content is comparable to that in mare basalts, but Ti is much lower. The Mg content is much higher than in most lunar materials analyzed to date, and the Cr content is also high. The low Al content is comparable to that of mare basalt glasses.

  14. Multiple Doped Erbium Glasses,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GLASS, LASERS, ERBIUM, ERBIUM COMPOUNDS, DOPING, OXIDES, OPTIMIZATION, ATOMIC ENERGY LEVELS, PHOSPHATES , YTTERBIUM COMPOUNDS, NEODYMIUM COMPOUNDS, OPTICAL PUMPING, FLUORESCENCE, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), BAND SPECTRA.

  15. Getting Started with Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The metamorphosis of glass when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with glass in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…

  16. Surface Conductive Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  17. Glass-Ampoule Breaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, R. C.; Kaushik, Surender M.; Davis, Dennis D.

    1995-01-01

    Device breaks glass ampoule in repeatable manner and retains gaseous content so pressure of gas measured accurately. In addition, protects technician from gaseous contents, which can be hazardous. Broken glass and sample materials easily removed for disposal or analysis. Apparatus developed for use in experiments on compatibility of materials.

  18. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  19. Laser cladding of bioactive glass coatings.

    PubMed

    Comesaña, R; Quintero, F; Lusquiños, F; Pascual, M J; Boutinguiza, M; Durán, A; Pou, J

    2010-03-01

    Laser cladding by powder injection has been used to produce bioactive glass coatings on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates. Bioactive glass compositions alternative to 45S5 Bioglass were demonstrated to exhibit a gradual wetting angle-temperature evolution and therefore a more homogeneous deposition of the coating over the substrate was achieved. Among the different compositions studied, the S520 bioactive glass showed smoother wetting angle-temperature behavior and was successfully used as precursor material to produce bioactive coatings. Coatings processed using a Nd:YAG laser presented calcium silicate crystallization at the surface, with a uniform composition along the coating cross-section, and no significant dilution of the titanium alloy was observed. These coatings maintain similar bioactivity to that of the precursor material as demonstrated by immersion in simulated body fluid. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Method for making glass

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-12-31

    A method for making better quality molten (borosilicate and other) glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the a ass constituents that are fed into the melterin accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter`s operating temperature until they meltmore » and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a ``non-bridging oxygen`` term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.« less

  1. Method for making glass

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    A method for making better quality molten (borosilicate and other) glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the a ass constituents that are fed into the melterin accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they meltmore » and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.« less

  2. Mixed effects modelling for glass category estimation from glass refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Lucy, David; Zadora, Grzegorz

    2011-10-10

    520 Glass fragments were taken from 105 glass items. Each item was either a container, a window, or glass from an automobile. Each of these three classes of use are defined as glass categories. Refractive indexes were measured both before, and after a programme of re-annealing. Because the refractive index of each fragment could not in itself be observed before and after re-annealing, a model based approach was used to estimate the change in refractive index for each glass category. It was found that less complex estimation methods would be equivalent to the full model, and were subsequently used. The change in refractive index was then used to calculate a measure of the evidential value for each item belonging to each glass category. The distributions of refractive index change were considered for each glass category, and it was found that, possibly due to small samples, members of the normal family would not adequately model the refractive index changes within two of the use types considered here. Two alternative approaches to modelling the change in refractive index were used, one employed more established kernel density estimates, the other a newer approach called log-concave estimation. Either method when applied to the change in refractive index was found to give good estimates of glass category, however, on all performance metrics kernel density estimates were found to be slightly better than log-concave estimates, although the estimates from log-concave estimation prossessed properties which had some qualitative appeal not encapsulated in the selected measures of performance. These results and implications of these two methods of estimating probability densities for glass refractive indexes are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Leaves Waste Composite with Glass Fiber Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoiri, N.; Jannah, W. N.; Huda, C.; Maulana, RM; Marwoto, P.; Masturi

    2018-03-01

    A research has been made to fabricate leave waste composites and Polyvinyl Acetate (PvAc) polymers reinforced with glass fibers. The method used was a simple mixing of leaves powders, PvAc, and glass fibers varied from 0 g to 1 g. Mass of 16 g leaves powder and mass of PvAc 4 g. The mixing result is suppressed by 5 metric-tons for 15 minutes. The composite is dried at room temperature for 1 day then in the oven at 100°C for 1 hour. The compressive strength is measured bu a hydraulic press. The result show that the compressive strength increased to the highest point of 0.8 g and will decrease significantly when the addition of glass fiber mass of 1 g. The highest compressive strength reaches 52.6 MPa when the glass fiber mass is 0.8 g. The result of this research showed that leaves composites with Polyvinyl Acetate polymer reinforced with fiber glass can be used as alternative material of wood substitute.

  4. Alternative strategies: a better alternative.

    PubMed

    Doody, Dennis

    2010-05-01

    Alternatives can be defined as being any financial asset other than traditional stocks and bonds. They include marketable alternatives, private capital, and equity real estate. There are two primary reasons for investing in alternatives: the potential for greater return and the opportunity to diversify a portfolio. Although alternatives were challenged in the highly volatile environment that existed in 2008 and early 2009, they generally lived up to expectations.

  5. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Roche, Michael F.

    1985-01-01

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na.sub.2 O, ZrO.sub.2, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and SiO.sub.2 in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2.times.10.sup.-3 (ohm-cm).sup.-1 at 300.degree. C. and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500.degree. C.

  6. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

    1985-01-08

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

  7. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  8. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  9. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, Sherman; Volin, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  10. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  11. Seeing Glass Contractors Clearly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deliberato, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Offers seven tips for finding and working with an effective glass contractor. For example, schools should consider the company's reputation and longevity of service, and whether it has in-house engineering capabilities. (EV)

  12. Dissolving Bubbles in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.; Oronato, P. I.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical expression used to calculate time it takes for stationary bubbles of oxygen and carbon dioxide to dissolve from glass melt. Technique based on analytical expression for bubble radius as function time, with consequences of surface tension included.

  13. Glass Stronger than Steel

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  14. Magnetostrictive Alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruder, Geoffrey A. (Inventor); Dyson, Jr., Rodger W. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    A magnetostrictive alternator configured to convert pressure waves into electrical energy is provided. It should be appreciated that the magnetostrictive alternator may be combined in some embodiments with a Stirling engine to produce electrical power. The Stirling engine creates the oscillating pressure wave and the magnetostrictive alternator converts the pressure wave into electricity. In some embodiments, the magnetostrictive alternator may include aerogel material and magnetostrictive material. The aerogel material may be configured to convert a higher amplitude pressure wave into a lower amplitude pressure wave. The magnetostrictive material may be configured to generate an oscillating magnetic field when the magnetostrictive material is compressed by the lower amplitude pressure wave.

  15. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  16. Metallic glass composition

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  17. Fluoride glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bayoumi, O.

    1983-08-09

    This invention relates to Fluoride-based glasses that exhibit a high degree of transparency throughout the near ultraviolet visible and mid infrared portions of the spectrum. The glasses are composed of MgF2 and ZnF2 as essential compositional ingredients together with at least two other metallic fluorides from the group of YbF3, ThF4, PbF2, A1F3 and MnF2.

  18. Heat Transfer Modelling of Glass Media within TPV Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Forbes, Ian; Penlington, Roger; Pearsall, Nicola

    2004-11-01

    Understanding and optimisation of heat transfer, and in particular radiative heat transfer in terms of spectral, angular and spatial radiation distributions is important to achieve high system efficiencies and high electrical power densities for thermophtovoltaics (TPV). This work reviews heat transfer models and uses the Discrete Ordinates method. Firstly one-dimensional heat transfer in fused silica (quartz glass) shields was examined for the common arrangement, radiator-air-glass-air-PV cell. It has been concluded that an alternative arrangement radiator-glass-air-PV cell with increased thickness of fused silica should have advantages in terms of improved transmission of convertible radiation and enhanced suppression of non-convertible radiation.

  19. Basic Research on Oxynitride Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    The upsurge in interest in these glasses was originally motivated by their relevance to the processing of Si 3 1 4 -based ceramics (4, 5) when it was...are suggested by results obtained so far, among them refractory glass - ceramics , leach-resistant glasses , hardened optical windows, and Joining...compositions for ceramic - ceramic seals. Oxynitride Glass Synthesis The preparation of oxynitride glasses is more complex than preparation of conventional

  20. Containerless synthesis of interesting glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    One aspect of containerless glass experimentation was thoroughly examined: glass forming ability. It is argued that although containerless processing will abet glass formation, other ground-based methods can do the job better. However, these methods have limitations, such as sample dimensions and concomitant ability to make property measurements. Most importantly, perhaps, is the observation that glass properties are a function of preparation procedure. Thus, it seems as though there still is an argument for use of containerless processing for glass forming.

  1. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg, making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this Perspective, we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition.

  2. Community Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    This resource booklet offers communities alternatives to juvenile detention and correctional facilities. The range of possibilities to be considered in lieu of incarceration is made available to planners, advocates, and decision-makers. The use of detention, correctional facilities and alternatives is a function of the social, political and…

  3. Glass microsphere lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  4. Chondrule-like objects and brown glasses in howardites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Fredriksson, Kurt; Rajan, Sundar; Noonan, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Chondrulelike objects and brown glasses were analyzed in the howardites, Bununu, Malvern, Monticello, Pavlovka, and Yamato 7308. The objects are very similar to chondrules in ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites. Like the brown glasses, the chondrulelike objects could have been produced by impact melting that left some crystalline nuclei, followed by a slower cooling rate than for the glasses. Alternatively, these objects are chondrules implanted from chondrite impactors. They are, however, without rims or any adhering matrix. The brown glasses appear to represent melting of average regolithic surface material, except for Monticello and Y7308, both of which have some siliceous glasses. The siliceous glasses could not have been produced by vapor fractionation but by melting of differentiated lithologies such as fayalitic granites. Impact mechanics indicates that howardites with abundant brown glasses came from an asteroid larger than Vesta (greater than 400 km radius), upon which impacts occurred at relative velocities of up to 5 km/s. Howardites with little or no brown glasses came from a smaller parent body. It is concluded that at least two parent bodies are likely sources for the basaltic achondrites.

  5. Connectivity of glass structure. Oxygen number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, E. F.; Min'ko, N. I.

    2018-03-01

    With reference to mathematics, crystal chemistry and chemical technology of synthesis of glass structures in the solution (sol-gel technology), the paper is devoted to the study of the degree of connectivity of a silicon-oxygen backbone (fSi) and the oxygen number (R) [1]. It reveals logical contradictions and uncertainty of mathematical expressions of parameters, since fSi is not similar to the oxygen number. The connectivity of any structure is a result of various types of bonds: ion-covalent, donor-acceptor, hydrogen bonds, etc. Besides, alongside with SiO2, many glass compositions contain other glass-forming elements due to tetrahedral sites thus formed. The connectivity function of a glassy network with any set of glass-forming elements is roughly ensured by connectivity factor Y [2], which has monovalent elements loosening a glassy network. The paper considers the existence of various structural motives in hydrogen-impermeable glasses containing B2O3, Al2O3, PbO, Na2O, K2O and rare-earth elements. Hence, it also describes gradual nucleation, change of crystal forms, and structure consolidation in the process of substance intake from a matrix solution according to sol-gel technology. The crystal form varied from two-dimensional plates to three-dimensional and dendritical ones [3]. Alternative parameters, such as the oxygen number (O) and the structure connectivity factor (Y), were suggested. Functional dependence of Y=f(O) to forecast the generated structures was obtained for two- and multicomponent glass compositions.

  6. Damage characterization of E-glass and C-glass fibre polymer composites after high velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, N.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Cardona, F.; Jawaid, M.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to identify impact damage on glass fibre reinforced polymer composite structures after high velocity impact. In this research, Type C-glass (600 g/m2) and Type E-glass (600 g/m2) were used to fabricate Glass Fibre-Reinforced Polymer composites (GFRP) plates. The panels were fabricated using a vacuum bagging and hot bounder method. Single stage gas gun (SSGG) was used to do the testing and data acquisition system was used to collect the damage data. Different types of bullets and different pressure levels were used for the experiment. The obtained results showed that the C-glass type of GFRP experienced more damage in comparison to E-glass type of materials based on the amount of energy absorbed on impact and the size of the damage area. All specimens underwent a partial fibre breakage but the laminates were not fully penetrated by the bullets. This indicated that both types of materials have high impact resistance even though the applied pressures of the gas gun were on the high range. We concluded that within the material specifications of the laminates including the type of glass fibre reinforcement and the thickness of the panels, those composite materials are safe to be applied in structural and body armour applications as an alternative to more expensive materials such as Kevlar and type S-glass fibre based panels.

  7. Alternative detox.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2012-01-01

    The concept that alternative therapies can eliminate toxins and toxicants from the body, i.e. 'alternative detox' (AD) is popular. Selected textbooks and articles on the subject of AD. The principles of AD make no sense from a scientific perspective and there is no clinical evidence to support them. The promotion of AD treatments provides income for some entrepreneurs but has the potential to cause harm to patients and consumers. In alternative medicine, simplistic but incorrect concepts such as AD abound. AREAS TIMELY FOR RESEARCH: All therapeutic claims should be scientifically tested before being advertised-and AD cannot be an exception.

  8. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  9. Glass matrix armor

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  10. Alternative Remedies

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called complementary medicine . Alternative remedies can include herbal medicines, vitamins, and folk remedies. Safety and Side Effects People often feel more comfortable taking herbal remedies, thinking that because these products are "natural," ...

  11. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    DOEpatents

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  12. New High Index Optical Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Gerald E.; Greco, Edgar J.; DeJager, Donald; Wylot, James M.

    1982-02-01

    The pioneering work of Charles W. Frederick and George W. Morey on the design by Frederick of an "ideal photographic lens" using hypothetical glasses, and the subsequent discovery and development of rare-element borate glasses by Morey, has been resumed at Eastman Kodak. New ultra-high index, low dispersion crown glasses and companion flint glasses have been developed, based on the needs dictated by lens design studies for novel fast cine' and still camera lenses. These new glasses reduce the number of elements required in a lens while maintaining or improving lens performance. Composition studies leading to these new glasses will be discussed.

  13. Glass and ceramics. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of glasses and ceramics can be produced from bulk lunar materials or from separated components. Glassy products include sintered regolith, quenched molten basalt, and transparent glass formed from fused plagioclase. No research has been carried out on lunar material or close simulants, so properties are not known in detail; however, common glass technologies such as molding and spinning seem feasible. Possible methods for producing glass and ceramic materials are discussed along with some potential uses of the resulting products.

  14. Recycled Glass and Dredged Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    stations, and is either source-separated or co-mingled with plastics, aluminum cans, ceramics , or colored glass containers. In the United States in...anything other than container glass ). The debris may contain contaminants including ceramics (from dishware, pottery, window glass , light bulbs...ERDC TN-DOER-T8 March 2007 Recycled Glass and Dredged Materials by Landris T. Lee, Jr. PURPOSE: This technical note explores the concepts

  15. Stained-Glass Pastels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    The author has always liked the look of stained-glass windows. Usually the designs are simplified and the shapes are easier for younger students to draw. This technique seemed to be the perfect place for her fifth-graders to try their hand at color mixing. The smaller spaces and simple shapes were just what she needed for this group. Her students…

  16. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  17. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... vision problems; this includes prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses, but also doing eye surgery for other eye-related problems. An optometrist ... them clean. The most important thing about contact lenses is good hygiene to prevent infections in your eye. But the really fun part of new glasses ...

  18. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    PubMed

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  19. What Glass Ceiling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  20. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  1. Glasses for Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... may play an important role in ensuring normal development of vision. The main reasons a child may need glasses are: • To provide better vision, so that a child may function better in his/her environment • To help straighten the eyes when they are ...

  2. Evaluation of Solubility and Microleakage of Glass Carbomer Sealant.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, P; Girish Babu, K L; Jayasurya, S

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate and compare solubility and microleakage of the newly introduced moisture tolerant glass carbomer sealant. For evaluation of solubility, 20 specimens of glass carbomer and conventional glass ionomer were prepared and immersed in artificial saliva of pH 4 and 6 for seven days. The difference between initial and final weight was calculated. For evaluation of microleakage, glass carbomer was compared with a conventional resin sealant. 20 premolar teeth indicated for orthodontic extraction were collected and divided into two groups and the respective sealants were applied. It was subjected to thermocycling and then kept immersed in methylene blue for 24 hours. Dye penetration was scored. The glass carbomer specimens were less soluble than the conventional glass ionomer at both pH values. There was no significant difference in the microleakage. Being moisture resistant, glass carbomer can be used as an alternative fissure sealant material; especially in young children with partially erupted teeth and where obtaining moisture control is difficult.

  3. Alternative Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    equipment when supplying jet fuel not practicable or cost effective Unclassified 5 erna ve ue s ocus Petroleum Crude Oil (declining discovery / production...on Jet A/A-1 Approved fuels, DXXXX Unclassified 6 JP-8/5 (Commercial Jet Fuel, ASTM Spec) DARPA Alternative Jet Fuels • Agricultural crop oils ...canola, jatropha, soy, palm , etc.) Alternative fuels – University of North Dakota EERC – UOP – General Electric (GE) t i o n C o s t t i o n C o s t

  4. Cosmic alternatives?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2009-04-01

    "Cosmologists are often in error but never in doubt." This pithy characterization by the Soviet physicist Lev Landau sums up the raison d'être of Facts and Speculations in Cosmology. Authors Jayant Narlikar and Geoffrey Burbidge are proponents of a "steady state" theory of cosmology, and they argue that the cosmological community has become fixated on a "Big Bang" dogma, suppressing alternative viewpoints. This book very much does what it says on the tin: it sets out what is known in cosmology, and puts forward the authors' point of view on an alternative to the Big Bang.

  5. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  6. Glass for Solid State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Glass film has low intrinsic compressive stress for isolating active layers of magnetic-bubble and other solid-state devices. Solid-state device structure incorporates low-stress glasses as barrier and spacer layers. Glass layers mechanically isolate substrate, conductor, and nickel/iron layers.

  7. Google glass based immunochromatographic diagnostic test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Steve; Caire, Romain; Cortazar, Bingen; Turan, Mehmet; Wong, Andrew; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Integration of optical imagers and sensors into recently emerging wearable computational devices allows for simpler and more intuitive methods of integrating biomedical imaging and medical diagnostics tasks into existing infrastructures. Here we demonstrate the ability of one such device, the Google Glass, to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis of immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) using a voice-commandable hands-free software-only interface, as an alternative to larger and more bulky desktop or handheld units. Using the built-in camera of Glass to image one or more RDTs (labeled with Quick Response (QR) codes), our Glass software application uploads the captured image and related information (e.g., user name, GPS, etc.) to our servers for remote analysis and storage. After digital analysis of the RDT images, the results are transmitted back to the originating Glass device, and made available through a website in geospatial and tabular representations. We tested this system on qualitative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) RDTs. For qualitative HIV tests, we demonstrate successful detection and labeling (i.e., yes/no decisions) for up to 6-fold dilution of HIV samples. For quantitative measurements, we activated and imaged PSA concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL and generated calibration curves relating the RDT line intensity values to PSA concentration. By providing automated digitization of both qualitative and quantitative test results, this wearable colorimetric diagnostic test reader platform on Google Glass can reduce operator errors caused by poor training, provide real-time spatiotemporal mapping of test results, and assist with remote monitoring of various biomedical conditions.

  8. Bioactive calcium pyrophosphate glasses and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Calcium phosphate glass-based materials in the pyrophosphate region are briefly reviewed. Calcium pyrophosphate glasses can be prepared by including a small amount of TiO(2) (glasses in simulated body fluid. By heating powder-compacts of the glasses, they are crystallized and subsequently are sintered, resulting in fabrication of high-strength glass-ceramics with machinability; they are easier to be machined using conventional tools in comparison with conventional calcium phosphate ceramics. beta-Ca(2)P(2)O(7) crystal formed in the glass-ceramics plays an important role in the machinability. Their apatite-forming ability in simulated body fluid is drastically enhanced after autoclaving in distilled water. The glass-ceramics can be easily coated on a new beta-type titanium alloy using a conventional glazing technique.

  9. U-based metallic glasses with superior glass forming ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongyang; Ke, Haibo; Huang, Huogen; Zhang, Pengguo; Pu, Zhen; Zhang, Pei; Liu, Tianwei

    2018-02-01

    By using Al as the third and B as the fourth but minor alloying elements for the U66.7Co33.3 basic metallic glass, a series of U-Co-Al(-B) alloys were designed. The quaternary U-Co-Al-B alloys exhibit significantly improved glass-forming ability (GFA) than previously reported U-based metallic glasses. Low fragility (∼24) is found for these new U-based metallic glasses. The improvement in GFA would result from denser atomic packing in the undercooled liquids due to the presence of small B atoms. Some U-Co-Al(-B) glasses showed corrosion resistance comparable to that of U64Co34Al2 glass, known for premium anti-corrosive performance among the unveiled U-based glasses.

  10. Potential utilization of glass experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreidl, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    Materials processing in space utilizing the microgravity environment is discussed; glass processing in particular is considered. Attention is given to the processing of glass shells, critical cooling rate and novel glasses, gel synthesis of glasses, immiscibility, surface tension, and glass composites. Soviet glass experiments in space are also enumerated.

  11. Alternative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Explains how advances in diesel and alternative fuels has caused schools to reconsider their use for their bus fleets. Reductions in air pollution emissions, cost-savings developments, and the economies experienced from less downtime and maintenance requirements are explored. (GR)

  12. ALTERNATIVE OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reports on the efforts of the USEPA to study chloramines, chlorine dioxide and ozone as alternative oxidants/disinfectants to chlorine for the control of disinfection by-rpdocuts (DBPs) in drinking water. It examines the control of DBPs like trihalomethanes and haloa...

  13. Alternative Conceptualizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; O'Reilly, Patricia, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains five articles devoted to the topic of "Alternative Conceptualizations" of the foundations of education. In "The Concept of Place in the New Sociology of Education," Paul Theobald examines the notion of place in educational theory and practice. Janice…

  14. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  15. Apollo 12 ropy glasses revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Basu, A.; Martinez, R. R.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-05-01

    We analyzed ropy glasses from Apollo 12 soils 12032 and 12033 by a variety of techniques including SEM/EDX, electron microprobe analysis, INAA, and Ar-39-Ar-40 age dating. The ropy glasses have potassium rare earth elements phosphorous (KREEP)-like compositions different from those of local Apollo 12 mare soils; it is likely that the ropy glasses are of exotic origin. Mixing calculations indicate that the ropy glasses formed from a liquid enriched in KREEP and that the ropy glass liquid also contained a significant amount of mare material. The presence of solar Ar and a trace of regolith-derived glass within the ropy glasses are evidence that the ropy glasses contain a small regolith component. Anorthosite and crystalline breccia (KREEP) clasts occur in some ropy glasses. We also found within these glasses clasts of felsite (fine-grained granitic fragments) very similar in texture and composition to the larger Apollo 12 felsites, which have a Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing age of 800 +/- 15 Ma. Measurements of 39-Ar-40-Ar in 12032 ropy glass indicate that it was degassed at the same time as the large felsite although the ropy glass was not completely degassed. The ropy glasses and felsites, therefore, probably came from the same source. Most early investigators suggested that the Apollo 12 ropy glasses were part of the ejecta deposited at the Apollo 12 site from the Copernicus impact. Our new data reinforce this model. If these ropy glasses are from Copernicus, they provide new clues to the nature of the target material at the Copernicus site, a part of the Moon that has not been sampled directly.

  16. Fluoride glass: Crystallization, surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    Fluoride glass was levitated acoustically in the ACES apparatus on STS-11, and the recovered sample had a different microstructure from samples cooled in a container. Further experiments on levitated samples of fluoride glass are proposed. These include nucleation, crystallization, melting observations, measurement of surface tension of molten glass, and observation of bubbles in the glass. Ground experiments are required on sample preparation, outgassing, and surface reactions. The results should help in the development and evaluation of containerless processing, especially of glass, in the development of a contaminent-free method of measuring surface tensions of melts, in extending knowledge of gas and bubble behavior in fluoride glasses, and in increasing insight into the processing and properties of fluoride glasses.

  17. Fun with singing wine glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency against water volume percent are made using a spreadsheet. Students can also play combinations of pitches with several glasses. A video (Ruiz 2018 Video: Singing glasses http://mjtruiz.com/ped/wineglasses/) is provided which includes an excerpt of a beautiful piece written for singing glasses and choir: Stars by Latvian composer Ēriks Ešenvalds.

  18. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  19. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  20. Water diffusion in silicate glasses: the effect of glass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, M.; Tachibana, S.

    2016-12-01

    Water diffusion in silicate melts (glasses) is one of the main controlling factors of magmatism in a volcanic system. Water diffusivity in silicate glasses depends on its own concentration. However, the mechanism causing those dependences has not been fully understood yet. In order to construct a general model for water diffusion in various silicate glasses, we performed water diffusion experiments in silica glass and proposed a new water diffusion model [Kuroda et al., 2015]. In the model, water diffusivity is controlled by the concentration of both main diffusion species (i.e. molecular water) and diffusion pathways, which are determined by the concentrations of hydroxyl groups and network modifier cations. The model well explains the water diffusivity in various silicate glasses from silica glass to basalt glass. However, pre-exponential factors of water diffusivity in various glasses show five orders of magnitude variations although the pre-exponential factor should ideally represent the jump frequency and the jump distance of molecular water and show a much smaller variation. Here, we attribute the large variation of pre-exponential factors to a glass structure dependence of activation energy for molecular water diffusion. It has been known that the activation energy depends on the water concentration [Nowak and Behrens, 1997]. The concentration of hydroxyls, which cut Si-O-Si network in the glass structure, increases with water concentration, resulting in lowering the activation energy for water diffusion probably due to more fragmented structure. Network modifier cations are likely to play the same role as water. With taking the effect of glass structure into account, we found that the variation of pre-exponential factors of water diffusivity in silicate glasses can be much smaller than the five orders of magnitude, implying that the diffusion of molecular water in silicate glasses is controlled by the same atomic process.

  1. Breaking the glass ceiling.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A

    1997-03-01

    The glass ceiling is a form of organizational bias and discrimination that prevents qualified professionals from achieving positions of top governance and leadership. This article examines glass ceiling barriers that keep physicians from the upper reaches of management. While these factors apply mainly to women and minority physicians in academia, and are attributable to sexual harassment and discrimination, physicians as a class are frequently denied executive management positions. Such denial results from inadequate preparation for a career in health care administration. Important issues in the professional development of physician executives include mentoring, training and education, administrative experience, and cultural and personality factors. All of those must be considered when making the transition from medicine to management.

  2. Spin Glass Patch Planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Mandra, Salvatore; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a patch planting method for creating arbitrarily large spin glass instances with known ground states. The scaling of the computational complexity of these instances with various block numbers and sizes is investigated and compared with random instances using population annealing Monte Carlo and the quantum annealing DW2X machine. The method can be useful for benchmarking tests for future generation quantum annealing machines, classical and quantum mechanical optimization algorithms.

  3. Picritic glasses from Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Weber, W.S.; Dixon, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    ESTIMATES of the MgO content of primary Hawaiian tholeiitic melts range from 8wt% to as high as 25wt% (refs 1, 2). In general, these estimates are derived from analysis of the whole-rock composition of lavas, coupled with the compositions of the most magnesian olivine phenocrysts observed. But the best estimate of magma composition comes from volcanic glass, as it represents the liquid composition at the time of quenching; minimal changes occur during the quenching process. Here we report the discovery of tholeiitic basalt glasses, recovered offshore of Kilauea volcano, that contain up to 15.0 wt% MgO. To our knowledge, these are the most magnesian glasses, and have the highest eruption temperatures (??? 1,316 ??C), yet found. The existence of these picritic (high-MgO) liquids provides constraints on the temperature structure of the upper mantle, magma transport and the material and thermal budgets of the Hawaiian volcanoes. Furthermore, picritic melts are affected little by magma-reservoir processes, and it is therefore relatively straightforward to extrapolate back to the composition of the primary melt and its volatile contents.

  4. Transferability of glass lens molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Masahide

    2006-02-01

    Sphere lenses have been used for long time. But it is well known that sphere lenses theoretically have spherical aberration, coma and so on. And, aspheric lenses attract attention recently. Plastic lenses are molded easily with injection machines, and are relatively low cost. They are suitable for mass production. On the other hand, glass lenses have several excellent features such as high refractive index, heat resistance and so on. Many aspheric glass lenses came to be used for the latest digital camera and mobile phone camera module. It is very difficult to produce aspheric glass lenses by conventional process of curve generating and polishing. For the solution of this problem, Glass Molding Machine was developed and is spreading through the market. High precision mold is necessary to mold glass lenses with Glass Molding Machine. The mold core is ground or turned by high precision NC aspheric generator. To obtain higher transferability of the mold core, the function of the molding machine and the conditions of molding are very important. But because of high molding temperature, there are factors of thermal expansion and contraction of the mold and glass material. And it is hard to avoid the factors. In this session, I introduce following items. [1] Technology of glass molding and the machine is introduced. [2] The transferability of glass molding is analyzed with some data of glass lenses molded. [3] Compensation of molding shape error is discussed with examples.

  5. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  6. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University ofmore » Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.« less

  7. Chalcogenide Glasses. Part 3. Chalcogenide Glass-Forming Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    34.L •. - . . . . . . . . ....... * .- . -.. . .. .. 8. Ti - As - S 31 9. As - Sb - S and As - Sb - Se 37 10. As - Halogen - (S, Se or Te) 40 11. As...Glass Forming Region and Tg in Ge-Sb-Se System 54[Ref. 40 ] 30 Glass Forming Region in Ge-Bi-S System [Ref.78] 55 31 Glass Forming Region in Ge-Bi-Se...poise), indicating the presence of tellurium chains. * p.° ~ -7 .. . *. 2. . * . . -~ ?’ ~ ~ - .. -~. r; - - - -•.~ ~ ~ ~ ~ * . 40 However, it rapidly

  8. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

  9. Solder glass sealing technology for use in packaging of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzmann, Gerd

    1990-08-01

    The solder glass sealing technology is an alternative to the direct sealing method of the socalled hboptocansu. Using solder glass for the junction of glass and the metal can the temperature at about 500 °C does not destroy the optical quality of the precision glass components. The glass can also be coated with an antireflective layer and even the sealing of filterglass is possible. In cases where coupling losses can't be tolerated, the fiber has to be fed directly through the wall into the housing. Fiber feedthroughs, using solder glass for the sealing of the fiber into a metal tube, are commonly metal soldered or welded into the wall and the fiber surface is directly leading to the semiconductor.

  10. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  11. Complexity of Curved Glass Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosić, T.; Svetel, I.; Cekić, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Despite the increasing number of research on the architectural structures of curvilinear forms and technological and practical improvement of the glass production observed over recent years, there is still a lack of comprehensive codes and standards, recommendations and experience data linked to real-life curved glass structures applications regarding design, manufacture, use, performance and economy. However, more and more complex buildings and structures with the large areas of glass envelope geometrically complex shape are built every year. The aim of the presented research is to collect data on the existing design philosophy on curved glass structure cases. The investigation includes a survey about how architects and engineers deal with different design aspects of curved glass structures with a special focus on the design and construction process, glass types and structural and fixing systems. The current paper gives a brief overview of the survey findings.

  12. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, Manuel Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine Wk; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-03-29

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  13. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  14. Space processing of chalcogenide glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Ali, M. I.

    1977-01-01

    The manner in which the weightless, containerless nature of in-space processing can be successfully utilized to improve the quality of infrared transmitting chalcogenide glasses is determined. The technique of space processing chalcogenide glass was developed, and the process and equipment necessary to do so was defined. Earthbound processing experiments with As2S3 and G28Sb12Se60 glasses were experimented with. Incorporated into these experiments is the use of an acoustic levitation device.

  15. Phosphate base laser glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Izumitani, T.; Tsuru, M.

    1980-12-16

    A phosphate base laser glass comprising 55-70% P2O5, 1-15% Al2O3, 0-25% Li2O, 0-25% Na2O, 0-8% K2O, the total proportion of Li2O, Na2O, and K2O being 10-25%, 0-15% BaO, 0-15% ZnO, 0-15% CaO , 0-15%, sro, 0-15% MgO, the total proportion of BaO, ZnO, CaO, SrO, and MgO being 5-15%, 0-5% Y2O3, 0-5% La2O3, 0-5% GeO2, 0-5% CeO2, 0-3% Nb2O5, 0-3% MnO2, 0-2% Ta2O5, 0-1% Sb2O3, and 0.01-5% Nd2O3, all % being mole %. The phosphate base laser glass of this invention has a high induced emission cross section, a low non-linear refractive index coefficient, and excellent acid resistance and divitrificationmore » resistance. By replacing partially or wholely one or more of LiO2, Na2O, K2O, BaO, ZnO, CaO, SrO, MgO or Al2O3 by LiF, NaF, KF , BaF2ZnF2, CaF2, SrF2, MgF2 or AlF3, respectively, the above properties of the laser glass are further improved.« less

  16. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  17. Glass corrosion in natural environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.; Barkatt, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    Experiments carried out during the progress period are summarized. Experiments carried out involving glass samples exposed to solutions of Tris have shown the appearance of 'spikes' upon monitoring glass dissolution as a function of time. The periodic 'spikes' observed in Tris-based media were interpreted in terms of cracking due to excessive stress in the surface region of the glass. Studies of the interactions of silicate glasses with metal ions in buffered media were extended to systems containing Al. Caps buffer was used to establish the pH. The procedures used are described and the results are given. Preliminary studies were initiated as to the feasibility of adding a slowly dissolving solid compound of the additive to the glass-water system to maintain a supply of dissolved additive. It appears that several magnesium compounds have a suitable combination of solubility and affinity towards silicate glass surfaces to have a pronounced retarding effect on the extraction of uranium from the glass. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that introducing a magnesium source into geologic repositories for nuclear waste glass in the form of a sparingly soluble Mg-based backfill material may cause a substantial reduction in the extent of long-term glass corrosion. The studies described also provide mechanistic understanding of the roles of various metal solutes in the leachant. Such understanding forms the basis for developing long-term predictions of nuclear waste glass durability under repository conditions. From what is known about natural highly reduced glasses such as tektites, it is clear that iron is dissolved as ferrous iron with little or no ferric iron. The reducing conditions were high enough to cause metallic iron to exsolve out of the glass in the form of submicroscopic spherules. As the nuclear waste glass is much less reduced, a study was initiated on other natural glasses in addition to the nuclear waste glass. Extensive measurements were

  18. Glass corrosion in natural environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.

    1989-01-01

    A series of studies of the effects of solutes which appear in natural aqueous environments, specifically Mg and Al, under controlled conditions, permit characterization of the retardation of silicate glass leaching in water containing such solutes. In the case of Mg the interaction with the glass appears to consist of exchange with alkali ions present in the glass to a depth of several microns. The effect of Al can be observed at much lower levels, indicating that the mechanism in the case of Al involves irreversible formation of aluminosilicate species at the glass surface.

  19. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  20. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker

    1998-01-01

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

  1. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  2. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

  3. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell wasmore » issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order

  4. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  5. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  6. Spheroidization of glass powders for glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Kumar, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercial angular glass powders were spheroidized using both the flame spraying and inductively coupled radio frequency plasma spraying techniques. Spherical powders with different particle size distributions were obtained after spheroidization. The effects of spherical glass powders on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. Results showed that the particle size distribution of the glass powders had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of GICs. Powders with a bimodal particle size distribution ensured a high packing density of glass ionomer cements, giving relatively high mechanical properties of GICs. GICs prepared by flame-spheroidized powders showed low strength values due to the loss of fine particles during flame spraying, leading to a low packing density and few metal ions reacting with polyacrylic acid to form cross-linking. GICs prepared by the nano-sized powders showed low strength because of the low bulk density of the nano-sized powders and hence low powder/liquid ratio of GICs.

  7. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass-based materials for structural and functional applications.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna; Bernardo, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass-based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass-ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica-rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron-rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass-based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste-derived glasses into glass-ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low-cost alternative for glass-ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up-to-date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste-derived, glass-based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod; Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt

    2014-02-01

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd2O3-22.7CeO2-11.7La2O3-10.9PrO2-1.3Eu2O3-1.3Gd2O3-8.1Sm2O3-4.8Y2O3 with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO2-16.0B2O3-12.6Na2O-3.8Al2O3-5.7CaO-1.7ZrO2. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La2O3 and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO5) and oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26) were found in glasses containing La2O3, while oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26 and NaNd9Si6O26) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (TL) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La2O3 were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while TL was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% addition of mixed rare earth oxides. The component coefficients TB2O3, TSiO2, TCaO, and TRE2O3 were also evaluated using a recently published study.

  9. Bioactive glass/polymer composites for bone and nerve repair and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadkhah, Ali

    Bioactive glasses have several attractive properties in hard and soft tissue repair but their brittleness limited their use, as scaffolding materials, for applications in load-bearing hard tissue repair. At the same time, because of their bioactive properties, they are being studied more often for soft tissue repair. In the present work, a new glass/polymer composite scaffold was developed for the repair of load-bearing bones with high flexural strength and without brittle behavior. The new composites have 2.5 times higher flexural strength and ˜100 times higher work of fracture (without catastrophic failure) compared to a similar bare glass scaffold. Also the use of two known bioactive glasses (13-93-B3 and 45S5) was investigated in developing glass/Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) composite films for peripheral nerve repair. It was found that a layer of globular hydroxyapatite (HA) formed on both sides of the composites. The borate glass in the composites was fully reacted in SBF and different ions were released into the solution. The addition of bioactive glass particles to the PCL lowered its elastic modulus and yield strength, but the composites remained intact after the 14 day period in SBF at 37°C. Finally, in an effort to design a better bioactive glass, new borosilicate glass compositions were developed that possess advantages of borate and silicate bioactive glasses at the same time. It was found that replacing small amounts of B2O3 with SiO2 improved glass formation, resistance to nucleation and crystallization, and increased the release rate of boron and silicon in vitro. This new borosilicate glass could be a good alternative to existing silicate and borate bioactive glasses.

  10. Development of the new generation of glass-based neutron detection materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosovitskiy, Alexey E.; Dosovitskiy, Georgy A.; Korjik, Mikhail V.

    2012-10-01

    Approach to obtaining of neutron detector material alternative to 3He containing ionization gas detectors is proposed. Recently, a severe deficit of the 3He has pushed its price up strongly, so alternative cheaper detecting materials are demanded. Possible alternatives to 3He are materials containing 10B and 6Li isotopes. These two elements form many inorganic materials, either crystalline or amorphous. Glass scintillators look very advantageous as detector materials, especially for large area detectors, as their manufacturing could be cheaper and easier-to-scale, compared to single crystals and ceramics. A poor exciton transport, which is a fundamental feature of glass scintillators, limits their light yield and, therefore, practical use. Here we discuss a possibility to improve energy transfer to luminescent centers by creation of high concentration of crystalline luminophore particles in the glass matrix. This could be achieved through the controlled crystallization of the glass. We demonstrate how this approach works in well known Li-Al-Si (LAS) glass system. Partially crystallized Ce3+-doped glass with nanocrystalline inclusions is obtained, which shows the superior scintillation properties compared to amorphous glass. The material is characterized by an emission spectrum shift towards shorter wavelengths, which provides low light self-absorption.

  11. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  12. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  13. Thermal Gradient Fining of Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W.

    1983-01-01

    Molten glass fined (cleared of bubbles) by heating with suitable temperature gradient, according to preliminary experiments. Temperature gradient produces force on gas bubbles trapped in molten glass pushing bubbles to higher temperature region where they are collected. Concept demonstrated in experiments on Earth and on rocket.

  14. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time.

  15. Space processing of chalcogenide glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Schramm, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technique of space processing for chalcogenide glass, and to define the process and equipment necessary. In the course of this program, successful long term levitation of objects in a 1-g environment was achieved. Glass beads 4 mm diameter were containerless melted and fused together.

  16. Holder for rotating glass body

    DOEpatents

    Kolleck, Floyd W.

    1978-04-04

    A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

  17. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.

    2010-09-23

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development ofmore » a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both

  18. Slow dynamics in glasses: A comparison between theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J. C.

    Minimalist theories of complex systems are broadly of two kinds: mean field and axiomatic. So far, all theories of complex properties absent from simple systems and intrinsic to glasses are axiomatic. Stretched Exponential Relaxation (SER) is the prototypical complex temporal property of glasses, discovered by Kohlrausch 150 years ago, and now observed almost universally in microscopically homogeneous, complex nonequilibrium materials, including luminescent electronic Coulomb glasses. A critical comparison of alternative axiomatic theories with both numerical simulations and experiments strongly favors channeled dynamical trap models over static percolative or energy landscape models. The topics discussed cover those reported since the author'smore » review article in 1996, with an emphasis on parallels between channel bifurcation in electronic and molecular relaxation.« less

  19. LUBRICATING AND SIZING AGENT FOR GLASS FIBER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GLASS TEXTILES, SURFACE PROPERTIES), (*LUBRICANTS, GLASS TEXTILES), FIBERS , POLYVINYL ALCOHOL, STEARATES, CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, MIXTURES, LACTATES, TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, USSR

  20. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

  1. Containerless glass fiber processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustic levitation furnace system is described that was developed for testing the feasibility of containerless fiber pulling experiments. It is possible to levitate very dense materials such as platinum at room temperature. Levitation at elevated temperatures is much more difficult. Samples of dense heavy metal fluoride glass were levitated at 300 C. It is therefore possible that containerless fiber pulling experiments could be performed. Fiber pulling from the melt at 650 C is not possible at unit gravity but could be possible at reduced gravities. The Acoustic Levitation Furnace is described, including engineering parameters and processing information. It is illustrated that a shaped reflector greatly increases the levitation force aiding the levitation of more dense materials.

  2. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  3. Cerium doped glasses: search for a new scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielty, Matthew William

    Single crystals have been the standard material when it comes to scintillators, but with the ability to easily be produced at a considerably lower cost and fabricated into tailored sizes and shapes there is increasing interest in the development of glass scintillators as an alternative. Ce-doped borosilicate and phosphate glasses were investigated focusing on the effect of different modifiers on their optical properties and luminescence. The borosilicate glasses were prepared aiming at the detection of thermal neutrons, utilizing B-10, while the phosphate glasses were targeting the detection of gamma-rays taking advantage of high Z elements such as, Ba, Bi, Ta, Pb and W. Structural characteristics determined by Raman spectroscopy were coupled with results from photoluminescence and UV-visible transmission measurements, while the index of refraction was estimated using the Gladstone-Dale relation using experimentally obtained density values. This work revealed barium, with its superior optical transmission and luminescent properties, to be the best high Z element for inclusion in the phosphate glasses studied.

  4. Ball lightning passage through a glass without breaking it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Vladimir L.; Nikitin, Anatoly I.; Ivanenko, Ilia P.; Nikitina, Tamara F.; Velichko, Alexander M.; Nosikov, Igor A.

    2016-12-01

    In long history of ball lightning (BL) theory development there is a struggle of two concepts. According to the first one, BL - is a high frequency electrical discharge, burning in the air due to action of alternating electric field or a continuous current generated by an external source of energy. According to the second one, the BL is a material body, storing energy within itself. Data banks of BL observations give evidence that BL can pass through glasses, leaving no traces on them. Supporters of the first concept consider this as the proof of the correctness of the "electric field" BL nature. Representation of BL as a material body with internal source of energy explains most of its features, but has difficulties in explanation of BL penetration through glasses. We describe results of research of the glass, through which BL freely passed, that was observed by one of the authors. They proved the presence of traces left by BL. With a help of optical and scanning microscopes and laser beam probing of the glass, that experienced action of 20 cm BL, we have found traces in it: in the glass we found a region of 1-2 mm, at the center of which a cavity of 0.24 mm diameter is located. This gives evidence to a "material" nature of BL. BL possibility to pass through small holes and its ability to "make" such holes poses a number of difficult issues to researchers indicated in the article.

  5. Degradation of partially immersed glass: A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnam, R. K.; Fossati, P. C. M.; Lee, W. E.

    2018-05-01

    The International Simple Glass (ISG) is a six-component borosilicate glass which was developed as a reference for international collaborative studies on high level nuclear waste encapsulation. Its corrosion behaviour is typically examined when it is immersed in a leaching solution, or when it is exposed to water vapour. In this study, an alternative situation is considered in which the glass is only partially immersed for 7 weeks at a temperature of 90 °C. In this case, half of the glass sample is directly in the solution itself, and the other half is in contact with a water film formed by condensation of water vapour that evaporated from the solution. This results in a different degradation behaviour compared to standard tests in which the material is fully immersed. In particular, whilst in standard tests the system reaches a steady state with a very low alteration rate thanks to the formation of a protective gel layer, in partially-immersed tests this steady state could not be reached because of the continuous alteration from the condensate water film. The constant input of ions from the emerged part of the sample caused a supersaturation of the solution, which resulted in early precipitation of secondary crystalline phases. This setup mimics storage conditions once small amounts of water have entered a glass waste form containing canister. It offers a more realistic outlook of corrosion mechanisms happening in such situations than standard fully-immersed corrosion tests.

  6. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    DOEpatents

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  7. Window Glasses: State and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, V. A.

    2018-04-01

    Analysis and generalization of the results of investigations devoted to the improvement of optical properties have been carried out, and descriptions of a structure and a reaction mechanism of available and promising window glasses with solar radiation are presented. All devices are divided into groups with static constant and dynamic regulated spectral characteristics. The group of static glasses includes heat-protective and spectrally selective glasses with low-emissivity coatings and infrared filters with dispersed plasmonic nanoparticles. Electrochromic glasses, nanostructured dynamic infrared filters, and glasses with separated regulation of the transmission of visible-light and near-infrared radiation are dynamic devices. It is noted that the use of mesoporous films made of plasmonic nanoparticles open up especially wide possibilities. Their application allows one to realize a dynamic separated regulation of the transmission of visible light and nearinfrared radiation in which, under the gradual increase in the electric potential on the glass, mechanisms of plasmon and polaron reduction of solar radiation gradually change the glass' condition from light warm to light cold and then to dark cold consecutively.

  8. SCHOTT optical glass in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Petzold, Uwe

    2017-09-01

    Optical systems in space environment have to withstand harsh radiation. Radiation in space usually comes from three main sources: the Van Allen radiation belts (mainly electrons and protons); solar proton events and solar energetic particles (heavier ions); and galactic cosmic rays (gamma- or x-rays). Other heavy environmental effects include short wavelength radiation (UV) and extreme temperatures (cold and hot). Radiation can damage optical glasses and effect their optical properties. The most common effect is solarization, the decrease in transmittance by radiation. This effect can be observed for UV radiation and for gamma or electron radiation. Optical glasses can be stabilized against many radiation effects. SCHOTT offers radiation resistant glasses that do not show solarization effects for gamma or electron radiation. A review of SCHOTT optical glasses in space missions shows, that not only radiation resistant glasses are used in the optical designs, but also standard optical glasses. This publication finishes with a selection of space missions using SCHOTT optical glass over the last decades.

  9. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Scintillating glasses for total absorption dual readout calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvicini, V.; Driutti, A.; Cauz, D.

    2012-01-01

    Scintillating glasses are a potentially cheaper alternative to crystal - based calorimetry with common problems related to light collection, detection and processing. As such, their use and development are part of more extensive R&D aimed at investigating the potential of total absorption, combined with the readout (DR) technique, for hadron calorimetry. A recent series of measurements, using cosmic and particle beams from the Fermilab test beam facility and scintillating glass with the characteristics required for application of the DR technique, serve to illustrate the problems addressed and the progress achieved by this R&D. Alternative solutions for light collection (conventional andmore » silicon photomultipliers) and signal processing are compared, the separate contributions of scintillation and Cherenkov processes to the signal are evaluated and results are compared to simulation.« less

  11. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in <1 week, without causing any detectable joint damage. The combination of dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres and EDTA chelation therapy provides an unique "tool" for the medical community, which can deliver a large dose (>100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass

  12. Method for manufacturing glass frit

    DOEpatents

    Budrick, Ronald G.; King, Frank T.; Nolen, Jr., Robert L.; Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of manufacturing a glass frit for use in the manufacture of uniform glass microspheres to serve as containers for laser fusion fuel to be exposed to laser energy which includes the formation of a glass gel which is then dried, pulverized, and very accurately sized to particles in a range of, for example, 125 to 149 micrometers. The particles contain an occluded material such as urea which expands when heated. The sized particles are washed, dried, and subjected to heat to control the moisture content prior to being introduced into a system to form microspheres.

  13. The molten glass sewing machine

    PubMed Central

    Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-01-01

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model—and a methodology—to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications’. PMID:28373379

  14. Galactic Hearts of Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger graph

    This artist's concept shows delicate greenish crystals sprinkled throughout the violent core of a pair of colliding galaxies. The white spots represent a thriving population of stars of all sizes and ages. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected more than 20 bright and dusty galactic mergers like the one depicted here, all teeming with the tiny gem-like crystals.

    When galaxies collide, they trigger the birth of large numbers of massive stars. Astronomers believe these blazing hot stars act like furnaces to produce silicate crystals in the same way that glass is made from sand. The stars probably shed the crystals as they age, and as they blow apart in supernovae explosions.

    At the same time the crystals are being churned out, they are also being destroyed. Fast-moving particles from supernova blasts easily convert silicates crystals back to their amorphous, or shapeless, form.

    How is Spitzer seeing the crystals if they are rapidly disappearing? Astronomers say that, for a short period of time at the beginning of galactic mergers, massive stars might be producing silicate crystals faster than they are eliminating them. When our own galaxy merges with the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years, a similar burst of massive stars and silicate crystals might occur.

    Crystal Storm in Distant Galaxy The graph (see inset above) of infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope tells astronomers that a distant galaxy called IRAS 08752+3915 is experiencing a storm of tiny crystals made up of silicates. The crystals are similar to the glass-like grains of sand found on Earth's many beaches.

    The data were taken by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, which splits light open to reveal its rainbow-like components. The resulting spectrum shown here reveals the signatures of both crystalline (green) and non-crystalline (brown) silicates.

    Spitzer detected the same

  15. Glass-ionomer-silver-cermet interim Class I restorations for permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P; Killian, C M

    1992-11-01

    Glass-ionomer-silver-cermet cement has proved to be a worthy alternative to silver amalgam for restoring certain Class I lesions in primary teeth. Such restorations are now known to last up to 8 years without need for repair or replacement. Cermet cement has also been used for interim restoration of permanent teeth in special cases, with ideal results. The procedure for placing a glass-ionomer-silver-cermet cement Class I restoration is described.

  16. 7 CFR 2902.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 2902.30 Section 2902.30 Agriculture... Glass cleaners. (a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in cleaning glass... qualifying biobased glass cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting...

  17. 7 CFR 2902.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 2902.30 Section 2902.30 Agriculture... Glass cleaners. (a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in cleaning glass... qualifying biobased glass cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting...

  18. Containerless Manufacture of Glass Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Contamination and crystallization reduced in proposed process. Solid optical fiber drawn from an acoustically levitated lump of molten glass. New material added in solid form, melted and then moved into main body of molten glass. Single axis acoustic levitation furnances levitate glass melts at temperature up to about 700 degrees C. Processing in unit limited to low-melting temperature glasses.

  19. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  20. Taylor impact of glass bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Natalie; Bourne, Neil; Field, John

    1997-07-01

    Brar and Bless pioneeered the use of plate impact upon bars as a technique for investigating the 1D stress loading of glass. We wish to extend this technique by applying VISAR and embedded stress gauge measurements to a symmetrical version of the test. In this configuration two rods impact one upon the other in a symmetrical version of the Taylor test geometry in which the impact is perfectly rigid in the centre of mass frame. Previous work in the laboratory has characterised the three glass types (float, borosilicate and a high density lead glass). These experiments will identify the 1D stress failure mechanisms from high-speed photography and the stress and particle velocity histories will be interpreted in the light of these results. The differences in response of the three glasses will be highlighted.

  1. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  2. Dispersion of barium gallogermanate glass.

    PubMed

    Zelmon, David E; Bayya, Shyam S; Sanghera, Jasbinder S; Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    2002-03-01

    Gallogermanate glasses are the subject of intense study as a result of their unique combination of physical and optical properties, including transmission from 0.4 to beyond 5.0 microm. These glasses can be easily made into large optics with high-index homogeneity for numerous U.S. Department of Defense and commercial visible-IR window applications such as reconnaissance, missile domes, IR countermeasures, avionics, and collision avoidance on automobiles. These applications require a knowledge of the refractive index of glass throughout the region of transmission. Consequently, we have measured the refractive index of BaO-Ga2O3-GeO2 glass from 0.4 to 5.0 microm and calculated the Sellmeier coefficients required for optical device design.

  3. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  4. Fiber glass pulling. [in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the viability of performing containerless glass fiber pulling in space. The optical transmission properties and glass-forming capabilities of the heavy metal fluorides are reviewed and the acoustic characteristics required for a molten glass levitation system are examined. The design limitations of, and necessary modifications to the acoustic levitation furnace used in the experiments are discussed in detail. Acoustic levitator force measurements were performed and a thermal map of the furnace was generated from thermocouple data. It was determined that the thermal capability of the furnace was inadequate to melt a glass sample in the center. The substitution of a 10 KW carbon monoxide laser for the original furnace heating elements resulted in improved melt heating.

  5. Luminescence of powdered uranium glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eubanks, A. G.; Mcgarrity, J. M.; Silverman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence efficiencies in powdered borosilicate glasses having different particle size and different uranium content. Excitation with 100 to 350 keV electrons and with 253.7 nm light was found to produce identical absolute radiant exitance spectra in powdered samples. The most efficient glass was one containing 29.4 wt% B2O3, 58.8 wt% SiO2, 9.8 wt% Na2O and 2.0 wt% UO2.

  6. Driving bubbles out of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Surface tension gradient in melt forces gas bubbles to surface, increasing glass strength and transparency. Conventional chemical and buoyant fining are extremely slow in viscous glasses, but tension gradient method moves 250 um bubbles as rapidly as 30 um/s. Heat required for high temperature part of melt is furnished by stationary electrical or natural-gas heater; induction and laser heating are also possible. Method has many applications in industry processes.

  7. The effect of replaced recycled glass on thermal conductivity and compression properties of cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    khalil, A. S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; AL-Hathal, A.; Jawad, M. K.; Mozahim, B. M.

    2018-05-01

    This study deal with recycling of waste colorless glass bottles which are prepared as a powder and use them as an alternative for cement to save the environment from west and reduce some of cement(ceramic) damage and interactions with conserving physical properties of block concrete. Different weight percentage (0%, 2%, 4%, 5%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25%) of recycled glass bottle were use in this research to be replaced by a certain percentages of cement. Thermal conductivity was studied for prepared samples. Results show that the thermal conductivity decrease with the increase of weight percentage of glass powder comparing with the stander sample.

  8. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  9. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility. PMID:24961911

  10. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  11. Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Elsholz, William E.

    1984-01-01

    A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

  12. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    DOEpatents

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  13. Fabrication of glass microspheres with conducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Elsholz, W.E.

    1982-09-30

    A method for making hollow glass microspheres with conducting surfaces by adding a conducting vapor to a region of the glass fabrication furnace. As droplets or particles of glass forming material pass through multiple zones of different temperature in a glass fabrication furnace, and are transformed into hollow glass microspheres, the microspheres pass through a region of conducting vapor, forming a conducting coating on the surface of the microspheres.

  14. Alternative Fuel Guidelines for Alternative Transportation Systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-31

    The Volpe Center documented the increased use of alternative fuels on vehicles owned and operated by federal land management agencies. For each alternative fuel type, the Volpe Center documented the availability of vehicles, fueling mechanisms and pr...

  15. Novel use of video glasses during binocular microscopy in the otolaryngology clinic.

    PubMed

    Fastenberg, Judd H; Fang, Christina H; Akbar, Nadeem A; Abuzeid, Waleed M; Moskowitz, Howard S

    2018-06-06

    The development of portable, high resolution video displays such as video glasses allows clinicians the opportunity to offer patients an increased ability to visualize aspects of their physical examination in an ergonomic and cost-effective manner. The objective of this pilot study is to trial the use of video glasses for patients undergoing binocular microscopy as well as to better understand some of the potential benefits of the enhanced display option. This study was comprised of a single treatment group. Patients seen in the otolaryngology clinic who required binocular microscopy for diagnosis and treatment were recruited. All patients wore video glasses during their otoscopic examination. An additional cohort of patients who required binocular microscopy were also recruited, but did not use the video glasses during their examination. Patients subsequently completed a 10-point Likert scale survey that assessed their comfort, anxiety, and satisfaction with the examination as well as their general understanding of their otologic condition. A total of 29 patients who used the video glasses were recruited, including those with normal examinations, cerumen impaction, or chronic ear disease. Based on the survey results, patients reported a high level of satisfaction and comfort during their exam with video glasses. Patients who used the video glasses did not exhibit any increased anxiety with their examination. Patients reported that video glasses improved their understanding and they expressed a desire to wear the glasses again during repeat exams. This pilot study demonstrates that video glasses may represent a viable alternative display option in the otolaryngology clinic. The results show that the use of video glasses is associated with high patient comfort and satisfaction during binocular microscopy. Further investigation is warranted to determine the potential for this display option in other facets of patient care as well as in expanding patient understanding

  16. Fast production of microfluidic devices by CO2 laser engraving of wax-coated glass slides.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Eric T; Santos, Mauro S F; Jiao, Hong; do Lago, Claudimir L; Gutz, Ivano G R; Garcia, Carlos D

    2016-07-01

    Glass is one of the most convenient materials for the development of microfluidic devices. However, most fabrication protocols require long processing times and expensive facilities. As a convenient alternative, polymeric materials have been extensively used due their lower cost and versatility. Although CO2 laser ablation has been used for fast prototyping on polymeric materials, it cannot be applied to glass devices because the local heating causes thermal stress and results in extensive cracking. A few papers have shown the ablation of channels or thin holes (used as reservoirs) on glass but the process is still far away from yielding functional glass microfluidic devices. To address these shortcomings, this communication describes a simple method to engrave glass-based capillary electrophoresis devices using standard (1 mm-thick) microscope glass slides. The process uses a sacrificial layer of wax as heat sink and enables the development of both channels (with semicircular shape) and pass-through reservoirs. Although microscope images showed some small cracks around the channels (that became irrelevant after sealing the engraved glass layer to PDMS) the proposed strategy is a leap forward in the application of the technology to glass. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the approach, the separation of dopamine, catechol and uric acid was accomplished in less than 100 s. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information availablemore » on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.« less

  18. Characteristic length of glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donth, E.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristic length of the glass transition (ξ _α ) is based on the concept of cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR's) by Adam & Gibbs (1965): ξ _α is the diameter of one CRR. In the theoretical part of the talk a formula is derived how this length can be calculated from calorimetric data of the transformation interval. The approach is based on fluctuations in natural functional subsystems. The corresponding thermodynamics is represented e.g. in a book of the author (E. Donth, Relaxation and Thermodynamics in Polymers. Glass Transition, Akademie-Verlag, Berlin 1992). A typical value for this length is 3 nanometers. In the experimental part several examples are reported to enlarge the experimental evidence for such a length: Squeezing the glass transition in the amorphous layers of partially crystallized PET (C. Schick, Rostock), glass transition of small-molecule glass formers in a series of nanoscaled pores of porous glasses (F. Kremer, Leipzig), comparison with a concentration fluctuation model in homogeneous polymer mixtures (E.W. Fischer, Mainz), and, from our laboratory, backscaling to ξ _α across the main transition from the entanglement spacing in several amorphous polymers such as PVAC, PS, NR, and some polymer networks. Rouse backscaling was possible in the α β splitting region of several poly(n alkyl methacrylates) resulting in small characteristic lengths of order 1 nanometer near the onset of α cooperativity. In a speculative outlook a dynamic density pattern is presented, having a cellular structure with higher density and lower mobility of the cell walls. It will be explained, with the aid of different thermal expansion of wall and clusters, how the clusters within the cells maintain a certain mobility far below the glass temperature.

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    AFDC » Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels

  20. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-07

    This paper describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the “ideal glass”. Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquidsmore » are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.« less

  1. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ediger, M. D.

    This paper describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the “ideal glass”. Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquidsmore » are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.« less

  2. Sealing Mustard Jars with Plastic Linerless Closures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Recommendations 15 Literature cited 16 Appendices: A . Levels of Packaging 19 B. Value Engineering Correspondence 2 3 V ILLUSTRATIVE DATA Page...Analytical Progress Total Dietary Fiber Another Look, 1984, Vol 2,■No. 1, Minneapolis, MN 16 APPENDIXES A : Levels of Packaging B: Value...Engineering Correspondence 17 APPENDIX A : Levels of Packaging 19 APPENDIX A : Levels of Packaging Excerpt from: AR 700-15/NAVSUPINST 4030.28B/AFR 71~6

  3. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Sushko, Peter V; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-09-06

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32](2+) ⋅ (e(-))2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. The concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: It invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a unique avenue in rational materials design.

  4. Study Of Phase Separation In Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.; Smith, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes an experimental study of effect of hydroxide content on phase separation in soda/silica glasses. Ordinary and gel glasses melted at 1,565 degree C, and melts stirred periodically. "Wet" glasses produced by passing bubbles of N2 saturated with water through melts; "dry" glasses prepared in similar manner, except N2 dried before passage through melts. Analyses of compositions of glasses performed by atomic-absorption and index-of-refraction measurements. Authors conclude hydroxide speeds up phase separation, regardless of method (gel or ordinary) by which glass prepared. Eventually helps material scientists to find ways to control morphology of phase separation.

  5. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Sushko, Peter V.; Tomota, Yudai; ...

    2016-08-24

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca 12Al 14O 32] 2+ ∙ (e –) 2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass-modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. Concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: it invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a new avenue in rational materials design.

  6. Arctic Glass: Innovative Consumer Technology in Support of Arctic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthkoski, T.

    2015-12-01

    The advancement of cyberinfrastructure on the North Slope of Alaska is drastically limited by location-specific conditions, including: unique geophysical features, remoteness of location, and harsh climate. The associated cost of maintaining this unique cyberinfrastructure also becomes a limiting factor. As a result, field experiments conducted in this region have historically been at a technological disadvantage. The Arctic Glass project explored a variety of scenarios where innovative consumer-grade technology was leveraged as a lightweight, rapidly deployable, sustainable, alternatives to traditional large-scale Arctic cyberinfrastructure installations. Google Glass, cloud computing services, Internet of Things (IoT) microcontrollers, miniature LIDAR, co2 sensors designed for HVAC systems, and portable network kits are several of the components field-tested at the Toolik Field Station as part of this project. Region-specific software was also developed, including a multi featured, voice controlled Google Glass application named "Arctic Glass". Additionally, real-time sensor monitoring and remote control capability was evaluated through the deployment of a small cluster of microcontroller devices. Network robustness was analyzed as the devices delivered streams of abiotic data to a web-based dashboard monitoring service in near real time. The same data was also uploaded synchronously by the devices to Amazon Web Services. A detailed overview of solutions deployed during the 2015 field season, results from experiments utilizing consumer sensors, and potential roles consumer technology could play in support of Arctic science will be discussed.

  7. Google Glass: An Evolution in Education or the Next Segway?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    When the Segway was unveiled in 2001, amid a cloud of internet buzz, it was supposed to revolutionize personal transportation. There is no denying the Segway is a remarkable piece of technological engineering but that ingenuity never transformed into sales or integration into society outside of security guards and tour guides. When Google announced Glass in 2012, to date the most high profile development from their "moonshot thinking" Project X engineering think-tank, similar life changing proclamations were made. Whether Google Glass will permeate everyday society is still unknown as the device has yet to be made available to the general public, and currently there are fewer than 10,000 pairs in circulation worldwide. However, the possibilities remain intriguing, particularly in the area of educational technology and understanding of student learning. The concept of virtual fieldtrips is well established, but the idea that Glass (using Google Hangouts) can be used to present in and connect to classrooms anywhere in the world, whilst showing views directly from a teacher's perspective is exciting. Alternatively, the idea that a teacher can follow the actions and movements of a student working on an assignment from that student's viewpoint offers huge potential for understanding cognitive learning. This presentation will pose some of the question surrounding Google Glass in education, and seek answers and opinions from others. The device itself will also be demonstrated, and the pros and cons of its design discussed.

  8. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture - pain relief; Hypnosis - pain relief; Guided imagery - pain relief ... forms of alternative medicine. Alternatives to medicines include acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, hypnosis, biofeedback, meditation, yoga, and tai- ...

  9. Space processing of chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Ali, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are discussed as good infrared transmitters, possessing the strength, corrosion resistance, and scale-up potential necessary for large 10.6-micron windows. The disadvantage of earth-produced chalcogenide glasses is shown to be an infrared absorption coefficient which is unacceptably high relative to alkali halides. This coefficient is traced to optical nonhomogeneities resulting from environmental and container contamination. Space processing is considered as a means of improving the infrared transmission quality of chalcogenides and of eliminating the following problems: optical inhomogeneities caused by thermal currents and density fluctuation in the l-g earth environment; contamination from the earth-melting crucible by oxygen and other elements deleterious to infrared transmission; and, heterogeneous nucleation at the earth-melting crucible-glass interface.

  10. Elastic Heterogeneity in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowski, W.; Iwashita, T.; Chuang, C.-P.; Almer, J.; Egami, T.

    2010-11-01

    When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook’s law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about (3)/(4) in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

  11. The valence bond glass phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarzia, M.; Biroli, G.

    2008-06-01

    We show that a new glassy phase can emerge in the presence of strong magnetic frustration and quantum fluctuations. It is a valence bond glass (VBG). We study its properties solving the Hubbard-Heisenberg model on a Bethe lattice within the large-N limit introduced by Affleck and Marston. We work out the phase diagram that contains Fermi liquid, dimer and valence bond glass phases. This new glassy phase has no electronic or spin gap (although a pseudo-gap is observed), it is characterized by long-range critical valence bond correlations and is not related to any magnetic ordering. As a consequence, it is quite different from both valence bond crystals and spin glasses.

  12. Disaster medicine through Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Carenzo, Luca; Barra, Federico Lorenzo; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Colombo, Davide; Costa, Alessandro; Della Corte, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Nontechnical skills can make a difference in the management of disasters and mass casualty incidents and any tool helping providers in action might improve their ability to respond to such events. Google Glass, released by Google as a new personal communication device, could play a role in this field. We recently tested Google Glass during a full-scale exercise to perform visually guided augmented-reality Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment triage using a custom-made application and to identify casualties and collect georeferenced notes, photos, and videos to be incorporated into the debriefing. Despite some limitations (battery life and privacy concerns), Glass is a promising technology both for telemedicine applications and augmented-reality disaster response support to increase operators' performance, helping them to make better choices on the field; to optimize timings; and finally represents an excellent option to take professional education to a higher level.

  13. Characterization and in vitro bioactivity of zinc-containing bioactive glass and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Du, Rui Lin; Chang, Jiang; Ni, Si Yu; Zhai, Wan Yin; Wang, Jun Ying

    2006-04-01

    Zinc-containing glass is prepared by the substitution of CaO in 58S bioactive glass with 0.5 and 4 wt% ZnO, and glass-ceramics are obtained by heat-treating the glass at 1,200 C. The bending strength and in vitro bioactivity of the glass and glass-ceramics are evaluated. The results indicate that Zn promotes the crystallization of SiO(2) and wollastonite in glass-ceramics, and proper crystallization can enhance the bending strength of the glass-ceramic. The in vitro results show that ZnO in glass retards the hydroxyapatite (HA) nucleation at the initial stage of simulated body fluid (SBF) soaking, but does not affect the growth of HA after long periods of soaking, and the ionic products of 58S4Z glass can stimulate the proliferation of osteoblast at certain concentrations. Osteoblasts attach well on both glass samples and glass-ceramic samples, but the high Si ion concentration released from glass samples restrains the proliferation of osteoblasts after 3 days of culture. In contrast, osteoblasts show good proliferation on glass-ceramic samples, and ZnO in glass-ceramics promotes the proliferation rate. The results in this study suggest that the glass and glass-ceramics with different ZnO content might be used as bioactive bone implant materials in different applications.

  14. Experimental studies of glass refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.; Kondos, P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic components of the experimental apparatus were selected and acquired. Techniques were developed for the fabrication of the special crucibles necessary for the experiments. Arrangements were made for the analysis of glass and gas bubble samples for composition information. Donations of major equipment were received for this project from Owens, Illinois where a similar study had been conducted a few year ago. Decisions were made regarding the actual glass composition to be used, the gas to be used in the first experiments, and the temperatures at which the experiments should be conducted. A microcomputer was acquired, and work was begun on interfacing the video analyzer to it.

  15. Glass-Derived Superconductive Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Critical superconducting-transition temperature of 107.2 K observed in specimen made by annealing glass of composition Bi1.5Pb0.5Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox for 243 h at 840 degrees C. PbO found to lower melting temperature and viscosity of glass, possibly by acting as fluxing agent. Suggested partial substitution of lead into bismuth oxide planes of crystalline phase having Tc of 110 K stabilizes this phase and facilitates formation of it.

  16. Antiferromagnetic inclusions in lunar glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Briggs, Charles; Alexander, Corrine

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 fines and two specimens of a relatively large glass spherical shell were studied as a function of temperature from room temperature to liquid helium temperatures. All but one specimen showed the presence of antiferromagnetic inclusions. Closely spaced temperature measurements of the magnetic susceptibility below 77 K on five of the specimens showed antiferromagnetic temperature transitions (Ne??el transitions). With the exception of ilmenite in one specimen, these transitions did not correspond to any transitions in known antiferromagnetic compounds. ?? 1974.

  17. Manufacturing unique glasses in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happe, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    An air suspension melting technique is described for making glasses from substances which to date have been observed only in the crystalline condition. A laminar flow vertical wind tunnel was constructed for suspending oxide melts that were melted using the energy from a carbon dioxide laser beam. By this method it is possible to melt many high-melting-point materials without interaction between the melt and crucible material. In addition, space melting permits cooling to suppress crystal growth. If a sufficient amount of under cooling is accompanied by a sufficient increase in viscosity, crystallization will be avoided entirely and glass will result.

  18. Alternate nozzle ablative materials program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    Four subscale solid rocket motor tests were conducted successfully to evaluate alternate nozzle liner, insulation, and exit cone structural overwrap components for possible application to the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle asasembly. The 10,000 lb propellant motor tests were simulated, as close as practical, the configuration and operational environment of the full scale SRM. Fifteen PAN based and three pitch based materials had no filler in the phenolic resin, four PAN based materials had carbon microballoons in the resin, and the rest of the materials had carbon powder in the resin. Three nozzle insulation materials were evaluated; an aluminum oxide silicon oxide ceramic fiber mat phenolic material with no resin filler and two E-glass fiber mat phenolic materials with no resin filler. It was concluded by MTI/WD (the fabricator and evaluator of the test nozzles) and NASA-MSFC that it was possible to design an alternate material full scale SRM nozzle assembly, which could provide an estimated 360 lb increased payload capability for Space Shuttle launches over that obtainable with the current qualified SRM design.

  19. Phosphorus solubility in basaltic glass: Limitations for phosphorus immobilization in glass and glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tarrago, M; Garcia-Valles, M; Martínez, S; Neuville, D R

    2018-05-11

    The composition of sewage sludge from urban wastewater treatment plants is simulated using P-doped basalts. Electron microscopy analyses show that the solubility of P in the basaltic melt is limited by the formation of a liquid-liquid immiscibility in the form of an aluminosilicate phase and a Ca-Mg-Fe-rich phosphate phase. The rheological behavior of these compositions is influenced by both phase separation and nanocrystallization. Upon a thermal treatment, the glasses will crystallize into a mixture of inosilicates and spinel-like phases at low P contents and into Ca-Mg-Fe phosphate at high P contents. Hardness measurements yield values between 5.41 and 7.66 GPa, inside the range of commercial glasses and glass-ceramics. Leaching affects mainly unstable Mg 2+ -PO 4 3- complexes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Large Area Sputter Coating on Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yoshihito

    Large glass has been used for commercial buildings, housings and vehicles for many years. Glass size for flat displays is getting larger and larger. The glass for the 8th generation is more than 5 m2 in area. Demand of the large glass is increasing not only in these markets but also in a solar cell market growing drastically. Therefore, large area coating is demanded to plus something else on glass more than ever. Sputtering and pyrolysis are the major coating methods on large glass today. Sputtering process is particularly popular because it can deposit a wide variety of materials in good coating uniformity on the glass. This paper describes typical industrial sputtering system and recent progress in sputtering technology. It also shows typical coated glass products in architectural, automotive and display fields and comments on their functions, film stacks and so on.

  1. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used in...

  2. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2014-03-21

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T "phase diagram" for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  3. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Janet; Starr, Francis W.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T "phase diagram" for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related

  4. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  5. Crystallization of a barium-aluminosilicate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, C. H., III; Lee, W. E.; Bansal, N. P.; Hyatt, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    The crystallization of a celsian glass composition was investigated as a possible high-temperature ceramic matrix material. Heat treatments invariably resulted in crystallization of the hexaclesian phase unless a flux, such as lithia, was added or a nucleating agent used (e.g., celsian seeds). TEM analysis revealed complex microstructures. Glasses with Mo additions contained hexacelsian, mullite, and an Mo-rich glass. Li2O additions stabilized celsian but mullite and Mo-rich glass were still present.

  6. Quantum Spin Glasses, Annealing and Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Tamura, Ryo; Tanaka, Shu

    2017-05-01

    List of tables; List of figures, Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. Quantum Spin Glass, Annealing and Computation: 2. Classical spin models from ferromagnetic spin systems to spin glasses; 3. Simulated annealing; 4. Quantum spin glass; 5. Quantum dynamics; 6. Quantum annealing; Part II. Additional Notes: 7. Notes on adiabatic quantum computers; 8. Quantum information and quenching dynamics; 9. A brief historical note on the studies of quantum glass, annealing and computation.

  7. Potentially improved glasses from space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R.

    1977-01-01

    The benefits of processing glasses in a low-gravity space environment are examined. Containerless processing, the absence of gravity driven convection, and lack of sedimentation are seen as potential advantages. Potential applications include the formation of glass-ceramics with a high content of active elements for ferromagnetic devices, the production of ultrapure chalcogenide glasses for laser windows and IR fiber optics, and improved glass products for use in optical systems and laser fusion targets.

  8. 'Nose method' of calculating critical cooling rates for glass formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Uhlmann, Donald R.; Zanotto, Edgar D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of the so-called 'nose method' for computing critical cooling rates for glass formation is examined and compared with other methods, presenting data for the glass-forming systems SiO2, GeO2, and P2O5. It is shown that, for homogeneous crystallization, the nose-method will give an overestimate of Rc, a conclusion which was drawn after assessing the enfluence of a range of values for the parameters which control crystal growth and nucleation. The paper also proposes an alternative simple procedure (termed the 'cutoff method') for computing critical cooling rates from T-T-T diagrams, which was shown in the SiO2 and GeO2 systems to be superior to the nose method.

  9. Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Baylor, Lewis C.; Whitaker, Michael J.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1997-01-01

    A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagant strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping.

  10. Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, G.G.; Livingston, R.R.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-06-10

    A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications is described. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagent strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping. 12 figs.

  11. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary means...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1320 - Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sighting ports, tubular gauge glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. 154.1320 Section 154.1320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... glasses, and flat plate type gauge glasses. (a) Cargo tanks may have sighting ports as a secondary means...

  13. Printing Silver Nanogrids on Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Wesley C.; Valcarce, Ron; Iles, Peter; Smith, James S.; Glass, Gabe; Gomez, Jesus; Johnson, Glen; Johnston, Dan; Morham, Maclaine; Befus, Elliot; Oz, Aimee; Tomaraei, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes a laboratory experiment that provides students with an opportunity to create conductive silver nanogrids using polymeric templates. A microcontact-printed polyvinylpyrrolidone grid directs the citrate-induced reduction of silver ions for the fabrication of silver nanogrids on glass substrates. In addition to…

  14. Fractography of glasses and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Frechette, V.D.; Varner, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book collects papers on fracture mechanics in vitreous and ceramic materials. Topics include: crack branching in ceramics, fractographic determination of crack-tip stress intensity, fracture mechanisms of solid-state slab lasers, beta alumina failure in sodium-sulfur batteries, and fractography of glass.

  15. An indication for "granny glasses".

    PubMed

    Brodie, S E

    1995-01-01

    A young woman with a large astigmatic refractive error obtained no visual improvement with glasses. Repeated manifest refractions revealed persistent variations in the apparent cylinder axis. A suitable choice of spectacle frames facilitated a satisfactory outcome. The pitfalls inherent in the clinical specification of cylinder axis, and the potential visual consequences, are discussed.

  16. Thermal rejuvenation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saida, Junji; Yamada, Rui; Wakeda, Masato; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2017-12-01

    Structural rejuvenation in metallic glasses by a thermal process (i.e. through recovery annealing) was investigated experimentally and theoretically for various alloy compositions. An increase in the potential energy, a decrease in the density, and a change in the local structure as well as mechanical softening were observed after thermal rejuvenation. Two parameters, one related to the annealing temperature, Ta/Tg, and the other related to the cooling rate during the recovery annealing process, Vc/Vi, were proposed to evaluate the rejuvenation phenomena. A rejuvenation map was constructed using these two parameters. Since the thermal history of metallic glasses is reset above 1.2Tg, accompanied by a change in the local structure, it is essential that the condition of Ta/Tg ≥ 1.2 is satisfied during annealing. The glassy structure transforms into a more disordered state with the decomposition of icosahedral short-range order within this temperature range. Therefore, a new glassy structure (rejuvenation) depending on the subsequent quenching rate is generated. Partial rejuvenation also occurs in a Zr55Al10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass when annealing is performed at a low temperature (Ta/Tg 1.07) followed by rapid cooling. This behavior probably originates from disordering in the weakly bonded (loosely packed) region. This study provides a novel approach to improving the mechanical properties of metallic glasses by controlling their glassy structure.

  17. Digimarc Discover on Google Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Eliot; Rodriguez, Tony; Lord, John; Alattar, Adnan

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of the Digimarc® Discover platform on Google Glass, enabling the reading of a watermark embedded in a printed material or audio. The embedded watermark typically contains a unique code that identifies the containing media or object and a synchronization signal that allows the watermark to be read robustly. The Digimarc Discover smartphone application can read the watermark from a small portion of printed image presented at any orientation or reasonable distance. Likewise, Discover can read the recently introduced Digimarc Barcode to identify and manage consumer packaged goods in the retail channel. The Digimarc Barcode has several advantages over the traditional barcode and is expected to save the retail industry millions of dollars when deployed at scale. Discover can also read an audio watermark from ambient audio captured using a microphone. The Digimarc Discover platform has been widely deployed on the iPad, iPhone and many Android-based devices, but it has not yet been implemented on a head-worn wearable device, such as Google Glass. Implementing Discover on Google Glass is a challenging task due to the current hardware and software limitations of the device. This paper identifies the challenges encountered in porting Discover to the Google Glass and reports on the solutions created to deliver a prototype implementation.

  18. Hollow glass for insulating layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merticaru, Andreea R.; Moagar-Poladian, Gabriel

    1999-03-01

    Common porous materials, some of which will be considered in the chapters of this book, include concrete, paper, ceramics, clays, porous semiconductors, chromotography materials, and natural materials like coral, bone, sponges, rocks and shells. Porous materials can also be reactive, such as in charcoal gasification, acid rock dissolution, catalyst deactivation and concrete. This study continues the investigations about the properties of, so-called, hollow glass. In this paper is presented a computer simulation approach in which the thermo-mechanical behavior of a 3D microstructure is directly computed. In this paper a computer modeling approach of porous glass is presented. One way to test the accuracy of the reconstructed microstructures is to computed their physical properties and compare to experimental measurement on equivalent systems. In this view, we imagine a new type of porous type of glass designed as buffer layer in multilayered printed boards in ICs. Our glass is a variable material with a variable pore size and surface area. The porosity could be tailored early from the deposition phases that permitting us to keep in a reasonable balance the dielectric constant and thermal conductivity.

  19. Comparative evaluation between glass and polyethylene fiber reinforced composites: A review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Mangoush, Enas; Säilynoja, Eija; Prinssi, Roosa; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) is a promising class of material that gives clinicians alternative treatment options. There are many FRC products available in the market based on either glass or polyethylene fiber type. The aim of this study was to present a comparison between glass and polyethylene fiber reinforced composites based on available literature review. Material and Methods A thorough literature search, with no limitation, was done up to June 2017. The range of relevant publications was surveyed using PubMed and Google Scholar. From the search results, articles related to our search terms were only considered. An assessment of these articles was done by two individuals in order to include only articles directly compare between glass and polyethylene FRCs. The search terms used were “fiber reinforced dental composites” and “glass and polyethylene fibers in dentistry”. Results The search provided 276 titles. Full-text analysis was performed for 29 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Most were laboratory-based research with various test specimen designs prepared according to ISO standard or with extracted teeth and only three articles were clinical studies. Most of studies (n=23) found superior characteristics of glass FRCs over polyethylene FRCs. Conclusions Significant reinforcement differences between commercial glass and polyethylene fiber reinforced composites were found. Key words:Fiber reinforced composite, glass fiber, polyethylene fiber. PMID:29410756

  20. Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slowmore » sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.« less

  1. Waste glass as eco-friendly replacement material in construction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gayatri; Sharma, Anu

    2018-05-01

    Atpresent time the biggest issue is increasing urban population, industrialization and development all over the world. The quantity of the raw materials of construction products like cement, concrete etc is gradually depleting. This is important because if we don't find the alternative material to accomplish need of this industry, with every year it will put pressure on natural resources which are limited in quantity. This major issue can be solved by partial replacing with waste glass of different construction products. This paper gives an overview of the current growth and recycling situation of waste glass and point out the direction for the proper use of waste glass as replacement of construction material. These will not only help in the reuse of waste glass but also create eco-friendly environment.

  2. Grinding Glass Disks On A Belt Sander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, James J., III

    1995-01-01

    Small machine attached to table-top belt sander makes possible to use belt sander to grind glass disk quickly to specified diameter within tolerance of about plus or minus 0.002 in. Intended to be used in place of production-shop glass grinder. Held on driveshaft by vacuum, glass disk rotated while periphery ground by continuous sanding belt.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Stable Glasses Using Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Sarah; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Yijie; Ablajan, Keyume; Zhang, Yue; Walsh, Patrick; Turner, Kevin; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Glasses with enhanced stability over ordinary, liquid quenched glasses have been formed via the process of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) by using a sufficiently slow deposition rate and a substrate temperature slightly below the glass transition temperature. These stable glasses have been shown to exhibit higher density, lower enthalpy, and better kinetic stability over ordinary glass, and are typically optically birefringent, due to packing and orientational anisotropy. Given these exceptional properties, it is of interest to further investigate how the properties of stable glasses compare to those of ordinary glass. In particular, the mechanical properties of stable glasses remain relatively under-investigated. While the speed of sound and elastic moduli have been shown to increase with increased stability, little is known about their hardness and fracture toughness compared to ordinary glasses. In this study, glasses of 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene were deposited at varying temperatures relative to their glass transition temperature, and their mechanical properties measured by nanoindentation. Hardness and elastic modulus of the glasses were compared across substrate temperatures. After indentation, the topography of these films were studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to further compare the relationship between thermodynamic and kinetic stability and mechanical failure. Z.F. and P.W. acknowledge funding from NSF(DMREF-1628407).

  4. Laser cutting of sodium silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanov, V. V.; Kazarian, M. A.; Kustov, M. E.; Mashir, Yu. I.; Murav'ev, E. N.; Revenko, V. I.; Solinov, E. F.

    2018-04-01

    The problems of through laser cutting of sodium silicate glasses by laser-controlled thermal cleavage are considered. A wide variety of obtained end face shapes is demonstrated. It is shown that the strength of glass samples cut by the laser is about two times higher than that of samples cut by a glass cutter.

  5. Jagged Edges of the Glass Ceiling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Victoria L.

    2004-01-01

    Although many aspiring young women might believe the glass ceiling was shattered a decade ago, they still need to understand how that glass ceiling impacted an older generation of women in educational leadership. They also must be aware that some segments of the glass ceiling might still exist. This article provides a historical overview of the…

  6. Method for milling and drilling glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, S. H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A process for machining glass by placing a rotating carbide working surface under minimum pressure against an area of glass to be worked is described. Concurrently the region between the working surface and the area of glass is wet with a lubricant consisting essentially of a petroleum carrier, a complex mixture of esters and a complex mixture of naturally occurring aromatic oils.

  7. Nickel-iron spherules from aouelloul glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Dwornik, E.J.; Merrill, C.W.

    1966-01-01

    Nickel-iron spherules, ranging from less than 0.2 to 50 microns in diameter and containing 1.7 to 9.0 percent Ni by weight, occur in glass associated with the Aouelloul crater. They occur in discrete bands of siliceous glass enriched in dissolved iron. Their discovery is significant tangible evidence that both crater and glass originated from terrestrial impact.

  8. Glass transition temperature and topological constraints of sodium borophosphate glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi; Zeng, Huidan; Liu, Zhao; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi; Zhao, Donghui

    2013-09-28

    Sodium borophosphate glasses exhibit intriguing mixed network former effect, with the nonlinear compositional dependence of their glass transition temperature as one of the most typical examples. In this paper, we establish the widely applicable topological constraint model of sodium borophosphate mixed network former glasses to explain the relationship between the internal structure and nonlinear changes of glass transition temperature. The application of glass topology network was discussed in detail in terms of the unified methodology for the quantitative distribution of each coordinated boron and phosphorus units and glass transition temperature dependence of atomic constraints. An accurate prediction of composition scaling of the glass transition temperature was obtained based on topological constraint model.

  9. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  10. Ancient Glass: A Literature Search and its Role in Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-07-01

    When developing a performance assessment model for the long-term disposal of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, it is desirable to determine the durability of glass forms over very long periods of time. However, testing is limited to short time spans, so experiments are performed under conditions that accelerate the key geochemical processes that control weathering. Verification that models currently being used can reliably calculate the long term behavior ILAW glass is a key component of the overall PA strategy. Therefore, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to evaluate alternative strategies that can be usedmore » for PA source term model validation. One viable alternative strategy is the use of independent experimental data from archaeological studies of ancient or natural glass contained in the literature. These results represent a potential independent experiment that date back to approximately 3600 years ago or 1600 before the current era (bce) in the case of ancient glass and 106 years or older in the case of natural glass. The results of this literature review suggest that additional experimental data may be needed before the result from archaeological studies can be used as a tool for model validation of glass weathering and more specifically disposal facility performance. This is largely because none of the existing data set contains all of the information required to conduct PA source term calculations. For example, in many cases the sediments surrounding the glass was not collected and analyzed; therefore having the data required to compare computer simulations of concentration flux is not possible. This type of information is important to understanding the element release profile from the glass to the surrounding environment and provides a metric that can be used to calibrate source term models. Although useful, the available literature sources do not contain the required

  11. Carbonate formation on bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Cerruti, Marta; Morterra, Claudio

    2004-07-20

    The system termed 58S is a sol-gel-synthesized bioactive glass composed of SiO2, CaO, and P2O5, used in medicine as bone prosthetic because, when immersed in a physiological fluid, a layer of hydroxycarbonate apatite is formed on its surface. The mechanism of bioactive glass 58S carbonation was studied in the vacuum by means of in-situ FTIR spectroscopy with the use of CO2, H2O, and CD3CN as probe molecules. The study in the vacuum was necessary to identify both the molecules specifically involved in the carbonation process and the type of carbonates formed. Bioactive glass 58S was compared to a Ca-doped silica and to CaO. On CaO, ionic carbonates could form by contact with CO2 alone, whereas on 58S and on Ca-doped silica carbonation occurred only if both CO2 and an excess of H2O were present on the sample. The function of H2O was not only to block surface cationic sites, so that CO2 could not manifest its Lewis base behavior, but also to form a liquid-like (mono)layer that allowed the formation of carbonate ions. The presence of H2O is also supposed to promote Ca2+ migration from the bulk to the surface. Carbonates formed at the surface of CaO and of Ca-bearing silicas (thus including bioactive glasses) are of the same type, but are produced through two different mechanisms. The finding that a water excess is necessary to start heavy carbonation on bioactive glasses seemed to imply that the mechanism leading to in-situ carbonation simulates, in a simplified and easy-to-reproduce system, what happens both in solution, when carbonates are incorporated in the apatite layer, and during sample shelf-aging. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  12. Analysis of early medieval glass beads - Glass in the transition period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmit, Žiga; Knific, Timotej; Jezeršek, David; Istenič, Janka

    2012-05-01

    Glass beads from graves excavated in Slovenia and dated archaeologically to the 7th-10th century AD were analysed by the combined PIXE-PIGE method. The results indicate two groups of glass; natron glass made in the Roman tradition and glass made with alkalis from the ash of halophytic plants, which gradually replaced natron glass after c. 800 AD. The alkalis used in the second group of glass seem to be in close relation to a variant of the Venetian white glass that appeared several centuries later. The origin of this glass may be traced to glass production in Mesopotamia and around the Aral Sea. All the mosaic beads with eye decoration, as well as most of the drawn-segmented and drawn-cut beads analysed, are of plant-ash glass, which confirms their supposed oriental origin.

  13. Candidate Low-Temperature Glass Waste Forms for Technetium-99 Recovered from Hanford Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mei; Tang, Ming; Rim, Jung Ho

    Alternative treatment and disposition options may exist for technetium-99 (99Tc) in secondary liquid waste from the Hanford Direct-Feed Low-Activity Waste (DFLAW) process. One approach includes development of an alternate glass waste form that is suitable for on-site disposition of technetium, including salts and other species recovered by ion exchange or precipitation from the EMF evaporator concentrate. By recovering the Tc content from the stream, and not recycling the treated concentrate, the DFLAW process can potentially be operated in a more efficient manner that lowers the cost to the Department of Energy. This report provides a survey of candidate glass formulationsmore » and glass-making processes that can potentially incorporate technetium at temperatures <700 °C to avoid volatilization. Three candidate technetium feed streams are considered: (1) dilute sodium pertechnetate loaded on a non-elutable ion exchange resin; (2) dilute sodium-bearing aqueous eluent from ion exchange recovery of pertechnetate, or (3) technetium(IV) oxide precipitate containing Sn and Cr solids in an aqueous slurry. From the technical literature, promising candidate glasses are identified based on their processing temperatures and chemical durability data. The suitability and technical risk of three low-temperature glass processing routes (vitrification, encapsulation by sintering into a glass composite material, and sol-gel chemical condensation) for the three waste streams was assessed, based on available low-temperature glass data. For a subset of candidate glasses, their long-term thermodynamic behavior with exposure to water and oxygen was modeled using Geochemist’s Workbench, with and without addition of reducing stannous ion. For further evaluation and development, encapsulation of precipitated TcO2/Sn/Cr in a glass composite material based on lead-free sealing glasses is recommended as a high priority. Vitrification of pertechnetate in aqueous anion exchange eluent

  14. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–22.7CeO{sub 2}–11.7La{submore » 2}O{sub 3}–10.9PrO{sub 2}–1.3Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1.3Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–8.1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–4.8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO{sub 2}–16.0B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–12.6Na{sub 2}O–3.8Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–5.7CaO–1.7ZrO{sub 2}. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO{sub 5}) and oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) were found in glasses containing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} and NaNd{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while T{sub L} was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for

  15. Photon Interaction Parameters for Some Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Nisha; Kaur, Updesh; Singh, Tejbir

    2010-11-06

    Some photon interaction parameters of dosimetric interest such as mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, electron density and KERMA relative to air have been computed in the wide energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV for some borate glasses viz. barium-lead borate, bismuth-borate, calcium-strontium borate, lead borate and zinc-borate glass. It has been observed that lead borate glass and barium-lead borate glass have maximum values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and KERMA relative to air. Hence, these borate glasses are suitable as gamma ray shielding material, packing of radioactive sources etc.

  16. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    SciTech Connect

    Koperwas, K., E-mail: kkoperwas@us.edu.pl; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.

    2015-07-14

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since thismore » relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition.« less

  17. Evaluation of Behaviours of Laminated Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, L.; Japins, G.; Kalnins, K.

    2015-11-01

    Visual appearance of building facades and other load bearing structures, which now are part of modern architecture, is the reason why it is important to investigate in more detail the reliability of laminated glass for civil structures. Laminated glass in particular has become one of the trendy materials, for example Apple© stores have both load carrying capacity and transparent appearance. Glass has high mechanical strength and relatively medium density, however, the risk of sudden brittle failure like concrete or other ceramics determine relatively high conservatism in design practice of glass structures. This should be changed as consumer requirements evolve calling for a safe and reliable design methodology and corresponding building standards. A design methodology for glass and glass laminates should be urgently developed and included as a chapter in Eurocode. This paper presents initial experimental investigation of behaviour of simple glass sheets and laminated glass samples in 4-point bending test. The aim of the current research is to investigate laminated glass characteristic values and to verify the obtained experimental results with finite element method for glass and EVA material in line with future European Structural Design of Glass Components code.

  18. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  19. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  20. Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Guerrero, Hector [Evans, GA; Bickford, Dennis [Folly Beach, SC

    2007-06-05

    A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

  1. Electrophoretic Deposition of Chitosan/45S5 Bioactive Glass Composite Coatings Doped with Zn and Sr

    PubMed Central

    Miola, Marta; Verné, Enrica; Ciraldo, Francesca Elisa; Cordero-Arias, Luis; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    In this research work, the original 45S5 bioactive glass was modified by introducing zinc and/or strontium oxide (6 mol%) in place of calcium oxide. Sr was added for its ability to stimulate bone formation and Zn for its role in bone metabolism, antibacterial properties, and anti-inflammatory effect. The glasses were produced by means of melting and quenching process. SEM and XRD analyses evidenced that Zr and Sr introduction did not modify the glass structure and morphology while compositional analysis (EDS) demonstrated the effective incorporation of these elements in the glass network. Bioactivity test in simulated body fluid (SBF) up to 1 month evidenced a reduced bioactivity kinetics for Zn-doped glasses. Doped glasses were combined with chitosan to produce organic/inorganic composite coatings on stainless steel AISI 316L by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Two EPD processes were considered for coating development, namely direct current EPD (DC-EPD) and alternating current EPD (AC-EPD). The stability of the suspension was analyzed and the deposition parameters were optimized. Tape and bending tests demonstrated a good coating-substrate adhesion for coatings containing 45S5-Sr and 45S5-ZnSr glasses, whereas the adhesion to the substrate decreased by using 45S5-Zn glass. FTIR analyses demonstrated the composite nature of coatings and SEM observations indicated that glass particles were well integrated in the polymeric matrix, the coatings were fairly homogeneous and free of cracks; moreover, the AC-EPD technique provided better results than DC-EPD in terms of coating quality. SEM, XRD analyses, and Raman spectroscopy, performed after bioactivity test in SBF solution, confirmed the bioactive behavior of 45S5-Sr-containing coating while coatings containing Zn exhibited no hydroxyapatite formation. PMID:26539431

  2. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    PubMed

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  3. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  4. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Bioactive glass particles (left) with a microporous surface (right) are widely accepted as a synthetic material for periodontal procedures. Using the particles to grow three-dimensional tissue cultures may one day result in developing an improved, more rugged bone tissue that may be used to correct skeletal disorders and bone defects. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research.

  5. A damage-tolerant glass.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, Marios D; Launey, Maximilien E; Garrett, Glenn; Schramm, Joseph P; Hofmann, Douglas C; Johnson, William L; Ritchie, Robert O

    2011-02-01

    Owing to a lack of microstructure, glassy materials are inherently strong but brittle, and often demonstrate extreme sensitivity to flaws. Accordingly, their macroscopic failure is often not initiated by plastic yielding, and almost always terminated by brittle fracture. Unlike conventional brittle glasses, metallic glasses are generally capable of limited plastic yielding by shear-band sliding in the presence of a flaw, and thus exhibit toughness-strength relationships that lie between those of brittle ceramics and marginally tough metals. Here, a bulk glassy palladium alloy is introduced, demonstrating an unusual capacity for shielding an opening crack accommodated by an extensive shear-band sliding process, which promotes a fracture toughness comparable to those of the toughest materials known. This result demonstrates that the combination of toughness and strength (that is, damage tolerance) accessible to amorphous materials extends beyond the benchmark ranges established by the toughest and strongest materials known, thereby pushing the envelope of damage tolerance accessible to a structural metal.

  6. Magnetic antenna using metallic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, Michael D. (Inventor); Farrell, William M. (Inventor); Houser, Jeffrey G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A lightweight search-coil antenna or sensor assembly for detecting magnetic fields and including a multi-turn electromagnetic induction coil wound on a spool type coil form through which is inserted an elongated coil loading member comprised of metallic glass material wrapped around a dielectric rod. The dielectric rod consists of a plastic or a wooden dowel having a length which is relatively larger than its thickness so as to provide a large length-to-diameter ratio. A tri-axial configuration includes a housing in which is located three substantially identical mutually orthogonal electromagnetic induction coil assemblies of the type described above wherein each of the assemblies include an electromagnetic coil wound on a dielectric spool with an elongated metallic glass coil loading member projecting therethrough.

  7. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    1993-01-01

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

  8. Lid heater for glass melter

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, T.D.

    1993-12-14

    A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

  9. Controlling Mackey-Glass chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gábor; Röst, Gergely

    2017-11-01

    The Mackey-Glass equation is the representative example of delay induced chaotic behavior. Here, we propose various control mechanisms so that otherwise erratic solutions are forced to converge to the positive equilibrium or to a periodic orbit oscillating around that equilibrium. We take advantage of some recent results of the delay differential literature, when a sufficiently large domain of the phase space has been shown to be attractive and invariant, where the system is governed by monotone delayed feedback and chaos is not possible due to some Poincaré-Bendixson type results. We systematically investigate what control mechanisms are suitable to drive the system into such a situation and prove that constant perturbation, proportional feedback control, Pyragas control, and state dependent delay control can all be efficient to control Mackey-Glass chaos with properly chosen control parameters.

  10. Mercury sulphide dimorphism in glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Kassem, Mohammad; Sokolov, Anton; Cuisset, Arnault; ...

    2016-05-23

    Crystals usually exist in several polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram. Glasses and liquids also reveal density- or entropy-driven polyamorphism when e.g. an amorphous molecular solid or liquid transforms into a network polymorph. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that mercury sulphide exists simultaneously in two polymorphic modifications in a glass network forming chain-like and tetrahedral motifs. DFT simulations of 4-fold coordinated mercury species and RMC modelling of high-resolution diffraction data provide additional details on local Hg environment and connectivity implying the (HgS2/2)m oligomeric chains (1 m 6) are acting as a network former whilemore » the HgS4/4-related mixed agglomerated units behave as a modifier« less

  11. Bus Propulsion Alternatives Overview

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1982-04-01

    The Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) is currently investigating propulsion alternatives which would conserve petroleum-based fuels and would be practical for use by U.S. transit operators. A discussion of these alternatives (electric p...

  12. Alternative Menopause Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms—non-estrogen prescription drugs, and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). What is CAM? CAM refers to practices ... my menopause symptoms without medicine? Are there any alternative medicine treatments you would recommend I try for relief ...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    those for comparable conventional vehicles, as long as the AFVs operate using an alternative fuel or both alternative and conventional fuel, when operating on a highway that is not part of the interstate

  14. Safely splicing glass optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korbelak, K.

    1980-01-01

    Field-repair technique fuses glass fibers in flammable environment. Apparatus consists of v-groove vacuum chucks on manipulators, high-voltage dc power supply and tungsten electrodes, microscope to observe joint alignment and fusion, means of test transmission through joint. Apparatus is enclosed in gas tight bos filled with inert gas during fusion. About 2 feet of fiber end are necessary for splicing.

  15. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  16. Effects of glass scraps powder and glass fiber on mechanical properties of polyester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsakul, K.; Boongsood, W.

    2017-11-01

    One concern in bus manufacturing is the high cost of glass fiber reinforced in polyester composites parts. The composites of glass fiber and polyester are low elongation and high strength, and glass scraps powder displays high hardness and good chemical compatibility with the polymer matrix and glass fiber. This research aimed to study the effects of glass scraps powder and glass fiber on mechanical performance of polyester composites. Glass fiber was randomly oriented fiber and used as new. Glass scraps were obtained from a bus factory and crushed to powder sizes of 120 and 240 μm by a ball mill. Polyester composites were prepared using Vacuum Infusion Process (VIP).Polyester reinforced with 3 layers of glass fiber was an initial condition. Then, one layer of glass fiber was replaced with glass scraps powder. Flexural strength, tensile strength, impact strength and hardness of the polyester composites were determined. Hardness was increased with a combination of smaller size and higher volume of glass scraps powder. Pictures of specimens obtained by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) confirmed that the powder of glass scraps packed in the layers of glass fiber in polyester composites.

  17. MgCu metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2018-03-01

    We generate an amorphous MgCu model using the rapid solidification of the melt through a first-principles molecular dynamics approach within a generalised gradient approximation and reveal, for the first time, its structural features and mechanical properties in details. The liquid and glassy MgCu are found to acquire slightly distinct local structures. Yet in both forms of MgCu, most Cu atoms have a tendency to form the ideal and defective icosahedrons while Mg atoms are arranged in complex configurations. The mean coordination number of Cu and Mg at 300 K is 11.31 and 13.73, respectively. The short-range order of MgCu glass is projected to be different than the known crystalline MgCu and Mg2Cu phases. The mechanical properties of MgCu glass and the CsCl-type MgCu crystal are computed and compared. On the basis of the enthalpy analyses, a possible pressure-induced crystallisation of the MgCu glass into a CsCl-type structure is proposed to occur at around 11 GPa.

  18. Chicano Alternative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galicia, H. Homero; Almaguer, Clementina

    Alternative schooling is challenging some basic notions of curriculum, operation, and structure of traditional schools; it is not challenging the basic concept of schooling. Chicano alternative education, an elusive concept, lacks a precise definition. Chicano alternative schools reflect a vast diversity in structure, focus, and goals. The Chicano…

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Grants The Maryland Energy Administration administers the Maryland Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Program (AFIP), which provides grants to develop public access alternative fueling and charging infrastructure. Only Maryland-based private businesses are eligible, and projects

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Alternative Fuel Commercial User Tax An alternative fuel commercial user that has not paid fuel consumed during the preceding month. Alternative fuel commercial users must pay the full amount of tax due

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Revolving Loan Program The Mississippi Alternative Fuel School Bus and Municipal Motor Vehicle Revolving Loan Program provides zero-interest loans for public school districts and municipalities to cover the incremental cost to purchase alternative fuel school buses and

  2. Assessment "Honest Alternatives".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Susan Glazer

    1995-01-01

    Addresses the challenge of finding or creating alternatives to tests and traditional grading systems. Reflects on and describes the experience of creating an assessment tool and cautions against choosing alternatives that merely camouflage the grades. Encourages educators to find authentic alternatives to describe children's growth. (BAC)

  3. Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies are increasingly used by many pregnant women in the United States; however, limited research is available on many therapies. The number of studies should increase with the establishment of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine by the National Institutes of Health. This column reviews recent studies of both herbal medicines and alternative therapies used in pregnancy. PMID:17273285

  4. Alternative Fleet Architecture Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Alternative Fleet Architecture Design Stuart E. Johnson and Arthur K. Cebrowski Center...2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Alternative Fleet Architecture Design 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...these principles in mind. An alternative fleet architecture design and three examples of future fleet platform architectures are presented in this

  5. Analysis of advanced optical glass and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Feng, Chen

    1991-01-01

    Optical lens systems performance utilizing optical materials comprising reluctant glass forming compositions was studied. Such special glasses are being explored by NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) researchers utilizing techniques such as containerless processing in space on the MSFC Acoustic Levitation Furnace and on the High Temperature Acoustic Levitation Furnace in the conceptual design phase for the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) series of shuttle flights. The application of high refractive index and low dispersive power glasses in optical lens design was investigated. The potential benefits and the impacts to the optical lens design performance were evaluated. The results of the studies revealed that the use of these extraordinary glasses can result in significant optical performance improvements. Recommendations of proposed optical properties for potential new glasses were also made. Applications of these new glasses are discussed, including the impact of high refractive index and low dispersive power, improvements of the system performance by using glasses which are located outside of traditional glass map, and considerations in establishing glass properties beyond conventional glass map limits.

  6. Additive manufacturing of borosilicate glass (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2017-02-01

    Glasses including have significant scientific and engineering applications including optics, communications, electronics, and hermetic seals. This paper investigates a filament fed process for Additive Manufacturing (AM) of borosilicate glasses. Compared to soda-lime glasses, borosilicate glasses have improved coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and are widely used because of thermal shock resistance. In this work, borosilicate glass filaments are fed into a CO2 laser generated melt pool, smoothly depositing material onto the workpiece. Single tracks are printed to explore the effects that different process parameters have on the morphology of printed glass as well as the residual stress trapped in the glass. The transparency of glass allows residual stress to be measured using a polariscope. The effect of the substrate as well and substrate temperature are analyzed. We show that if fracture due to thermal shock can be avoided during deposition, then the residual stress can be relieved with an annealing step, removing birefringence. When combined with progress toward avoiding bubble entrapment in printed glass, we show the AM approach has the potential to produce high quality optically transparent glass for optical applications.

  7. Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumera, M.; Wacławska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

  8. Adhesion of new bioactive glass coating.

    PubMed

    Schrooten, J; Van Oosterwyck, H; Vander Sloten, J; Helsen, J A

    1999-03-05

    A valuable alternative to the existing biomedical implant coatings is a bioactive glass (BAG) coating that is produced by reactive plasma spraying. A mechanical performance requirement that is of the utmost importance is the adhesion strength of the coating. Considering the application as dental implant, a new adhesion test (shear test), which was close to the service conditions, was designed. A Ti6Al4V rod (3 mm) with a sprayed BAG coating of 50 microm was glued with an epoxy glue to a hollow cylindrical counterpart and was used as such in the tensile machine. This test was evaluated by finite element analysis (FEA). Preliminary experiments showed that a conversion from shear to tensile adhesion strength is possible by using the Von Mises criterion (sigma = 3(1/2)tau), indicating that thin coatings of brittle materials can behave as a ductile material. The new coating technique was proved to produce a high quality coating with an adhesion strength of 40.1 +/- 4.8 MPa in shear and 69.4 +/- 8.4 MPa in tension. The FEA revealed that no one homogeneously distributed shear stress is present but several nonhomogeneously distributed stress components (shear and tensile) are present in the coating. This analysis indicated that real service conditions are much more complicated than standard adhesion tests. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker; Sitzman, Gary W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet.

  10. Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

    1998-10-27

    A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

  11. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  12. AC Conductivity and Dielectric Properties of Borotellurite Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, T. A.; Azab, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Borotellurite glasses with formula 60B2O3-10ZnO-(30 - x)NaF- xTeO2 ( x = 0 mol.%, 5 mol.%, 10 mol.%, and 15 mol.%) have been synthesized by thermal melting. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed that the glasses were amorphous. The glass density ( ρ) was determined by the Archimedes method at room temperature. The density ( ρ) and molar volume ( V m) were found to increase with increasing TeO2 content. The direct-current (DC) conductivity was measured in the temperature range from 473 K to 623 K, in which the electrical activation energy of ionic conduction increased from 0.27 eV to 0.48 eV with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%. The dielectric parameters and alternating-current (AC) conductivity ( σ ac) were investigated in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz and temperature range from 300 K to 633 K. The AC conductivity and dielectric constant decreased with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%.

  13. Localization and Symmetry Breaking in the Quantum Quasiperiodic Ising Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, A.; Laumann, C. R.

    2017-07-01

    Quasiperiodic modulation can prevent isolated quantum systems from equilibrating by localizing their degrees of freedom. In this article, we show that such systems can exhibit dynamically stable long-range orders forbidden in equilibrium. Specifically, we show that the interplay of symmetry breaking and localization in the quasiperiodic quantum Ising chain produces a quasiperiodic Ising glass stable at all energy densities. The glass order parameter vanishes with an essential singularity at the melting transition with no signatures in the equilibrium properties. The zero-temperature phase diagram is also surprisingly rich, consisting of paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and quasiperiodically alternating ground-state phases with extended, localized, and critically delocalized low-energy excitations. The system exhibits an unusual quantum Ising transition whose properties are intermediate between those of the clean and infinite randomness Ising transitions. Many of these results follow from a geometric generalization of the Aubry-André duality that we develop. The quasiperiodic Ising glass may be realized in near-term quantum optical experiments.

  14. A review of glass-ionomers: From conventional glass-ionomer to bioactive glass-ionomer

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Keshani, Fateme

    2013-01-01

    Materials used in the body, especially the materials used in various oral cavity regions should be stable and passive without any interactions with the body tissues or fluids. Dental amalgam, composite resins and dental cements are the materials of choice with such properties. The first attempts to produce active materials, which could interact with the human body tissues and fluids were prompted by the concept that fluoride-releasing materials exert useful effects in the body. The concept of using the “smart” materials in dentistry has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Conventional glass-ionomer (GI) cements have a large number of applications in dentistry. They are biocompatible with the dental pulp to some extent. GI is predominantly used as cements in dentistry; however, they have some disadvantages, the most important of which is lack of adequate strength and toughness. In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of the conventional GI, resin-modified glass-ionomers have been marketed, with hydrophilic monomers, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylated (HEMA). Some recent studies have evaluated GI with bioactive glass in its structure to validate the claims that such a combination will improve tooth bioactivity, regeneration capacity and restoration. There is ever-increasing interest in the application of bioactive materials in the dental field in an attempt to remineralize affected dentin. The aim of this review article is to evaluate these materials and their characteristics and applications. PMID:24130573

  15. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, David K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2015-11-01

    throughout the WTP flowsheet and the underlying mechanisms that dictate its partitioning between streams within the LAW vitrification facility. These studies are aimed at increasing the single-pass Tc retention in glass and the potential use of high-temperature mineral phases to capture Tc. The Tc-bearing mineral phases would be thermally stable and resistant to Tc release during feed melting reactions or they could serve as alternative waste forms. The LAW glass research and development is focused on reducing the total volume of LAW glass produced and minimizing the impact of (or potentially eliminating) the need for recycle.« less

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ

    Science.gov Websites

    Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ on Google Bookmark

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy

    Science.gov Websites

    Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center : Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in

  18. Applicability of Glass Dosimeters for In-vivo Dosimetry in Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sun Young; Son, Jaeman; Yoon, Myonggeun; Jeang, EunHee; Lim, Young Kyung; Chung, Weon Kyu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2018-06-01

    During brachytherapy, confirming the dose delivered is very important in order to prevent radiation-associated side effects. Therefore, we aimed to confirm the accuracy of dose delivery near the source by inserting glass dosimeters within the applicator. We created an alternative pelvic phantom with the same shape and internal structures as the usual patient. In addition, we created a tandem for insertion of the glass dosimeters and measured the dose near the source by inserting the glass dosimeters into the tandem and evaluating the accuracy of the dwell position and time through the dose near the source. Errors between the values obtained from the five glass dosimeters and the values from the treatment planning system were -6.27, -2.1, -4.18, 6.31, and -0.39%, respectively. The mean error was 3.85%. This value was acceptable considering that the error of the glass dosimeter itself is approximately 3%. Even though a complement of the applicator and the error calibration is required in order to apply this technique clinically, we believe that radiation accidents and overdoses can be prevented through in-vivo dosimetry using a glass dosimeter for brachytherapy.

  19. Comparison of bioactive glass coated and hydroxyapatite coated titanium dental implants in the human jaw bone.

    PubMed

    Mistry, S; Kundu, D; Datta, S; Basu, D

    2011-03-01

    Current trends in clinical dental implant therapy include modification of titanium surfaces for the purpose of improving osseointegration by different additive (bioactive coatings) and subtractive processes (acid etching, grit-blasting). The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the behaviour of hydroxyapatite and the newly developed bioactive glass coated implants (62 implants) in osseous tissue following implantation in 31 patients. Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite was suitably coated on titanium alloy. Hydroxyapatite coating was applied on the implant surface by air microplasma spray technique and bioactive glass coating was applied by vitreous enamelling technique. The outcome was assessed up to 12 months after prosthetic loading using different clinical and radiological parameters. Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were non-toxic and biocompatible. Overall results showed that bioactive glass coated implants were as equally successful as hydroxyapatite in achieving osseointegration and supporting final restorations. The newly developed bioactive glass is a good alternative coating material for dental implants. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  20. UV-transmitting step-index fluorophosphate glass fiber fabricated by the crucible technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleani, Gustavo; Ledemi, Yannick; de Lima Filho, Elton Soares; Morency, Steeve; Delaizir, Gaëlle; Chenu, Sébastien; Duclere, Jean René; Messaddeq, Younes

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we report on the fabrication process of highly pure step-index fluorophosphate glass optical fibers by a modified crucible technique. High-purity fluorophosphate glasses based on 10 mol% of barium metaphosphate and 90 mol% of metal fluorides (AlF3sbnd CaF2sbnd MgF2sbnd SrF2) have been studied in order to produce step-index optical fibers transmitting in the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) region. The characteristic temperatures, viscosity around softening temperature and optical transmission in the UV-visible region of the prepared bulk glasses were characterized in a first step. The selected glass compositions were then used to prepare core-cladding optical preforms by using a modified built-in casting technique. While uncontrolled crystallization of the fiber was observed during the preform stretching by using the conventional method, we successfully obtained crystal-free fiber by using a modified crucible technique. In this alternative approach, the produced core-cladding preforms were inserted into a home-designed fused silica crucible assembly and heated at 643 °C to allow glass flowing throughout the crucible, preventing the formation of crystals. Single index fluorophosphate glass fibers were fabricated following the same process as well. The optical attenuation at 244 nm and in the interval 350-1750 nm was measured on both single index and step-index optical fibers. Their potential for using in DUV applications is discussed.

  1. A curious relationship between Potts glass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Chiaki

    2015-08-01

    A Potts glass model proposed by Nishimori and Stephen [H. Nishimori, M.J. Stephen, Phys. Rev. B 27, 5644 (1983)] is analyzed by means of the replica mean field theory. This model is a discrete model, has a gauge symmetry, and is called the Potts gauge glass model. By comparing the present results with the results of the conventional Potts glass model, we find the coincidences and differences between the models. We find a coincidence that the property for the Potts glass phase in this model is coincident with that in the conventional model at the mean field level. We find a difference that, unlike in the case of the conventional p-state Potts glass model, this system for large p does not become ferromagnetic at low temperature under a concentration of ferromagnetic interaction. The present results support the act of numerically investigating the present model for study of the Potts glass phase in finite dimensions.

  2. Layered chalcogenide glass structures for IR lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel; Bayya, Shyam; Sanghera, Jas; Nguyen, Vinh; Scribner, Dean; Maksimovic, Velimir; Gill, John; Yi, Allen; Deegan, John; Unger, Blair

    2014-07-01

    A technique for fabricating novel infrared (IR) lenses can enable a reduction in the size and weight of IR imaging optics through the use of layered glass structures. These structures can range from having a few thick glass layers, mimicking cemented doublets and triplets, to having many thin glass layers approximating graded index (GRIN) lenses. The effectiveness of these structures relies on having materials with diversity in refractive index (large Δn) and dispersion and similar thermo-viscous behavior (common glass transition temperature, ΔTg = 10°C). A library of 13 chalcogenide glasses with broad IR transmission (NIR through LWIR bands) was developed to satisfy these criteria. The lens fabrication methodology, including glass design and synthesis, sheet fabrication, preform making, lens molding and surface finishing are presented.

  3. Surface Coatings on Lunar Volcanic Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas,-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    We are undertaking a detailed study of surface deposits on lunar volcanic glass beads. These tiny deposits formed by vapor condensation during cooling of the gases that drove the fire fountain eruptions responsible for the formation of the beads. Volcanic glass beads are present in most lunar soil samples in the returned lunar collection. The mare-composition beads formed as a result of fire-fountaining approx.3.4-3.7 Ga ago, within the age range of large-scale mare volcanism. Some samples from the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 landing sites are enriched in volcanic spherules. Three major types of volcanic glass bead have been identified: Apollo 15 green glass, Apollo 17 orange glass, and Apollo 17 "black" glass. The Apollo 15 green glass has a primitive composition with low Ti. The high-Ti compositions of the orange and black glasses are essentially identical to each other but the black glasses are opaque because of quench crystallization. A poorly understood feature common to the Apollo 15 and 17 volcanic glasses is the presence of small deposits of unusual materials on their exterior surfaces. For example, early studies indicated that the Apollo 17 orange glasses had surface enrichments of In, Cd, Zn, Ga, Ge, Au, and Na, and possible Pb- and Zn-sulfides, but it was not possible to characterize the surface features in detail. Technological advances now permit us to examine such features in detail. Preliminary FE-TEM/X-ray studies of ultramicrotome sections of Apollo 15 green glass indicate that the surface deposits are heterogeneous and layered, with an inner layer consisting of Fe with minor S and an outer layer of Fe and no S, and scattered Zn enrichments. Layering in surface deposits has not been identified previously; it will be key to defining the history of lunar fire fountaining.

  4. Stability of Glass Fiber-Plastic Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    investigated. 1. S-Glass The formation of S-g1ass 1s proprietary and differs between the two main sources ( Owens - Corning and Ferro Corporation) from...which samples were obtained for this research program. However, according to published work by Humphrey (8) of Owens - Corning , the approximate...of the glass fibers. S-glass fibers furnished by both Owens - Corning and Ferro Cor- poration were utilized and the results analyzed using scanning

  5. Stability of Glass Fiber-Plastic Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    miniiiii’ 5 0712 01016774 9 x TECHNICA. . LIBRARY Jt U*Al>/l 1 Technical Report RL-75-6 STABILITY OF GLASS FIBER -PLASTIC COMPOSITES Wartan A...Subtitle) STABILITY OF GLASS FIBER -PLASTIC COMPOSITES 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Technical Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7...Exploratory research was conducted to determine the stages and nature of degradation of glass fiber -plastic composite systems under various environmental

  6. Glass Fiber Used in Light Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-05

    narrow pulse width is extended about 4 millimicroseconds/ kilometer, the gallium arsenide emptying into the laser is extended about 0.1...glass for the core forms quartz glass fiber. Possibly the use of the chemical vapour deposition method can make low ref racting glass for the...directly from the vapour phase and reaches a very high optical homogeneity. When the temperature of the high frequency induction plasma flame is very

  7. Cooling rates of lunar volcanic glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, H.; Hess, K. U.; Zhang, Y.; Peslier, A. H.; Lange, R. A.; Dingwell, D. B.; Neal, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  8. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  9. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Buckwalter, Jr., Charles Q.

    1981-01-01

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  10. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

    1980-01-28

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  11. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  13. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition modelsmore » were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.« less

  14. Laceration and Ejection Dangers of Automotive Glass, and the Weak Standards Involved. The Strain Fracture Test.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Carl C.; Yudenfriend, Herbert; Redner, Alex S.

    2000-01-01

    Glazing types are historically described, with the laceration injuries and ejection deaths associated with present glazing. Sixty tempered glass windows manufactured at nominally four temper levels were tested for uncracked fracture fragment size and weight and length by the American and European standards, which fracture the glass without strain, and our preliminary strain fracture test, which produces longer uncracked fragments and heavier clusters of fragments. Our study relates the results by the three methods to the temper measurements using birefringence, with a discussion of alternate safer glazing and the inadequacy of present standards for reducing laceration and ejection dangers. PMID:11558078

  15. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  16. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  17. 3D-Printed Transparent Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Du T.; Meyers, Cameron; Yee, Timothy D.

    In this study, silica inks are developed, which may be 3D printed and thermally processed to produce optically transparent glass structures with sub-millimeter features in forms ranging from scaffolds to monoliths. The inks are composed of silica powder suspended in a liquid and are printed using direct ink writing. The printed structures are then dried and sintered at temperatures well below the silica melting point to form amorphous, solid, transparent glass structures. This technique enables the mold-free formation of transparent glass structures previously inaccessible using conventional glass fabrication processes.

  18. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  19. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

    1986-04-17

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with an ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

  20. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

    1987-04-21

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material. 6 figs.

  1. Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Bloom, Ira D.; Roche, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

  2. Raman band intensities of tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Plotnichenko, V G; Sokolov, V O; Koltashev, V V; Dianov, E M; Grishin, I A; Churbanov, M F

    2005-05-15

    Raman spectra of TeO2-based glasses doped with WO3, ZnO, GeO2, TiO2, MoO3, and Sb2O3 are measured. The intensity of bands in the Raman spectra of MoO3-TeO2 and MoO3-WO3-TeO2 glasses is shown to be 80-95 times higher than that for silica glass. It is shown that these glasses can be considered as one of the most promising materials for Raman fiber amplifiers.

  3. 3D-Printed Transparent Glass

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, Du T.; Meyers, Cameron; Yee, Timothy D.; ...

    2017-04-28

    In this study, silica inks are developed, which may be 3D printed and thermally processed to produce optically transparent glass structures with sub-millimeter features in forms ranging from scaffolds to monoliths. The inks are composed of silica powder suspended in a liquid and are printed using direct ink writing. The printed structures are then dried and sintered at temperatures well below the silica melting point to form amorphous, solid, transparent glass structures. This technique enables the mold-free formation of transparent glass structures previously inaccessible using conventional glass fabrication processes.

  4. Optical Properties of Silver Nanoparticulate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Rachel N.; Cannavino, Sarah A.; King, Christy A.; Lamartina, Joseph A.; Magruder, Robert H.; Ferrara, Davon W.

    The ion exchange method of embedding metal nanoparticles (NPs) into float glass is an often used technique of fabricating colored glasses and graded-index waveguides. The depth and size of NP formation in the glass depends on the concentration and temperature of metal ions in the molten bath. In this study we explore the dichroic properties of silver metal ion exchange restricted to only one side of a glass microscope slide using reflection and transmission spectroscopy and its dependence on temperature, concentration of silver ions, and length of time in the molten bath.

  5. High-Temperature Viscosity Of Commercial Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R; See, Clem A; Lam, Oanh P

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity was measured for six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Viscosity data were obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900°C and 1550°C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa∙s to 750 Pa∙s. Arrhenius coefficients were calculated for individual glasses and linear models were applied to relate them to the mass fractions of 11 major components (SiO2, CaO, Na2O, Al2O3, B2O3, BaO, SrO, K2O, MgO, PbO, and ZrO2) and 12 minor components (Fe2O3, ZnO, Li2O, TiO2, CeO2, F, Sb2O3, Cr2O3, As2O3, MnO2, SO3, andmore » Co3O4). The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100°C to 1550°C and viscosity range from 10 to 400 Pas.« less

  6. Containerless Processing of a Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranasinghe, K. S.; Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.; Rogers, J. R.; Hyers, R W.; Rathz, T.

    2006-01-01

    Glasses of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and LS2 doped with 0.001 wt% platinum (LS2 + 0.001 wt% Pt) compositions were melted, cooled and re-heated at controlled rates while levitated (containerless) inside an Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) furnace at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experiments were conducted in vacuum using spherical 2.5 - 3.0 mm diameter glass samples. The measured critical cooling rate for glass formation, Rc, for the LS2 and LS2 + 0.001 wt% Pt glasses processed at ESL were 14 plus or minus 2 C/min and 130 plus or minus 5 C/min, respectively. The values of Rc for the same LS2 and LS2 + 0.001 wt% Pt glasses processed in a container were 62 plus or minus 3 C/min and 162 plus or minus 5 C/min, respectively. The effective activation energy for crystallization, E, for the LS2 glass processed without a container at ESL was higher than that for an identical glass processed in a container. These results suggest that the glass formation tendency for a containerless LS2 melt is significantly increased compared to an identical melt in contact with a container. The absence of heterogeneous nucleation sites that are inherently present in all melts held in containers is believed to be the reason for the increased glass forming tendency of this containerless melt.

  7. Thin glass substrates for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, Reiner H.; Wegener, Holger; Kruse, Anke; Hildebrand, Norbert

    2000-10-01

    Flat panel displays play an important role as the visual interface for today's electronic devices (Notebook computers, PDA's, pagers, mobile phones, etc.). Liquid Crystal Display's are dominating the market. While for higher resolution displays active matrix displays like Thin Film Transistor LCD's are used, portable devices are mainly using Super Twisted Nematic (STN) displays. Based on the application, STN displays for mobile applications require thinner glass substrates with improved surface quality at a lower cost. The requirements and trends for STN glass substrates are identified and discussed. Different glass manufacturing processes are used today for the manufacture of these substrates. Advantages and disadvantages of the different glass substrate types are presented and discussed.

  8. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  9. Adsorption of calcitonin to glass.

    PubMed

    Law, S L; Shih, C L

    1999-02-01

    Surface adsorption of calcitonin on soda lime silica glass was investigated. An attempt was also made to examine the effect of additives on the inhibition of calcitonin adsorption. Results showed that the adsorption isotherms were of the Langmuir and Freundlich type, depending on pH. Less adsorption was found for calcitonin at pH 4.3. The addition of nonionic surfactants such as Pluronic F68 and Tween 80 to the calcitonin solutions demonstrated inhibition of absorption and reduction of adsorption rate. The addition of chlorobutanol also showed the effect of minimizing adsorption.

  10. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. A.; Holland, D.; Bland, J.; Johnson, C. E.; Thomas, M. F.

    2003-02-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb2O3]x - [ZnCl2]1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb)2(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn)2(OSb)2].

  11. Glass-bead peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Peen plating of aluminum, copper, and nickel powders was investigated. Only aluminum was plated successfully within the range of peen plating conditions studied. Optimum plating conditions for aluminum were found to be: (1) bead/powder mixture containing 25 to 35% powder by weight, (2) peening intensity of 0.007A as measured by Almen strip, and (3) glass impact bead diameter of at least 297 microns (0.0117 inches) for depositing-100 mesh aluminum powder. No extensive cleaning or substrate preparation is required beyond removing loose dirt or heavy oil.

  12. Glass-windowed ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Tostein; Gilja, Odd Helge; Cochran, Sandy; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2016-05-01

    In research and industrial processes, it is increasingly common practice to combine multiple measurement modalities. Nevertheless, experimental tools that allow the co-linear combination of optical and ultrasonic transmission have rarely been reported. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise a water-matched ultrasound transducer architecture using standard components, with a central optical window larger than 10 mm in diameter allowing for optical transmission. The window can be used to place illumination or imaging apparatus such as light guides, miniature cameras, or microscope objectives, simplifying experimental setups. Four design variations of a basic architecture were fabricated and characterised with the objective to assess whether the variations influence the acoustic output. The basic architecture consisted of a piezoelectric ring and a glass disc, with an aluminium casing. The designs differed in piezoelectric element dimensions: inner diameter, ID=10 mm, outer diameter, OD=25 mm, thickness, TH=4 mm or ID=20 mm, OD=40 mm, TH=5 mm; glass disc dimensions OD=20-50 mm, TH=2-4 mm; and details of assembly. The transducers' frequency responses were characterised using electrical impedance spectroscopy and pulse-echo measurements, the acoustic propagation pattern using acoustic pressure field scans, the acoustic power output using radiation force balance measurements, and the acoustic pressure using a needle hydrophone. Depending on the design and piezoelectric element dimensions, the resonance frequency was in the range 350-630 kHz, the -6 dB bandwidth was in the range 87-97%, acoustic output power exceeded 1 W, and acoustic pressure exceeded 1 MPa peak-to-peak. 3D stress simulations were performed to predict the isostatic pressure required to induce material failure and 4D acoustic simulations. The pressure simulations indicated that specific design variations could sustain isostatic pressures up to 4.8 MPa.The acoustic simulations were able to

  13. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  14. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  15. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  16. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.113 - Glass and glazed openings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glass and glazed openings. 3280.113... Glass and glazed openings. (a) Windows and sliding glass doors. All windows and sliding glass doors shall meet the requirements of § 3280.403 the “Standard for Windows and Sliding Glass Doors Used in...

  18. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  19. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  20. Synthesis for Lunar Simulants: Glass, Agglutinate, Plagioclase, Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Michael; Wilson, Stephen A.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Stoeser, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The video describes a process for making glass for lunar regolith simulants that was developed from a patented glass-producing technology. Glass composition can be matched to simulant design and specification. Production of glass, pseudo agglutinates, plagioclase, and breccias is demonstrated. The system is capable of producing hundreds of kilograms of high quality glass and simulants per day.

  1. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  2. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  3. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass. Injectors...

  4. 49 CFR 230.52 - Water glass valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water glass valves. 230.52 Section 230.52... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.52 Water glass valves. All water glasses shall be equipped with no more than two valves capable of isolating the water glass from the boiler. They shall also be equipped...

  5. Alternative Certification Isn't Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kate; Jacobs, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    While nearly all states now have something on their books labeled "alternate route to certification," these programs defy standard definition due to their enormous variability. States differ in the types of candidates allowed to apply (e.g., career changers or recent college graduates) and in the academic backgrounds these individuals must…

  6. Comparison of a model vapor deposited glass films to equilibrium glass films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flenner, Elijah; Berthier, Ludovic; Charbonneau, Patrick; Zamponi, Francesco

    Vapor deposition of particles onto a substrate held at around 85% of the glass transition temperature can create glasses with increased density, enthalpy, kinetic stability, and mechanical stability compared to an ordinary glass created by cooling. It is estimated that an ordinary glass would need to age thousands of years to reach the kinetic stability of a vapor deposited glass, and a natural question is how close to the equilibrium is the vapor deposited glass. To understand the process, algorithms akin to vapor deposition are used to create simulated glasses that have a higher kinetic stability than their annealed counterpart, although these glasses may not be well equilibrated either. Here we use novel models optimized for a swap Monte Carlo algorithm in order to create equilibrium glass films and compare their properties with those of glasses obtained from vapor deposition algorithms. This approach allows us to directly assess the non-equilibrium nature of vapor-deposited ultrastable glasses. Simons Collaboration on Cracking the Glass Problem and NSF Grant No. DMR 1608086.

  7. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.

    This paper discusses work to develop Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. Here, five new glasses with high Na2O contents were designed to generate waste forms having higher sodalite contents and fewer stress fractures. The structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the new glasses were measured using variety of analytical techniques. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with surrogate salt waste. The materials made using the glasses developed during this study were formulated to generate more sodalite than materialsmore » made with previous baseline glasses used. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature. These improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability. Additionally, a model generated during this study for predicting softening temperature of silicate binder glasses is presented.« less

  8. Alternatives to Certain Phthalates Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The alternatives assessment partnership project on alternatives to certain phthalates seeks to eplore the human health and environmental profiles of eight action plan phthalates and functional alternatives

  9. Alternator insulation evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, W. B.; Schaefer, R. F.; Balke, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to predict the remaining electrical insulation life of a 60 KW homopolar inductor alternator following completion of NASA turbo-alternator endurance tests for SNAP-8 space electrical power systems application. The insulation quality was established for two alternators following completion of these tests. A step-temperature aging test procedure was developed for insulation life prediction and applied to one of the two alternators. Armature winding insulation life of over 80,000 hours for an average winding temperature of 248 degrees C was predicted using the developed procedure.

  10. Crystallization Kinetics in Fluorochloroziroconate Glass-Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Carlos J.

    Annealing fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses nucleates BaCl2 nanocrystals in the glass matrix, resulting in a nanocomposite glass-ceramic that has optical properties suitable for use as a medical X-ray imaging plate. Understanding the way in which the BaCl¬2 nanocrystal nucleation, growth and phase transformation processes proceed is critical to controlling the optical behavior. However, there is a very limited amount of information about the formation, morphology, and distribution of the nanocrystalline particles in FCZ glass-ceramics. In this thesis, the correlation between the microstructure and the crystallization kinetics of FCZ glass-ceramics, are studied in detail. In situ X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy annealing experiments are used to analyze the crystal structure, size and distribution of BaCl 2 nanocrystals in FCZ glass-ceramics as a function of annealing rate and temperature. Microstructural analysis of the early stages on nucleation identified the formation of both BaCl2 and BaF2 nanocrystals. Annealing FCZ glass-ceramics above 280°C can cause the formation of additional glass matrix phase crystals, their microstructure and the annealing parameters required for their growth are identified. As the crystalline phases grow directly from the glass, small variations in processing of the glass can have a profound influence on the crystallization process. The information obtained from these experiments improves the understanding of the nucleation, growth and phase transformation process of the BaCl¬2 nanocrystals and additional crystalline phases that form in FCZ glass-ceramics, and may help expedite the implementation of FCZ glass-ceramics as next-generation X-ray detectors. Lastly, as these glass-ceramics may one day be commercialized, an investigation into their degradation in different environmental conditions was also performed. The effects of direct contact with water or prolonged exposure to humid environments on the

  11. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.; Nolen, R. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres (shells), which are used for inertial confinement fusion targets, were formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a vertical furnace. As a result of the rapid pyrolysis caused by the furnace, the gel is transformed to a shell in five distinct stages: (a) surface closure of the porous gel; (b) generation of a closed-cell foam structure in the gel; (c) spheridization of the gel and further expansion of the foam; (d) coalescence of the closed-cell foam to a single-void shell; and (e) fining of the glass shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the falling gel particle was modeled to determine the effective heating rate of the gel. The model predicts the temperature history for a particle as a function of mass, dimensions, specific heat, and absorptance as well as furnace temperature profile and thermal conductivity of the furnace gas. A model was developed that predicts the gravity-induced degradation of shell concentricity in falling molten shells as a function of shell characteristics and time.

  12. -Sb Glasses at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souri, Dariush; Azizpour, Parvin; Zaliani, Hamideh

    2014-09-01

    Semiconducting glasses of the type 40TeO2-(60 - x) V2O5- xSb were prepared by rapid melt quenching and their dc electrical conductivity was measured in the temperature range 180-296 K. For these glassy samples, the dc electrical conductivity ranged from 2.26 × 10-7 S cm-1 to 1.11 × 10-5 S cm-1 at 296 K, indicating the conductivity is enhanced by increasing the V2O5 content. These experimental results could be explained on the basis of different mechanisms (based on polaron-hopping theory) in the different temperature regions. At temperatures above Θ D/2 (where Θ D is the Debye temperature), the non-adiabatic small polaron hopping (NASPH) model is consistent with the data, whereas at temperatures below Θ D/2, a T -1/4 dependence of the conductivity indicative of the variable range hopping (VRH) mechanism is dominant. For all these glasses crossover from SPH to VRH conduction was observed at a characteristic temperature T R ≤ Θ D/2. In this study, the hopping carrier density and carrier mobility were determined at different temperatures. N ( E F), the density of states at (or near) the Fermi level, was also determined from the Mott variables; the results were dependent on V2O5 content.

  13. Optically responsive supramolecular polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkenende, Diederik W. R.; Monnier, Christophe A.; Fiore, Gina L.; Weder, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    The reversible and dynamic nature of non-covalent interactions between the constituting building blocks renders many supramolecular polymers stimuli-responsive. This was previously exploited to create thermally and optically healable polymers, but it proved challenging to achieve high stiffness and good healability. Here we present a glass-forming supramolecular material that is based on a trifunctional low-molecular-weight monomer ((UPyU)3TMP). Carrying three ureido-4-pyrimidinone (UPy) groups, (UPyU)3TMP forms a dynamic supramolecular polymer network, whose properties are governed by its cross-linked architecture and the large content of the binding motif. This design promotes the formation of a disordered glass, which, in spite of the low molecular weight of the building block, displays typical polymeric behaviour. The material exhibits a high stiffness and offers excellent coating and adhesive properties. On account of reversible dissociation and the formation of a low-viscosity liquid upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, rapid optical healing as well as (de)bonding on demand is possible.

  14. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Even in normal gravity, bioactive glass particles enhance bone growth in laboratory tests with flat tissue cultures. Ducheyne and his team believe that using the bioactive microcarriers in a rotating bioreactor in microgravity will produce improved, three-dimensional tissue cultures. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering.

  15. Nucleation and crystal growth behavior of nepheline in simulated high-level waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Amoroso, J.; Mcclane, D.

    composition using optical microscopy. This research establishes a viable alternative to more traditional techniques for evaluating nepheline crystallization in large numbers of glasses, which are prohibitively time consuming or otherwise impractical. The ultimate objective is to combine the nucleation and growth information obtained from DSC, like that presented in this report, with computer simulations of glass cooling within the canister to accurately predict nepheline crystallization in HLW during processing through WTP.« less

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: About the Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: About the Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: About the Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: About the Alternative Fuels

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Science.gov Websites

    Locate Stations Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center : Alternative Fueling Station Locator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Locator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative

  18. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  19. Funding an Alternative School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alternate Learning Project, Providence, RI.

    Several types of funding for alternative schools such as list books on Federal grants, foundations, and other sources of money are described in this paper, along with explanations about some of the ways in which an alternative school budget differs from that of a traditional school. Probably the best option from the point of view of stability is…

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Act (EPAct) of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) provisions related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air for a waiver include the lack of alternative fuel availability and cost restrictions. For more information, visit the Sustainable Federal Fleets website. Section 702 Federal Fleets Incremental Cost

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    jobs, economic growth, tax relief, improvements in education and healthcare, infrastructure of alternative fuel and advanced vehicle technologies through grant programs, tax credits, research Section 1123 amends the alternative fuel infrastructure tax credit for qualified equipment placed into

  2. Alternative Automobile Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David Gordon

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for cleaner and more efficient engines have stimulated a search for alternatives to the conventional spark-ignition engine. So far, the defects of the alternative engines are clearer than the virtues. The following engines are compared: spark ignition, diesel, vapor-cycle, Stirling, and gas turbine. (Author/MA)

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    License Fee Each alternative fuel supplier, refiner, distributor, terminal operator, importer or exporter of alternative fuel used in motor vehicles must obtain an annual license from the Wyoming Department of Transportation to conduct business in the state. The fee for each type of license is $25

  4. Alternative Retirement Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, John D.

    1984-01-01

    Alternative college retirement programs and features of a desirable retirement program are discussed. The historical, social, and economic forces that prompt institutions to consider alternative programs are identified. The present position of college faculty in terms of retirement options is also addressed. Since its inception, the Teachers…

  5. Alternative Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Kerri L.

    2004-01-01

    Employers are feeling the strain of needing to offer alternative work arrangements to retain and recruit employees. Due to a change in demographics, dual-career couples and increased technology; people are demanding a transformation in the workplace environment. Two alternatives, which are being offered by employers, are flextime and…

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    legislation dates back to the Clean Air Act of 1970, which created initiatives to reduce mobile sources of acts also include provisions related to alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and infrastructure. The Energy alternative fuel use and infrastructure development. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 included

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Infrastructure Incentives Study The Georgia Joint Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Study Committee evaluated how providing market incentives for AFV fueling infrastructure may lead . For more information, see the Joint Study Committee

  8. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  9. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  10. A 6-GW NEODYMIUM GLASS LASER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A 6-GW neodymium glass laser with a simple phototropic Q-switch is described. The laser consists of three cylindrical rods in series, each 250 mm...operation (50-80 microsec. repetition frequency), the total output was 200 j. The use of a phototropic liquid switch and large-diameter neodymium glass

  11. 7 CFR 3201.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 3201.30 Section 3201.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.30 Glass cleaners. (a)...

  12. 7 CFR 3201.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 3201.30 Section 3201.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.30 Glass cleaners. (a)...

  13. 7 CFR 3201.30 - Glass cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glass cleaners. 3201.30 Section 3201.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.30 Glass cleaners. (a)...

  14. Phase Stability Determinations of DWPF Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, S.L.

    1999-10-22

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. To fulfill this requirement, glass samples were heat treated at various times and temperatures. These results will provide guidance to the repository program about conditions to be avoided during shipping, handling and storage of DWPF canistered waste forms.

  15. Method and apparatus for melting glass batch

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alexander G.; Walkup, Paul C.; Mudge, Lyle K.

    1988-01-01

    A glass melting system involving preheating, precalcining, and prefluxing of batch materials prior to injection into a glass furnace. The precursors are heated by convection rather than by radiation in present furnaces. Upon injection into the furnace, batch materials are intimately coated with molten flux so as to undergo or at least begin the process of dissolution reaction prior to entering the melt pool.

  16. The glass ceiling in nursing management.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D I

    1993-01-01

    Women managers in business and health care have experienced discrimination related to advancement in management. Nurse executives must understand the strategies to overcome the barriers, the "glass ceiling," as well as implications for future practice. Women executives need an organized blueprint and the tools to dismantle the glass ceiling and overcome the political and discriminatory barriers to success.

  17. The Glass Ceiling: Progress and Persistent Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLlwain, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been written that since 2001, there has not been any significant progress and the glass ceiling is still intact. Women are still underrepresented in top positions (Anonymous, 2004). If this is true, the glass ceiling presents a major barrier between women and their desire to advance into executive or senior management positions. In addition…

  18. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, Ray F.

    1994-01-01

    A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

  19. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

  20. An Interview with Gene V. Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel H.

    2004-01-01

    Gene V. Glass is presently Regents' Professor of both Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and Psychology in Education at Arizona State University. He won the Palmer O. Johnson Award for best article in the "American Educational Research Journal" in both 1968 and 1970. Dr. Glass has also served on the editorial boards of 13 journals and has…

  1. Photoelastic response of permanently densified oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Mauro, John C.; Thirion, Lynn M.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2017-05-01

    The stress-induced birefringence (photoelastic response) in oxide glasses has important consequences for several applications, including glass for flat panel displays, chemically strengthened cover glass, and advanced optical glasses. While the effect of composition on the photoelastic response is relatively well documented, the effect of pressure has not been systematically studied. In this work, we evaluate the effect of hot isostatic compression on the photoelastic response of ten oxide glasses within two commonly used industrial glass families: aluminosilicates and boroaluminosilicates. Hot isostatic compression generally results in decreasing modifier-oxygen bond lengths and increasing network-former coordination numbers. These structural changes should lead to an increase in the stress optic coefficient (C) according to the model of Zwanziger et al., which can successfully predict the composition and structure dependence of C. However, in compressed glasses, we observe the opposite trend, viz., a decrease in the stress optic coefficient as a result of pressurization. We discuss this result based on measured changes in refractive index and elastic moduli within the context of atomic and lattice effects, building on the pioneering work of Mueller. We propose that the pressure-induced decrease in C is a result of changes in the shear modulus due to underlying topological changes in the glass network.

  2. The Glass Ceiling Initiative. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

    While minorities and women have made considerable gains in entering the workforce in the last few decades, there remains a dearth of minorities and women at management levels. This phenomenon has come to be known as the "glass ceiling." The Department of Labor defines the glass ceiling as those artificial barriers based on attitudinal or…

  3. Devitrification properties of lead borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Anu; Khanna, Atul; Krishnan, K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2013-06-01

    Lead borate glasses containing 30 to 60 mol% PbO were prepared by melt quenching technique and devitrified by long duration heat treament in the supercooled region. Glasses crystallized on heating above their glass transition temperature, and the crystalline phases produced on devitrification were characterized by XRD and DSC analyses. Glass with 30 mol% PbO slowly formed a solid solution of Pb6B10O21 and Pb5B8O17 crystalline phases, while glasses with 40 and 50 mol% PbO formed a mixture of Pb6B10O21, Pb5B8O17 and the remanent glassy phase. Glasses with higher PbO concentration of 56 to 60 mol% devitrified completely and produced only Pb5B8O17 crystalline phase. Lead borate glasses with PbO concentration of 40 to 50 mol% showed maximum thermal stability against devitrification, the ease of crystallization of glasses was correlated with the fraction of tetrahedral borons in them.

  4. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    DOE PAGES

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.; ...

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na 2O-B 2O 3-SiO 2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. In this paper, five new glasses with ~20 mass% Na 2O were designed to generate waste forms with high sodalite. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with a surrogate salt waste. The waste forms made using these new glasses were formulated to generate more sodalite than those made with previous baseline glasses for this type of waste. The coefficients of thermal expansion formore » the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature than previous binder glasses used. Finally, these improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability.« less

  5. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. Here, five new glasses with ∼20 mass% Na2O were designed to generate waste forms with high sodalite. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with a surrogate salt waste. The waste forms made using these new glasses were formulated to generate more sodalite than those made with previous baseline glasses for this type of waste. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature than previous binder glasses used. These improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability.

  6. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.

    This paper discusses work to develop Na 2O-B 2O 3-SiO 2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. In this paper, five new glasses with ~20 mass% Na 2O were designed to generate waste forms with high sodalite. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with a surrogate salt waste. The waste forms made using these new glasses were formulated to generate more sodalite than those made with previous baseline glasses for this type of waste. The coefficients of thermal expansion formore » the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature than previous binder glasses used. Finally, these improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability.« less

  7. Quantitative risk assessment of durable glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Fayerweather, William E; Eastes, Walter; Cereghini, Francesco; Hadley, John G

    2002-06-01

    This article presents a quantitative risk assessment for the theoretical lifetime cancer risk from the manufacture and use of relatively durable synthetic glass fibers. More specifically, we estimate levels of exposure to respirable fibers or fiberlike structures of E-glass and C-glass that, assuming a working lifetime exposure, pose a theoretical lifetime cancer risk of not more than 1 per 100,000. For comparability with other risk assessments we define these levels as nonsignificant exposures. Nonsignificant exposure levels are estimated from (a) the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) chronic rat inhalation bioassay of durable E-glass microfibers, and (b) the Research Consulting Company (RCC) chronic inhalation bioassay of durable refractory ceramic fibers (RCF). Best estimates of nonsignificant E-glass exposure exceed 0.05-0.13 fibers (or shards) per cubic centimeter (cm3) when calculated from the multistage nonthreshold model. Best estimates of nonsignificant C-glass exposure exceed 0.27-0.6 fibers/cm3. Estimates of nonsignificant exposure increase markedly for E- and C-glass when non-linear models are applied and rapidly exceed 1 fiber/cm3. Controlling durable fiber exposures to an 8-h time-weighted average of 0.05 fibers/cm3 will assure that the additional theoretical lifetime risk from working lifetime exposures to these durable fibers or shards is kept below the 1 per 100,000 level. Measured airborne exposures to respirable, durable glass fibers (or shards) in glass fiber manufacturing and fabrication operations were compared with the nonsignificant exposure estimates described. Sampling results for B-sized respirable E-glass fibers at facilities that manufacture or fabricate small-diameter continuous-filament products, from those that manufacture respirable E-glass shards from PERG (process to efficiently recycle glass), from milled fiber operations, and from respirable C-glass shards from Flakeglass operations indicate very low median exposures of 0

  8. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-09-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  9. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  10. Method for heating and forming a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.

    1997-08-12

    A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration. 5 figs.

  11. Method for heating and forming a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker

    1997-01-01

    A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration.

  12. Crack tip fracture toughness of base glasses for dental restoration glass-ceramics using crack opening displacements.

    PubMed

    Deubener, J; Höland, M; Höland, W; Janakiraman, N; Rheinberger, V M

    2011-10-01

    The critical stress intensity factor, also known as the crack tip toughness K(tip), was determined for three base glasses, which are used in the manufacture of glass-ceramics. The glasses included the base glass for a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, the base glass for a fluoroapatite glass-ceramic and the base glass for a leucite glass-ceramic. These glass-ceramic are extensively used in the form of biomaterials in restorative dental medicine. The crack tip toughness was established by using crack opening displacement profiles under experimental conditions. The crack was produced by Vickers indentation. The crack tip toughness parameters determined for the three glass-ceramics differed quite significantly. The crack tip parameters of the lithium disilicate base glass and the leucite base glass were higher than that of the fluoroapatite base glass. This last material showed glass-in-glass phase separation. The discussion of the results clearly shows that the droplet glass phase is softer than the glass matrix. Therefore, the authors conclude that a direct relationship exists between the chemical nature of the glasses and the crack tip parameter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste.

    PubMed

    Ponsot, Inès M M M; Pontikes, Yiannis; Baldi, Giovanni; Chinnam, Rama K; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Bernardo, Enrico

    2014-07-31

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900-1000 °C), whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C). The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  14. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    PubMed Central

    Ponsot, Inès M. M. M.; Pontikes, Yiannis; Baldi, Giovanni; Chinnam, Rama K.; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Bernardo, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C), whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C). The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests. PMID:28788146

  15. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  16. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr).more » Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.« less

  17. Predicting Shear Transformation Events in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Falk, Michael L; Li, J F; Kong, L T

    2018-03-23

    Shear transformation is the elementary process for plastic deformation of metallic glasses, the prediction of the occurrence of the shear transformation events is therefore of vital importance to understand the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. In this Letter, from the view of the potential energy landscape, we find that the protocol-dependent behavior of shear transformation is governed by the stress gradient along its minimum energy path and we propose a framework as well as an atomistic approach to predict the triggering strains, locations, and structural transformations of the shear transformation events under different shear protocols in metallic glasses. Verification with a model Cu_{64}Zr_{36} metallic glass reveals that the prediction agrees well with athermal quasistatic shear simulations. The proposed framework is believed to provide an important tool for developing a quantitative understanding of the deformation processes that control mechanical behavior of metallic glasses.

  18. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE PAGES

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantialmore » investments.« less

  19. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  20. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-12-02

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

  1. Predicting Shear Transformation Events in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Falk, Michael L.; Li, J. F.; Kong, L. T.

    2018-03-01

    Shear transformation is the elementary process for plastic deformation of metallic glasses, the prediction of the occurrence of the shear transformation events is therefore of vital importance to understand the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. In this Letter, from the view of the potential energy landscape, we find that the protocol-dependent behavior of shear transformation is governed by the stress gradient along its minimum energy path and we propose a framework as well as an atomistic approach to predict the triggering strains, locations, and structural transformations of the shear transformation events under different shear protocols in metallic glasses. Verification with a model Cu64 Zr36 metallic glass reveals that the prediction agrees well with athermal quasistatic shear simulations. The proposed framework is believed to provide an important tool for developing a quantitative understanding of the deformation processes that control mechanical behavior of metallic glasses.

  2. Nanocrystallization in Fluorochlorozirconate Glass-Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carlos J; Liu, Yuzi; Leonard, Russell L; Johnson, Jacqueline A; Petford-Long, Amanda K

    2013-11-01

    Heat treating fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses nucleates nanocrystals in the glass matrix, resulting in a nanocomposite glass-ceramic that has optical properties suitable for use as a medical imaging plate. Understanding the way in which the nanocrystal nucleation proceeds is critical to controlling the optical behavior. The nucleation and growth of nanocrystals in FCZ glass-ceramics was investigated with in situ transmission electron microscopy heating experiments. The experiments showed the nucleation and growth of previously unreported BaF 2 nanocrystals in addition to the expected BaCl 2 nanocrystals. Chemical analysis of the BaF 2 nanocrystals shows an association with the optically active dopant previously thought only to interact with BaCl 2 nanocrystals. The association of the dopant with BaF 2 crystals suggests that it plays a role in the photoluminescent (PL) properties of FCZ glass-ceramics.

  3. Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, Mary

    2013-11-30

    Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature tomore » guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.« less

  4. DNA adsorption onto glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Krista Lynn

    Streaming potential measurements were performed on microspheres of silica, lime silicate (SLS) and calcium aluminate (CA) glasses containing silica and iron oxide (CASi and CAFe). The silicate based glasses exhibited acidic surfaces with isoelectric points (IEP) around a pH of 3 while the calcium aluminates displayed more basic surfaces with IEP ranging from 8--9.5. The surface of the calcium aluminate microspheres containing silica reacted with the background electrolyte, altering the measured zeta potential values and inhibiting electrolyte flow past the sample at ˜ pH 4 due to formation of a solid plug. DNA adsorption experiments were performed using the microspheres and a commercially available silicate based DNA isolation filter using a known quantity of DNA suspended in a chaotropic agent free 0.35 wt% Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) buffer solution. The microspheres and commercial filter were also used to isolate DNA from macrophage cells in the presence of chaotropic agents. UV absorbance at ˜260 nm and gel electrophoresis were used to quantify the amount and size of the DNA strands that adsorbed to the microsphere surfaces. In both experiments, the 43--106 microm CAFe microspheres adsorbed the largest quantity of DNA. However, the 43--106 microm SLS microspheres isolated more DNA from the cells than the <43 microm CAFe microspheres, indicating that microsphere size contributes to isolation ability. The UV absorbance of DNA at ˜260 nm was slightly altered due to the dissolution of the calcium aluminate glasses during the adsorption process. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) determined that calcium and aluminum ions leached from the CA and CAFe microsphere surfaces during these experiments. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the leached ions had no effect on the conformation of the DNA, and therefore would not be expected to interfere in downstream applications such as DNA replication. The 0.35 wt

  5. Crack networks in damaged glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Celine; Fortin, Jerome; Gueguen, Yves

    2013-04-01

    We investigate how cracks develop and propagate in synthetic glass samples. Cracks are introduced in glass by a thermal shock of 300oC. Crack network is documented from optical and electronic microscopy on these samples that have been submitted to a thermal shock only. Samples are cylinder of 80 mm length and 40 mm diameter. Sections were cut along the cylinder axis and perpendicular to it. Using SEM, crack lengths and apertures can be measured. Optical microscopy allows to get the crack distribution over the entire sample. The sample average crack length is 3 mm. The average aperture is 6 ± 3μm. There is however a clear difference between the sample core, where the crack network has approximatively a transverse isotrope symmetry and the outer ring, where cracks are smaller and more numerous. By measuring before and after the thermal treatment the radial P and S wave velocities in room conditions, we can determine the total crack density which is 0.24. Thermally cracked samples, as described above, were submitted to creep tests. Constant axial stress and lateral stress were applied. Several experiments were performed at different stress values. Samples are saturated for 48 hours (to get an homogeneous pore fluid distribution), the axial stress is increased up to 80% of the sample strength. Stress step tests were performed in order to get creep data. The evolution of strain (axial and radial strain) is measured using strain gages, gap sensors (for the global axial strain) and pore volume change (for the volumetric strain). Creep data are interpreted as evidence of sub-critical crack growth in the cracked glass samples. The above microstructural observations are used, together with a crack propagation model, to account for the creep behavior. Assuming that (i) the observed volumetric strain rate is due to crack propagation and (ii) crack aspect ratio is constant we calculate the creep rate. We obtain some value on the crack propagation during a 24 hours of constant

  6. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  7. Late Byzantine Mineral Soda High Alumina Glasses from Asia Minor: A New Primary Glass Production Group

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor. PMID:21526144

  8. ROLE OF THE NETWORK FORMER IN SEMICONDUCTING OXIDE GLASSES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES, * GLASS ), (*ELECTRICAL NETWORKS, GLASS ), ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES, SEEBECK EFFECT, BORATES, PHOSPHATES, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, X RAY DIFFRACTION, ANNEALING, OXIDATION, OXIDES, ELECTRODES, VANADIUM

  9. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Operational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Operational & Hangar Access Aprons, Spanning length of northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  10. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast Deflector Fences, Northeast & Southwest sides of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  11. The effect of aqueous media on the mechanical properties of fluorapatite-mullite glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Mollazadeh, S; Ajalli, Siamak; Kashi, Tahereh S Jafarzadeh; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhai; Javadpour, Jafar; Jafari, S; Youssefi, Abbas; Fazel, Akbar

    2015-11-01

    To verify the effects of alternating thermal changes in aqueous media and chemical composition on mechanical properties of apatite-mullite glass-ceramics and to investigate concentration of ions eluted from glass-ceramics in aqueous media. The glass compositions were from SiO2Al2O3P2O5CaOTiO2BaOZrO2CaF2 system. Glass-ceramics were prepared by heat-treating at 1100°C for 3h samples alternately immersed in water at 5 and 60°C. The 3-point bending strength (n=10) were determined using 3×4×25mm/bar and a universal testing machine, at a cross-head speed of 0.1mm/min. Vickers micro hardness were evaluated by applying a total of 15-20 indentations under a 100g load for 30s. Concentrations of ions eluted from glass-ceramics immersed in 60±5°C double distilled water were determined by ion chromatography. The toxicity of glass-ceramics was assessed by seeding the osteosarcoma cells (MG63) on powder for different days and their cell proliferation assessment was investigated by MTT assay. The data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance and the means were compared by Tukey's test (5% significance level). The highest flexural strength and hardness values after thermal changes belonged to TiO2 and ZrO2 containing glass-ceramics which contained lower amount of released ions. BaO containing glass-ceramic and sample with extra amount of silica showed the highest amount of reduction in their mechanical strength values. These additives enhanced the concentration of eluted ions in aqueous media. MTT results showed that glass-ceramics were almost equivalent concerning their in-vitro biological behavior. Thermal changes and chemical compositions had significant effects on flexural strength and Vickers micro-hardness values. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanical behaviour of degradable phosphate glass fibres and composites-a review.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, R; Tanner, K E

    2015-12-23

    Biodegradable materials are potentially an advantageous alternative to the traditional metallic fracture fixation devices used in the reconstruction of bone tissue defects. This is due to the occurrence of stress shielding in the surrounding bone tissue that arises from the absence of mechanical stimulus to the regenerating bone due to the mismatch between the elastic modulus of bone and the metal implant. However although degradable polymers may alleviate such issues, these inert materials possess insufficient mechanical properties to be considered as a suitable alternative to current metallic devices at sites of sufficient mechanical loading. Phosphate based glasses are an advantageous group of materials for tissue regenerative applications due to their ability to completely degrade in vivo at highly controllable rates based on the specific glass composition. Furthermore the release of the glass's constituent ions can evoke a therapeutic stimulus in vivo (i.e. osteoinduction) whilst also generating a bioactive response. The processing of these materials into fibres subsequently allows them to act as reinforcing agents in degradable polymers to simultaneously increase its mechanical properties and enhance its in vivo response. However despite the various review articles relating to the compositional influences of different phosphate glass systems, there has been limited work summarising the mechanical properties of different phosphate based glass fibres and their subsequent incorporation as a reinforcing agent in degradable composite materials. As a result, this review article examines the compositional influences behind the development of different phosphate based glass fibre compositions intended as composite reinforcing agents along with an analysis of different potential composite configurations. This includes variations in the fibre content, matrix material and fibre architecture as well as other novel composites designs.

  13. Correlation Functions and Glass Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chergui, Y.; Nehaoua, N.; Telghemti, B.; Guemid, S.; Deraddji, N. E.; Belkhir, H.; Mekki, D. E.

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the use of molecular dynamics (MD) and the code of Dl Poly, in order to study the structure of fluoride glass after melting and quenching. We are realized the processing phase liquid-phase, simulating rapid quenching at different speeds to see the effect of quenching rate on the operation of the devitrification. This technique of simulation has become a powerful tool for investigating the microscopic behaviour of matter as well as for calculating macroscopic observable quantities. As basic results, we calculated the interatomic distance, angles and statistics, which help us to know the geometric form and the structure of PbF2. These results are in experimental agreement to those reported in literature.

  14. Shock temperatures in anorthite glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Temperatures of CaAl2Si2O8 (anorthite glass) shocked to pressures between 48 and 117 GPa were measured in the range from 2500 to 5600 K, using optical pyrometry techniques. The pressure dependence of the shock temperatures deviates significantly from predictions based on a single high pressure phase. At least three phase transitions, at pressures of about 55, 85, and 100 GPa and with transition energies of about 0.5 MJ/kg each (approximately 1.5 MJ/kg total) are required to explain the shock temperature data. The phase transition at 100 GPa can possibly be identified with the stishovite melting transition. Theoretical models of the time dependence of the thermal radiation from the shocked anorthite based on the geometry of the experiment and the absorptive properties of the shocked material yields good agreement with observations, indicating that it is not necessary to invoke intrinsic time dependences to explain the data in many cases.

  15. Glass for sealing lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Leedecke, C.J.

    1981-08-28

    Glass compositions resistant to corrosion by lithium cell electrolyte and having an expansion coefficient of 45 to 85 x 10/sup -70/C/sup -1/ have been made with SiO/sub 2/, 25 to 55% by weight; B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 5 to 12%; Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 12 to 35%; CaO, 5 to 15%; MgO, 5 to 15%; SrO, 0 to 10%; and La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0 to 5%. Preferred compositions within that range contain 3 to 8% SrO and 0.5 to 2.5% La/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  16. Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line

    SciTech Connect

    Brophy, Brenor

    2015-09-30

    This project aims to enable US module manufacturers to coat glass with Enki’s state of the art tunable functionalized AR coatings at the lowest possible cost and highest possible performance by encapsulating Enki’s coating process in an integrated tool that facilitates effective process improvement through metrology and data analysis for greater quality and performance while reducing footprint, operating and capital costs. The Phase 1 objective was a fully designed manufacturing line, including fully specified equipment ready for issue of purchase requisitions; a detailed economic justification based on market prices at the end of Phase 1 and projected manufacturing costs andmore » a detailed deployment plan for the equipment.« less

  17. The peculiar behavior of the glass transition temperature of amorphous drug-polymer films coated on inert sugar spheres.

    PubMed

    Dereymaker, Aswin; Van Den Mooter, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Fluid bed coating has been proposed in the past as an alternative technology for manufacturing of drug-polymer amorphous solid dispersions, or so-called glass solutions. It has the advantage of being a one-step process, and thus omitting separate drying steps, addition of excipients, or manipulation of the dosage form. In search of an adequate sample preparation method for modulated differential scanning calorimetry analysis of beads coated with glass solutions, glass transition broadening and decrease of the glass transition temperature (Tg ) were observed with increasing particle size of crushed coated beads and crushed isolated films of indomethacin (INDO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Substituting INDO with naproxen gave comparable results. When ketoconazole was probed or the solvent in INDO-PVP films was switched to dichloromethane (DCM) or a methanol-DCM mixture, two distinct Tg regions were observed. Small particle sizes had a glass transition in the high Tg region, and large particle sizes had a glass transition in the low Tg region. This particle size-dependent glass transition was ascribed to different residual solvent amounts in the bulk and at the surface of the particles. A correlation was observed between the deviation of the Tg from that calculated from the Gordon-Taylor equation and the amount of residual solvent at the Tg of particles with different sizes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Mix proportions and properties of CLSC made from thin film transition liquid crystal display optical waste glass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Her-Yung; Chen, Jyun-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    In this study, controlled low-strength concrete (CLSC) is mixed using different water-to-binder (W/B) ratios (1.1, 1.3 and 1.5) and various percentages of sand substituted by waste LCD glass sand (0%, 10%, 20% and 30%). The properties of the fresh concrete, including compressive strength, electrical resistivity, ultrasonic pulse velocity, permeability ratio and shrinking of the CLSC, are examined. Results show that increases in amount of waste glass added result in better slump and slump flow, longer initial setting time and smaller unit weight. Compressive strength decreases with increasing W/B ratio and greater amounts of waste glass added. Both electrical resistivity and ultrasonic pulse velocity increase with increases in amount of waste glass and decreases in W/B ratio. On the contrary, the permeability ratio increases with increases in W/B ratio, but decreases with greater amounts of waste glass added. CLSC specimens cured for different durations show little changes in length with shrinkage below 0.025%. Our findings reveal that CLSC mixed using waste LCD glass in place of sand can meet design requirements. Recycling of waste LCD glass not only offers an economical substitute for aggregates, but also an ecological alternative for waste management. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Function of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Olga; Convertini, Paolo; Zhang, Zhaiyi; Wen, Yuan; Shen, Manli; Falaleeva, Marina; Stamm, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Almost all polymerase II transcripts undergo alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we review the functions of alternative splicing events that have been experimentally determined. The overall function of alternative splicing is to increase the diversity of mRNAs expressed from the genome. Alternative splicing changes proteins encoded by mRNAs, which has profound functional effects. Experimental analysis of these protein isoforms showed that alternative splicing regulates binding between proteins, between proteins and nucleic acids as well as between proteins and membranes. Alternative splicing regulates the localization of proteins, their enzymatic properties and their interaction with ligands. In most cases, changes caused by individual splicing isoforms are small. However, cells typically coordinate numerous changes in ‘splicing programs’, which can have strong effects on cell proliferation, cell survival and properties of the nervous system. Due to its widespread usage and molecular versatility, alternative splicing emerges as a central element in gene regulation that interferes with almost every biological function analyzed. PMID:22909801

  20. Dynamic Fatigue of ULE Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra Low Expansion (ULE) glass is used in a number of applications which require a low thermal expansion coefficient. One such application is telescope mirror elements. An allowable stress can be calculated for this material based upon modulus of rupture data; however, this does not take into account the problem of delayed failure. Delayed failure, due to stress corrosion can significantly shorten the lifetime of a glass article. Knowledge of the factors governing the rate of subcritical flaw growth in a given environment enables the development of relations between lifetime, applied stress and failure probability for the material under study. Dynamic fatigue is one method of obtaining the necessary information to develop these relationships. In this study, the dynamic fatigue method was used to construct time-to-failure diagrams for both 230/270 ground and optically polished samples. The grinding and polishing process reduces the surface flaw size and subsurface damage, and relieves residual stress by removing materials with successively smaller grinding media. This resulted in an increase in the strength of the optic during the grinding and polishing sequence. There was also an increase in the lifetime due to grinding and polishing. It was found that using the fatigue parameters determined from the 230/270 grit surface are not significantly different from the optically polished values. Although the lower bound of the polished samples is more conservative, neither time-to-failure curves lie beyond the upper or lower bound of the confidence limits. Therefore, designers preferring conservative limits could use samples without residual stress present (polished samples) to determine the fatigue parameters and inert Weibull parameters from samples with the service condition surface, to determine time-to-failure of the optical element.

  1. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates overmore » the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington

  2. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates overmore » the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington

  3. New laser glass for short pulsed laser applications: the BLG80 (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Simi A.

    2017-03-01

    For achieving highest peak powers in a solid state laser (SSL) system, significant energy output and short pulses are necessary. For mode-locked lasers, it is well-known from the Fourier theorem that the largest gain bandwidths produce the narrowest pulse-widths; thus are transform limited. For an inhomogeneously broadened line width of a laser medium, if the intensity of pulses follow a Gaussian function, then the resulting mode-locked pulse will have a Gaussian shape with the emission bandwidth/pulse duration relationship of pulse ≥ 0.44?02/c. Thus, for high peak power SSL systems, laser designers incorporate gain materials capable of broad emission bandwidths. Available energy outputs from a phosphate glass host doped with rare-earth ions are unparalleled. Unfortunately, the emission bandwidths achievable from glass based gain materials are typically many factors smaller when compared to the Ti:Sapphire crystal. In order to overcome this limitation, a hybrid "mixed" laser glass amplifier - OPCPA approach was developed. The Texas petawatt laser that is currently in operation at the University of Texas-Austin and producing high peak powers uses this hybrid architecture. In this mixed-glass laser design, a phosphate and a silicate glass is used in series to achieve a broader bandwidth required before compression. Though proven, this technology is still insufficient for the future compact petawatt and exawatt systems capable of producing high energies and shorter pulse durations. New glasses with bandwidths that are two and three times larger than what is now available from glass hosts is needed if there is to be an alternative to Ti:Sapphire for laser designers. In this paper, we present new materials that may meet the necessary characteristics and demonstrate the laser and emission characteristics these through the internal and external studies.

  4. Alternative Salary Auction Mechanisms for the Navy: An Experimental Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    33 2. Fidelity of WTP Information ............................................................33 3. Effects of Competition...70 3. WTA and WTP Control ....................................................................70 4. Bidding...jar of pennies would be $18, which is the maximum that buyer’s willingness to pay ( WTP ) for that object. 8 2. First-price and Second-price

  5. Dual-view integral imaging three-dimensional display using polarized glasses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Lv, Guo-Jiao; Deng, Huan; Zhao, Bai-Chuan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2018-02-20

    We propose a dual-view integral imaging (DVII) three-dimensional (3D) display using polarized glasses. The DVII 3D display consists of a display panel, a polarized parallax barrier, a microlens array, and two pairs of polarized glasses. Two kinds of elemental images, which are captured from two different 3D scenes, are alternately arranged on the display panel. The polarized parallax barrier is attached to the display panel and composed of two kinds of units that are also alternately arranged. The polarization directions between adjacent units are perpendicular. The polarization directions of the two pairs of polarized glasses are the same as those of the two kinds of units of the polarized parallax barrier, respectively. The lights emitted from the two kinds of elemental images are modulated by the corresponding polarizer units and microlenses, respectively. Two different 3D images are reconstructed in the viewing zone and separated by using two pairs of polarized glasses. A prototype of the DVII 3D display is developed and two 3D images can be presented simultaneously, verifying the hypothesis.

  6. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    DOEpatents

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  7. Light weight optics made by glass thermal forming for future x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Anita; Vongehr, Monika; Friedrich, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Future X-ray observatory missions, such as IXO or Gen-X, require grazing incidence optics of large collecting area in combination with a very good angular resolution. Wolter type I X-ray telescopes made of slumped glass segments could be a possible alternative to silicon pore optics. To achieve these requirements we develop slumping methods for high accuracy segments by experimental means. In particular, we follow the approach of indirect slumping and aim to produce parabola and hyperbola in one piece. In order to avoid internal stress in the glass segments the thermal expansion coefficient of the glass should closely match the thermal expansion of the mould material. Currently we focus on a combination of the alloy KOVAR for the mould and D263 for the glass; additionally a platinum-coated silica as mould material is studied. We investigate the behaviour of both materials during slumping in order to obtain the ideal environment for the slumping process. Additionally we report on the design of different metrology methods to measure the figure and thickness variations of the glass segments in visual light, e.g. interference, and on bearings used for shape measurements and integration.

  8. Low temperature fabrication of biodegradable sugar glass microneedles for transdermal drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Martin, C J; Allender, C J; Brain, K R; Morrissey, A; Birchall, J C

    2012-02-28

    Transdermal drug delivery is limited by the barrier properties of the outer skin layer. Microneedles (MNs) effectively circumvent the skin barrier to offer this route as a potential alternative to oral and parenteral delivery of therapeutics. Biodegradable microneedles offer particular advantages however processing commonly requires elevated temperatures that may adversely affect heat-labile molecules and macromolecules. In this study, solid amorphous sugar glasses containing low residual quantities of water were created by dehydration of trehalose and sucrose sugar combination solutions. Biodegradable sugar glass MNs were fabricated following optimisation of a simple and novel low temperature vacuum deposition micromoulding methodology. These had absolute morphological fidelity to silicon master structures and demonstrated sufficient structural rigidity to efficiently penetrate excised human breast skin. Sugar glass MNs incorporating a marker compound dissolved rapidly and completely in situ releasing dye into deeper skin layers. The biological activity of a model macromolecule was partially retained over extended storage following incorporation into sugar glass. This is the first demonstration that MNs created from amorphous sugar glasses can be used for incorporating and delivering molecules, and potentially biologically active macromolecules, via the transdermal route. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass surfaces for fiber reinforced composite implants via surface ablation by Excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Kulkova, Julia; Moritz, Niko; Huhtinen, Hannu; Mattila, Riina; Donati, Ivan; Marsich, Eleonora; Paoletti, Sergio; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2017-11-01

    In skeletal reconstructions, composites, such as bisphenol-A-glycidyldimethacrylate resin reinforced with glass fibers, are potentially useful alternatives to metallic implants. Recently, we reported a novel method to prepare bioactive surfaces for these composites. Surface etching by Excimer laser was used to expose bioactive glass granules embedded in the resin. The purpose of this study was to analyze two types of bioactive surfaces created by this technique. The surfaces contained bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite granules. The selected processing parameters were adequate for the creation of the surfaces. However, the use of porous hydroxyapatite prevented the complete exposure the granules. In cell culture, for bioactive glass coatings, the pattern of proliferation of MG63 cells was comparable to that in the positive control group (Ti6Al4V) while inferior cell proliferation was observed on the surfaces containing hydroxyapatite granules. Scanning electron microscopy revealed osteointegration of implants with both types of surfaces. The technique is suitable for the exposure of solid bioactive glass granules. However, the long-term performance of the surfaces needs further assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental Investigations on the effect of Additive on the Tensile Properties of Fiber Glass Fabric Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava Sai Divya, A.; Raghu Kumar, B., Dr; Lakshmi Narayana, G., Dr

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the effect of additives on tensile behaviour of fiber glass fabric at lamina level to explore an alternative skin material for the outer body of aerospace applications and machines. This experimental work investigates the effect of silica concentration in epoxy resin lapox L-12 on the tensile properties of glass fabric lamina of 4H-satin weave having 3.6 mm thickness. The lamina was prepared by using hand lay-up method and tests were conducted on it. Various tensile properties values obtained from experimentation were compared for four glass fiber lamina composites fabricated by adding the silica powder to resin bath. The effect of variations in silica concentration (0% SiO2, 5% SiO2, 10% SiO2 and 15% SiO2) on the tensile properties of prepared material revealed that maximum stiffness was obtained at 15% and yield strength at 10% SiO2 concentration in glass fiber lamina. Increasing the silica concentration beyond 10% had led to deterioration in the material properties. The experimentation that was carried out on test specimen was reasonably successful as the effect of silica powder as an additive in glass fiber lamina enhanced the mechanical properties up to certain limit. The underpinning microscopic behaviour at the source of these observations will be investigated in a follow up work.

  11. Practical automated glass selection and the design of apochromats with large field of view.

    PubMed

    Siew, Ronian

    2016-11-10

    This paper presents an automated approach to the selection of optical glasses for the design of an apochromatic lens with large field of view, based on a design originally provided by Yang et al. [Appl. Opt.55, 5977 (2016)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.55.005977]. Following from this reference's preliminary optimized structure, it is shown that the effort of glass selection is significantly reduced by using the global optimization feature in the Zemax optical design program. The glass selection process is very fast, complete within minutes, and the key lies in automating the substitution of glasses found from the global search without the need to simultaneously optimize any other lens parameter during the glass search. The result is an alternate optimized version of the lens from the above reference possessing zero axial secondary color within the visible spectrum and a large field of view. Supplementary material is provided in the form of Zemax and text files, before and after final optimization.

  12. Review: emerging developments in the use of bioactive glasses for treating infected prosthetic joints.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Mohamed N; Bal, B Sonny; Huang, Wenhai

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial contamination of implanted orthopedic prostheses is a serious complication that requires prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy, major surgery to remove infected implants, bone reconstruction, and considerable morbidity. Local delivery of high doses of antibiotics using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cement as the carrier, along with systemic antibiotics, is the standard treatment. However, PMMA is not biodegradable, and it can present a surface on which secondary bacterial infection can occur. PMMA spacers used to treat deep implant infections must be removed after resolution of the infection. Alternative carrier materials for antibiotics that could also restore deficient bone are therefore of interest. In this article, the development of bioactive glass-based materials as a delivery system for antibiotics is reviewed. Bioactive glass is osteoconductive, converts to hydroxyapatite, and heals to hard and soft tissues in vivo. Consequently, bioactive glass-based carriers can provide the combined functions of controlled local antibiotic delivery and bone restoration. Recently-developed borate bioactive glasses are of particular interest since they have controllable degradation rates coupled with desirable properties related to osteogenesis and angiogenesis. Such glasses have the potential for providing a new class of biomaterials, as substitutes for PMMA, in the treatment of deep bone infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Current status of photoprotection by window glass, automobile glass, window films, and sunglasses.

    PubMed

    Almutawa, Fahad; Vandal, Robert; Wang, Steven Q; Lim, Henry W

    2013-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has known adverse effects on the skin and eyes. Practitioners are becoming more aware of the importance of outdoor photoprotection. However, little attention is directed to the exposure of the skin and eyes to UVR through the window glass or sunglasses. The amount of ultraviolet transmission through glass depends mainly on the type of the glass. All types of commercial and automobile glass block the majority of ultraviolet-B; however, the degree of ultraviolet-A transmission depends on the type of glass. Laminated glass offers better UVA protection than tempered glass; new safety regulations for automobiles may result in increased use of laminated glass for side windows. Window films can be applied to glass to increase UVR protection. Sunglasses need to be compliant with one of the national standards; a wraparound style or side shields offer the best protection. Increased understanding by practitioners on the transmission of UVR through glass, window films, and sunglasses would allow them to better educate the public and to better manage photosensitive patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO₄) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe,Cr)₂O₄), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside of HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscositymore » arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies.« less

  15. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. H.

    2015-08-18

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO 4) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr) 2O 4), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic,more » thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies. Higher waste loadings and more efficient processing strategies will reduce the overall HLW Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vitrification facilities mission life.« less

  16. Bone Graft Alternatives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Bone Graft Alternatives Patient Education Committee Patient Education Committee ... procedure such as spinal fusion. What Types of Bone Grafts are There? Bone grafts that are transplanted ...

  17. SOLVENT WASTE REDUCTION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication contains edited versions of presentations on this subject made at five Technology Transfer seminars in 1988. Chapters are included on land disposal regulations and requirements; waste solvent disposal alternatives from various industries such as process equipment...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    strategic locations along major highways to improve the mobility of alternative fuel vehicles. To designate providers and purchasers, and reestablishing the goal of achieving strategic deployment of fueling

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Science.gov Websites

    up to 100% of the amount of the loan for an eligible project. Eligible projects may include the Financing Bank. For more information, see the Loan Guarantee Program website and the Alternative Fuel

  20. GLOBAL ALTERNATIVE FUTURE SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One way to examine possible future outcomes for environmental protection is through the development and analysis of alternative future scenarios. This type of assessment postulates two or more different paths that social and environmental development might take, using correspond...