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Sample records for alters intratumoral drug

  1. Intratumoral Immune Cell Densities Are Associated with Lung Adenocarcinoma Gene Alterations.

    PubMed

    Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Alifano, Marco; Pécuchet, Nicolas; Biton, Jérôme; Becht, Etienne; Goc, Jeremy; Germain, Claire; Ouakrim, Hanane; Régnard, Jean-François; Cremer, Isabelle; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Blons, Hélène; Damotte, Diane

    2016-12-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells affect lung cancer outcome. However, the factors that influence the composition and function of the tumor immune environment remain poorly defined and need investigation, particularly in the era of immunotherapy. To determine whether the tumoral immune environment is related to lung adenocarcinoma mutations. This retrospective cohort included 316 consecutive patients with lung adenocarcinoma (225 men; 258 smokers) studied from 2001 to 2005 in a single center. We investigated the association of densities of intratumoral mature dendritic cells (mDCs), CD8(+) T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages with clinical and pathological variables and tumor cell mutation profiles obtained by next-generation sequencing. In 282 tumors, we found 460 mutations, mainly in TP53 (59%), KRAS (40%), STK11 (24%), and EGFR (14%). Intratumoral CD8(+) T-cell density was high in smokers (P = 0.02) and TP53-mutated tumors (P = 0.02) and low in BRAF-mutated tumors (P = 0.005). Intratumoral mDC density was high with low pathological tumor stage (P = 0.01) and low with STK11 mutation (P = 0.004). Intratumoral neutrophil density was high and low with BRAF mutation (P = 0.04) and EGFR mutation (P = 0.02), respectively. Intratumoral macrophage density was low with EGFR mutation (P = 0.01). Intratumoral CD8(+) T-cell and mDC densities remained strong independent markers of overall survival (P = 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively). Intratumoral immune cell densities (mDCs, CD8(+) T cells, neutrophils, macrophages) were significantly associated with molecular alterations in adenocarcinoma underlying the interactions between cancer cells and their microenvironment.

  2. Mathematical modeling analysis of intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents and drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Popilski, Hen; Stepensky, David

    2015-05-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by complex morphology. Numerous factors relating to the composition of the cells and tumor stroma, vascularization and drainage of fluids affect the local microenvironment within a specific location inside the tumor. As a result, the intratumoral drug/drug delivery system (DDS) disposition following systemic or local administration is non-homogeneous and its complexity reflects the differences in the local microenvironment. Mathematical models can be used to analyze the intratumoral drug/DDS disposition and pharmacological effects and to assist in choice of optimal anticancer treatment strategies. The mathematical models that have been applied by different research groups to describe the intratumoral disposition of anticancer drugs/DDSs are summarized in this article. The properties of these models and of their suitability for prediction of the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition and pharmacological effects are reviewed. Currently available mathematical models appear to neglect some of the major factors that govern the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition, and apparently possess limited prediction capabilities. More sophisticated and detailed mathematical models and their extensive validation are needed for reliable prediction of different treatment scenarios and for optimization of drug treatment in the individual cancer patients.

  3. Overcoming intratumor heterogeneity of polygenic cancer drug resistance with improved biomarker integration.

    PubMed

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2012-12-01

    Improvements in technology and resources are helping to advance our understanding of cancer-initiating events as well as factors involved with tumor progression, adaptation, and evasion of therapy. Tumors are well known to contain diverse cell populations and intratumor heterogeneity affords neoplasms with a diverse set of biologic characteristics that can be used to evolve and adapt. Intratumor heterogeneity has emerged as a major hindrance to improving cancer patient care. Polygenic cancer drug resistance necessitates reconsidering drug designs to include polypharmacology in pursuit of novel combinatorial agents having multitarget activity to overcome the diverse and compensatory signaling pathways in which cancer cells use to survive and evade therapy. Advances will require integration of different biomarkers such as genomics and imaging to provide for more adequate elucidation of the spatially varying location, type, and extent of diverse intratumor signaling molecules to provide for a rationale-based personalized cancer medicine strategy.

  4. Overcoming Intratumor Heterogeneity of Polygenic Cancer Drug Resistance with Improved Biomarker Integration1

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in technology and resources are helping to advance our understanding of cancer-initiating events as well as factors involved with tumor progression, adaptation, and evasion of therapy. Tumors are well known to contain diverse cell populations and intratumor heterogeneity affords neoplasms with a diverse set of biologic characteristics that can be used to evolve and adapt. Intratumor heterogeneity has emerged as a major hindrance to improving cancer patient care. Polygenic cancer drug resistance necessitates reconsidering drug designs to include polypharmacology in pursuit of novel combinatorial agents having multitarget activity to overcome the diverse and compensatory signaling pathways in which cancer cells use to survive and evade therapy. Advances will require integration of different biomarkers such as genomics and imaging to provide for more adequate elucidation of the spatially varying location, type, and extent of diverse intratumor signaling molecules to provide for a rationale-based personalized cancer medicine strategy. PMID:23308059

  5. Chemical Structure and Concentration of Intratumor Catabolites Determine Efficacy of Antibody Drug Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shang-Fan; Ma, Yong; Xu, Keyang; Dragovich, Peter S.; Pillow, Thomas H.; Liu, Luna; Del Rosario, Geoffrey; He, Jintang; Pei, Zhonghua; Sadowsky, Jack D.; Erickson, Hans K.; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Khojasteh, S. Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent technological advances in quantifying antibody drug conjugate (ADC) species, such as total antibody, conjugated antibody, conjugated drug, and payload drug in circulation, the correlation of their exposures with the efficacy of ADC outcomes in vivo remains challenging. Here, the chemical structures and concentrations of intratumor catabolites were investigated to better understand the drivers of ADC in vivo efficacy. Anti-CD22 disulfide-linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD-dimer) conjugates containing methyl- and cyclobutyl-substituted disulfide linkers exhibited strong efficacy in a WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse model, whereas an ADC derived from a cyclopropyl linker was inactive. Total ADC antibody concentrations and drug-to-antibody ratios (DAR) in circulation were similar between the cyclobutyl-containing ADC and the cyclopropyl-containing ADC; however, the former afforded the release of the PBD-dimer payload in the tumor, but the latter only generated a nonimmolating thiol-containing catabolite that did not bind to DNA. These results suggest that intratumor catabolite analysis rather than systemic pharmacokinetic analysis may be used to better explain and predict ADC in vivo efficacy. These are good examples to demonstrate that the chemical nature and concentration of intratumor catabolites depend on the linker type used for drug conjugation, and the potency of the released drug moiety ultimately determines the ADC in vivo efficacy. PMID:27417182

  6. Potential role of intratumor bacteria in mediating tumor resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Geller, Leore T; Barzily-Rokni, Michal; Danino, Tal; Jonas, Oliver H; Shental, Noam; Nejman, Deborah; Gavert, Nancy; Zwang, Yaara; Cooper, Zachary A; Shee, Kevin; Thaiss, Christoph A; Reuben, Alexandre; Livny, Jonathan; Avraham, Roi; Frederick, Dennie T; Ligorio, Matteo; Chatman, Kelly; Johnston, Stephen E; Mosher, Carrie M; Brandis, Alexander; Fuks, Garold; Gurbatri, Candice; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Kim, Michael; Hurd, Mark W; Katz, Matthew; Fleming, Jason; Maitra, Anirban; Smith, David A; Skalak, Matt; Bu, Jeffrey; Michaud, Monia; Trauger, Sunia A; Barshack, Iris; Golan, Talia; Sandbank, Judith; Flaherty, Keith T; Mandinova, Anna; Garrett, Wendy S; Thayer, Sarah P; Ferrone, Cristina R; Huttenhower, Curtis; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Gevers, Dirk; Wargo, Jennifer A; Golub, Todd R; Straussman, Ravid

    2017-09-15

    Growing evidence suggests that microbes can influence the efficacy of cancer therapies. By studying colon cancer models, we found that bacteria can metabolize the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine) into its inactive form, 2',2'-difluorodeoxyuridine. Metabolism was dependent on the expression of a long isoform of the bacterial enzyme cytidine deaminase (CDDL), seen primarily in Gammaproteobacteria. In a colon cancer mouse model, gemcitabine resistance was induced by intratumor Gammaproteobacteria, dependent on bacterial CDDL expression, and abrogated by cotreatment with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Gemcitabine is commonly used to treat pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and we hypothesized that intratumor bacteria might contribute to drug resistance of these tumors. Consistent with this possibility, we found that of the 113 human PDACs that were tested, 86 (76%) were positive for bacteria, mainly Gammaproteobacteria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Advances in image-guided intratumoral drug delivery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Luis; Patel, Ravi B; Wu, Hanping; Krupka, Tianyi; Exner, Agata A

    2017-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery provides a means for treating a variety of diseases with minimal systemic involvement while concurrently monitoring treatment efficacy. These therapies are particularly useful to the field of interventional oncology, where elevation of tumor drug levels, reduction of systemic side effects and post-therapy assessment are essential. This review highlights three such image-guided procedures: transarterial chemoembolization, drug-eluting implants and convection-enhanced delivery. Advancements in medical imaging technology have resulted in a growing number of new applications, including image-guided drug delivery. This minimally invasive approach provides a comprehensive answer to many challenges with local drug delivery. Future evolution of imaging devices, image-acquisition techniques and multifunctional delivery agents will lead to a paradigm shift in patient care. PMID:22816134

  8. Osteoblasts promote castration-resistant prostate cancer by altering intratumoral steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hagberg Thulin, Malin; Nilsson, Maria E; Thulin, Pontus; Céraline, Jocelyn; Ohlsson, Claes; Damber, Jan-Erik; Welén, Karin

    2016-02-15

    The skeleton is the preferred site for prostate cancer (PC) metastasis leading to incurable castration-resistant disease. The increased expression of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes found in bone metastatic tissue from patients suggests that up-regulated steroidogenesis might contribute to tumor growth at the metastatic site. Because of the overall sclerotic phenotype, we hypothesize that osteoblasts regulate the intratumoral steroidogenesis of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in bone. We here show that osteoblasts alter the steroidogenic transcription program in CRPC cells, closely mimicking the gene expression pattern described in CRPC. Osteoblast-stimulated LNCaP-19 cells displayed an increased expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes (CYP11A1, HSD3B1, and AKR1C3), estrogen signaling-related genes (CYP19A1, and ESR2), and genes for DHT-inactivating enzymes (UGT2B7, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17). The observed osteoblast-induced effect was exclusive to osteogenic CRPC cells (LNCaP-19) in contrast to osteolytic PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. The altered steroid enzymatic pattern was specific for the intratibial tumors and verified by immunohistochemistry in tissue specimens from LNCaP-19 xenograft tumors. Additionally, the overall steroidogenic effect was reflected by corresponding levels of progesterone and testosterone in serum from castrated mice with intratibial xenografts. A bi-directional interplay was demonstrated since both proliferation and Esr2 expression of osteoblasts were induced by CRPC cells in steroid-depleted conditions. Together, our results demonstrate that osteoblasts are important mediators of the intratumoral steroidogenesis of CRPC and for castration-resistant growth in bone. Targeting osteoblasts may therefore be important in the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of DNA nano-meso-microspheres as drug delivery carriers for intratumoral chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enriquez Schumacher, Iris Vanessa

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy results in systemic toxicity which severely limits effectiveness and often adversely affects patient quality of life. There is a need to find new drugs and delivery methods for less toxic therapy. Previous studies concerning DNA complexing with chemotherapy drugs suggest unique opportunities for DNA as a mesosphere drug carrier. The overall objective of this research was devoted to the synthesis and evaluation of novel DNA-drug nano-mesospheres designed for localized chemotherapy via intratumoral injection. My research presents DNA nano-meso-microspheres (DNA-MS) that were prepared using a modified steric stabilization method originally developed in this lab for the preparation of albumin MS. DNA-MS were prepared with glutaraldehyde covalent crosslinking (genipin crosslinking was attempted) through the DNA base pairs. In addition, novel crosslinking of DNA-MS was demonstrated using chromium, gadolinium, or iron cations through the DNA phosphate groups. Covalent and ionic crosslinked DNA-MS syntheses yielded smooth and spherical particle morphologies with multimodal size distributions. Optimized DNA-MS syntheses produced particles with narrow and normal size distributions in the 50nm to 5mum diameter size range. In aqueous dispersions approximately 200% swelling was observed with dispersion stability for more than 48 hours. Typical process conditions included a 1550rpm initial mixing speed and particle filtration through 20mum filters to facilitate preparation. DNA-MS were in situ loaded during synthesis for the first time with mitoxantrone, 5-fluorouracil, and methotrexate. DNA-MS drug incorporation was 12%(w/w) for mitoxantrone, 9%(w/w) for methotrexate, and 5%(w/w) for 5-fluorouracil. In vitro drug release into phosphate buffered saline was observed for over 35 days by minimum sink release testing. The effect of gadolinium crosslink concentration on mitoxantrone release was evaluated at molar equivalences in the range of 20% to

  10. P450 inhibitor ketoconazole increased the intratumor drug levels and antitumor activity of fenretinide in human neuroblastoma xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Barcons, Lluis; Maurer, Barry J; Kang, Min H; Reynolds, C Patrick

    2017-03-24

    We previously reported that concurrent ketoconazole, an oral anti-fungal agent and P450 enzyme inhibitor, increased plasma levels of the cytotoxic retinoid, fenretinide (4-HPR) in mice. We have now determined the effects of concurrent ketoconazole on 4-HPR cytotoxic dose-response in four neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines in vitro and on 4-HPR activity against two cell line-derived, subcutaneous NB xenografts (CDX) and three patient-derived NB xenografts (PDX). Cytotoxicity in vitro was assessed by DIMSCAN assay. Xenografted animals were treated with 4-HPR/LXS (240 mg/kg/day) + ketoconazole (38 mg/kg/day) in divided oral doses in cycles of five continuous days a week. In one model, intratumoral levels of 4-HPR and metabolites were assessed by HPLC assay, and in two models intratumoral apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL assay, on Day 5 of the first cycle. Antitumor activity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier event-free survival (EFS). The in vitro cytotoxicity of 4-HPR was not affected by ketoconazole (P ≥ 0.06). Ketoconazole increased intratumoral levels of 4-HPR (P = 0.02), of the active 4-oxo-4-HPR metabolite (P = 0.04), and intratumoral apoptosis (P ≤ 0.002), compared to 4-HPR/LXS-alone. Concurrent ketoconazole increased EFS in both CDX models compared to 4-HPR/LXS-alone (P ≤ 0.01). 4-HPR + ketoconazole also increased EFS in PDX models compared to controls (P ≤ 0.03). Thus, concurrent ketoconazole decreased 4-HPR metabolism with resultant increases of plasma and intratumoral drug levels and antitumor effects in neuroblastoma murine xenografts. These results support the clinical testing of concurrent ketoconazole and oral fenretinide in neuroblastoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Drug interactions of lipid-altering drugs.

    PubMed

    Bays, H E; Dujovne, C A

    1998-11-01

    The use of lipid-altering drugs has been shown to reduce the progression of atherosclerotic lesions and reduce the risk of atherosclerotic events (such as myocardial infarction and stroke). In general, these lipid-altering drugs are well tolerated but there is the potential for drug interactions. For example, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors may interact with macrolides, azalides, azole antifungals and cyclosporin. Resins (such as cholestyramine and colestipol) may impair the absorption of many concurrent medications. Fibrates have potential drug interactions with warfarin, furosemide (frusemide), oral hypoglycaemics and probenecid. Nicotinic acid (niacin) may have potential drug interactions with high dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), uricosuric agents (such as sulfapyrazone) and alcohol (ethanol). Finally, probucol may have potential drug interactions with antidysrhythmics, tricyclic antidepressants and phenothiazines. In addition, lipid-altering drugs, used in combination, may have the potential for drug interactions, enhancing some of the risks of adverse effects, such as myositis and hepatotoxicity. Therefore, in order to use lipid-altering drugs in the most effective, and safest manner, it is important for the clinician to have an understanding of the mechanisms of potential drug interactions, which drug interactions may theoretically occur, and specifically, which spe cific drug interactions have already been described.

  12. A novel doxorubicin-loaded in situ forming gel based high concentration of phospholipid for intratumoral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenqi; Chen, Hui; Shan, Fengying; Zhou, Jing; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Ling; Gong, Tao

    2014-10-06

    The purpose of this study was to develop a safe and effective drug delivery system for local chemotherapy. A novel injectable in-situ-forming gel system was prepared using small molecule materials, including phospholipids, medium chain triglycerides (MCTs), and ethanol. Thus, this new sustained release system was named PME (first letter of phospholipids, MCT, and ethanol). PME has a well-defined molecule structure, a high degree of safety, and better biocompatible characteristics. It was in sol state with low viscosity in vitro and turned into a solid or semisolid gel in situ after injection. When loaded with doxorubicin (Dox), PME-D (doxorubicin-loaded PME) exhibited notably antitumor efficiency in S180 sarcoma tumors bearing mice after a single intratumoral injection. In vitro, PME-D had remarkable antiproliferative efficacies against MCF-7 breast cancer cells for over 5 days. Moreover, the initial burst effect can hardly be observed from PME system, which was different from many other in-situ-forming gels. The in vivo biodistribution study showed the high Dox concentration in tumors compared with other major organs after PME-D intratumoral administration. The strong signal in tumors was retained for more than 14 days after one single injection. The high concentration of Dox in tumor and long-term retention may explain the superior therapeutic efficacy and reduced side effects. The PME-D in-situ-forming gel system is a promising drug delivery system for local chemotherapy.

  13. Tumor pH-responsive Release of Drug-conjugated Micelles from Fiber Fragments for Intratumoral Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    He, Nan; Chen, Zhoujiang; Yuan, Jiang; Zhao, Long; Chen, Maohua; Wang, Tao; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-09-06

    The tumor accumulation of micelles is essential to enhance the cellular uptake and extend the release of chemotherapeutic agents. In the previous study camptothecin (CPT)-conjugated micelles (MCPT) were constructed with disulfide linkages and folate moieties for reduction-sensitive release and cell-selective uptake. This study proposes a strategy to integrate the promicelle polymers (PMCPT) into fiber fragments for intratumoral injection, realizing acid-liable release of PMCPT in response to acidic tumor microenvironment and spontaneous self-assembly into MCPT. Acid-liable 2-propionic-3-methylmaleic anhydride (CDM)-linked poly(ethylene glycol) initiates the ring-opening polymerization of DL-lactide as the fiber matrix. There is no apparent burst release of MCPT from fiber fragments and around 80% of accumulated releases after incubation in pH 6.5 buffers for 40 days. Compared to MCPT freshly prepared via solvent evaporation, the micelles released from fiber fragments reveal similar profiles, such as folate-mediated cellular uptake and glutathione-sensitive drug release. Taking advantage of the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) effect of tetraphenylethylene (TPE) derivatives, TPE-conjugated micelles (MTPE) have been successfully been used to track the self-assembly into micelles after release from fibers and subsequent cell internalization into cytosol. The self-assembly-induced fluorescence light-up was also detected after intratumoral injection of fiber fragments. Compared with CPT-loaded fiber fragments and intratumoral or intravenous injection of free MCPT, the sustained release from fiber fragments and high accumulation of micelles in tumors results in significantly higher inhibition of tumor growths, prolongation of animal survivals and induction of tumor cell apoptosis. Thus, the integration of double targeting and double stimuli-responsiveness into fragmented fibers provides a feasible strategy to realize the sustained micelle release from fibers and

  14. Doxorubicin-Loaded QuadraSphere Microspheres: Plasma Pharmacokinetics and Intratumoral Drug Concentration in an Animal Model of Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Hun; Liapi, Eleni A.; Cornell, Curt; Reb, Philippe; Buijs, Manon; Vossen, Josephina A.; Ventura, Veronica Prieto

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, doxorubicin-loaded poly (vinyl alcohol-sodium acrylate) copolymer microspheres [QuadraSphere microspheres (QSMs)] for transcatheter arterial delivery in an animal model of liver cancer. Doxorubicin loading efficiency and release profile were first tested in vitro. In vivo, 15 rabbits, implanted with a Vx-2 tumor in the liver, were divided into three groups of five rabbits each, based on the time of euthanasia. Twenty-five milligrams of QSMs was diluted in 10 ml of a 10 mg/ml doxorubicin solution and 10 ml of nonionic contrast medium for a total volume of 20 ml. One milliliter of a drug-loaded QSM solution containing 5 mg of doxorubicin was injected into the tumor feeding artery. Plasma doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations, and intratumoral and peritumoral doxorubicin tissue concentrations, were measured. Tumor specimens were pathologically evaluated to record tumor necrosis. As a control, one animal was blandly embolized with plain QSMs in each group. In vitro testing of QSM doxorubicin loadability and release over time showed 82–94% doxorubicin loadability within 2 h and 6% release within the first 6 h after loading, followed by a slow release pattern. In vivo, the doxorubicin plasma concentration declined at 40 min. The peak doxorubicin intratumoral concentration was observed at 3 days and remained detectable till the study’s end point (7 days). Mean percentage tumor cell death in the doxorubicin QSM group was 90% at 7 days and 60% in the bland QSM embolization group. In conclusion, QSMs can be efficiently loaded with doxorubicin. Initial experiments with doxorubicin-loaded QSMs show a safe pharmacokinetic profile and effective tumor killing in an animal model of liver cancer. PMID:20087738

  15. Doxorubicin-Loaded QuadraSphere Microspheres: Plasma Pharmacokinetics and Intratumoral Drug Concentration in an Animal Model of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kwang-Hun; Liapi, Eleni A.; Cornell, Curt; Reb, Philippe; Buijs, Manon; Vossen, Josephina A.; Ventura, Veronica Prieto; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro and in vivo, doxorubicin-loaded poly (vinyl alcohol-sodium acrylate) copolymer microspheres [QuadraSphere microspheres (QSMs)] for transcatheter arterial delivery in an animal model of liver cancer. Doxorubicin loading efficiency and release profile were first tested in vitro. In vivo, 15 rabbits, implanted with a Vx-2 tumor in the liver, were divided into three groups of five rabbits each, based on the time of euthanasia. Twenty-five milligrams of QSMs was diluted in 10 ml of a 10 mg/ml doxorubicin solution and 10 ml of nonionic contrast medium for a total volume of 20 ml. One milliliter of a drug-loaded QSM solution containing 5 mg of doxorubicin was injected into the tumor feeding artery. Plasma doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations, and intratumoral and peritumoral doxorubicin tissue concentrations, were measured. Tumor specimens were pathologically evaluated to record tumor necrosis. As a control, one animal was blandly embolized with plain QSMs in each group. In vitro testing of QSM doxorubicin loadability and release over time showed 82-94% doxorubicin loadability within 2 h and 6% release within the first 6 h after loading, followed by a slow release pattern. In vivo, the doxorubicin plasma concentration declined at 40 min. The peak doxorubicin intratumoral concentration was observed at 3 days and remained detectable till the study's end point (7 days). Mean percentage tumor cell death in the doxorubicin QSM group was 90% at 7 days and 60% in the bland QSM embolization group. In conclusion, QSMs can be efficiently loaded with doxorubicin. Initial experiments with doxorubicin-loaded QSMs show a safe pharmacokinetic profile and effective tumor killing in an animal model of liver cancer.

  16. MRI monitoring of intratumoral drug delivery and prediction of the therapeutic effect with a multifunctional thermosensitive liposome.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Tatsuaki; Foltz, Warren D; Ernsting, Mark J; Lee, Carol M; Tannock, Ian F; May, Jonathan P; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2011-09-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of drug distribution enables real-time monitoring and prediction of therapeutic responses to treatment. We have developed a thermosensitive liposomal formulation (HaT: Hyperthermia-activated-cytoToxic) consisting of DPPC and Brij78, a formulation that enhanced drug delivery compared to the lyso-lipid temperature sensitive liposomes (LTSL). Here we report the development of a multifunctional HaT liposome co-encapsulating Gd-DTPA (an MRI probe) and doxorubicin (DOX), which simultaneously releases and reports on drug delivery in a locally heated tumor. The temperature-dependent release profiles of DOX from HaT were closely related to the change in the MR T(1) relaxation time, in which DOX was 100% released at 40-42 °C in 3 min, accompanied by a 60% reduction in T(1). By T(1) relaxometry analysis, no Gd-DTPA leakage was detected in 30 min at 30-37 °C. In the in vivo study, DOX uptake in the tumor was quantitatively correlated with T(1) response (R(2) = 0.98) and the patterns of the T(1) image and the intratumoral DOX uptake were matched, in which both signals were predominantly detected in the highly perfused tumor periphery. Finally, the extent of T(1) relaxation enhancement in the heated tumor successfully predicted the antitumor efficacy in a standard pharmacological response model (R(2) = 0.98). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intratumoral therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using genetically engineered transferrin for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dennis J; Kwan, Byron H; Chao, Felix C; Nicolaides, Theodore P; Phillips, Joanna J; Lam, Gretchen Y; Mason, Anne B; Weiss, William A; Kamei, Daniel T

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor with median survival of only 12 to 15 months under the current standard of care. To both increase tumor specificity and decrease nonspecific side effects, recent experimental strategies in the treatment of GBM have focused on targeting cell surface receptors, including the transferrin (Tf) receptor, that are overexpressed in many cancers. A major limitation of Tf-based therapeutics is the short association of Tf within the cell to deliver its payload. We previously developed two mutant Tf molecules, K206E/R632A Tf and K206E/K534A Tf, in which iron is locked into each of the two homologous lobes. Relative to wild-type Tf, we showed enhanced delivery of diphtheria toxin (DT) from these mutants to a monolayer culture of HeLa cells. Here, we extend the application of our Tf mutants to the treatment of GBM. In vitro treatment of Tf mutants to a monolayer culture of glioma cells showed enhanced cellular association as well as enhanced delivery of conjugated DT. Treatment of GBM xenografts with mutant Tf-conjugated DT resulted in pronounced regression in vivo, indicating their potential use as drug carriers.

  18. Intra-tumor distribution of PEGylated liposome upon repeated injection: No possession by prior dose.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Abu Lila, Amr S; Nishio, Miho; Tanaka, Masao; Ando, Hidenori; Kiwada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2015-12-28

    Liposomes have proven to be a viable means for the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to solid tumors. However, significant variability has been detected in their intra-tumor accumulation and distribution, resulting in compromised therapeutic outcomes. We recently examined the intra-tumor accumulation and distribution of weekly sequentially administered oxaliplatin (l-OHP)-containing PEGylated liposomes. In that study, the first and second doses of l-OHP-containing PEGylated liposomes were distributed diversely and broadly within tumor tissues, resulting in a potent anti-tumor efficacy. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying such a diverse and broad liposome distribution. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the influence of dosage interval on the intra-tumor accumulation and distribution of "empty" PEGylated liposomes. Intra-tumor distribution of sequentially administered "empty" PEGylated liposomes was altered in a dosing interval-dependent manner. In addition, the intra-tumor distribution pattern was closely related to the chronological alteration of tumor blood flow as well as vascular permeability in the growing tumor tissue. These results suggest that the sequential administrations of PEGylated liposomes in well-spaced intervals might allow the distribution to different areas and enhance the total bulk accumulation within tumor tissue, resulting in better therapeutic efficacy of the encapsulated payload. This study may provide useful information for a better design of therapeutic regimens involving multiple administrations of nanocarrier drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intratumor Heterogeneity in Primary Kidney Cancer Revealed by Metabolic Profiling of Multiple Spatially Separated Samples within Tumors.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Takatsugu; Morimoto, Megumi; Nishizawa, Satoru; Kitazawa, Satoshi; Honda, Kohei; Araki, Hideo; Tamura, Toshiya; Ando, Ayumi; Satomi, Yoshinori; Nutahara, Kikuo; Hara, Takahito

    2017-04-06

    Metabolic alteration constitutes a hallmark of cancer. Glycolysis and antioxidant pathways in kidney cancer are elevated, with frequent mutation of the VHL gene. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity has been recently demonstrated in kidney cancer. However, intratumor metabolic heterogeneity has not been investigated. Here, we used global metabolomics analysis and tissue slice tracer studies to demonstrate that different portions of a human primary kidney tumor possess different metabolic characteristics and drug sensitivity. Pyruvate levels were elevated and pyruvate metabolism was altered in some tumor sections. These observations indicated that pyruvate metabolism may constitute a possible vulnerability of kidney cancer; indeed, pyruvate stimulated the growth of primary kidney cancer cells and pharmacological inhibition of pyruvate transporters slowed the growth of patient-derived kidney tumors in mice. These findings deepen our understanding of the intratumor metabolic heterogeneity of kidney cancer and may inform novel therapeutic approaches in human kidney cancer.

  20. Inertial cavitation to non-invasively trigger and monitor intratumoral release of drug from intravenously delivered liposomes.

    PubMed

    Graham, Susan M; Carlisle, Robert; Choi, James J; Stevenson, Mark; Shah, Apurva R; Myers, Rachel S; Fisher, Kerry; Peregrino, Miriam-Bazan; Seymour, Len; Coussios, Constantin C

    2014-03-28

    The encapsulation of cytotoxic drugs within liposomes enhances pharmacokinetics and allows passive accumulation within tumors. However, liposomes designed to achieve good stability during the delivery phase often have compromised activity at the target site. This problem of inefficient and unpredictable drug release is compounded by the present lack of low-cost, non-invasive methods to measure such release. Here we show that focused ultrasound, used at pressures similar to those applied during diagnostic ultrasound scanning, can be utilised to both trigger and monitor release of payload from liposomes. Notably, drug release was influenced by liposome composition and the presence of SonoVue® microbubbles, which provided the nuclei for the initiation of an event known as inertial cavitation. In vitro studies demonstrated that liposomes formulated with a high proportion of 1,2 distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) released up to 30% of payload following ultrasound exposure in the presence of SonoVue®, provided that the exposure created sufficient inertial cavitation events, as characterised by violent bubble collapse and the generation of broadband acoustic emissions. In contrast a 'Doxil'-like liposome formulation gave no such triggered release. In pre-clinical studies, ultrasound was used as a non-invasive, targeted stimulus to trigger a 16-fold increase in the level of payload release within tumors following intravenous delivery. The inertial cavitation events driving this release could be measured remotely in real-time and were a reliable predictor of drug release.

  1. Intratumor Heterogeneity in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beca, Francisco; Polyak, Kornelia

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity is the main obstacle to effective cancer treatment and personalized medicine. Both genetic and epigenetic sources of intratumor heterogeneity are well recognized and several technologies have been developed for their characterization. With the technological advances in recent years, investigators are now elucidating intratumor heterogeneity at the single cell level and in situ. However, translating the accumulated knowledge about intratumor heterogeneity to clinical practice has been slow. We are certain that better understanding of the composition and evolution of tumors during disease progression and treatment will improve cancer diagnosis and the design of therapies. Here we review some of the most important considerations related to intratumor heterogeneity. We discuss both genetic and epigenetic sources of intratumor heterogeneity and review experimental approaches that are commonly used to quantify it. We also discuss the impact of intratumor heterogeneity on cancer diagnosis and treatment and share our perspectives on the future of this field.

  2. Minimal-invasive magnetic heating of tumors does not alter intra-tumoral nanoparticle accumulation, allowing for repeated therapy sessions: an in vivo study in mice.

    PubMed

    Kettering, Melanie; Richter, Heike; Wiekhorst, Frank; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Trahms, Lutz; Kaiser, Werner Alois; Hilger, Ingrid

    2011-12-16

    Localized magnetic heating treatments (hyperthermia, thermal ablation) using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) continue to be an active area of cancer research. For generating the appropriate heat to sufficiently target cell destruction, adequate MNP concentrations need to be accumulated into tumors. Furthermore, the knowledge of MNP bio-distribution after application and additionally after heating is significant, firstly because of the possibility of repeated heating treatments if MNPs remain at the target region and secondly to study potential adverse effects dealing with MNP dilution from the target region over time. In this context, little is known about the behavior of MNPs after intra-tumoral application and magnetic heating. Therefore, the present in vivo study on the bio-distribution of intra-tumorally injected MNPs in mice focused on MNP long term monitoring of pre and post therapy over seven days using multi-channel magnetorelaxometry (MRX). Subsequently, single-channel MRX was adopted to study the bio-distribution of MNPs in internal organs and tumors of sacrificed animals. We found no distinct change of total MNP amounts in vivo during long term monitoring. Most of the MNP amounts remained in the tumors; only a few MNPs were detected in liver and spleen and less than 1% of totally injected MNPs were excreted. Apparently, the application of magnetic heating and the induction of apoptosis did not affect MNP accumulation. Our results indicate that MNP mainly remained within the injection side after magnetic heating over a seven-days-observation and therefore not affecting healthy tissue. As a consequence, localized magnetic heating therapy of tumors might be applied periodically for a better therapeutic outcome.

  3. Minimal-invasive magnetic heating of tumors does not alter intra-tumoral nanoparticle accumulation, allowing for repeated therapy sessions: an in vivo study in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettering, Melanie; Richter, Heike; Wiekhorst, Frank; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Trahms, Lutz; Alois Kaiser, Werner; Hilger, Ingrid

    2011-12-01

    Localized magnetic heating treatments (hyperthermia, thermal ablation) using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) continue to be an active area of cancer research. For generating the appropriate heat to sufficiently target cell destruction, adequate MNP concentrations need to be accumulated into tumors. Furthermore, the knowledge of MNP bio-distribution after application and additionally after heating is significant, firstly because of the possibility of repeated heating treatments if MNPs remain at the target region and secondly to study potential adverse effects dealing with MNP dilution from the target region over time. In this context, little is known about the behavior of MNPs after intra-tumoral application and magnetic heating. Therefore, the present in vivo study on the bio-distribution of intra-tumorally injected MNPs in mice focused on MNP long term monitoring of pre and post therapy over seven days using multi-channel magnetorelaxometry (MRX). Subsequently, single-channel MRX was adopted to study the bio-distribution of MNPs in internal organs and tumors of sacrificed animals. We found no distinct change of total MNP amounts in vivo during long term monitoring. Most of the MNP amounts remained in the tumors; only a few MNPs were detected in liver and spleen and less than 1% of totally injected MNPs were excreted. Apparently, the application of magnetic heating and the induction of apoptosis did not affect MNP accumulation. Our results indicate that MNP mainly remained within the injection side after magnetic heating over a seven-days-observation and therefore not affecting healthy tissue. As a consequence, localized magnetic heating therapy of tumors might be applied periodically for a better therapeutic outcome.

  4. Intratumoral Approaches for the Treatment of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bommareddy, Praveen K; Silk, Ann W; Kaufman, Howard L

    There have been significant advances in the immunotherapy of melanoma over the last decade. The tumor microenvironment is now known to promote an immune-suppressive milieu that can block effective immune-mediated tumor rejection. Several novel strategies designed to overcome local immunosuppression hold promise for treatment of melanoma and other cancers. These approaches include oncolytic viruses, plasmid DNA delivery, Toll-like receptor agonists, inflammatory dyes, cytokines, checkpoint inhibitors, immunomodulatory agents, and host and pathogenic cell-based vectors. In addition, there are several novel methods for local drug delivery, including direct injection, image-guided, electroporation, and nanodelivery techniques under study. The approval of talimogene laherparepvec (Imlygic), an attenuated, recombinant oncolytic herpesvirus, for melanoma treatment is the first intratumoral agent to receive regulatory approval for the treatment of patients with melanoma. This review will focus on the rationale for intratumoral treatment in melanoma, describe the clinical and safety data for some of the agents in clinical development, and provide a perspective for future clinical investigation with intratumoral approaches. Melanoma has been a paradigm tumor for progress in targeted therapy and immunotherapy and will likely also be the tumor to establish the therapeutic role of intratumoral treatment for cancer.

  5. The Role of Cell Density and Intratumoral Heterogeneity in Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Orit; Greene, James M.; Levy, Doron; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have demonstrated that cancer drug resistance reflects complex biological factors including tumor heterogeneity, varying growth, differentiation, apoptosis pathways, and cell density. As a result, there is a need to find new ways to incorporate these complexities in the mathematical modeling of multidrug resistance. Here, we derive a novel structured population model that describes the behavior of cancer cells under selection with cytotoxic drugs. Our model is designed to estimate intratumoral heterogeneity as a function of the resistance level and time. This updated model of the multidrug resistance problem integrates both genetic and epigenetic changes, density-dependence, and intratumoral heterogeneity. Our results suggest that treatment acts as a selection process, while genetic/epigenetic alterations rates act as a diffusion process. Application of our model to cancer treatment suggests that reducing alteration rates as a first step in treatment causes a reduction in tumor heterogeneity, and may improve targeted therapy. The new insight provided by this model could help to dramatically change the ability of clinical oncologists to design new treatment protocols and analyze the response of patients to therapy. Major Findings We suggest that chemotherapeutic treatment acts as a selection process in the effective drug concentrations range, while genetic/epigenetic alterations act as a diffusion process that results in trait spread based on different stress signals. Application of our model to cancer treatment suggests that reducing the alteration rate as a first step in treatment causes a reduction in tumor heterogeneity, and may improve targeted therapy. PMID:24163380

  6. Important Role of CYP2J2 in Protein Kinase Inhibitor Degradation: A Possible Role in Intratumor Drug Disposition and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Narjoz, Céline; Favre, Amélie; McMullen, Justin; Kiehl, Philippe; Montemurro, Michael; Figg, William D.; Beaune, Philippe; de Waziers, Isabelle; Rochat, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated in vitro the metabolic capability of 3 extrahepatic cytochromes P-450, CYP1A1, 1B1 and 2J2, known to be over-expressed in various tumors, to biotransform 5 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI): dasatinib, imatinib, nilotinib, sorafenib and sunitinib. Moreover, mRNA expression of CYP1A1, 1B1, 2J2 and 3A4 in 6 hepatocellular and 14 renal cell carcinoma tumor tissues and their surrounding healthy tissues, was determined. Our results show that CYP1A1, 1B1 and especially 2J2 can rapidly biotransform the studied TKIs with a metabolic efficiency similar to that of CYP3A4. The mRNA expression of CYP1A1, 1B1, 2J2 and 3A4 in tumor biopsies has shown i) the strong variability of CYP expression and ii) distinct outliers showing high expression levels (esp. CYP2J2) that are compatible with high intratumoral CYP activity and tumor-specific TKI degradation. CYP2J2 inhibition could be a novel clinical strategy to specifically increase the intratumoral rather than plasma TKI levels, improving TKI efficacy and extending the duration before relapse. Such an approach would be akin to beta-lactamase inhibition, a classical strategy to avoid antibiotic degradation and resistance. PMID:24819355

  7. Mind Altering Drugs and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Wayne O.

    1971-01-01

    A researcher in psychopharmacology foresees a flood of new drugs that will make man feel happy, cause him to forget his past, and arouse his sexual desires. Man may actually have the possibility of attaining sustained happiness, or something like it, through drugs, and so must ask the question, Is happiness what I most want?" (Author)

  8. Mind Altering Drugs and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Wayne O.

    1971-01-01

    A researcher in psychopharmacology foresees a flood of new drugs that will make man feel happy, cause him to forget his past, and arouse his sexual desires. Man may actually have the possibility of attaining sustained happiness, or something like it, through drugs, and so must ask the question, Is happiness what I most want?" (Author)

  9. Drug Addiction and Histone Code Alterations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Dae; Call, Tanessa; Magazu, Samantha; Ferguson, Deveroux

    2017-01-01

    Acute and prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse induces changes in gene expression, synaptic function, and neural plasticity in brain regions involved in reward. Numerous genes are involved in this process, and persistent changes in gene expression coincide with epigenetic histone modifications and DNA methylation. Histone modifications are attractive regulatory mechanisms, which can encode complex environmental signals in the genome of postmitotic cells, like neurons. Recently, it has been demonstrated that specific histone modifications are involved in addiction-related gene regulatory mechanisms, by a diverse set of histone-modifying enzymes and readers. These histone modifiers and readers may prove to be valuable pharmacological targets for effective treatments for drug addiction.

  10. Alterations of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ghalib, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Imran; Goel, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug interactions in oncology are common place and largely ignored as we tolerate high thresholds of ‘toxic’ drug responses in these patients. However, in the era of ‘targeted’ or seemingly ‘less toxic’ therapy, these interactions are more commonly flagged and contribute significantly towards poor ‘quality of life’ and medical fatalities. Objective This review and opinion article focuses on alteration of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug interactions in the setting of polypharmacy. The assumption is that the drugs, with changes in their pharmacokinetics, will contribute towards changes in their pharmacodynamics. Methods The examples cited for such drug–drug interactions are culled from published literature with an emphasis on those interactions that have been well characterized at the molecular level. Results Although very few drug interaction studies have been performed on approved oncology based drugs, it is clear that drugs whose pharmacokinetics profiles are closely related to their pharmacodynamics will indeed result in clinically important drug interactions. Some newer mechanisms are described that involve interactions at the level of gene transcription, whereby, drug metabolism is significantly altered. However, for any given drug interaction, there does not seem to be a comprehensive model describing interactions. Conclusions Mechanisms based drug interactions are plentiful in oncology; however, there is an absolute lack of a comprehensive model that would predict drug–drug interactions. PMID:19239394

  11. Anti-tumor effect of an intratumoral administration of dendritic cells in combination with TS-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine anti-cancer drug, and OK-432, a streptococcal immunopotentiator: involvement of toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sharif Uddin; Okamoto, Masato; Oshikawa, Tetsuya; Tano, Tomoyuki; Sasai, Akiko; Kan, Shin; Hiroshima, Tokafumi; Ohue, Hideki; Moriya, Yoichiro; Ryoma, Yoshiki; Saito, Motoo; Sato, Mitsunobu

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the in vivo anti-tumor effect of intratumoral administration of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) after chemotherapy using an oral fluoropyrimidine anti-cancer drug TS-1, and followed by immunotherapeutic agent OK-432, in two syngeneic tumor-bearing mouse models. Both in Meth-A fibrosarcoma-bearing BALB/c mice and in SCCVII-bearing C3H/HeN mice, 1 week of oral administration of TS-1 effected partial eradication of established tumors. Intratumoral injection of DCs and OK-432 caused only slight inhibition of the tumor growth. However, TS-1 administration followed by DCs and OK-432 resulted in a marked inhibition in the tumor growth and also contributed to a greater prolongation of survival. By the injection of DCs and OK-432 after TS-1 administration, a significant infiltration of immune cells, especially CD8+ T cells, was observed. Furthermore, the cytotoxic activities of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and draining lymph node cells against inoculated tumor cells were significantly increased by the therapy, while activities against nonspecific target cells were not. Cytotoxic memory T cells were also induced; the main effectors were MHC class I-restricted, CD8+ T cells. The same therapy was also applied to SCCVII-bearing C3H/HeJ mice in which the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is mutated and its function impaired; no immunotherapeutic effect was observed in the TLR4-deficient mouse model. These findings suggest that the local DC therapy in combination with TS-1 and OK-432 may be a useful strategy for the treatment of solid tumors, and that TLR4 signaling is involved in the success of this therapy.

  12. Theoretical pharmacokinetic drug alterations in pediatric celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tran H; Smith, Candace; Mangione, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pediatric celiac disease has risen and many of these children will receive medications at some time in their life. However, the absorption of drugs in pediatric patients with celiac disease has never been studied. The few studies that do exist have only been performed in adults and indicate that drug concentrations can be altered for some drugs. It is also noteworthy that few researchers have conducted studies to determine if the distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs are altered in celiac disease. The pharmacokinetics of drugs greatly differ between children and adults. Combined with the pathophysiological changes known to occur with celiac disease, there is compelling evidence to support that drug exposure in pediatric celiac disease may be altered. Relevant characteristics of celiac disease that may affect drug disposition include intestinal atrophy, hypoalbuminemia, reduced CYP3A enzymes, and thyroid dysfunction. The safety and efficacy of drug dosing in children with celiac disease can be enhanced with additional pharmacokinetic studies of commonly prescribed drugs in this population. Ideally, these studies should include drugs that have high bioavailability, are highly protein bound, undergo extensive CYP3A enzyme metabolism, and/or have a narrow therapeutic range.

  13. Tolerance development to cadmium-induced alteration of drug action.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A; Miya, T S; Schnell, R C

    1976-05-01

    Cadmium administration potentiates the duration of hexobarbital-induced hypnosis and inhibits the rate of hepatic microsomal metabolism of this drug in the male rat. The threshold dose of cadmium required to produce these alterations in drug action is 0.84 mg Ck/kg. If subthreshold doses of cadmium (0.21 or 0.42 mg Cd/kg) are administered prior to the 0.84 mg Cd/kg dose, the cadmium-induced alterations in drug action are no longer observed.

  14. Drug metabolism alterations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, Matthew D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes play a vital role in the elimination of the majority of therapeutic drugs. The major organ involved in drug metabolism is the liver. Chronic liver diseases have been identified as a potential source of significant interindividual variation in metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States, affecting between 60 and 90 million Americans, yet the vast majority of NAFLD patients are undiagnosed. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of pathologies, ranging from steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Numerous animal studies have investigated the effects of NAFLD on hepatic gene expression, observing significant alterations in mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Information on the effects of NAFLD in human patients is limited, though several significant investigations have recently been published. Significant alterations in the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes may affect the clearance of therapeutic drugs, with the potential to result in adverse drug reactions. With the enormous prevalence of NAFLD, it is conceivable that every drug currently on the market is being given to patients with NAFLD. The current review is intended to present the results from both animal models and human patients, summarizing the observed alterations in the expression and activity of the phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. PMID:21612324

  15. Imaging the intratumoral-peritumoral extracellular pH gradient of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; Rao, Jyotsna U.; De Feyter, Henk M.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Juchem, Christoph; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors have acidic extracellular pH (pHe) but near neutral intracellular pH (pHi). Because acidic pHe milieu is conducive to tumor growth and builds resistance to therapy, simultaneous mapping of pHe inside and outside the tumor (i.e., intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradient) fulfills an important need in cancer imaging. We used Biosensor Imaging of Redundant Deviation in Shifts (BIRDS), which utilizes shifts of nonexchangeable protons from macrocyclic chelates (e.g., 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakis(methylene phosphonate) or DOTP8−) complexed with paramagnetic thulium (Tm3+) ion, to generate in vivo pHe maps in rat brains bearing 9L and RG2 tumors. Upon TmDOTP5− infusion, MRI identified the tumor boundary by enhanced water transverse relaxation and BIRDS allowed imaging of intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradients. The pHe measured by BIRDS was compared with pHi measured with 31P-MRS. In normal tissue pHe was similar to pHi, but inside the tumor pHe was lower than pHi. While the intratumoral pHe was acidic for both tumor types, peritumoral pHe varied with tumor type. The intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradient was much larger for 9L than RG2 tumors, because in RG2 tumors acidic pHe was found in distal peritumoral regions. Increased presence of Ki-67 positive cells beyond the RG2 tumor border suggested that RG2 was more invasive than 9L tumor. These results indicate that extensive acidic pHe beyond the tumor boundary correlates with tumor cell invasion. In summary, BIRDS has sensitivity to map in vivo intratumoral-peritumoral pHe gradient, thereby creating preclinical applications in monitoring cancer therapeutic responses (e.g., with pHe-altering drugs). PMID:26752688

  16. Intratumor heterogeneity in human glioblastoma reflects cancer evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Piccirillo, Sara G. M.; Touloumis, Anestis; Collins, V. Peter; Marioni, John C.; Curtis, Christina; Watts, Colin; Tavaré, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy, with poor prognosis and a lack of effective therapeutic options. Accumulating evidence suggests that intratumor heterogeneity likely is the key to understanding treatment failure. However, the extent of intratumor heterogeneity as a result of tumor evolution is still poorly understood. To address this, we developed a unique surgical multisampling scheme to collect spatially distinct tumor fragments from 11 GB patients. We present an integrated genomic analysis that uncovers extensive intratumor heterogeneity, with most patients displaying different GB subtypes within the same tumor. Moreover, we reconstructed the phylogeny of the fragments for each patient, identifying copy number alterations in EGFR and CDKN2A/B/p14ARF as early events, and aberrations in PDGFRA and PTEN as later events during cancer progression. We also characterized the clonal organization of each tumor fragment at the single-molecule level, detecting multiple coexisting cell lineages. Our results reveal the genome-wide architecture of intratumor variability in GB across multiple spatial scales and patient-specific patterns of cancer evolution, with consequences for treatment design. PMID:23412337

  17. Potentiation of anti-cancer drug activity at low intratumoral pH induced by the mitochondrial inhibitor m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and its analogue benzylguanidine (BG)

    PubMed Central

    Kuin, A; Aalders, M; Lamfers, M; Zuidam, D J van; Essers, M; Beijnen, J H; Smets, L A

    1999-01-01

    Tumour-selective acidification is of potential interest for enhanced therapeutic gain of pH sensitive drugs. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a tumour-selective reduction of the extracellular and intracellular pH and their effect on the tumour response of selected anti-cancer drugs. In an in vitro L1210 leukaemic cell model, we confirmed enhanced cytotoxicity of chlorambucil at low extracellular pH conditions. In contrast, the alkylating drugs melphalan and cisplatin, and bioreductive agents mitomycin C and its derivative EO9, required low intracellular pH conditions for enhanced activation. Furthermore, a strong and pH-independent synergism was observed between the pH-equilibrating drug nigericin and melphalan, of which the mechanism is unclear. In radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumour-bearing mice, the extracellular pH was reduced by the mitochondrial inhibitor m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) or its analogue benzylguanidine (BG) plus glucose. To simultaneously reduce the intracellular pH, MIBG plus glucose were combined with the ionophore nigericin or the Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor amiloride and the Na+-dependent HCO3−/Cl−exchanger inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS). Biochemical studies confirmed an effective reduction of the extracellular pH to approximately 6.2, and anti-tumour responses to the interventions indicated a simultaneous reduction of the intracellular pH below 6.6 for at least 3 h. Combined reduction of extra- and intracellular tumour pH with melphalan increased the tumour regrowth time to 200% of the pretreatment volume from 5.7 ± 0.6 days for melphalan alone to 8.1 ± 0.7 days with pH manipulation (P< 0.05). Mitomycin C related tumour growth delay was enhanced by the combined interventions from 3.8 ± 0.5 to 5.2 ± 0.5 days (P< 0.05), but only in tumours of relatively large sizes. The interventions were non-toxic alone or in combination with the anti-cancer drugs and did not affect

  18. Prenatal antiepileptic drug exposure alters seizure susceptibility in rats.

    PubMed

    Sobrian, S K; Nandedkar, A K

    1986-05-01

    An animal model is used to address the issue of prenatal exposure to certain antiepileptic drugs and seizure susceptibility in the offspring. Administration of doses established as median therapeutic doses in humans of phenobarbital, valproate and clonazepam to pregnant rats during the last third of gestation produced sexually dimorphic alterations in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures as well as in non-convulsive (spontaneous alternation and cliff avoidance) behaviors in the offspring. Altered seizure susceptibility occurred in the absence of overtly recognizable morphological abnormalities and did not appear to reflect differences in the status of circulating drug-binding plasma proteins. Possible neural and/or metabolic mechanisms responsible for these behavioral changes are discussed.

  19. Metabolic monosaccharides altered cell responses to anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering has been used to manipulate the glycochemistry of cell surfaces and thus the cell/cell interaction, cell adhesion, and cell migration. However, potential application of glycoengineering in pharmaceutical sciences has not been studied until recently. Here, we reported that Ac(4)ManNAc, an analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), could affect cell responses to anticancer drugs. Although cells from different tissues and organs responded to Ac(4)ManNAc treatment differently, treated cells with increased sialic acid contents showed dramatically reduced sensitivity (up to 130 times) to anti-cancer drugs as tested on various drugs with distinct chemical structures and acting mechanisms. Neither increased P-glycoprotein activity nor decreased drug uptake was observed during the course of Ac(4)ManNAc treatment. However, greatly altered intracellular drug distributions were observed. Most intracellular daunorubicin was found in the perinuclear region, but not the expected nuclei in the Ac(4)ManNAc treated cells. Since sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides were synthesized in the Golgi, intracellular glycans affected intracellular signal transduction and drug distributions seem to be the main reason for Ac(4)ManNAc affected cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. It was interesting to find that although Ac(4)ManNAc treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) maintained the same sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil, the IC(50) value of 5-Fluorouracil to the same Ac(4)ManNAc treated normal cells (MCF-10A) was increased by more than 20 times. Thus, this Ac(4)ManNAc treatment enlarged drug response difference between normal and tumor cells provides a unique opportunity to further improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs.

  20. Seizures and antiepileptic drugs: does exposure alter normal brain development?

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric D; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Porter, Brenda E

    2006-12-01

    Seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affect brain development and have long-term neurological consequences. The specific molecular and cellular changes, the precise timing of their influence during brain development, and the full extent of the long-term consequences of seizures and AEDs exposure have not been established. This review critically assesses both the basic and clinical science literature on the effects of seizures and AEDs on the developing brain and finds that evidence exists to support the hypothesis that both seizures and antiepileptic drugs influence a variety of biological process, at specific times during development, which alter long-term cognition and epilepsy susceptibility. More research, both clinical and experimental, is needed before changes in current clinical practice, based on the scientific data, can be recommended.

  1. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  2. Oral drug delivery systems comprising altered geometric configurations for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix(®) multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise(®), which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix(®) as well as "release modules assemblage", which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments.

  3. Alteration of drug metabolizing enzymes in sulphite oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncu, Begum; Kuçukatay, Vural; Arslan, Sevki; Sahin, Barbaros; Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of sulphite oxidase (SOX, E.C. 1.8.3.1) deficiency on xenobiotic metabolism. For this purpose, SOX deficiency was produced in rats by the administration of a low molybdenum diet with concurrent addition of 200 ppm tungsten to their drinking water. First, hepatic SOX activity in deficient groups was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. Then, aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline 4-hydroxylase, aromatase, caffeine N-demethylase, cytochrome b5 reductase, erythromycin N-demethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase and penthoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were determined to follow changes in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in SOX-deficient rats. Our results clearly demonstrated that SOX deficiency significantly elevated A4H, caffeine N-demethylase, erythromycin N-demethylase and N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase activities while decreasing ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aromatase activities. These alterations in drug metabolizing enzymes can contribute to the varying susceptibility and response of sulphite-sensitive individuals to different drugs and/or therapeutics used for treatments. PMID:22798713

  4. Bacillus cereus causing intratumoral brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Karnika; Gautam, Vikas; Singh, Gagandeep; Ray, Pallab

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of intratumoral brain abscess due to Bacillus cereus in an adult male patient, which was managed successfully with excision of lesion and piperacillin-tazobactam for the duration of 5 weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first case report of B. cereus infection leading to intratumoral brain abscess in a patient with a history of steroid administration by the intravenous route.

  5. Effects of liver diseases on drug-metabolizing enzymes: implications for drug fate alterations and nano-therapeutic openings.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Shi, J; Li, Q; Peng, X; Dong, L; Li, Y; Dai, P; Wang, Y; Guo, E; Zhou, F; Liu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Metabolizing and eliminating toxic chemicals in the liver are key processes in the body's defense system. Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) play central roles in such processes. The activity and expression of several key DMEs are changed in various liver diseases and thus lead to significantly altered drug disposition. This phenomenon severely affects the pharmacotherapy of clinical medications in terms of the safety and efficacy of drug responses. This review highlights liver physiological functions, altered DMEs, and altered drug disposition in liver diseases. Moreover, the implications of changes in DMEs on the fate of clinically relevant drugs are also discussed. Pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor are two liver-enriched nuclear receptors originally defined as xenobiotic sensors that affect regulation of DMEs. Altered regulation of DMEs in liver diseases contributes to the development of powerful in vitro and in vivo tools to predict drug responses and options for improved drug delivery and development. Although a number of treatment drugs are available for liver diseases, they are limited by their low drug concentration in the target site, presence of side effects, and instability in the human body. The nanoparticle drug delivery system has recently attracted research attention because of its potential to offer solutions to current obstacles that involve the use of therapeutic drugs for liver diseases. Conclusively, this review aims to improve understanding on the regulation of DMEs in liver diseases and on corresponding implications in drug disposition, including novel therapeutic medications.

  6. Can chronic maternal drug therapy alter the nursing infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme pattern?

    PubMed

    Toddywalla, V S; Patel, S B; Betrabet, S S; Kulkarni, R D; Kombo, I; Saxena, B N

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether minute quantities of maternal drugs ingested over an extended period of time by a breast-feeding infant can alter the activity pattern of the infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (HDME). The HDME activity patterns of 12 breast-fed infants whose mothers were not on drug therapy were compared with those of 11 infants whose mothers had been taking 30 micrograms levo-norgesterel daily for 90 to 195 days (oral contraceptives group) and of 10 infants whose mothers had been taking ethambutol and isoniazid daily since pregnancy (tuberculosis group). As 6 beta hydroxycortisol in urine is considered to be a good and acceptable reflector of HDME activity, it was estimated from the infants' urine using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A comparison of the patterns between 90 days of age and 195 days of age of the infants in the control group and the two study groups indicated an increase from 36.6 ng/mL to 58.4 ng/mL at 195 days in the control group. An initial decrease from 36.6 ng/mL to 26.2 ng/mL was noted with commencement of maternal levo-norgesterel therapy, followed by a slow and steady rise to 47.8 ng/mL at 195 days of age, with a shift in the peak from 120 to 135 days of infants age in the oral contraceptive group. A suppressed pattern with decreased levels of 6 beta hydroxycortisol ranging from 19.3 ng/mL to 26.5 ng/mL at 195 days was found in the tuberculosis group. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with Duncan's Multiple range test. Both treatment group showed significant differences from the control group at the 0.050 level. The HDME plays an important role in determining the final outcome of any drug in humans, as it controls the metabolism of drugs. Hence, alterations in its activity caused by the transfer of maternal drugs over a prolonged period of time could pose a serious problem to nurslings when they require drugs for their own benefit.

  7. Ultra-structural hair alterations of drug abusers: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Turkmenoglu, Fatma Pinar; Kasirga, Ugur Baran; Celik, Hakan Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    As drug abuse carries a societal stigma, patients do not often report their history of drug abuse to the healthcare providers. However, drug abuse is highly co-morbid with a host of other health problems such as psychiatric disorders and skin diseases, and majority of individuals with drug use disorders seek treatment in the first place for other problems. Therefore, it is very important for physicians to be aware of clinical signs and symptoms of drug use. Recently diagnostic value of dermatologic tissue alterations associated with drug abuse has become a very particular interest because skin changes were reported to be the earliest noticeable consequence of drug abuse prompting earlier intervention and treatment. Although hair is an annex of skin, alterations on hair structure due to drug use have not been demonstrated. This study represents the first report on ultra-structural hair alterations of drug abusers. We have investigated ultra-structure of the hair samples obtained from 6 cocaine, 6 heroin, 7 cannabis and 4 lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) abusers by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM analysis of hair samples gave us drug-specific discriminating alterations. We suggest that results of this study will make a noteworthy contribution to cutaneous alterations associated with drug abuse which are regarded as the earliest clinical manifestations, and this SEM approach is a very specific and effective tool in the detection of abuse of respective drugs, leading early treatment. PMID:26309532

  8. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Chad C.

    2015-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:26509485

  9. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Chad C

    2016-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics, but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling.

  10. Mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres for localized intratumoral chemotherapy of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, Brett Anthony

    The safety and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy is limited by its toxicity. The direct intratumoral injection of free or microsphere-loaded antineoplastic drugs is a promising modality for the treatment of solid tumors. Intratumoral chemotherapy delivers high localized doses of cytotoxic drugs to the tumor tissues than does systemic (intravenous) chemotherapy and it decreases systemic drug concentrations and toxicities. The use of drug-loaded microspheres also provides a prolonged release of drug into the surrounding tumor tissues, increasing exposure of the neoplasm to therapeutic levels of the cytotoxic drug. Mitoxantrone and 5-fluorouracil-loaded albumin microspheres were synthesized. The microspheres were synthesized using a suspension crosslinking technique and a glutardehyde crosslinking agent. The particle-size distribution of the microspheres was controlled by adjusting the emulsion energy and the concentration of cellulose acetate butyrate, the emulsion stabilization agent. Both microsphere size and crosslink density (glutaraldehyde concentration) were found to affect the in vitro release of loaded drugs in in vitro infinite sink conditions. The in vivo efficacy and toxicity of intratumoral chemotherapy with free and microsphere-loaded mitoxantrone were evaluated in a 16/C murine mammary adenocarcinoma model. Intratumoral chemotherapy with free mitoxantrone significantly improved survival and decreased toxicity compared to intravenously delivered drug. The efficacy of two size distributions of mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres, corresponding to mean diameters of 5 to 10 mum and 20 to 40 mum, were evaluated delivered both alone and in combination with free mitoxantrone. Intratumoral injection of mitoxantrone-loaded microspheres was found to allow the safe delivery of increased doses compared to free drug. The maximum tolerated doses were approximately 40 mg/kg compared to 12 mg/kg, respectively. Intratumoral chemotherapy using free and

  11. Nutritional Alterations in Drug Abusers With and Without HIV

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have found that drug abusers have nutritional deficits, including weight deficits. The most plausible explanation for these deficits is dietary insufficiency. However, studies using objective measures of the dietary intake of drug abusers have failed to provide evidence of dietary insufficiency. Other mechanisms have rarely been examined. This article reviews the published literature on the nutritional status of drug abusers with and without HIV, with emphasis on dietary energy and macronutrient intake. PMID:17356685

  12. Increased efficacy of photodynamic therapy of R3230AC mammary adenocarcinoma by intratumoral injection of Photofrin II.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, S. L.; van der Meid, K. R.; Murant, R. S.; Hilf, R.

    1990-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy consists of the systemic administration of a derivative of haematoporphyrin (Photofrin II) followed 24-72 h later by exposure of malignant lesions to photoradiation. We investigated the efficacy of this treatment after direct intratumoral injection of Photofrin II. This direct treatment regimen resulted in higher rates of inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (5.13% J-1 cm-2 x 10(-1) and succinate dehydrogenase (3.14% J-1 cm-2 x 10(-1] in vitro at 2 h after intratumoral injection compared to rates of inhibition obtained after intraperitoneal drug administration: 0.51 and 0.42% J-1 cm-2 x 10(-1), respectively. A significant delay in tumour growth in vivo was observed in animals that received intratumoral injections 2 h before photoradiation compared to animals injected intraperitoneally at either 2 or 24 h before photoradiation. The treatment protocols were compared with control groups, consisting of Photofrin II administration intratumorally or intraperitoneally without photoradiation, or photoradiation in the absence of Photofrin II. These data indicate that the intratumoral injection regimen with Photofrin II enhanced the efficacy of photodynamic therapy. The greater delay in tumour growth observed after intratumoral administration of Photofrin II suggests a mechanism favouring direct cell damage. PMID:2139578

  13. Mood-Altering Drugs: A Middle School Series. Revised Edition. Teacher's Guide [and Six Pamphlets:] An Introduction to Mood-Altering Drugs; Depressants or "Downers"; Alcohol - The No. 1 Drug; Stimulants or "Uppers"; Hallucinogens; [and] Marijuana or "Grass."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiUlio, Jean; And Others

    This guide is designed as a resource for parents and teachers to develop middle school students' critical thinking about mood-altering drugs. It consists of a series of six pamphlets which focus on each of the major types of mood-altering drugs; each pamphlet may be used alone or as part of a series. The teacher's guide contains a short summary of…

  14. Intratumoral Mistletoe (Viscum album L) Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreas Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schad, Friedemann; Atxner, Jan; Buchwald, Dirk; Happe, Antje; Popp, Stephan; Kröz, Matthias; Matthes, Harald

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma remains one of the main causes for cancer-related death. Intratumoral application of anticancer agents is discussed as a promising method for solid tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound provides a good tool to examine and treat the pancreas. European mistletoe (Viscum album L) is a phytotherapeutic commonly used in integrative oncology in Central Europe. Its complementary use seeks to induce immunostimulation and antitumoral effects as well as alleviate chemotherapeutic side effects. Intratumoral mistletoe application has induced local tumor response in various cancer entities. This off-label use needs to be validated carefully in terms of safety and benefits. Here we report on 39 patients with advanced, inoperable pancreatic cancer, who received in total 223 intratumoral applications of mistletoe, endoscopic ultrasound guided or under transabdominal ultrasound control. No severe procedure-related events were reported. Adverse drug reactions were mainly increased body temperature or fever in 14% and 11% of the applications, respectively. Other adverse drug reactions, such as pain or nausea, occurred in less than 7% of the procedures. No severe adverse drug reaction was recorded. Patients received standard first- and second-line chemotherapy and underwent adequate palliative surgical interventions as well as additive subcutaneous and partly intravenous mistletoe application. A median survival of 11 months was observed for all patients, or 11.8 and 8.3 months for stages III and IV, respectively. Due to the multimodal therapeutic setting and the lack of a control group, the effect of intratumoral mistletoe administration alone remains unclear. This retrospective analysis suggests that intratumoral-applicated mistletoe might contribute to improve survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. In conclusion, the application is feasible and safe, and its efficacy should be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial.

  15. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of ALK-Rearranged and ALK/EGFR Coaltered Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weijing; Lin, Dongmei; Wu, Chunyan; Li, Xuefei; Zhao, Chao; Zheng, Limou; Chuai, Shannon; Fei, Ke; Zhou, Caicun; Hirsch, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Genetic intratumoral heterogeneity has a profound influence on the selection of clinical treatment strategies and on addressing resistance to targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential effect of intratumoral heterogeneity on both genetic and pathologic characteristics of ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). Methods We tested ALK fusions and EGFR mutations in 629 patients with LADC by using laser-capture microdissection to capture spatially separated tumor cell subpopulations in various adenocarcinoma subtypes and to test for ALK fusions and EGFR mutations in ALK-rearranged, EGFR-mutated, and ALK/EGFR coaltered LADCs to compare the oncogenic driver status between different tumor cell subpopulations in the same primary tumor. Results Among the 629 patients, 30 (4.8%) had ALK fusions, 364 (57.9%) had EGFR mutations, and two had ALK fusions that coexisted with EGFR mutations. Intratumoral heterogeneity of ALK fusions were identified in nine patients by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In the two patients with an ALK/EGFR coaltered status, genetic intratumoral heterogeneity was observed both between different growth patterns and within the same growth pattern. The relative abundance of ALK and EGFR alterations was different in the same captured area. ALK fusions were positively associated with a micropapillary pattern (P = .002) and were negatively associated with a lepidic pattern (P = .008) in an expanded statistical analysis of 900 individual adenocarcinoma components, although they appeared to be more common in acinar-predominant LADCs in the analysis of 629 patients. Conclusion Intratumoral genetic heterogeneity was demonstrated to coexist with histologic heterogeneity in both single-driver and ALK/EGFR coaltered LADCs. Altered oncogenic drivers in spatially separated subclones of the same tumor may be different. PMID:26416997

  16. Intratumoral Concentrations and Effects of Orally Administered Micellar Curcuminoids in Glioblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Dützmann, Stephan; Schiborr, Christina; Kocher, Alexa; Pilatus, Ulrich; Hattingen, Elke; Weissenberger, Jakob; Geßler, Florian; Quick-Weller, Johanna; Franz, Kea; Seifert, Volker; Frank, Jan; Senft, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of curcuminoids is low, but can be enhanced by incorporation into micelles. The major curcuminoid curcumin has antitumor effects on glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. We therefore aimed to determine intratumoral concentrations and the clinical tolerance of highly bioavailable micellar curcuminoids in glioblastoma patients. Thirteen glioblastoma patients ingested 70 mg micellar curcuminoids [57.4 mg curcumin, 11.2 mg demethoxycurcumin (DMC), and 1.4 mg bis-demethoxycurcumin (BDMC)] three times per day for 4 days (total amount of 689 mg curcumin, 134 mg DMC, and 17 mg BDMC) prior to planned resection of their respective brain tumors. Tumor and blood samples were taken during the surgery and analyzed for total curcuminoid concentrations. (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging was performed before and after curcuminoid consumption. Ten patients completed the study. The mean intratumoral concentration of curcumin was 56 pg/mg of tissue (range 9-151), and the mean serum concentration was 253 ng/ml (range 129-364). Inorganic phosphate was significantly increased within the tumor (P = 0.034). The mean ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate decreased, and the mean intratumoral pH increased (P = 0.08) after curcuminoid intervention. Oral treatment with micellar curcuminoids led to quantifiable concentrations of total curcuminoids in glioblastomas and may alter intratumoral energy metabolism.

  17. Acute Neuroactive Drug Exposures alter Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae by assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially,...

  18. Acute Neuroactive Drug Exposures alter Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae by assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially,...

  19. Acute neuroactive drug exposures alter locomotor activity in larval zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA's prioritization of toxic chemicals, we are characterizing the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae after exposure to prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. MPTP (1-methyl-4phenyl- 1 ,2,3,6-...

  20. Acute neuroactive drug exposures alter locomotor activity in larval zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA's prioritization of toxic chemicals, we are characterizing the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae after exposure to prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. MPTP (1-methyl-4phenyl- 1 ,2,3,6-...

  1. Drug-drug interactions related to altered absorption and plasma protein binding: theoretical and regulatory considerations, and an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Jerome; Tang, Cuyue; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant

    2015-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) related to altered drug absorption and plasma protein binding have received much less attention from regulatory agencies relative to DDIs mediated via drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. In this review, a number of theoretical bases and regulatory framework are presented for these DDI aspects. Also presented is an industry perspective on how to approach these issues in support of drug development. Overall, with the exception of highly permeable and highly soluble (BCS 1) drugs, DDIs related to drug-induced changes in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology can be substantial, thus warranting more attentions. For a better understanding of absorption-associated DDI potential in a clinical setting, mechanistic studies should be conducted based on holistic integration of the pharmaceutical profiles (e.g., pH-dependent solubility) and pharmacological properties (e.g., GI physiology and therapeutic margin) of drug candidates. Although majority of DDI events related to altered plasma protein binding are not expected to be of clinical significance, exceptions exist for a subset of compounds with certain pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties. Knowledge of the identity of binding proteins and the binding extent in various clinical setting (including disease states) can be valuable in aiding clinical DDI data interpretations, and ensuring safe and effective use of new drugs.

  2. Altering physiological networks using drugs: steps towards personalized physiology.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Adam D; Cohen, Mitchell J; Manley, Geoffrey T; Butte, Atul J

    2013-01-01

    The rise of personalized medicine has reminded us that each patient must be treated as an individual. One factor in making treatment decisions is the physiological state of each patient, but definitions of relevant states and methods to visualize state-related physiologic changes are scarce. We constructed correlation networks from physiologic data to demonstrate changes associated with pressor use in the intensive care unit. We collected 29 physiological variables at one-minute intervals from nineteen trauma patients in the intensive care unit of an academic hospital and grouped each minute of data as receiving or not receiving pressors. For each group we constructed Spearman correlation networks of pairs of physiologic variables. To visualize drug-associated changes we split the networks into three components: an unchanging network, a network of connections with changing correlation sign, and a network of connections only present in one group. Out of a possible 406 connections between the 29 physiological measures, 64, 39, and 48 were present in each of the three component networks. The static network confirms expected physiological relationships while the network of associations with changed correlation sign suggests putative changes due to the drugs. The network of associations present only with pressors suggests new relationships that could be worthy of study. We demonstrated that visualizing physiological relationships using correlation networks provides insight into underlying physiologic states while also showing that many of these relationships change when the state is defined by the presence of drugs. This method applied to targeted experiments could change the way critical care patients are monitored and treated.

  3. Spatiotemporally Photoradiation-Controlled Intratumoral Depot for Combination of Brachytherapy and Photodynamic Therapy for Solid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Ratul; Schaal, Jeffrey; Li, Xinghai; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Asai, Daisuke; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Liu, Wenge

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to spatiotemporally control both tumor retention and the coverage of anticancer agents, we developed a photoradiation-controlled intratumoral depot (PRCITD) driven by convention enhanced delivery (CED). This intratumoral depot consists of recombinant elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) containing periodic cysteine residues and is conjugated with a photosensitizer, chlorin-e6 (Ce6) at the N-terminus of the ELP. We hypothesized that this cysteine-containing ELP (cELP) can be readily crosslinked through disulfide bonds upon exposure to oxidative agents, specifically the singlet oxygen produced during photodynamic stimulation. Upon intratumoral injection, CED drives the distribution of the soluble polypeptide freely throughout the tumor interstitium. Formation and retention of the depot was monitored using fluorescence molecular tomography imaging. When imaging shows that the polypeptide has distributed throughout the entire tumor, 660-nm light is applied externally at the tumor site. This photo-radiation wavelength excites Ce6 and generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of oxygen. The ROS induce in situ disulfide crosslinking of the cysteine thiols, stabilizing the ELP biopolymer into a stable therapeutic depot. Our results demonstrate that this ELP design effectively forms a hydrogel both in vitro and in vivo. These depots exhibit high stability in subcutaneous tumor xenografts in nude mice and significantly improved intratumoral retention compared to controls without crosslinking, as seen by fluorescent imaging and iodine-125 radiotracer studies. The photodynamic therapy provided by the PRCITD was found to cause significant tumor inhibition in a Ce6 dose dependent manner. Additionally, the combination of PDT and intratumoral radionuclide therapy co-delivered by PRCITD provided a greater antitumor effect than either monotherapy alone. These results suggest that the PRCITD could provide a stable platform for delivering synergistic, anti

  4. Drug-induced alterations in Mg2+ homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lameris, Anke L; Monnens, Leo A; Bindels, René J; Hoenderop, Joost G J

    2012-07-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) balance is tightly regulated by the concerted actions of the intestine, bone and kidneys. This balance can be disturbed by a broad variety of drugs. Diuretics, modulators of the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), proton pump inhibitors, antimicrobials, calcineurin inhibitors and cytostatics may all cause hypomagnesaemia, potentially leading to tetany, seizures and cardiac arrhythmias. Conversely, high doses of Mg2+ salts, frequently administered as an antacid or a laxative, may lead to hypermagnesaemia causing various cardiovascular and neuromuscular abnormalities. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of these medications on Mg2+ balance will indicate ways of prevention and treatment of these adverse effects and could potentially provide more insight into Mg2+ homoeostasis.

  5. Identifying drug effects via pathway alterations using an integer linear programming optimization formulation on phosphoproteomic data.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Siminelakis, Paraskeuas; Chairakaki, Aikaterini D; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cell function and drug action is a major endeavor in the pharmaceutical industry. Drug effects are governed by the intrinsic properties of the drug (i.e., selectivity and potency) and the specific signaling transduction network of the host (i.e., normal vs. diseased cells). Here, we describe an unbiased, phosphoproteomic-based approach to identify drug effects by monitoring drug-induced topology alterations. With our proposed method, drug effects are investigated under diverse stimulations of the signaling network. Starting with a generic pathway made of logical gates, we build a cell-type specific map by constraining it to fit 13 key phopshoprotein signals under 55 experimental conditions. Fitting is performed via an Integer Linear Program (ILP) formulation and solution by standard ILP solvers; a procedure that drastically outperforms previous fitting schemes. Then, knowing the cell's topology, we monitor the same key phosphoprotein signals under the presence of drug and we re-optimize the specific map to reveal drug-induced topology alterations. To prove our case, we make a topology for the hepatocytic cell-line HepG2 and we evaluate the effects of 4 drugs: 3 selective inhibitors for the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and a non-selective drug. We confirm effects easily predictable from the drugs' main target (i.e., EGFR inhibitors blocks the EGFR pathway) but we also uncover unanticipated effects due to either drug promiscuity or the cell's specific topology. An interesting finding is that the selective EGFR inhibitor Gefitinib inhibits signaling downstream the Interleukin-1alpha (IL1alpha) pathway; an effect that cannot be extracted from binding affinity-based approaches. Our method represents an unbiased approach to identify drug effects on small to medium size pathways which is scalable to larger topologies with any type of signaling interventions (small molecules, RNAi, etc). The method can reveal drug effects on

  6. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-01-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target. PMID:26261286

  7. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-10-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. Drug interaction between idelalisib and diazepam resulting in altered mental status and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Bossaer, John B; Chakraborty, Kanishka

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, several new oral anticancer drugs have been approved, many via an accelerated approval process. These new agents have the potential for drug interactions, but lack of familiarity with these drugs by clinicians may increase the risk for drug interactions. We describe an interaction between the new anticancer agent idelalisib (CYP 3A4 inhibitor) and diazepam (CYP 3A4 substrate) that resulted in altered mental status and type II respiratory failure resulting in hospitalization. After discontinuation of both agents, the patient recovered quickly. Idelalisib was reinitiated after discharge. Lorazepam was substituted for diazepam since it is not metabolized via CYP 3A4. Both agents were tolerated well thereafter. This interaction was only flagged by two of four commonly used drug interaction databases. Clinicians should exercise caution with initiating new oral anticancer agents and consider the potential for drug interactions without solely relying on drug interaction databases.

  9. Drug Disposition Alterations in Liver Disease: Extra-hepatic Effects in Cholestasis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Canet, Mark J; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pharmacokinetics of drugs and xenobiotics, namely pharmaceuticals, is influenced by a host of factors that include genetics, physiological factors, and environmental stressors. The importance of disease on the disposition of xenobiotics has been increasingly recognized among medical professionals for alterations in key enzymes and membrane transporters that influence drug disposition and contribute to the development of adverse drug reactions. Areas Covered This review will survey pertinent literature of how liver disease alters the pharmacokinetics of drugs and other xenobiotics. The focus will be on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as well as cholestatic liver diseases. A review of basic pharmacokinetic principles, with a special emphasis on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and membrane transporters will be provided. Specifically, examples of how genetic alterations affect metabolism and excretion, respectively, will be highlighted. Lastly, the idea of “extra-hepatic” regulation will be explored, citing examples of how disease manifestation in the liver may affect drug disposition in distal sites, such as the kidney. Expert Opinion An expert opinion will be provided highlighting the definite need for data in understanding extra-hepatic regulation of membrane transporters in the presence of liver disease and its potential to dramatically alter the pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic profile of numerous drugs and xenobiotics. PMID:24989624

  10. TCR repertoires of intratumoral T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Carsten; Mezzadra, Riccardo; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2014-01-01

    The infiltration of human tumors by T cells is a common phenomenon, and over the past decades, it has become increasingly clear that the nature of such intratumoral T-cell populations can predict disease course. Furthermore, intratumoral T cells have been utilized therapeutically in clinical studies of adoptive T-cell therapy. In this review, we describe how novel methods that are either based on T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing or on cancer exome analysis allow the analysis of the tumor reactivity and antigen-specificity of the intratumoral TCR repertoire with unprecedented detail. Furthermore, we discuss studies that have started to utilize these techniques to probe the link between cancer exomes and the intratumoral TCR pool. Based on the observation that both the cancer epitope repertoire and intratumoral TCR repertoire appear highly individual, we outline strategies, such as 'autologous TCR gene therapy', that exploit the tumor-resident TCR repertoire for the development of personalized immunotherapy.

  11. Evaluation of Altered Drug Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Michael A; Sieg, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-support modality used in patients with refractory cardiac and/or respiratory failure. A significant resurgence in the use ECMO has been seen in recent years as a result of substantial improvements in technology and survival benefit. With expanding ECMO use, a better understanding of how ECMO affects drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is necessary. The vast majority of PK studies in patients receiving ECMO have been conducted within neonatal or pediatric populations or within a controlled environment (e.g., in vitro or ex vivo). Because of significant differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, it may be inappropriate to extrapolate these PK data to adults. Thus, the aims of this review are to evaluate the changes in drug PK during ECMO and to summarize the available PK data for common drugs used in the adult critically ill patients during ECMO support. A search of the PubMed (1965-July 2016), EMBASE (1965-July 2016), and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register databases was performed. All relevant studies describing PK alterations during ECMO in ex vivo experiments and in adults were included. Evaluation of the data indicated that drug PK in adults receiving ECMO support may be significantly altered. Factors influencing these alterations are numerous and have intricate relationships with each other but can generally be classified as ECMO circuit factors, drug factors, and patient factors. Commonly used drugs in these patients include antimicrobials, sedatives, and analgesics. PK data for most of these drugs are generally lacking; however, recent research efforts in this patient population have provided some limited guidance in drug dosing. With an improved understanding of altered drug PK secondary to ECMO therapy, optimization of pharmacotherapy within this critically ill population continues to move forward.

  12. Reversed lipid-based nanoparticles dispersed in oil for malignant tumor treatment via intratumoral injection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liao; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Tao; Yang, Xi; Huang, Ri; Quan, Dongqin

    2017-11-01

    Intratumoral injection of anticancer drugs directly delivers chemotherapeutics to the tumor region, offering an alternative strategy for cancer treatment. However, most hydrophilic drugs spread quickly from the injection site into systemic circulation, leading to inferior antitumor activity and adverse effects in patients. Therefore, we developed novel reversed lipid-based nanoparticles (RLBN) as a nanoscale drug carrier. RLBNs differ from traditional nanoscale drug carriers in that they possess a reversed structure consisting of a polar core and lipophilic periphery, leading to excellent solubility and stability in hydrophobic liquids; therefore, hydrophilic drugs can be entrapped in RLBNs and dispersed in oil. In vivo studies in tumor-bearing Balb/c nude mice indicated remarkable antitumor activity of RLBN-DOX after a single injection, with effective tumor growth inhibition for at least 17 days; the inhibition rate was ∼80%. These results can be attributed to the long-term retention and sustained drug release of RLBN-DOX in the tumor region. In contrast, intratumoral injection of free DOX showed weaker antitumor activity than RLBN-DOX did, with the tumor size doubling by day 11 and tripling by day 17. Further, the initial burst of drug released from free DOX could produce detrimental systemic effects, such as weight loss. Histological analyses by TUNEL staining showed apoptosis after treatment with RLBN-DOX, whereas tumor cell viability was high in the free DOX group. Current results indicate that RLBNs show sustained delivery of hydrophilic agents to local areas resulting in therapeutic efficacy, and they may be a promising drug delivery system suitable for intratumoral chemotherapy.

  13. Developmental Insights into Breast Cancer Intratumoral Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is no longer considered a single disease, but instead is made up of multiple subtypes with genetically and most likely epigenetically heterogeneous tumors composed of numerous clones. Both the hierarchical cancer stem cell and clonal evolution models have been invoked to help explain this intratumoral heterogeneity. Several recent studies have helped define the functional interactions among the different cellular subpopulations necessary for the evolution of this complex ecosystem. These interactions involve paracrine interactions that include locally acting Wnt family members, reminiscent of the signaling pathways important for normal mammary gland development and stem cell self-renewal. In this review, we discuss the interactions among various cell populations in both normal and tumor tissues. A better understanding of these interactions, especially in the metastatic setting, will be important for the development of improved combinatorial therapies designed to prevent relapse and to ultimately decrease mortality. PMID:26753176

  14. Current Approaches for Improving Intratumoral Accumulation and Distribution of Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Durymanov, Mikhail O; Rosenkranz, Andrey A; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of nanoparticles and macromolecules to passively accumulate in solid tumors and enhance therapeutic effects in comparison with conventional anticancer agents has resulted in the development of various multifunctional nanomedicines including liposomes, polymeric micelles, and magnetic nanoparticles. Further modifications of these nanoparticles have improved their characteristics in terms of tumor selectivity, circulation time in blood, enhanced uptake by cancer cells, and sensitivity to tumor microenvironment. These “smart” systems have enabled highly effective delivery of drugs, genes, shRNA, radioisotopes, and other therapeutic molecules. However, the resulting therapeutically relevant local concentrations of anticancer agents are often insufficient to cause tumor regression and complete elimination. Poor perfusion of inner regions of solid tumors as well as vascular barrier, high interstitial fluid pressure, and dense intercellular matrix are the main intratumoral barriers that impair drug delivery and impede uniform distribution of nanomedicines throughout a tumor. Here we review existing methods and approaches for improving tumoral uptake and distribution of nano-scaled therapeutic particles and macromolecules (i.e. nanomedicines). Briefly, these strategies include tuning physicochemical characteristics of nanomedicines, modulating physiological state of tumors with physical impacts or physiologically active agents, and active delivery of nanomedicines using cellular hitchhiking. PMID:26155316

  15. Factors Controlling the Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution and Intratumoral Penetration of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, Mark J.; Murakami, Mami; Roy, Aniruddha; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery to the tumor is impacted by multiple factors: nanoparticles must evade clearance by renal filtration and the reticuloendothelial system, extravasate through the enlarged endothelial gaps in tumors, penetrate through dense stroma in the tumor microenvironment to reach the tumor cells, remain in the tumor tissue for a prolonged period of time, and finally release the active agent to induce pharmacological effect. The physicochemical properties of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, surface chemistry (PEGylation, ligand conjugation) and composition affect the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intratumoral penetration and tumor bioavailability. On the other hand, tumor biology (blood flow, perfusion, permeability, interstitial fluid pressure and stroma content) and patient characteristics (age, gender, tumor type, tumor location, body composition and prior treatments) also have impact on drug delivery by nanoparticles. It is now believed that both nanoparticles and the tumor microenvironment have to be optimized or adjusted for optimal delivery. This review provides a comprehensive summary of how these nanoparticle and biological factors impact nanoparticle delivery to tumors, with discussion on how the tumor microenvironment can be adjusted and how patients can be stratified by imaging methods to receive the maximal benefit of nanomedicine. Perspectives and future directions are also provided. PMID:24075927

  16. Imaging Patterns of Intratumoral Calcification in the Abdominopelvic Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi Hye; Park, Hee Sun; Jung, Sung Il; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Intratumoral calcification is one of the most noticeable of radiologic findings. It facilitates detection and provides information important for correctly diagnosing tumors. In the abdominopelvic cavity, a wide variety of tumors have calcifications with various imaging features, though the majority of such calcifications are dystrophic in nature. In this article, we classify the imaging patterns of intratumoral calcification according to number, location, and morphology. Then, we describe commonly-encountered abdominopelvic tumors containing typical calcification patterns, focusing on their differentiable characteristics using the imaging patterns of intratumoral calcification. PMID:28246512

  17. Tumour-associated macrophages act as a slow-release reservoir of nano-therapeutic Pt(IV) pro-drug

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Gadde, Suresh; Pfirschke, Christina; Zope, Harshal; Engblom, Camilla; Kohler, Rainer H.; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Yang, Katherine S.; Askevold, Bjorn; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Pittet, Mikael; Lippard, Stephen J.; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic nanoparticles (TNPs) aim to deliver drugs more safely and effectively to cancers, yet clinical results have been unpredictable owing to limited in vivo understanding. Here we use single-cell imaging of intratumoral TNP pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to better comprehend their heterogeneous behaviour. Model TNPs comprising a fluorescent platinum(IV) pro-drug and a clinically tested polymer platform (PLGA-b-PEG) promote long drug circulation and alter accumulation by directing cellular uptake toward tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs). Simultaneous imaging of TNP vehicle, its drug payload and single-cell DNA damage response reveals that TAMs serve as a local drug depot that accumulates significant vehicle from which DNA-damaging Pt payload gradually releases to neighbouring tumour cells. Correspondingly, TAM depletion reduces intratumoral TNP accumulation and efficacy. Thus, nanotherapeutics co-opt TAMs for drug delivery, which has implications for TNP design and for selecting patients into trials. PMID:26503691

  18. Dilute concentrations of a psychiatric drug alter behavior of fish from natural populations.

    PubMed

    Brodin, T; Fick, J; Jonsson, M; Klaminder, J

    2013-02-15

    Environmental pollution by pharmaceuticals is increasingly recognized as a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. A variety of pharmaceuticals enter waterways by way of treated wastewater effluents and remain biochemically active in aquatic systems. Several ecotoxicological studies have been done, but generally, little is known about the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals. Here we show that a benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug (oxazepam) alters behavior and feeding rate of wild European perch (Perca fluviatilis) at concentrations encountered in effluent-influenced surface waters. Individuals exposed to water with dilute drug concentrations (1.8 micrograms liter(-1)) exhibited increased activity, reduced sociality, and higher feeding rate. As such, our results show that anxiolytic drugs in surface waters alter animal behaviors that are known to have ecological and evolutionary consequences.

  19. Intratumoral chemotherapy for lung cancer: re-challenge current targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Vogl, Thomas; Goldberg, Eugene P; Huang, Haidong; Simoff, Michael; Li, Qiang; Browning, Robert; Turner, Francis J; Le Pivert, Patrick; Spyratos, Dionysios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Celikoglu, Seyhan I; Celikoglu, Firuz; Brachmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Strategies to enhance the already established doublet chemotherapy regimen for lung cancer have been investigated for more than 20 years. Initially, the concept was to administer chemotherapy drugs locally to the tumor site for efficient diffusion through passive transport within the tumor. Recent advances have enhanced the diffusion of pharmaceuticals through active transport by using pharmaceuticals designed to target the genome of tumors. In the present study, five patients with non-small cell lung cancer epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) negative stage IIIa–IV International Union Against Cancer 7 (UICC-7), and with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 2 scores were administered platinum-based doublet chemotherapy using combined intratumoral-regional and intravenous route of administration. Cisplatin analogues were injected at 0.5%–1% concentration within the tumor lesion and proven malignant lymph nodes according to pretreatment histological/cytological results and the concentration of systemic infusion was decreased to 70% of a standard protocol. This combined intravenous plus intratumoral-regional chemotherapy is used as a first line therapy on this short series of patients. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of direct treatment of involved lymph nodes with cisplatin by endobronchial ultrasound drug delivery with a needle without any adverse effects. The initial overall survival and local response are suggestive of a better efficacy compared to established doublet cisplatin–based systemic chemotherapy in (higher) standard concentrations alone according to the UICC 7 database expected survival. An extensive search of the literature was performed to gather information of previously published literature of intratumoral chemo-drug administration and formulation for this treatment modality. Our study shows a favorable local response, more than a 50% reduction, for a massive tumor mass after administration of five sessions of

  20. Heterogeneous intratumoral distribution of gadolinium nanoparticles within U87 human glioblastoma xenografts unveiled by micro-PIXE imaging.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Asuncion; Roudeau, Stéphane; L'Homel, Baptiste; Pouzoulet, Frédéric; Bonnet-Boissinot, Sarah; Prezado, Yolanda; Ortega, Richard

    2017-04-15

    Metallic nanoparticles have great potential in cancer radiotherapy as theranostic drugs since, they serve simultaneously as contrast agents for medical imaging and as radio-therapy sensitizers. As with other anticancer drugs, intratumoral diffusion is one of the main limiting factors for therapeutic efficiency. To date, a few reports have investigated the intratumoral distribution of metallic nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to determine the quantitative distribution of gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles after direct intratumoral injection within U87 human glioblastoma tumors grafted in mice, using micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) imaging. AGuIX (Activation and Guiding of Irradiation by X-ray) 3 nm particles composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates were used. PIXE results indicate that the direct injection of Gd nanoparticles in tumors results in their heterogeneous diffusion, probably related to variations in tumor density. All tumor regions contain Gd, but with markedly different concentrations, with a more than 250-fold difference. Also Gd can diffuse to the healthy adjacent tissue. This study highlights the usefulness of mapping the distribution of metallic nanoparticles at the intratumoral level, and proposes PIXE as an imaging modality to probe the quantitative distribution of metallic nanoparticles in tumors from experimental animal models with micrometer resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antitumor activity of TNF-α after intratumoral injection using an in situ thermosensitive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yourui; Shen, Yan; Ouahab, Ammar; Li, Chang; Xiong, Yerong; Tu, Jiasheng

    2015-03-01

    Local drug delivery strategies based on nanoparticles, gels, polymeric films, rods and wafers are increasingly used in cancer chemotherapy in order to enhance therapeutic effect and reduce systemic toxicity. Herein, a biodegradable and biocompatible in situ thermosensitive hydrogel was designed and employed to deliver tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) locally by intratumoral injection. The triblock copolymer was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of β-butyrolactone (β-BL) and lactide (LA) in bulk using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as an initiator and Sn(Oct)2 as the catalyst, the polymer was characterized by NMR, gel permeation chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry. Blood and tumor pharmacokinetics and in vivo antitumor activity of TNF-α after intratumoral administration in hydrogel or solution with the same dose were evaluated on S180 tumor-bearing mice. Compared with TNF-α solution, TNF-α hydrogel exhibited a longer T1/2 (4-fold) and higher AUCtumor (19-fold), but Cmax was lower (0.5-fold), which means that the hydrogel formulation improved the efficacy with a lower systhemic exposure than the solution formation. In addition, TNF-α hydrogel improved the antitumor activity and survival due to lower systemic exposure than the solution. These results demonstrate that the in situ thermosensitive hydrogel-based local delivery system by intratumoral injection is well suited for the administration of TNF-α.

  2. Drug hypersensitivity caused by alteration of the MHC-presented self-peptide repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Ostrov, David A.; Grant, Barry J.; Pompeu, Yuri A.; Sidney, John; Harndahl, Mikkel; Southwood, Scott; Oseroff, Carla; Lu, Shun; Jakoncic, Jean; de Oliveira, Cesar Augusto F.; Yang, Lun; Mei, Hu; Shi, Leming; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; English, A. Michelle; Wriston, Amanda; Lucas, Andrew; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Grey, Howard M.; Sette, Alessandro; Hunt, Donald F.; Buus, Soren; Peters, Bjoern

    2012-01-01

    Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions are unpredictable, dose-independent and potentially life threatening; this makes them a major factor contributing to the cost and uncertainty of drug development. Clinical data suggest that many such reactions involve immune mechanisms, and genetic association studies have identified strong linkages between drug hypersensitivity reactions to several drugs and specific HLA alleles. One of the strongest such genetic associations found has been for the antiviral drug abacavir, which causes severe adverse reactions exclusively in patients expressing the HLA molecular variant B*57:01. Abacavir adverse reactions were recently shown to be driven by drug-specific activation of cytokine-producing, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells that required HLA-B*57:01 molecules for their function; however, the mechanism by which abacavir induces this pathologic T-cell response remains unclear. Here we show that abacavir can bind within the F pocket of the peptide-binding groove of HLA-B*57:01, thereby altering its specificity. This provides an explanation for HLA-linked idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions, namely that drugs can alter the repertoire of self-peptides presented to T cells, thus causing the equivalent of an alloreactive T-cell response. Indeed, we identified specific self-peptides that are presented only in the presence of abacavir and that were recognized by T cells of hypersensitive patients. The assays that we have established can be applied to test additional compounds with suspected HLA-linked hypersensitivities in vitro. Where successful, these assays could speed up the discovery and mechanistic understanding of HLA-linked hypersensitivities, and guide the development of safer drugs. PMID:22645359

  3. Computational Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Responsiveness in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Valerio; Federico, Antonio; Pollastro, Carla; Ziviello, Carmela; Cataldi, Simona; Formisano, Pietro; Ciccodicola, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is one of the most frequent mortality causes in western countries, with rapidly increasing prevalence. Anti-diabetic drugs are the first therapeutic approach, although many patients develop drug resistance. Most drug responsiveness variability can be explained by genetic causes. Inter-individual variability is principally due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, and differential drug responsiveness has been correlated to alteration in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9) or insulin signaling (IRS1, ABCC8, KCNJ11 and PPARG). However, most genome-wide association studies did not provide clues about the contribution of DNA variations to impaired drug responsiveness. Thus, characterizing T2D drug responsiveness variants is needed to guide clinicians toward tailored therapeutic approaches. Here, we extensively investigated polymorphisms associated with altered drug response in T2D, predicting their effects in silico. Combining different computational approaches, we focused on the expression pattern of genes correlated to drug resistance and inferred evolutionary conservation of polymorphic residues, computationally predicting the biochemical properties of polymorphic proteins. Using RNA-Sequencing followed by targeted validation, we identified and experimentally confirmed that two nucleotide variations in the CAPN10 gene—currently annotated as intronic—fall within two new transcripts in this locus. Additionally, we found that a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), currently reported as intergenic, maps to the intron of a new transcript, harboring CAPN10 and GPR35 genes, which undergoes non-sense mediated decay. Finally, we analyzed variants that fall into non-coding regulatory regions of yet underestimated functional significance, predicting that some of them can potentially affect gene expression and/or post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs affecting the splicing. PMID:27347941

  4. Computational Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Responsiveness in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Valerio; Federico, Antonio; Pollastro, Carla; Ziviello, Carmela; Cataldi, Simona; Formisano, Pietro; Ciccodicola, Alfredo

    2016-06-25

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is one of the most frequent mortality causes in western countries, with rapidly increasing prevalence. Anti-diabetic drugs are the first therapeutic approach, although many patients develop drug resistance. Most drug responsiveness variability can be explained by genetic causes. Inter-individual variability is principally due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, and differential drug responsiveness has been correlated to alteration in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9) or insulin signaling (IRS1, ABCC8, KCNJ11 and PPARG). However, most genome-wide association studies did not provide clues about the contribution of DNA variations to impaired drug responsiveness. Thus, characterizing T2D drug responsiveness variants is needed to guide clinicians toward tailored therapeutic approaches. Here, we extensively investigated polymorphisms associated with altered drug response in T2D, predicting their effects in silico. Combining different computational approaches, we focused on the expression pattern of genes correlated to drug resistance and inferred evolutionary conservation of polymorphic residues, computationally predicting the biochemical properties of polymorphic proteins. Using RNA-Sequencing followed by targeted validation, we identified and experimentally confirmed that two nucleotide variations in the CAPN10 gene-currently annotated as intronic-fall within two new transcripts in this locus. Additionally, we found that a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), currently reported as intergenic, maps to the intron of a new transcript, harboring CAPN10 and GPR35 genes, which undergoes non-sense mediated decay. Finally, we analyzed variants that fall into non-coding regulatory regions of yet underestimated functional significance, predicting that some of them can potentially affect gene expression and/or post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs affecting the splicing.

  5. Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Math, M.; Tarpey, Patrick; Varela, Ignacio; Phillimore, Benjamin; Begum, Sharmin; McDonald, Neil Q.; Butler, Adam; Jones, David; Raine, Keiran; Latimer, Calli; Santos, Claudio R.; Nohadani, Mahrokh; Eklund, Aron C.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Clark, Graham; Pickering, Lisa; Stamp, Gordon; Gore, Martin; Szallasi, Zoltan; Downward, Julian; Futreal, P. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Intratumor heterogeneity may foster tumor evolution and adaptation and hinder personalized-medicine strategies that depend on results from single tumor-biopsy samples. Methods To examine intratumor heterogeneity, we performed exome sequencing, chromosome aberration analysis, and ploidy profiling on multiple spatially separated samples obtained from primary renal carcinomas and associated metastatic sites. We characterized the consequences of intratumor heterogeneity using immunohistochemical analysis, mutation functional analysis, and profiling of messenger RNA expression. Results Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed branched evolutionary tumor growth, with 63 to 69% of all somatic mutations not detectable across every tumor region. Intratumor heterogeneity was observed for a mutation within an autoinhibitory domain of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, correlating with S6 and 4EBP phosphorylation in vivo and constitutive activation of mTOR kinase activity in vitro. Mutational intratumor heterogeneity was seen for multiple tumor-suppressor genes converging on loss of function; SETD2, PTEN, and KDM5C underwent multiple distinct and spatially separated inactivating mutations within a single tumor, suggesting convergent phenotypic evolution. Gene-expression signatures of good and poor prognosis were detected in different regions of the same tumor. Allelic composition and ploidy profiling analysis revealed extensive intratumor heterogeneity, with 26 of 30 tumor samples from four tumors harboring divergent allelic-imbalance profiles and with ploidy heterogeneity in two of four tumors. Conclusions Intratumor heterogeneity can lead to underestimation of the tumor genomics landscape portrayed from single tumor-biopsy samples and may present major challenges to personalized-medicine and biomarker development. Intratumor heterogeneity, associated with heterogeneous protein function, may foster tumor adaptation and therapeutic failure through

  6. Direct intratumoral infusion of liposome encapsulated rhenium radionuclides for cancer therapy: Effects of nonuniform intratumoral dose distribution

    PubMed Central

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Li, Shihong; Goins, Beth; Otto, Randal A.; Bao, Ande

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Focused radiation therapy by direct intratumoral infusion of lipid nanoparticle (liposome)-carried beta-emitting radionuclides has shown promising results in animal model studies; however, little is known about the impact the intratumoral liposomal radionuclide distribution may have on tumor control. The primary objective of this work was to investigate the effects the intratumoral absorbed dose distributions from this cancer therapy modality have on tumor control and treatment planning by combining dosimetric and radiobiological modeling with in vivo imaging data. Methods:99mTc-encapsulated liposomes were intratumorally infused with a single injection location to human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude rats. High resolution in vivo planar imaging was performed at various time points for quantifying intratumoral retention following infusion. The intratumoral liposomal radioactivity distribution was obtained from 1 mm resolution pinhole collimator SPECT imaging coregistered with CT imaging of excised tumors at 20 h postinfusion. Coregistered images were used for intratumoral dosimetric and radiobiological modeling at a voxel level following extrapolation to the therapeutic analogs, 186Re∕188Re liposomes. Effective uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were used to assess therapy effectiveness and possible methods of improving upon tumor control with this radiation therapy modality. Results: Dosimetric analysis showed that average tumor absorbed doses of 8.6 Gy∕MBq (318.2 Gy∕mCi) and 5.7 Gy∕MBq (209.1 Gy∕mCi) could be delivered with this protocol of radiation delivery for 186Re∕188Re liposomes, respectively, and 37–92 MBq (1–2.5 mCi)∕g tumor administered activity; however, large intratumoral absorbed dose heterogeneity, as seen in dose-volume histograms, resulted in insignificant values of EUD and TCP for achieving tumor control. It is indicated that the use of liposomes encapsulating radionuclides

  7. Direct intratumoral infusion of liposome encapsulated rhenium radionuclides for cancer therapy: Effects of nonuniform intratumoral dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Li Shihong; Goins, Beth; Otto, Randal A.; Bao, Ande

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Focused radiation therapy by direct intratumoral infusion of lipid nanoparticle (liposome)-carried beta-emitting radionuclides has shown promising results in animal model studies; however, little is known about the impact the intratumoral liposomal radionuclide distribution may have on tumor control. The primary objective of this work was to investigate the effects the intratumoral absorbed dose distributions from this cancer therapy modality have on tumor control and treatment planning by combining dosimetric and radiobiological modeling with in vivo imaging data. Methods: {sup 99m}Tc-encapsulated liposomes were intratumorally infused with a single injection location to human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude rats. High resolution in vivo planar imaging was performed at various time points for quantifying intratumoral retention following infusion. The intratumoral liposomal radioactivity distribution was obtained from 1 mm resolution pinhole collimator SPECT imaging coregistered with CT imaging of excised tumors at 20 h postinfusion. Coregistered images were used for intratumoral dosimetric and radiobiological modeling at a voxel level following extrapolation to the therapeutic analogs, {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re liposomes. Effective uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were used to assess therapy effectiveness and possible methods of improving upon tumor control with this radiation therapy modality. Results: Dosimetric analysis showed that average tumor absorbed doses of 8.6 Gy/MBq (318.2 Gy/mCi) and 5.7 Gy/MBq (209.1 Gy/mCi) could be delivered with this protocol of radiation delivery for {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re liposomes, respectively, and 37-92 MBq (1-2.5 mCi)/g tumor administered activity; however, large intratumoral absorbed dose heterogeneity, as seen in dose-volume histograms, resulted in insignificant values of EUD and TCP for achieving tumor control. It is indicated that the use of liposomes encapsulating

  8. Towards inverse modeling of intratumor heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutovsky, Branislav; Horvath, Denis

    2015-08-01

    Development of resistance limits efficiency of present anticancer therapies and preventing it remains a big challenge in cancer research. It is accepted, at the intuitive level, that resistance emerges as a consequence of the heterogeneity of cancer cells at the molecular, genetic and cellular levels. Produced by many sources, tumor heterogeneity is extremely complex time dependent statistical characteristics which may be quantified by measures defined in many different ways, most of them coming from statistical mechanics. In this paper, we apply the Markovian framework to relate population heterogeneity to the statistics of the environment. As, from an evolutionary viewpoint, therapy corresponds to a purposeful modi- fication of the cells' fitness landscape, we assume that understanding general relationship between the spatiotemporal statistics of a tumor microenvironment and intratumor heterogeneity will allow to conceive the therapy as an inverse problem and to solve it by optimization techniques. To account for the inherent stochasticity of biological processes at cellular scale, the generalized distancebased concept was applied to express distances between probabilistically described cell states and environmental conditions, respectively.

  9. Alter Ego. Drug and brain--information to prevent. Compared analysis of opinions, knowledge and habits among a multicentric sample of secondary school students about drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, M; Gentile, A; Langiano, E; De Vito, E; La Torre, G; Ricciardi, G

    2006-03-01

    Repression and control have been shown to be inadequate for drug addiction issues. Recent history, however has proved that information is one of the most effective measures against the spread of drugs. The wide range of drug circulation and the need for the spread of correct information on the effects of drugs in man, especially his brain, have led the Center for Scientific Culture Diffusion of Cassino University, to widen the scope of "Alter Ego. Drugs and the brain", a touring educational exhibition, which opened in 1994, by dedicating more attention to socially accepted drugs, such as alcohol and tobacco, and to new substances like ecstasy and similar drugs. Concurrently with the Alter Ego touring exhibition, a study was undertaken to obtain information on public awareness of the dangers of psychotropic drug abuse and to assess the effectiveness of the exhibition as an instrument of scientific information about drug addiction among its visitors, during its tour of over 60 Italian towns.

  10. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 1012 parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 1010 parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 1017 parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  11. Prenatal tactile stimulation attenuates drug-induced behavioral sensitization, modifies behavior, and alters brain architecture.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Arif; Kolb, Bryan

    2011-07-11

    Based on the findings of postnatal tactile stimulation (TS), a favorable experience in rats, the present study examined the influence of prenatal TS on juvenile behavior, adult amphetamine (AMPH) sensitization, and structural alteration in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the striatum. Female rats received TS through a baby hair brush throughout pregnancy, and the pups born were tested for open field locomotion, elevated plus maze (EPM), novel object recognition (NOR), and play fighting behaviors. Development and persistence of drug-induced behavioral sensitization in adults were tested by repeated AMPH administration and a challenge, respectively. Structural plasticity in the brain was assessed from the prefrontal cortical thickness and striatum size from serial coronal sections. The results indicate that TS females showed enhanced exploration in the open field. TS decreased the frequency of playful attacks whereas the response to face or evade an attack was not affected. Anxiety-like behavior and cognitive performance were not influenced by TS. AMPH administration resulted in gradual increase in locomotor activity (i.e., behavioral sensitization) that persisted at least for 2 weeks. However, both male and female TS rats exhibited attenuated AMPH sensitization compared to sex-matched controls. Furthermore, the drug-associated alteration in the prefrontal cortical thickness and striatum size observed in controls were prevented by TS experience. In summary, TS during prenatal development modified juvenile behavior, attenuated drug-induced behavioral sensitization in adulthood, and reorganized brain regions implicated in drug addiction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbiota-derived uremic retention solutes: perpetrators of altered nonrenal drug clearance in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Prokopienko, Alexander J; Nolin, Thomas D

    2017-09-20

    Scientific interest in the gut microbiota is increasing due to improved understanding of its implications in human health and disease. In patients with kidney disease, gut microbiota-derived uremic toxins directly contribute to altered nonrenal drug clearance. Microbial imbalances, known as dysbiosis, potentially increase formation of microbiota-derived toxins, and diminished renal clearance leads to toxin accumulation. High concentrations of microbiota-derived toxins such as indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol sulfate perpetrate interactions with drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, which provides a mechanistic link between increases in drug-related adverse events and dysbiosis in kidney disease. Areas covered: This review summarizes the effects of microbiota-derived uremic toxins on hepatic phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters. Research articles that tested individual toxins were included. Therapeutic strategies to target microbial toxins are also discussed. Expert commentary: Large interindividual variability in toxin concentrations may explain some differences in nonrenal clearance of medications. Advances in human microbiome research provide unique opportunities to systematically evaluate the impact of individual and combined microbial toxins on drug metabolism and transport, and to explore microbiota-derived uremic toxins as potential therapeutic targets.

  13. Short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laureen A; Achterbergh, Roos; de Vries, Emmely M; van Nierop, F Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R; Boelen, Anita; Romijn, Johannes A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2015-06-01

    Experimental studies indicate that short-term fasting alters drug metabolism. However, the effects of short-term fasting on drug metabolism in humans need further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-term fasting (36 h) on P450-mediated drug metabolism. In a randomized crossover study design, nine healthy subjects ingested a cocktail consisting of five P450-specific probe drugs [caffeine (CYP1A2), S-warfarin (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), metoprolol (CYP2D6), and midazolam (CYP3A4)] on two occasions (control study after an overnight fast and after 36 h of fasting). Blood samples were drawn for pharmacokinetic analysis using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. In addition, we studied in Wistar rats the effects of short-term fasting on hepatic mRNA expression of P450 isoforms corresponding with the five studied P450 enzymes in humans. In the healthy subjects, short-term fasting increased oral caffeine clearance by 20% (P = 0.03) and decreased oral S-warfarin clearance by 25% (P < 0.001). In rats, short-term fasting increased mRNA expression of the orthologs of human CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 (P < 0.05), and decreased the mRNA expression of the ortholog of CYP2C9 (P < 0.001) compared with the postabsorptive state. These results demonstrate that short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in a nonuniform pattern. Therefore, short-term fasting is another factor affecting cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

  14. Altered MRP is associated with multidrug resistance and reduced drug accumulation in human SW-1573 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eijdems, E. W.; Zaman, G. J.; de Haas, M.; Versantvoort, C. H.; Flens, M. J.; Scheper, R. J.; Kamst, E.; Borst, P.; Baas, F.

    1995-01-01

    We have analysed the contribution of several parameters, e.g. drug accumulation, MDR1 P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and topoisomerase (topo) II, to drug resistance in a large set of drug-resistant variants of the human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line SW-1573 derived by selection with low concentrations of doxorubicin or vincristine. Selection with either drug nearly always resulted in MDR clones. The resistance of these clones could be explained by reduced drug accumulation and was associated with a decrease rather than an increase in the low MDR1 mRNA level. To test whether a decrease in MDR1 mRNA indirectly affected resistance in these cells, we introduced a MDR1-specific hammerhead ribozyme into wild-type SW-1573 cells. Although this led to a substantial reduction in MDR1 mRNA, it did not result in resistance. In all resistant clones we found an altered form of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), migrating slightly slower during SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis than MRP in parental cells. This altered MRP was also present in non-P-gp MDR somatic cell hybrids of the SW-1573 cells, demonstrating a clear linkage with the MDR phenotype. Treatment of crude cellular membrane fractions with N-glycanase, endoglycosidase H or neuraminidase showed that the altered migration of MRP on SDS-PAGE is due to a post-translational modification. There was no detectable difference in sialic acid content. In most but not all doxorubicin-selected clones, this MDR phenotype was accompanied by a reduction in topo II alpha mRNA level. No reduction was found in the clones selected with vincristine. We conclude from these results that selection of the SW-1573 cell line for low levels of doxorubicin or vincristine resistance, predominantly results in MDR with reduced drug accumulation associated with the presence of an altered MRP protein. This mechanism can be accompanied by other resistance mechanisms, such as reduced topo

  15. Reversal of schizophrenia-like symptoms and immune alterations in mice by immunomodulatory drugs.

    PubMed

    da Silva Araújo, Tatiane; Maia Chaves Filho, Adriano Jose; Monte, Aline Santos; Isabelle de Góis Queiroz, Ana; Cordeiro, Rafaela Carneiro; de Jesus Souza Machado, Michel; de Freitas Lima, Ricardo; Freitas de Lucena, David; Maes, Michael; Macêdo, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Immune dysregulation observed in schizophrenia alters tryptophan metabolism. Tryptophan metabolism is triggered by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Tryptophan is converted to quinolinic acid, a potent neurotoxin, and to kynurenic acid, an NMDA antagonist. 1-Methyl-D-tryptophan (MDT) inhibits IDO. Melatonin is metabolized by IDO while inhibiting TDO. We evaluated the reversal of ketamine-induced schizophrenia-like behavioral and neurochemical alterations in mice by the administration of MDT (20 or 40 mg/kg, i.p.) or melatonin (15 mg/kg, per os). Oxidative stress and inflammatory alterations, i.e. myeloperoxidase activity (MPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-6 were measured in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum. Risperidone was used as standard antipsychotic. Ketamine triggered positive- (PPI deficits and hyperlocomotion), cognitive- (working memory deficits) and negative (social interaction deficits) schizophrenia-like symptoms. These symptoms were accompanied by increased MPO activity, decreased GSH and increased LPO in all brain areas and increments in hippocampal IL-4 and IL-6. MDT and melatonin reversed all ketamine-induced behavioral alterations. Risperidone did not reverse working memory deficits. MDT and melatonin reversed alterations in MPO activity and GSH levels. LP was reversed only by melatonin and risperidone. Risperidone could not reverse MPO alterations in the PFC and striatum. All drugs reversed the alterations in IL-4 and IL-6. The hippocampus and striatum of ketamine+melatonin-treated animals had lower levels of IL-6. Our findings provide further preclinical evidence that immune-inflammatory and oxidative pathways are involved in schizophrenia and that targeting these pathways is a valid treatment option in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Superior intratumoral penetration of paclitaxel nanodots strengthens tumor restriction and metastasis prevention.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dezhi; Ding, Hui; Liu, Shan; Yue, Hua; Bao, Yali; Wang, Zhenhua; Su, Zhiguo; Wei, Wei; Ma, Guanghui

    2015-06-03

    Recently discovered intratumoral diffusion resistance, together with poor solubility and nontargeted distribution of chemotherapeutic drugs, has significantly impaired the performance of cancer treatments. By developing a well-designed droplet-confined/cryodesiccation-driven crystallization approach, we herein report the successful preparation of nanocrystallites of insoluble chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) in forms of nanodots (NDs, ≈10 nm) and nanoparticles (NPs, ≈70 nm) with considerably high drug loading capacity. Superficially coated Pluronic F127 is demonstrated to endow the both PTX nanocrystallites with excellent water solubility and prevent undesired phagocyte uptake. Further decoration with tumor-penetrating peptide iRGD, as expected, indiscriminatively facilitates tumor cell uptake in traditional monolayer cell culture model. On the contrary, distinctly enhanced performances in inward penetration and ensuing elimination of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids are achieved by iRGD-NDs rather than iRGD-NPs, revealing the significant influence of particle size variation in nanoscale. In vivo experiments verify that, although efficient tumor enrichment is achieved by all nanocrystallites, only the iRGD-grafted nanocrystallites of ultranano size realize thorough intratumoral delivery and reach cancer stem cells, which are concealed inside the tumor core. Consequently, much strengthened restriction on progress and metastasis of orthotopic 4T1 mammary adenocarcinoma is achieved in murine model, in sharp contrast to commercial PTX formulation Taxol. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  18. Subtoxic Alterations in Hepatocyte-Derived Exosomes: An Early Step in Drug-Induced Liver Injury?

    PubMed

    Holman, Natalie S; Mosedale, Merrie; Wolf, Kristina K; LeCluyse, Edward L; Watkins, Paul B

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant clinical and economic problem in the United States, yet the mechanisms that underlie DILI remain poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that signaling molecules released by stressed hepatocytes can trigger immune responses that may be common across DILI mechanisms. Extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes, principally hepatocyte-derived exosomes (HDEs), may constitute one such signal. To examine HDE alterations as a function of drug-induced stress, this work utilized prototypical hepatotoxicant acetaminophen (APAP) in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, SD rat hepatocytes, and primary human hepatocytes. HDE were isolated using ExoQuick precipitation reagent and analyzed by quantification of the liver-specific RNAs albumin and microRNA-122 (miR-122). In vivo, significant elevations in circulating exosomal albumin mRNA were observed at subtoxic APAP exposures. Significant increases in exosomal albumin mRNA were also observed in primary rat hepatocytes at subtoxic APAP concentrations. In primary human hepatocytes, APAP elicited increases in both exosomal albumin mRNA and exosomal miR-122 without overt cytotoxicity. However, the number of HDE produced in vitro in response to APAP did not increase with exosomal RNA quantity. We conclude that significant drug-induced alterations in the liver-specific RNA content of HDE occur at subtoxic APAP exposures in vivo and in vitro, and that these changes appear to reflect selective packaging rather than changes in exosome number. The current findings demonstrate that translationally relevant HDE alterations occur in the absence of overt hepatocellular toxicity, and support the hypothesis that HDE released by stressed hepatocytes may mediate early immune responses in DILI.

  19. Tumor Suppressor WWOX and p53 Alterations and Drug Resistance in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Fu; Chou, Pei-Yi; Wang, Wan-Jen; Sze, Chun-I; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 are frequently mutated in glioblastomas (GBMs) and appears to contribute, in part, to resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) and therapeutic drugs. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase WWOX (FOR or WOX1) is a proapoptotic protein and is considered as a tumor suppressor. Loss of WWOX gene expression is frequently seen in malignant cancer cells due to promoter hypermethylation, genetic alterations, and translational blockade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of wild type WWOX preferentially induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells harboring mutant p53. WWOX is known to physically bind and stabilize wild type p53. Here, we provide an overview for the updated knowledge in p53 and WWOX, and postulate potential scenarios that wild type and mutant p53, or isoforms, modulate the apoptotic function of WWOX. We propose that triggering WWOX activation by therapeutic drugs under p53 functional deficiency is needed to overcome TMZ resistance and induce GBM cell death. PMID:23459853

  20. The Impact of the Expression Level of Intratumoral Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase on Chemotherapy Sensitivity and Survival of Patients in Gastric Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong; Liu, Hongpeng; Ma, Bin; Song, Yongxi; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yingying; Yu, Dehao

    2017-01-01

    The potential impact that the intratumoral expression level of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) has on chemotherapy sensitivity and long-term survival for gastric cancer (GC) patients remains controversial; therefore, this study seeks to clarify this issue. Our meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan) 5.3 software. In vitro drug sensitivity tests, correlation coefficients between sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and expression levels of intratumoral DPD were used as effective indexes to analyse. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were used as endpoints for patient outcome, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were noted as measures of effect. There were 15 eligible studies including 1805 patients for the final analysis. The analysis revealed a statistically significant difference between the expression level of intratumoral DPD activity, DPD mRNA levels, and sensitivity to 5-FU in GC patients, with high expression levels of intratumoral DPD resulting in low sensitivity to 5-FU. However, no matter what therapeutic regimens were used, there was no significant difference for patient outcomes between high and low DPD expression groups, either in OS or in PFS. In conclusion, high levels of intratumoral DPD expression have a negative impact on sensitivity to 5-FU in GC patients, but no prognostic value for long-term survival was uncovered. PMID:28255193

  1. Disease-Induced Alterations in Brain Drug Transporters in Animal Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Ihalainen, Jouni; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Gosselet, Fabien; Picardat, Théo; Gynther, Mikko; Kanninen, Katja M; White, Anthony R; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Forsberg, Markus M; Ruponen, Marika

    2017-09-26

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) may disturb functions of the blood-brain barrier and change the disposition of drugs to the brain. This study assessed the disease-induced changes in drug transporters in the brain capillaries of transgenic AD mice. Eighteen drug transporters and four tight junction-associated proteins were analyzed by RT-qPCR in cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum tissue samples of 12-16-month-old APdE9, Tg2576 and APP/PS1 transgenic mice and their healthy age-matched controls. In addition, microvessel fractions enriched from 1-3-month-old APdE9 mice were analyzed using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Brain transport of methotrexate in APdE9 mice was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. The expression profiles of studied genes were similar in brain tissues of AD and control mice. Instead, in the microvessel fraction in APdE9 mice, >2-fold alterations were detected in the expressions of 11 genes but none at the protein level. In control mice strains, >5-fold changes between different brain regions were identified for Slc15a2, Slc22a3 and occludin. Methotrexate distribution into hippocampus of APdE9 mice was faster than in controls. The expression profile of mice carrying presenilin and amyloid precursor protein mutations is comparable to controls, but clear regional differences exist in the expression of drug transporters in brain.

  2. Intratumor photosensitizer injection for photodynamic therapy: Pre-clinical experience with methylene blue, Pc 4, and Photofrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Timothy M.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2016-03-01

    Intravenous administration of some photosensitizers, including the FDA-approved Photofrin, results in significant systemic photosensitivity and a 2-3-day drug-light interval. Direct intratumor injection of photosensitizer could potentially eliminate these negative aspects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), while requiring a lower photosensitizer dose to achieve comparable drug concentration in the target tissue. We performed PDT using intratumor injection of 3 photosensitizers, methylene blue (MB), Pc 4, and Photofrin, in mouse tumor models. After a 0-15 minute drug-light interval, illumination was delivered by appropriate diode lasers. For animals receiving MB or Pc 4, surface illumination was delivered using a microlens-terminated fiber. For animals receiving Photofrin, interstitial illumination was delivered by a 1 cm diffuser. In animals receiving MB or Pc 4, tumor dimensions were measured daily post-PDT, with a cure being defined as no palpable tumor 90 days post-treatment. For Photofrin, animals were sacrificed 24 hours post-PDT and tumors were excised, with samples HE stained to assess PDT-induced necrosis. 55% of tumors were cured with MB-PDT, and significant tumor growth delay (p=0.002) was observed for Pc 4. For Photofrin PDT, the mean necrosis radius was 3.4+/-0.8 mm, compared to 2.9+/-1.3 mm for systemic administration, which was not a significant difference (p=0.58). Intratumoral injection of the photosensitizers methylene blue, Pc 4, and Photofrin is feasible, and results in appreciable tumor response. Further investigation is necessary to optimize treatment protocols and assess the systemic photosensitivity induced by intratumor injection.

  3. Functional network alterations and their structural substrate in drug-resistant epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Caciagli, Lorenzo; Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, Seok-Jun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    The advent of MRI has revolutionized the evaluation and management of drug-resistant epilepsy by allowing the detection of the lesion associated with the region that gives rise to seizures. Recent evidence indicates marked chronic alterations in the functional organization of lesional tissue and large-scale cortico-subcortical networks. In this review, we focus on recent methodological developments in functional MRI (fMRI) analysis techniques and their application to the two most common drug-resistant focal epilepsies, i.e., temporal lobe epilepsy related to mesial temporal sclerosis and extra-temporal lobe epilepsy related to focal cortical dysplasia. We put particular emphasis on methodological developments in the analysis of task-free or “resting-state” fMRI to probe the integrity of intrinsic networks on a regional, inter-regional, and connectome-wide level. In temporal lobe epilepsy, these techniques have revealed disrupted connectivity of the ipsilateral mesiotemporal lobe, together with contralateral compensatory reorganization and striking reconfigurations of large-scale networks. In cortical dysplasia, initial observations indicate functional alterations in lesional, peri-lesional, and remote neocortical regions. While future research is needed to critically evaluate the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity, fMRI mapping promises to lend distinct biomarkers for diagnosis, presurgical planning, and outcome prediction. PMID:25565942

  4. Primary cerebral myxopapillary ependymoma presenting with intratumoral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2014-08-01

    Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE), a benign histological variant of ependymoma, is found most commonly in the cauda equina region. Primary intracranial MPE is very rare, and most cases are a metastatic deposit from a spinal lesion. Primary cerebral MPEs are usually well-defined solid or cystic lesions without hemorrhage. We report the first case of primary cerebral MPE with intratumoral hemorrhage.

  5. Inhibition of topoisomerase I by anti-cancer drug altered the endometrial cyclicity and receptivity.

    PubMed

    Liani-Leibson, K; Har-Vardi, I; Priel, E

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (topo I) is an essential nuclear enzyme involved in virtually all aspects of gene expression, and is the target of the anti-cancer drugs- camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives. Improvement of the survival rates of young women with cancer has led to the consideration of the effects of long-term chemotherapy on their fertility. The effect of anticancer drugs on ovarian function was previously investigated; however, no reports are available concerning their effect on the endometrium, whose integrity is an important factor in embryo implantation. Here we used a rat animal model to investigate the expression and activity of topo I in the various physiologic phases of the endometrium and the influence of CPT on its integrity and receptivity. The results show, for the first time, that the endometrial topo I level and activity are influenced by the physiologic phases of the endometrium (estrous cycle) and correlate with the estrogen blood concentration. Treatment with the anti-cancer drug CPT caused histological disruption of the endometrium and deleterious effect on its cyclicity. Moreover, CPT treatment significantly reduced the implantation rate of embryos, suggesting alteration in the receptivity of the endometrium. These results suggest that topo I is important for maintaining the normal physiologic cyclicity and functionality of the endometrium in rats. Anti-cancer agents that target topo I severely impair estrous cycle progression and endometrial integrity and receptivity, emphasizing the importance of addressing the effect of chemotherapy on the endometrial functionality.

  6. Effect of intratumoral injection on the biodistribution and therapeutic potential of novel chemophor EL-modified single-walled nanotube loading doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhuo; Xu, Hui; Wang, Yan; He, Zhonggui; Li, Sanming

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate in vivo efficacy and loco-regional distribution of a doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded Polyoxyl 35 Castor Oil (Cremophor EL, CrEL) noncovalent modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) formulation in a sarcoma tumor model after intratumoral injection. The drug loaded SWNTs were successfully prepared via physical absorption, which was confirmed by UV-vis-NIR absorbance spectra and dynamic light scattering assay. Solid tumor models were obtained by injecting mouse sarcoma 180 cells into the thighs of ICR mice. CrEL-SWNTs-DOX, CrEL-SWNTs, free DOX and saline (control) were intratumorally injected after 5 days post transplantation. The biodistribution studies demonstrated that intratumoral delivery of CrEL-SWNTs-DOX resulted in longer drug retention time in tumor, higher tumor level (27.6-fold than that of free DOX), as well as less accumulation in other solid tissues, especially in heart. Furthermore, in vivo anti-tumor activity results showed that CrEL-SWNTs-DOX could effectively suppress the tumor growth than free DOX and the control, attributing to its enhanced intratumoral DOX level. The histopathological findings revealed that the new carbon nanomaterials were a safe vehicle for topical drug delivery systems. It is concluded that this noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes by CrEL for anticancer agents might be a promising alternative for cancer treatment.

  7. Importance of influx and efflux systems and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rochat, B

    2009-08-01

    In this review, intratumoral drug disposition will be integrated into the wide range of resistance mechanisms to anticancer agents with particular emphasis on targeted protein kinase inhibitors. Six rules will be established: 1. There is a high variability of extracellular/intracellular drug level ratios; 2. There are three main systems involved in intratumoral drug disposition that are composed of SLC, ABC and XME enzymes; 3. There is a synergistic interplay between these three systems; 4. In cancer subclones, there is a strong genomic instability that leads to a highly variable expression of SLC, ABC or XME enzymes; 5. Tumor-expressed metabolizing enzymes play a role in tumor-specific ADME and cell survival and 6. These three systems are involved in the appearance of resistance (transient event) or in the resistance itself. In addition, this article will investigate whether the overexpression of some ABC and XME systems in cancer cells is just a random consequence of DNA/chromosomal instability, hypo- or hypermethylation and microRNA deregulation, or a more organized modification induced by transposable elements. Experiments will also have to establish if these tumor-expressed enzymes participate in cell metabolism or in tumor-specific ADME or if they are only markers of clonal evolution and genomic deregulation. Eventually, the review will underline that the fate of anticancer agents in cancer cells should be more thoroughly investigated from drug discovery to clinical studies. Indeed, inhibition of tumor expressed metabolizing enzymes could strongly increase drug disposition, specifically in the target cells resulting in more efficient therapies.

  8. A population genetics perspective on the determinants of intra-tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zheng; Sun, Ruping; Curtis, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Cancer results from the acquisition of somatic alterations in a microevolutionary process that typically occurs over many years, much of which is occult. Understanding the evolutionary dynamics that are operative at different stages of progression in individual tumors might inform the earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Although these processes cannot be directly observed, the resultant spatiotemporal patterns of genetic variation amongst tumor cells encode their evolutionary histories. Such intra-tumor heterogeneity is pervasive not only at the genomic level, but also at the transcriptomic, phenotypic, and cellular levels. Given the implications for precision medicine, the accurate quantification of heterogeneity within and between tumors has become a major focus of current research. In this review, we provide a population genetics perspective on the determinants of intra-tumor heterogeneity and approaches to quantify genetic diversity. We summarize evidence for different modes of evolution based on recent cancer genome sequencing studies and discuss emerging evolutionary strategies to therapeutically exploit tumor heterogeneity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Evolutionary principles - heterogeneity in cancer?, edited by Dr. Robert A. Gatenby. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alterations of prefrontal cortical microRNAs in methamphetamine self-administering rats: From controlled drug intake to escalated drug intake.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao-Yue; Cao, Dan-Ni; Chen, Ying; Wang, Lv; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2016-01-12

    Drug addiction is a process that transits from recreative and regular drug use into compulsive drug use. The two patterns of drug use, controlled drug intake and escalated drug intake, represent different stages in the development of drug addiction; and escalation of drug use is a hallmark of addiction. Accumulating studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) play key regulatory roles in drug addiction. However, the molecular adaptations in escalation of drug use, as well as the difference in the adaptations between escalated and controlled drug use, remain unclear. In the present study, 28 altered miRNAs in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were found in the groups of controlled methamphetamine self-administration (1h/session) and escalated self-administration (6h/session), and some of them were validated. Compared with saline control group, miR-186 was verified to be up-regulated while miR-195 and miR-329 were down-regulated in the rats with controlled methamphetamine use. In the rats with escalated drug use, miR-127, miR-186, miR-222 and miR-24 were verified to be up-regulated while miR-329 was down-regulated compared with controls. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis indicated that the predicted targets of these verified miRNAs involved in the processes of neuronal apoptosis and synaptic plasticity. However, the putative regulated molecules may be different between controlled and escalated drug use groups. Taken together, we detected the altered miRNAs in rat PFC under the conditions of controlled methamphetamine use and escalated use respectively, which may extend our understanding of the molecular adaptations underlying the transition from controlled drug use to addiction.

  10. Prenatal drug exposure to illicit drugs alters working memory-related brain activity and underlying network properties in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Julie B; Riggins, Tracy; Liang, Xia; Gallen, Courtney; Kurup, Pradeep K; Ross, Thomas J; Black, Maureen M; Nair, Prasanna; Salmeron, Betty Jo

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of effects of prenatal drug exposure (PDE) on brain functioning during adolescence is poorly understood. We explored neural activation to a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) versus a control task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in adolescents with PDE and a community comparison group (CC) of non-exposed adolescents. We applied graph theory metrics to resting state data using a network of nodes derived from the VSWM task activation map to further explore connectivity underlying WM functioning. Participants (ages 12-15 years) included 47 adolescents (27 PDE and 20 CC). All analyses controlled for potentially confounding differences in birth characteristics and postnatal environment. Significant group by task differences in brain activation emerged in the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6) with the CC group, but not the PDE group, activating this region during VSWM. The PDE group deactivated the culmen, whereas the CC group activated it during the VSWM task. The CC group demonstrated a significant relation between reaction time and culmen activation, not present in the PDE group. The network analysis underlying VSWM performance showed that PDE group had lower global efficiency than the CC group and a trend level reduction in local efficiency. The network node corresponding to the BA 6 group by task interaction showed reduced nodal efficiency and fewer direct connections to other nodes in the network. These results suggest that adolescence reveals altered neural functioning related to response planning that may reflect less efficient network functioning in youth with PDE.

  11. The Potential Role of Systemic Buffers in Reducing Intratumoral Extracellular pH and Acid-Mediated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ariosto S.; Yunes, Jose A.; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that the extracellular pH (pHe) in cancers is typically lower than that in normal tissue and that an acidic pHe promotes invasive tumor growth in primary and metastatic cancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that increased systemic concentrations of pH buffers reduce intratumoral and peritumoral acidosis and, as a result, inhibit malignant growth. Computer simulations are used to quantify the ability of systemic pH buffers to increase the acidic pHe of tumors in vivo and investigate the chemical specifications of an optimal buffer for such purpose. We show that increased serum concentrations of the sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) can be achieved by ingesting amounts that have been used in published clinical trials. Furthermore, we find that consequent reduction of tumor acid concentrations significantly reduces tumor growth and invasion without altering the pH of blood or normal tissues. The simulations also show that the critical parameter governing buffer effectiveness is its pKa. This indicates that NaHCO3, with a pKa of 6.1, is not an ideal intratumoral buffer and that greater intratumoral pHe changes could be obtained using a buffer with a pKa of ~7. The simulations support the hypothesis that systemic pH buffers can be used to increase the tumor pHe and inhibit tumor invasion. PMID:19276380

  12. The potential role of systemic buffers in reducing intratumoral extracellular pH and acid-mediated invasion.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ariosto S; Yunes, Jose A; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A

    2009-03-15

    A number of studies have shown that the extracellular pH (pHe) in cancers is typically lower than that in normal tissue and that an acidic pHe promotes invasive tumor growth in primary and metastatic cancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that increased systemic concentrations of pH buffers reduce intratumoral and peritumoral acidosis and, as a result, inhibit malignant growth. Computer simulations are used to quantify the ability of systemic pH buffers to increase the acidic pHe of tumors in vivo and investigate the chemical specifications of an optimal buffer for such purpose. We show that increased serum concentrations of the sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) can be achieved by ingesting amounts that have been used in published clinical trials. Furthermore, we find that consequent reduction of tumor acid concentrations significantly reduces tumor growth and invasion without altering the pH of blood or normal tissues. The simulations also show that the critical parameter governing buffer effectiveness is its pK(a). This indicates that NaHCO(3), with a pK(a) of 6.1, is not an ideal intratumoral buffer and that greater intratumoral pHe changes could be obtained using a buffer with a pK(a) of approximately 7. The simulations support the hypothesis that systemic pH buffers can be used to increase the tumor pHe and inhibit tumor invasion.

  13. Norepinephrine transporter knock-out alters expression of the genes connected with antidepressant drugs action.

    PubMed

    Solich, Joanna; Kolasa, Magdalena; Kusmider, Maciej; Faron-Gorecka, Agata; Pabian, Paulina; Zurawek, Dariusz; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2015-01-12

    Norepinephrine transporter knock-out mice (NET-KO) exhibit depression-resistant phenotypes. They manifest significantly shorter immobility times in both the forced swim test and the tail suspension test. Moreover, biochemical studies have revealed the up-regulation of other monoamine transporters (dopamine and serotonin) in the brains of NET-KO mice, similar to the phenomenon observed after the chronic pharmacological blockade of norepinephrine transporter by desipramine in wild-type (WT) animals. NET-KO mice are also resistant to stress, as we demonstrated previously by measuring plasma corticosterone concentration. In the present study, we used a microdissection technique to separate target brain regions and the TaqMan Low Density Array approach to test the expression of a group of genes in the NET-KO mice compared with WT animals. A group of genes with altered expression were identified in four brain structures (frontal and cingulate cortices, dentate gyrus of hippocampus and basal-lateral amygdala) of NET-KO mice compared with WT mice. These genes are known to be altered by antidepressant drugs administration. The most interesting gene is Crh-bp, which modulates the activity of corticotrophin--releasing hormone (CRH) and several CRH-family members. Generally, genetic disturbances within noradrenergic neurons result in biological changes, such as in signal transduction and intercellular communication, and may be linked to changes in noradrenaline levels in the brains of NET-KO mice.

  14. Developmental exposures to waterborne abused drugs alter physiological function and larval locomotion in early life stages of medaka fish.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pei-Han; Hwang, Chiu-Chu; Chen, Te-Hao; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2015-08-01

    Environmental pollution by neuroactive pharmaceuticals from wastewater discharge is a major threat to aquatic ecosystems. However, the ecotoxicologic effect of waterborne abused drugs remains unclear. Embryos of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to aqueous solutions of 2 hallucinogenic drugs, ketamine (KET) and methamphetamine (MET) (0.004-40μM) to assess developmental toxicity, oxidative stress and behavioral alteration in early life stages. The environmentally relevant concentration (0.004μM) of both KET and MET significantly delayed blood circulation and hatching time in embryos and altered larval swimming behavior (e.g., maximum velocity and relative turn angle). KET and MET induced similar oxidative stress responses in embryos, which were unrecoverable in hatchlings in drug-free solutions. Early life exposure to the 2 drugs conferred distinct patterns in larval locomotion: KET induced hyperactivity and a less tortuous swimming path, but MET-treated larvae showed hypoactivity and a clockwise swimming direction at high doses. The alteration in locomotor responses were generally similar in mammals and zebrafish. We report sensitive biomarkers (e.g., heartbeat, hatching and swimming behavior) by developmental stage of medaka that reflect environmentally relevant exposures of abused drugs. They could be useful for ecological risk assessment of waterborne neuroactive drugs. The toxicity results implicate a potential ecotoxicological impact of controlled or abused drugs on fish development and populations in aquatic environments.

  15. Alteration of the diffusional barrier property of the nail leads to greater terbinafine drug loading and permeation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anroop B; Sammeta, Srinivasa M; Kim, Hyun D; Chakraborty, Bireswar; Friden, Phillip M; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2009-06-22

    The diffusional barrier property of biological systems varies with ultrastructural organization of the tissues and/or cells, and often plays an important role in drug delivery. The nail plate is a thick, hard and impermeable membrane which makes topical nail drug delivery challenging. The current study investigated the effect of physical and chemical alteration of the nail on the trans-ungual drug delivery of terbinafine hydrochloride (TH) under both passive and iontophoretic conditions. Physical alterations were carried out by dorsal or ventral nail layer abrasion, while chemical alterations were performed by defatting or keratolysis or ionto-keratolysis of the nails. Terbinafine permeation into and across the nail plate following various nail treatments showed similar trends in both passive and iontophoretic delivery, although the extent of drug delivery varied with treatment. Application of iontophoresis to the abraded nails significantly improved (P<0.05) TH permeation and loading compared to abraded nails without iontophoresis or normal nails with iontophoresis. Drug permeation was not enhanced when the nail plate was defatted. Keratolysis moderately enhanced the permeation but not the drug load. Ionto-keratolysis enhanced TH permeation and drug load significantly (P<0.05) during passive and iontophoretic delivery as compared to untreated nails. Ionto-keratolysis may be more efficient in permeabilization of nail plates than long term exposure to keratolysing agents.

  16. Alterations in the hippocampal phosphorylated CREB expression in drug state-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, Sakineh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sepehri, Houri; Delphi, Ladan

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the possible alterations of hippocampal CREB phosphorylation in drug state-dependent memory retrieval. One-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used to assess memory retrieval in adult male NMRI mice. Pre-training administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p) or nicotine (0.7 mg/kg, s.c.) reversed ethanol-induced amnesia, indicating ethanol- or ethanol-nicotine induced state-dependent learning (STD). Using Western blot analysis, it was found that the p-CREB/CREB ratio in the hippocampus increased in the mice that showed successful memory retrieval as compared with untrained mice. In contrast, pre-training administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) decreased the hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio in comparison with the control group. The hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio enhanced in ethanol- and ethanol-nicotine induced STD. Moreover, memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN (1 mg/kg, i.p.) improved in the animals that received pre-test administration of WIN (1 mg/kg, i.p.), ethanol (0.5 g/kg, i.p.) or nicotine (0.7 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting a cross STD between the drugs. The p-CREB/CREB ratio in the hippocampus decreased in the of WIN-induced amnesia and STD groups in comparison with the control group. In addition, cross state-dependent learning between WIN and ethanol or nicotine was associated with the increase of the hippocampal p-CREB/CREB ratio. It can be concluded that phosphorylation of CREB in the hippocampus is a critical event underlying the interaction of co-administration of drugs on memory retrieval in passive avoidance learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Alcohol Cirrhosis Alters Nuclear Receptor and Drug Transporter Expression in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    More, Vijay R.; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Buckley, David B.; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Unsafe use of alcohol results in approximately 2.5 million deaths worldwide, with cirrhosis contributing to 16.6% of reported deaths. Serum insulin levels are often elevated in alcoholism and may result in diabetes, which is why alcoholic liver disease and diabetes often are present together. Because there is a sizable population with these diseases alone or in combination, the purpose of this study was to determine whether transporter expression in human liver is affected by alcoholic cirrhosis, diabetes, and alcoholic cirrhosis coexisting with diabetes. Transporters aid in hepatobiliary excretion of many drugs and toxic chemicals and can be determinants of drug-induced liver injury. Drug transporter expression and transcription factor–relative mRNA and protein expression in normal, diabetic, cirrhotic, and cirrhosis with diabetes human livers were quantified. Cirrhosis significantly increased ABCC4, 5, ABCG2, and solute carrier organic anion (SLCO) 2B1 mRNA expression and decreased SLCO1B3 mRNA expression in the liver. ABCC1, 3–5, and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated by alcoholic cirrhosis. ABCC3-5 and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated in diabetic cirrhosis. Cirrhosis increased nuclear factor E2–related factor 2 mRNA expression, whereas it decreased pregnane-X-receptor and farnesoid-X-receptor mRNA expression in comparison with normal livers. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that expressions of ABCC2, 3, and 6; SLCO1B1 and 1B3; and ABCC4 and 5 were more closely related in the livers from this cohort. Overall, alcoholic cirrhosis altered transporter expression in human liver. PMID:23462698

  18. Alcohol cirrhosis alters nuclear receptor and drug transporter expression in human liver.

    PubMed

    More, Vijay R; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Donepudi, Ajay C; Buckley, David B; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J; Slitt, Angela L

    2013-05-01

    Unsafe use of alcohol results in approximately 2.5 million deaths worldwide, with cirrhosis contributing to 16.6% of reported deaths. Serum insulin levels are often elevated in alcoholism and may result in diabetes, which is why alcoholic liver disease and diabetes often are present together. Because there is a sizable population with these diseases alone or in combination, the purpose of this study was to determine whether transporter expression in human liver is affected by alcoholic cirrhosis, diabetes, and alcoholic cirrhosis coexisting with diabetes. Transporters aid in hepatobiliary excretion of many drugs and toxic chemicals and can be determinants of drug-induced liver injury. Drug transporter expression and transcription factor-relative mRNA and protein expression in normal, diabetic, cirrhotic, and cirrhosis with diabetes human livers were quantified. Cirrhosis significantly increased ABCC4, 5, ABCG2, and solute carrier organic anion (SLCO) 2B1 mRNA expression and decreased SLCO1B3 mRNA expression in the liver. ABCC1, 3-5, and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated by alcoholic cirrhosis. ABCC3-5 and ABCG2 protein expression was also upregulated in diabetic cirrhosis. Cirrhosis increased nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 mRNA expression, whereas it decreased pregnane-X-receptor and farnesoid-X-receptor mRNA expression in comparison with normal livers. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that expressions of ABCC2, 3, and 6; SLCO1B1 and 1B3; and ABCC4 and 5 were more closely related in the livers from this cohort. Overall, alcoholic cirrhosis altered transporter expression in human liver.

  19. Inter- and intratumoral heterogeneity of BCL2 correlates with IgH expression and prognosis in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Barreca, A; Martinengo, C; Annaratone, L; Righi, L; Chiappella, A; Ladetto, M; Demurtas, A; Chiusa, L; Stacchini, A; Crosetto, N; van Oudenaarden, A; Chiarle, R

    2014-01-01

    Most follicular lymphomas (FLs) are genetically defined by the t(14;18)(q32;q21) translocation that juxtaposes the BCL2 gene to the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) 3' regulatory regions (IgH-3'RRs). Despite this recurrent translocation, FL cases are heterogeneous in terms of intratumoral clonal diversity for acquired mutations and variations in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe an additional mechanism that contributes to inter- and intratumoral heterogeneity in FLs. By applying a novel single-molecule RNA fluorescence-based in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to detect mRNA molecules of BCL2 and IgH in single cells, we found marked heterogeneity in the number of BCL2 mRNA transcripts within individual lymphoma cells. Moreover, BCL2 mRNA molecules correlated with IgH mRNA molecules in individual cells both in t(14;18) lymphoma cell lines and in patient samples. Consistently, a strong correlation between BCL2 and IgH protein levels was found in a series of 205 primary FL cases by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Inter- and intratumoral heterogeneity of BCL2 expression determined resistance to drugs commonly used in FL treatment and affected overall survival of FL patients. These data demonstrate that BCL2 and IgH expressions are heterogeneous and coregulated in t(14;18)-translocated cells, and determine the response to therapy in FL patients. PMID:25303368

  20. Addressing intra-tumoral heterogeneity and therapy resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rybinski, Brad; Yun, Kyuson

    2016-01-01

    In the last several years, our appreciation of intra-tumoral heterogeneity has greatly increased due to accumulating evidence for the co-existence of genetically and epigenetically divergent cancer cells residing in different microenvironments within a tumor. Herein, we review recent literature discussing intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the context of therapy resistance mechanisms at the genetic, epigenetic and microenvironmental levels. We illustrate the influence of tumor microenvironment on therapy resistance and epigenetic states of cancer cells by highlighting the role of cancer stem cells in therapy resistance. We also summarize different strategies that have been employed to address various resistance mechanisms at genetic, epigenetic, and microenvironmental levels in preclinical and clinical studies. We propose that future personalized cancer therapy design needs to incorporate dynamic and comprehensive analyses of tumor heterogeneity landscape and multi-dimensional mechanisms of therapy resistance. PMID:27608848

  1. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma with intratumoral calcification: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Inoko, Kazuho; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Noji, Takehiro; Kurashima, Yo; Ebihara, Yuma; Tamoto, Eiji; Nakamura, Toru; Murakami, Soichi; Okamura, Keisuke; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of hilar cholangiocarcinoma with intratumoral calcification that mimicked hepatolithiasis. A 73-year-old man presented to a local hospital with a calcified lesion in the hepatic hilum. At first, hepatolithiasis was diagnosed, and he underwent endoscopic stone extraction via the trans-papillary route. This treatment strategy failed due to biliary stricture. He was referred to our hospital, and further examination suggested the existence of cholangiocarcinoma. He underwent left hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy and extrahepatic bile duct resection. Pathological examination revealed hilar cholangiocarcinoma with intratumoral calcification, while no stones were found. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of calcified hilar cholangiocarcinoma has been previously reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare case of calcified hilar cholangiocarcinoma and reveal its clinicopathologic features. PMID:26478684

  2. Ovarian intratumoral 21-hydroxylase deficiency in a postmenopausal hirsute woman.

    PubMed

    Souto, Selma B; Baptista, Pedro V; Barreto, Filomena; Sousa, Pedro F; Braga, Daniel C; Carvalho, Davide

    2012-12-01

    Virilising ovarian tumours are a rare cause of hyperandrogenism in women, accounting for less than 5% of all ovarian neoplasms. It occurs most often in - and postmenopausal women. We report a case of a 64 year-old woman with signs of virilisation that had started 3 years before. Blood hormone analysis revealed increased levels of testosterone, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone. The tetracosactin test revealed 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Radiological imaging demonstrated a nodule in her left ovary. The patient was submitted to bilateral laparoscopic oophorectomy, and histopathological examination revealed a luteoma of the left ovary. Postoperative serum testosterone level and 17-hydroxyprogesterone returned to normal levels in one month. Virilism regressed within six months. Our patient also showed an elevation in 17-OHP serum levels. Normalization of 17-OHP after oophorectomy suggests a case of intratumoral 21-hydroxylase deficiency. To our knowledge, this is the first description of ovarian intratumoral 21-hydroxylase deficiency in a postmenopausal woman.

  3. Thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers alter lipid bilayer properties and voltage-dependent sodium channel function: implications for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Karl F.; Sanford, R. Lea; Greathouse, Denise V.; Hemmings, Hugh C.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    The thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. Their canonical effects are mediated by activation of the peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcription factor. In addition to effects mediated by gene activation, the TZDs cause acute, transcription-independent changes in various membrane transport processes, including glucose transport, and they alter the function of a diverse group of membrane proteins, including ion channels. The basis for these off-target effects is unknown, but the TZDs are hydrophobic/amphiphilic and adsorb to the bilayer–water interface, which will alter bilayer properties, meaning that the TZDs may alter membrane protein function by bilayer-mediated mechanisms. We therefore explored whether the TZDs alter lipid bilayer properties sufficiently to be sensed by bilayer-spanning proteins, using gramicidin A (gA) channels as probes. The TZDs altered bilayer elastic properties with potencies that did not correlate with their affinity for PPARγ. At concentrations where they altered gA channel function, they also altered the function of voltage-dependent sodium channels, producing a prepulse-dependent current inhibition and hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state inactivation curve. The shifts in the inactivation curve produced by the TZDs and other amphiphiles can be superimposed by plotting them as a function of the changes in gA channel lifetimes. The TZDs’ partition coefficients into lipid bilayers were measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The most potent bilayer modifier, troglitazone, alters bilayer properties at clinically relevant free concentrations; the least potent bilayer modifiers, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, do not. Unlike other TZDs tested, ciglitazone behaves like a hydrophobic anion and alters the gA monomer–dimer equilibrium by more than one mechanism. Our results provide a possible mechanism for some off-target effects of an important group of

  4. Pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin after intratumoral injection using a thermosensitive hydrogel in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Hong, Ki-Yun; Song, Soo-Chang; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2010-02-25

    A novel, thermosensitive hydrogel, poly(organophosphazene), is an injectable drug delivery system that transforms from sol to gel at body temperature. Doxorubicin (DOX) is a cytotoxic drug used for the treatment of several solid tumors. Due to its acute cardiac toxicity, DOX is a good candidate for local chemo-drug delivery system. In this study, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics of DOX (30 mg/kg) when given as an intratumoral injection using poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel in mice with human gastric tumor xenografts. DOX was formulated at 0.6% into a 10% hydrogel, and 40% and 90% of the dose was released in a sustained manner over 5 weeks in vitro and in vivo, respectively. The hydrogel mass was well retained over 7 weeks, and T(1/2beta, tumor) was 1.8-fold longer than that of the solution, but the 2.2-fold lower C(max, tumor), produced a similar AUC(tumor) and antitumor effect. However, solution caused a 2-fold higher systemic exposure (AUC(plasma)), which resulted in significant mortality due to acute cardiac toxicity. These data indicate that hydrogel formulation may have similar efficacy but lower systemic exposure than aqueous solution. In conclusion, poly(organophosphazene) showed adequate characteristics for local intratumoral delivery of DOX, including dose capacity, local retention, and minimal systemic spill-over. The safety and biocompatibility of poly(organophosphazene) should be further evaluated and its application should be extended to other anticancer agents. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  6. Prevention of posttraumatic alterations in lymphocyte subpopulations in mice by immunomodulating drugs.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Sirvent, R; Hansbrough, J F; Bartle, E J

    1986-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in traumatized victims, as well as an unfortunate complication following surgical procedures. The incidence of such infections is probably related to immune suppression occurring after severe trauma and surgery. Cell-mediated immunity is an arm of immunity that is probably important in defense against bacterial as well as fungal and viral infections. The status of cell-mediated immunity appears to be reflected by the helper/inducer to suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocyte (Ly1+/Ly2+ in the mouse model) ratio. A depressed ratio has been shown to correlate with other measures of suppressed immunity. Using monoclonal antibodies and immunofluorescent analysis, splenic lymphocyte subpopulations were enumerated at different intervals after injury in mice receiving various injuries (laparotomy, 40% liver resection, burn injury covering 20% of total body surface area, and crush injury-amputation of hind limb). An immediate fall in the Ly1+/Ly2+ ratio was observed following the most severe injuries, namely, liver resection, burn, and crush injury-amputation, but not following laparotomy. Changes in the ratio were reflected by both decreases in helper populations (Ly1+) and increases in suppressor populations (Ly2+). Prostaglandins and histamines have been implicated as possible mediators in producing down-regulation of the immune system. Posttraumatic lymphocyte alterations were prevented in crush injury-amputation group mice when drugs (ibuprofen and cimetidine) to block such mediators were administered prior to trauma; changes were also prevented by administering cyclophosphamide, a drug which in low dose might inhibit proliferation of suppressor lymphocyte populations.

  7. Hematological alterations and thymic function in newborns of HIV-infected mothers receiving antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Wongnoi, Rotjanee; Penvieng, Nawaporn; Singboottra, Panthong; Kingkeow, Doungnapa; Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Sirivatanapa, Pannee; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2013-06-08

    To investigate the effects of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs on hematological parameters and thymic function in HIV-uninfected newborns of HIV-infected mothers. Cross sectional study. Chiang-Mai University Hospital, Chiang-Mai, Thailand. 49 HIV-uninfected and 26 HIV-infected pregnancies. Cord blood samples of newborns from HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected mothers were collected. Hematological parameters were measured using automatic blood cell count. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) levels in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs), CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were quantified using real-time PCR.. Hemotological parameters and thymic function. Newborn of HIV-infected mother tended to have lower mean levels of hemoglobin than those of HIV-uninfected mother (137 ±22 vs 146 ±17 g/L, P = 0.05). Furthermore, mean of red blood cell (RBC) counts and hematocrit and median of TRECs in CD4+ T-cells in the newborns of the former were significantly lower than those of the latter [3.6 ±0.7 vs 4.8 ±0.6 x 1012 cells/L, P <0.001; 0.40 ±0.07 vs 0.46 ±0.05 L/L, P < 0.001 and 0.53 (IQR: 0.03-5.76) vs 13.20 (IQR: 2.77-27.51) x 10-3 pg/uL, P = 0.02, respectively]. ARV drugs altered hematological parameters and thymic function (TRECs CD4+ T-cells) in HIV-uninfected newborns of HIV-infected mothers.

  8. Short-Term Fasting Alters Pharmacokinetics of Cytochrome P450 Probe Drugs: Does Protein Binding Play a Role?

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laureen A; Achterbergh, Roos; Romijn, Johannes A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2017-09-19

    Short-term fasting differentially alters cytochrome P450 (CYP) mediated drug metabolism. This has been established by using CYP-enzyme selective probe drugs. However, the observed effects of fasting on the pharmacokinetics of these probe drugs may also include the effects of altered plasma protein binding of these drugs. Therefore, we studied the effect of short-term fasting on protein binding of five commonly used probe drugs [caffeine (CYP1A2), metoprolol (CYP2D6), midazolam (CYP3A4), omeprazole (CYP2C19) and S-warfarin (CYP2C9)]. The free and total plasma concentrations of the five probe drugs were analyzed by LC-MS/MS in samples retrieved in a cross-over study in which nine healthy subjects received an intravenous administration of the cocktail after an overnight fast (control) and after 36 h of fasting. Short-term fasting increased plasma free fatty acid concentrations from 0.48 mmol/L (control) to 1.29 mmol/L (36 h fasting) (p = 0.012). Short-term fasting did not alter the free fractions of caffeine, metoprolol and omeprazole compared to the control intervention (p > 0.05). Power to detect a difference for midazolam and S-warfarin was low since the majority of free concentrations were below the limit of quantification. This study demonstrates that short-term fasting does not alter protein binding of the probe drugs caffeine, metoprolol and omeprazole.

  9. Assessing and monitoring intratumor heterogeneity in glioblastoma: how far has multimodal imaging come?

    PubMed

    Boonzaier, Natalie R; Piccirillo, Sara G M; Watts, Colin; Price, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma demonstrates imaging features of intratumor heterogeneity that result from underlying heterogeneous biological properties. This stems from variations in cellular behavior that result from genetic mutations that either drive, or are driven by, heterogeneous microenvironment conditions. Among all imaging methods available, only T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery are used in standard clinical glioblastoma assessment and monitoring. Advanced imaging modalities are still considered emerging techniques as appropriate end points and robust methodologies are missing from clinical trials. Discovering how these images specifically relate to the underlying tumor biology may aid in improving quality of clinical trials and understanding the factors involved in regional responses to treatment, including variable drug uptake and effect of radiotherapy. Upon validation and standardization of emerging MR techniques, providing information based on the underlying tumor biology, these images may allow for clinical decision-making that is tailored to an individual's response to treatment.

  10. Increased fibrosis and impaired intratumoral accumulation of macromolecules in a murine model of pancreatic cancer co-administered with FGF-2.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoshi; Iwata, Caname; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi Y; Cabral, Horacio; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Miyazono, Kohei; Kano, Mitsunobu R

    2016-05-28

    Pancreatic cancer is notorious for its poor prognosis. The histopathologic characteristic of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which is the most common type of pancreatic cancer, is fibrosis within tumor tissue. Although fibrosis within tumor tissue is thought to impede drug therapy by interfering with the intratumoral accumulation of anti-tumor drugs, this hypothesis has yet to be proven directly in preclinical models. Here, we evaluated the effect of enhanced fibrosis on intratumoral accumulation of macromolecular drugs by increasing fibrosis in a murine tumor model of subcutaneously xenografted BxPC-3, a human PDAC cell line. When fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was co-administered upon BxPC-3 inoculation, stromal fibrotic area was increased and was characterized by augmented murine collagen accumulation compared to inoculation of BxPC-3 alone, which correlated with increased monocyte/macrophage contents in the tumor tissues. We further discovered that the intratumoral accumulation of intravenously administrated fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran of 2,000,000Da (2MDa) was significantly reduced in the FGF-2 co-administered tumors despite unaltered hyaluronan accumulation and pericyte coverage of the tumor neovasculature and increased lymphangiogenesis. Finally, we found that FGF-2 co-administered tumors are more refractory to macromolecular drug therapy using nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane). The model established and analyzed in this study, characterized by increased fibrotic component, provides a preclinical animal model suited to predict the intratumoral accumulation of macromolecular drugs and to evaluate the efficacy of drugs targeting the tumor stroma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery: Active filling of laser channels with pressure and vacuum alteration.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, Andrés M; Doukas, Apostolos G; Farinelli, William A; Bhayana, Brijesh; Anderson, R Rox; Haedersdal, Merete

    2016-02-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFXL) is rapidly evolving as one of the foremost techniques for cutaneous drug delivery. While AFXL has effectively improved topical drug-induced clearance rates of actinic keratosis, treatment of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) has been challenging, potentially due to insufficient drug uptake in deeper skin layers. This study sought to investigate a standardized method to actively fill laser-generated channels by altering pressure, vacuum, and pressure (PVP), enquiring its effect on (i) relative filling of individual laser channels; (ii) cutaneous deposition and delivery kinetics; (iii) biodistribution and diffusion pattern, estimated by mathematical simulation. Franz diffusion chambers (FCs) were used to evaluate the PVP-technique, comparing passive (AFXL) and active (AFXL + PVP) channel filling. A fractional CO2-laser generated superficial (225 µm;17.5 mJ/channel) and deep (1200 µm; 130.5 mJ/channel) channels, and PVP was delivered as a 3-minutes cycle of 1 minute pressure (+1.0 atm), 1 minute vacuum (-1.0 atm), and 1 minute pressure (+1.0 atm). Filling of laser channels was visualized with a colored biomarker liquid (n = 12 FCs, n = 588 channels). Nuclear magnetic resonance quantified intracutaneous deposition of topically applied polyethylene glycol (PEG400) over time (10 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours), investigated with (n = 36 FCs) and without (n = 30 FCs) PVP-filling. Two-dimensional mathematical simulation was used to simulate intradermal biodistribution and diffusion at a depth of 1,000 µm. Active filling with application of PVP increased the number of filled laser channels. At a depth of 1,000 µm, filling increased from 44% (AFXL) to 94% with one PVP cycle (AFXL + PVP; P < 0.01). Active filling greatly enhanced intracutaneous deposition of PEG400, resulting in a rapid delivery six-folding uptake at 10 minutes (AFXL 54 µg/ml vs. AFXL + PVP 303 µg/ml, P < 0.01). AFXL alone generated an inhomogeneous uptake of PEG400

  12. Re-Directing an Alkylating Agent to Mitochondria Alters Drug Target and Cell Death Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wisnovsky, Simon P.; Pereira, Mark P.; Wang, Xiaoming; Hurren, Rose; Parfitt, Jeremy; Larsen, Lesley; Smith, Robin A. J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2013-01-01

    We have successfully delivered a reactive alkylating agent, chlorambucil (Cbl), to the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the mechanism of cell death for mitochondria-targeted chlorambucil (mt-Cbl) in vitro and assess its efficacy in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia. Using a ρ° cell model, we show that mt-Cbl toxicity is not dependent on mitochondrial DNA damage. We also illustrate that re-targeting Cbl to mitochondria results in a shift in the cell death mechanism from apoptosis to necrosis, and that this behavior is a general feature of mitochondria-targeted Cbl. Despite the change in cell death mechanisms, we show that mt-Cbl is still effective in vivo and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to the parent drug. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial rerouting changes the site of action of Cbl and also alters the cell death mechanism drastically without compromising in vivo efficacy. Thus, mitochondrial delivery allows the exploitation of Cbl as a promiscuous mitochondrial protein inhibitor with promising therapeutic potential. PMID:23585833

  13. Altered membrane lipid dynamics and chemoprevention by non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs during colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh Kanwar, S; Vaish, V; Nath Sanyal, S

    2011-01-01

    The present work focuses on the anti-neoplastic role of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in modulating the biophysical parameters of the colonic membranes in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) induced carcinogenesis. The steady-state fluorescence polarization technique was applied to assess membrane fluidity, membrane polarity and lipid phase states. The decline in cholesterol content, biosynthesis and cholesterol: phospholipids ratio with DMH treatment indicates more fluidity associated with carcinogenesis. The DMH group had shown lower order parameter indicating more fluidity whereas NSAIDs resulted in increasing the membrane lipid order. The converging effects of these changes were more in membrane phase separations and membrane phase state. In DMH treatment membrane shows lesser phase separation or high polarity, and more liquid crystalline state while for NSAID groups membranes have higher phase separations or low polarity, and more of the gel phase. Further, NSAIDs induced anti-proliferative effects were evidently observed by apoptosis in the colonocytes by using acridine orange-ethidium bromide fluorescent staining and Terminal de-oxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The results suggest that NSAIDs induced alteration in the membrane biophysical parameters may be an important initiating event for the chemopreventive action.

  14. Comparative lipidomics of drug sensitive and resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals altered lipid imprints.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rahul; Hameed, Saif; Kumar, Parveen; Singh, Sarman; Fatima, Zeeshan

    2017-10-01

    Lipids are most adaptable molecules that acclimatize to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). The precise molecular mechanism of this acclimatization achieved in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains elusive. Although lipids of MTB have been characterized to some details, a comparable resource does not exist between drug sensitive (DS) and resistant (DR) strains of MTB. Here, by employing high-throughput mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach, we attempted to analyze the differential lipidome profile of DS and DR MTB clinical isolates. We analyzed three major classes of lipids viz fatty acyls, glycerophospholipids and glycerolipids and their respective subclasses. Notably, we observed differential fatty acyls and glycerophospholipids as evident from increased mycolic acids phosphatidylinositol mannosides, phosphatidylinositol, cardiolipin and triacylglycerides abundance, respectively, which are crucial for MTB virulence and pathogenicity. Considering the fact that 30% of the MTB genome codes for lipid, this comprehensive lipidomic approach unravels extensive lipid alterations in DS and DR that will serve as a resource for identifying biomarkers aimed at disrupting the functions of MTB lipids responsible for MDR acquisition in MTB.

  15. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  16. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya’an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  17. Drug-induced taste and smell alterations: a case/non-case evaluation of an italian database of spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting.

    PubMed

    Tuccori, Marco; Lapi, Francesco; Testi, Arianna; Ruggiero, Elisa; Moretti, Ugo; Vannacci, Alfredo; Bonaiuti, Roberto; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Giustarini, Giulio; Scollo, Carla; Corona, Tiberio; Ferrazin, Fernanda; Sottosanti, Laura; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2011-10-01

    The frequency and clinical features of drug-related taste and/or smell impairments are currently unclear. The aim of this study was to identify major drug classes associated with taste and smell alterations reported to the Italian spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting database. The association between drug and altered taste or smell was investigated by case/non-case methodology. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) was used as a measure of disproportionality. Cases were defined as patients with at least one ADR related to taste or smell impairments. The non-cases included all patients without any ADRs related to taste or smell alterations. According to the selection criteria, 52 166 reports were included in the analysis. Overall, 182 cases of drug-related taste and/or smell dysfunctions were identified. Statistically significant unadjusted RORs were reported for macrolides (n = 31; 7.1; 95% CI 4.8, 10.5), terbinafine (the only drug reported within the group of antimycotics belonging to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical class D01AE) [n = 17; 76.4; 95% CI 44.0, 132.6], fluoroquinolones (n = 15; 1.7; 95% CI 1.0, 2.8) and protein kinase inhibitors (n = 10; 4.0; 95% CI 2.1, 7.7). When RORs were adjusted for sex and age category, the disproportion remained statistically significant for all of the previously mentioned drug classes. Taste and/or smell abnormalities are common, sometimes unexpected and often persistent complaints of patients during pharmacological treatments. Physicians should be aware of the impact of these ADRs on patients' quality of life.

  18. Alterations in Polysomnographic (PSG) profile in drug-naïve Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Sanju P.; Sinha, Sanjib; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Panda, Samhita; Philip, Mariamma; Taly, Arun B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We studied the changes in Polysomnographic (PSG) profile in drug-naïve patients of Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent evaluation with sleep overnight PSG. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 30 with newly diagnosed levodopa-naïve patients with PD, fulfilling the UK-PD society brain bank clinical diagnostic criteria (M:F = 25:5; age: 57.2 ± 10.7 years). The disease severity scales and sleep related questionnaires were administered, and then patients were subjected to overnight PSG. Results: The mean duration of illness was 9.7 ± 9.5 months. The mean Hoehn and Yahr stage was 1.8 ± 0.4. The mean Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score improved from 27.7 ± 9.2 to 17.5 ± 8.9 with sustained usage of levodopa. Nocturnal sleep as assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was impaired in 10 (33.3%) patients (mean PSQI score: 5.1 ± 3.1). Excessive day time somnolence was recorded in three patients with Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score ≥ 10 (mean ESS score: 4.0 ± 3.4). PSG analysis revealed that poor sleep efficiency of <85% was present in 86.7% of patients (mean: 68.3 ± 21.3%). The latencies to sleep onset (mean: 49.8 ± 67.0 minutes) and stage 2 sleep (36.5 ± 13.1%) were prolonged while slow wave sleep was shortened. Respiration during sleep was significantly impaired in which 43.3% had impaired apnoea hyperpnoea index (AHI) ≥5, mean AHI: 8.3 ± 12.1). Apnoeic episodes were predominantly obstructive (obstructive sleep apnea, OSA index = 2.2 ± 5.1). These patients had periodic leg movement (PLM) disorder (56.7% had PLM index of 5 or more, mean PLMI: 27.53 ± 4 9.05) that resulted in excessive daytime somnolence. Conclusions: To conclude, sleep macro-architecture is altered in frequently and variably in levodopa-naïve patients of PD and the alterations are possibly due to disease process per se. PMID:25221397

  19. Intratumoral injection of a CpG oligonucleotide reverts resistance to PD-1 blockade by expanding multifunctional CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Campos, Jose; Gallotta, Marilena; Gong, Mei; Crain, Chad; Naik, Edwina; Coffman, Robert L; Guiducci, Cristiana

    2016-11-15

    Despite the impressive rates of clinical response to programmed death 1 (PD-1) blockade in multiple cancers, the majority of patients still fail to respond to this therapy. The CT26 tumor in mice showed similar heterogeneity, with most tumors unaffected by anti-PD-1. As in humans, response of CT26 to anti-PD-1 correlated with increased T- and B-cell infiltration and IFN expression. We show that intratumoral injection of a highly interferogenic TLR9 agonist, SD-101, in anti-PD-1 nonresponders led to a complete, durable rejection of essentially all injected tumors and a majority of uninjected, distant-site tumors. Therapeutic efficacy of the combination was also observed with the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and MCA38 colon carcinoma tumor models that show little response to PD-1 blockade alone. Intratumoral SD-101 substantially increased leukocyte infiltration and IFN-regulated gene expression, and its activity was dependent on CD8(+) T cells and type I IFN signaling. Anti-PD-1 plus intratumoral SD-101 promoted infiltration of activated, proliferating CD8(+) T cells and led to a synergistic increase in total and tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells expressing both IFN-γ and TNF-α. Additionally, PD-1 blockade could alter the CpG-mediated differentiation of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells into CD127(low)KLRG1(high) short-lived effector cells, preferentially expanding the CD127(high)KLRG1(low) long-lived memory precursors. Tumor control and intratumoral T-cell proliferation in response to the combined treatment is independent of T-cell trafficking from secondary lymphoid organs. These findings suggest that a CpG oligonucleotide given intratumorally may increase the response of cancer patients to PD-1 blockade, increasing the quantity and the quality of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells.

  20. Intratumoral injection of a CpG oligonucleotide reverts resistance to PD-1 blockade by expanding multifunctional CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu; Campos, Jose; Gallotta, Marilena; Gong, Mei; Crain, Chad; Naik, Edwina; Coffman, Robert L.; Guiducci, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Despite the impressive rates of clinical response to programmed death 1 (PD-1) blockade in multiple cancers, the majority of patients still fail to respond to this therapy. The CT26 tumor in mice showed similar heterogeneity, with most tumors unaffected by anti–PD-1. As in humans, response of CT26 to anti–PD-1 correlated with increased T- and B-cell infiltration and IFN expression. We show that intratumoral injection of a highly interferogenic TLR9 agonist, SD-101, in anti–PD-1 nonresponders led to a complete, durable rejection of essentially all injected tumors and a majority of uninjected, distant-site tumors. Therapeutic efficacy of the combination was also observed with the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and MCA38 colon carcinoma tumor models that show little response to PD-1 blockade alone. Intratumoral SD-101 substantially increased leukocyte infiltration and IFN-regulated gene expression, and its activity was dependent on CD8+ T cells and type I IFN signaling. Anti–PD-1 plus intratumoral SD-101 promoted infiltration of activated, proliferating CD8+ T cells and led to a synergistic increase in total and tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells expressing both IFN-γ and TNF-α. Additionally, PD-1 blockade could alter the CpG-mediated differentiation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells into CD127lowKLRG1high short-lived effector cells, preferentially expanding the CD127highKLRG1low long-lived memory precursors. Tumor control and intratumoral T-cell proliferation in response to the combined treatment is independent of T-cell trafficking from secondary lymphoid organs. These findings suggest that a CpG oligonucleotide given intratumorally may increase the response of cancer patients to PD-1 blockade, increasing the quantity and the quality of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:27799536

  1. Sequential treatment of oxaliplatin-containing PEGylated liposome together with S-1 improves intratumor distribution of subsequent doses of oxaliplatin-containing PEGylated liposome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Doi, Yusuke; Abu Lila, Amr S; Nagao, Ai; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Kiwada, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    We recently reported that combination therapy with metronomic S-1 dosing and oxaliplatin (l-OHP)-containing PEGylated liposomes improved antitumor activity in a murine colorectal tumor model. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying such improved therapeutic efficacy. Here we investigated the impact of combined treatment on biodistribution, tumor accumulation and intratumor distribution of test PEGylated liposomes and on the structure of tumor vasculature in a solid tumor. The combined treatment clearly enhanced tumor accumulation and intratumor distribution of a subsequent test dose of PEGylated liposome as a result of on the one hand prolonging blood circulation of test liposome and on the other hand the alteration in tumor microenvironment. The l-OHP-containing PEGylated liposomes contributed predominantly to the enhanced tumor accumulation and altered tumor distribution of test liposome. On the other hand, metronomic S-1 dosing contributed to the altered tumor distribution but not the tumor accumulation of test liposome. The antitumor effect of the combined treatment, reflected by the proportion of apoptotic cells in the tumor, was approximately equally accounted for by each of the two treatments, leading to a roughly additive effect. In conclusion, 1-OHP-containing PEGylated liposome together with S-1 enhanced intratumor influx, leading to improved antitumor activity of subsequently injected 1-OHP-containing PEGylated liposomes and/or S-1. This strategy we propose, which is clinically applicable, may overcome the problems related to the use of EPR effect-based nanocarrier systems.

  2. Cardiovascular regulation by central adrenergic mechanisms and its alteration by hypotensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, G

    1975-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus is followed by an immediate increase in sympathetic nerve activity and rise in blood pressure. Destruction of hypothalamic adrenergic structures by local unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the posterior hypothalamus reduced the blood pressure rise in response to stimulation of the lesioned side. This and numerous other findings indicate an involvement of central adrenergic neurons in the mediation of an increase of sympathetic nerve activity caused by hypothalamic stimulation. However, central adrenergic neurons do not seem to be an integral part of the sympathoexcitatory pathways originating in the posterior hypothalamus but rather facilitate their activation: after almost complete norepinephrine depletion produced by combined treatment with reserpine and alpha-methl-p-tyrosine, hypothalamic stimulation was still followed by an increase in spontaneous sympathetic nerve activity. Stimulation of an alpha-adrenoceptive site, probably located in the lower brain stem, mimics an activation of the baroreceptor reflex. The hypotensive drug, clonidine, stimulates this alpha-adrenoceptive site. In low doses clonidine facilitates the activation of the reflex, and in high doses this drug induces a state which closely resembles a pronounced activation of the reflex. Experiments following depletion of norepinephrine suggest that the central part of the baroreceptor reflex arc does not contain adrenergic neurons. However, these findings are compatible with the view that some neurons within the reflex arc are supplied with alpha-adrenoceptors. For the present it cannot be stated with certainty whether these alpha-adrenoceptors possess an innervation by adrenergic neurons projecting onto the reflex arc. In favor of such an innervation are the obsevations that alpha-methyldopa has its site of action in the lower brain stem and that the integrity of central adrenergic neurons is essential for its hypotensive effect. It

  3. Intratumor mapping of intracellular water lifetime: metabolic images of breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Charles S; Li, Xin; Tudorica, Luminita A; Oh, Karen Y; Roy, Nicole; Chui, Stephen Y-C; Naik, Arpana M; Holtorf, Megan L; Afzal, Aneela; Rooney, William D; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Shutter-speed pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data allows evaluation of equilibrium inter-compartmental water interchange kinetics. The process measured here – transcytolemmal water exchange – is characterized by the mean intracellular water molecule lifetime (τi). The τi biomarker is a true intensive property not accessible by any formulation of the tracer pharmacokinetic paradigm, which inherently assumes it is effectively zero when applied to DCE-MRI. We present population-averaged in vivo human breast whole tumor τi changes induced by therapy, along with those of other pharmacokinetic parameters. In responding patients, the DCE parameters change significantly after only one neoadjuvant chemotherapy cycle: while Ktrans (measuring mostly contrast agent (CA) extravasation) and kep (CA intravasation rate constant) decrease, τi increases. However, high-resolution, (1 mm)2, parametric maps exhibit significant intratumor heterogeneity, which is lost by averaging. A typical 400 ms τi value means a trans-membrane water cycling flux of 1013 H2O molecules s−1/cell for a 12 µm diameter cell. Analyses of intratumor variations (and therapy-induced changes) of τi in combination with concomitant changes of ve (extracellular volume fraction) indicate that the former are dominated by alterations of the equilibrium cell membrane water permeability coefficient, PW, not of cell size. These can be interpreted in light of literature results showing that τi changes are dominated by a PW(active) component that reciprocally reflects the membrane driving P-type ATPase ion pump turnover. For mammalian cells, this is the Na+,K+-ATPase pump. These results promise the potential to discriminate metabolic and microenvironmental states of regions within tumors in vivo, and their changes with therapy. PMID:24798066

  4. The upright posture improves plantar stepping and alters responses to serotonergic drugs in spinal rats

    PubMed Central

    Sławińska, Urszula; Majczyński, Henryk; Dai, Yue; Jordan, Larry M

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury have employed robotic means of positioning rats above a treadmill such that the animals are held in an upright posture and engage in bipedal locomotor activity. However, the impact of the upright posture alone, which alters hindlimb loading, an important variable in locomotor control, has not been examined. Here we compared the locomotor capabilities of chronic spinal rats when placed in the horizontal and upright postures. Hindlimb locomotor movements induced by exteroceptive stimulation (tail pinching) were monitored with video and EMG recordings. We found that the upright posture alone significantly improved plantar stepping. Locomotor trials using anaesthesia of the paws and air stepping demonstrated that the cutaneous receptors of the paws are responsible for the improved plantar stepping observed when the animals are placed in the upright posture. We also tested the effectiveness of serotonergic drugs that facilitate locomotor activity in spinal rats in both the horizontal and upright postures. Quipazine and (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) improved locomotion in the horizontal posture but in the upright posture either interfered with or had no effect on plantar walking. Combined treatment with quipazine and 8-OH-DPAT at lower doses dramatically improved locomotor activity in both postures and mitigated the need to activate the locomotor CPG with exteroceptive stimulation. Our results suggest that afferent input from the paw facilitates the spinal CPG for locomotion. These potent effects of afferent input from the paw should be taken into account when interpreting the results obtained with rats in an upright posture and when designing interventions for restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury. PMID:22351637

  5. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor induced intratumoral aromatase in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryoko; Miki, Yasuhiro; Hata, Shuko; Ishida, Takanori; Suzuki, Takashi; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2017-02-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inhibits estrogen receptor (ER) pathway, which may suppress estrogen-dependent cell proliferation. However, the correlation between AhR stimulation and intratumoral estrogen synthesis, especially through aromatase, has not been reported to date. In the present study, we examined this correlation in breast cancer cells. We examined AhR and aromatase immunoreactivity in 29 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. We performed in vitro studies using three breast carcinoma cell lines, MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231. AhR stimulation induced the mRNA expression of the aromatase gene in vitro in three breast carcinoma cell lines, and increased estrogen synthesis in MCF-7 cell line. Results of microarray analysis showed that AhR-induced aromatase expression was associated with BRCA1 induction. Analysis of patients with breast cancer showed a significant positive correlation between intratumoral AhR and aromatase status. We also compared the effects of AhR stimulation on the induction of intratumoral estrogen synthesis and inhibition of the ER signaling pathway, because AhR exerts contradictory effects on estrogen action in breast carcinoma cells. AhR-induced aromatase expression persisted for a significantly longer duration than AhR-induced ER pathway inhibition. Moreover, breast carcinoma cells treated with an AhR agonist tended to show earlier cell proliferation after removing the agonist than cells not treated with the AhR agonist. The results of the present study suggest that AhR stimulates estrogen-dependent progression of breast carcinoma by inducing aromatase expression under some conditions. These results provide new insights on the possible roles of environmental toxins in breast cancer development.

  6. Drug-induced alterations in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway: implications for reinforcement and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Haifeng; Li, Yanqin; Wang, Xi; Lu, Lin

    2008-02-01

    Drug addiction, characterized by high rates of relapse, is recognized as a kind of neuroadaptive disorder. Since the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is critical to neuroplasticity in the adult brain, understanding the role this pathway plays is important for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying drug addiction and relapse. Here, we review previous literatures that focus on the effects of exposure to cocaine, amphetamine, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), nicotine, morphine, and alcohol on ERK signaling in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system; these alterations of ERK signaling have been thought to contribute to the drug's rewarding effects and to the long-term maladaptation induced by drug abuse. We then discuss the possible upstreams of the ERK signaling pathway activated by exposure of drugs of abuse and the environmental cues previously paired with drugs. Finally, we argue that since ERK activation is a key molecular process in reinstatement of conditioned place preference and drug self-administration, the pharmacological manipulation of the ERK pathway is a potential treatment strategy for drug addiction.

  7. Possible drug–drug interaction in dogs and cats resulted from alteration in drug metabolism: A mini review

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions (in particular at metabolism) may result in fatal adverse effects in some cases. This basic information, therefore, is needed for drug therapy even in veterinary medicine, as multidrug therapy is not rare in canines and felines. The aim of this review was focused on possible drug–drug interactions in dogs and cats. The interaction includes enzyme induction by phenobarbital, enzyme inhibition by ketoconazole and fluoroquinolones, and down-regulation of enzymes by dexamethasone. A final conclusion based upon the available literatures and author’s experience is given at the end of the review. PMID:26257936

  8. Antitumoral effect and reduced systemic toxicity in mice after intra-tumoral injection of an in vivo solidifying calcium sulfate formulation with docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Grudén, Stefan; Sandelin, Martin; Rasanen, Veera; Micke, Patrick; Hedeland, Mikael; Axén, Niklas; Jeansson, Marie

    2017-05-01

    Docetaxel is a cytostatic agent approved for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer as well as other cancers. Although docetaxel is an effective cytostatic agent, its effectiveness in clinical practice is associated with a variety of acute and long term side-effects. To overcome systemic side-effects, a slow release formulation based on calcium sulfate with docetaxel for intra-tumoral administration was developed. Two formulations with the calcium sulfate NanoZolid technology were generated with a twofold difference in docetaxel drug load. The formulations were injected intra-tumorally as a paste which solidified within the tumor. The effects of the two intra-tumoral injection formulations were tested in female mice (n=60) inoculated with subcutaneous Lewis lung carcinoma cells. The two formulations were compared to systemic intraperitoneal injection of docetaxel and a placebo formulation without docetaxel. Tumor volumes were measured and systemic side-effects were evaluated using body weight and cell counts from whole blood as well as plasma concentrations. Both docetaxel formulations showed a significantly higher antitumor efficacy compared to placebo, which was comparable to that of systemic administration of docetaxel. Moreover, the intra-tumoral formulations with docetaxel showed reduced systemic toxicity compared to systemic treatment, including less weight loss and no decrease in blood cell counts. The results suggest that intra-tumoral slow release calcium sulfate based formulations with docetaxel can be an alternative strategy as an efficient local antitumoral treatment with reduced systemic toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alienation and the Use of Mind-Altering Drugs by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romine, Ray S.

    1976-01-01

    Students who are highly alienated report a higher incidence of drug use; accordingly, corrective and preventive action can be initiated to reduce alienation, and possibly, as a result, reduce the incidence of drug use. (JD)

  10. Phase II trial of intratumoral BCNU injection and radiotherapy on untreated adult malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Michael D; Smith, Trevor S; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; Shenoy, Aditya; Vinjamuri, Sobhan; Walker, Carol; Pietronigro, Denis; Warnke, Peter C

    2010-08-01

    DTI-015 (BCNU dissolved in ethanol) utilizes solvent facilitated perfusion (SFP) for intratumoral drug delivery. A phase II clinical trial of DTI-015 and fractionated external beam radiotherapy on newly diagnosed, malignant gliomas investigated early changes in tumour physiology and metabolism, clinical outcome and safety. Pre- and post DTI-015 injection neuro-imaging included computed tomography (CT) cerebral blood flow and volume, glucose and thallium single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Clinical status was determined before and after DTI-015, prior to radiotherapy and 3 monthly thereafter until progression (defined by Macdonald criteria). Primary endpoint was radiographic response. Secondary endpoints were progression free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twelve patients were enrolled; eight glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), four anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Three days after DTI-015 injection, mean tumour blood flow (Paired t-test; P < 0.001) and blood volume (Paired t-test; P = 0.001) were significantly reduced. There was a significant decrease in glucose utilization (Paired t-test; P < 0.001) and thallium uptake (Paired t-test; P < 0.001) at 6 days. Tumour blood volume had a sustained reduction (Paired t-test; P = 0.001) at 26 days after DTI-015. There were two serious adverse events. Two patients with AA achieved a partial response. Median PFS was 39 weeks for AA and 27 weeks for GBM; median OS for GBM was 47 weeks and 132 weeks for AA. The imaging data forms a biological basis for understanding the effects of high dose BCNU delivered intratumorally by SFP, and suggests early effects on tumour vasculature and metabolism.

  11. Modulating effect of Liv.100, an ayurvedic formulation on antituberculosis drug-induced alterations in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Saraswathy, S D; Shyamala Devi, C S

    2001-09-01

    The influence of Liv.100 on the hepatotoxicity of antituberculosis drugs [isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) pyrazinamide (PZA)] was studied in male albino rats. INH, RMP, and PZA were proved to be the most hepatotoxic. Rats were treated with antituberculosis drugs daily for a period of 6 weeks by intragastric administration. The combined use of antituberculosis drugs elevated the levels of cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome-b5. A significant increase was observed in the levels of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and NADH-cytochrome-b5 reductases after antitubercular drug administration. During antitubercular drug treatment a significant decrease was also observed in the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase. The extent of NADPH-induced and ascorbic acid-induced lipid peroxides were marked in antitubercular drug treatment, when compared with normal control animals. Oral Liv.100 co-administration, for the same period, modulated the alterations in the xenobiotic metabolizing system and microsomal lipid peroxidation in experimental animals. The results are discussed with reference to drug metabolizing enzymes, lipid peroxidation and the hepatoprotective nature of Liv.100. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Improved targeting of photosensitizers by intratumoral administration of immunoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Seema; Mishra, A K; Muralidhar, K; Jain, Viney

    2004-06-01

    Biodistribution of technetium (99mTc) labeled hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD, Photosan-3) conjugated to a monoclonal antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) was compared following intravenous (i.v.) and intratumoral (i.t.) administration in solid Ehrlich ascites tumor bearing mice. Images of mice at different time intervals were acquired after injection of radiolabeled PS-3 in either conjugated or unconjugated forms. Quantitative estimation of the radiolabel in different tissues was performed by selecting the different region of interests (ROIs). Maximum accumulation of both free and antibody conjugated PS-3 following i.v. administration was observed in liver followed by tumor. Tumor/muscle (T/N) ratio was more with free PS-3 compared to conjugated PS-3. Pharmacokinetics of free and conjugated PS-3 was also different with faster accumulation of conjugated PS-3 in the tumor. With intratumoral administration of anti-CEA-PS-3-99mTc, specific accumulation and retention of the sensitizer was observed in the tumor tissue. Since, direct injection of antibody conjugated photosensitizer into the tumor resulted in longer retention of the dye in the tumor with no accumulation in the normal tissues, the present results imply that the toxicity to normal tissues could be reduced significantly with selective destruction of the tumor following photodynamic treatment with the use of i.t. administration of specific antibodies conjugated to photosensitizers.

  13. PD-1 blockade expands intratumoral T memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse; Frederiksen, Juliet; Cornish, Andrew; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Kivork, Christine; Siebert, Janet; Kaplan-Lefko, Paula; Wang, Xiaoyan; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Glaspy, John A.; Tumeh, Paul C.; Chodon, Thinle; Pe’er, Dana; Comin-Anduix, Begoña

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to PD-1 blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated and single cell infiltrates were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry using two computational approaches to resolve the leukocyte phenotypes at the single cell level. There was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of T cells in patients who responded to therapy. The frequency of intratumoral B cells and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs) significantly increased in patients’ biopsies taken on treatment. The percentage of cells with a T regulatory phenotype, monocytes, and NK cells did not change while on PD-1 blockade therapy. CD8+ T memory cells were the most prominent phenotype that expanded intratumorally on therapy. However, the frequency of CD4+ T effector memory cells significantly decreased on treatment, whereas CD4+ T effector cells significantly increased in nonresponding tumors on therapy. In peripheral blood, an unusual population of blood cells expressing CD56 were detected in two patients with regressing melanoma. In conclusion, PD-1 blockade increases the frequency of T cells, B cells, and MDSCs in tumors, with the CD8+ T effector memory subset being the major T-cell phenotype expanded in patients with a response to therapy. PMID:26787823

  14. The Effects of Drug-Induced Alterations of the Autonomic Nervous System on the Responses of Mammals to Oxygen Deprivation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-06-01

    ill-defined. While certain authors state that tetraethylammonium chloride ( TEA ) (2, 3) and adrenergic blocking drugs (3-8) reduce or obliterate the...apparently vary the foregoing relationship; that the relationship was greatly altered and the pressor response greatly reduced by doses of TEA (adequate...cannula in the femoral or jugular vein at a constant rate. Infusion times were 2 minutes for TEA and 5 minutes for adrenergic-blocking agents. The

  15. Alterations of DNA repair genes in the NCI-60 cell lines and their predictive value for anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fabricio G; Matuo, Renata; Tang, Sai-Wen; Rajapakse, Vinodh N; Luna, Augustin; Sander, Chris; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Paul H G; Doroshow, James H; Reinhold, William C; Pommier, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair (DNAR) genes is associated with genomic instability and cancer predisposition; it also makes cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNAR pathways to resist DNA-targeted therapy, which remains the core of the anticancer armamentarium. Because the landscape of DNAR defects across numerous types of cancers and its relation with drug activity have not been systematically examined, we took advantage of the unique drug and genomic databases of the US National Cancer Institute cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) to characterize 260 DNAR genes with respect to deleterious mutations and expression down-regulation; 169 genes exhibited a total of 549 function-affecting alterations, with 39 of them scoring as putative knockouts across 31 cell lines. Those mutations were compared to tumor samples from 12 studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). Based on this compendium of alterations, we determined which DNAR genomic alterations predicted drug response for 20,195 compounds present in the NCI-60 drug database. Among 242 DNA damaging agents, 202 showed associations with at least one DNAR genomic signature. In addition to SLFN11, the Fanconi anemia-scaffolding gene SLX4 (FANCP/BTBD12) stood out among the genes most significantly related with DNA synthesis and topoisomerase inhibitors. Depletion and complementation experiments validated the causal relationship between SLX4 defects and sensitivity to raltitrexed and cytarabine in addition to camptothecin. Therefore, we propose new rational uses for existing anticancer drugs based on a comprehensive analysis of DNAR genomic parameters. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Alterations of DNA repair genes in the NCI-60 cell lines and their predictive value for anticancer drug activity

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fabricio G.; Matuo, Renata; Tang, Sai-Wen; Rajapakse, Vinodh N.; Luna, Augustin; Sander, Chris; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Paul H.G.; Doroshow, James H.; Reinhold, William C.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair (DNAR) genes is associated with genomic instability and cancer predisposition; it also makes cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNAR pathways to resist DNA-targeted therapy, which remains the core of the anticancer armamentarium. Because the landscape of DNAR defects across numerous types of cancers and its relation with drug activity have not been systematically examined, we took advantage of the unique drug and genomic databases of the US National Cancer Institute cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) to characterize 260 DNAR genes with respect to deleterious mutations and expression down-regulation; 169 genes exhibited a total of 549 function-affecting alterations, with 39 of them scoring as putative knockouts across 31 cell lines. Those mutations were compared to tumor samples from 12 studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). Based on this compendium of alterations, we determined which DNAR genomic alterations predicted drug response for 20,195 compounds present in the NCI-60 drug database. Among 242 DNA damaging agents, 202 showed associations with at least one DNAR genomic signature. In addition to SLFN11, the Fanconi anemia-scaffolding gene SLX4 (FANCP/BTBD12) stood out among the genes most significantly related with DNA synthesis and topoisomerase inhibitors. Depletion and complementation experiments validated the causal relationship between SLX4 defects and sensitivity to raltitrexed and cytarabine in addition to camptothecin. Therefore, we propose new rational uses for existing anticancer drugs based on a comprehensive analysis of DNAR genomic parameters. PMID:25758781

  17. Differential selective pressure alters rate of drug resistance acquisition in heterogeneous tumor populations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Daphne; Dalin, Simona; Hemann, Michael T.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Zhao, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    Recent drug discovery and development efforts have created a large arsenal of targeted and chemotherapeutic drugs for precision medicine. However, drug resistance remains a major challenge as minor pre-existing resistant subpopulations are often found to be enriched at relapse. Current drug design has been heavily focused on initial efficacy, and we do not fully understand the effects of drug selective pressure on long-term drug resistance potential. Using a minimal two-population model, taking into account subpopulation proportions and growth/kill rates, we modeled long-term drug treatment and performed parameter sweeps to analyze the effects of each parameter on therapeutic efficacy. We found that drugs with the same overall initial kill may exert differential selective pressures, affecting long-term therapeutic outcome. We validated our conclusions experimentally using a preclinical model of Burkitt’s lymphoma. Furthermore, we highlighted an intrinsic tradeoff between drug-imposed overall selective pressure and rate of adaptation. A principled approach in understanding the effects of distinct drug selective pressures on short-term and long-term tumor response enables better design of therapeutics that ultimately minimize relapse. PMID:27819268

  18. Banned -- Select: "a drug to alter the sex of the foetus".

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, P V

    1993-04-01

    In 1991, the Government of Gujarat State, India, banned the manufacture and sale of an Ayurvedic drug called Select. This was the first time an Ayurvedic product had ever been banned. The manufacturer claimed that if a pregnant woman took Select for 45 days after her last menstrual period, she would have a male fetus. Further, the manufacturer marketed the drug as a tool which would change the dowry system (i.e., it would reduce the number of girls in the population). Select's high cost did not deter the naive and trusting public in Gujarat and other states. Drug activists and consumer groups called for the ban and noted that the marketing claims were typical of the unethical behavior of the Ayurvedic market. These consumer groups brought the existence of Select to the attention of the government which admittedly cannot adequately monitor and control the drug market. Groups ranging from illegal smugglers to multinational giants use loopholes in the Drugs and Cosmetics Act and Excise Laws to license their drugs as Ayurvedic/Herbal, but most drugs are hazardous. Policy makers, physicians, nongovernmental and consumer groups, the media, and others should join together to rid India of this unethical practice. They should help the government to implement a rational policy for traditional systems of medicine and, once the policy has been developed to select an essential drug list of Ayurvedic drugs needed for national health programs; monitor and minimize misleading advertisements; screen all existing Ayurvedic drugs and drugs of other traditional medicine systems; and require thorough research on the relevance, usefulness, and safety of new patent drugs of other traditional medicine systems; and require thorough research on the relevance, usefulness, and safety of new patent drugs. The government should declare any products with more than 12% alcohol to be liquor.

  19. Intratumoral Administration of Holmium-166 Acetylacetonate Microspheres: Antitumor Efficacy and Feasibility of Multimodality Imaging in Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elschot, Mattijs; Seevinck, Peter R.; Beekman, Freek J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.; Uges, Donald R. A.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Luijten, Peter R.; Hennink, Wim E.; van het Schip, Alfred D.; Bosch, J. L. H. Ruud; Nijsen, J. Frank W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The increasing incidence of small renal tumors in an aging population with comorbidities has stimulated the development of minimally invasive treatments. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and demonstrate feasibility of multimodality imaging of intratumoral administration of holmium-166 microspheres (166HoAcAcMS). This new technique locally ablates renal tumors through high-energy beta particles, while the gamma rays allow for nuclear imaging and the paramagnetism of holmium allows for MRI. Methods 166HoAcAcMS were administered intratumorally in orthotopic renal tumors (Balb/C mice). Post administration CT, SPECT and MRI was performed. At several time points (2 h, 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days) after MS administration, tumors were measured and histologically analyzed. Holmium accumulation in organs was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results 166HoAcAcMS were successfully administered to tumor bearing mice. A striking near-complete tumor-control was observed in 166HoAcAcMS treated mice (0.10±0.01 cm3 vs. 4.15±0.3 cm3 for control tumors). Focal necrosis and inflammation was present from 24 h following treatment. Renal parenchyma outside the radiated region showed no histological alterations. Post administration CT, MRI and SPECT imaging revealed clear deposits of 166HoAcAcMS in the kidney. Conclusions Intratumorally administered 166HoAcAcMS has great potential as a new local treatment of renal tumors for surgically unfit patients. In addition to strong cancer control, it provides powerful multimodality imaging opportunities. PMID:23320070

  20. Intratumoral administration of holmium-166 acetylacetonate microspheres: antitumor efficacy and feasibility of multimodality imaging in renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bult, Wouter; Kroeze, Stephanie G C; Elschot, Mattijs; Seevinck, Peter R; Beekman, Freek J; de Jong, Hugo W A M; Uges, Donald R A; Kosterink, Jos G W; Luijten, Peter R; Hennink, Wim E; van het Schip, Alfred D; Bosch, J L H Ruud; Nijsen, J Frank W; Jans, Judith J M

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of small renal tumors in an aging population with comorbidities has stimulated the development of minimally invasive treatments. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and demonstrate feasibility of multimodality imaging of intratumoral administration of holmium-166 microspheres ((166)HoAcAcMS). This new technique locally ablates renal tumors through high-energy beta particles, while the gamma rays allow for nuclear imaging and the paramagnetism of holmium allows for MRI. (166)HoAcAcMS were administered intratumorally in orthotopic renal tumors (Balb/C mice). Post administration CT, SPECT and MRI was performed. At several time points (2 h, 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days) after MS administration, tumors were measured and histologically analyzed. Holmium accumulation in organs was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. (166)HoAcAcMS were successfully administered to tumor bearing mice. A striking near-complete tumor-control was observed in (166)HoAcAcMS treated mice (0.10±0.01 cm(3) vs. 4.15±0.3 cm(3) for control tumors). Focal necrosis and inflammation was present from 24 h following treatment. Renal parenchyma outside the radiated region showed no histological alterations. Post administration CT, MRI and SPECT imaging revealed clear deposits of (166)HoAcAcMS in the kidney. Intratumorally administered (166)HoAcAcMS has great potential as a new local treatment of renal tumors for surgically unfit patients. In addition to strong cancer control, it provides powerful multimodality imaging opportunities.

  1. Off-Target drug effects resulting in altered gene expression events with epigenetic and "Quasi-Epigenetic" origins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stephen J; Feye, Kristina M; Schmidt-McCormack, Garrett R; Malovic, Emir; Mlynarczyk, Gregory S A; Izbicki, Patricia; Arnold, Larissa F; Jefferson, Matthew A; de la Rosa, Bierlein M; Wehrman, Rita F; Luna, K C; Hu, Hilary Z; Kondru, Naveen C; Kleinhenz, Michael D; Smith, Joe S; Manne, Sireesha; Putra, Marson R; Choudhary, Shivani; Massey, Nyzil; Luo, Diou; Berg, Carrie A; Acharya, Sreemoyee; Sharma, Shaunik; Kanuri, Sri Harsha; Lange, Jennifer K; Carlson, Steve A

    2016-05-01

    This review synthesizes examples of pharmacological agents who have off-target effects of an epigenetic nature. We expand upon the paradigm of epigenetics to include "quasi-epigenetic" mechanisms. Quasi-epigenetics includes mechanisms of drugs acting upstream of epigenetic machinery or may themselves impact transcription factor regulation on a more global scale. We explore these avenues with four examples of conventional pharmaceuticals and their unintended, but not necessarily adverse, biological effects. The quasi-epigenetic drugs identified in this review include the use of beta-lactam antibiotics to alter glutamate receptor activity and the action of cyclosporine on multiple transcription factors. In addition, we report on more canonical epigenome changes associated with pharmacological agents such as lithium impacting autophagy of aberrant proteins, and opioid drugs whose chronic use increases the expression of genes associated with addictive phenotypes. By expanding our appreciation of transcriptomic regulation and the effects these drugs have on the epigenome, it is possible to enhance therapeutic applications by exploiting off-target effects and even repurposing established pharmaceuticals. That is, exploration of "pharmacoepigenetic" mechanisms can expand the breadth of the useful activity of a drug beyond the traditional drug targets such as receptors and enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lack of ceramide generation and altered sphingolipid composition are associated with drug resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Prinetti, Alessandro; Millimaggi, Danilo; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Clarkson, Matilda; Bettiga, Arianna; Chigorno, Vanna; Sonnino, Sandro; Pavan, Antonio; Dolo, Vincenza

    2005-01-01

    PTX (Paclitaxel®) is an antimitotic agent used in the treatment of a number of major solid tumours, particularly in breast and ovarian cancer. This study was undertaken to gain insight into the molecular alterations producing PTX resistance in ovarian cancer. PTX treatment is able to induce apoptosis in the human ovarian carcinoma cell line, CABA I. PTX-induced apoptosis in CABA I cells was accompanied by an increase in the cellular Cer (ceramide) levels and a decrease in the sphingomyelin levels, due to the activation of sphingomyelinases. The inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase decreased PTX-induced apoptosis. Under the same experimental conditions, PTX had no effect on Cer and sphingomyelin levels in the stable PTX-resistant ovarian carcinoma cell line, CABA-PTX. The acquisition of the PTX-resistant phenotype is accompanied by unique alterations in the complex sphingolipid pattern found on lipid extraction. In the drug-resistant cell line, the levels of sphingomyelin and neutral glycosphingolipids were unchanged compared with the drug-sensitive cell line. The ganglioside pattern in CABA I cells is more complex compared with that of CABA-PTX cells. Specifically, we found that the total ganglioside content in CABA-PTX cells was approximately half of that in CABA I cells, and GM3 ganglioside content was remarkably higher in the drug-resistant cell line. Taken together our findings indicate that: i) Cer generated by acid sphingomyelinase is involved in PTX-induced apoptosis in ovarian carcinoma cells, and PTX-resistant cells are characterized by their lack of increased Cer upon drug treatment, ii) PTX resistance might be correlated with an alteration in metabolic Cer patterns specifically affecting cellular ganglioside composition. PMID:16356169

  3. Antipsychotic drugs alter neuronal development including ALM neuroblast migration and PLM axonal outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Dallas R; Weeks, Kathrine; Aamodt, Eric J; Dwyer, Donard S

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly being prescribed for children and adolescents, and are used in pregnant women without a clear demonstration of safety in these populations. Global effects of these drugs on neurodevelopment (e.g., decreased brain size) have been reported in rats, but detailed knowledge about neuronal effects and mechanisms of action are lacking. Here we report on the evaluation of a comprehensive panel of antipsychotic drugs in a model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans) that is widely used to study neuronal development. Specifically, we examined the effects of the drugs on neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in mechanosensory neurons visualized with green fluorescent protein expressed from the mec-3 promoter. Clozapine, fluphenazine, and haloperidol produced deficits in the development and migration of ALM neurons and axonal outgrowth in PLM neurons. The defects included failure of neuroblasts to migrate to the proper location, and excessive growth of axons past their normal termination point, together with abnormal morphological features of the processes. Although the antipsychotic drugs are potent antagonists of dopamine and serotonin receptors, the neurodevelopmental deficits were not rescued by co-incubation with serotonin or the dopaminergic agonist, quinpirole. Other antipsychotic drugs, risperidone, aripiprazole, quetiapine, trifluoperazine and olanzapine, also produced modest, but detectable, effects on neuronal development. This is the first report that antipsychotic drugs interfere with neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in a developing nervous system.

  4. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Peter J; Calderon, Tina M; Coley, Jacqueline S; Berman, Joan W

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70 % of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers.

  5. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  6. Intratumor heterogeneity in localized lung adenocarcinomas delineated by multiregion sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Junya; Zhang, Jianhua; Wedge, David C; Song, Xingzhi; Zhang, Jiexin; Seth, Sahil; Chow, Chi-Wan; Cao, Yu; Gumbs, Curtis; Gold, Kathryn A; Kalhor, Neda; Little, Latasha; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Moran, Cesar; Protopopov, Alexei; Sun, Huandong; Tang, Jiabin; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; William, William N; Lee, J Jack; Heymach, John V; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Futreal, P Andrew

    2014-10-10

    Cancers are composed of populations of cells with distinct molecular and phenotypic features, a phenomenon termed intratumor heterogeneity (ITH). ITH in lung cancers has not been well studied. We applied multiregion whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 11 localized lung adenocarcinomas. All tumors showed clear evidence of ITH. On average, 76% of all mutations and 20 out of 21 known cancer gene mutations were identified in all regions of individual tumors, which suggested that single-region sequencing may be adequate to identify the majority of known cancer gene mutations in localized lung adenocarcinomas. With a median follow-up of 21 months after surgery, three patients have relapsed, and all three patients had significantly larger fractions of subclonal mutations in their primary tumors than patients without relapse. These data indicate that a larger subclonal mutation fraction may be associated with increased likelihood of postsurgical relapse in patients with localized lung adenocarcinomas.

  7. Intratumoral heterogeneity of malignant gliomas measured in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, A.; Taghian, A.; Gioioso, D.; Duffy, M.; Suit, H.D. )

    1993-09-20

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the extent of intratumoral heterogeneity of radiation sensitivity in malignant gliomas, by comparing the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of different glioma sublines derived from the same tumor. The study was performed on five early established malignant gliomas (passage 3-10). Each specimen was quickly cut into three equal pieces (except for one specimen, where only two pieces were obtained). Each piece was processed independently, disintegrated into single cell suspension using a cocktail of enzymes. Survival curve assays, using colony formation as an end-point, were performed for each subline. Comparison between the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of sublines was calculated using the surviving fraction at 2 Gy and the mean inactivation dose as the measured parameters. The DNA content of the cell lines as well as their cell cycle analysis was determined using flow cytometry. The mean calculated surviving fraction at 2 Gy of all the sublines was 0.37, the mean mean inactivation dose was 1.98. The intertumoral coefficient of variation for the calculated surviving fraction at a statistically significant difference in the surviving fraction at 2 Gy and mean inactivation dose values of their sublines. This difference in radiation sensitivity between sublines of the same tumor was not attributed to a difference either in the ploidy status or in the distribution of cells in the cell cycle. There is a significant intratumoral heterogeneity of radiation sensitivity in some malignant gliomas. This heterogeneity may limit the predictive power of surviving fraction at 2 Gy or mean inactivation dose, especially when their values are based upon a single measurement/single biopsy. In the meantime, this heterogeneity may be a factor in the discrepancy between unexpectedly sensitive tumor cell lines in vitro and their high clinical radiation resistance. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Tetracycline-regulated intratumoral expression of interleukin-3 enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy for murine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C-H; Hong, J-H; Hsieh, K-F; Hsiao, H-W; Chuang, W-L; Lee, C-C; McBride, W H; Chiang, C-S

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate means of increasing the efficiency with which cancer cell death following local radiation therapy (RT) is translated into the generation of tumor immunity since, if this were to be achieved, it would be expected to enhance the rates of disease-free recurrence and survival. Our investigations centered around the use of interleukin-3 (IL-3), expressed intratumorally using an inducible adenoviral vector, to alter the immunogenicity of established murine TRAMP-C1 prostate cancer receiving a course of fractionated local RT (7 Gy per fraction per day for 5 days). Because high systemic levels of IL-3 can be associated with toxicity, a tetracycline-regulated gene delivery system was employed. The results show that while intratumoral IL-3 expression or RT alone caused a modest delay in TRAMP-C1 tumor growth, the combination was synergistic with 50% of mice being cured and developing a long-term, tumor-specific state of immunity. Immunological analyses performed on splenic lymphocytes demonstrated that, compared to RT or IL-3 alone, combined treatment significantly increased the number of tumor-specific IFN-gamma-secreting and cytotoxic T cells. The study demonstrates that tetracycline-regulated IL-3 gene expression within tumors can enhance the immune response to prostate cancer and this can augment the efficacy of a course of RT without additional side effects.

  9. Alteration of redox status by commonly used antimalarial drugs in the north-western region of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, A; Ibrahim, M A; Mohammed, H A; Erukainure, O L; Malami, I; Suleiman, A; Mansir, A; Godwin, A; Khalil, H A

    2017-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the alteration of redox status by commonly used antimalarials in Nigeria. Drugs used were artemisinin, artesunate, chloroquine, coartem and quinine at the final concentrations of 0.5-8.0 mg/mL. Blood samples were collected from malarial patients and apparently healthy humans for comparison. Reduced glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, protein content and lipid peroxidation were determined. All drugs significantly ( p < 0.05) increases the protein level relative to control in normal blood, whereas in the infected, a significant ( p < 0.05) reduction was observed. In normal blood, the antimalarials dose dependently decreased ( p < 0.05) SOD and catalase activities with significant ( p < 0.05) increase in the infected. The level of glutathione in normal blood significantly ( p < 0.05) increases as compared with control, whereas in the infected, similar observation was made except that the levels were less, relative to control sample. Malondialdehyde level significantly ( p < 0.05) increases with increase in drugs concentration even though less than the level in the control with few exceptions. These effects were dose dependent and more pronounced in non-malarial conditions. Commonly used antimalarials might alter the redox status in both healthy and non-healthy subjects thereby inducing oxidative stress.

  10. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  11. Inter- and intraspecies polymorphisms in the cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor alter drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kopin, A S; McBride, E W; Gordon, M C; Quinn, S M; Beinborn, M

    1997-09-30

    The brain cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor (CCK-BR) is a major target for drug development because of its postulated role in modulating anxiety, memory, and the perception of pain. Drug discovery efforts have resulted in the identification of small synthetic molecules that can selectively activate this receptor subtype. These drugs include the peptide-derived compound PD135,158 as well as the nonpeptide benzodiazepine-based ligand, L-740,093 (S enantiomer). We now report that the maximal level of receptor-mediated second messenger signaling that can be achieved by these compounds (drug efficacy) markedly differs among species homologs of the CCK-BR. Further analysis reveals that the observed differences in drug efficacy are in large part explained by single or double aliphatic amino acid substitutions between respective species homologs. This interspecies variability in ligand efficacy introduces the possibility of species differences in receptor-mediated function, an important consideration when selecting animal models for preclinical drug testing. The finding that even single amino acid substitutions can significantly affect drug efficacy prompted us to examine ligand-induced signaling by a known naturally occurring human CCK-BR variant (glutamic acid replaced by lysine in position 288; 288E --> K). When examined using the 288E --> K receptor, the efficacies of both PD135,158 and L-740, 093 (S) were markedly increased compared with values obtained with the wild-type human protein. These observations suggest that functional variability resulting from human receptor polymorphisms may contribute to interindividual differences in drug effects.

  12. Alterations in brain-stem auditory evoked potentials among drug addicts

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sonia; Sharma, Rajeev; Mittal, Shilekh; Thapar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the absolute latencies, the interpeak latencies, and amplitudes of different waveforms of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) in different drug abusers and controls, and to identify early neurological damage in persons who abuse different drugs so that proper counseling and timely intervention can be undertaken. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, BAEP’s were assessed by a data acquisition and analysis system in 58 male drug abusers in the age group of 15-45 years as well as in 30 age matched healthy controls. The absolute peak latencies and the interpeak latencies of BAEP were analyzed by applying one way ANOVA and student t-test. The study was carried out at the GGS Medical College, Faridkot, Punjab, India between July 2012 and May 2013. Results: The difference in the absolute peak latencies and interpeak latencies of BAEP in the 2 groups was found to be statistically significant in both the ears (p<0.05). However, the difference in the amplitude ratio in both the ears was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Chronic intoxication by different drugs has been extensively associated with prolonged absolute peak latencies and interpeak latencies of BAEP in drug abusers reflecting an adverse effect of drug dependence on neural transmission in central auditory nerve pathways. PMID:26166594

  13. Calcified plaque modification alters local drug delivery in the treatment of peripheral atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tzafriri, Abraham R; Garcia-Polite, Fernando; Zani, Brett; Stanley, James; Muraj, Benny; Knutson, Jennifer; Kohler, Robert; Markham, Peter; Nikanorov, Alexander; Edelman, Elazer R

    2017-09-01

    Calcific atherosclerosis is a major challenge to intraluminal drug delivery in peripheral artery disease (PAD). We evaluated the effects of orbital atherectomy on intraluminal paclitaxel delivery to human peripheral arteries with substantial calcified plaque. Diagnostic angiography and 3-D rotational imaging of five fresh human lower limbs revealed calcification in all main arteries. The proximal or distal segment of each artery was treated using an orbital atherectomy system (OAS) under simulated blood flow and fluoroscopy. Explanted arterial segments underwent either histomorphometric assessment of effect or tracking of (14)C-labeled or fluorescent-labeled paclitaxel. Radiolabeled drug quantified bulk delivery and fluorescent label established penetration of drug over finer spatial domain in serial microscopic sections. Results were interpreted using a mathematical model of binding-diffusion mediated arterial drug distribution. Lesion composition affected paclitaxel absorption and distribution in cadaveric human peripheral arteries. Pretreatment imaging calcium scores in control femoropopliteal arterial segments correlated with a log-linear decline in the bulk absorption rate-constant of (14)C-labeled, declining 5.5-fold per calcified quadrant (p=0.05, n=7). Compared to controls, OAS-treated femoropopliteal segments exhibited 180μm thinner intima (p<0.001), 45% less plaque calcification, and 2 log orders higher paclitaxel bulk absorption rate-constants. Correspondingly, fluorescent paclitaxel penetrated deeper in OAS-treated femoropopliteal segments compared to controls, due to a 70% increase in diffusivity (p<0.001). These data illustrate that calcified plaque limited intravascular drug delivery, and controlled OAS treatment of calcific plaques resulted in greater drug permeability and improved adjunct drug delivery to diseased arteries. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-Step Delivery: Exploiting the Partition Coefficient Concept to Increase Intratumoral Paclitaxel Concentrations In vivo Using Responsive Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, Aaron H.; Liu, Rong; Schulz, Morgan D.; Padera, Robert F.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Drug dose, high local target tissue concentration, and prolonged duration of exposure are essential criteria in achieving optimal drug performance. However, systemically delivered drugs often fail to effectively address these factors with only fractions of the injected dose reaching the target tissue. This is especially evident in the treatment of peritoneal cancers, including mesothelioma, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer, which regularly employ regimens of intravenous and/or intraperitoneal chemotherapy (e.g., gemcitabine, cisplatin, pemetrexed, and paclitaxel) with limited results. Here, we show that a “two-step” nanoparticle (NP) delivery system may address this limitation. This two-step approach involves the separate administration of NP and drug where, first, the NP localizes to tumor. Second, subsequent administration of drug then rapidly concentrates into the NP already stationed within the target tissue. This two-step method results in a greater than 5-fold increase in intratumoral drug concentrations compared to conventional “drug-alone” administration. These results suggest that this unique two-step delivery may provide a novel method for increasing drug concentrations in target tissues.

  15. Two-Step Delivery: Exploiting the Partition Coefficient Concept to Increase Intratumoral Paclitaxel Concentrations In vivo Using Responsive Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Colby, Aaron H; Liu, Rong; Schulz, Morgan D; Padera, Robert F; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-01-07

    Drug dose, high local target tissue concentration, and prolonged duration of exposure are essential criteria in achieving optimal drug performance. However, systemically delivered drugs often fail to effectively address these factors with only fractions of the injected dose reaching the target tissue. This is especially evident in the treatment of peritoneal cancers, including mesothelioma, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer, which regularly employ regimens of intravenous and/or intraperitoneal chemotherapy (e.g., gemcitabine, cisplatin, pemetrexed, and paclitaxel) with limited results. Here, we show that a "two-step" nanoparticle (NP) delivery system may address this limitation. This two-step approach involves the separate administration of NP and drug where, first, the NP localizes to tumor. Second, subsequent administration of drug then rapidly concentrates into the NP already stationed within the target tissue. This two-step method results in a greater than 5-fold increase in intratumoral drug concentrations compared to conventional "drug-alone" administration. These results suggest that this unique two-step delivery may provide a novel method for increasing drug concentrations in target tissues.

  16. Two-Step Delivery: Exploiting the Partition Coefficient Concept to Increase Intratumoral Paclitaxel Concentrations In vivo Using Responsive Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Aaron H.; Liu, Rong; Schulz, Morgan D.; Padera, Robert F.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Drug dose, high local target tissue concentration, and prolonged duration of exposure are essential criteria in achieving optimal drug performance. However, systemically delivered drugs often fail to effectively address these factors with only fractions of the injected dose reaching the target tissue. This is especially evident in the treatment of peritoneal cancers, including mesothelioma, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer, which regularly employ regimens of intravenous and/or intraperitoneal chemotherapy (e.g., gemcitabine, cisplatin, pemetrexed, and paclitaxel) with limited results. Here, we show that a “two-step” nanoparticle (NP) delivery system may address this limitation. This two-step approach involves the separate administration of NP and drug where, first, the NP localizes to tumor. Second, subsequent administration of drug then rapidly concentrates into the NP already stationed within the target tissue. This two-step method results in a greater than 5-fold increase in intratumoral drug concentrations compared to conventional “drug-alone” administration. These results suggest that this unique two-step delivery may provide a novel method for increasing drug concentrations in target tissues. PMID:26740245

  17. Comparative effects of chelating drugs on trace metal and biochemical alterations in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, M.; Athar, M.; Hasan, S.K.; Srivastava, R.C.

    1988-08-01

    Chelation therapy is the most successful modality for the management of heavy metal poisoning. The success of these drugs stem from their multidentate polyfunctional chelating behavior. The therapeutic mechanism for chelating drugs involves their interaction with toxic metals leading to their rapid excretion from the body. However, because of their indiscriminate affinity for various metal ions, the potential interactions between these drugs and endogenous trace metals is of concern. It was, therefore, of importance to define new chelating drugs which in addition to being effective as an antidote in metal poisoning may possess low undesirable toxicity. In the present communication the authors compare the acute effect of Cyclam with those of other conventional chelating drugs namely, triethylenetetramine (TETA), reduced glutathione (GSH), ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), cyclohexanediamine tetraacetic acid (CDTA), diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and hydroxyethylenediamine triacetic acid (HEDTA) on (i) serum levels of Cu, Zn, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutamyloxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and ceruloplasmin (CP); (ii) hepatic and renal levels of Cu, Mn, Zn and Fe and (iii) hepatic and renal levels of GSH, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM) at various time intervals (16, 24 and 72 hrs) after their administration to rats.

  18. Photodynamic Therapy Induced Enhancement of Tumor Vasculature Permeability Using an Upconversion Nanoconstruct for Improved Intratumoral Nanoparticle Delivery in Deep Tissues.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weidong; Wang, Zhaohui; Lv, Liwei; Yin, Deyan; Chen, Dan; Han, Zhihao; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Min; Yang, Man; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has recently emerged as an approach to enhance intratumoral accumulation of nanoparticles. However, conventional PDT is greatly limited by the inability of the excitation light to sufficiently penetrate tissue, rendering PDT ineffective in the relatively deep tumors. To address this limitation, we developed a novel PDT platform and reported for the first time the effect of deep-tissue PDT on nanoparticle uptake in tumors. This platform employed c(RGDyK)-conjugated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which facilitate active targeting of the nanoconstruct to tumor vasculature and achieve the deep-tissue photosensitizer activation by NIR light irradiation. Results indicated that our PDT system efficiently enhanced intratumoral uptake of different nanoparticles in a deep-seated tumor model. The optimal light dose for deep-tissue PDT (34 mW/cm(2)) was determined and the most robust permeability enhancement was achieved by administering the nanoparticles within 15 minutes following PDT treatment. Further, a two-step treatment strategy was developed and validated featuring the capability of improving the therapeutic efficacy of Doxil while simultaneously reducing its cardiotoxicity. This two-step treatment resulted in a tumor inhibition rate of 79% compared with 56% after Doxil treatment alone. These findings provide evidence in support of the clinical application of deep-tissue PDT for enhanced nano-drug delivery.

  19. Photodynamic Therapy Induced Enhancement of Tumor Vasculature Permeability Using an Upconversion Nanoconstruct for Improved Intratumoral Nanoparticle Delivery in Deep Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weidong; Wang, Zhaohui; Lv, Liwei; Yin, Deyan; Chen, Dan; Han, Zhihao; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Min; Yang, Man; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has recently emerged as an approach to enhance intratumoral accumulation of nanoparticles. However, conventional PDT is greatly limited by the inability of the excitation light to sufficiently penetrate tissue, rendering PDT ineffective in the relatively deep tumors. To address this limitation, we developed a novel PDT platform and reported for the first time the effect of deep-tissue PDT on nanoparticle uptake in tumors. This platform employed c(RGDyK)-conjugated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which facilitate active targeting of the nanoconstruct to tumor vasculature and achieve the deep-tissue photosensitizer activation by NIR light irradiation. Results indicated that our PDT system efficiently enhanced intratumoral uptake of different nanoparticles in a deep-seated tumor model. The optimal light dose for deep-tissue PDT (34 mW/cm2) was determined and the most robust permeability enhancement was achieved by administering the nanoparticles within 15 minutes following PDT treatment. Further, a two-step treatment strategy was developed and validated featuring the capability of improving the therapeutic efficacy of Doxil while simultaneously reducing its cardiotoxicity. This two-step treatment resulted in a tumor inhibition rate of 79% compared with 56% after Doxil treatment alone. These findings provide evidence in support of the clinical application of deep-tissue PDT for enhanced nano-drug delivery. PMID:27279907

  20. Injectable intratumoral depot of thermally responsive polypeptide-radionuclide conjugates delays tumor progression in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenge; MacKay, J. Andrew; Dreher, Matthew R.; Chen, Mingnan; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Simnick, Andrew J.; Callahan, Daniel J.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated a biodegradable drug delivery system for local cancer radiotherapy consisting of a thermally sensitive elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) conjugated to a therapeutic radionuclide. Two ELPs (49 kD) were synthesized using genetic engineering to test the hypothesis that injectable biopolymeric depots can retain radionuclides locally and reduce the growth of tumors. A thermally sensitive polypeptide, ELP1, was designed to spontaneously undergo a soluble-insoluble phase transition (forming viscous microparticles) between room temperature and body temperature upon intratumoral injection, while ELP2 was designed to remain soluble upon injection and to serve as a negative control for the effect of aggregate assembly. After intratumoral administration of radionuclide conjugates of ELPs into implanted tumor xenografts in nude mice, their retention within the tumor, spatio-temporal distribution, and therapeutic effect were quantified. The residence time of the radionuclide-ELP1 in the tumor was significantly longer than the thermally insensitive ELP2 conjugate. In addition, the thermal transition of ELP1 significantly protected the conjugated radionuclide from dehalogenation, whereas the conjugated radionuclide on ELP2 was quickly eliminated from the tumor and cleaved from the biopolymer. These attributes of the thermally sensitive ELP1 depot improved the antitumor efficacy of iodine-131 compared to the soluble ELP2 control. This novel injectable and biodegradable depot has the potential to control advanced-stage cancers by reducing the bulk of inoperable tumors, enabling surgical removal of de-bulked tumors, and preserving healthy tissues. PMID:20117157

  1. Altered cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of TGFβ1 in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weihua; Zou, Yan; Du, Yingshi; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Man; Yang, Wenxiu; Wang, Xuefeng; Lü, Yang

    2014-11-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling participates in pathogenesis of epilepsy. TGFβ1, as a transmitter of TGFβ signaling, might be a useful marker for predicting the prognosis of patients with epilepsy. The present study aimed to measure TGFβ1 level in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and non-resistant epilepsy. A total of 43 patients with epilepsy were recruited, 28 were non-resistant epilepsy subgroup, 15 drug-resistant epilepsy subgroup. 11 patients with intracranial infection and 11 individuals with primary headache were used as controls. The concentration of CSF and serum TGFβ1 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The concentration of CSF-TGFβ1 was 209.26 ± 81.07 pg/ml in the drug-resistant epilepsy subgroup, 121.80 ± 40.32 pg/ml in the non-resistant epilepsy subgroup, 552.17 ± 456.20 pg/ml in intracranial infection control, 133.80 ± 68.55 pg/ml in headache control, respectively. TGFβ1 level was significantly increased in the drug-resistant epilepsy subgroup compared to the non-resistant epilepsy subgroup. TGFβ1 level in intracranial infection control was higher than that in the non-resistant epilepsy subgroup. There was no statistically difference of CSF-TGFβ1 between the non-resistant epilepsy subgroup and headache controls, between the resistant epilepsy subgroup and intracranial infection controls. TGFβ levels are increased in the CSF of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. High CSF-TGFβ1 levels may be a potential screening biomarker of antiepileptic drug resistance in patients with epilepsy.

  2. Altering metabolic profiles of drugs by precision deuteration: reducing mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2D6 by paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Uttamsingh, Vinita; Gallegos, Richard; Liu, Julie F; Harbeson, Scott L; Bridson, Gary W; Cheng, Changfu; Wells, David S; Graham, Philip B; Zelle, Robert; Tung, Roger

    2015-07-01

    Selective deuterium substitution as a means of ameliorating clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions is demonstrated in this study. Carbon-deuterium bonds are more stable than corresponding carbon-hydrogen bonds. Using a precision deuteration platform, the two hydrogen atoms at the methylenedioxy carbon of paroxetine were substituted with deuterium. The new chemical entity, CTP-347 [(3S,4R)-3-((2,2-dideuterobenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yloxy)methyl)-4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperidine], demonstrated similar selectivity for the serotonin receptor, as well as similar neurotransmitter uptake inhibition in an in vitro rat synaptosome model, as unmodified paroxetine. However, human liver microsomes cleared CTP-347 faster than paroxetine as a result of decreased inactivation of CYP2D6. In phase 1 studies, CTP-347 was metabolized more rapidly in humans and exhibited a lower pharmacokinetic accumulation index than paroxetine. These alterations in the metabolism profile resulted in significantly reduced drug-drug interactions between CTP-347 and two other CYP2D6-metabolized drugs: tamoxifen (in vitro) and dextromethorphan (in humans). Our results show that precision deuteration can improve the metabolism profiles of existing pharmacotherapies without affecting their intrinsic pharmacologies.

  3. Altered subjective reward valuation among drug-deprived heavy marijuana users: Aversion to uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Kathryn R.; Starr, Mark. J.; Curtin, John. J.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States and its use is rising. Nonetheless, scientific efforts to clarify the risk for addiction and other harm associated with marijuana use have been lacking. Maladaptive decision-making is a cardinal feature of addiction that is likely to emerge in heavy users. In particular, distorted subjective reward valuation related to homeostatic or allostatic processes has been implicated for many drugs of abuse. Selective changes in responses to uncertainty have been observed in response to intoxication and deprivation from various drugs of abuse. To assess for these potential neuroadaptive changes in reward valuation associated with marijuana deprivation, we examined the subjective value of uncertain and certain rewards among deprived and non-deprived heavy marijuana users in a behavioral economics decision-making task. Deprived users displayed reduced valuation of uncertain rewards, particularly when these rewards were more objectively valuable. This uncertainty aversion increased with increasing quantity of marijuana use. These results suggest comparable decision-making vulnerability from marijuana use as other drugs of abuse, and highlights targets for intervention. PMID:26595464

  4. Drugs Targeting the Dopaminergic Nervous System Alter Locomotion in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort at the US Environmental Protection Agency to develop a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. This includes assessing the acute effects of drugs that ...

  5. Species variations among primates in responses to drugs which alter the renal excretion of uric acid.

    PubMed

    Fannelli, G M; Weiner, I M

    1975-05-01

    The effects of salicylate, probenecid (Benemid) and pyrazinoate on uric acid excretion were determined in clearance experiments in the chimpanzee and Cebus monkey (C. albifrons and C. apella). The results were correlated with data from these species in the literature and where possible to analogous data in man. With salicylate, the rank order of responsiveness in terms of uricosuric action was chimpanzee greater than man greater than C. albifrons = C. apella. This was true when comparisons were made on the bases of drug concentration in plasma or the rate of drug excretion per milliliter of glomerular filtrate. A similar rank order was obtained with probenecid except that C. albifrons was slightly more responsive than C. apella. The latter comparisons were on the basis of plasma concentration of drug. The chimpanzee is more susceptible to the uricosuric action of pyrazinoate than is C. apella. With salicylate and pyrazinoate, there was urate retention at levels lower than those required for a uricosuric effect. The results suggest that in comparison with man, the chimpanzee is a hyperresponder to uricosuric drugs and Cebus monkeys are hyporesponders. Therefore, these findings limit extensions of quantitative results from one species to another.

  6. Drugs Targeting the Dopaminergic Nervous System Alter Locomotion in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort at the US Environmental Protection Agency to develop a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. This includes assessing the acute effects of drugs that ...

  7. Altered chromatin organization and SUN2 localization in mandibuloacral dysplasia are rescued by drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Camozzi, Daria; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Schena, Elisa; Cenni, Vittoria; Columbaro, Marta; Capanni, Cristina; Maraldi, Nadir M; Squarzoni, Stefano; Ortolani, Michela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2012-10-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia type A (MADA) is a rare laminopathy characterized by growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies, bone resorption at specific sites including clavicles, phalanges and mandibula, mottled cutaneous pigmentation, skin rigidity, partial lipodystrophy, and insulin resistance. The disorder is caused by recessive mutations of the LMNA gene encoding for A-type lamins. The molecular feature of MADA consists in the accumulation of the unprocessed lamin A precursor, which is detected at the nuclear rim and in intranuclear aggregates. Here, we report the characterization of prelamin A post-translational modifications in MADA cells that induce alterations in the chromatin arrangement and dislocation of nuclear envelope-associated proteins involved in correct nucleo-cytoskeleton relationships. We show that protein post-translational modifications change depending on the passage number, suggesting the onset of a feedback mechanism. Moreover, we show that treatment of MADA cells with the farnesyltransferase inhibitors is effective in the recovery of the chromatin phenotype, altered in MADA, provided that the cells are at low passage number, while at high passage number, the treatment results ineffective. Moreover, the distribution of the lamin A interaction partner SUN2, a constituent of the nuclear envelope, is altered by MADA mutations, as argued by the formation of a highly disorganized lattice. Treatment with statins partially rescues proper SUN2 organization, indicating that its alteration is caused by farnesylated prelamin A accumulation. Given the major role of SUN1 and SUN2 in the nucleo-cytoskeleton interactions and in regulation of nuclear positioning in differentiating cells, we hypothesise that mechanisms regulating nuclear membrane-centrosome interplay and nuclear movement may be affected in MADA fibroblasts.

  8. Pan-cancer analysis of the extent and consequences of intratumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Andor, Noemi; Graham, Trevor A; Jansen, Marnix; Xia, Li C; Aktipis, C Athena; Petritsch, Claudia; Ji, Hanlee P; Maley, Carlo C

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) drives neoplastic progression and therapeutic resistance. We used the bioinformatics tools 'expanding ploidy and allele frequency on nested subpopulations' (EXPANDS) and PyClone to detect clones that are present at a ≥10% frequency in 1,165 exome sequences from tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas. 86% of tumors across 12 cancer types had at least two clones. ITH in the morphology of nuclei was associated with genetic ITH (Spearman's correlation coefficient, ρ = 0.24-0.41; P < 0.001). Mutation of a driver gene that typically appears in smaller clones was a survival risk factor (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.71-2.69). The risk of mortality also increased when >2 clones coexisted in the same tumor sample (HR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.20-1.87). In two independent data sets, copy-number alterations affecting either <25% or >75% of a tumor's genome predicted reduced risk (HR = 0.15, 95% CI: 0.08-0.29). Mortality risk also declined when >4 clones coexisted in the sample, suggesting a trade-off between the costs and benefits of genomic instability. ITH and genomic instability thus have the potential to be useful measures that can universally be applied to all cancers.

  9. Intratumoral heterogeneity: Clonal cooperation in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Neelakantan, Deepika; Drasin, David J; Ford, Heide L

    2015-01-01

    Although phenotypic intratumoral heterogeneity was first described many decades ago, the advent of next-generation sequencing has provided conclusive evidence that in addition to phenotypic diversity, significant genotypic diversity exists within tumors. Tumor heterogeneity likely arises both from clonal expansions, as well as from differentiation hierarchies existent in the tumor, such as that established by cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-CSCs. These differentiation hierarchies may arise due to genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, or microenvironmental influences. An additional differentiation hierarchy within epithelial tumors may arise when only a few tumor cells trans-differentiate into mesenchymal-like cells, a process known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Again, this process can be influenced by both genetic and non-genetic factors. In this review we discuss the evidence for clonal interaction and cooperation for tumor maintenance and progression, particularly with respect to EMT, and further address the far-reaching effects that tumor heterogeneity may have on cancer therapy. PMID:25482627

  10. Pan-cancer analysis of intratumor heterogeneity as a prognostic determinant of survival

    PubMed Central

    Desrichard, Alexis; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Hakimi, A. Ari; Makarov, Vladimir; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    As tumors accumulate genetic alterations, an evolutionary process occurs in which genetically distinct subclonal populations of cells co-exist, resulting in intratumor genetic heterogeneity (ITH). The clinical implications of ITH remain poorly defined. Data are limited with respect to whether ITH is an independent determinant of patient survival outcomes, across different cancer types. Here, we report the results of a pan-cancer analysis of over 3300 tumors, showing a varied landscape of ITH across 9 cancer types. While some gene mutations are subclonal, the majority of driver gene mutations are clonal events, present in nearly all cancer cells. Strikingly, high levels of ITH are associated with poorer survival across diverse types of cancer. The adverse impact of high ITH is independent of other clinical, pathologic and molecular factors. High ITH tends to be associated with lower levels of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, but this association is not able to explain the observed survival differences. Together, these data show that ITH is a prognostic marker in multiple cancers. These results illuminate the natural history of cancer evolution, indicating that tumor heterogeneity represents a significant obstacle to cancer control. PMID:26840267

  11. Quantitative Contributions of Target Alteration and Decreased Drug Accumulation to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bruchmann, Sebastian; Dötsch, Andreas; Nouri, Bianka; Chaberny, Iris F.

    2013-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics constitute a clinically successful and widely used class of broad-spectrum antibiotics; however, the emergence and spread of resistance increasingly limits the use of fluoroquinolones in the treatment and management of microbial disease. In this study, we evaluated the quantitative contributions of quinolone target alteration and efflux pump expression to fluoroquinolone resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We generated isogenic mutations in hot spots of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, and parC and inactivated the efflux regulator genes so as to overexpress the corresponding multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps. We then introduced the respective mutations into the reference strain PA14 singly and in various combinations. Whereas the combined inactivation of two efflux regulator-encoding genes did not lead to resistance levels higher than those obtained by inactivation of only one efflux regulator-encoding gene, the combination of mutations leading to increased efflux and target alteration clearly exhibited an additive effect. This combination of target alteration and overexpression of efflux pumps was commonly observed in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates; however, these two mechanisms were frequently found not to be sufficient to explain the level of fluoroquinolone resistance. Our results suggest that there are additional mechanisms, independent of the expression of the MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and/or MexXY-OprM efflux pump, that increase ciprofloxacin resistance in isolates with mutations in the QRDRs. PMID:23274661

  12. Psychotropic drugs attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia by altering hypothalamic levels of inflammatory mediators in rats.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Ahmad; Sharon-Granit, Yael; Azab, Abed N

    2016-07-28

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation may contribute to the pathophysiology of mental disorders and that psychotropic drugs exert various effects on brain inflammation. The administration of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) to mammals is associated with robust production of inflammatory mediators and pathological changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of four different psychotropic drugs on LPS-induced hypothermia and production of prostaglandin (PG) E2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and phosphorylated-p65 (P-p65) levels in hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. Rats were treated once daily with lithium (100mg/kg), carbamazepine (40mg/kg), haloperidol (2mg/kg), imipramine (20mg/kg) or vehicle (NaCl 0.9%) for 29 days. On day 29, rats were injected with LPS (1mg/kg) or saline. At 1.5h post LPS injection body temperature was measured, rats were sacrificed, blood was collected and their hypothalami were excised, homogenized and centrifuged. PGE2, TNF-α and nuclear P-p65 levels were determined by specific ELISA kits. We found that lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine significantly attenuated LPS-induced hypothermia, resembling the effect of classic anti-inflammatory drugs. Moreover, lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine differently but significantly affected the levels of PGE2, TNF-α and P-p65 in plasma and hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. The results suggest that psychotropic drugs attenuate LPS-induced hypothermia by reducing hypothalamic production of inflammatory constituents, particularly PGE2. The effects of psychotropic drugs on brain inflammation may contribute to their therapeutic mechanism but also to their toxicological profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Altered Cell Cycle Arrest by Multifunctional Drug-Loaded Enzymatically-Triggered Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Can; Sun, Ying; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gao, Pei; Duan, Yourong

    2016-01-20

    cRGD-targeting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-sensitive nanoparticles [PLGA-PEG1K-cRGD/PLGA-peptide-PEG5K (NPs-cRGD)] were successfully developed. Au-Pt(IV) nanoparticles, PTX, and ADR were encapsulated into NPs-RGD separately. The effects of the drug-loaded nanoparticles on the cell cycle were investigated. Here, we showed that higher cytotoxicity of drug-loaded nanoparticles was related to the cell cycle arrest, compared to that of free drugs. The NPs-cRGD studied here did not disrupt cell cycle progression. The cell cycle of Au-Pt(IV)@NPs-cRGD showed a main S phase arrest in all phases of the cell cycle phase, especially in G0/G1 phase. PTX@NPs-cRGD and ADR@NPs-cRGD showed a higher ratio of G2/M and S phase arrest than the free drugs, respectively. Cells in G0/G1 and S phases of the cell cycle had a higher uptake ratio of NPs-cRGD. A nutrient deprivation or an increase in the requirement of nutrients in tumor cells could promote the uptake of nanoparticles from the microenvironments. In vivo, NPs-cRGD could efficiently accumulate at tumor sites. The inhibition of tumor growth coupled with cell cycle arrest is in line with that in vitro. On the basis of our results, we propose that future studies on nanoparticle action mechanism should consider the cell cycle, which could be different from free drugs. Understanding the actions of cell cycle arrest could affect the application of nanomedicine in the clinic.

  14. Doxorubicin-induced co-assembling nanomedicines with temperature-sensitive acidic polymer and their in-situ-forming hydrogels for intratumoral administration.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiangshan; Geng, Shinan; Zhao, Hao; Peng, Xiaole; Zhou, Qing; Li, Han; He, Ming; Zhao, Yanbing; Yang, Xiangliang; Xu, Huibi

    2016-08-10

    Doxorubicin (DOX)-induced co-assembling nanomedicines (D-PNAx) with temperature-sensitive PNAx triblock polymers have been developed for regional chemotherapy against liver cancer via intratumoral administration in the present work. Owing to the formation of insoluble DOX carboxylate, D-PNAx nanomedicines showed high drug-loading and entrapment efficacy via a simple mixing of doxorubicin hydrochloride and PNAx polymers. The sustained releasing profile of D-PNA100 nanomedicines indicated that only 9.4% of DOX was released within 1day, and 60% was released during 10days. Based on DOX-induced co-assembling behavior and their temperature sensitive in-situ-forming hydrogels, D-PNA100 nanomedicines showed excellent antitumor activity against H22 tumor using intratumoral administration. In contrast to that by free DOX solution (1.13±0.04 times at 9days) and blank PNA100 (2.11±0.34 times), the tumor volume treated by D-PNA100 had been falling to only 0.77±0.13 times of original tumor volume throughout the experimental period. In vivo biodistribution of DOX indicated that D-PNA100 nanomedicines exhibited much stronger DOX retention in tumor tissues than free DOX solution via intratumoral injection. D-PNA100 nanomedicines were hopeful to be developed as new temperature sensitive in-situ-forming hydrogels via i.t. injection for regional chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Are we getting closer to understanding intratumor heterogeneity in hepatocellular carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Ghassan M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly heterogenous disease and intratumor heterogeneity is a well-known fact within each individual tumor, and may involve morphological, immunohistochemical, and molecular heterogeneities. Understanding of intratumor heterogeneity of HCC should provide critical knowledge about prognosis of the disease and response to therapy. In a recent article by Friemel and colleagues, the investigators utilized a comprehensive approach in linking immunohistochemical markers and molecular changes to morphological intratumor heterogeneity in HCC. The study found that intratumor heterogeneity was detectable in 87% of HCC cases. Combined heterogeneities with respect to morphologic, immunohistochemical, and mutational status of the two most important driver mutations CTNNB1 and TP53 were seen in 22% of HCC cases. The study demonstrates the challenges facing therapeutic strategies targeting single molecules and may explain the limited success so far in developing molecular targeted therapy for HCC. PMID:27115014

  16. Intratumoral DNA electroporation induces anti-tumor immunity and tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Radkevich-Brown, Olga; Piechocki, Marie P; Back, Jessica B; Weise, Amy M; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2010-03-01

    In situ expression of a foreign antigen and an immune-modulating cytokine by intratumoral DNA electroporation was tested as a cancer therapy regimen. Transgene expression in the tumors was sustained for 2-3 weeks after intratumoral electroporation with mammalian expression plasmid containing firefly luciferase cDNA. Electroporation with cDNA encoding tetanus toxin fragment C (TetC) induced tetanus toxin-binding antibody, demonstrating immune recognition of the transgene product. Intratumoral electroporation with TetC and IL-12 cDNA after mice were treated with CD25 mAb to remove regulatory T cells induced IFN-gamma producing T-cell response to tumor-associated antigen, heavy inflammatory infiltration, regression of established tumors and immune memory to protect mice from repeated tumor challenge. Intratumoral expression of immune-modulating molecules may be most suitable in the neoadjuvant setting to enhance the therapeutic efficacy and provide long-term protection.

  17. Supratentorial extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma in an adult with repeated intratumoral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Naotaka; Murai, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Adachi, Koji; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-04-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old man with supratentorial extraventricular anaplastic ependymoma who presented with repeated intratumoral hemorrhage. The patient was admitted with headache. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed an enhancing mass with intratumoral hemorrhage in the right temporal lobe. Gross total resection was performed. The tumor was well demarcated from the brain tissue, and showed no continuity with the ventricular system. Histopathological examination revealed the features of anaplastic ependymoma. Therefore, additional radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy were administered. Ten months later, the tumor recurred with hemorrhage in the spinal canal. This case showed rapid malignant progression and repeated intratumoral hemorrhage within a short period of time, both of which are characteristics of anaplastic ependymomas. Close observation of the central nervous system and adjuvant radiotherapy are mandatory, even if the ependymoma presents with repeated intratumoral hemorrhage.

  18. The intra-tumoral relationship between microcirculation, interstitial fluid pressure and liposome accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Shawn; Milosevic, Michael; Tannock, Ian F; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A

    2015-08-10

    The heterogeneous intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes has been linked to both the chaotic tumor microcirculation and to elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we explored the relationship between tumor microcirculation, IFP, and the intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes. Measurements of the tumor microcirculation using perfusion imaging, IFP using a novel image-guided robotic needle positioning system, and the intra-tumoral distribution of liposomes using volumetric micro-CT imaging were performed in mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic MDA-MB-231 tumors. Intra-tumoral perfusion and IFP were substantially different between the two tumor implantation sites. Tumor perfusion and not vascular permeability was found to be the primary mediator of the intra-tumoral accumulation of CT-liposomes. A strong relationship was observed between the radial distribution of IFP, metrics of tumor perfusion, and the intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes. Tumors with elevated central IFP that decreased at the periphery had low perfusion and low levels of CT-liposome accumulation that increased towards the periphery. Conversely, tumors with low and radially uniform IFP exhibited higher levels of tumor perfusion and CT-liposome accumulation. Both tumor perfusion and elevated IFP exhibit substantial intra-tumoral heterogeneity and both play an integral role in mediating the intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes through a complex interactive effect. Measuring IFP in the clinical setting remains challenging and these results demonstrate that tumor perfusion imaging alone provides a robust non-invasive method to identify factors that contribute to poor liposome accumulation and may allow for pre-selection of patients that are more likely to respond to nanoparticle therapy.

  19. Radiosensitizing effect of intratumoral interleukin-12 gene electrotransfer in murine sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sedlar, Ales; Kranjc, Simona; Dolinsek, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Coer, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor

    2013-01-29

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) based radiosensitization is an effective way of tumor treatment. Local cytokine production, without systemic shedding, might provide clinical benefit in radiation treatment of sarcomas. Therefore, the aim was to stimulate intratumoral IL-12 production by gene electrotransfer of plasmid coding for mouse IL-12 (mIL-12) into the tumors, in order to explore its radiosensitizing effect after single or multiple intratumoral gene electrotransfer. Solid SA-1 fibrosarcoma tumors, on the back of A/J mice, were treated intratumorally by mIL-12 gene electrotransfer and 24 h later irradiated with a single dose. Treatment effectiveness was measured by tumor growth delay and local tumor control assay (TCD(50) assay). With respect to therapeutic index, skin reaction in the radiation field was scored. The tumor and serum concentrations of cytokines mIL-12 and mouse interferon γ (mIFNγ) were measured. Besides single, also multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer before and after tumor irradiation was evaluated. Single intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral but not serum mIL-12 and mIFNγ concentrations, and had good antitumor (7.1% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing effect (21.4% tumor cures). Combined treatment resulted in the radiation dose-modifying factor of 2.16. Multiple mIL-12 gene electrotransfer had an even more pronounced antitumor (50% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing (86.7% tumor cures) effect. Single or multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral mIL-12 and mIFNγ cytokine level, and may provide an efficient treatment modality for soft tissue sarcoma as single or adjuvant therapy to tumor irradiation.

  20. Radiosensitizing effect of intratumoral interleukin-12 gene electrotransfer in murine sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interleukin-12 (IL-12) based radiosensitization is an effective way of tumor treatment. Local cytokine production, without systemic shedding, might provide clinical benefit in radiation treatment of sarcomas. Therefore, the aim was to stimulate intratumoral IL-12 production by gene electrotransfer of plasmid coding for mouse IL-12 (mIL-12) into the tumors, in order to explore its radiosensitizing effect after single or multiple intratumoral gene electrotransfer. Methods Solid SA-1 fibrosarcoma tumors, on the back of A/J mice, were treated intratumorally by mIL-12 gene electrotransfer and 24 h later irradiated with a single dose. Treatment effectiveness was measured by tumor growth delay and local tumor control assay (TCD50 assay). With respect to therapeutic index, skin reaction in the radiation field was scored. The tumor and serum concentrations of cytokines mIL-12 and mouse interferon γ (mIFNγ) were measured. Besides single, also multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer before and after tumor irradiation was evaluated. Results Single intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral but not serum mIL-12 and mIFNγ concentrations, and had good antitumor (7.1% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing effect (21.4% tumor cures). Combined treatment resulted in the radiation dose-modifying factor of 2.16. Multiple mIL-12 gene electrotransfer had an even more pronounced antitumor (50% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing (86.7% tumor cures) effect. Conclusions Single or multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral mIL-12 and mIFNγ cytokine level, and may provide an efficient treatment modality for soft tissue sarcoma as single or adjuvant therapy to tumor irradiation. PMID:23360213

  1. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Jakobsen, Anders; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of studies have investigated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential markers of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. So far, agreement between studies has been minimal, which may in part be explained by intratumoral heterogeneity of miRNA expression. The aim of the present study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. Materials and Methods The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) in tumour specimens from 27 patients with T3-4 rectal cancer. From each tumour, tissue from three different luminal localisations was examined. Inter- and intra-patient variability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlations between RT-qPCR and ISH were evaluated using Spearman’s correlation. Results ICCsingle (one sample from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21 and miRNA-31. For miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630, ICCsingle was lower than 50%. The ICCmean (mean of three samples from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21(RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-125b (RT-qPCR and ISH), miRNA-145 (ISH), miRNA-630 (RT-qPCR), and miRNA-31 (RT-qPCR). For miRNA-145 (RT-qPCR) and miRNA-630 (ISH), ICCmean was lower than 50%. Spearman correlation coefficients, comparing results obtained by RT-qPCR and ISH, respectively, ranged from 0.084 to 0.325 for the mean value from each patient, and from -0.085 to 0.515 in the section including the deepest part of the tumour. Conclusion Intratumoral heterogeneity may influence the measurement of miRNA expression and consequently the number of samples needed for representative estimates. Our findings with two different methods suggest that one sample is sufficient for adequate assessment of miRNA-21 and miRNA-31, whereas more samples would improve the assessment of miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630

  2. A systems model of altered consciousness: integrating natural and drug-induced psychoses.

    PubMed

    Vollenweider, F X; Geyer, M A

    2001-11-15

    Increasing evidence from neuroimaging and behavioral studies suggests that functional disturbances within cortico-striato-thalamic pathways are critical to psychotic symptom formation in drug-induced and possibly also naturally occurring psychoses. Recent basic and clinical research with psychotomimetic drugs, such as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist, ketamine, and the serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor agonist, psilocybin, suggest that the hallucinogenic effects of these drugs arise, at least in part, from their common capacity to disrupt thalamo-cortical gating of external and internal information to the cortex. Deficient gating of sensory and cognitive information is thought to result in an overloading inundation of information and subsequent cognitive fragmentation and psychosis. Cross-species studies of homologues gating functions, such as prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex, in animal and human models of psychosis corroborate this view and provide a translational testing mechanism for the exploration of novel pathophysiologic and therapeutic hypotheses relevant to psychotic disorders, such as the group of schizophrenias.

  3. Heterogeneous glioblastoma cell cross-talk promotes phenotype alterations and enhanced drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Motaln, Helena; Koren, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Ramšak, Živa; Schichor, Christian; Lah, Tamara T.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most lethal of brain cancer, and it comprises a heterogeneous mixture of functionally distinct cancer cells that affect tumor progression. We examined the U87, U251, and U373 malignant cell lines as in vitro models to determine the impact of cellular cross-talk on their phenotypic alterations in co-cultures. These cells were also studied at the transcriptome level, to define the mechanisms of their observed mutually affected genomic stability, proliferation, invasion and resistance to temozolomide. This is the first direct demonstration of the neural and mesenchymal molecular fingerprints of U87 and U373 cells, respectively. U87-cell conditioned medium lowered the genomic stability of U373 (U251) cells, without affecting cell proliferation. In contrast, upon exposure of U87 cells to U373 (U251) conditioned medium, U87 cells showed increased genomic stability, decreased proliferation rates and increased invasion, due to a plethora of produced cytokines identified in the co-culture media. This cross talk altered the expression 264 genes in U87 cells that are associated with proliferation, inflammation, migration, and adhesion, and 221 genes in U373 cells that are associated with apoptosis, the cell cycle, cell differentiation and migration. Indirect and direct co-culturing of U87 and U373 cells showed mutually opposite effects on temozolomide resistance. In conclusion, definition of transcriptional alterations of distinct glioblastoma cells upon co-culturing provides better understanding of the mechanisms of glioblastoma heterogeneity, which will provide the basis for more informed glioma treatment in the future. PMID:26517510

  4. Contractile abnormalities and altered drug response in engineered heart tissue from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Andrea; Friedrich, Felix W; Flenner, Frederik; Geertz, Birgit; Eder, Alexandra; Schaaf, Sebastian; Hirt, Marc N; Uebeler, June; Schlossarek, Saskia; Carrier, Lucie; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (Mybpc3)-targeted knock-in mice (KI) recapitulate typical aspects of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated whether these functional alterations can be reproduced in engineered heart tissue (EHT) and yield novel mechanistic information on the function of cMyBP-C. EHTs were generated from cardiac cells of neonatal KI, heterozygous (HET) or wild-type controls (WT) and developed without apparent morphological differences. KI had 70% and HET 20% lower total cMyBP-C levels than WT, accompanied by elevated fetal gene expression. Under standard culture conditions and spontaneous beating, KI EHTs showed more frequent burst beating than WT and occasional tetanic contractions (14/96). Under electrical stimulation (6Hz, 37°C) KI EHTs exhibited shorter contraction and relaxation times and a twofold higher sensitivity to external [Ca(2+)]. Accordingly, the sensitivity to verapamil was 4-fold lower and the response to isoprenaline or the Ca(2+) sensitizer EMD 57033 2- to 4-fold smaller. The loss of EMD effect was verified in 6-week-old KI mice in vivo. HET EHTs were apparently normal under basal conditions, but showed similarly altered contractile responses to [Ca(2+)], verapamil, isoprenaline and EMD. In contrast, drug-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) transients (Fura-2) were essentially normal. In conclusion, the present findings in auxotonically contracting EHTs support the idea that cMyBP-C's normal role is to suppress force generation at low intracellular Ca(2+) and stabilize the power-stroke step of the cross bridge cycle. Pharmacological testing in EHT unmasked a disease phenotype in HET. The altered drug response may be clinically relevant.

  5. DREAMing: a simple and ultrasensitive method for assessing intratumor epigenetic heterogeneity directly from liquid biopsies.

    PubMed

    Pisanic, Thomas R; Athamanolap, Pornpat; Poh, Weijie; Chen, Chen; Hulbert, Alicia; Brock, Malcolm V; Herman, James G; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-12-15

    Many cancers comprise heterogeneous populations of cells at primary and metastatic sites throughout the body. The presence or emergence of distinct subclones with drug-resistant genetic and epigenetic phenotypes within these populations can greatly complicate therapeutic intervention. Liquid biopsies of peripheral blood from cancer patients have been suggested as an ideal means of sampling intratumor genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity for diagnostics, monitoring and therapeutic guidance. However, current molecular diagnostic and sequencing methods are not well suited to the routine assessment of epigenetic heterogeneity in difficult samples such as liquid biopsies that contain intrinsically low fractional concentrations of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and rare epigenetic subclonal populations. Here we report an alternative approach, deemed DREAMing (Discrimination of Rare EpiAlleles by Melt), which uses semi-limiting dilution and precise melt curve analysis to distinguish and enumerate individual copies of epiallelic species at single-CpG-site resolution in fractions as low as 0.005%, providing facile and inexpensive ultrasensitive assessment of locus-specific epigenetic heterogeneity directly from liquid biopsies. The technique is demonstrated here for the evaluation of epigenetic heterogeneity at p14(ARF) and BRCA1 gene-promoter loci in liquid biopsies obtained from patients in association with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN), respectively.

  6. MRI mediated, non-invasive tracking of intratumoral distribution of nanocarriers in rat glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Park, Jaekeun; Agarwal, Abhiruchi; Patel, Vijal; Zhao, Fuqiang; Annapragada, Ananth V.; Hu, Xiaoping; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2008-08-01

    Nanocarrier mediated therapy of gliomas has shown promise. The success of systemic nanocarrier-based chemotherapy is critically dependent on the so-called leaky vasculature to permit drug extravasation across the blood-brain barrier. Yet, the extent of vascular permeability in individual tumors varies widely, resulting in a correspondingly wide range of responses to the therapy. However, there exist no tools currently for rationally determining whether tumor blood vessels are amenable to nanocarrier mediated therapy in an individualized, patient specific manner today. To address this need for brain tumor therapy, we have developed a multifunctional 100 nm scale liposomal agent encapsulating a gadolinium-based contrast agent for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with prolonged blood circulation. Using a 9.4 T MRI system, we were able to track the intratumoral distribution of the gadolinium-loaded nanocarrier in a rat glioma model for a period of three days due to improved magnetic properties of the contrast agent being packaged in a nanocarrier. Such a nanocarrier provides a tool for non-invasively assessing the suitability of tumors for nanocarrier mediated therapy and then optimizing the treatment protocol for each individual tumor. Additionally, the ability to image the tumor in high resolution can potentially constitute a surgical planning tool for tumor resection.

  7. Fluence rate-dependent photobleaching of intratumorally administered Pc 4 does not predict tumor growth delay.

    PubMed

    Baran, Timothy M; Foster, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    We examined effects of fluence rate on the photobleaching of the photosensitizer Pc 4 during photodynamic therapy (PDT) and the relationship between photobleaching and tumor response to PDT. BALB/c mice with intradermal EMT6 tumors were given 0.03 mg kg(-1) Pc 4 by intratumor injection and irradiated at 667 nm with an irradiance of 50 or 150 mW cm(-2) to a fluence of 100 J cm(-2). While no cures were attained, significant tumor growth delay was demonstrated at both irradiances compared with drug-only controls. There was no significant difference in tumor responses to these two irradiances (P = 0.857). Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor the bleaching of Pc 4 during irradiation, with more rapid bleaching with respect to fluence shown at the higher irradiance. No significant correlation was found between fluorescence photobleaching and tumor regrowth for the data interpreted as a whole. Within each treatment group, weak associations between photobleaching and outcome were observed. In the 50 mW cm(-2) group, enhanced photobleaching was associated with prolonged growth delay (P = 0.188), while at 150 mW cm(-2) this trend was reversed (P = 0.308). Thus, it appears that Pc 4 photobleaching is not a strong predictor of individual tumor response to Pc 4-PDT under these treatment conditions.

  8. Intratumoral lymphatic vessel density in vulvar squamous cell carcinomas: a possible association with favorable prognosis.

    PubMed

    Goes, Renata Sampaio; Carvalho, Jesus P; Almeida, Bernardo G L; Bacchi, Carlos E; Goes, Joao Carlos Sampaio; Calil, Marcelo Alvarenga; Baracat, Edmund C; Carvalho, Filomena M

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels serve as major routes for regional dissemination, and therefore, lymph node status is a key indicator of prognosis. To predict lymph node metastasis, tumor lymphatic density and lymphangiogenesis-related molecules have been studied in various tumor types. To our knowledge, no previous studies have evaluated the role of intratumoral lymphatic vessel density (LVD) in the behavior of vulvar carcinomas. The aim of this study was to analyze intratumoral LVD in relation to patient survival and well-characterized prognostic factors for cancer. Thirty-five patients with vulvar squamous cell carcinoma underwent vulvectomy and dissection of regional lymph nodes. Clinical records were reviewed, in addition to histological grade, peritumoral lymphatic invasion, and depth of infiltration for each case. Tissue microarray paraffin blocks were created, and lymphatic vessels were detected using immunohistochemical staining of podoplanin (D2-40 antibody). Intratumoral LVD was quantified by counting the number of stained vessels. Higher values for intratumoral LVD were associated with low-grade and low-stage tumors, and with tumors without lymphatic invasion and reduced stromal infiltration. In a univariate analysis, high intratumoral LVD was associated with a higher rate of overall survival and a lower rate of lymph node metastasis. Our results suggest that increased intratumoral LVD is associated with favorable prognosis in vulvar squamous carcinomas.

  9. Intratumoral and peritumoral lymphatic vessel density both correlate with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Song; Yi, Shanhong; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Mingfu; Cai, Yuanqing; Zou, Liguang

    2017-01-01

    The status of lymph node involvement is an important prognostic factor for breast cancer. However, the presence of intratumoral lymphatic vessels in primary tumor lesions and the relationship between lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and lymph node metastasis (LNM) have not been firmly established. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis study to investigate these issues. According to the pre-established inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 studies, involving 1029 breast cancer patients, were included in this study. Using immunohistochemical staining, intratumoral lymphatic vessels were detected in 40.07% of breast cancer patients (240/599), and peritumoral lymphatics were detected in 77.09% (397/515). All studies demonstrated that peritumoral LVD was higher than intratumoral LVD, with a pooled standard mean difference and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.75 (1.28 to 2.21). Both intratumoral LVD and peritumoral LVD positively correlated with LNM, with correlation coefficients of 0.14 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.23) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.49), respectively. In summary, our study reports the overall detection rate of intratumoral lymphatics and demonstrates the associations between intratumoral LVD, peritumoral LVD, and LNM in breast cancer. Additionally, controlled studies with a larger number of subjects are needed to establish these relationships. PMID:28067327

  10. Multifunctional Ebselen drug functions through the activation of DNA damage response and alterations in nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gajendra K; Balkrishna, Shah Jaimin; Sathish, Narayanan; Kumar, Sangit; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2012-01-15

    Several studies have demonstrated that Ebselen is an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agent. Contrary to this, studies have also shown a high degree of cellular toxicity associated with Ebselen usage, the underlying mechanism of which remains less understood. In this study we have attempted to identify a possible molecular mechanism behind the above by investigating the effects of Ebselen on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Significant growth arrest was documented in yeast cells exposed to Ebselen similar to that seen in presence of DNA damaging agents (including methyl methane sulfonate [MMS] and hydroxy urea [HU]). Furthermore, mutations in specific lysine residues in the histone H3 tail (H3 K56R) resulted in increased sensitivity of yeast cells to Ebselen presumably due to alterations in post-translational modifications of histone proteins towards regulating replication and DNA damage repair. Our findings suggest that Ebselen functions through activation of DNA damage response, alterations in histone modifications, activation of checkpoint kinase pathway and derepression of ribonucleotide reductases (DNA repair genes) which to the best of our knowledge is being reported for the first time. Interestingly subsequent to Ebselen exposure there were changes in global yeast protein expression and specific histone modifications, identification of which is expected to reveal a fundamental cellular mechanism underlying the action of Ebselen. Taken together these observations will help to redesign Ebselen-based therapy in clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CD74 and intratumoral immune response in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Milne, Katy; Webb, John R; Watson, Peter H

    2016-04-06

    CD74 (invariant chain) plays a role in MHC class II antigen presentation. We assessed CD74 and MHCII expression in tumor cells, as well as CD8, CD4, and CD68 tumor infiltrating leucocyte (TIL) density by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 492 breast cancer patients. CD74 expression was associated with poor prognostic markers including patient age, tumor grade, ER status, non-Luminal A subtypes, and with MHCII expression and higher TIL densities, particularly in the Basal-like subgroup. Univariate analysis showed a favorable prognostic effect of CD74 (Hazard ratio = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.26-0.89, p = 0.022) and for combined CD74/MHCII (Hazard ratio = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.17-0.81, p = 0.014) positive status for overall survival that was only manifested in the Basal-like subgroup. CD74 and MHCII expression is associated with patient survival in Basal-like breast cancer, and the association with TIL may reflect an effective intratumoral immune response.

  12. Does Respondent Driven Sampling Alter the Social Network Composition and Health-Seeking Behaviors of Illicit Drug Users Followed Prospectively?

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Abby E.; Latkin, Carl; Crawford, Natalie D.; Jones, Kandice C.; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2011-01-01

    Respondent driven sampling (RDS) was originally developed to sample and provide peer education to injection drug users at risk for HIV. Based on the premise that drug users' social networks were maintained through sharing rituals, this peer-driven approach to disseminate educational information and reduce risk behaviors capitalizes and expands upon the norms that sustain these relationships. Compared with traditional outreach interventions, peer-driven interventions produce greater reductions in HIV risk behaviors and adoption of safer behaviors over time, however, control and intervention groups are not similarly recruited. As peer-recruitment may alter risk networks and individual risk behaviors over time, such comparison studies are unable to isolate the effect of a peer-delivered intervention. This analysis examines whether RDS recruitment (without an intervention) is associated with changes in health-seeking behaviors and network composition over 6 months. New York City drug users (N = 618) were recruited using targeted street outreach (TSO) and RDS (2006–2009). 329 non-injectors (RDS = 237; TSO = 92) completed baseline and 6-month surveys ascertaining demographic, drug use, and network characteristics. Chi-square and t-tests compared RDS- and TSO-recruited participants on changes in HIV testing and drug treatment utilization and in the proportion of drug using, sex, incarcerated and social support networks over the follow-up period. The sample was 66% male, 24% Hispanic, 69% black, 62% homeless, and the median age was 35. At baseline, the median network size was 3, 86% used crack, 70% used cocaine, 40% used heroin, and in the past 6 months 72% were tested for HIV and 46% were enrolled in drug treatment. There were no significant differences by recruitment strategy with respect to changes in health-seeking behaviors or network composition over 6 months. These findings suggest no association between RDS recruitment and changes in network

  13. Alterations in the levels of heterotrimeric G protein subunits induced by psychostimulants, opiates, barbiturates, and ethanol: Implications for drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Hall, F. Scott; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Uhl, George R.

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal adaptations have been found to occur in multiple brain regions after chronic intake of abused drugs, and are therefore thought to underlie drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal. Pathophysiological changes in drug responsiveness as well as behavioral sequelae of chronic drug exposure are thought to depend largely upon the altered state of heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR)-G protein interactions. Responsiveness of GPCR-related intracellular signaling systems to drugs of abuse is heterogeneous, depending on the types of intracellular effectors to which the specific Gα protein subtypes are coupled and GPCR-G protein coupling efficiency, factors influenced by the class of drug, expression levels of G protein subunits, and drug treatment regimens. To enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of pathophysiological states resulting from chronic intake of abused drugs, this review focuses on alterations in the expression levels of G protein subunits induced by various drugs of abuse. Changes in these mechanisms appear to be specific to particular drugs of abuse, and specific conditions of drug treatment. PMID:18566973

  14. Alterations in the levels of heterotrimeric G protein subunits induced by psychostimulants, opiates, barbiturates, and ethanol: Implications for drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Hall, F Scott; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Uhl, George R

    2008-09-01

    Neuronal adaptations have been found to occur in multiple brain regions after chronic intake of abused drugs, and are therefore thought to underlie drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal. Pathophysiological changes in drug responsiveness as well as behavioral sequelae of chronic drug exposure are thought to depend largely upon the altered state of heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR)-G protein interactions. Responsiveness of GPCR-related intracellular signaling systems to drugs of abuse is heterogeneous, depending on the types of intracellular effectors to which the specific Galpha protein subtypes are coupled and GPCR-G protein coupling efficiency, factors influenced by the class of drug, expression levels of G protein subunits, and drug treatment regimens. To enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of pathophysiological states resulting from chronic intake of abused drugs, this review focuses on alterations in the expression levels of G protein subunits induced by various drugs of abuse. Changes in these mechanisms appear to be specific to particular drugs of abuse, and specific conditions of drug treatment. Published 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Primary breast cancer cell culture yields intra-tumor heterogeneous subpopulations expressing exclusive patterns of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Esparza-López, José; Ramos-Elías, Pier A; Castro-Sánchez, Andrea; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Escobar-Arriaga, Elizabeth; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; León-Rodríguez, Eucario; Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Ibarra-Sánchez, María de Jesus

    2016-09-20

    It has become evident that intra-tumor heterogeneity of breast cancer impact on several biological processes such as proliferation, migration, cell death and also might contribute to chemotherapy resistance. The expression of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) has not been analyzed in the context of intra-tumor heterogeneity in a primary breast cancer cell culture. Several subpopulations were isolated from the MBCDF (M serial-breast cancer ductal F line) primary breast cancer cells and were successfully maintained in culture and divided in two groups according to their morphology and RTKs expression pattern, and correlated with biological processes like proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent cell growth, and resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Subpopulations were isolated from MBCDF primary breast cancer cell culture by limiting dilution. RTKs and hormone receptors were examined by Western blot. Proliferation was measure by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay). Cell viability was evaluated by Crystal Violet. Migration was assessed using Boyden chambers. Anchorage-independent cell growth was evaluated by colony formation in soft agar. Several subpopulations were isolated from the MBCDF breast cancer cells that were divided into two groups according to their morphology. Analysis of RTKs expression pattern showed that HER1, HER3, c-Met and VEGFR2 were expressed exclusively in cells from group 1, but not in cells from group 2. PDGFR was expressed only in cells from group 2, but not in cells from group 1. HER2, HER4, c-Kit, IGF1-R were expressed in all subpopulations. Biological processes correlated with the RTKs expression pattern. Group 2 subpopulations present the highest rate of cell proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent cell growth. Analysis of susceptibility to chemotherapy drugs and TKIs showed that only Paclitaxel and Imatinib behaved differently between groups

  16. Drug-Induced Alterations of Endocannabinoid-Mediated Plasticity in Brain Reward Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zlebnik, Natalie E.

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has emerged as one of the most important mediators of physiological and pathological reward-related synaptic plasticity. eCBs are retrograde messengers that provide feedback inhibition, resulting in the suppression of neurotransmitter release at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses, and they serve a critical role in the spatiotemporal regulation of both short- and long-term synaptic plasticity that supports adaptive learning of reward-motivated behaviors. However, mechanisms of eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity in reward areas of the brain are impaired following exposure to drugs of abuse. Because of this, it is theorized that maladaptive eCB signaling may contribute to the development and maintenance of addiction-related behavior. Here we review various forms of eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity present in regions of the brain involved in reward and reinforcement and explore the potential physiological relevance of maladaptive eCB signaling to addiction vulnerability. PMID:27707960

  17. Drug-Induced Alterations of Endocannabinoid-Mediated Plasticity in Brain Reward Regions.

    PubMed

    Zlebnik, Natalie E; Cheer, Joseph F

    2016-10-05

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has emerged as one of the most important mediators of physiological and pathological reward-related synaptic plasticity. eCBs are retrograde messengers that provide feedback inhibition, resulting in the suppression of neurotransmitter release at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses, and they serve a critical role in the spatiotemporal regulation of both short- and long-term synaptic plasticity that supports adaptive learning of reward-motivated behaviors. However, mechanisms of eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity in reward areas of the brain are impaired following exposure to drugs of abuse. Because of this, it is theorized that maladaptive eCB signaling may contribute to the development and maintenance of addiction-related behavior. Here we review various forms of eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity present in regions of the brain involved in reward and reinforcement and explore the potential physiological relevance of maladaptive eCB signaling to addiction vulnerability.

  18. Amprenavir complexes with HIV-1 protease and its drug-resistant mutants altering hydrophobic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-10-22

    The structural and kinetic effects of amprenavir (APV), a clinical HIV protease (PR) inhibitor, were analyzed with wild-type enzyme and mutants with single substitutions of V32I, I50V, I54V, I54M, I84V and L90M that are common in drug resistance. Crystal structures of the APV complexes at resolutions of 1.02-1.85 {angstrom} reveal the structural changes due to the mutations. Substitution of the larger side chains in PR{sub V32I}, PR{sub I54M} and PR{sub L90M} resulted in the formation of new hydrophobic contacts with flap residues, residues 79 and 80, and Asp25, respectively. Mutation to smaller side chains eliminated hydrophobic interactions in the PR{sub I50V} and PR{sub I54V} structures. The PR{sub I84V}-APV complex had lost hydrophobic contacts with APV, the PR{sub V32I}-APV complex showed increased hydrophobic contacts within the hydrophobic cluster and the PR{sub I50V} complex had weaker polar and hydrophobic interactions with APV. The observed structural changes in PR{sub I84V}-APV, PR{sub V32I}-APV and PR{sub I50V}-APV were related to their reduced inhibition by APV of six-, 10- and 30-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type PR. The APV complexes were compared with the corresponding saquinavir complexes. The PR dimers had distinct rearrangements of the flaps and 80's loops that adapt to the different P1{prime} groups of the inhibitors, while maintaining contacts within the hydrophobic cluster. These small changes in the loops and weak internal interactions produce the different patterns of resistant mutations for the two drugs.

  19. Ligand-Dependent Modulation of G Protein Conformation Alters Drug Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Furness, Sebastian George Barton; Liang, Yi-Lynn; Nowell, Cameron James; Halls, Michelle Louise; Wookey, Peter John; Dal Maso, Emma; Inoue, Asuka; Christopoulos, Arthur; Wootten, Denise; Sexton, Patrick Michael

    2016-10-20

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, mediated by hetero-trimeric G proteins, can be differentially controlled by agonists. At a molecular level, this is thought to occur principally via stabilization of distinct receptor conformations by individual ligands. These distinct conformations control subsequent recruitment of transducer and effector proteins. Here, we report that ligand efficacy at the calcitonin GPCR (CTR) is also correlated with ligand-dependent alterations to G protein conformation. We observe ligand-dependent differences in the sensitivity of the G protein ternary complex to disruption by GTP, due to conformational differences in the receptor-bound G protein hetero-trimer. This results in divergent agonist-dependent receptor-residency times for the hetero-trimeric G protein and different accumulation rates for downstream second messengers. This study demonstrates that factors influencing efficacy extend beyond receptor conformation(s) and expands understanding of the molecular basis for how G proteins control/influence efficacy. This has important implications for the mechanisms that underlie ligand-mediated biased agonism. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  20. Intratumoral Delivery of β-Lapachone via Polymer Implants for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Chin, Shook-Fong; Blanco, Elvin; Bey, Erik A; Kabbani, Wareef; Xie, Xian-Jin; Bornmann, William G.; Boothman, David A.; Gao, Jinming

    2010-01-01

    Purpose β-Lapachone (β-lap, ARQ 501) is a novel anticancer agent with selectivity against prostate cancer cells over-expressing the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) enzyme. Lack of solubility and an efficient drug delivery strategy limits this compound in clinical applications. In this study, we aimed to develop β-lap-containing polymer implants (millirods) for direct implantation into prostate tumors to test the hypothesis that the combination of a tumor-specific anticancer agent with site-specific release of the agent will lead to significant antitumor efficacy. Experimental Design Survival assays in vitro were used to test β-lap killing effect in different prostate cancer cells. β-Lap release kinetics from millirods was determined both in vitro and in vivo. PC-3 prostate tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice were employed for antitumor efficacy studies in vivo. Results β-Lap killed three different prostate cancer cell lines in an NQO1-dependent manner. Upon incorporation of solid-state inclusion complexes of β-lap with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβ-CD) into poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) millirods, β-lap release kinetics in vivo showed a burst release of ~0.5 mg within 12 h and a subsequently sustained release of the drug (~0.4 mg/kg/day) comparable to that observed in vitro. Antitumor efficacy studies demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition by β-lap millirods compared to controls (p value <0.0001, n =10/group). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that tumor-bearing mice treated with β-lap millirods survived nearly two-fold longer than controls, without observable systemic toxicity. Conclusions Intratumoral delivery of β-lap using polymer millirods demonstrated the promising therapeutic potential for human prostate tumors. PMID:19118040

  1. Drug-induced alterations in gene expression of the asexual blood forms of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Anusha Munasinghe; Patankar, Swati; Schug, Jonathan; Eisen, Geoffrey; Wirth, Dyann F

    2003-11-01

    The complete genome sequence of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum [Gardner, M.J., Hall, N., Fung, E., White, O., Berriman, M., and Hyman, R.W. (2002) Nature 419: 498-510; Hyman, R.W., Fung, E., Conway, A., Kurdi, O., Mao, J., Miranda, M. et al. (2002) Nature 419: 534-537], has provided researchers with the informational base for establishing genomic [Volkman, S.K., Hartl, D.L., Wirth, D.F., Nielsen, K.M., Choi, M., Batalov, S., et al. (2002) Science 298: 216-218], proteomic [Florens, L., Washburn, M.P.J.D.R., Anthony, R.M., Grainger, M., Haynes, J.D., et al. (2002) Nature 419: 520-526; Lasonder, E., Ishihama, Y., Anderson, J.S., Vermunt, A.M.W., Pain, A., Sauerwein, R.W., et al. (2002) Nature 419: 537-542] and genome-wide RNA expression [Ben Mamoun, C., Gluzman, I.Y., Hott, C., MacMillan, S.K., Amarakone, A.S., Anderson, D.L., et al. (2001) Mol Microbiol 39: 26-36; Hayward, R.E., Derisi, J.L., Alfadhli, S., Kaslow, D.C., Brown, P.O., and Rathod, P.K. (2000) Mol Microbiol 35: 6-14] analyses in this system. In fact, we have previously utilized SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) to identify abundant loci that probably constitute part of the active metabolome [Patankar, S., Munasinghe, A., Shoaibi, A., Cummings, L.M., and Wirth, D.F. (2001) Mol Biol Cell 12: 3114-3125], as well as to characterize antisense transcription on a global scale in Plasmodium. In the present study, the comprehensive annotation of SAGE libraries derived from an asexual stage population exposed to drug and its matched control was used to assess the modulation of gene expression by chloroquine. Here, we observed a constellation of changes, with the differential regulation of over 100 transcripts, and have confirmed the data by alternate methods. A few responsive loci, including PfMDR1, have previously been implicated in the mechanism of chloroquine action/resistance. Several others, however, were derived from unexpected categories, including a large number of unknown open

  2. Malaria parasite mutants with altered erythrocyte permeability: a new drug resistance mechanism and important molecular tool

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David A; Desai, Sanjay A

    2010-01-01

    Erythrocytes infected with plasmodia, including those that cause human malaria, have increased permeability to a diverse collection of organic and inorganic solutes. While these increases have been known for decades, their mechanistic basis was unclear until electrophysiological studies revealed flux through one or more ion channels on the infected erythrocyte membrane. Current debates have centered on the number of distinct ion channels, which channels mediate the transport of each solute and whether the channels represent parasite-encoded proteins or human channels activated after infection. This article reviews the identification of the plasmodial surface anion channel and other proposed channels with an emphasis on two distinct channel mutants generated through in vitro selection. These mutants implicate parasite genetic elements in the parasite-induced permeability, reveal an important new antimalarial drug resistance mechanism and provide tools for molecular studies. We also critically examine the technical issues relevant to the detection of ion channels by electrophysiological methods; these technical considerations have general applicability for interpreting studies of various ion channels proposed for the infected erythrocyte membrane. PMID:20020831

  3. Psychotropic drugs in mixture alter swimming behaviour of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) larvae above environmental concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chiffre, Axelle; Clérandeau, Christelle; Dwoinikoff, Charline; Le Bihanic, Florane; Budzinski, Hélène; Geret, Florence; Cachot, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric pharmaceuticals, such as anxiolytics, sedatives, hypnotics and antidepressors, are among the most prescribed active substances in the world. The occurrence of these compounds in the environment, as well as the adverse effects they can have on non-target organisms, justifies the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. This study aims to analyse the effects of six psychotropic drugs, valproate, cyamemazine, citalopram, sertraline, fluoxetine and oxazepam, on the survival and locomotion of Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes larvae. Newly hatched Japanese medaka were exposed to individual compounds for 72 h, at concentrations ranging from 10 μg L(-1) to 10 mg L(-1). Lethal concentrations 50 % (LC50) were estimated at 840, 841 and 9,136 μg L(-1) for fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram, respectively, while other compounds did not induce any significant increase in mortality. Analysis of the swimming behaviour of larvae, including total distance moved, mobility and location, provided an estimated lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) of 10 μg L(-1) for citalopram and oxazepam, 12.2 μg L(-1) for cyamemazine, 100 μg L(-1) for fluoxetine, 1,000 μg L(-1) for sertraline and >10,000 μg L(-1) for valproate. Realistic environmental mixture of the six psychotropic compounds induced disruption of larval locomotor behaviour at concentrations about 10- to 100-fold greater than environmental concentrations.

  4. Altered microtubule dynamics in neurodegenerative disease: Therapeutic potential of microtubule-stabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Brunden, Kurt R; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Smith, Amos B; Trojanowski, John Q; Ballatore, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by deficiencies in neuronal axonal transport, a process in which cellular cargo is shuttled with the aid of molecular motors from the cell body to axonal termini and back along microtubules (MTs). Proper axonal transport is critical to the normal functioning of neurons, and impairments in this process could contribute to the neuronal damage and death that is characteristic of neurodegenerative disease. Although the causes of axonal transport abnormalities may vary among the various neurodegenerative conditions, in many cases it appears that the transport deficiencies result from a diminution of axonal MT stability. Here we review the evidence of MT abnormalities in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and traumatic brain injury, and highlight the potential benefit of MT-stabilizing agents in improving axonal transport and nerve function in these diseases. Moreover, we discuss the challenges associated with the utilization of MT-stabilizing drugs as therapeutic candidates for neurodegenerative conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sexual differentiation of the brain: a model for drug-induced alterations of the reproductive system

    SciTech Connect

    Gorski, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    The process of the sexual differentiation of the brain represents a valuable model system for the study of the chemical modification of the mammalian brain. Although there are numerous functional and structural sex differences in the adult brain, these are imposed on an essentially feminine or bipotential brain by testicular hormones during a critical phase of perinatal development in the rat. It is suggested that a relatively marked structural sex difference in the rat brain, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA), is a morphological signature of the permanent or organizational action of estradiol derived from the aromatization of testicular testosterone. The SDN-POA of the male rat is severalfold larger in volume and is composed of more neurons than that of the female. The observation that the mitotic formation of the neurons of the SDN-POA is specifically prolonged has enabled us to identify the time course and pathway of neuronal migration into the nucleus. Study of the development of the SDN-POA suggests that estradiol in the male increases the number of neurons which survive a phase of neuronal death by exerting a neurite growth promoting action and/or a direct neuronotrophic action. Finally, although it is clear that gonadal hormones have dramatic permanent effects on the brain during perinatal development, even after puberty and in adulthood gonadal steroids can alter neuronal structure and, perhaps as a corollary to this, have permanent effects on reproductive function. Although the brain may be most sensitive to gonadal hormones or exogenous chemical factors during perinatal development, such as sensitivity does not appear limited to this period.

  6. Age, drugs, or disease: what alters the macrostructure of sleep in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Trautmann, Ellen; Mollenhauer, Brit; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2012-10-01

    To describe the alterations in the macrostructure of sleep in a large cohort of sleep-disturbed patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and investigate influencing factors. A cohort of sleep-disturbed but otherwise unselected PD patients (n=351) was investigated with video-supported polysomnography. We analyzed the influence of age, disease duration, disease severity, and dopaminergic medication on subjective sleep perception, sleep efficiency, the amount of slow wave sleep, awakenings, periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Sleep efficiency and slow wave sleep decreased with age (p=0.003 and p=0.041, respectively). The number of awakenings and the frequency of RBD increased with age (p=0.028 and p=0.006, respectively). Higher Hoehn & Yahr stages were associated with more PLMS (p=0.017). A higher daily dose of levodopa corresponded to more RBD (p<0.001). Neither disease duration nor levodopa dosage had any influence on sleep efficiency, slow wave sleep, awakenings, or PLMS. Dopamine agonists increased awakenings (p<0.001) and lowered PLMS (p<0.001). Subjective sleep perception was not influenced by any of the factors analyzed. The only path model that could be replicated identified disease severity and dopamine agonists as interdependent factors influencing awakenings and PLMS. Age leads to less sleep and a higher risk for RBD, and disease severity increases motor phenomena such as PLMS; dopamine agonists reduce PLMS but increase awakenings. No single factor analyzed influenced subjective sleep perception in this cohort of sleep disturbed PD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of peritumoral and intratumoral budding in esophageal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Thies, Svenja; Guldener, Lars; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Zlobec, Inti; Koelzer, Viktor H; Lugli, Alessandro; Kröll, Dino; Seiler, Christian A; Feith, Marcus; Langer, Rupert

    2016-06-01

    Tumor budding has prognostic significance in many carcinomas and is defined as the presence of detached isolated single cells or small cell clusters up to 5 cells at the invasion front (peritumoral budding [PTB]) or within the tumor (intratumoral budding [ITB]). For esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs), there are currently only few data about the impact of this morphological feature. We investigated tumor budding in a large collective of 200 primarily resected EACs. Pancytokeratin staining was demonstrated to be superior to hematoxylin and eosin staining for the detection of buds with substantial to excellent interobserver agreement and used for subsequent analysis. PTB and ITB were scored across 10 high-power fields (HPFs). The median count of tumor buds was 130/10 HPFs for PTB (range, 2-593) and 80/10 HPFs for ITB (range, 1-656). PTB and ITB correlated significantly with each other (r = 0.9; P < .001). High PTB and ITB rates were seen in more advanced tumor categories (P < .001 each); tumors with lymph node metastases (P < .001/P = .002); and lymphatic, vascular, and perineural invasion and higher tumor grading (P < .001 each). Survival analysis showed an association with worse survival for high-grade ITB (P = .029) but not PTB (P = .385). However, in multivariate analysis, lymph node and resection status, but not ITB, were independent prognostic parameters. In conclusion, PTB and ITB can be observed in EAC to various degrees. High-grade budding is associated with aggressive tumor phenotype. Assessment of tumor budding, especially ITB, may provide additional prognostic information about tumor behavior and may be useful in specific cases for risk stratification of EAC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MK-801 alters Na+, K+-ATPase activity and oxidative status in zebrafish brain: reversal by antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kelly Juliana; da Luz Oliveira, Renata; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Scherer, Emilene B S; Schmitz, Felipe; Wyse, Angela T S; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2012-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating mental disorder with a global prevalence of 1% and its etiology remains poorly understood. In the current study we investigated the influence of antipsychotic drugs on the effects of MK-801 administration, which is a drug that mimics biochemical changes observed in schizophrenia, on Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity and some parameters of oxidative stress in zebrafish brain. Our results showed that MK-801 treatment significantly decreased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, and all antipsychotics tested prevented such effects. Acute MK-801 treatment did not alter reactive oxygen/nitrogen species by 2'7'-dichlorofluorscein (H2DCF) oxidation assay, but increased the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), when compared with controls. Some antipsychotics such as sulpiride, olanzapine, and haloperidol prevented the increase of TBARS caused by MK-801. These findings indicate oxidative damage might be a mechanism involved in the decrease of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity induced by MK-801. The parameters evaluated in this study had not yet been tested in this animal model using the MK-801, suggesting that zebrafish is an animal model that can contribute for providing information on potential treatments and disease characteristics.

  9. Alteration of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis following anti-tuberculosis drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Imran Hussain; Ahmed, Albin Mostaque; Choudhuri, Subhadip; Sen, Aditi; Hazra, Avijit; Pal, Nishith Kumar; Bhattacharya, Basudev; Bahar, Bojlul

    2014-11-01

    Active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) is associated with a failure of the host immune system to control the invading Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The objective of this study was to quantify and assess the role of serum inflammatory cytokines in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients following anti-tuberculosis drug (ATD) therapy. Blood samples were collected from APTB patients and normal healthy subjects (NHS) (total n=204) at baseline and 2, 4 and 6 months post-therapy and the abundance of serum inflammatory cytokines were measured by cytokine specific ELISA. Compared to NHS, APTB patients at baseline had higher levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 (P<0.001), IFN-γ (P<0.001), TNF-α (P<0.01), IL-1β (P<0.001) and IL-6 (P<0.001) and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 (P<0.001) and TGF-β1 (P<0.001) while there was no change in the level of IL-4. In APTB patients, the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β1 directly relate to the bacterial load while the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 relate to radiological severity. At baseline, the IL-6 level in NHS and APTB patients differed most and following ATD therapy, this level rapidly decreased and stabilized by 4-month in APTB patients. It is concluded that a subtle reduction in the serum level of IL-6 of the APTB patients following ATD therapy might play a vital role in immune-protection of the host against Mtb infection and hence the serum IL-6 level can be a useful marker to diagnose the effectiveness of therapy in the patients.

  10. Comparison of circulating and intratumoral regulatory T cells in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Asma, Gati; Amal, Gorrab; Raja, Marrakchi; Amine, Derouiche; Mohammed, Chebil; Amel, Ben Ammar Elgaaied

    2015-05-01

    The clear evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) exists in the tumor microenvironment raises the question why renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progresses. Numerous studies support the implication of CD4(+)CD25(high) regulatory T (Treg) cells in RCC development. We aimed in this study to characterize the phenotype and function of circulating and intratumoral Treg cells of RCC patient in order to evaluate their implication in the inhibition of the local antitumor immune response. Our results demonstrate that the proportion of Treg in TIL was, in average, similar to that found in circulating CD4(+) T cells of patients or healthy donors. However, intratumoral Treg exhibit a marked different phenotype when compared with the autologous circulating Treg. A higher CD25 mean level, HLA-DR, Fas, and GITR, and a lower CD45RA expression were observed in intratumoral Treg, suggesting therefore that these cells are effector in the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, intratumoral Treg showed a higher inhibitory function on autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells when compared with circulating Treg that may be explained by an overexpression of FoxP3 transcription factor. These findings suggest that intratumoral Treg could be major actors in the impairment of local antitumor immune response for RCC patients.

  11. Chronic cigarette smoking is linked with structural alterations in brain regions showing acute nicotinic drug-induced functional modulations.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Matthew T; Riedel, Michael C; Flannery, Jessica S; Yanes, Julio A; Fox, Peter T; Stein, Elliot A; Laird, Angela R

    2016-06-02

    Whereas acute nicotine administration alters brain function which may, in turn, contribute to enhanced attention and performance, chronic cigarette smoking is linked with regional brain atrophy and poorer cognition. However, results from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies comparing smokers versus nonsmokers have been inconsistent and measures of gray matter possess limited ability to inform functional relations or behavioral implications. The purpose of this study was to address these interpretational challenges through meta-analytic techniques in the service of clarifying the impact of chronic smoking on gray matter integrity and more fully contextualizing such structural alterations. We first conducted a coordinate-based meta-analysis of structural MRI studies to identify consistent structural alterations associated with chronic smoking. Subsequently, we conducted two additional meta-analytic assessments to enhance insight into potential functional and behavioral relations. Specifically, we performed a multimodal meta-analytic assessment to test the structural-functional hypothesis that smoking-related structural alterations overlapped those same regions showing acute nicotinic drug-induced functional modulations. Finally, we employed database driven tools to identify pairs of structurally impacted regions that were also functionally related via meta-analytic connectivity modeling, and then delineated behavioral phenomena associated with such functional interactions via behavioral decoding. Across studies, smoking was associated with convergent structural decreases in the left insula, right cerebellum, parahippocampus, multiple prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions, and the thalamus. Indicating a structural-functional relation, we observed that smoking-related gray matter decreases overlapped with the acute functional effects of nicotinic agonist administration in the left insula, ventromedial PFC, and mediodorsal thalamus. Suggesting structural

  12. Holmium-loaded PLLA nanoparticles for intratumoral radiotherapy via the TMT technique: preparation, characterization, and stability evaluation after neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hamoudeh, Misara; Fessi, Hatem; Salim, Hani; Barbos, Dumitru

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the preparation of biocompatible radioactive holmium-loaded particles with appropriate nanoscale size for radionuclide intratumoral administration by the targeted multitherapy (TMT) technique. For this objective, holmium acetylacetonate has been encapsulated in poly-L-lactide (PLLA)-based nanoparticles (NP) by oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method. NP sizes ranged between 100 and 1,100 m being suitable for the TMT administration method. Elemental holmium loading was found to be around 18% wt/wt and the holmium acetylacetonate trihydrate (HoAcAc) encapsulation efficacy was about 90%. Different experiments demonstrated an amorphous state of HoAcAc after incorporation in NPs. The NPs were irradiated in a nuclear reactor with a neutron flux of 1.1 x 10(13) n/cm(2)/s for 1 h, which yielded a specific activity of about 27.4 GBq/g of NPs being sufficient for our desired application. Microscopic analysis of irradiated NPs showed some alteration after neutron irradiation as some NPs looked partially coagglomerated and a few pores appeared at their surface because of the locally released heat in the irradiation vials. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicated a clear decrease in PLLA melting point and melting enthalpy reflecting a decrease in polymer crystallinity. This was accompanied by a clear decrease in polymer molecular weights, which can be ascribed to a radiation-induced chain scission mechanism. However, interestingly, other experiments confirmed the chemical identity retention of both HoAcAc and PLLA in irradiated NPs despite this detected decrease in the polymer crystallinity and molecular weight. Although neutron irradiation has induced some NPs damage, these NPs kept out their overall chemical composition, and their size distribution remained suitable for the TMT administration technique. Coupled with the TMT technique, these NPs may represent a novel potential radiopharmaceutical agent for

  13. Peri-tumoral leakage during intra-tumoral convection-enhanced delivery has implications for efficacy of peri-tumoral infusion before removal of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoliang; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamura, Taigen; Zhang, Rong; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant brain tumors, infiltrating tumor cells that exist at the tumor-surrounding brain tissue always escape from cytoreductive surgery and, protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB), survive the adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, eventually leading to tumor recurrence. Local interstitial delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a promising strategy to target these cells. During our effort to develop effective drug delivery methods by intra-tumoral infusion of chemotherapeutic agents, we found consistent pattern of leakage from the tumor. Here we describe our findings and propose promising strategy to cover the brain tissue surrounding the tumor with therapeutic agents by means of convection-enhanced delivery. First, the intracranial tumor isograft model was used to define patterns of leakage from tumor mass after intra-tumoral infusion of the chemotherapeutic agents. Liposomal doxorubicin, although first distributed inside the tumor, distributed diffusely into the surrounding normal brain once the leakage happen. Trypan blue dye was used to evaluate the distribution pattern of peri-tumoral infusions. When infused intra- or peri-tumorally, infusates distributed robustly into the tumor border. Subsequently, volume of distributions with different infusion scheduling; including intra-tumoral infusion, peri-tumoral infusion after tumor resection, peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal with or without systemic infusion of steroids, were compared with Evans-blue dye. Peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal resulted in maximum volume of distribution. Prior use of steroids further increased the volume of distribution. Local interstitial drug delivery targeting tumor surrounding brain tissue before tumor removal should be more effective when targeting the invading cells.

  14. Multiregion sequencing reveals the intratumor heterogeneity of driver mutations in TP53-driven non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le-Le; Kan, Mengyuan; Zhang, Man-Man; Yu, Sha-Sha; Xie, Hui-Jun; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Hai-Ning; Zhao, Shuang-Xia; Zhou, Guang-Biao; Song, Huai-Dong; Zheng, Cui-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may account for resistance after a period of targeted therapies because drugs destroy only a portion of tumor cells. The recognition of ITH helps identify high-risk patients to make effective treatment decisions. However, ITH studies are confounded by interpatient heterogeneity in NSCLC and a large amount of passenger mutations. To address these issues, we recruited NSCLC patients carrying TP53 mutations and selected driver mutations within recurrently mutated genes in NSCLC. A total of 12-paired normal-tumor tissues were subjected to whole-genome/whole-exome sequencing. From these, 367 non-silent mutations were selected as driver mutations and deeply sequenced in 61 intratumoral microdissections. We identified a universal prevalence of heterogeneity in all 12 tumors, indicating branched evolution. Although TP53 mutations were observed in single biopsy of all 12 tumors, most tumors consist of both TP53 mutated and non-mutated cells in separate regions within the same tumor. This suggests the late molecular timing of the acquisition of TP53 mutations; therefore, the detection of TP53 mutations in a single biopsy may simply not reflect the early malignant potential. In addition, we identified regions of loss of heterozygosity surrounding TP53 and CDKN2A mutations in tumor 711, which also exhibited heterogeneity in different regional samples. Because the ITH of driver mutations likely has clinical consequences, further efforts are needed to limit the impact of ITH and to improve therapeutic efficiency, which will benefit NSCLC patients receiving targeted treatments.

  15. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with intratumoral and nodal extramedullary megakaryopoiesis: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Mast, Kelley J; Cheng, Liang; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is occasionally associated with erythrocytosis, hypothesized to result from tumoral production of erythropoietin. Rarely, intratumoral erythropoiesis has been identified, although intratumoral megakaryopoiesis has not, to our knowledge, been previously described. We report the case of an 81-year-old man with myelofibrosis who underwent resection of a 9.8-cm clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Numerous megakaryocytes were present within the renal cell carcinoma; regional lymph nodes; and, to a lesser extent, the nonneoplastic kidney, glomeruli, and renal hilar soft tissue, in some areas associated with trilineage hematopoiesis. Immunohistochemistry verified the megakaryocytic lineage of the atypical cells (CD61, CD42b, and von Willebrand factor +; cytokeratin -). Intratumoral extramedullary megakaryopoiesis is a novel finding in clear cell renal cell carcinoma with potential to mimic high-grade carcinoma and involvement of lymph nodes. Careful attention to morphology, presence of other hematopoietic elements, and immunoprofile can facilitate recognition of this rare phenomenon.

  16. Intratumoral oestrone sulphatase activity as a prognostic marker in human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. R.; Rowlands, M. G.; Law, M.; Coombes, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Oestrone sulphatase is an important source of local synthesis of biologically active oestrogens in human breast cancer. The oestrone sulphatase enzyme in the particulate fraction of human breast carcinoma was characterised. The Km was 8.91 microM, and the Vmax was 0.022 nmol min-1 mg-1. Oestrone sulphatase activity was detected in 93 of 104 human breast carcinoma samples (89%), and mean activity was 0.041 nmol min-1 mg-1 (range 0-0.399 nmol min-1 mg-1). There was no significant correlation between intratumoral oestrone sulphatase activity and oestrogen receptor status, or with any other prognostic factors. Intratumoral enzyme levels were not associated with time to recurrence or with overall survival time. It thus appears that, although a useful source of intratumoral oestrogens, oestrone sulphatase activity is not of prognostic significance in breast carcinoma. PMID:8123487

  17. Intratumoral Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Hyperthermia and Radiation Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoopes, Pj; Strawbridge, Rr; Gibson, Uj; Zeng, Q; Pierce, Ze; Savellano, M; Tate, Ja; Ogden, Ja; Baker, I; Ivkov, R; Foreman, Ar

    2007-02-13

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 × 10(6)) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm(3) +/- 50 mm(3). Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia

  18. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  19. Intratumoral regulatory T cells with higher prevalence and more suppressive activity in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Chen, Pei; Liao, Rui; Li, Yi-Wei; Yi, Yong; Wang, Jia-Xing; Cai, Xiao-Yan; He, Hong-Wei; Jin, Jian-Jun; Cheng, Yun-Feng; Fan, Jia; Sun, Jian; Qiu, Shuang-Jian

    2013-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a vital role in immunosuppressive crosstalk; however, Tregs from different locations lead to different clinical outcomes. Our aim was, therefore, to compare the prevalences and suppressive phenotypes of Tregs in the peripheral blood, peritumor, and intratumor of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS : The frequencies and phenotypes of CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low/-) CD49d(-) Tregs in the periphery, peritumor, and intratumor of 78 HCC patients and 12 healthy controls were evaluated by flow cytometry. Treg-cell suppressive activity was determined using an in vitro CD154 expression assay. Tregs from tumor and paired peritumor were then hybridized using an Agilent whole genome oligo microarray, and selected genes were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Functional analysis of the microarray data was performed using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology analyses. RESULTS : Intratumoral Tregs exhibited higher frequencies and more suppressive phenotypic functions than those in peritumor and periphery, whereas there was no difference between the latter two. Functional analysis showed that complement cascades, p53, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor biosynthesis pathways were significantly upregulated in intratumoral Tregs; the salivary secretion pathway was significantly downregulated in intratumoral Tregs, and immune cells and tumor-immuno-related Gene Ontology terms were significantly affected. CONCLUSIONS : Tregs in different locations exhibited different functional statuses. A higher prevalence and more suppressive phenotype suggested a critical role for intratumoral Tregs in the formation of multicellular immunosuppressive networks. HCC immunotherapy may be improved, therefore, by specific locational Tregs elimination or suppression. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Intratumoral injection of BCG-CWS-pretreated dendritic cells following tumor cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Naoshi; Udagawa, Masaru; Fujita, Tomonobu; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral administration of dendritic cells (DC) following cryoablation of tumor is one of the personalized cancer immunotherapies which is able to induce immune responses to multiple endogenous tumor antigens, including shared and unique antigens. Here we describe protocols of cryoablation of tumors, generation of cultured DC, pretreatment of DC with a Toll-like receptor (TLR)-stimulating purified component of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall fraction (BCG-CWS) and highly immunogenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) antigen, and combined use of tumor cryoablation and intratumoral administration of BCG-CWS-pretreated DC in both a murine model and cancer patients.

  1. In vivo assessment of intratumoral aspirin injection to treat hepatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Saad-Hossne, Rogério; Teixeira, Fábio Vieira; Denadai, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the antineoplastic efficacy of 10% aspirin intralesional injection on VX2 hepatic tumors in a rabbit model. METHODS: Thirty-two male rabbits (age: 6-9 wk; body weight: 1700-2500 g) were inoculated with VX2 hepatic tumor cells (104 cells/rabbit) via supra-umbilical median laparotomy. On day 4 post-implantation, when the tumors were about 1 cm in diameter, the rabbits were randomly divided into the following groups (n = 8 each group) to assess early (24 h) and late (7 d) antineoplastic effects of intratumoral injection of 10% bicarbonate aspirin solution (experimental groups) in comparison to intratumoral injection of physiological saline solution (control groups): group 1, 24 h control; group 2, 24 h experimental; group 3, 7 d control; group 4, 7 d experimental. The serum biochemistry profile (measurements of glycemia, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase) and body weight measurements were obtained for all animals at the following time points: D0, before tumor implant; D4, day of treatment; D5, day of sacrifice for groups 1 and 2; D11, day of sacrifice for groups 3 and 4. Gross assessments of the abdominal and thoracic cavities were carried out upon sacrifice. The resected liver tissues, including hepatic tumors, were qualitatively (general morphology, signs of necrosis) and quantitatively (tumor area) assessed by histopathological analysis. RESULTS: Gross examination showed no alterations, besides the left hepatic lobe tumors, had occurred in the thoracic and abdominal cavities of any animal at any time point evaluated. However, the features of the tumor foci were distinctive between the groups. Compared to the control groups, which showed normal unabated tumor progression, the aspirin-treated groups showed imprecise but limited tumor boundaries and a general red-white coloration (indicating hemorrhaging) at 24 h post-treatment, and development of yellow-white areas of a cicatricial

  2. Alterations in plasma dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity in depression and schizophrenia: effects of antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; De Meester, I; Scharpe, S; Desnyder, R; Ranjan, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Recently, our laboratory reported that the activity of dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV) was significantly lower in the peripheral blood of major depressed patients than in normal controls. The present study examines plasma DPP IV activity in 43 major depressed and 13 schizophrenic subjects versus 21 normal controls and the effects of antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs on plasma DPP IV activity. DPP IV activity was significantly lower in major depressed subjects than in normal controls and schizophrenic subjects. There was a trend towards higher DPP IV activity in schizophrenic patients than in normal controls. There were no significant effects of antidepressants or neuroleptics on plasma DPP IV activity in depressed and schizophrenic patients, respectively. There were no significant relationships between plasma DPP IV activity and plasma cortisol or immune-inflammatory markers, such as serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) or soluble IL-2 receptor. A significant and positive correlation was found between plasma DPP IV and prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) enzyme activity in the study group as a whole and in schizophrenic subjects. The results support the hypothesis that lower and higher plasma DPP IV activities are trait markers of major depression and schizophrenia, respectively. It is concluded that alterations in the enzyme activity of peptidases, such as DPP IV and PEP, play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression and schizophrenia.

  3. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lindenbach, D; Conti, M M; Ostock, C Y; Dupre, K B; Bishop, C

    2015-12-03

    Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression is altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD/dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD/dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets.

  4. [Alterations in the decision making processes linked to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in drug-abusing patients].

    PubMed

    Verdejo, A; Aguilar de Arcos, F; Pérez García, M

    The somatic marker hypothesis proposes that somatic signals guide the decision making processes in an adaptive sense for the organism. The processing of these somatic signals is linked to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity. The influence of somatic markers on decision making processes has been studied by means of the 'gambling task' (GT). Several studies using the GT in substance abusers have showed the existence of decision making impairments in these patients. To examine the performance in the GT of a Spanish sample of substance abusers; and to study the influence of clinically relevant variables: type of substance, years of abuse and abstinence period on GT performance. 106 substance abusers patients during the dishabituation phase participated in the study. We administered a computerized version of the GT in a single individual session. We used descriptive analyses to study the patients' performance in the GT. Next we carried out multiple regression analyses to study the influence of the clinical variables on the GT performance. A 76.4% of the sample patients showed impairments in the decision making processes measured by the GT. None of the clinical variables significantly predicted performance in the task. These results suggest the existence of decision making impairments in substance abusers that may be related to pre morbid alterations, or to a neurotoxic effect of drugs of abuse on the activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

  5. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-Parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Lindenbach, David; Conti, Melissa M.; Ostock, Corinne Y.; Dupre, Kristin B.; Bishop, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression are altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD / dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD / dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets. PMID:26363150

  6. Expression of CD133 and CD44 in glioblastoma stem cells correlates with cell proliferation, phenotype stability and intra-tumor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daniel V.; Filiz, Gulay; Daniel, Paul M.; Hollande, Frédéric; Dworkin, Sebastian; Amiridis, Stephanie; Kountouri, Nicole; Ng, Wayne; Morokoff, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a heterogeneous tumor of the brain with a poor prognosis due to recurrence and drug resistance following therapy. Genome-wide profiling has revealed the existence of distinct GBM molecular subtypes that respond differently to aggressive therapies. Despite this, molecular subtype does not predict recurrence or drug resistance and overall survival is similar across subtypes. One of the key features contributing to tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy is proposed to be an underlying subpopulation of resistant glioma stem cells (GSC). CD133 expression has been used as a marker of GSCs, however recent evidence suggests the relationship between CD133 expression, GSCs and molecular subtype is more complex than initially proposed. The expression of CD133, Olig2 and CD44 was investigated using patient derived glioma stem-like cells (PDGCs) in vitro and in vivo. Different PDGCs exhibited a characteristic equilibrium of distinct CD133+ and CD44+ subpopulations and the influence of environmental factors on the intra-tumor equilibrium of CD133+ and CD44+ cells in PDGCs was also investigated, with hypoxia inducing a CD44+ to CD133+ shift and chemo-radiotherapy inducing a CD133+ to CD44+ shift. These data suggest that surveillance and modulation of intra-tumor heterogeneity using molecular markers at initial surgery and surgery for recurrent GBM may be important for more effective management of GBM. PMID:28241049

  7. Comedications alter drug-induced liver injury reporting frequency: Data mining in the WHO VigiBase™.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ayako; Yuen, Nancy A; Ilic, Katarina; Miller, Richard T; Reese, Melinda J; Brown, H Roger; Ambroso, Jeffrey I; Falls, J Gregory; Hunt, Christine M

    2015-08-01

    Polypharmacy is common, and may modify mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury. We examined the effect of these drug-drug interactions on liver safety reports of four drugs highly associated with hepatotoxicity. In the WHO VigiBase™, liver event reports were examined for acetaminophen, isoniazid, valproic acid, and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Then, we evaluated the liver event reporting frequency of these 4 drugs in the presence of co-reported medications. Each of the 4 primary drugs was reported as having more than 2000 liver events, and co-reported with more than 600 different medications. Overall, the effect of 2275 co-reported drugs (316 drug classes) on the reporting frequency was analyzed. Decreased liver event reporting frequency was associated with 245 drugs/122 drug classes, including anti-TNFα, opioids, and folic acid. Increased liver event reporting frequency was associated with 170 drugs/82 drug classes; in particular, halogenated hydrocarbons, carboxamides, and bile acid sequestrants. After adjusting for age, gender, and other co-reported drug classes, multiple co-reported drug classes were significantly associated with decreased/increased liver event reporting frequency in a drug-specific/unspecific manner. In conclusion, co-reported medications were associated with changes in the liver event reporting frequency of drugs commonly associated with hepatotoxicity, suggesting that comedications may modify drug hepatic safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comedications alter drug-induced liver injury reporting frequency: Data mining in the WHO VigiBase™

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ayako; Yuen, Nancy A.; Ilic, Katarina; Miller, Richard T.; Reese, Melinda J.; Brown, H. Roger; Ambroso, Jeffrey I.; Falls, J. Gregory; Hunt, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Polypharmacy is common, and may modify mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury. We examined the effect of these drug–drug interactions on liver safety reports of four drugs highly associated with hepatotoxicity. In the WHO VigiBase™, liver event reports were examined for acetaminophen, isoniazid, valproic acid, and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Then, we evaluated the liver event reporting frequency of these 4 drugs in the presence of co-reported medications. Each of the 4 primary drugs was reported as having more than 2000 liver events, and co-reported with more than 600 different medications. Overall, the effect of 2275 co-reported drugs (316 drug classes) on the reporting frequency was analyzed. Decreased liver event reporting frequency was associated with 245 drugs/122 drug classes, including anti-TNFα, opioids, and folic acid. Increased liver event reporting frequency was associated with 170 drugs/82 drug classes; in particular, halogenated hydrocarbons, carboxamides, and bile acid sequestrants. After adjusting for age, gender, and other co-reported drug classes, multiple co-reported drug classes were significantly associated with decreased/increased liver event reporting frequency in a drug-specific/unspecific manner. In conclusion, co-reported medications were associated with changes in the liver event reporting frequency of drugs commonly associated with hepatotoxicity, suggesting that comedications may modify drug hepatic safety. PMID:25988394

  9. Interrogation of individual intratumoral B lymphocytes from lung cancer patients for molecular target discovery.

    PubMed

    Campa, Michael J; Moody, M Anthony; Zhang, Ruijun; Liao, Hua-Xin; Gottlin, Elizabeth B; Patz, Edward F

    2016-02-01

    Intratumoral B lymphocytes are an integral part of the lung tumor microenvironment. Interrogation of the antibodies they express may improve our understanding of the host response to cancer and could be useful in elucidating novel molecular targets. We used two strategies to explore the repertoire of intratumoral B cell antibodies. First, we cloned VH and VL genes from single intratumoral B lymphocytes isolated from one lung tumor, expressed the genes as recombinant mAbs, and used the mAbs to identify the cognate tumor antigens. The Igs derived from intratumoral B cells demonstrated class switching, with a mean VH mutation frequency of 4%. Although there was no evidence for clonal expansion, these data are consistent with antigen-driven somatic hypermutation. Individual recombinant antibodies were polyreactive, although one clone demonstrated preferential immunoreactivity with tropomyosin 4 (TPM4). We found that higher levels of TPM4 antibodies were more common in cancer patients, but measurement of TPM4 antibody levels was not a sensitive test for detecting cancer. Second, in an effort to focus our recombinant antibody expression efforts on those B cells that displayed evidence of clonal expansion driven by antigen stimulation, we performed deep sequencing of the Ig genes of B cells collected from seven different tumors. Deep sequencing demonstrated somatic hypermutation but no dominant clones. These strategies may be useful for the study of B cell antibody expression, although identification of a dominant clone and unique therapeutic targets may require extensive investigation.

  10. Perfusion Pressure Is a Critical Determinant of the Intratumoral Extravasation of Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amber; Nace, Rebecca; Ayala-Breton C, Camilo; Steele, Michael; Bailey, Kent; Peng, Kah Whye; Russell, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy is determined by the density and distribution of infectious centers within the tumor, which may be heavily influenced by the permeability and blood flow in tumor microvessels. Here, we investigated whether systemic perfusion pressure, a key driver of tumor blood flow, could influence the intratumoral extravasation of systemically administered oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in myeloma tumor-bearing mice. Exercise was used to increase mean arterial pressure, and general anesthesia to decrease it. A recombinant VSV expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), which concentrates radiotracers at sites of infection, was administered intravenously to exercising or anesthetized mice, and nuclear NIS reporter gene imaging was used to noninvasively track the density and spatial distribution of intratumoral infectious centers. Anesthesia resulted in decreased intratumoral infection density, while exercise increased the density and uniformity of infectious centers. Perfusion state also had a significant impact on the antitumor efficacy of the VSV therapy. In conclusion, quantitative dynamic radiohistologic imaging was used to noninvasively interrogate delivery of oncolytic virotherapy, highlighting the critical importance of perfusion pressure as a driver of intratumoral delivery and efficacy of oncolytic viruses. PMID:26647825

  11. Factors Influencing Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy Sensitized by Intratumor Administration of Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Timothy M.; Giesselman, Benjamin R.; Hu, Rui; Biel, Merrill A.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective We examined tumor response to methylene blue (MB)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) in a murine tumor model. The goal was to investigate the effects of drug-light interval (DLI), injection vehicle, and fluence on tumor destruction. Fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy informed our understanding. Materials and Methods EMT6 tumor cells were implanted intradermally on the backs of female BALB/c mice and grown to ~ 4-mm diameter. Mice were given a 35 μL, single site, intratumor injection of 500 μg/mL MB administered in either a water or a 5% ethanol-5% Cremophor-90% saline vehicle. PDT was begun either immediately or after a 1-hour DLI with a fluence rate of 60 mW/cm2. Each animal received a fluence of 240 or 480 J/cm2. Fluorescence and reflectance spectra were captured before and during irradiation. Results A protocol consisting of the Cremophor-based vehicle, 0 DLI, and a fluence of 480 J/cm2 was the most effective, with a 55% cure rate as measured by no evidence of tumor 90 days after PDT. Use of the water vehicle with this fluence and DLI reduced the cure rate to 20%. Reducing the fluence to 240 J/cm2 similarly reduced treatment efficacy with 0 and 1-h DLIs. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified increased fluence, 0 vs. 1-h DLI, and the Cremophor vs. water vehicle as highly significant independent predictors of long term tumor control (p < 0.01 in each case). Multivariate analysis with model selection revealed fluence and injection vehicle as the best predictors of survival hazards. Fluorescence spectroscopy in vivo showed that MB fluorescence decreased monotonically during a 2-h dark interval but was restored by irradiation. Reflectance spectroscopy revealed that MB at this injected concentration attenuates the treatment beam significantly. Conclusion Sensitizer delivery vehicle, drug-light interval, and fluence contribute significantly to the tumor response to MB-mediated PDT. PMID:20848552

  12. Adrenergic drugs modify the level of noradrenaline in the insular cortex and alter extinction of conditioned taste aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fresquet, Nadine; Angst, Marie-Josée; Schleef, Carmen; Gobaille, Serge; Sandner, Guy

    2007-03-12

    We compared the effect of conditioned taste aversion in rats by measuring the amount of sucrose that they drunk after conditioning, which differed according to whether rats had drunk the sucrose freely (SD: self drinking) during the conditioning session, or had been forced to drink it (IO: intra-oral administration through a chronically implanted cannula). The SD procedure delayed the extinction of conditioned taste aversion. Enhanced arousal, alertness, awareness or attention in the SD condition may have strengthened the memory of the taste. Brain noradrenergic networks are involved in such processes. We administered two noradrenergic drugs that produce opposite effects on noradrenaline release in the brain, methoxy-idazoxan, RX821002 (1mg/kg, i.p.), and guanfacine (0.12mg/kg, i.p.). We evaluated their effect (i) on the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex using microdialysis, (ii) on glycaemia that is an essential factor of taste learning and (iii) on the comparative SD versus IO conditioned taste aversion protocol mentioned above. Injecting RX821001 increased the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex up to two-fold of the baseline. This effect lasted 1h. The same dose of RX821002 did not elicit any alteration of glycaemia. It enhanced extinction of conditioned taste aversion in the SD group of rats. Injecting 0.12mg/kg of guanfacine produced the opposite effect. The noradrenaline level of the gustatory cortex decreased, but only down to 20% of the baseline. This decrease lasted 2h. Guanfacine increased glycaemia. Extinction of conditioned taste aversion was only marginally decreased by guanfacine in the SD group of rats. These results fit with Aston-Jones' point of view that the role of the noradrenergic coeruleo-cortical system may be to enhance arousal, alertness, awareness or attention to an event by a transient increase of cortical noradrenaline.

  13. Spinning disk confocal microscopy of live, intraerythrocytic malarial parasites. 2. Altered vacuolar volume regulation in drug resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Gligorijevic, Bojana; Bennett, Tyler; McAllister, Ryan; Urbach, Jeffrey S; Roepe, Paul D

    2006-10-17

    In the previous paper [Gligorijevic, B., et al. (2006) Biochemistry 45, pp 12400-12410], we reported on a customized Nipkow spinning disk confocal microscopy (SDCM) system and its initial application to DIC imaging of hemozoin within live, synchronized, intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum malarial parasites. In this paper, we probe the biogenesis as well as the volume and pH regulation of the parasite digestive vacuole (DV), using the fluorescence imaging capabilities of the system. Several previous reports have suggested that mutant PfCRT protein, which causes chloroquine resistance (CQR) in P. falciparum, also causes increased acidification of the DV. Since pH and volume regulation are often linked, we wondered whether DV volume differences might be associated with CQR. Using fast acquisition of SDCM z stacks for synchronized parasites with OGd internalized into the DV, followed by iterative deconvolution using experimental point spread functions, we quantify the volume of the DV for live, intraerythrocytic HB3 (CQS), Dd2 (CQR via drug selection), GCO3 (CQS), and GCO3/C3(Dd2) (CQR via transfection with mutant pfcrt) malarial parasites as they develop within the human red blood cell. We find that relative to both CQS strains, both CQR strains show significantly increased DV volume as the organelle forms upon entry into the trophozoite stage of development and that this persists until the trophozoite-schizont boundary. A more acidic DV pH is found for CQR parasites as soon as the organelle forms and persists throughout the trophozoite stage. We probe DV volume and pH changes upon ATP depletion, hypo- and hypertonic shock, and rapid withdrawal of perfusate chloride. Taken together, these data suggest that the PfCRT mutations that cause CQR also lead to altered DV volume regulation.

  14. A phase I study of intratumoral ipilimumab and interleukin-2 in patients with advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephanie M.; Bowen, Randy C.; Grossmann, Kenneth F.; Andtbacka, Robert H.I.; Bowles, Tawnya L.; Hyngstrom, John R.; Leachman, Sancy A.; Grossman, Douglas; Bowen, Glen M.; Holmen, Sheri L.; VanBrocklin, Matthew W.; Suneja, Gita; Khong, Hung T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intratumoral interleukin-2 (IL-2) is effective but does not generate systemic immunity. Intravenous ipilimumab produces durable clinical response in a minority of patients, with potentially severe toxicities. Circulating anti-tumor T cells activated by ipilimumab may differ greatly from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes activated by intratumoral ipilimumab in phenotypes and functionality. The objective of this study was to primarily assess the safety of intratumoral ipilimumab/IL-2 combination and to obtain data on clinical efficacy. Results There was no dose limiting toxicity. While local response of injected lesions was observed in 67% patients (95% CI, 40%-93%), an abscopal response was seen in 89% (95% CI, 68%-100%). The overall response rate and clinical benefit rate by immune-related response criteria (irRC) was 40% (95% CI, 10%-70%) and 50% (95% CI, 19%-81%), respectively. Enhanced systemic immune response was observed in most patients and correlated with clinical responses. Experimental Design Twelve patients with unresectable stages III/IV melanoma were enrolled. A standard 3+3 design was employed to assess highest tolerable intratumoral dose of ipilimumab and IL-2 based on toxicity during the first three weeks. Escalated doses of ipilimumab was injected into only one lesion weekly for eight weeks in cohorts of three patients. A fixed dose of IL-2 was injected three times a week into the same lesion for two weeks, followed by two times a week for six weeks. Conclusions Intratumoral injection with the combination of ipilimumab/IL-2 is well tolerated and generates responses in both injected and non-injected lesions in the majority of patients. PMID:27391442

  15. A phase I study of intratumoral ipilimumab and interleukin-2 in patients with advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ray, Abhijit; Williams, Matthew A; Meek, Stephanie M; Bowen, Randy C; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Bowles, Tawnya L; Hyngstrom, John R; Leachman, Sancy A; Grossman, Douglas; Bowen, Glen M; Holmen, Sheri L; VanBrocklin, Matthew W; Suneja, Gita; Khong, Hung T

    2016-09-27

    Intratumoral interleukin-2 (IL-2) is effective but does not generate systemic immunity. Intravenous ipilimumab produces durable clinical response in a minority of patients, with potentially severe toxicities. Circulating anti-tumor T cells activated by ipilimumab may differ greatly from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes activated by intratumoral ipilimumab in phenotypes and functionality. The objective of this study was to primarily assess the safety of intratumoral ipilimumab/IL-2 combination and to obtain data on clinical efficacy. There was no dose limiting toxicity. While local response of injected lesions was observed in 67% patients (95% CI, 40%-93%), an abscopal response was seen in 89% (95% CI, 68%-100%). The overall response rate and clinical benefit rate by immune-related response criteria (irRC) was 40% (95% CI, 10%-70%) and 50% (95% CI, 19%-81%), respectively. Enhanced systemic immune response was observed in most patients and correlated with clinical responses. Twelve patients with unresectable stages III/IV melanoma were enrolled. A standard 3+3 design was employed to assess highest tolerable intratumoral dose of ipilimumab and IL-2 based on toxicity during the first three weeks. Escalated doses of ipilimumab was injected into only one lesion weekly for eight weeks in cohorts of three patients. A fixed dose of IL-2 was injected three times a week into the same lesion for two weeks, followed by two times a week for six weeks. Intratumoral injection with the combination of ipilimumab/IL-2 is well tolerated and generates responses in both injected and non-injected lesions in the majority of patients.

  16. Combinatorial effects of doxorubicin and retargeted tissue factor by intratumoral entrapment of doxorubicin and proapoptotic increase of tumor vascular infarction

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Caroline; Höltke, Carsten; Schliemann, Christoph; Kessler, Torsten; Schmidt, Lars Henning; Harrach, Saliha; Mantke, Verena; Hintelmann, Heike; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Wardelmann, Eva; Lenz, Georg; Wünsch, Bernhard; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Mesters, Rolf M.; Schwöppe, Christian; Berdel, Wolfgang E.

    2016-01-01

    Truncated tissue factor (tTF), retargeted to tumor vasculature by GNGRAHA peptide (tTF-NGR), and doxorubicin have therapeutic activity against a variety of tumors. We report on combination experiments of both drugs using different schedules. We have tested fluorescence- and HPLC-based intratumoral pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin, flow cytometry for cellular phosphatidylserine (PS) expression, and tumor xenograft studies for showing in vivo apoptosis, proliferation decrease, and tumor shrinkage upon combination therapy with doxorubicin and induced tumor vascular infarction. tTF-NGR given before doxorubicin inhibits the uptake of the drug into human fibrosarcoma xenografts in vivo. Reverse sequence does not influence the uptake of doxorubicin into tumor, but significantly inhibits the late wash-out phase, thus entrapping doxorubicin in tumor tissue by vascular occlusion. Incubation of endothelial and tumor cells with doxorubicin in vitro increases PS concentrations in the outer layer of the cell membrane as a sign of early apoptosis. Cells expressing increased PS concentrations show comparatively higher procoagulatory efficacy on the basis of equimolar tTF-NGR present in the Factor X assay. Experiments using human M21 melanoma and HT1080 fibrosarcoma xenografts in athymic nude mice indeed show a combinatorial tumor growth inhibition applying doxorubicin and tTF-NGR in sequence over single drug treatment. Combination of cytotoxic drugs such as doxorubicin with tTF-NGR-induced tumor vessel infarction can improve pharmacodynamics of the drugs by new mechanisms, entrapping a cytotoxic molecule inside tumor tissue and reciprocally improving procoagulatory activity of tTF-NGR in the tumor vasculature via apoptosis induction in tumor endothelial and tumor cells. PMID:27738341

  17. Darwinian dynamics of intratumoral heterogeneity: not solely random mutations but also variable environmental selection forces

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Mark C; Cunningham, Jessica J; Bui, Marilyn M; Gillies, Robert J; Brown, Joel S; Gatenby, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in tumors is generally thought to result from branching clonal evolution driven by random mutations that accumulate during tumor development. However, this concept rests on the implicit assumption that cancer cells never evolve to a fitness maximum because they can always acquire mutations that increase proliferative capacity. In this study, we investigated the validity of this assumption. Using evolutionary game theory, we demonstrate that local cancer cell populations will rapidly converge to the fittest phenotype given a stable environment. In such settings, cellular spatial heterogeneity in a tumor will be largely governed by regional variations in environmental conditions, e.g. alterations in blood flow. Model simulations specifically predict a common spatial pattern in which cancer cells at the tumor-host interface exhibit invasion-promoting, rapidly-proliferating phenotypic properties, while cells in the tumor core maximize their population density by promoting supportive tissue infrastructures e.g. to promote angiogenesis. We tested model predictions through detailed quantitative image analysis of phenotypic spatial distribution in histological sections of 10 patients with stage 2 invasive breast cancers. CAIX, GLUT1 and Ki67 were upregulated in the tumor edge consistent with an acid-producing invasive, proliferative phenotype. Cells in the tumor core were 20% denser than the edge, exhibiting upregulation of CAXII, HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3, consistent with a more static and less proliferative phenotype. Similarly, vascularity was consistently lower in the tumor center compared to the tumor edges. Lymphocytic immune responses to tumor antigens also trended to higher level in the tumor edge, although this effect did not reach statistical significance. Like invasive species in nature, cancer cells at the leading edge of the tumor possess a different phenotype from cells in the tumor core. Our results suggest that at least some of the

  18. Fast Single-Cell Patterning for Study of Drug-Induced Phenotypic Alterations of HeLa Cells Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Chen, Yin; Weng, Lu-Tao; Leung, Mark; Xing, Xiaoxing; Fan, Zhiyong; Wu, Hongkai

    2016-12-20

    A facile single-cell patterning (ScP) method was developed and integrated with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) for the study of drug-induced cellular phenotypic alterations. Micropatterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stencil film and centrifugation-assisted cell trapping were combined for the preparation of on-surface single-cell microarrays, which exhibited both high site occupancy (>90%) and single-cell resolution (>97%). TOF-SIMS is a surface-sensitive mass spectrometry and is increasingly utilized in biological studies. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, its successful application in high-throughput single-cell analysis. Drug-induced phenotypic alterations of HeLa cells in the early stage of apoptosis were investigated using TOF-SIMS. The major molecular sources of variations were analyzed by principle component analysis (PCA).

  19. The influence of TP53 mutations on the prognosis of patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer may depend on the intratumor heterogeneity of the mutations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Yup; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hwangbo, Yup; Jeong, Ji Yun; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Jin; Jin, Guang; Shin, Kyung Min; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Eung Bae; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-02-01

    A large number of studies have evaluated the impact of TP53 mutations on the prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, the results of these studies are still controversial. Recently, considerable intratumor heterogeneity for genetic alterations has been demonstrated in various human cancers, including lung cancer. In the present study, we evaluated TP53 mutations in NSCLCs by direct sequencing and observed remarkable variation in the values of relative intensity (RI, the height of the peak of mutated allele/the height of the peak of non-mutated allele) of the mutations. We also examined whether the RI values were associated with intratumor heterogeneity of TP53 mutations. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between TP53 mutations and survival outcome. The patients with a TP53 mutation did not have significantly worse survival compared to those without the mutation. However, when tumors with a TP53 mutation were categorized into two groups, those with a low and those with a high RI, the latter group had significantly worse survival compared to those with wild-type TP53 (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.58, 95% confidence interval = 1.21-5.48, P = 0.01), whereas the former group did not. These results suggest that intratumor genetic heterogeneity may be an important factor in determining the role of TP53 mutations on the prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  20. [Intratumoral administration of biological preparations--recommendation for integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Ebina, T

    2001-10-01

    The antitumor effect of biological preparations was examined in a double grafted tumor system. PSK is a hot water extract of cultured mycelia from Coliolus versicolor. Its protein content is about 38% and the main glycoside portion of PSK is beta-D-glucan. Lentinan is purified from fruit bodies of Lentinus edodes and is a beta-1, 3-glucan. Cepharanthin is an extract from the root of Stephania cepharantha HAYATA, consisting of 4 kinds of biscoclaurine alkaloids. TAHEEBO tea is a hot water extract of Tabebuia avellanedae, the active ingredient of which is naphthoquinones. If protein-bound polysaccharides were to be used in Western medicine, these polysaccharides would be purified, but purified beta-glucan loses its beneficial effects. Similarly, when raw Cepharanthin is purified to isolate its active ingredient (an alkaloid cepharanthine), its anti-tumor effect is weakened. Clear IAP induction was observed in serum of mice treated with extracts of Coliolus versicolor and Stephania cepharantha. However, IAP induction was not observed in the serum of mice treated with purified beta-glucan or purified alkaloid. This suggests that macrophages may recognize extracts but not purified substances. In Western medicine, purified substances with known chemical structures are recognized as drugs, but overdoses of these drugs are toxic to the body, thus adverse reactions are always an issue. In Chinese medicine, mixtures containing several crude drugs are recognized as drugs, whose active ingredients are not identified. In integrative medicine, drugs are extracts that contain active ingredients with known structures and functions. We propose a Japanese version of integrative medicine which is neither Western nor Chinese.

  1. Combined VEGFR and CTLA-4 blockade increases the antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs and reduces the suppressive capacity of intratumoral MDSCs

    PubMed Central

    Du Four, Stephanie; Maenhout, Sarah K; Niclou, Simone P; Thielemans, Kris; Neyns, Bart; Aerts, Joeri L

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma brain metastases (MBM) occur in 10% to 50% of melanoma patients. They are often associated with a high morbidity and despite the improvements in the treatment of advanced melanoma, including immunotherapy, patients with MBM still have a poor prognosis. Antiangiogenic treatment was shown to reduce the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Therefore we investigated the effect of the combination of VEGFR- and CTLA-4 blockade on the immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the effect of the combination of axitinib, a TKI against VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, with therapeutic inhibition of CTLA-4 in subcutaneous and intracranial mouse melanoma models. The combination of axitinib with αCTLA-4 reduced tumor growth and increased survival in both intracranial and subcutaneous models. Investigation of the splenic immune cells showed an increased number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after combination treatment. Moreover, combination treatment increased the number of intratumoral dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs). When these immune cell populations were sorted from the subcutaneous and intracranial tumors of mice treated with axitinib+αCTLA-4, we observed an increased antigen-presenting function of DCs and a reduced suppressive capacity of moMDSCs on a per cell basis. Our results suggest that the combination of antiangiogenesis and checkpoint inhibition can lead to an enhanced antitumor effect leading to increased survival. We found that this effect is in part due to an enhanced antitumor immune response generated by an increased antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs in combination with a reduced suppressive capacity of intratumoral moMDSCs. PMID:27904768

  2. Combined VEGFR and CTLA-4 blockade increases the antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs and reduces the suppressive capacity of intratumoral MDSCs.

    PubMed

    Du Four, Stephanie; Maenhout, Sarah K; Niclou, Simone P; Thielemans, Kris; Neyns, Bart; Aerts, Joeri L

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma brain metastases (MBM) occur in 10% to 50% of melanoma patients. They are often associated with a high morbidity and despite the improvements in the treatment of advanced melanoma, including immunotherapy, patients with MBM still have a poor prognosis. Antiangiogenic treatment was shown to reduce the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Therefore we investigated the effect of the combination of VEGFR- and CTLA-4 blockade on the immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the effect of the combination of axitinib, a TKI against VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, with therapeutic inhibition of CTLA-4 in subcutaneous and intracranial mouse melanoma models. The combination of axitinib with αCTLA-4 reduced tumor growth and increased survival in both intracranial and subcutaneous models. Investigation of the splenic immune cells showed an increased number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after combination treatment. Moreover, combination treatment increased the number of intratumoral dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs). When these immune cell populations were sorted from the subcutaneous and intracranial tumors of mice treated with axitinib+αCTLA-4, we observed an increased antigen-presenting function of DCs and a reduced suppressive capacity of moMDSCs on a per cell basis. Our results suggest that the combination of antiangiogenesis and checkpoint inhibition can lead to an enhanced antitumor effect leading to increased survival. We found that this effect is in part due to an enhanced antitumor immune response generated by an increased antigen-presenting function of intratumoral DCs in combination with a reduced suppressive capacity of intratumoral moMDSCs.

  3. Association between intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density (LMVD) and clinicopathologic features in endometrial cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer significantly decreases survival rate. Few data on the influence of intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density (LMVD) on survival in endometrial cancer are available. Our aim was to assess the intratumoral LMVD of endometrial carcinomas and to investigate its association with classical pathological factors, lymph node metastasis and survival. Methods Fifty-seven patients with endometrial carcinoma diagnosed between 2000 and 2008 underwent complete surgical staging and evaluation of intratumoral LMVD and other histologic variables. Lymphatic microvessels were identified by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibody against human podoplanin (clone D2-40) and evaluated by counting the number of immunostained lymphatic vessels in 10 hot spot areas at 400× magnification. The LMVD was expressed by the mean number of vessels in these 10 hot spot microscopic fields. We next investigated the association of LMVD with the clinicopathologic findings and prognosis. Results The mean number of lymphatic vessels counted in all cases ranged between 0 and 4.7. The median value of mean LMVD was 0.5, and defined the cut-off for low and high LMVD. We identified low intratumoral LMVD in 27 (47.4%) patients and high LMVD in 30 (52.6%) patients. High intratumoral LMVD was associated with lesser miometrial and adnaexal infiltration, lesser cervical and peritoneal involvement, and fewer fatal cases. Although there was lower lymph node involvement among cases with high LMVD, the difference did not reach significance. No association was seen between LMVD and FIGO staging, histological type, or vascular invasion. On the other hand, low intratumoral LMVD was associated with poor outcome. Seventy-five percent of deaths occurred in patients with low intratumoral LMVD. Conclusion Our results show association of high intratumoral LMVD with features related to more localized disease and better outcome. We discuss the role of

  4. Arterial spin-labeling assessment of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity as a predictor of histologic grade of astrocytic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Furtner, J; Schöpf, V; Schewzow, K; Kasprian, G; Weber, M; Woitek, R; Asenbaum, U; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Hainfellner, J A; Widhalm, G; Wolfsberger, S; Prayer, D

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed arterial spin-labeling is a noninvasive MR imaging perfusion method performed with the use of water in the arterial blood as an endogenous contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to determine the inversion time with the largest difference in normalized intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. Thirty-three patients with gliomas, histologically classified as low-grade (n = 7) or high-grade astrocytomas (n = 26) according to the World Health Organization brain tumor classification, were included. A 3T MR scanner was used to perform pulsed arterial spin-labeling measurements at 8 different inversion times (370 ms, 614 ms, 864 ms, 1114 ms, 1364 ms, 1614 ms, 1864 ms, and 2114 ms). Normalized intratumoral signal intensity was calculated, which was defined by the signal intensity ratio of the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue for all fixed inversion times. A 3-way mixed ANOVA was used to reveal potential differences in the normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. The difference in normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas obtained the most statistically significant results at 370 ms (P = .003, other P values ranged from .012-.955). The inversion time by which to differentiate high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas by use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity was 370 ms in our study. The normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values at this inversion time mainly reflect the labeled intra-arterial blood bolus and therefore could be referred to as normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity. Our data indicate that the use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values allows differentiation between low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas and thus may serve as a new, noninvasive marker for astrocytoma grading.

  5. Sclareol modulates the Treg intra-tumoral infiltrated cell and inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Noori, Shokoofe; Hassan, Zuhair M; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Habibi, Zohre; Sohrabi, Nooshin; Bayanolhagh, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    A regulatory or suppressor T cell is functionally defined as a T cell that inhibits an immune response by influencing the activity of another cell type. On the other hand, Th1 cells express IFN-gamma and mediate cellular immunity. Sclareol exhibits growth inhibition and cytotoxic activity against a variety of human cancer cell lines. In the first set of experiments, Sclareol was isolated from the plant Salvia sclarea and our study assessed the immuno-therapeutic effectiveness of Sclareol by direct intra-tumoral injection. Secondly, several immunological parameters such as splenocytes proliferation, intra-tumor CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, IFN-gamma and IL-4 secretion and tumor size were assessed to evaluate the anti-tumoral immune response. By all means, the findings confirmed that the activity of Sclareol could reduce the tumor growth in vivo against breast cancer. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Antibodies Expressed by Intratumoral B Cells as the Basis for a Diagnostic Test for Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    expression, purification, and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) cloned from intratumoral B lymphocytes (ITLs). While this work was...successful in identifying a mAb with preferential binding to tropomyosin 4, all cloned mAbs exhibited polyreactivity. This suggested that the isolated ITLs...our most recent efforts have focused on methods to permit the cloning and expression of recombinant antibodies specifically from oligoclonal ITLs. We

  7. Intraoperative Intratumoral Embolization of a Complex Recurrent Hemangiopericytoma: Technical Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ryttlefors, Mats; Latini, Francesco; Basma, Jaafar; Krisht, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Objective Recurrent brain tumors represent a challenge for neurosurgeons because of the extensive blood loss and the time needed for surgical resection. Only a few hemostatic agents are useful to prevent the bleeding and thus facilitate the surgical resection. Fibrin sealant can be used to achieve sealing, tissue adherence, or hemostasis when other means of hemostasis are inadequate or inappropriate. We report the feasibility and positive effects of direct intratumoral injection of fibrin sealant during resection of a recurrent hemangiopericytoma. Material and Methods The intraoperative intratumoral injection of fibrin sealant changed the tumor properties of a recurrent hemangiopericytoma of the tentorium with infra- and supratentorial extension. From a loose friable briskly bleeding tumor, this complex lesion became a nonbleeding well-demarcated soft-firm tumor that could easily be dissected off the pial surface and totally resected without extensive bleeding. Results There are several benefits of intratumoral injection of fibrin sealant in hemangiopericytomas: (1) the extensive bleeding is diminished and blood loss minimized; (2) the restriction of the surgical view by the venous oozing is diminished, making the microsurgical dissection of the tumor capsule off the pial surface easier and safer; (3) the loose consistency of the tumor becomes firmer and facilitates the manipulation of the tumor and leads to a safer resection; and (4) a shorter operating time is needed. Conclusion The use of intratumoral fibrin glue injection is a safe and useful technique that could be used for hemostasis of highly vascularized tumors to facilitate a safer resection and to reduce blood loss. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Intratumoral heterogeneity: Role of differentiation in a potentially lethal phenotype of testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Mehmet Asim; Hess, Kenneth R.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Kopetz, Scott; Wei, Chongjuan; Pagliaro, Lance C.; Karam, Jose A.; Ward, John F.; Wood, Christopher G.; Rao, Priya; Tu, Zachary H.; General, Rosale; Chen, Adrienne H.; Nieto, Yago L.; Yeung, Sai‐ching J.; Lin, Sue‐Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Pisters, Louis L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intratumoral heterogeneity presents a major obstacle to the widespread implementation of precision medicine. The authors assessed the origin of intratumoral heterogeneity in nonseminomatous germ cell tumor of the testis (NSGCT) and identified distinct tumor subtypes and a potentially lethal phenotype. METHODS In this retrospective study, all consecutive patients who had been diagnosed with an NSGCT between January 2000 and December 2010 were evaluated. The histologic makeup of primary tumors and the clinical course of disease were determined for each patient. A Fine and Gray proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine the prognostic risk factors, and the Gray test was used to detect differences in the cumulative incidence of cancer death. In a separate prospective study, next‐generation sequencing was performed on tumor samples from 9 patients to identify any actionable mutations. RESULTS Six hundred fifteen patients were included in this study. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of yolk sac tumor in the primary tumor (P = .0003) was associated with an unfavorable prognosis. NSGCT could be divided into 5 subgroups. Patients in the yolk sac‐seminoma subgroup had the poorest clinical outcome (P = .0015). These tumors tended to undergo somatic transformation (P < .0001). Among the 9 NSGCTs that had a yolk sac tumor phenotype, no consistent gene mutation was detected. CONCLUSIONS The current data suggest that intratumoral heterogeneity is caused in part by differentiation of pluripotent progenitor cells. Integrated or multimodal therapy may be effective at addressing intratumoral heterogeneity and treating distinct subtypes as well as a potentially lethal phenotype of NSGCT. Cancer 2016;122:1836–43. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial License

  9. An intercalation mechanism as a mode of action exerted by psychotropic drugs: results of altered phospholipid substrate availabilities in membranes?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Anders; Pryme, Ian F.; Holmsen, Holm

    2010-01-01

    Patients respond differently to psychotropic drugs, and this is currently a controversial theme among psychiatrists. The effects of 16 psychotropics on cell membrane parameters have been reported. These drugs belong to three major groups used in therapeutic psychiatry: antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytic/hypnotics. Human platelets, lacking dopamine (D2) receptors (proposed targets of most psychotropics), have been used as a cell model. Here we discuss the effects of these drugs on three metabolic phenomena and also results from Langmuir experiments. Diazepam, in contrast to the remaining drugs, had negligible effects on metabolic phenomena and had no effects in Langmuir experiments. Psychotropic drugs may work through intercalation in membrane phospholipids. It is possible that the fluidity of membranes, rich in essential fatty acids, the content being influenced by diet, could be a contributing factor to the action of psychotropics. This might in turn explain the observed major differences in therapeutic response among patients. PMID:21270935

  10. Macrophage IL-10 blocks CD8+ T cell-dependent responses to chemotherapy by suppressing IL-12 expression in intratumoral dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruffell, Brian; Chang-Strachan, Debbie; Chan, Vivien; Rosenbusch, Alexander; Ho, Christine M.T.; Pryer, Nancy; Daniel, Dylan; Hwang, E. Shelley; Rugo, Hope S.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Blockade of colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) limits macrophage infiltration and improves response of mammary carcinomas to chemotherapy. Herein we identify interleukin (IL)-10 expression by macrophages as the critical mediator of this phenotype. Infiltrating macrophages were the primary source of IL-10 within tumors, and therapeutic blockade of IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) was equivalent to CSF-1 neutralization in enhancing primary tumor response to paclitaxel and carboplatin. Improved response to chemotherapy was CD8+ T cell-dependent, however IL-10 did not directly suppress CD8+ T cells or alter macrophage polarization. Instead, IL-10R blockade increased intratumoral dendritic cell expression of IL-12, which was necessary for improved outcomes. In human breast cancer, expression of IL12A and cytotoxic effector molecules were predictive of pathological complete response rates to paclitaxel. PMID:25446896

  11. Disruption of BSEP Function in HepaRG Cells Alters Bile Acid Disposition and Is a Susceptive Factor to Drug-Induced Cholestatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xi; Zhang, Yueping; Liu, Tongtong; Shen, Hong; Xiao, Yongling; Bourner, Maureen J; Pratt, Jennifer R; Thompson, David C; Marathe, Punit; Humphreys, W Griffith; Lai, Yurong

    2016-04-04

    In the present study, we characterized in vitro biosynthesis and disposition of bile acids (BAs) as well as hepatic transporter expression followed by ABCB11 (BSEP) gene knockout in HepaRG cells (HepaRG-KO cells). BSEP KO in HepaRG cells led to time-dependent BA accumulation, resulting in reduced biosynthesis of BAs and altered BA disposition. In HepaRG-KO cells, the expression of NTCP, OATP1B1, OATP2B1, BCRP, P-gp, and MRP2 were reduced, whereas MRP3 and OCT1 were up-regulated. As a result, BSEP KO altered the disposition of BAs and subsequently underwent adaptive regulations of BA synthesis and homeostasis to enable healthy growth of the cells. Although BSEP inhibitors caused no or slight increase of BAs in HepaRG wild type cells (HepaRG-WT cells), excessive intracellular accumulation of BAs was observed in HepaRG-KO cells exposed to bosentan and troglitazone, but not dipyridamole. LDH release in the medium was remarkably increased in HepaRG-KO cultures exposed to troglitazone (50 μM), suggesting drug-induced cellular injury. The results revealed that functional impairment of BSEP predisposes the cells to altered BA disposition and is a susceptive factor to drug-induced cholestatic injury. In total, BSEP inhibition might trigger the processes but is not a sole determinant of cholestatic cellular injury. As intracellular BA accumulation is determined by BSEP function and the subsequent adaptive gene regulation, assessment of intracellular BA accumulation in HepaRG-KO cells could be a useful approach to evaluate drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potentials of drugs that could disrupt other BA homeostasis pathways beyond BSEP inhibition.

  12. Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Rusk, Anthony W.; Tung, David; Miller, Maria; Roix, Jeffrey; Khanna, Kristen V.; Murthy, Ravi; Benjamin, Robert S.; Helgason, Thorunn; Szvalb, Ariel D.; Bird, Justin E.; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Zhang, Halle H.; Qiao, Yuan; Karim, Baktiar; McDaniel, Jennifer; Elpiner, Amanda; Sahora, Alexandra; Lachowicz, Joshua; Phillips, Brenda; Turner, Avenelle; Klein, Mary K.; Post, Gerald; Diaz, Luis A.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Bettegowda, Chetan; Huso, David L.; Varterasian, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Species of Clostridium bacteria are notable for their ability to lyse tumor cells growing in hypoxic environments. We show that an attenuated strain of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) induces a microscopically precise, tumor-localized response in a rat orthotopic brain tumor model after intratumoral injection. It is well known, however, that experimental models often do not reliably predict the responses of human patients to therapeutic agents. We therefore used naturally occurring canine tumors as a translational bridge to human trials. Canine tumors are more like those of humans because they occur in animals with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds, are of host origin, and are due to spontaneous rather than engineered mutations. We found that intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores was well tolerated in companion dogs bearing spontaneous solid tumors, with the most common toxicities being the expected symptoms associated with bacterial infections. Objective responses were observed in 6 of 16 dogs (37.5%), with three complete and three partial responses. On the basis of these encouraging results, we treated a human patient who had an advanced leiomyosarcoma with an intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores. This treatment reduced the tumor within and surrounding the bone. Together, these results show that C. novyi-NT can precisely eradicate neoplastic tissues and suggest that further clinical trials of this agent in selected patients are warranted. PMID:25122639

  13. Improved Intratumoral Oxygenation Through Vascular Normalization Increases Glioma Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, Mackenzie C.; Hamner, J. Blair; Williams, Regan F.; Rosati, Shannon F.; Sims, Thomas L.; Ng, Catherine Y.; Gaber, M. Waleed; Calabrese, Christopher; Wu Jianrong; Nathwani, Amit C.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Davidoff, Andrew M.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation, an important component of glioma therapy, is critically dependent on tumor oxygenation. However, gliomas are notable for areas of necrosis and hypoxia, which foster radioresistance. We hypothesized that pharmacologic manipulation of the typically dysfunctional tumor vasculature would improve intratumoral oxygenation and, thus, the antiglioma efficacy of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87 xenografts were treated with either continuous interferon-beta (IFN-beta) or bevacizumab, alone, or combined with cranial irradiation (RT). Tumor growth was assessed by quantitative bioluminescence imaging; the tumor vasculature using immunohistochemical staining, and tumor oxygenation using hypoxyprobe staining. Results: Both IFN-beta and bevaziumab profoundly affected the tumor vasculature, albeit with different cellular phenotypes. IFN-beta caused a doubling in the percentage of area of perivascular cell staining, and bevacizumab caused a rapid decrease in the percentage of area of endothelial cell staining. However, both agents increased intratumoral oxygenation, although with bevacizumab, the effect was transient, being lost by 5 days. Administration of IFN-beta or bevacizumab before RT was significantly more effective than any of the three modalities as monotherapy or when RT was administered concomitantly with IFN-beta or bevacizumab or 5 days after bevacizumab. Conclusion: Bevacizumab and continuous delivery of IFN-beta each induced significant changes in glioma vascular physiology, improving intratumoral oxygenation and enhancing the antitumor activity of ionizing radiation. Additional investigation into the use and timing of these and other agents that modify the vascular phenotype, combined with RT, is warranted to optimize cytotoxic activity.

  14. Assessment of the feasibility of TACE combined with intratumoral injection of cisplatin in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhaomin, Song; Zifeng, Liu; Chenghui, Yin; Jiali, Yang; Xun, Peng; Peili, Zhao; Xiaolin, Lang

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of transcatheter arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) combined with intratumoral injection of cisplatin as treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. 30 cases receiving TACE were denoted the TACE group, another 30 cases receiving TACE combined with an intratumoral multi-point injection of cisplatin were denoted the TACE/cisplatin group. Cases with partial remission/complete remission (PR/CR) were analyzed using 2 tests; alpha fetoprotein (AFP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBIL), erythrocyte, and platelet levels were detected and the differences between two groups were analyzed using the Student's t-test; cases with complications, including intrahepatic metastasis (IM), upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB), and liver failure were also counted. The correlation of clinical parameters with PR/CR was analyzed using multifactorial correlation analysis. Cases with PR/CR in the TACE/cisplatin group were significantly more than in TACE group, accompanied by significant declination in FAP. There were no significant differences of AST, ALT, TBIL, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), and platelets (PLT) between two groups; 3 cases with IM, one case with UGB and one case with LF were found in the TACE group, but only 1 case with IM was found in the TACE/cisplatin group. In addition, tumor stage was correlated with PR/CR. We concluded that TACE combined with intratumoral injection of cisplatin was more effective than TACE, and with fewer complications and side effects.

  15. Assessment of the feasibility of TACE combined with intratumoral injection of cisplatin in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhaomin, Song; Zifeng, Liu; Chenghui, Yin; Jiali, Yang; Xun, Peng; Peili, Zhao; Xiaolin, Lang

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of transcatheter arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) combined with intratumoral injection of cisplatin as treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. 30 cases receiving TACE were denoted the TACE group, another 30 cases receiving TACE combined with an intratumoral multi-point injection of cisplatin were denoted the TACE/cisplatin group. Cases with partial remission/complete remission (PR/CR) were analyzed using 2 tests; alpha fetoprotein (AFP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBIL), erythrocyte, and platelet levels were detected and the differences between two groups were analyzed using the Student’s t-test; cases with complications, including intrahepatic metastasis (IM), upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB), and liver failure were also counted. The correlation of clinical parameters with PR/CR was analyzed using multifactorial correlation analysis. Cases with PR/CR in the TACE/cisplatin group were significantly more than in TACE group, accompanied by significant declination in FAP. There were no significant differences of AST, ALT, TBIL, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), and platelets (PLT) between two groups; 3 cases with IM, one case with UGB and one case with LF were found in the TACE group, but only 1 case with IM was found in the TACE/cisplatin group. In addition, tumor stage was correlated with PR/CR. We concluded that TACE combined with intratumoral injection of cisplatin was more effective than TACE, and with fewer complications and side effects. PMID:28352732

  16. Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nicholas J; Zhang, Linping; Janku, Filip; Collins, Amanda; Bai, Ren-Yuan; Staedtke, Verena; Rusk, Anthony W; Tung, David; Miller, Maria; Roix, Jeffrey; Khanna, Kristen V; Murthy, Ravi; Benjamin, Robert S; Helgason, Thorunn; Szvalb, Ariel D; Bird, Justin E; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Zhang, Halle H; Qiao, Yuan; Karim, Baktiar; McDaniel, Jennifer; Elpiner, Amanda; Sahora, Alexandra; Lachowicz, Joshua; Phillips, Brenda; Turner, Avenelle; Klein, Mary K; Post, Gerald; Diaz, Luis A; Riggins, Gregory J; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Bettegowda, Chetan; Huso, David L; Varterasian, Mary; Saha, Saurabh; Zhou, Shibin

    2014-08-13

    Species of Clostridium bacteria are notable for their ability to lyse tumor cells growing in hypoxic environments. We show that an attenuated strain of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) induces a microscopically precise, tumor-localized response in a rat orthotopic brain tumor model after intratumoral injection. It is well known, however, that experimental models often do not reliably predict the responses of human patients to therapeutic agents. We therefore used naturally occurring canine tumors as a translational bridge to human trials. Canine tumors are more like those of humans because they occur in animals with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds, are of host origin, and are due to spontaneous rather than engineered mutations. We found that intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores was well tolerated in companion dogs bearing spontaneous solid tumors, with the most common toxicities being the expected symptoms associated with bacterial infections. Objective responses were observed in 6 of 16 dogs (37.5%), with three complete and three partial responses. On the basis of these encouraging results, we treated a human patient who had an advanced leiomyosarcoma with an intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores. This treatment reduced the tumor within and surrounding the bone. Together, these results show that C. novyi-NT can precisely eradicate neoplastic tissues and suggest that further clinical trials of this agent in selected patients are warranted.

  17. The role of intratumoral lymphovascular density in distinguishing primary from secondary mucinous ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    de Lacerda Almeida, Bernardo Gomes; Bacchi, Carlos E; Carvalho, Jesus P; Ferreira, Cristiane R; Carvalho, Filomena M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ovarian mucinous metastases commonly present as the first sign of the disease and are capable of simulating primary tumors. Our aim was to investigate the role of intratumoral lymphatic vascular density together with other surgical-pathological features in distinguishing primary from secondary mucinous ovarian tumors. METHODS: A total of 124 cases of mucinous tumors in the ovary (63 primary and 61 metastatic) were compared according to their clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical profiles. The intratumoral lymphatic vascular density was quantified by counting the number of vessels stained by the D2-40 antibody. RESULTS: Metastases occurred in older patients and were associated with a higher proportion of tumors smaller than 10.0 cm; bilaterality; extensive necrosis; extraovarian extension; increased expression of cytokeratin 20, CDX2, CA19.9 and MUC2; and decreased expression of cytokeratin 7, CA125 and MUC5AC. The lymphatic vascular density was increased among primary tumors. However, after multivariate analysis, the best predictors of a secondary tumor were a size of 10.0 cm or less, bilaterality and cytokeratin 7 negativity. Lack of MUC2 expression was an important factor excluding metastasis. CONCLUSIONS: The higher intratumoral lymphatic vascular density in primary tumors when compared with secondary lesions suggests differences in the microenvironment. However, considering the differential diagnosis, the best discriminator of a secondary tumor is the combination of tumor size, laterality and the pattern of expression of cytokeratin 7 and MUC2. PMID:25518016

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor and intratumoral microvessel density as prognostic factors in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Topolovec, Zlatko; Corusić, Ante; Babić, Damir; Mrcela, Milanka; Sijanović, Sinisa; Müller-Vranjes, Andrijana; Curzik, Darko

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the VEGF A expression in tumor cells and the intratumoral microvessel density and their prognostic significance in the survival of the subjects. 87 subjects were monitored retrospectively for a period of 60 to 132 months. The subjects were treated at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Osijek University Hospital Center, Croatia. We analysed standard clinical, pathohistological and therapeutical prognostic factors, intratumoral microvessel density and expression of VEGF A. Five-year survival was calculated by the life chart method and presented graphically by Kaplan-Meier curves. Reaching conclusions on statistical hypotheses in this paper was done with a reliability level p < 0.05. Of the analyzed clinical prognostic factors, those which proved to be statistically significant and independent prognostic factors were age and clinical stage of the disease, and of pathohistologic ones it was the depth of myometrial invasion and VEGF expression. An elevated VEGF expression is associated with deep myometrial invasion, poorly differentiated tumors, histologic type and intratumoral microvessel density to a statistically significant degree. Elevated VEGF expression, age, FIGO stage and depth of myometrial invasion play a significant prognostic role in patients with endometrial cancer. VEGF receptors could be a target for adjuvant therapy in VEGF positive endometrial cancer.

  19. The role of intratumoral lymphovascular density in distinguishing primary from secondary mucinous ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Bernardo Gomes de Lacerda; Bacchi, Carlos E; Carvalho, Jesus P; Ferreira, Cristiane R; Carvalho, Filomena M

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian mucinous metastases commonly present as the first sign of the disease and are capable of simulating primary tumors. Our aim was to investigate the role of intratumoral lymphatic vascular density together with other surgical-pathological features in distinguishing primary from secondary mucinous ovarian tumors. A total of 124 cases of mucinous tumors in the ovary (63 primary and 61 metastatic) were compared according to their clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical profiles. The intratumoral lymphatic vascular density was quantified by counting the number of vessels stained by the D2-40 antibody. Metastases occurred in older patients and were associated with a higher proportion of tumors smaller than 10.0 cm; bilaterality; extensive necrosis; extraovarian extension; increased expression of cytokeratin 20, CDX2, CA19.9 and MUC2; and decreased expression of cytokeratin 7, CA125 and MUC5AC. The lymphatic vascular density was increased among primary tumors. However, after multivariate analysis, the best predictors of a secondary tumor were a size of 10.0 cm or less, bilaterality and cytokeratin 7 negativity. Lack of MUC2 expression was an important factor excluding metastasis. The higher intratumoral lymphatic vascular density in primary tumors when compared with secondary lesions suggests differences in the microenvironment. However, considering the differential diagnosis, the best discriminator of a secondary tumor is the combination of tumor size, laterality and the pattern of expression of cytokeratin 7 and MUC2.

  20. Multiregion ultra-deep sequencing reveals early intermixing and variable levels of intratumoral heterogeneity in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuka; Ng, Sarah Boonhsi; Chua, Clarinda; Leow, Wei Qiang; Chng, Jermain; Liu, Shi Yang; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; Gan, Anna; Ho, Dan Liang; Ten, Rachel; Su, Yan; Lezhava, Alexandar; Lai, Jiunn Herng; Koh, Dennis; Lim, Kiat Hon; Tan, Patrick; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Iain Beehuat

    2017-02-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) contributes to cancer progression and chemoresistance. We sought to comprehensively describe ITH of somatic mutations, copy number, and transcriptomic alterations involving clinically and biologically relevant gene pathways in colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed multiregion, high-depth (384× on average) sequencing of 799 cancer-associated genes in 24 spatially separated primary tumor and nonmalignant tissues from four treatment-naïve CRC patients. We then used ultra-deep sequencing (17 075× on average) to accurately verify the presence or absence of identified somatic mutations in each sector. We also digitally measured gene expression and copy number alterations using NanoString assays. We identified the subclonal point mutations and determined the mutational timing and phylogenetic relationships among spatially separated sectors of each tumor. Truncal mutations, those shared by all sectors in the tumor, affected the well-described driver genes such as APC, TP53, and KRAS. With sequencing at 17 075×, we found that mutations first detected at a sequencing depth of 384× were in fact more widely shared among sectors than originally assessed. Interestingly, ultra-deep sequencing also revealed some mutations that were present in all spatially dispersed sectors, but at subclonal levels. Ultra-high-depth validation sequencing, copy number analysis, and gene expression profiling provided a comprehensive and accurate genomic landscape of spatial heterogeneity in CRC. Ultra-deep sequencing allowed more sensitive detection of somatic mutations and a more accurate assessment of ITH. By detecting the subclonal mutations with ultra-deep sequencing, we traced the genomic histories of each tumor and the relative timing of mutational events. We found evidence of early mixing, in which the subclonal ancestral mutations intermixed across the sectors before the acquisition of subsequent nontruncal mutations. Our findings also indicate that

  1. Cancer Cells Acquire Mitotic Drug Resistance Properties Through Beta I-Tubulin Mutations and Alterations in the Expression of Beta-Tubulin Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Wu, Su-Ying; Lee, Tian-Ren; Chang, Chi-Yen; Wu, Jian-Sung; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2010-01-01

    Background Anti-mitotic compounds (microtubule de-stabilizers) such as vincristine and vinblastine have been shown clinically successful in treating various cancers. However, development of drug-resistance cells limits their efficacies in clinical situations. Therefore, experiments were performed to determine possible drug resistance mechanisms related to the application of anti-mitotic cancer therapy. Principal Findings A KB-derived microtubule de-stabilizer-resistant KB-L30 cancer cell line was generated for this study. KB-L30 cells showed cross-resistance to various microtubule de-stabilizers including BPR0L075, vincristine and colchicine through multiple-drug resistant (MDR)-independent mechanisms. Surprisingly, KB-L30 cells showed hyper-sensitivity to the microtubule-stabilizer, paclitaxel. Results of the RT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of both class II and III β-tubulin was down-regulated in KB-L30 cells as compared to its parental KB cancer cells. In addition, DNA sequencing analysis revealed six novel mutation sites present in exon four of the βI-tubulin gene. Computational modeling indicated that a direct relationship exists between βI-tubulin mutations and alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells and this predicted model was supported by an increased microtubule assembly and reduced microtubule dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells, as shown by Western blot analysis. Conclusions and Significance Our study demonstrated that these novel mutations in exon four of the βI-tubulin induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers and hyper-sensitivity to microtubule stabilizer through an alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamics in cancer cells. Importantly, the current study reveals that cancer cells may acquire drug resistance ability to anti-mitotic compounds through multiple changes in the microtubule networks. This study further provided molecular information in drug selection for patients with

  2. Pharmacological and genetic interventions in serotonin (5-HT)(2C) receptors to alter drug abuse and dependence processes.

    PubMed

    Filip, Małgorzata; Spampinato, Umberto; McCreary, Andrew C; Przegaliński, Edmund

    2012-10-02

    The present review provides an overview on serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT)(2C) receptors and their relationship to drug dependence. We have focused our discussion on the impact of 5-HT(2C) receptors on the effects of different classes of addictive drugs, illustrated by reference to data using pharmacological and genetic tools. The neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between 5-HT(2C) receptors, with focus on the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, and drugs of abuse (using cocaine as an example) is discussed. Finally, we integrate recent nonclinical and clinical research and information with marketed products possessing 5-HT(2C) receptor binding affinities. Accordingly, available nonclinical data and some clinical observations targeting 5-HT(2C) receptors may offer innovative translational strategies for combating drug dependence.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration.

  3. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  4. GBR 12909 administration as an animal model of bipolar mania: time course of behavioral, brain oxidative alterations and effect of mood stabilizing drugs.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Ana Isabelle G; de Araújo, Maíra Moraes; da Silva Araújo, Tatiane; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Jesus Souza Machado, Michel; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms in the human dopamine transporter (DAT) are associated with bipolar endophenotype. Based on this, the acute inhibition of DAT using GBR12909 causes behavioral alterations that are prevented by valproate (VAL), being related to a mania-like model. Herein our first aim was to analyze behavioral and brain oxidative alterations during a 24 h period post-GBR12909 to better characterize this model. Our second aim was to determine the preventive effects of lithium (Li) or VAL 2 h post-GBR12909. For this, adult male mice received GBR12909 or saline being evaluated at 2, 4, 8, 12 or 24 h post-administration. Hyperlocomotion, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation in brain areas were assessed at all these time-points. GBR12909 caused hyperlocomotion at 2 and 24 h. Rearing behavior increased only at 2 h. GSH levels decreased in the hippocampus and striatum at the time points of 2, 4, 8 and 12 h. Increased lipid peroxidation was detected at the time-points of 2 and 12 h in all brain areas studied. At the time-point of 2 h post-GBR12909 Li prevented the hyperlocomotion and rearing alterations, while VAL prevented only rearing alterations. Both drugs prevented pro-oxidative changes. In conclusion, we observed that the main behavioral and oxidative alterations took place at the time-period of 2 h post-GBR12909, what points to this time-period as the best for the assessment of alterations in this model. Furthermore, the present study expands the predictive validity of the model by the determination of the preventive effects of Li.

  5. Prenatal Stress Alters Progestogens to Mediate Susceptibility to Sex-Typical, Stress-Sensitive Disorders, such as Drug Abuse: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Paris, Jason J.; Osborne, Danielle M.; Campbell, Joannalee C.; Kippin, Tod E.

    2011-01-01

    Maternal–offspring interactions begin prior to birth. Experiences of the mother during gestation play a powerful role in determining the developmental programming of the central nervous system. In particular, stress during gestation alters developmental programming of the offspring resulting in susceptibility to sex-typical and stress-sensitive neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, neither these effects, nor the underlying mechanisms, are well understood. Our hypothesis is that allopregnanolone, during gestation, plays a particularly vital role in mitigating effects of stress on the developing fetus and may mediate, in part, alterations apparent throughout the lifespan. Specifically, altered balance between glucocorticoids and progestogens during critical periods of development (stemming from psychological, immunological, and/or endocrinological stressors during gestation) may permanently influence behavior, brain morphology, and/or neuroendocrine-sensitive processes. 5α-reduced progestogens are integral in the developmental programming of sex-typical, stress-sensitive, and/or disorder-relevant phenotypes. Prenatal stress (PNS) may alter these responses and dysregulate allopregnanolone and its normative effects on stress axis function. As an example of a neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and/or neurodegenerative process, this review focuses on responsiveness to drugs of abuse, which is sensitive to PNS and progestogen milieu. This review explores the notion that allopregnanolone may effect, or be influenced by, PNS, with consequences for neurodevelopmental-, neuropsychiatric-, and/or neurodegenerative- relevant processes, such as addiction. PMID:22022315

  6. Prenatal Stress Alters Progestogens to Mediate Susceptibility to Sex-Typical, Stress-Sensitive Disorders, such as Drug Abuse: A Review.

    PubMed

    Frye, Cheryl A; Paris, Jason J; Osborne, Danielle M; Campbell, Joannalee C; Kippin, Tod E

    2011-01-01

    Maternal-offspring interactions begin prior to birth. Experiences of the mother during gestation play a powerful role in determining the developmental programming of the central nervous system. In particular, stress during gestation alters developmental programming of the offspring resulting in susceptibility to sex-typical and stress-sensitive neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, neither these effects, nor the underlying mechanisms, are well understood. Our hypothesis is that allopregnanolone, during gestation, plays a particularly vital role in mitigating effects of stress on the developing fetus and may mediate, in part, alterations apparent throughout the lifespan. Specifically, altered balance between glucocorticoids and progestogens during critical periods of development (stemming from psychological, immunological, and/or endocrinological stressors during gestation) may permanently influence behavior, brain morphology, and/or neuroendocrine-sensitive processes. 5α-reduced progestogens are integral in the developmental programming of sex-typical, stress-sensitive, and/or disorder-relevant phenotypes. Prenatal stress (PNS) may alter these responses and dysregulate allopregnanolone and its normative effects on stress axis function. As an example of a neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and/or neurodegenerative process, this review focuses on responsiveness to drugs of abuse, which is sensitive to PNS and progestogen milieu. This review explores the notion that allopregnanolone may effect, or be influenced by, PNS, with consequences for neurodevelopmental-, neuropsychiatric-, and/or neurodegenerative- relevant processes, such as addiction.

  7. Development of a Prediction Model for Diagnosis of Acute Poisoning in Patients with Altered Mental Status and Absent History of Alcohol/Drug Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Robert

    2017-09-05

    Diagnosis of acute poisoning in patients with altered mental status and absent history is a challenging diagnostic problem in clinical practice. The aims of the study were to develop a simple clinical tool to stratify risk of acute poisoning in patients with altered mental states and no history of alcohol/drug ingestion, and develop a prediction model using initial observations from which a simple risk score could be derived. The study was carried out on non-trauma patients aged 15 years and older admitted with altered mental states and no history of alcohol or drug ingestion. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were carried out and a score was derived and validated. There were 607 patients included, with mean age of 60.3 years and 54% were male. The regression model performed moderately well on both the training and validation sets with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.834 and 0.844, respectively. The risk score correlated with the regression model (R(2) = 0.969). At cutoff thresholds of 20% for the model and 2 for the score, sensitivity and specificity of the regression model (67.6% and 85.6%) and the score (67.6% and 85.4%) were moderate, while positive predictive values were low (43.4%) and negative predictive values were high (94.2%) for both the regression model and the score. A prediction model with a derived risk score was developed with a high negative predictive value and may have potential in assessing risk of poisoning in altered mental status and may have value in a prehospital environment or at triage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Network-Level Dysconnectivity in Drug-Naïve First-Episode Psychosis: Dissociating Transdiagnostic and Diagnosis-Specific Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Qiyong; Hu, Xinyu; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Xu, Xin; Lui, Su; Crossley, Nicolas; Wu, Min; Zhu, Hongyan; Mechelli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The neuroimaging literature provides compelling evidence for functional dysconnectivity in people with psychosis. However, it is likely that at least some of the observed alterations represent secondary effects of illness chronicity and/or antipsychotic medication. In addition, the extent to which these alterations are specific to psychosis or represent a transdiagnostic feature of psychiatric illness remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the diagnostic specificity of functional dysconnectivity in drug-naïve first-episode psychosis (FEP). We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and functional connectivity analysis to estimate network-level connectivity in 50 patients with FEP, 50 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), 50 patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 122 healthy controls (HCs). The FEP, MDD, and PTSD groups showed reductions in intranetwork connectivity of the default mode network relative to the HC group (p<0.05 corrected); therefore, intranetwork alterations were expressed across the three diagnostic groups. In addition, the FEP group showed heightened internetwork connectivity between the default mode network, particularly the anterior cingulate cortex, and the central executive network relative to the MDD, PTSD, and HC groups (p<0.05 corrected); therefore, internetwork alterations were specific to the FEP. These findings suggest that network-level alterations are present in individuals with a first episode of psychosis who have not been exposed to antipsychotic medication. In addition, they suggest a dissociation between aberrant internetwork connectivity as a distinctive feature of psychosis and aberrant intranetwork connectivity as a transdiagnostic feature of psychiatric illness. PMID:27782128

  9. Ethanol-induced Locomotor Sensitization in DBA/2J Mice is Associated with Alterations in GABAA Subunit Gene Expression and Behavioral Sensitivity to GABAA Acting Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Linsenbardt, David N.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to ethanol may produce increased sensitivity to its acute locomotor stimulant actions, a process referred to as locomotor sensitization. Neuroadaptation within certain brain circuits, including those possessing GABAA receptors, may underlie locomotor sensitization to ethanol. Indeed, GABAA receptors are documented mediators of ethanol's cellular and behavioral actions. Moreover, because subunit composition of this receptor is predictive of its pharmacology, it is possible that alterations in subunit composition contribute to the expression of locomotor sensitization to ethanol. The goal of the present study was to determine if alterations in GABAA subunit composition are associated with the expression of locomotor sensitization in DBA/2J mice, a strain known to be particularly susceptible to the development of this behavioral phenomenon. Following a modified 14 day sensitization procedure (Phillips et al., 1994) relative changes in GABAA subunit gene expression were assessed in discrete mesolimbic brain regions. To determine if the observed changes in gene expression produced functional changes in the locomotor responses to drugs known to either preferentially or generally activate GABAA receptors normally possessing the significantly altered subunits, separate cohorts of animals were challenged with one of several low doses of zolpidem (α1-selective), etomidate (β2/3-selective), or flurazepam (γ2-directed) and assessed for locomotor alterations. Sensitized animals displayed increased expression of the α1, β2, and γ2 (v1) subunits in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) but not Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA). Additionally, sensitized animals displayed altered sensitivity to the locomotor actions of etomidate and flurazepam. These results support the hypothesis that neuroadaptive changes in GABAA subunit composition participate in the expression of locomotor sensitization. PMID:20219525

  10. Intratumoral chemotherapy with paclitaxel liposome combined with systemic chemotherapy: a new method of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bei; Sun, Lixin; Yan, Xi; Ai, Zhenzhong; Xu, Jinzhi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intratumoral chemotherapy with paclitaxel liposome combined with systemic chemotherapy as induction therapy in clinical stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between January 2011 and July 2014, 48 patients, stage III, performance status 0-1, with unresectable clinical stage IIIA or IIIB NSCLC suitable for definitive radiation treatment, were included in the study. Patients with T3N1M0 and T4 (ipsilateral lung nodules) N0-1M0 were not included. Patients were given 3 cycles of chemotherapy every 3 weeks. Carboplatin (AUC5 by i.v. on day 1) and gemcitabine (i.v. 1,000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8) were administered. Paclitaxel liposome was injected at 1-3 mg/ml concentration into the tumor lesion by computed tomography-guided percutaneous fine-needle intratumoral injection and proven malignant lymph nodes according to pretreatment histological/cytological results by endobronchial ultrasound drug delivery with a needle on day 1 and day 8. Toxicity was assessed on days 8 and 22 in each cycle. Overall response rate (ORR) evaluation was performed at the end of cycle 3. Out of the 48 enrolled patients, 28 were males and 20 females, 19 patients had stage IIIA and 29 stage IIIB NSCLC. Thirty-six partial responses and two complete responses were observed, for an ORR of 81 %. The most frequent G3-G4 toxicity included neutropenia (in 15 % of cases), hypertransaminasemia (6 %), and diarrhea (4 %). A median PFS of 16.5 months (95 % CI 13.7-19.2) and median OS of 23.2 months (95 % CI 20.0-26.3) were observed. Eleven stage IIIA patients underwent surgery, for a resection rate of 58 %. Intratumoral chemotherapy with paclitaxel liposome combined with systemic chemotherapy demonstrated a considerable disease response and resection rate, with acceptable toxicity.

  11. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of structural alterations in first-episode, drug-naive patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Peng, W; Sun, H; Kuang, W; Li, W; Jia, Z; Gong, Q

    2016-01-01

    Previous structural imaging studies have found evidence of brain morphometric changes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but these studies rarely excluded compounding effects of certain important factors, such as medications and long duration of illnesses. Furthermore, the neurobiological mechanism of the macroscopic findings of structural alterations in MDD patients remains unclear. In this study, we utilized magnetization transfer imaging, a quantitative measure of the macromolecular structural integrity of brain tissue, to identify biophysical alterations, which are represented by a magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), in MDD patients. To ascertain whether MTR changes occur independent of volume loss, we also conduct voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis. The participants included 27 first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients and 28 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Whole-brain voxel-based analysis was used to compare MTR and gray matter volume across groups and to analyse correlations between MTR and age, symptom severity, and illness duration. The patients exhibited significantly lower MTR in the left superior parietal lobule and left middle occipital gyrus compared with healthy controls, which may be related to the attentional and cognitive dysfunction in MDD patients. The VBM analysis revealed significantly increased gray matter volume in right postcentral gyrus in MDD patients. These findings in first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients may reflect microstructural gray matter changes in the parietal and occipital cortices close to illness onset that existed before volume loss, and thus potentially provide important new insight into the early neurobiology of depression. PMID:27824357

  12. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of structural alterations in first-episode, drug-naive patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Peng, W; Sun, H; Kuang, W; Li, W; Jia, Z; Gong, Q

    2016-11-08

    Previous structural imaging studies have found evidence of brain morphometric changes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but these studies rarely excluded compounding effects of certain important factors, such as medications and long duration of illnesses. Furthermore, the neurobiological mechanism of the macroscopic findings of structural alterations in MDD patients remains unclear. In this study, we utilized magnetization transfer imaging, a quantitative measure of the macromolecular structural integrity of brain tissue, to identify biophysical alterations, which are represented by a magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), in MDD patients. To ascertain whether MTR changes occur independent of volume loss, we also conduct voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis. The participants included 27 first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients and 28 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Whole-brain voxel-based analysis was used to compare MTR and gray matter volume across groups and to analyse correlations between MTR and age, symptom severity, and illness duration. The patients exhibited significantly lower MTR in the left superior parietal lobule and left middle occipital gyrus compared with healthy controls, which may be related to the attentional and cognitive dysfunction in MDD patients. The VBM analysis revealed significantly increased gray matter volume in right postcentral gyrus in MDD patients. These findings in first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients may reflect microstructural gray matter changes in the parietal and occipital cortices close to illness onset that existed before volume loss, and thus potentially provide important new insight into the early neurobiology of depression.

  13. Garlic attenuates chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in rats by altering the phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Mohamed; Musthapa, M Syed; Abidi, Parveen; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rahman, Qamar

    2003-01-01

    Asbestos and its carcinogenic properties have been extensively documented. Asbestos exposure induces diverse cellular events associated with lung injury. Previously, we have shown that treatment with chrysotile shows significant alteration in phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzyme system. In this study we have examined some potential mechanisms by which garlic treatment attenuates chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in rat. Female Wistar rats received an intratracheal instillation of 5 mg chrysotile (0.5 mL saline) as well as intragastric garlic treatment (1% body weight (v/w); 6 days per week). Effect of garlic treatment was evaluated after 1, 15, 30, 90, and 180 days by assaying aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in rat lung microsome. The results showed that AHH and TBARS formation were significantly reduced at day 90 and day 180 in chrysotile treated garlic cofed rats; GSH recovered 15 days later to the near normal level and GST elevated significantly after treatment of garlic as compared to chrysotile alone treated rat lung microsome. The data obtained shows that inhibition of AHH activity and induction of GST activity could be contributing factor in chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in garlic cofed rats. However, recovery of GSH and inhibition of TBARS formation by garlic and its constituent(s) showed that garlic may give protection by altering the drug metabolizing enzyme system.

  14. Chronic cardiac reactions. IV. Effect of drugs and altered functional loads on cardiac energetics as inferred from myofibrillar ATPase and the myosin isoenzyme population.

    PubMed

    Rupp, H; Wahl, R; Jacob, R

    1987-01-01

    A major determinant of myocardial energetics is the ATPase activity of myofibrils. In order to account for chronic changes in myofibrillar ATPase, the state equation of the intertropomyosin-interaction model of Tawada et al. was extended by introducing the rates of cross-bridge cycling of myofibrils composed of V-1 or V-3 and the concentration of the myosin isoenzymes. Cross-bridge cycling rates of 1.0 or 0.7 were derived for myofibrils composed of V-1 or V-3, respectively. Ca2+ responsiveness and positive co-operativity were not significantly affected by the myosin isoenzymes. Redistribution of the myosin isoenzyme population and thus altered myocardial energetics was observed following administration of various drugs and as a result of different functional loads. Besides thyroid hormones, catecholamines had a marked influence on myosin. Reducing the adrenergic drive by administration of atenolol, guanethidine or reserpine led to a shift in the direction of V-3. Since serum T3 levels were not significantly reduced by these interventions, the drugs act most probably at the organ level. The functional states responsible for the increase in the proportion of V-3 (pressure load, intermittent feeding, schedule-induced stress) also did not affect circulating T3 in a manner that could entirely explain the redistribution. Hypertrophy-induced dilution of sympathetic nerve fibres or reduced adrenergic responsiveness most likely play a role in the redistribution. An increase in the proportion of V-1 was observed following swimming exercise but not, however, after spontaneous or enforced running. In the swim-exercised rats, T3 was markedly reduced. Thus, the trigger reactions linked most probably to the high adrenergic drive during swimming have to overcome the lower T3 level. It is concluded that myocardial energetics can be decisively altered by a variety of drugs and functional loads, whereby the trigger reactions leading to an altered gene expression of myosin cannot be

  15. Monoclonal origin of peritoneal implants and lymph node deposits in serous borderline ovarian tumors (s-BOT) with high intratumoral homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Lars-Christian; Höhn, Anne K; Einenkel, Jens; Siebolts, Udo

    2014-11-01

    Molecular studies have shown that the most prevalent mutations in serous ovarian borderline tumors (s-BOT) are BRAF and/or KRAS alterations. About one third of s-BOT represent peritoneal implants and/or lymph node involvement. These extraovarian deposits may be monoclonal or polyclonal in origin. To test both the hypotheses, mutational analyses using pyrosequencing for BRAF codon 600 and KRAS codon 12/13 and 61 of microdissected tissue was performed in 15 s-BOT and their invasive and noninvasive peritoneal implants. Two to 6 implants from different peritoneal sites were examined in 13 cases. Lymph node deposits were available for the analysis in 3 cases. Six s-BOT showed mutation in exon 2 codon 12 of the KRAS proto-oncogen. Five additional cases showed BRAF p.V600E mutation representing an overall mutation rate of 73.3%. Multiple (2-6) peritoneal implants were analyzed after microdissection in 13 of 15 cases. All showed identical mutational results when compared with the ovarian site of the disease. All lymph node deposits, including those with multiple deposits in different nodes, showed identical results, suggesting high intratumoral mutational homogeneity. The evidence presented in this study and the majority of data reported in the literature support the hypothesis that s-BOT with their peritoneal implants and lymph node deposits show identical mutational status of BRAF and KRAS suggesting a monoclonal rather than a polyclonal disease regarding these both tested genetic loci. In addition, a high intratumoral genetic homogeneity can be suggested. In conclusion, the results of the present study support the monoclonal origin of s-BOT and their peritoneal implants and lymph node deposits.

  16. Niche-Dependent Gene Expression Profile of Intratumoral Heterogeneous Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Abelson, Sagi; Shamai, Yeela; Berger, Liron; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity challenges existing paradigms for anti-cancer therapy. We have previously demonstrated that the human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived cellular microenvironment in immunocompromised mice, enables functional distinction of heterogeneous tumor cells, including cells which do not grow into a tumor in a conventional direct tumor xenograft platform. We have identified and characterized six cancer cell subpopulations each clonally expanded from a single cell, derived from human ovarian clear cell carcinoma of a single tumor, to demonstrate striking intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity that is dynamically dependent on the tumor growth microenvironment. These cancer cell subpopulations, characterized as cancer stem cell subpopulations, faithfully recapitulate the full spectrum of histological phenotypic heterogeneity known for human ovarian clear cell carcinoma. Each of the six subpopulations displays a different level of morphologic and tumorigenic differentiation wherein growth in the hESC-derived microenvironment favors growth of CD44+/aldehyde dehydrogenase positive pockets of self-renewing cells that sustain tumor growth through a process of tumorigenic differentiation into CD44-/aldehyde dehydrogenase negative derivatives. Strikingly, these derivative cells display microenvironment-dependent plasticity with the capacity to restore self-renewal markers and CD44 expression. In the current study, we delineate the distinct gene expression and epigenetic profiles of two such subpopulations, representing extremes of phenotypic heterogeneity in terms of niche-dependent self-renewal and tumorigenic differentiation. By combining Gene Set Enrichment, Gene Ontology and Pathway-focused array analyses with methylation status, we propose a suite of robust differences in tumor self-renewal and differentiation pathways that underlie the striking intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity which characterize this and other solid tumor malignancies. PMID

  17. Color Doppler ultrasound and gamma imaging of intratumorally injected 500 nm iron-silica nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Alexander; Wu, Zhe; Barback, Christopher V; Viveros, Robert; Blair, Sarah L; Ellies, Lesley G; Vera, David R; Mattrey, Robert F; Kummel, Andrew C; Trogler, William C

    2013-07-23

    Perfluoropentane gas filled iron-silica nanoshells have been developed as stationary ultrasound contrast agents for marking tumors to guide surgical resection. It is critical to establish their long-term imaging efficacy, as well as biodistribution. This work shows that 500 nm Fe-SiO2 nanoshells can be imaged by color Doppler ultrasound over the course of 10 days in Py8119 tumor bearing mice. The 500 nm nonbiodegradable SiO2 and biodegradable Fe-SiO2 nanoshells were functionalized with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) ligand and radiolabeled with (111)In(3+) for biodistribution studies in nu/nu mice. The majority of radioactivity was detected in the liver and kidneys following intravenous (IV) administration of nanoshells to healthy animals. By contrast, after nanoshells were injected intratumorally, most of the radioactivity remained at the injection site; however, some nanoshells escaped into circulation and were distributed similarly as those given intravenously. For intratumoral delivery of nanoshells and IV delivery to healthy animals, little difference was seen between the biodistribution of SiO2 and biodegradable Fe-SiO2 nanoshells. However, when nanoshells were administered IV to tumor bearing mice, a significant increase was observed in liver accumulation of SiO2 nanoshells relative to biodegradable Fe-SiO2 nanoshells. Both SiO2 and Fe-SiO2 nanoshells accumulate passively in proportion to tumor mass, during intravenous delivery of nanoshells. This is the first report of the biodistribution following intratumoral injection of any biodegradable silica particle, as well as the first report demonstrating the utility of DTPA-(111)In labeling for studying silica nanoparticle biodistributions.

  18. Higher-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Elastography in Meningiomas to Determine Intratumoral Consistency

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Joshua D.; Fattahi, Nikoo; Van Gompel, J.; Arani, Arvin; Meyer, Fredric; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Link, Michael J.; Ehman, Richard; Huston, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) analyzes shear waves’ movement thorough tissue to determine stiffness. In a prior study, measurements using first-generation brain MRE techniques correlated with intraoperative observations regarding overall meningioma stiffness. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of a higher-resolution MRE technique to preoperatively detect intratumoral variations as compared to surgeon assessment. Methods Fifteen meningiomas in fourteen patients underwent MRE. Tumors with regions of distinctly different stiffness were considered heterogenous. Intratumoral portions were considered hard if there was a significant area ≥ 6 kiloPascals. A 5-point scale graded intraoperative consistency. A durometer semi-quantitatively measured surgical specimen hardness. Statistics included Chi-squared, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predicative values (PPV and NPV), and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results Between MRE and surgery respectively, 9(60%) vs 7(47%) tumors were homogenous; 6(40%) vs 8(53%) tumors were heterogenous; 6(40%) vs 10(67%) tumors had hard portions; and 14(93%) vs 12(80%) tumors had soft portions. MRE sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were: for heterogeneity, 75%, 100%, 100%, and 87%; for hardness, 60%, 100%, 100%, and 56%; and for softness, 100%, 33%, 86%, and 100%. Overall, 10(67%) tumors matched well with MRE and intraoperative consistency and correlated between intraoperative observations (p=0.018) and durometer readings (p=0.046). Tumor size ≤3.5 cm or vascular tumors were more likely to be inconsistent (p<0.05). Conclusions MRE was excellent at ruling-in heterogeneity with hard portions, but less effective in ruling-out heterogeneity and hard portions, particularly in tumors more vascular or <3.5 cm. MRE is the first technology capable of prospectively evaluating intratumoral stiffness and, with further refinement, will likely prove useful in preoperative planning. PMID:26197204

  19. An Advance in Prescription Opioid Vaccines: Overdose Mortality Reduction and Extraordinary Alteration of Drug Half-Life.

    PubMed

    Kimishima, Atsushi; Wenthur, Cody J; Zhou, Bin; Janda, Kim D

    2017-01-20

    Prescription opioids (POs) such as oxycodone and hydrocodone are highly effective medications for pain management, yet they also present a substantial risk for abuse and addiction. The consumption of POs has been escalating worldwide, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths due to overdose each year. Pharmacokinetic strategies based upon vaccination present an attractive avenue to suppress PO abuse. Herein, the preparation of two active PO vaccines is described that were found to elicit high-affinity antiopioid antibodies through a structurally congruent drug-hapten design. Administration of these vaccines resulted in a significant blockade of opioid analgesic activity, along with an unprecedented increase in drug serum half-life and protection against lethal overdose.

  20. Cell proliferation and drug sensitivity of human glioblastoma cells are altered by the stable modulation of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II.

    PubMed

    Cividini, F; Cros-Perrial, E; Pesi, R; Machon, C; Allegrini, S; Camici, M; Dumontet, C; Jordheim, L P; Tozzi, M G

    2015-08-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) has been reported to be involved in cell survival, nucleotide metabolism and in the cellular response to anticancer drugs. With the aim to further evaluate the role of this enzyme in cell biology, we stably modulated its expression the human glioblastoma cell ADF in which the transient inhibition of cN-II has been shown to induce cell death. Stable cell lines were obtained both with inhibition, obtained with plasmids coding cN-II-targeting short hairpin RNA, and stimulation, obtained with plasmids coding Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP)-fused wild type cN-II or a GFP-fused hyperactive mutant (GFP-cN-II-R367Q), of cN-II expression. Silenced cells displayed a decreased proliferation rate while the over expressing cell lines displayed an increased proliferation rate as evidenced by impedance measurement using the xCELLigence device. The expression of nucleotide metabolism relevant genes was only slightly different between cell lines, suggesting a compensatory mechanism in transfected cells. Cells with decreased cN-II expression were resistant to the nucleoside analog fludarabine confirming the involvement of cN-II in the metabolism of this drug. Finally, we observed sensitivity to cisplatin in cN-II silenced cells and resistance to this same drug in cN-II over-expressing cells indicating an involvement of cN-II in the mechanism of action of platinum derivatives, and most probably in DNA repair. In summary, our findings confirm some previous data on the role of cN-II in the sensitivity of cancer cells to cancer drugs, and suggest its involvement in other cellular phenomenon such as cell proliferation.

  1. Perpetrators of pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions arising from altered cytochrome P450 activity: a criteria-based assessment

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Thomas M; Lin, Frank P Y; Miners, John O; Doogue, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To catalogue the perpetrators of CYP-mediated pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions (PK-DDIs) using clinically relevant criteria, and to compare this with an analogous catalogue. METHODS Candidate inhibitors and inducers of CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A (‘perpetrators’) were evaluated using published clinical pharmacokinetic interaction studies. Studies were selected on the basis of ≥six human subjects, use of a validated in vivo probe substrate for the CYP enzyme, and clinically relevant dosing. Inhibitors were described according to the FDA classifications of strong, moderate or weak, whereas inducers were classified as major (≥twofold decrease in AUC) or weak (Drug Interaction Table (CDIT) were compared with the ‘accepted’ major perpetrators. RESULTS From a list of 216 candidate drugs (349 CYP-perpetrator pairs, CYP-PPs), 36 inhibitors and eight inducers were accepted as major perpetrators of PK-DDIs, resulting in 58 CYP-PPs. In comparison, the clinical version of the CDIT had a sensitivity of 33% and a positive predictive value of 68%. One hundred and ninety-nine CYP-PPs were rejected as major perpetrators, and 92 CYP-PPs had insufficient published human pharmacokinetic data for robust classification. CONCLUSIONS Using a criteria-based assessment, the number of drugs that are proven or likely major perpetrators of CYP-mediated PK-DDIs is relatively small. Current clinical decision support on PK-DDIs is inconsistent with the published evidence and can be improved using simple criteria. PMID:21223357

  2. Causal connectivity alterations of cortical-subcortical circuit anchored on reduced hemodynamic response brain regions in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing; Zou, Ke; He, Zongling; Sun, Xueli; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Some efforts were done to investigate the disruption of brain causal connectivity networks involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) using Granger causality (GC) analysis. However, the homogenous hemodynamic response function (HRF) assumption over the brain may disturb the inference of temporal precedence. Here we applied a blind deconvolution approach to examine the altered HRF shape in first-episode, drug-naïve MDD patients. The regions with abnormal HRF shape in patients were chosen as seeds to detect the GC alterations in MDD. The results demonstrated significantly decreased magnitude of spontaneous hemodynamic response of the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the caudate nucleus (CAU) in MDD comparing to healthy controls, suggesting MDD patients likely had alterations in neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular physiology in these two regions. GC mapping showed increased/decreased GC in OFC-/CAU centered networks in MDD. The outgoing GC values from OFC to anterior cingulate cortex and occipital regions were positively correlated with Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, while the incoming GC from insula, middle and superior temporal gyrus to CAU were negatively correlated with HAMD scores of MDD. The abnormalities of directional connections in the cortico-subcortico-cerebellar network may lead to unbalanced integrating the emotional-related information for MDD, and further exacerbating depressive symptoms. PMID:26911651

  3. Plasticizing effect of ibuprofen induced an alteration of drug released from Kollidon SR matrices produced by direct compression.

    PubMed

    Wiranidchapong, Chutima; Ruangpayungsak, Nuchnan; Suwattanasuk, Pattaraporn; Shuwisitkul, Duangratana; Tanvichien, Sujimon

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of storage temperature on drug release from matrices containing 10, 40 and 70% w/w ibuprofen in Kollidon® SR (KSR). The matrix tablets were produced by direct compression and then kept at 30 and 45 °C for 3 months. Drug release from the matrix tablets was examined after storage for 0, 1, 4 and 12 weeks. Scanning electron microscope was used to reveal physical appearance of the tablet surface at the respective time intervals. In addition, differential scanning calorimeter was used to investigate glass transition temperature (Tg) of ibuprofen in KSR at 0-100% w/w based on the principle of Gordon-Taylor equation. At 45 °C, the dissolution of ibuprofen in KSR as well as the coalescence of polymer particles were observed to be higher than those of storage at 30 °C. The physical state of ibuprofen dispersed in the polymeric matrix and degree of polymer coalescence led to the variation of drug release. The coalescence of polymer particles was a result of the polymer transition from glassy to rubbery state according to water absorption of KSR and plasticizing effect of ibuprofen. The reduction of the Tg of ibuprofen blended with KSR could be better described by the Kwei equation, a modified version of Gordon-Taylor equation.

  4. Hydration and N-acetyl-l-cysteine alter the microstructure of human nail and bovine hoof: implications for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueiras-Nieto, L; Gómez-Amoza, J L; Delgado-Charro, M B; Otero-Espinar, F J

    2011-12-20

    This work aimed to (a) characterize the microstructure and porosity of human nail and bovine hoof by mercury intrusion porosimetry and SEM image analysis, (b) study the effects of hydration and of N-acetyl-l-cysteine treatment on the microstructure of both membranes, and (c) determine whether the microstructural modifications were associated with changes in drug penetration measured by standard diffusion studies. Bovine hoof surface is more porous than nail surface although there were no differences between the mean surface pore sizes. Hydration and N-acetyl-l-cysteine increased the roughness and apparent surface porosity, and the porosity determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry of both membranes. Pore-Cor™ was used to generate tridimensional structures having percolation characteristics comparable to nail and hooves. The modeled structures were horizontally banded having an inner less-porous area which disappeared upon treatment. Treatment increased the predicted permeability of the simulated structures. Triamcinolone permeation increased significantly for hooves treated N-acetyl-l-cysteine, i.e., the membranes for which microstructural and permeability changes were the largest. Thus, microstructural changes determined via mercury intrusion porosimetry and subsequently modeled by Pore-Cor™ were related to drug diffusion. Further refinement of the technique will allow fast screening of penetration enhancers to be used in ungual drug delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pan-cancer analysis of the extent and consequences of intratumor heterogeneity | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) drives neoplastic progression and therapeutic resistance. We used the bioinformatics tools 'expanding ploidy and allele frequency on nested subpopulations' (EXPANDS) and PyClone to detect clones that are present at a ≥10% frequency in 1,165 exome sequences from tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas. 86% of tumors across 12 cancer types had at least two clones. ITH in the morphology of nuclei was associated with genetic ITH (Spearman's correlation coefficient, ρ = 0.24-0.41; P < 0.001).

  6. Effect of Drug Alprazolam on Restrained Stress Induced Alteration of Serum Cortisol and Antioxidant Vitamins (Vitamin C and E) in Male Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kori, Rohini Sharanappa; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H.; Desai, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stress can cause harmful effects in the body that induce a wide range of biochemical and behavioural changes. As anti-stress drugs are routinely used to combat stress hence study is needed to assess the contraindication of these drugs in the physiological systems. Aim To investigate the effect of alprazolam on restrained stress induced alteration of serum cortisol, and antioxidant vitamin levels in male albino rats. Materials and Methods Adult male albino rats (body weight 175-225g) were divided into four groups of six animals in each. Group I (control), kept undisturbed in the metabolic cage throughout the 42 days experimental period. Group II (stress) rats were kept in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 hr/day for 42 days. Group III (stress+ withdrawal) rats were stressed for 21 days and withdrawal of stress for remaining 21 days (total 42 days). Group IV (stress + alprazolam) rats were only stressed for 21 days and treated with drug alprazolam (5mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal) in continuation with stress for remaining 21 days (total period is 42 days). At the end of 42 days all the rats were sacrificed and serum cortisol, vitamin C and E levels were estimated. Results Group II (stressed) showed a significant increase in serum cortisol level with concomitant decrease of serum vitamin C and E levels. Group III (withdrawal) and Group IV (+alprazolam) rats showed significant reduction of serum cortisol along with subsequent increase of serum vitamin C and E concentrations. Conclusion Results indicate a possible antioxidant effect of alprazolam on restrained stress induced alteration of serum cortisol and antioxidant vitamin levels. PMID:27656428

  7. Effect of Drug Alprazolam on Restrained Stress Induced Alteration of Serum Cortisol and Antioxidant Vitamins (Vitamin C and E) in Male Albino Rats.

    PubMed

    Kori, Rohini Sharanappa; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Desai, S D; Das, Kusal Kanti

    2016-08-01

    Stress can cause harmful effects in the body that induce a wide range of biochemical and behavioural changes. As anti-stress drugs are routinely used to combat stress hence study is needed to assess the contraindication of these drugs in the physiological systems. To investigate the effect of alprazolam on restrained stress induced alteration of serum cortisol, and antioxidant vitamin levels in male albino rats. Adult male albino rats (body weight 175-225g) were divided into four groups of six animals in each. Group I (control), kept undisturbed in the metabolic cage throughout the 42 days experimental period. Group II (stress) rats were kept in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 hr/day for 42 days. Group III (stress+ withdrawal) rats were stressed for 21 days and withdrawal of stress for remaining 21 days (total 42 days). Group IV (stress + alprazolam) rats were only stressed for 21 days and treated with drug alprazolam (5mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal) in continuation with stress for remaining 21 days (total period is 42 days). At the end of 42 days all the rats were sacrificed and serum cortisol, vitamin C and E levels were estimated. Group II (stressed) showed a significant increase in serum cortisol level with concomitant decrease of serum vitamin C and E levels. Group III (withdrawal) and Group IV (+alprazolam) rats showed significant reduction of serum cortisol along with subsequent increase of serum vitamin C and E concentrations. Results indicate a possible antioxidant effect of alprazolam on restrained stress induced alteration of serum cortisol and antioxidant vitamin levels.

  8. Patient-Specific Detection of Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by Arterial Spin Labeling in Drug-Resistant Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Del Felice, Alessandra; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; Arcaro, Chiara; Formaggio, Emanuela; Mai, Roberto; Chappell, Michael; Beltramello, Alberto; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological and hemodynamic data can be integrated to accurately and precisely identify the generators of abnormal electrical activity in drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for quantitative noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), can provide a direct measure of variations in cerebral perfusion associated with the epileptic focus. In this study, we aimed to confirm the ASL diagnostic value in the identification of the epileptogenic zone, as compared to electrical source imaging (ESI) results, and to apply a template-based approach to depict statistically significant CBF alterations. Standard video-electroencephalography (EEG), high-density EEG, and ASL were performed to identify clinical seizure semiology and noninvasively localize the epileptic focus in 12 drug-resistant focal epilepsy patients. The same ASL protocol was applied to a control group of 17 healthy volunteers from which a normal perfusion template was constructed using a mixed-effect approach. CBF maps of each patient were then statistically compared to the reference template to identify perfusion alterations. Significant hypo- and hyperperfused areas were identified in all cases, showing good agreement between ASL and ESI results. Interictal hypoperfusion was observed at the site of the seizure in 10/12 patients and early postictal hyperperfusion in 2/12. The epileptic focus was correctly identified within the surgical resection margins in the 5 patients who underwent lobectomy, all of which had good postsurgical outcomes. The combined use of ESI and ASL can aid in the noninvasive evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients. PMID:25946055

  9. Intratumoral stages of metastatic cells: a synthesis of ontogeny, Rho/Rac GTPases, epithelial-mesenchymal transitions, and more.

    PubMed

    Bustelo, Xosé R

    2012-09-01

    Metastasis is one of the clinical parameters that has a strong negative influence on the prognosis of cancer patients. In recent years, significant advances have furthered our understanding of this process at the molecular and biological levels. This paper will discuss recent discoveries relating to the earliest, intra-tumoral stages of metastasis in cancer cells, specifically focusing on: (i) the development of metastatic traits during primary tumorigenesis; (ii) intrinsic and extrinsic cancer cell programs associated with malignant traits; (iii) the intra-tumoral migration patterns of cancer cells and the dynamic roles played by the Rho/Rac GTPases and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in this process; and (iv) the genetic strategies used by metastatic cancer cells to promote intra-tumoral cell migration and their subsequent escape to peripheral tissues. Finally, the therapeutic and diagnostic relevance of this information will be discussed, as well as potential future developments. Copyright © 2012 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Metabolic flux-driven sialylation alters internalization, recycling, and drug sensitivity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Mohit P.; Tan, Elaine; Saeui, Christopher T.; Bovonratwet, Patawut; Sklar, Samuel; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    In prior work we reported that advanced stage, drug-resistant pancreatic cancer cells (the SW1990 line) can be sensitized to the EGFR-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib and gefitinib by treatment with 1,3,4-O-Bu3ManNAc (Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. (2015) 25(6):1223-7). Here we provide mechanistic insights into how this compound inhibits EGFR activity and provides synergy with TKI drugs. First, we showed that the sialylation of the EGFR receptor was at most only modestly enhanced (by ∼20 to 30%) compared to overall ∼2-fold increase in cell surface levels of this sugar. Second, flux-driven sialylation did not alter EGFR dimerization as has been reported for cancer cell lines that experience increased sialylation due to spontaneous mutations. Instead, we present evidence that 1,3,4-O-Bu3ManNAc treatment weakens the galectin lattice, increases the internalization of EGFR, and shifts endosomal trafficking towards non-clathrin mediated (NCM) endocytosis. Finally, by evaluating downstream targets of EGFR signaling, we linked synergy between 1,3,4-O-Bu3ManNAc and existing TKI drugs to a shift from clathrin-coated endocytosis (which allows EGFR signaling to continue after internalization) towards NCM endocytosis, which targets internalized moieties for degradation and thereby rapidly diminishes signaling. PMID:27613843

  11. Imaging Intratumoral Nanoparticle Uptake after Combining Nanoembolization with Various Ablative Therapies in Hepatic VX2 Rabbit Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Alda L; Melancon, Marites P.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Figueira, Tomas Appleton; Dixon, Katherine; McWatters, Amanda; Zhou, Min; Huang, Qian; Mawlawi, Osama; Dunner, Kenneth; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Combining image-guided therapy techniques for the treatment of liver cancers is a strategy that is being used to improve local tumor control rates. Here, we evaluate the intratumoral uptake of nanoparticles used in combination with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), or laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). Eight rabbits with VX2 tumor in the liver underwent one of four treatments: (i) nanoembolization (NE) with radiolabeled, hollow gold nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (64Cu-PEG-HAuNS-DOX); (ii) NE+RFA; (iii) NE+IRE; (iv) NE+LITT. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was obtained 1-hr or 18-hrs after intervention. Tissue samples were collected for autoradiography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. PET/CT imaging at 1-hr showed focal deposition of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor only after NE+RFA but at 18-hrs, all animals had focal accumulation of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor region. Autoradiograph analysis demonstrated nanoparticle deposition in the tumor and in the ablated tissues adjacent to the tumor when NE was combined with ablation. TEM results showed the intracellular uptake of nanoparticles in tumor only after NE+IRE. Nanoparticles demonstrated a structural change, suggesting direct interaction, potentially leading to drug release, only after NE+LITT. The findings demonstrate that a combined NE and ablation treatment technique for liver tumors is feasible, resulting in deposition of nanoparticles in and around the tumor. Depending on the ablative energy applied, different effects are seen on nanoparticle localization and structure. These effects should be considered when designing nanoparticles for use in combination with ablation technologies. PMID:27305763

  12. Technique, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and efficacy of intratumoral etanidazole and radiotherapy for treatment of spontaneous feline oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.M.; LaCreta, F.; Helfand, S.; VanWinkle, T.; Curran, W.J. Jr.; Brown, D.Q.; Hanks, G. )

    1991-04-01

    The histologic appearance, locoregional recurrence, and rate/site of metastases of spontaneous feline oral squamous cell carcinoma are similar to head and neck cancer in humans. A feasibility study of intratumoral Etanidazole, a hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation therapy were instituted in this model. Eleven cats with feline squamous cell carcinoma were treated with intratumoral Etanidazole and radiation therapy. Total Etanidazole doses were 1.5-24.0 gms/m2 (0.5-6.9 gms). The tumor partial response rate was 100% (11/11); the median volume regression was 70%. All cats have died as a result of tumor recurrence or tumor-related complications. Median survival was 116 days. Ten cats have been autopsied. Non-necrotic and necrotic tumor cells were identified at the treatment site in all cats. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in six cats. Following intravenous infusion, the plasma elimination of the Etanidazole was biexponential. The systemic availability following intratumoral administration was 61.2 +/- 21.1%. Peak plasma Etanidazole levels were observed 14 minutes following intratumoral injection, after which elimination was biexponential. Thirty minutes following intratumoral Etanidazole administration, tumor Etanidazole levels were 62.8% of plasma levels. Feline squamous cell carcinoma appears to be a useful model of human head and neck cancer. Cats tolerate substantial doses of intratumoral and intravenous Etanidazole. Etanidazole and radiation therapy cause rapid regression, but not cure, of feline squamous cell carcinoma. There is a similarity between the intravenous kinetics of Etanidazole in humans and cats. Further studies in this model are planned.

  13. Fulvestrant treatment alters MDM2 protein turnover and sensitivity of human breast carcinoma cells to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Dolfi, Sonia C; Jäger, Adriana V; Medina, Daniel J; Haffty, Bruce G; Yang, Jin-Ming; Hirshfield, Kim M

    2014-08-01

    The human homologue of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) is overexpressed in tumors and contributes to tumorigenesis through inhibition of p53 activity. We investigated the effect of the anti-estrogen fulvestrant on MDM2 expression and sensitivity of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cell lines to chemotherapeutics. Fulvestrant down-regulated MDM2 through increased protein turnover. Fulvestrant blocked estrogen-dependent up-regulation of MDM2 and decreased basal expression of MDM2 in the absence of estradiol. As combinations of fulvestrant with doxorubicin, etoposide or paclitaxel were synergistic, altering cell cycle distribution and increasing cell death, this provides rationale for testing combinatorial chemotherapy with fulvestrant as a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with advanced breast cancer.

  14. Gene alterations in the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway as a mechanism of drug-resistance (review).

    PubMed

    Hafsi, Sameh; Pezzino, Franca Maria; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Soua, Zohra; McCubrey, James A; Travali, Salvatore; Libra, Massimo

    2012-03-01

    The most common therapeutic approach for many cancers is chemotherapy. However, many patients relapse after treatment due to the development of chemoresistance. Recently, targeted therapies represent novel approaches to destroy cancer cells. The PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway is a key signaling pathway involved in the regulation of cell growth. Dysregulated signaling of this pathway may be associated with activating mutations of PI3K-related genes. Analyses of these mutations reveal that they increase the PI3K signal, stimulate downstream Akt signaling, promote growth factor-independent growth and increase cell invasion and metastasis. In this review, we summarize the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway genetic alterations in cancer and their potential clinical applications.

  15. Activation of CAR and PXR by Dietary, Environmental and Occupational Chemicals Alters Drug Metabolism, Intermediary Metabolism, and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J.P.; Mota, L.C.; Baldwin, W.S.

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane × receptor (PXR) are activated by a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands, such as steroid hormones, bile acids, pharmaceuticals, and environmental, dietary, and occupational chemicals. In turn, they induce phase I–III detoxification enzymes and transporters that help eliminate these chemicals. Because many of the chemicals that activate CAR and PXR are environmentally-relevant (dietary and anthropogenic), studies need to address whether these chemicals or mixtures of these chemicals may increase the susceptibility to adverse drug interactions. In addition, CAR and PXR are involved in hepatic proliferation, intermediary metabolism, and protection from cholestasis. Therefore, activation of CAR and PXR may have a wide variety of implications for personalized medicine through physiological effects on metabolism and cell proliferation; some beneficial and others adverse. Identifying the chemicals that activate these promiscuous nuclear receptors and understanding how these chemicals may act in concert will help us predict adverse drug reactions (ADRs), predict cholestasis and steatosis, and regulate intermediary metabolism. This review summarizes the available data on CAR and PXR, including the environmental chemicals that activate these receptors, the genes they control, and the physiological processes that are perturbed or depend on CAR and PXR action. This knowledge contributes to a foundation that will be necessary to discern interindividual differences in the downstream biological pathways regulated by these key nuclear receptors. PMID:20871735

  16. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  17. Alterations in plasma prolyl endopeptidase activity in depression, mania, and schizophrenia: effects of antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Goossens, F; Scharpé, S; Calabrese, J; Desnyder, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1995-10-16

    The activity of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), a serine proteinase, has been found to be significantly lower in the blood of patients with major depression than in normal volunteers. The present study investigates plasma PEP activity in 25 major depressed, 10 manic, and 14 schizophrenic subjects versus 30 normal volunteers. It also examines the effects of antidepressants, valproate, and neuroleptic drugs on plasma PEP activity. PEP activity was significantly lower in major depressed subjects than in normal volunteers and in patients with mania and schizophrenia. In depressed subjects, plasma PEP activity was significantly increased during treatment with antidepressant drugs, such as fluoxetine. Plasma PEP activity was significantly increased in manic and schizophrenic subjects compared with normal volunteers. In manic subjects, short-term treatment with valproate had a significant suppressive effect on PEP activity. No significant effects of neuroleptics on PEP activity could be found in the schizophrenic patients. The results support the hypothesis that lower PEP activity could play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression, while increased PEP activity may be related to psychotic conditions, such as mania and schizophrenia.

  18. Does the presence of heart failure alter prescribing of drug therapy after myocardial infarction? A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Krum, Henry; Meehan, Adam; Varigos, John; Loane, Philippa R; Billah, Baki

    2006-08-21

    To evaluate the use of cardiovascular medications in patients with and without heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI). Multicentre study of drug therapy for patients with MI in 16 major metropolitan teaching hospitals in Australia over a 1-month period at each hospital in the period November 2004 - March 2005. 479 patients admitted consecutively to the individual hospitals. Proportion of patients with and without heart failure who were prescribed key cardiovascular medications after MI. 116 of the 479 patients admitted for MI (24.2%) had heart failure at some point during their hospitalisation. Patients with heart failure were older (68 v 63 years; P < 0.05), more likely to be women (34% v 24%; P < 0.05) and a higher proportion had diabetes (26% v 21%). There was significantly reduced prescribing of beta-blockers, clopidogrel and statins for patients with heart failure compared with those without heart failure. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist use was low (< 10%) in the former group. We found reduced prescribing of some prognostically relevant medications for patients with heart failure. For beta-blockers, this may be explained by the greater clinical instability in patients with heart failure. Given the absolute benefit of drug therapy in patients with heart failure after MI, our findings suggest suboptimal prescribing in Australian teaching hospital practice.

  19. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  20. Alteration of skin hydration and its barrier function by vehicle and permeation enhancers: a study using TGA, FTIR, TEWL and drug permeation as markers.

    PubMed

    Shah, D K; Khandavilli, S; Panchagnula, R

    2008-09-01

    Vehicles and permeation enhancers (PEs) used in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) of a drug can affect skin hydration, integrity and permeation of the solute administered. This investigation was designed to study the effect of the most commonly used vehicles and PEs on rat skin hydration, barrier function and permeation of an amphiphilic drug, imipramine hydrochloride (IMH). An array of well-established techniques were used to confirm the findings of the study. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to determine changes in skin hydration. Alteration of the stratum corneum (SC) structure was investigated using FTIR studies. To monitor the barrier function alteration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement and permeation studies were performed. Our findings indicate that with hydration, there was an increase in the bound water content of the skin, and pseudoequilibrium of hydration (a drastic decrease in hydration rate) was achieved at around 12 h. Hydration increased the ratio between amide-I and amide-II peaks in FTIR and reduced the C-H stretching peak area. Both propylene glycol (PG) and ethanol (EtOH) dehydrated skin, with the latter showing a predominant effect. Furthermore, it was confirmed that PG and EtOH decreased the bound water content due to alteration in the protein domains and extraction of SC lipids, respectively. The effect of hydration on the SC was found to be similar to that reported for temperature. Permeation studies revealed that the dehydration caused by vehicles decreased IMH flux, whereas the flux was enhanced by PEs. The role of partition was predominant for the permeation of IMH through dehydrated skin. A synergistic effect was observed for PG and menthol in the enhancement of IMH. Further findings provided strong evidence that PG affects protein domains and EtOH extracts lipids from the bilayer. Both PG and EtOH, with or without PEs, increased TEWL. Initial TEWL was well

  1. Intratumor diversity and clonal evolution in cancer--a skeptical standpoint.

    PubMed

    Gisselsson, David

    2011-01-01

    Clonal evolution in cancer is intimately linked to the concept of intratumor cellular diversity, as the latter is a prerequisite for Darwinian selection at the micro-level. It has been frequently suggested in the literature that clonal evolution can be promoted by an elevated rate of mutation in tumor cells, so-called genomic instability, the mechanisms of which are now becoming increasingly well characterized. However, several issues need clarification before the presumably complex relationship between mutation rate, intratumor diversity, and clonal evolution can be understood sufficiently well to translate into models that predict the course of tumor disease. In particular, it has to be clarified which of the proposed mechanisms for genomic instability that are able to generate daughter cells with sufficient viability to form novel clones, how clones with different genomic changes differ phenotypically from each other, and what the selective forces are that guide competition among diverse clones in different microenvironments. Furthermore, standardized measurements of mutation rates at the chromosome level, as well as genotypic and phenotypic diversity, are essential to compare data from different studies. Finally, the relationship between clonal variation brought about by genomic instability, on the one hand, and cellular differentiation hierarchies, on the other hand, should be explored to put genomic instability in the context of the tumor stem cell hypothesis.

  2. Quantitative image variables reflect the intratumoral pathologic heterogeneity of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E-Ryung; Lee, Ho Yun; Jeong, Ji Yun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Jhingook; Bae, Jungmin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare quantitative radiomic parameters from dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of lung adenocarcinoma and pathologic complexity. A total 89 tumors with clinical stage I/II lung adenocarcinoma were prospectively included. Fifty one radiomic features were assessed both from iodine images and non-contrast images of DECT datasets. Comprehensive histologic subtyping was evaluated with all surgically resected tumors. The degree of pathologic heterogeneity was assessed using pathologic index and the number of mixture histologic subtypes in a tumor. Radiomic parameters were correlated with pathologic index. Tumors were classified as three groups according to the number of mixture histologic subtypes and radiomic parameters were compared between the three groups. Tumor density and 50th through 97.5th percentile Hounsfield units (HU) of histogram on non-contrast images showed strong correlation with the pathologic heterogeneity. Radiomic parameters including 75th and 97.5th percentile HU of histogram, entropy, and inertia on 1-, 2- and 3 voxel distance on non-contrast images showed incremental changes while homogeneity showed detrimental change according to the number of mixture histologic subtypes (all Ps < 0.05). Radiomic variables from DECT of lung adenocarcinoma reflect pathologic intratumoral heterogeneity, which may help in the prediction of intratumoral heterogeneity of the whole tumor. PMID:27589833

  3. Lack of functioning intratumoral lymphatics in colon and pancreas cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Stanczyk, Marek; Gewartowska, Magdalena; Domaszewska-Szostek, Anna; Durlik, Marek

    2012-09-01

    There are controversial views as to whether intratumoral or peritumoral lymphatics play a dominant role in the metastatic process. Most clinical observations originate from studies of colon cancer. Colon contains mucosa and submucosa rich in lymphatics and with high lymph formation rate. This seems to be a prerequisite for easy metastasis of cancer cells to regional lymph nodes. However, there are other tissues as pancreas with a rudimentary lymphatic network where cancer metastasis formation is as intensive as in colon cancer. This contradicts the common notion that intratumor lymphatics play major role in metastases. We visualized interstitial space and lymphatics in the central and peripheral regions of colon and pancreas tumors using the color stereoscopic lymphography and simultaneously immunohistochemical performed stainings specific for lymphatic and blood endothelial cells. The density of open and compressed lymphatic and blood vessels was measured in the tumor core and edge. There were very few lymphatics in the colon and pancreas tumor core but numerous minor fluid "lakes" with no visible connection to the peritumoral lymphatics. Lining of "lakes" did not express molecular markers specific for lymphatic endothelial cells. Dense connective tissue surrounding tumor foci did not contain lymphatics. Peritumoral lymphatics were irregularly distributed in both types of tumor and only sporadically contained cells that might be tumor cells. Similar lymphoscintigraphic and histological pictures were seen in colon and pancreas cancer despite of different structure of both tissues. This suggests a uniform reaction of tissues to the growing cancer irrespective of the affected organ.

  4. Uptake and distribution of specific and control monoclonal antibodies in subcutaneous xenografts following intratumor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlinson-Busza, G.; Bamias, A.; Krausz, T.; Epenetos, A.A. )

    1991-06-15

    Nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of the human colon adenocarcinoma HT29 were given intratumor injections of a mixture of 125I-labeled specific antibody (AUA1) and 131I-labeled control antibody (HMFG1), or with the labels reversed. After dissection at 1 and 4 h postadministration, both specific and control antibodies had 47-63% of the injected dose (% ID) in the tumor. By 24 h, the tumor contained 43 {plus minus} 11% ID of AUA1 which persisted at around this level for 5 days and remained at nearly 20% ID at 18 days. In contrast, the HMFG1 activity was 23 {plus minus} 9% ID at 24 h, which continued to fall and was less than 5% ID by 7 days. Normal organ levels were less than 2% ID/g for both antibodies, with HMFG1 being higher than AUA1 at all times, resulting in specificity indices greater than 20 by 5 days. Autoradiography of tumors removed 2 h postinjection of 125I-labeled AUA1 or HMFG1 showed high levels of antibody at the injection site. At 48 h and 7 days postinjection, the specific antibody was bound to the surface of tumor cells in islands remote from the injection site, whereas the control antibody was found only in the stroma and blood vessels, or as diffuse nonspecific uptake. These data indicate that intratumor injection of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies may achieve high radiation doses in accessible tumors without systemic irradiation.

  5. Extreme volume expansion of a vestibular schwannoma due to intratumoral hemorrhage after gamma knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shunichiro; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Matsuda, Masahide; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-07-01

    A 48-year-old man with right hemi-facial palsy and cerebellar ataxia was referred to our hospital. Three years and 10 months earlier he had undergone gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) at the referring hospital for an 18 mm right vestibular schwannoma. Slight tumor enlargement had been observed on MRI performed at the referring hospital 3 years after the GKRS. On close follow-up after another 6 months an MRI showed an obvious enlargement of the tumor. An MRI on admission revealed an iso-intense mass lesion measuring 36 mm in maximum diameter at the right cerebellopontine angle. A two stage surgery was conducted using a retrosigmoid approach because bleeding from the tumor wall was difficult to control intraoperatively during the first operation. At the second operation, the majority of the tumor capsule had converted to necrotic tissue. A large hematoma cavity was present inside the tumor capsule which explained the rapid increase in size over a short period of time. Near total removal was achieved. Histopathological examination revealed massive intratumoral hemorrhage within a typical vestibular schwannoma with no malignancy. The complication of intratumoral hemorrhage is very rare and the utility of stereotactic radiation surgery/therapy, including GKRS, for vestibular schwannoma is well known. However, we must emphasize that careful follow-up is still required, even after several years.

  6. Intratumoral heterogeneity and chemoresistance in nonseminomatous germ cell tumor of the testis

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Mehmet Asim; Hess, Kenneth R.; Campbell, Matthew T.; Wang, Jennifer; Broaddus, Russell R.; Karam, Jose A.; Ward, John F.; Wood, Christopher G.; Choi, Seungtaek L.; Rao, Priya; Zhang, Miao; Naing, Aung; General, Rosale; Cauley, Diana H.; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Pisters, Louis L.; Tu, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonseminomatous germ cell tumor of the testis (NSGCT) is largely curable. However, a small group of patients develop refractory disease. We investigated the hypothesis that intratumoral heterogeneity contributes to the emergence of chemoresistance and the development of refractory tumor subtypes. Results Our institution's records for January 2000 through December 2010 included 275 patients whose primary tumor showed pure embryonal carcinoma (pure E); mixed embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac tumor, and teratoma (EYT); or mixed embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac tumor, seminoma, and teratoma (EYST). Patients with EYST had the highest cancer-specific mortality rate (P = .001). They tended to undergo somatic transformation (P = .0007). Two of 5 patients with clinical stage I EYST who had developed recurrence during active surveillance died of their disease. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, we evaluated consecutive patients who had been diagnosed with the three most common histological phenotypes of NSGCT. Chemoresistance was defined as the presence of teratoma, viable germ cell tumor, or somatic transformation in the residual tumor or the development of progressive or relapsed disease after chemotherapy. In a separate prospective study, we performed next-generation sequencing on tumor samples from 39 patients to identify any actionable genetic mutations. Conclusions Our data suggest that patients with EYST in their primary tumor may harbor a potentially refractory NSGCT phenotype and are at increased risk of dying from disease. Despite intratumoral heterogeneity, improved patient selection and personalized care of distinct tumor subtypes may optimize the clinical outcome of patients with NSGCT. PMID:27861143

  7. Imaging Intratumor Heterogeneity: Role in Therapy Response, Resistance, and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James P.B.; Rose, Chris J.; Waterton, John C.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Parker, Geoff J.M.; Jackson, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Tumors exhibit genomic and phenotypic heterogeneity which has prognostic significance and may influence response to therapy. Imaging can quantify the spatial variation in architecture and function of individual tumors through quantifying basic biophysical parameters such as density or MRI signal relaxation rate; through measurements of blood flow, hypoxia, metabolism, cell death and other phenotypic features; and through mapping the spatial distribution of biochemical pathways and cell signaling networks. These methods can establish whether one tumor is more or less heterogeneous than another and can identify sub-regions with differing biology. In this article we review the image analysis methods currently used to quantify spatial heterogeneity within tumors. We discuss how analysis of intratumor heterogeneity can provide benefit over more simple biomarkers such as tumor size and average function. We consider how imaging methods can be integrated with genomic and pathology data, rather than be developed in isolation. Finally, we identify the challenges that must be overcome before measurements of intratumoral heterogeneity can be used routinely to guide patient care. PMID:25421725

  8. Intratumoral Injection of 188Re labeled Cationic Polyethylenimine Conjugates: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Heo, Young-Jun; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Chang-Guhn

    2004-01-01

    188Re(Rhenium) is easily obtained from an in-house 188W/188Re generator that is similar to the current 99Mo/99mTc generator, making it very convenient for clinical use. This characteristic makes this radionuclide a promising candidate as a therapeutic agent. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is a cationic polymer and has been used as a gene delivery vector. Positively charged materials interact with cellular blood components, vascular endothelium, and plasma proteins. In this study, the authors investigated whether intratumoral injection of 188Re labeled transferrin (Tf)-PEI conjugates exert the effect of radionuclide therapy against the tumor cells. When the diameters of the Ramos lymphoma (human Burkitt's lymphoma) xenografted tumors reached approximately 1 cm, 3 kinds of 188Re bound compounds (HYNIC-PEI-Tf, HYNIC-PEI, 188Re perrhenate) were injected directly into the tumors. There were increases in the retention of 188Re inside the tumor when PEI was incorporated with 188Re compared to the use of free 188Re. The 188Re HYNIC-Tf-PEI showed the most retention inside the tumor (retention rate=approximately 97%). H&E stain of isolated tumor tissues showed that 188Re labeled HYNIC-PEI-Tf caused extensive tumor necrosis. These results support 188Re HYNIC-PEI-Tf as being a useful radiopharmaceutical agent to treat tumors when delievered by intratumoral injection. PMID:15483337

  9. Improvement of intratumor microdistribution of PEGylated liposome via tumor priming by metronomic S-1 dosing

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yusuke; Abu Lila, Amr S; Matsumoto, Haruna; Okada, Tomoko; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The efficient delivery of nanocarrier-based cancer therapeutics into tumor tissue is problematic. Structural abnormalities, tumor vasculature heterogeneity, and elevated intratumor pressure impose barriers against the preferential accumulation of nanocarrier-based cancer therapeutics within tumor tissues and, consequently, compromise their therapeutic efficacy. Recently, we have reported that metronomic S-1, orally available tegafur formulation, dosing synergistically augmented the therapeutic efficacy of oxaliplatin (l-OHP)-containing PEGylated liposome without increasing the toxicity in animal model. However, the exact mechanism behind such synergistic effect was not fully elucidated. In this study, therefore, we tried to shed the light on the contributions of metronomic S-1 dosing to the enhanced accumulation and/or spatial distribution of PEGylated liposome within tumor tissue. Tumor priming with metronomic S-1 treatment induced a potent apoptotic response against both angiogenic endothelial cells and tumor cells adjacent to tumor blood vessels, resulting in enhanced tumor blood flow via transient normalization of tumor vasculature, along with alleviation of intratumor pressure. Such a change in the tumor microenvironment imparted by S-1 treatment allows efficient delivery of PEGylated liposome to tumor tissue and permits their deep penetration/distribution into the tumor mass. Such a priming effect of S-1 dosing can be exploited as a promising strategy to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of nanocarrier-based cancer therapeutics suffering from inadequate/heterogeneous delivery to tumor tissues. PMID:27822036

  10. A combinatorial approach for analyzing intra-tumor heterogeneity from high-throughput sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Hajirasouliha, Iman; Mahmoody, Ahmad; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput sequencing of tumor samples has shown that most tumors exhibit extensive intra-tumor heterogeneity, with multiple subpopulations of tumor cells containing different somatic mutations. Recent studies have quantified this intra-tumor heterogeneity by clustering mutations into subpopulations according to the observed counts of DNA sequencing reads containing the variant allele. However, these clustering approaches do not consider that the population frequencies of different tumor subpopulations are correlated by their shared ancestry in the same population of cells. Results: We introduce the binary tree partition (BTP), a novel combinatorial formulation of the problem of constructing the subpopulations of tumor cells from the variant allele frequencies of somatic mutations. We show that finding a BTP is an NP-complete problem; derive an approximation algorithm for an optimization version of the problem; and present a recursive algorithm to find a BTP with errors in the input. We show that the resulting algorithm outperforms existing clustering approaches on simulated and real sequencing data. Availability and implementation: Python and MATLAB implementations of our method are available at http://compbio.cs.brown.edu/software/ Contact: braphael@cs.brown.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24932008

  11. Intratumoral infusion of fluid: estimation of hydraulic conductivity and implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Y.; Brekken, C.; Netti, P. A.; Baxter, L. T.; Jain, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a new technique to measure in vivo tumour tissue fluid transport parameters (hydraulic conductivity and compliance) that influence the systemic and intratumoral delivery of therapeutic agents. An infusion needle approximating a point source was constructed to produce a radially symmetrical fluid source in the centre of human tumours in immunodeficient mice. At constant flow, the pressure gradient generated in the tumour by the infusion of fluid (Evans blue-albumin in saline) was measured as a function of the radial position with micropipettes connected to a servo-null system. To evaluate whether the fluid infused was reabsorbed by blood vessels, infusions were also performed after circulatory arrest. In the colon adenocarcinoma LS174T with a spherically symmetrical distribution of Evans blue-albumin, the median hydraulic conductivity in vivo and after circulatory arrest at a flow rate of 0.1 microl min(-1) was, respectively, 1.7x10(-7) and 2.3x10(-7) cm2 mmHg(-1) s. Compliance estimates were 35 microl mmHg(-1) in vivo, and 100 microl mmHg(-1) after circulatory arrest. In the sarcoma HSTS 26T, hydraulic conductivity and compliance were not calculated because of the asymmetric distribution of the fluid infused. The technique will be helpful in identifying strategies to improve the intratumoral and systemic delivery of gene targeting vectors and other therapeutic agents. Images Figure 2 PMID:9836476

  12. In vivo observing x-ray attenuation of intratumor injection of indocyanine green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chang; Luo, Qingming; Liang, Wenxi; Lu, Jinling

    2003-12-01

    We report our experimental results of in vivo observing x-ray attenuation of intra-tumor injection of indocyanine green (ICG). An eight- to nine-week-old male BALB/c mouse weighting between 15 and 20 g is used in the experiments, which has been implanted with myeloma cell line (SP2/0) two week before. The system used to monitor the intratumor diffusion of ICG is a digital x-ray imaging system. It works at 33kVp, 0.3mAs, 4 seconds and 1.5×magnification. The objective of this research is to study the x-ray attenuation at different area, which represented by gray-scale value. Compare to the ROI in the tissue without ICG and ROI of black background in the image, there is an obvious change before and after injecting ICG in the tumor, which is the area ICG can diffuse to. It shows the feasibility of using digital x-ray imaging system to dynamically, effectively and noninterventionly monitor the diffusion of the ICG.

  13. Lymph Node Metastases in Papillary and Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Are Independent of Intratumoral Lymphatic Vessel Density.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Filipe; Pereira, Sofia S; Mesquita, Marta; Morais, Tiago; Costa, Madalena M; Quelhas, Pedro; Lopes, Carlos; Monteiro, Mariana P; Leite, Valeriano

    2017-04-01

    Blood and lymph vessel invasion are well-recognized markers of tumor aggressiveness, as these are the routes that lead to metastases. Thyroid tumors, depending on the histological variant, tend to have distinctive biological behaviors and use different vascular routes to metastasize, yet the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess how the lymph vessel density (LVD) in different histological types of thyroid tumors, and in their surrounding tissue, correlate with the presence of lymph node metastases (LNM) and tumor pathological features. Lymph vessels of papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), of the classical (CVPTC, n = 50) and follicular variants (FVPTC, n = 18), and medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC, n = 34) were immunohistochemically stained against antigen D2-40. The stained area was quantified using a computerized morphometric analysis tool and correlated with the tumor pathological characteristics. LVD within all analyzed thyroid tumor subtypes was significantly lower than in the surrounding thyroid tissues (p < 0.001). Despite intratumoral LVD being significantly higher in CVPTC than in FVPTC, and peritumoral LVD being significantly higher in MTC than in PTC (p < 0.05), no correlations were found between LVD (either intratumoral or peritumoral) and the presence of lymph node metastasis. As no LVD differences were found amongst thyroid tumors with or without LNM, dissemination is more likely to depend on the tumor ability to invade the abundant lymph vessel network of the surrounding thyroid tissue than on the ability of the tumor to promote de novo lymphangiogenesis.

  14. Involvement of the Pleiotropic Drug Resistance Response, Protein Kinase C Signaling, and Altered Zinc Homeostasis in Resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Diclofenac ▿

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Jolanda S.; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Vos, J. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Diclofenac is a widely used analgesic drug that can cause serious adverse drug reactions. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote with which to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of diclofenac toxicity and resistance. Although most yeast cells died during the initial diclofenac treatment, some survived and started growing again. Microarray analysis of the adapted cells identified three major processes involved in diclofenac detoxification and tolerance. In particular, pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes and genes under the control of Rlm1p, a transcription factor in the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, were upregulated in diclofenac-adapted cells. We tested if these processes or pathways were directly involved in diclofenac toxicity or resistance. Of the pleiotropic drug resistance gene products, the multidrug transporter Pdr5p was crucially important for diclofenac tolerance. Furthermore, deletion of components of the cell wall stress-responsive PKC pathway increased diclofenac toxicity, whereas incubation of cells with the cell wall stressor calcofluor white before the addition of diclofenac decreased its toxicity. Also, diclofenac induced flocculation, which might trigger the cell wall alterations. Genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and rRNA processing were downregulated, as were zinc-responsive genes. Paradoxically, deletion of the zinc-responsive transcription factor Zap1p or addition of the zinc chelator 1,10-phenanthroline significantly increased diclofenac toxicity, establishing a regulatory role for zinc in diclofenac resistance. In conclusion, we have identified three new pathways involved in diclofenac tolerance in yeast, namely, Pdr5p as the main contributor to the PDR response, cell wall signaling via the PKC pathway, and zinc homeostasis, regulated by Zap1p. PMID:21724882

  15. Nephron-Specific Deletion of Circadian Clock Gene Bmal1 Alters the Plasma and Renal Metabolome and Impairs Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Ansermet, Camille; Centeno, Gabriel; Pradervand, Sylvain; Bize, Vincent; Mordasini, David; Henry, Hugues; Koesters, Robert; Maillard, Marc; Bonny, Olivier; Tokonami, Natsuko; Firsov, Dmitri

    2016-10-01

    The circadian clock controls a wide variety of metabolic and homeostatic processes in a number of tissues, including the kidney. However, the role of the renal circadian clocks remains largely unknown. To address this question, we performed a combined functional, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analysis in mice with inducible conditional knockout (cKO) of BMAL1, which is critically involved in the circadian clock system, in renal tubular cells (Bmal1(lox/lox)/Pax8-rtTA/LC1 mice). Induction of cKO in adult mice did not produce obvious abnormalities in renal sodium, potassium, or water handling. Deep sequencing of the renal transcriptome revealed significant changes in the expression of genes related to metabolic pathways and organic anion transport in cKO mice compared with control littermates. Furthermore, kidneys from cKO mice exhibited a significant decrease in the NAD(+)-to-NADH ratio, which reflects the oxidative phosphorylation-to-glycolysis ratio and/or the status of mitochondrial function. Metabolome profiling showed significant changes in plasma levels of amino acids, biogenic amines, acylcarnitines, and lipids. In-depth analysis of two selected pathways revealed a significant increase in plasma urea level correlating with increased renal Arginase II activity, hyperargininemia, and increased kidney arginine content as well as a significant increase in plasma creatinine concentration and a reduced capacity of the kidney to secrete anionic drugs (furosemide) paralleled by an approximate 80% decrease in the expression level of organic anion transporter 3 (SLC22a8). Collectively, these results indicate that the renal circadian clocks control a variety of metabolic/homeostatic processes at the intrarenal and systemic levels and are involved in drug disposition. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Altered pH gradient at the plasma membrane of osteosarcoma cells is a key mechanism of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Avnet, Sofia; Lemma, Silvia; Cortini, Margherita; Pellegrini, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Zini, Nicoletta; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Chano, Tokuhiro; Grisendi, Giulia; Dominici, Massimo; De Milito, Angelo; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy of osteosarcoma (OS), the most common primary bone malignancy, is based on a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression has been previously associated with treatment failure and progression of OS, although other mechanisms may also play a role. We considered the typical acidic extracellular pH (pHe) of sarcomas, and found that doxorubicin (DXR) cytotoxicity is reduced in P-gp negative OS cells cultured at pHe 6.5 compared to standard 7.4. Short-time (24–48 hours) exposure to low pHe significantly increased the number and acidity of lysosomes, and the combination of DXR with omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor targeting lysosomal acidity, significantly enhanced DXR cytotoxicity. In OS xenografts, the combination treatment of DXR and omeprazole significantly reduced tumor volume and body weight loss. The impaired toxicity of DXR at low pHe was not associated with increased autophagy or lysosomal acidification, but rather, as shown by SNARF staining, with a reversal of the pH gradient at the plasma membrane (ΔpHcm), eventually leading to a reduced DXR intracellular accumulation. Finally, the reversal of ΔpHcm in OS cells promoted resistance not only to DXR, but also to cisplatin and methotrexate, and, to a lesser extent, to vincristine. Altogether, our findings show that, in OS cells, short-term acidosis induces resistance to different chemotherapeutic drugs by a reversal of ΔpHcm, suggesting that buffer therapies or regimens including proton pump inhibitors in combination to low concentrations of conventional anticancer agents may offer novel solutions to overcome drug resistance. PMID:27566564

  17. Combination Therapy Targeting BCL6 and Phospho-STAT3 Defeats Intratumor Heterogeneity in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Deb, Dhruba; Rajaram, Satwik; Larsen, Jill E; Dospoy, Patrick D; Marullo, Rossella; Li, Long Shan; Avila, Kimberley; Xue, Fengtian; Cerchietti, Leandro; Minna, John D; Altschuler, Steven J; Wu, Lani F

    2017-06-01

    Oncogene-specific changes in cellular signaling have been widely observed in lung cancer. Here, we investigated how these alterations could affect signaling heterogeneity and suggest novel therapeutic strategies. We compared signaling changes across six human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) strains that were systematically transformed with various combinations of TP53, KRAS, and MYC-oncogenic alterations commonly found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We interrogated at single-cell resolution how these alterations could affect classic readouts (β-CATENIN, SMAD2/3, phospho-STAT3, P65, FOXO1, and phospho-ERK1/2) of key pathways commonly affected in NSCLC. All three oncogenic alterations were required concurrently to observe significant signaling changes, and significant heterogeneity arose in this condition. Unexpectedly, we found two mutually exclusive altered subpopulations: one with STAT3 upregulation and another with SMAD2/3 downregulation. Treatment with a STAT3 inhibitor eliminated the upregulated STAT3 subpopulation, but left a large surviving subpopulation with downregulated SMAD2/3. A bioinformatics search identified BCL6, a gene downstream of SMAD2/3, as a novel pharmacologically accessible target of our transformed HBECs. Combination treatment with STAT3 and BCL6 inhibitors across a panel of NSCLC cell lines and in xenografted tumors significantly reduced tumor cell growth. We conclude that BCL6 is a new therapeutic target in NSCLC and combination therapy that targets multiple vulnerabilities (STAT3 and BCL6) downstream of common oncogenes, and tumor suppressors may provide a potent way to defeat intratumor heterogeneity. Cancer Res; 77(11); 3070-81. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Synthetic Poly(L-Glutamic Acid)-conjugated CpG Exhibits Antitumor Efficacy With Increased Retention in Tumor and Draining Lymph Nodes After Intratumoral Injection in a Mouse Model of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; Zhou, Dapeng; DeLyria, Elizabeth S; Wen, Xiaoxia; Lu, Wei; Thapa, Prakash; Liu, Chengwen; Li, Dan; Bassett, Roland L; Overwijk, Willem W; Hwu, Patrick; Li, Chun

    2017-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new clinically applicable drug-delivery methods to enhance accumulation of immune-activating drugs in tumors. We synthesized a poly(L-glutamic acid)-CpG ODN2216 conjugate (PG-CpG) and injected it intratumorally into C57BL/6 mice bearing subcutaneous B16-ovalbumin melanoma. PG-CpG elicited the same potent antitumoral activity as CpG with respect to reducing tumor growth and triggering antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses in this well-established solid tumor model. Moreover, PG-CpG was retained significantly longer in both tumor and draining lymph nodes than was free CpG after intratumoral injection. Specifically, 48 hours after injection, 26.5%±16.9% of the injected PG-CpG dose versus 4.72%±2.61% of free CpG remained at the tumor, and 1.53%±1.22% of the injected PG-CpG versus 0.37%±0.33% of free CpG was retained in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. These findings indicate that PG is an effective synthetic polymeric carrier for delivery of immunostimulatory agents to tumors and lymph nodes.

  19. βI-tubulin mutations in the laulimalide/peloruside binding site mediate drug sensitivity by altering drug-tubulin interactions and microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Rowe, Matthew R; Field, Jessica J; Northcote, Peter T; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H; Miller, John H

    2015-09-01

    Peloruside A (PLA) and laulimalide (LAU) are potent microtubule-stabilizing natural products that are effective against a broad spectrum of cancer cells. The interactions of PLA and LAU with tubulin have attracted a great deal of attention, mainly because they bind to β-tubulin at a site that is different from the classical taxoid site. Multiple βI-tubulin amino acid residues have been predicted by computer modelling studies and more recently by protein crystallography to participate in the binding of PLA and LAU to tubulin. The relevance of these residues in determining cellular sensitivity to the compounds, however, remains largely uncertain. To determine the role of four binding site residues, Q291, D295, V333, and N337 on PLA and LAU activity, we introduced single mutations to these sites by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected each mutant tubulin separately into HEK and/or HeLa cells. We found that a Q291M βI-tubulin mutation increased sensitivity of the cells to PLA, but not to LAU, paclitaxel (PTX), or vinblastine (VBL). In contrast, V333W and N337L mutations led to less stable microtubules, with the V333W causing resistance to PLA and PTX, but not LAU, and the N337L causing resistance to PLA, LAU, and PTX. Moreover, cells expressing either W333 or L337 were hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent, VBL. The D295I mutation conferred resistance to both PLA and LAU without affecting microtubule stability or sensitivity to PTX or ixabepilone (IXB). This study identifies the first mammalian βI-tubulin mutation that specifically increases sensitivity to PLA, and reports mutations at PLA and LAU binding site residues that can either reduce microtubule stability or impair drug-tubulin binding, conferring resistance to these microtubule-stabilizing agents. This information provides insights on β-tubulin residues important for maintaining microtubule structural integrity and for sensitivity to microtubule-targeting agents, and suggests novel

  20. Repositioning metformin in cancer: genetics, drug targets, and new ways of delivery.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Mihaela; Craciun, Lucian; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Kacso, Gabriel; Florian, Ioan Stefan; Crivii, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    After sitting many years on the shelves of drug stores as a harmless antidiabetic drug, metformin comes back in the spotlight of the scientific community as a surprisingly effective antineoplastic drug. Metformin targets multiple pathways that play pivotal roles in cancer progression, impacting various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell death, metabolism, and even the cancer stemness features. The biomolecular characteristics of tumors, such as appropriate expression of organic cation transporters or genetic alterations including p53, K-ras, LKB1, and PI3K may impact metformin's anticancer efficiency. This could indicate a need for tumor genetic profiling in order to identify patients most likely to benefit from metformin treatment. Considering that the majority of experimental models suggest that higher, supra-clinical doses of metformin should be used in order to obtain an antineoplastic effect, new ways of drug delivery could be developed, such as metformin-loaded nanoparticles or incorporation of metformin into microparticles used in transarterial chemoembolization, with the aim of obtaining higher intratumoral drug concentrations and a targeted therapy which will ultimately maximize metformin's efficacy.

  1. Altered serum levels of interleukin-3 in first-episode drug-naive and chronic medicated schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yin Yang; Zhang, Tong; Xiu, Mei Hong; Tang, Wei; Han, Mei; Yun, Long Tan; Chen, Da Chun; Chen, Song; Tan, Shu Ping; Soares, Jair C; Tang, Wen Jie; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2016-10-01

    Elevated serum levels of Interleukin-3 (IL-3), a major component of the cytokines, have been observed in chronic and medicated patients with schizophrenia, but this elevation may reflect either or both medication and illness chronicity effects. Thus, we compared serum IL-3 levels in first-episode drug-naive (FEDN) to chronic medicated patients with schizophrenia and examined the association of IL-3 with their psychopathological symptoms. Serum IL-3 levels were assessed in 55 FEDN patients, 52 chronic medicated patients and 43 healthy controls. Schizophrenia symptomatology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Serum IL-3 levels were measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found significantly lower IL-3 levels in FEDN patients than both chronic patients and healthy controls (both p<0.001), while IL-3 levels in chronic patients were markedly higher than in healthy controls. No significant association was observed between IL-3 and any clinical psychopathology in FEDN patients; however, we found a significant correlation between serum IL-3 levels and the PANSS general psychopathology subscore in chronic medicated patients (p<0.05). Decreased IL-3 levels in FEDN patients suggest that suppressed immune function may be associated with developing schizophrenia, but as the disease progresses IL-3 levels increase perhaps related to medication treatment or other factors that occur during chronic illness.

  2. Methamphetamine decreases CD4 T cell frequency and alters pro-inflammatory cytokine production in a model of drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Mata, Mariana M; Napier, T Celeste; Graves, Steven M; Mahmood, Fareeha; Raeisi, Shohreh; Baum, Linda L

    2015-04-05

    The reason co-morbid methamphetamine use and HIV infection lead to more rapid progression to AIDS is unclear. We used a model of methamphetamine self-administration to measure the effect of methamphetamine on the systemic immune system to better understand the co-morbidity of methamphetamine and HIV. Catheters were implanted into the jugular veins of male, Sprague Dawley rats so they could self-administer methamphetamine (n=18) or be given saline (control; n=16) for 14 days. One day after the last operant session, blood and spleens were collected. We measured serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α, and frequencies of CD4(+), CD8(+), CD200(+) and CD11b/c(+) lymphocytes in the spleen. Rats that self-administered methamphetamine had a lower frequency of CD4(+) T cells, but more of these cells produced IFN-γ. Methamphetamine did not alter the frequency of TNF-α-producing CD4(+) T cells. Methamphetamine using rats had a higher frequency of CD8(+) T cells, but fewer of them produced TNF-α. CD11b/c and CD200 expression were unchanged. Serum cytokine levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 in methamphetamine rats were unchanged. Methamphetamine lifetime dose inversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. Our data suggest that methamphetamine abuse may exacerbate HIV disease progression by activating CD4 T cells, making them more susceptible to HIV infection, and contributing to their premature demise. Methamphetamine may also increase susceptibility to HIV infection, explaining why men who have sex with men (MSM) and frequently use methamphetamine are at the highest risk of HIV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Methamphetamine decreases CD4 T cell frequency and alters pro-inflammatory cytokine production in a model of drug abuse

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Mariana M.; Napier, T. Celeste; Graves, Steven M.; Mahmood, Fareeha; Raeisi, Shohreh; Baum, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    The reason co-morbid methamphetamine use and HIV infection lead to more rapid progression to AIDS is unclear. We used a model of methamphetamine self-administration to measure the effect of methamphetamine on the systemic immune system to better understand the comorbidity of methamphetamine and HIV. Catheters were implanted into the jugular veins of male, Sprague Dawley rats so they could self-administer methamphetamine (n = 18) or be given saline (control; n = 16) for 14 days. One day after the last self-administration session, blood and spleens were collected. We measured serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, intracellular IFN-γand TNF-α, and frequencies of CD4+, CD8+, CD200+ and CD11b/c+ lymphocytes in the spleen. Rats that self-administer methamphetamine had a lower frequency of CD4+ T cells, but more of these cells produced IFN-γ. Methamphetamine did not alter the frequency of TNF-α-producing CD4+ T cells. Methamphetamine using rats had a higher frequency of CD8+ T cells, but fewer of them produced TNF-α. CD11b/c and CD200 expression were unchanged. Serum cytokine levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 in methamphetamine rats were unchanged. Methamphetamine lifetime dose inversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. Or data suggest that methamphetamine abuse may exacerbate HIV disease progression by activating CD4 T cells, making them more susceptible to HIV infection, and contributing to their premature demise. Methamphetamine may also increase susceptibility to HIV infection, explaining why African American men who have sex with men (MSM) and frequently use methamphetamine are at the highest risk of HIV infection. PMID:25678251

  4. Sunitinib pretreatment improves tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte expansion by reduction in intratumoral content of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guislain, Aurelie; Gadiot, Jules; Kaiser, Andrew; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; Broeks, Annegien; Sanders, Joyce; van Boven, Hester; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Haanen, John B A G; Bex, Axel; Blank, Christian U

    2015-10-01

    Targeted therapy with sunitinib, pazopanib or everolimus has improved treatment outcome for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients (RCC). However, despite considerable efforts in sequential or combined modalities, durable remissions are rare. Immunotherapy like cytokine therapy with interleukin-2, T cell checkpoint blockade or adoptive T cell therapies can achieve long-term benefit and even cure. This raises the question of whether combining targeted therapy with immunotherapy could also be an effective treatment option for RCC patients. Sunitinib, one of the most frequently administered therapeutics in RCC patients has been implicated in impairing T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. In this work, we addressed whether this notion holds true for expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in sunitinib-treated patients. We compared resected primary RCC tumor material of patients pretreated with sunitinib with resection specimen from sunitinib-naïve patients. We found improved TIL expansion from sunitinib-pretreated tumor digests. These TIL products contained more PD-1 expressing TIL, while the regulatory T cell infiltration was not altered. The improved TIL expansion was associated with reduced intratumoral myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) content. Depletion of MDSCs from sunitinib-naïve RCC tissue-digest improved TIL expansion, proving the functional relevance of the MDSC alteration by sunitinib. Our in vivo results do not support previous in vitro observations of sunitinib inhibiting T cell function, but do provide a possible rationale for the combination of sunitinib with immunotherapy.

  5. Intratumoral Heterogeneity as a Therapy Resistance Mechanism: Role of Melanoma Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Villanueva, Jessie; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer whose incidence continues to increase worldwide. Increased exposure to sun, ultraviolet radiation and the use of tanning beds can increase the risk of melanoma. Early detection of melanomas is the key to successful treatment mainly through surgical excision of the primary tumor lesion. But in advanced stage melanomas, once the disease has spread beyond the primary site to distant organs, the tumors are difficult to treat and quickly develop resistance to most available forms of therapy. The advent of molecular and cellular techniques has led to a better characterization of tumor cells revealing the presence of heterogeneous melanoma subpopulations. The discovery of gene mutations and alterations of cell-signaling pathways in melanomas has led to the development of new targeted drugs that show dramatic response rates in patients. Single agent therapies generally target one subpopulation of tumor cells while leaving others unharmed. The surviving subpopulations will have the ability to repopulate the original tumors that can continue to progress. Thus, a rational approach to target multiple subpopulations of tumor cells with a combination of drugs instead of single agent therapy will be necessary for long-lasting inhibition of melanoma lesions. In this context, the recent development of immune checkpoint reagents provides an additional armor that can be used in combination with targeted drugs to expand the presence of melanoma reactive T-cells in circulation to prevent tumor recurrence. PMID:22959031

  6. Effect of drugs that alter alertness and emotionality on the novelty response of a weak electric fish, Gymnotus carapo.

    PubMed

    Aparecida, S; Corrêa, L; Hoffmann, A

    Weak field electric fish respond to alerting stimuli with a transient increase in the frequency of electric organ discharge (novelty response). In an attempt to demonstrate the influence of different degrees of alertness and of emotionality on the novelty response of Gymnotus carapo, we studied the variations in the magnitude of this response induced by the application of an electric stimulus to the water of the experimental box using a pair of electrodes, before and after intramuscular injections of d-amphetamine (1-2 and 4 mg/kg), sodium pentobarbital (10-20 and 30 mg/kg), diazepam (1-2 and 4 mg/kg), beta-carboline (2 mg/kg), and saline. After d-amphetamine injection the animal presented increased somatic motility but no changes in electric organ baseline firing rate or in response to the alerting electric stimulus. Sodium pentobarbital induced a partial loss of posture and a reduction of fin and operculum movements, as well as a reduction of baseline firing rate and of the response to the alerting electric stimulus, with frequent interruptions in electric organ firing. Beta-carboline caused increased motility, but no changes in basal firing rate or in response to the alerting stimulus. Diazepan-injected fishes remained still throughout the experiment, and some of those threated with the higher dose (4 mg/kg) presented interruptions on electric organ discharges in response to stimulation but no change on baseline firing rate. The data suggest that a reduction of the degree of alertness by the barbiturate and a decrease in emotionality and/or stress by the benzodiazepine interfere with the novelty response. The possible site of action of the drugs is discussed.

  7. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Thale, Zia I; Brodin, Birger; Hansen, Steen H; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an antiepileptic drug substance mainly used in pediatric treatment of infantile spasms. The main source of nutrition for infants is breast milk and/or infant formula. Our hypothesis was that infant formula may affect the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The aim was therefore to investigate the potential effect of coadministration of infant formula with vigabatrin on the oral absorption in vitro and in vivo. The effect of vigabatrin given with an infant formula on the oral uptake and transepithelial transport was investigated in vitro in Caco-2 cells. In vivo effects of infant formula and selected amino acids on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin was investigated after oral coadministration to male Sprague–Dawley rats using acetaminophen as a marker for gastric emptying. The presence of infant formula significantly reduced the uptake rate and permeability of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells. Oral coadministration of vigabatrin and infant formula significantly reduced Cmax and prolonged tmax of vigabatrin absorption. Ligands for the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, sarcosine, and proline/l-tryptophan had similar effects on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin. The infant formula decreased the rate of gastric emptying. Here we provide experimental evidence for an in vivo role of PAT1 in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The effect of infant formula on the oral absorption of vigabatrin was found to be due to delayed gastric emptying, however, it seems reasonable that infant formula may also directly affect the intestinal absorption rate of vigabatrin possibly via PAT1. PMID:25505585

  8. Robust Intratumor Partitioning to Identify High-Risk Subregions in Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Gensheimer, Michael F; Dong, Xinzhe; Rubin, Daniel L; Napel, Sandy; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W; Li, Ruijiang

    2016-08-01

    To develop an intratumor partitioning framework for identifying high-risk subregions from (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging and to test whether tumor burden associated with the high-risk subregions is prognostic of outcomes in lung cancer. In this institutional review board-approved retrospective study, we analyzed the pretreatment FDG-PET and CT scans of 44 lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. A novel, intratumor partitioning method was developed, based on a 2-stage clustering process: first at the patient level, each tumor was over-segmented into many superpixels by k-means clustering of integrated PET and CT images; next, tumor subregions were identified by merging previously defined superpixels via population-level hierarchical clustering. The volume associated with each of the subregions was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis regarding its prognostic capability in predicting overall survival (OS) and out-of-field progression (OFP). Three spatially distinct subregions were identified within each tumor that were highly robust to uncertainty in PET/CT co-registration. Among these, the volume of the most metabolically active and metabolically heterogeneous solid component of the tumor was predictive of OS and OFP on the entire cohort, with a concordance index or CI of 0.66-0.67. When restricting the analysis to patients with stage III disease (n=32), the same subregion achieved an even higher CI of 0.75 (hazard ratio 3.93, log-rank P=.002) for predicting OS, and a CI of 0.76 (hazard ratio 4.84, log-rank P=.002) for predicting OFP. In comparison, conventional imaging markers, including tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and metabolic tumor volume using threshold of 50% standardized uptake value maximum, were not predictive of OS or OFP, with CI mostly below 0.60 (log-rank P>.05). We propose a robust intratumor partitioning method to identify clinically relevant, high

  9. Intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment modulates the glioma microenvironment and facilitates systemic tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Ling, Alex; M Nettlebeck, Dirk; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor and is associated with poor survival. Virotherapy is a promising candidate for the development of effective, novel treatments for GBM. Recent studies have underscored the potential of virotherapy in enhancing antitumor immunity despite the fact that its mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, using a syngeneic GBM mouse model, we report that intratumoral virotherapy significantly modulates the tumor microenvironment. We found that intratumoral administration of an oncolytic adenovirus, AdCMVdelta24, decreased tumor-infiltrating CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and increased IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in treated tumors, even in late stage disease in which a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is considered to be a significant barrier to immunotherapy. Importantly, intratumoral AdCMVdelta24 treatment augmented systemically transferred tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed (1) downregulation of Foxp3 in Tregs that were incubated with media conditioned by virus-infected tumor cells, (2) downregulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO) in glioma cells upon infection by AdCMVdelta24, and (3) reprograming of Tregs from an immunosuppressive to a stimulatory state. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potency of intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment in enhancing antitumor immunity through the regulation of multiple aspects of immune suppression in the context of glioma, supporting further clinical development of oncolytic adenovirus-based immune therapies for malignant brain cancer. PMID:26405578

  10. Extranodal induction of therapeutic immunity in the tumor microenvironment after intratumoral delivery of Tbet gene-modified dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Taylor, J L; Sabins, N C; Lowe, D B; Qu, Y; You, Z; Storkus, W J

    2013-08-01

    Murine dendritic cells (DC) transduced to express the Type-1 transactivator T-bet (i.e. mDC.Tbet) and delivered intratumorally as a therapy are superior to control wild-type DC in slowing the growth of established subcutaneous MCA205 sarcomas in vivo. Optimal antitumor efficacy of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy was dependent on host natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells, and required mDC.Tbet expression of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, but was independent of the capacity of the injected mDC.Tbet to produce proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-12 family members or interferon-γ) or to migrate to tumor-draining lymph nodes based on CCR7 ligand chemokine recruitment. Conditional (CD11c-DTR) or genetic (BATF3(-/-)) deficiency in host antigen-crosspresenting DC did not diminish the therapeutic action of intratumorally delivered wild-type mDC.Tbet. Interestingly, we observed that intratumoral delivery of mDC.Tbet (versus control mDC.Null) promoted the acute infiltration of NK cells and naive CD45RB(+) T cells into the tumor microenvironment (TME) in association with elevated expression of NK- and T-cell-recruiting chemokines by mDC.Tbet. When taken together, our data support a paradigm for extranodal (cross)priming of therapeutic Type-1 immunity in the TME after intratumoral delivery of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy.

  11. Intratumoral modulation of the inducible co-stimulator ICOS by recombinant oncolytic virus promotes systemic anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Ricca, Jacob; Plitt, Tamar; Palese, Peter; Sharma, Padmanee; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that locoregional cancer therapeutic approaches with oncolytic viruses can lead to systemic anti-tumour immunity, although the appropriate targets for intratumoral immunomodulation using this strategy are not known. Here we find that intratumoral therapy with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), in addition to the activation of innate immunity, upregulates the expression of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, with the inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) being most notable. To explore ICOS as a direct target in the tumour, we engineered a recombinant NDV-expressing ICOS ligand (NDV-ICOSL). In the bilateral flank tumour models, intratumoral administration of NDV-ICOSL results in enhanced infiltration with activated T cells in both virus-injected and distant tumours, and leads to effective rejection of both tumours when used in combination with systemic CTLA-4 blockade. These findings highlight that intratumoral immunomodulation with an oncolytic virus expressing a rationally selected ligand can be an effective strategy to drive systemic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:28194010

  12. Alterations in Body Temperature, Corticosterone, and Behavior Following the Administration of 5-Methoxy-Diisopropyltryptamine (‘Foxy’) to Adult Rats: a New Drug of Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Wiliiams, Michael T; Herring, Nicole R; Schaefer, Tori L; Skelton, Matthew R; Campbell, Nicholas G; Lipton, Jack W; McCrea, Anne E; Vorhees, Charles V

    2010-01-01

    Many drugs are used or abused in social contexts without understanding the ramifications of their use. In this study, we examined the effects of a newly popular drug, 5-methoxy-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MEO-DIPT; ‘foxy’ or ‘foxy-methoxy’). Two experiments were performed. In the first, 5-MEO-DIPT (0, 10, or 20 mg/kg) was administered to rats four times on a single day and animals were examined 3 days later. The animals that received 5-MEO-DIPT demonstrated hypothermia during the period of drug administration and delayed mild hyperthermic rebound for at least 48 h. Corticosterone levels in plasma were elevated in a dose-dependent manner compared to saline-treated animals with minor changes in 5-HT turnover and no changes in monoamine levels. In experiment 2, rats were examined in behavioral tasks following either 0 or 20 mg/kg of 5-MEO-DIPT. The animals treated with 5-MEO-DIPT showed hypoactivity and an attenuated response to (+)-methamphetamine-induced stimulation (1 mg/kg). In a test of path integration (Cincinnati water maze), 5-MEO-DIPT-treated animals displayed deficits in performance compared to the saline-treated animals. No differences were noted in the ability of the animals to perform in the Morris water maze or on tests of novel object or place recognition. The data demonstrate that 5-MEO-DIPT alters the ability of an animal to perform certain cognitive tasks, while leaving others intact and disrupts the endocrine system. 5-MEO-DIPT may have the potential to induce untoward effects in humans. PMID:17047665

  13. Site of PGF2α injection does not alter effectiveness of the Select Synch + controlled internal drug release and timed artificial insemination protocol.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, C L; Bell, L M; Greene, W; Whisnant, C S; Poole, D H

    2017-01-01

    Beef Quality Assurance programs have contributed to significant improvements in the wholesomeness of beef available for consumption. Injection site blemishes in the round have declined since the promotion of administering intramuscular injections in the neck. Unfortunately, many producers continue to administer estrus synchronization (ES) drugs in the rump. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of injection site of PGF2α, in ES protocols, on steroid hormone concentrations and pregnancy rates. A Select Synch + 7-day controlled internal drug release ES protocol was conducted with the site of PGF2α injection alternated between neck and rump in beef cattle (n = 312) at the Ohio State University Agricultural Technical Institute and North Carolina State University. Blood samples (n = 75) were collected at controlled internal drug release insertion and at the time of artificial insemination (AI) to determine if progesterone (P4) and estrogen (E2) concentrations varied due to PGF2α injection site. All cattle were confirmed pregnant by ultrasonography at approximately 30 and 90 days after insemination in North Carolina and approximately 70 days after insemination in Ohio. Data were analyzed as randomized complete block designs in PROC GLIMMIX with animal as the experimental unit. Differences were declared significant at P < 0.05. Site of PGF2α injection, in either the neck or rump, did not affect (P > 0.05) overall conception rates in response to AI (58.4% and 55.6%, respectively). Altering PGF2α injection site did not impact P4, E2 concentrations, or the P4:E2 ratio at AI (P > 0.05). However, cattle inseminated after displaying estrus had greater (P < 0.05) pregnancy rates than timed AI (67.8 vs. 47.5%, respectively). First service conception rates and pregnancy rates were consistent with previous reports. Overall, altering the location of the PGF2α injection during ES did not change circulating hormone concentrations at AI or

  14. The linker histone H1.0 generates epigenetic and functional intratumor heterogeneity*

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Matthew J.; Patel, Harshil; Henser-Brownhill, Tristan; Cohen, Ayelet-Hashahar Shapira; Li, Yilong; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Nye, Emma; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Chakravarty, Probir; Efroni, Sol; Matthews, Nik; Misteli, Tom; Meshorer, Eran; Scaffidi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Tumors comprise functionally diverse subpopulations of cells with distinct proliferative potential. Here, we show that dynamic epigenetic states defined by the linker histone H1.0 determine which cells within a tumor can sustain the long-term cancer growth. Numerous cancer types exhibit high inter- and intratumor heterogeneity of H1.0, with H1.0 levels correlating with tumor differentiation status, patient survival and, at the single-cell level, cancer stem cell markers. Silencing of H1.0 promotes maintenance of self-renewing cells by inducing de-repression of megabase-sized gene domains harboring downstream effectors of oncogenic pathways. Self-renewing epigenetic states are not stable and re-expression of H1.0 in subsets of tumor cells establishes transcriptional programs that restrict cancer cell long-term proliferative potential and drive their differentiation. Our results uncover epigenetic determinants of tumor-maintaining cells. PMID:27708074

  15. Intratumoral heterogeneity in a p53 null mouse model of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Tsimelzon, Anna; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Fan, Cheng; Wolff, Andrew; Perou, Charles M.; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity correlates with clinical outcome and reflects the cellular complexity and dynamics within a tumor. Such heterogeneity is thought to contribute to radio- and chemoresistance since many treatments may only target certain tumor cell subpopulations. A better understanding of the functional interactions between various subpopulations of cells, therefore, may help in the development of effective cancer treatments. We identified a unique subpopulation of tumor cells expressing mesenchymal-like markers in a p53 null mouse model of basal-like breast cancer using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and microarray analysis. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed the existence of crosstalk between these “mesenchymal-like” cells and tumor-initiating cells. Knockdown of genes encoding ligands upregulated in the mesenchymal cells and their corresponding receptors in the tumor-initiating cells resulted in reduced tumorigenicity and increased tumor latency. These studies illustrate the non-cell autonomous properties and importance of cooperativity between tumor subpopulations. PMID:25735774

  16. Mathematical model for radial expansion and conflation of intratumoral infectious centers predicts curative oncolytic virotherapy parameters.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kent; Kirk, Amber; Naik, Shruthi; Nace, Rebecca; Steele, Michael B; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Li, Xing; Federspiel, Mark J; Peng, Kah-Whye; Kirk, David; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Simple, inductive mathematical models of oncolytic virotherapy are needed to guide protocol design and improve treatment outcomes. Analysis of plasmacytomas regressing after a single intravenous dose of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus in myeloma animal models revealed that intratumoral virus spread was spatially constrained, occurring almost exclusively through radial expansion of randomly distributed infectious centers. From these experimental observations we developed a simple model to calculate the probability of survival for any cell within a treated tumor. The model predicted that small changes to the density of initially infected cells or to the average maximum radius of infected centers would have a major impact on treatment outcome, and this was confirmed experimentally. The new model provides a useful and flexible tool for virotherapy protocol optimization.

  17. Effects of intratumoral injection of I-125 iododeoxyuridine on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S.S.; Ford, E.H.; Alfieri, A.A.; Bravo, S. )

    1989-11-01

    Intratumoral injection of I-125 iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), saline solution, and oil suspension was investigated using Ehrlich ascites tumors in the thighs of mice. The oil suspension was more effective in tumor growth delay than was the saline solution. Single injection of the oil suspension at the dose of 12.5 microCi resulted in 21.5 days growth delay, whereas 50 microCi of the saline solution resulted in 11.5 days growth delay relative to control growth delay. At 40 days after treatment, higher radioactivities were observed in the tumor and the skin of the mice treated with the oil suspension, which represented the prolongation of I-125 IUdR oil suspension within the tumor. No normal tissue toxicities were observed.

  18. Locally disordered methylation forms the basis of intra-tumor methylome variation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Dan A.; Clement, Kendell; Ziller, Michael J.; Boyle, Patrick; Fan, Jean; Gu, Hongcang; Stevenson, Kristen; Sougnez, Carrie; Wang, Lili; Li, Shuqiang; Kotliar, Dylan; Zhang, Wandi; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Garraway, Levi; Fernandes, Stacey M.; Livak, Kenneth J.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gnirke, Andreas; Lander, Eric S.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Neuberg, Donna; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Hacohen, Nir; Getz, Gad; Meissner, Alexander; Wu, Catherine J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Intra-tumoral heterogeneity plays a critical role in tumor evolution. To define the contribution of DNA methylation to heterogeneity within tumors, we performed genome-scale bisulfite sequencing of 104 primary chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL). Compared to 26 normal B cell samples, CLLs consistently displayed higher intra-sample variability of DNA methylation patterns across the genome, which appears to arise from stochastically disordered methylation in malignant cells. Transcriptome analysis of bulk and single CLL cells revealed that methylation disorder was linked to low-level expression. Disordered methylation was further associated with adverse clinical outcome. We therefore propose that disordered methylation plays a similar role to genetic instability, enhancing the ability of cancer cells to search for superior evolutionary trajectories. PMID:25490447

  19. Signet-ring cell ependymoma with intratumoral hemorrhage in the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Junichi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tatsushi; Kondo, Shiro; Hara, Kazuo; Hashizume, Yoshio

    2005-08-01

    We report a case of signet-ring cell ependymoma of the medulla oblongata. The patient presented with acute paralysis of the soft palate and absent gag reflex resulting in respiratory distress after accidental inhalation of water. MRI revealed a large intra-axial mass with foci of intratumoral hemorrhage in the medulla oblongata. A subtotal resection was performed as histopathological findings on the frozen section were consistent with metastatic carcinoma. However, the final paraffin section showed an ependymoma with signet-ring cells. A total removal was then performed with preservation of the lower cranial nerves. Postoperatively, the patient made a slow but steady recovery, and was able to swallow both water and food within 3 months. Signet-ring cell ependymoma must be included in the differential diagnosis of metastatic carcinoma to the central nervous system.

  20. Ultrasound-guided intra-tumor injection of combined immunotherapy cures mice from orthotopic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Giorgio; Chiodoni, Claudia; Parenza, Mariella; Arioli, Ivano; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario Paolo

    2013-12-01

    Intra-tumor injection of immunotherapeutic agents is often the most effective, likely because of concomitant modification of tumor microenvironment. We tested an immunotherapeutic regimen consisting of CpG oligonucleotides and of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery of CCL16 chemokine directly into orthotopically implanted prostate tumors by ultrasound-guided injection, followed by systemic administration of an anti-IL-10R antibody. This combination treatment induced rapid stromal rearrangement, characterized by massive leukocyte infiltration and large areas of necrosis, a scenario that eventually led to complete tumor rejection and systemic immunity in 75 % of the treated mice. In vivo T lymphocyte depletion experiments demonstrated that the efficacy of CCL16/CpG/anti-IL-10R combination treatment relies upon CD8 T lymphocytes whereas CD4 T cells are dispensable. The results underlie the feasibility of echo-guided local immunotherapy of tumors located in visceral organs that are not easily accessible.

  1. How to be good at being bad: centrosome amplification and mitotic propensity drive intratumoral heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Rida, Padmashree C. G.; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Reid, Michelle D.; Kucuk, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is truly an iconic disease—a tour de force whose multiple formidable strengths can be attributed to the bewildering heterogeneity that a tumor can manifest both spatially and temporally. A Darwinian evolutionary process is believed to undergird, at least in part, the generation of this heterogeneity that contributes to poor clinical outcomes. Risk assessment in clinical oncology is currently based on a small number of clinicopathologic factors (like stage, histological grade, receptor status, and serum tumor markers) and offers limited accuracy in predicting disease course as evidenced by the prognostic heterogeneity that persists in risk segments produced by present-day models. We posit that this insufficiency stems from the exclusion of key risk contributors from such models, especially the omission of certain factors implicated in generating intratumoral heterogeneity. The extent of centrosome amplification and the mitotic propensity inherent in a tumor are two such vital factors whose contributions to poor prognosis are presently overlooked in risk prognostication. Supernumerary centrosomes occur widely in tumors and are potent drivers of chromosomal instability that fosters intratumoral heterogeneity. The mitotic propensity of a proliferating population of tumor cells reflects the cell cycling kinetics of that population. Since frequent passage through improperly regulated mitotic divisions accelerates production of diverse genotypes, the mitotic propensity inherent in a tumor serves as a powerful beacon of risk. In this review, we highlight how centrosome amplification and error-prone mitoses contribute to poor clinical outcomes and urge the need to develop these cancer-specific traits as much-needed clinically-facile prognostic biomarkers with immense potential value for individualized cancer treatment in the clinic. PMID:26358854

  2. Neural Stem Cell-Mediated Intratumoral Delivery of Gold Nanorods Improves Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic photothermal therapy utilizes biologically inert gold nanorods (AuNRs) as tumor-localized antennas that convert light into heat capable of eliminating cancerous tissue. This approach has lower morbidity than surgical resection and can potentially synergize with other treatment modalities including chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Despite these advantages, it is still challenging to obtain heating of the entire tumor mass while avoiding unnecessary collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. It is therefore critical to identify innovative methods to distribute an effective concentration of AuNRs throughout tumors without depositing them in surrounding healthy tissue. Here we demonstrate that AuNR-loaded, tumor-tropic neural stem cells (NSCs) can be used to improve the intratumoral distribution of AuNRs. A simple UV–vis technique for measuring AuNR loading within NSCs was established. It was then confirmed that NSC viability is unimpaired following AuNR loading and that NSCs retain AuNRs long enough to migrate throughout tumors. We then demonstrate that intratumoral injections of AuNR-loaded NSCs are more efficacious than free AuNR injections, as evidenced by reduced recurrence rates of triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) xenografts following NIR exposure. Finally, we demonstrate that the distribution of AuNRs throughout the tumors is improved when transported by NSCs, likely resulting in the improved efficacy of AuNR-loaded NSCs as compared to free AuNRs. These findings highlight the advantage of combining cellular therapies and nanotechnology to generate more effective cancer treatments. PMID:25375246

  3. CTL Induction of Tumoricidal Nitric Oxide Production by Intratumoral Macrophages Is Critical for Tumor Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D.; Cherpes, Thomas L.; Watson, Leah J.; McKenna, Kyle C.

    2011-01-01

    To characterize mechanisms of CTL inhibition within an ocular tumor microenvironment, tumor-specific CTLs were transferred into mice with tumors developing within the anterior chamber of the eye or skin. Ocular tumors were resistant to CTL transfer therapy whereas skin tumors were sensitive. CTLs infiltrated ocular tumors at higher CTL/tumor ratios than in skin tumors and demonstrated comparable ex vivo effector function to CTLs within skin tumors indicating that ocular tumor progression was not due to decreased CTL accumulation or inhibited CTL function within the eye. CD11b+Gr-1+F4/80− cells predominated within ocular tumors, whereas skin tumors were primarily infiltrated by CD11b+Gr-1−F4/80+ macrophages (Mϕs), suggesting that myeloid derived suppressor cells may contribute to ocular tumor growth. However, CD11b+ myeloid cells isolated from either tumor site suppressed CTL activity in vitro via NO production. Paradoxically, the regression of skin tumors by CTL transfer therapy required NO production by intratumoral Mϕs indicating that NO-producing intratumoral myeloid cells did not suppress the effector phase of CTL. Upon CTL transfer, tumoricidal concentrations of NO were only produced by skin tumor-associated Mϕs though ocular tumor-associated Mϕs demonstrated comparable expression of inducible NO synthase protein suggesting that NO synthase enzymatic activity was compromised within the eye. Correspondingly, in vitro-activated Mϕs limited tumor growth when co-injected with tumor cells in the skin but not in the eye. In conclusion, the decreased capacity of Mϕs to produce NO within the ocular microenvironment limits CTL tumoricidal activity allowing ocular tumors to progress. PMID:21041723

  4. Histological evaluation of intratumoral myxoma virus treatment in an immunocompetent mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Rosalinda A; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Roy, Edward J; MacNeill, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Two recombinant myxoma viruses (MYXV expressing a fluorescent protein [MYXV-Tred] and MYXV-Tred encoding murine interleukin-15 [MYXV-IL15]) were evaluated for therapeutic effects in an aggressive B16F10 melanoma model in immunocompetent mice. It was hypothesized that continuous expression of IL-15 within a tumor would recruit cytotoxic effector cells to induce an antitumor immune response and improve treatment efficacy. Weekly intratumoral injections were given to evaluate the effect of treatment on the median survival time of C57BL/6 mice bearing established B16F10 melanomas. Mice that received MYXV-Tred or MYXV-IL15 lived significantly longer than mice given treatment controls. Unexpectedly, the median survival time of MYXV-IL15-treated mice was similar to that of MYXV-treated mice. At 1, 2, and 4 days postinoculation, viral plaque assays detected replicating MYXV-Tred and MYXV-IL15 within treated tumors. At these time points in MYXV-IL15-treated tumors, IL-15 concentration, lymphocyte grades, and cluster of differentiation-3+ cell counts were significantly increased when compared to other treatment groups. However, viral titers, recombinant protein expression, and lymphocyte numbers within the tumors diminished rapidly at 7 days postinoculation. These data indicate that treatment with recombinant MYXV should be repeated at least every 4 days to maintain recombinant protein expression within a murine tumor. Additionally, neutrophilic inflammation was significantly increased in MYXV-Tred- and MYXV-IL15-treated tumors at early time points. It is speculated that neutrophilic inflammation induced by intratumoral replication of recombinant MXYV contributes to the antitumoral effect of MYXV treatment in this melanoma model. These findings support the inclusion of neutrophil chemotaxins in recombinant poxvirus oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:25866742

  5. Histological evaluation of intratumoral myxoma virus treatment in an immunocompetent mouse model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Doty, Rosalinda A; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; Roy, Edward J; MacNeill, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Two recombinant myxoma viruses (MYXV expressing a fluorescent protein [MYXV-Tred] and MYXV-Tred encoding murine interleukin-15 [MYXV-IL15]) were evaluated for therapeutic effects in an aggressive B16F10 melanoma model in immunocompetent mice. It was hypothesized that continuous expression of IL-15 within a tumor would recruit cytotoxic effector cells to induce an antitumor immune response and improve treatment efficacy. Weekly intratumoral injections were given to evaluate the effect of treatment on the median survival time of C57BL/6 mice bearing established B16F10 melanomas. Mice that received MYXV-Tred or MYXV-IL15 lived significantly longer than mice given treatment controls. Unexpectedly, the median survival time of MYXV-IL15-treated mice was similar to that of MYXV-treated mice. At 1, 2, and 4 days postinoculation, viral plaque assays detected replicating MYXV-Tred and MYXV-IL15 within treated tumors. At these time points in MYXV-IL15-treated tumors, IL-15 concentration, lymphocyte grades, and cluster of differentiation-3+ cell counts were significantly increased when compared to other treatment groups. However, viral titers, recombinant protein expression, and lymphocyte numbers within the tumors diminished rapidly at 7 days postinoculation. These data indicate that treatment with recombinant MYXV should be repeated at least every 4 days to maintain recombinant protein expression within a murine tumor. Additionally, neutrophilic inflammation was significantly increased in MYXV-Tred- and MYXV-IL15-treated tumors at early time points. It is speculated that neutrophilic inflammation induced by intratumoral replication of recombinant MXYV contributes to the antitumoral effect of MYXV treatment in this melanoma model. These findings support the inclusion of neutrophil chemotaxins in recombinant poxvirus oncolytic virotherapy.

  6. Lymph Node Metastases in Papillary and Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Are Independent of Intratumoral Lymphatic Vessel Density

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Filipe; Pereira, Sofia S.; Mesquita, Marta; Morais, Tiago; Costa, Madalena M.; Quelhas, Pedro; Lopes, Carlos; Monteiro, Mariana P.; Leite, Valeriano

    2017-01-01

    Background Blood and lymph vessel invasion are well-recognized markers of tumor aggressiveness, as these are the routes that lead to metastases. Thyroid tumors, depending on the histological variant, tend to have distinctive biological behaviors and use different vascular routes to metastasize, yet the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process are still poorly understood. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess how the lymph vessel density (LVD) in different histological types of thyroid tumors, and in their surrounding tissue, correlate with the presence of lymph node metastases (LNM) and tumor pathological features. Methods Lymph vessels of papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), of the classical (CVPTC, n = 50) and follicular variants (FVPTC, n = 18), and medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC, n = 34) were immunohistochemically stained against antigen D2-40. The stained area was quantified using a computerized morphometric analysis tool and correlated with the tumor pathological characteristics. Results LVD within all analyzed thyroid tumor subtypes was significantly lower than in the surrounding thyroid tissues (p < 0.001). Despite intratumoral LVD being significantly higher in CVPTC than in FVPTC, and peritumoral LVD being significantly higher in MTC than in PTC (p < 0.05), no correlations were found between LVD (either intratumoral or peritumoral) and the presence of lymph node metastasis. Conclusions As no LVD differences were found amongst thyroid tumors with or without LNM, dissemination is more likely to depend on the tumor ability to invade the abundant lymph vessel network of the surrounding thyroid tissue than on the ability of the tumor to promote de novo lymphangiogenesis. PMID:28589086

  7. Pointwise mutual information quantifies intratumor heterogeneity in tissue sections labeled with multiple fluorescent biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Daniel M.; Gyanchandani, Rekha; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Stern, Andrew M.; Lezon, Timothy R.; Gough, Albert; Meyer, Dan E.; Ginty, Fiona; Sarachan, Brion; Fine, Jeffrey; Lee, Adrian V.; Taylor, D. Lansing; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measures of spatial intratumor heterogeneity are potentially important diagnostic biomarkers for cancer progression, proliferation, and response to therapy. Spatial relationships among cells including cancer and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) are key contributors to heterogeneity. Methods: We demonstrate how to quantify spatial heterogeneity from immunofluorescence pathology samples, using a set of 3 basic breast cancer biomarkers as a test case. We learn a set of dominant biomarker intensity patterns and map the spatial distribution of the biomarker patterns with a network. We then describe the pairwise association statistics for each pattern within the network using pointwise mutual information (PMI) and visually represent heterogeneity with a two-dimensional map. Results: We found a salient set of 8 biomarker patterns to describe cellular phenotypes from a tissue microarray cohort containing 4 different breast cancer subtypes. After computing PMI for each pair of biomarker patterns in each patient and tumor replicate, we visualize the interactions that contribute to the resulting association statistics. Then, we demonstrate the potential for using PMI as a diagnostic biomarker, by comparing PMI maps and heterogeneity scores from patients across the 4 different cancer subtypes. Estrogen receptor positive invasive lobular carcinoma patient, AL13-6, exhibited the highest heterogeneity score among those tested, while estrogen receptor negative invasive ductal carcinoma patient, AL13-14, exhibited the lowest heterogeneity score. Conclusions: This paper presents an approach for describing intratumor heterogeneity, in a quantitative fashion (via PMI), which departs from the purely qualitative approaches currently used in the clinic. PMI is generalizable to highly multiplexed/hyperplexed immunofluorescence images, as well as spatial data from complementary in situ methods including FISSEQ and CyTOF, sampling many different components

  8. HIF-1 mediates metabolic responses to intratumoral hypoxia and oncogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Gregg L.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs frequently in human cancers and induces adaptive changes in cell metabolism that include a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, increased glycogen synthesis, and a switch from glucose to glutamine as the major substrate for fatty acid synthesis. This broad metabolic reprogramming is coordinated at the transcriptional level by HIF-1, which functions as a master regulator to balance oxygen supply and demand. HIF-1 is also activated in cancer cells by tumor suppressor (e.g., VHL) loss of function and oncogene gain of function (leading to PI3K/AKT/mTOR activity) and mediates metabolic alterations that drive cancer progression and resistance to therapy. Inhibitors of HIF-1 or metabolic enzymes may impair the metabolic flexibility of cancer cells and make them more sensitive to anticancer drugs. PMID:23999440

  9. State-dependent alterations in sleep/wake architecture elicited by the M4 PAM VU0467154 - Relation to antipsychotic-like drug effects.

    PubMed

    Gould, Robert W; Nedelcovych, Michael T; Gong, Xuewen; Tsai, Erica; Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Wood, Michael R; Duggan, Mark E; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Wood, Michael W; Ivarsson, Magnus; Noetzel, Meredith J; Daniels, J Scott; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates direct relationships between sleep abnormalities and the severity and prevalence of other symptom clusters in schizophrenia. Assessment of potential state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal relative to antipsychotic-like activity is critical for the development of novel antipsychotic drugs (APDs). Recently, we reported that VU0467154, a selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), exhibits robust APD-like and cognitive enhancing activity in rodents. However, the state-dependent effects of VU0467154 on sleep architecture and arousal have not been examined. Using polysomnography and quantitative electroencephalographic recordings from subcranial electrodes in rats, we evaluated the effects of VU0467154, in comparison with the atypical APD clozapine and the M1/M4-preferring mAChR agonist xanomeline. VU0467154 induced state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal including delayed Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep onset, increased cumulative duration of total and Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep, and increased arousal during waking periods. Clozapine decreased arousal during wake, increased cumulative NREM, and decreased REM sleep. In contrast, xanomeline increased time awake and arousal during wake, but reduced slow wave activity during NREM sleep. Additionally, in combination with the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801, modeling NMDAR hypofunction thought to underlie many symptoms in schizophrenia, both VU0467154 and clozapine attenuated MK-801-induced elevations in high frequency gamma power consistent with an APD-like mechanism of action. These findings suggest that selective M4 PAMs may represent a novel mechanism for treating multiple symptoms of schizophrenia, including disruptions in sleep architecture without a sedative profile.

  10. State-Dependent Alterations in Sleep/wake Architecture Elicited by the M4 PAM VU0467154- Relation to Antipsychotic-like Drug Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Robert W.; Nedelcovych, Michael T.; Gong, Xuewen; Tsai, Erica; Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M.; Wood, Michael R.; Duggan, Mark E.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, John; Wood, Michael W.; Ivarsson, Magnus; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Daniels, J. Scott; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates direct relationships between sleep abnormalities and the severity and prevalence of other symptom clusters in schizophrenia. Assessment of potential state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal relative to antipsychotic-like activity is critical for the development of novel antipsychotic drugs (APDs). Recently, we reported that VU0467154, a selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), exhibits robust APD-like and cognitive enhancing activity in rodents. However, the state-dependent effects of VU0467154 on sleep architecture and arousal have not been examined. Using polysomnography and quantitative electroencephalographic recordings from subcranial electrodes in rats, we evaluated the effects of VU0467154, in comparison with the atypical APD clozapine and the M1/M4-preferring mAChR agonist xanomeline. VU0467154 induced state-dependent alterations in sleep architecture and arousal by delaying Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep onset, selectively increased cumulative duration of total and Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep, and increased arousal during waking periods. Clozapine decreased arousal during wake, increased cumulative NREM, and decreased REM sleep. In contrast, xanomeline increased time awake and arousal during wake, but reduced slow wave activity during NREM sleep. Additionally, in combination with the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK-801, modeling NMDAR hypofunction thought to underlie many symptoms in schizophrenia, both VU0467154 and clozapine attenuated MK-801-induced elevations in high frequency gamma power consistent with an APD-like mechanism of action. These findings suggest that selective M4 PAMs may represent a novel mechanism for treating multiple symptoms of schizophrenia, including disruptions in sleep architecture without a sedative profile. PMID:26617071

  11. Naproxen, a Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug, Can Affect Daily Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Alterations of Monoamine Levels in Different Areas of the Brain in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ananda Raj; Dutta, Goutam; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-06-01

    Goswami, Ananda Raj, Goutam Dutta, and Tusharkanti Ghosh. Naproxen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug can affect daily hypobaric hypoxia-induced alterations of monoamine levels in different areas of the brain in male rats. High Alt Med Biol. 17:133-140, 2016.-The oxidative stress (OS)-induced prostaglandin (PG) release, in hypobaric hypoxic (HHc) condition, may be linked with the changes of brain monoamines. The present study intends to explore the changes of monoamines in hypothalamus (H), cerebral cortex (CC), and cerebellum (CB) along with the motor activity in rats after exposing them to simulated hypobaric condition and the role of PGs on the daily hypobaric hypoxia (DHH)-induced alteration of brain monoamines by administering, an inhibitor of PG synthesis, naproxen. The rats were exposed to a decompression chamber at 18,000 ft for 8 hours per day for 6 days after administration of vehicle or naproxen (18 mg/kg body wt.). The monoamine levels (epinephrine, E; norepinephrine, NE; dopamine, DA; and 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in CC, CB, and H were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection, and the locomotor behavior was measured by open field test. The NE and DA levels were decreased in CC, CB, and H of the rat brain in HHc condition. The E and 5-HT levels were decreased in CC, but in H and CB, they remained unaltered in HHc condition. These DHH-induced changes of monoamines in brain areas were prevented after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The locomotor behavior remained unaltered in HHc condition and after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The DHH-induced changes of monoamines in the brain in HHc condition are probably linked with PGs that may be induced by OS.

  12. Theophylline, a methylxanthine drug induces osteopenia and alters calciotropic hormones, and prophylactic vitamin D treatment protects against these changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Pal, Subhashis; Khan, Kainat; China, Shyamsundar Pal; Mittal, Monika; Porwal, Konica; Shrivastava, Richa; Taneja, Isha; Hossain, Zakir; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Gayen, Jiaur R; Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Sharma, Vishnu Lal; Trivedi, Arun K; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Bhadauria, Smrati; Godbole, Madan M; Gupta, Sushil K; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2016-03-15

    The drug, theophylline is frequently used as an additive to medications for people suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). We studied the effect of theophylline in bone cells, skeleton and parameters related to systemic calcium homeostasis. Theophylline induced osteoblast apoptosis by increasing reactive oxygen species production that was caused by increased cAMP production. Bone marrow levels of theophylline were higher than its serum levels, indicating skeletal accumulation of this drug. When adult Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with theophylline, bone regeneration at fracture site was diminished compared with control. Theophylline treatment resulted in a time-dependent (at 4- and 8 weeks) bone loss. At 8 weeks, a significant loss of bone mass and deterioration of microarchitecture occurred and the severity was comparable to methylprednisone. Theophylline caused formation of hypomineralized osteoid and increased osteoclast number and surface. Serum bone resorption and formation marker were respectively higher and lower in the theophylline group compared with control. Bone strength was reduced by theophylline treatment. After 8 weeks, serum 25-D3 and liver 25-hydroxylases were decreased in theophylline group than control. Further, theophylline treatment reduced serum 1, 25-(OH)2 vitamin D3 (1,25-D3), and increased parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor-23. Theophylline treated rats had normal serum calcium and phosphate but displayed calciuria and phosphaturia. Co-administration of 25-D3 with theophylline completely abrogated theophylline-induced osteopenia and alterations in calcium homeostasis. In addition, 1,25-D3 protected osteoblasts from theophylline-induced apoptosis and the attendant oxidative stress. We conclude that theophylline has detrimental effects in bone and prophylactic vitamin D supplementation to subjects taking theophylline could be osteoprotective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intra-tumoral budding in preoperative biopsy specimens predicts lymph node and distant metastasis in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giger, Olivier T; Comtesse, Sarah C M; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti; Kurrer, Michael O

    2012-07-01

    Tumor budding, a histological hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer, is a parameter of tumor progression and according to the International Union Against Cancer/American Joint Committee on Cancer an 'additional' prognostic factor. The current definition of tumor budding is reserved for the invasive tumor front of colorectal cancer (so called peri-tumoral budding), but tumor buds can also be observed in small preoperative biopsy specimens. Whereas the prognostic value of peri-tumoral budding assessed in resection specimens has found wide acceptance, the value of budding in preoperative biopsies, which normally do not encompass the invasive tumor margin and hence can be called intra-tumoral budding, has not been systematically investigated yet. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the predictive value of intra-tumoral budding for lymph node and distant metastasis in preoperative biopsies. Preoperative biopsy samples and consecutive resection specimens from 72 patients with pathological information on TNM stage, vascular, lymphatic and perineural invasion, and tumor border configuration were used to evaluate intra-tumoral budding and peri-tumoral budding. Both parameters were scored semiquantitatively as 'high' (detectable at low power magnification × 2.5) and 'low' (occasional budding at intermediate magnification × 10, difficult to find or absent). In biopsy samples high intra-tumoral budding was observed in 12/72 patients (17%) and associated with high peri-tumoral budding in the corresponding resection specimens (P=0.008). Additionally, there was a correlation between high intra-tumoral budding and lymph node metastasis (P=0.034), distant metastasis (P=0.007) and higher tumor grade (P=0.025). Peri-tumoral budding was associated with higher N stage (P=0.004), vascular (P=0.046) and lymphatic invasion (P=0.019) as well as with an infiltrating tumor border (P<0.001), reflecting the predictive power of peri-tumoral budding for

  14. Neonatal methamphetamine-induced corticosterone release in rats is inhibited by adrenal autotransplantation without altering the effect of the drug on hippocampal serotonin.

    PubMed

    Grace, Curtis E; Schaefer, Tori L; Gudelsky, Gary A; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2010-01-01

    Rat neonatal methamphetamine exposure results in corticosterone release and learning and memory impairments in later life; effects also observed after neonatal stress. Previous attempts to test the role of corticosterone release after methamphetamine using corticosterone inhibitors were unsuccessful and adrenalectomy caused reductions in hippocampal serotonin greater than those caused by methamphetamine alone. Here we tested whether adrenal autotransplantation could be used to attenuate methamphetamine-induced corticosterone release without also altering the effects of the drug on serotonin. Adrenal autotransplantation surgery occurred on postnatal day 9 followed by methamphetamine or saline treatment from postnatal day 11-20 (10mg/kg/dosex4/day). Plasma corticosterone and hippocampal serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were determined 30min following the first treatment on each day between postnatal days 11-20. Adrenal autotransplantation attenuated neonatal methamphetamine-induced corticosterone release by approximately 70% initially, approximately 55% midway through treatment, and approximately 25% by the end of treatment. Methamphetamine reduced serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the hippocampus in the ADXA rats to the same degree as in SHAM rats. The data show that neonatal adrenal autotransplantation is an effective method for partially reducing treatment-induced corticosterone release while providing sufficient corticosterone to sustain normal growth and development. The method should be applicable to other models of developmental stress/corticosterone release.

  15. Altered resting state functional connectivity of anterior cingulate cortex in drug naïve adolescents at the earliest stages of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Santino; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Romana Montecchi, Francesca; Riva, Giuseppe; Carducci, Filippo; Cosimo Quattrocchi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Previous Resting-State Functional Connectivity (RSFC) studies have shown several functional alterations in adults with or recovered from long Anorexia Nervosa (AN). The aim of this paper was to investigate whole brain RSFC in adolescents with AN in the earliest stages, less than 6 months, of the disorder. Sixteen drug-naïve outpatient female adolescents with AN-restrictive type (AN-r) (mean age: 15,8; SD 1,7) were compared to 16 age-matched healthy female (mean age: 16,3; SD 1,4). Relevant resting state networks (RSNs) were identified using independent component analysis (ICA) from functional magnetic resonance imaging data; a dual regression technique was used to detect between-group differences in the RSNs. Between-group differences of the functional connectivity maps were found in the executive control network (ECN). Particularly, decreased temporal correlation was observed in AN-r patients relative to healthy controls between the ECN functional connectivity maps and the anterior cingulate cortex (p < 0.05 corrected). Our results in AN adolescents may represent an early trait-related biomarker of the disease. Considering that the above mentioned network and its area are mainly involved in cognitive control and emotional processing, our findings could explain the impaired cognitive flexibility in relation to body image and appetite in AN patients. PMID:26043139

  16. Spatial intratumoral heterogeneity of proliferation in immunohistochemical images of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Valous, Nektarios A; Lahrmann, Bernd; Halama, Niels; Bergmann, Frank; Jäger, Dirk; Grabe, Niels

    2016-06-01

    The interactions of neoplastic cells with each other and the microenvironment are complex. To understand intratumoral heterogeneity, subtle differences should be quantified. Main factors contributing to heterogeneity include the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, action of microenvironment, mechanisms of intercellular transfer of genetic information, and differential mechanisms of modifications of genetic material/proteins. This may reflect on the expression of biomarkers in the context of prognosis/stratification. Hence, a rigorous approach for assessing the spatial intratumoral heterogeneity of histological biomarker expression with accuracy and reproducibility is required, since patterns in immunohistochemical images can be challenging to identify and describe. A quantitative method that is useful for characterizing complex irregular structures is lacunarity; it is a multiscale technique that exhaustively samples the image, while the decay of its index as a function of window size follows characteristic patterns for different spatial arrangements. In histological images, lacunarity provides a useful measure for the spatial organization of a biomarker when a sampling scheme is employed and relevant features are computed. The proposed approach quantifies the segmented proliferative cells and not the textural content of the histological slide, thus providing a more realistic measure of heterogeneity within the sample space of the tumor region. The aim is to investigate in whole sections of primary pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs), using whole-slide imaging and image analysis, the spatial intratumoral heterogeneity of Ki-67 immunostains. Unsupervised learning is employed to verify that the approach can partition the tissue sections according to distributional heterogeneity. The architectural complexity of histological images has shown that single measurements are often insufficient. Inhomogeneity of distribution depends not only on percentage

  17. Intratumoral injection of boiling carboplatin (BCBP) solution for treatment of liver cancer in the animal model.

    PubMed

    Lu, M; Yin, X; Shen, Q; Lu, J

    2001-01-01

    To develop a new modality of local hyperthermal chemotherapy for liver cancer. Carboplatin solutions of various concentrations were heated at 60 degrees C, 80 degrees C and 100 degrees C, and carboplatin content, pH value and ultraviolet absorption spectrum were assayed before and after heating. By establishing BALB/c murine model of subcutaneous transplant liver cancer, intratumoral injection of boiling carboplatin solution (group A), 45 degrees C carboplatin solution (group B), room-temperature carboplatin solution (group C), boiling distilled-water (group D) and room-temperature distilled-water (control group) was carried out, and tumor growth curve, tumor regression rate and pathohistological features following treatment were evaluated. Carboplatin content remained stable, ultraviolet absorption spectrum presented no remarkable changes and pH value showed a slight decline after being heated for up to 20 min. Following treatment, all 16 tumors in group A were completely regressed up to day 21. In groups B, C and control group, no tumors became fully regressed and a size of 1.98 +/- 1.11 cm2, 1.50 +/- 0.58 cm2 and 4.83 +/- 0.37 cm2 was presented on day 21, respectively. In group D, though all tumors grossly disappeared during the early post-treatment days, 12 out of 16 recurred on day 21. The tumor regression rate in group A was significantly lower as compared with that of groups B, C, D and control group (all P < 0.01). Histological examination revealed massive necrosis with some degenerated tumor cells at the tumor margin in groups A and D, and only focal necrosis with more viable tumor cells at the center and margin in groups B and C on post-treatment day 1 and 3. Twenty-one days after injection, all tumors in group A presented complete necrosis and were partly replaced by fibrotic tissue. Except for 4 regressed tumors in group D which had the same histological features as those in group A, all other tumors in groups B, C, D and control group presented the

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopic imaging of intra-tumor heterogeneity and molecular identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Reinecke, Dan; Miller, Kathy; Kruger, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Purpose. To evaluate photoacoustic spectroscopy as a potential imaging modality capable of measuring intra-tumor heterogeneity and spectral features associated with hemoglobin and the molecular probe indocyanine green (ICG). Material and Methods. Immune deficient mice were injected with wildtype and VEGF enhanced MCF-7 breast cancer cells or SKOV3x ovarian cancer cells, which were allowed to grow to a size of 6-12 mm in diameter. Two mice were imaged alive and after euthanasia for (oxy/deoxy)-hemoglobin content. A 0.4 mL volume of 1 μg/mL concentration of ICG was injected into the tail veins of two mice prior to imaging using the photoacoustic computed tomography (PCT) spectrometer (Optosonics, Inc., Indianapolis, IN 46202) scanner. Mouse images were acquired for wavelengths spanning 700-920 nm, after which the major organs were excised, and similarly imaged. A histological study was performed by sectioning the organ and optically imaging the fluorescence distribution. Results. Calibration of PCT-spectroscopy with different samples of oxygenated blood reproduced a hemoglobin dissociation curve consistent with empirical formula with an average error of 5.6%. In vivo PCT determination of SaO II levels within the tumor vascular was measurably tracked, and spatially correlated to the periphery of the tumor. Statistical and systematic errors associated with hypoxia were estimated to be 10 and 13%, respectively. Measured ICG concentrations determined by contrast-differential PCT images in excised organs (tumor, liver) were approximately 0.8 μg/mL, consistent with fluorescent histological results. Also, the difference in the ratio of ICG concentration in the gall bladder-to-vasculature between the mice was consistent with excretion times between the two mice. Conclusion. PCT spectroscopic imaging has shown to be a noninvasive modality capable of imaging intra-tumor heterogeneity of (oxy/deoxy)-hemoglobin and ICG in vivo, with an estimated error in SaO II at 17% and in

  19. Multistep, effective drug distribution within solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shemi, Amotz; Khvalevsky, Elina Zorde; Gabai, Rachel Malka; Domb, Abraham; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of drugs within solid tumors presents a long-standing barrier for efficient cancer therapies. Tumors are highly resistant to diffusion, and the lack of blood and lymphatic flows suppresses convection. Prolonged, continuous intratumoral drug delivery from a miniature drug source offers an alternative to both systemic delivery and intratumoral injection. Presented here is a model of drug distribution from such a source, in a multistep process. At delivery onset the drug mainly affects the closest surroundings. Such ‘priming’ enables drug penetration to successive cell layers. Tumor ‘void volume’ (volume not occupied by cells) increases, facilitating lymphatic perfusion. The drug is then transported by hydraulic convection downstream along interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) gradients, away from the tumor core. After a week tumor cell death occurs throughout the entire tumor and IFP gradients are flattened. Then, the drug is transported mainly by ‘mixing’, powered by physiological bulk body movements. Steady state is achieved and the drug covers the entire tumor over several months. Supporting measurements are provided from the LODER™ system, releasing siRNA against mutated KRAS over months in pancreatic cancer in-vivo models. LODER™ was also successfully employed in a recent Phase 1/2 clinical trial with pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26416413

  20. Combined treatment with ipilimumab and intratumoral interleukin-2 in pretreated patients with stage IV melanoma-safety and efficacy in a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Weide, Benjamin; Martens, Alexander; Wistuba-Hamprecht, Kilian; Zelba, Henning; Maier, Ludwig; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Klumpp, Bernhard D; Soffel, Daniel; Eigentler, Thomas K; Garbe, Claus

    2017-04-01

    Treatment of advanced melanoma patients with ipilimumab results in improved survival. However, only about 20% of treated patients experience long-term benefit. Combining treatment of ipilimumab with other drugs may improve immune activation and potentially enhance clinical efficacy. The aims of the phase II clinical trial reported here were to investigate tolerability and efficacy of a combined immunotherapeutic strategy comprising standard systemic ipilimumab at 3 mg/kg four times at 3-week intervals and intratumorally injected IL-2 at 9 MIU daily twice weekly for four weeks in pretreated melanoma patients with distant metastasis. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate according to immune-related response criteria at week 12; tolerability according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria was secondary endpoint. No objective responses were observed in the 15 enrolled patients. Three patients had stable disease 12 weeks after starting treatment, yielding a disease control rate of 20%. Tolerability of this combination treatment was acceptable. Observed adverse events were those expected from the respective monotherapies. Autoimmune colitis was observed in two patients. Grade III/IV adverse events were observed in 40% of patients, and no treatment-related deaths occurred. Thus, this combined immunotherapy is associated with adverse events similar to those associated with the respective monotherapies. However, this study does not provide any evidence of improved efficacy of the combination over ipilimumab alone.

  1. Limited Tumor Tissue Drug Penetration Contributes to Primary Resistance against Angiogenesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Szilvia; Rezeli, Melinda; Kelemen, Olga; Vegvari, Akos; Watanabe, Kenichi; Sugihara, Yutaka; Tisza, Anna; Marton, Timea; Kovacs, Ildiko; Tovari, Jozsef; Laszlo, Viktoria; Helbich, Thomas H.; Hegedus, Balazs; Klikovits, Thomas; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Klepetko, Walter; Paku, Sandor; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy; Dome, Balazs

    2017-01-01

    Resistance mechanisms against antiangiogenic drugs are unclear. Here, we correlated the antitumor and antivascular properties of five different antiangiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs) (motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib) with their intratumoral distribution data obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). In the first mouse model, only sunitinib exhibited broad-spectrum antivascular and antitumor activities by simultaneously suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and desmin expression, and by increasing intratumoral hypoxia and inhibiting both tumor growth and vascularisation significantly. Importantly, the highest and most homogeneous intratumoral drug concentrations have been found in sunitinib-treated animals. In another animal model, where - in contrast to the first model - vatalanib was detectable at homogeneously high intratumoral concentrations, the drug significantly reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. In conclusion, the tumor tissue penetration and thus the antiangiogenic and antitumor potential of antiangiogenic RTKIs vary among the tumor models and our study demonstrates the potential of MALDI-MSI to predict the efficacy of unlabelled small molecule antiangiogenic drugs in malignant tissue. Our approach is thus a major technical and preclinical advance demonstrating that primary resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors involves limited tumor tissue drug penetration. We also conclude that MALDI-MSI may significantly contribute to the improvement of antivascular cancer therapies. PMID:28042343

  2. The intratumoral administration of ferucarbotran conjugated with doxorubicin improved therapeutic effect by magnetic hyperthermia combined with pharmacotherapy in a hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Local hyperthermia of tumor in conjunction with chemotherapy is a promising strategy for cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral delivery of clinically approved magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with doxorubicin to simultaneously induce magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery in a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. Materials and methods HCC cells expressing luciferase were implanted into the flank of BALB/c-nu mice (n = 19). When the tumor diameter reached 7–8 mm, the animals were divided into four groups according to the injected agents: group A (normal saline, n = 4), group B (doxorubicin, n = 5), group C (MNP, n = 5), and group D (MNP/doxorubicin complex, n = 5). Animals were exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to receive magnetic hyperthermia, and intratumoral temperature changes were measured. Bioluminescence imagings (BLIs) were performed before treatment and at 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment to measure the tumoral activities. The relative signal intensity (RSI) of each tumor was calculated by dividing the BLI signal at each time point by the value measured before treatment. At day 14 post-treatment, all tumor tissues were harvested to assess the apoptosis rates by pathological examination. Results The rise in temperature of the tumors was 1.88 ± 0.21°C in group A, 0.96 ± 1.05°C in B, 7.93 ± 1.99°C in C, and 8.95 ± 1.31°C in D. The RSI of the tumors at day 14 post-treatment was significantly lower in group D (0.31 ± 0.20) than in group A (2.23 ± 1.14), B (0.94 ± 0.47), and C (1.02 ± 0.21). The apoptosis rates of the tumors were 11.52 ± 3.10% in group A, 23.0 ± 7.68% in B, 25.4 ± 3.36% in C, and 39.0 ± 13.2% in D, respectively. Conclusions The intratumoral injection of ferucarbotran conjugated with doxorubicin shows an improved therapeutic effect compared with doxorubicin or ferucarbotran alone

  3. Intratumoral concentration of estrogens and clinicopathological changes in ductal carcinoma in situ following aromatase inhibitor letrozole treatment

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, K; Ishida, T; Miki, Y; Hirakawa, H; Kakugawa, Y; Amano, G; Ebata, A; Mori, N; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, M; Amari, M; Ohuchi, N; Sasano, H; Suzuki, T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Estrogens have important roles in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. However, the significance of presurgical aromatase inhibitor treatment remains unclear. Therefore, we examined intratumoral concentration of estrogens and changes of clinicopathological factors in DCIS after letrozole treatment. Methods: Ten cases of postmenopausal oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive DCIS were examined. They received oral letrozole before the surgery, and the tumour size was evaluated by ultrasonography. Surgical specimens and corresponding biopsy samples were used for immunohistochemistry. Snap-frozen specimens were also available in a subset of cases, and used for hormone assays and microarray analysis. Results: Intratumoral oestrogen levels were significantly lower in DCIS treated with letrozole compared with that in those without the therapy. A great majority of oestrogen-induced genes showed low expression levels in DCIS treated with letrozole by microarray analysis. Moreover, letrozole treatment reduced the greatest dimension of DCIS, and significantly decreased Ki-67 and progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in DCIS tissues. Conclusion: These results suggest that estrogens are mainly produced by aromatase in DCIS tissues, and aromatase inhibitors potently inhibit oestrogen actions in postmenopausal ER-positive DCIS through rapid deprivation of intratumoral estrogens. PMID:23756858

  4. Intratumoral concentration of estrogens and clinicopathological changes in ductal carcinoma in situ following aromatase inhibitor letrozole treatment.

    PubMed

    Takagi, K; Ishida, T; Miki, Y; Hirakawa, H; Kakugawa, Y; Amano, G; Ebata, A; Mori, N; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, M; Amari, M; Ohuchi, N; Sasano, H; Suzuki, T

    2013-07-09

    Estrogens have important roles in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. However, the significance of presurgical aromatase inhibitor treatment remains unclear. Therefore, we examined intratumoral concentration of estrogens and changes of clinicopathological factors in DCIS after letrozole treatment. Ten cases of postmenopausal oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive DCIS were examined. They received oral letrozole before the surgery, and the tumour size was evaluated by ultrasonography. Surgical specimens and corresponding biopsy samples were used for immunohistochemistry. Snap-frozen specimens were also available in a subset of cases, and used for hormone assays and microarray analysis. Intratumoral oestrogen levels were significantly lower in DCIS treated with letrozole compared with that in those without the therapy. A great majority of oestrogen-induced genes showed low expression levels in DCIS treated with letrozole by microarray analysis. Moreover, letrozole treatment reduced the greatest dimension of DCIS, and significantly decreased Ki-67 and progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in DCIS tissues. These results suggest that estrogens are mainly produced by aromatase in DCIS tissues, and aromatase inhibitors potently inhibit oestrogen actions in postmenopausal ER-positive DCIS through rapid deprivation of intratumoral estrogens.

  5. Phase 1 Study of Intratumoral Pexa-Vec (JX-594), an Oncolytic and Immunotherapeutic Vaccinia Virus, in Pediatric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cripe, Timothy P; Ngo, Minhtran C; Geller, James I; Louis, Chrystal U; Currier, Mark A; Racadio, John M; Towbin, Alexander J; Rooney, Cliona M; Pelusio, Adina; Moon, Anne; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Burke, James M; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H; Breitbach, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec, JX-594) is an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus designed to destroy cancer cells through viral lysis and induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-driven tumor-specific immunity. Pexa-Vec has undergone phase 1 and 2 testing alone and in combination with other therapies in adult patients, via both intratumoral and intravenous administration routes. We sought to determine the safety of intratumoral administration in pediatric patients. In a dose-escalation study using either 106 or 107 plaque-forming units per kilogram, we performed one-time injections in up to three tumor sites in five pediatric patients and two injections in one patient. Ages at study entry ranged from 4 to 21 years, and their cancer diagnoses included neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and Ewing sarcoma. All toxicities were ≤ grade 3. The most common side effects were sinus fever and sinus tachycardia. All three patients at the higher dose developed asymptomatic grade 1 treatment-related skin pustules that resolved within 3–4 weeks. One patient showed imaging evidence suggestive of antitumor biological activity. The two patients tested for cellular immunoreactivity to vaccinia antigens showed strong responses. Overall, our study suggests Pexa-Vec is safe to administer to pediatric patients by intratumoral administration and could be studied further in this patient population. PMID:25531693

  6. Inter-patient and Intra-tumor Heterogeneity in the Sensitivity to Tumor-targeted Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Tsubasa; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

      Efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors such as PD-1 antibody for colorectal cancer remains to be proved except in microsatellite-instability-high (MSI-H) cases. While the objective response rate of MSI-H cases was 40%, that of microsatellite-stable (MSS) cases was 0%, showing that response rate to immune checkpoint inhibitors varies even among the microsatellite status. Some possible mechanisms that confer each patient variation in the response to immunotherapy should be considered. We focused on the combination of inter-patient heterogeneity and intra-tumor heterogeneity as a determining factor of immune reaction. An example of intra-tumor heterogeneity is the low expression of tumor antigen by CD271(+) cells in melanoma. It is not surprising that similar mechanism exists in CRC. Other related intra-tumor heterogeneity includes EMT and autophagy, both molecular mechanisms that are thought to promote immune-evading phenotype. Besides the microsatellite status, inter-patient heterogeneity in response to tumor immunity includes hypermutator phenotype, which is driven by POLE mutation, intrinsic cytokine production, and microbiota in the gut.

  7. Formulation of a charcoal suspension for intratumoral injection. Study of galenical excipients.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme-Faivre, L; Mathieu, M C; Depraetere, P; Grossiord, J L; Orbach-Arbouys, S; Puisieux, F; Seiller, M

    1999-02-01

    To tattoo human breast cancer prior to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery, thus allowing a better localization of the remaining tumor by the surgeon, we developed a formulation containing 10% charcoal suspended in water for parenteral preparations. The present study concerns a new step in the development of the charcoal suspension. We sought to determine whether the addition of various excipients could improve the formulation properties and affect the labeling of tumor by the suspension. We have tested surfactants (egg lecithin, polysorbate 80, Cremophor EL, and Pluronic F68), isotonisants (sugars such as glucose and mannitol), polysaccharides (dextrans 20 and 40), and Cabosil, a pyrogenated silica. Except for glucose and mannitol, which were added at a 5% concentration, the other excipients were added at a 0.1% concentration, they were dissolved in water for parenteral injection and sterilized at 120 degrees C for 20 min. We then measured diffusion in vivo in mammary tumor. In vivo, when injected intratumorally in mice, a greater diffusion of charcoal particles was noted within the tumor (in the case of egg lecithin, polysorbate 80, dextran 20 and 40, and glucose) and sometimes in some organs (e.g., Cremophor EL and mannitol). Pluronic F68 slightly improved the stability of the suspension and did not lead to marked diffusion at the injection site, but it showed slight toxicity and cannot be used in the formulation. We concluded that the best formulation was an aqueous 10% micronized peat charcoal suspension.

  8. Detection of Intratumor Heterogeneity in Modern Pathology: A Multisite Tumor Sampling Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Jesús M.; de Petris, Giovanni; López, José I.

    2017-01-01

    Current sampling protocols of neoplasms along the digestive tract and in the urinary bladder have to be updated, as they do not respond to the necessities of modern personalized medicine. We show here that an adapted version of multisite tumor sampling (MSTS) is a sustainable model to overcome current deficiencies in digestive and bladder tumors when they are large enough so as to make unaffordable a total sampling. The new method is based on the divide-and-conquer algorithm and includes a slight modification of the MSTS, which proved to be useful very recently in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This in silico analysis confirms the usefulness of MSTS for detecting intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) in tumors arising in hollow viscera. However, MSTS does not seem to improve routine traditional sampling in detecting tumor budding, extramural venous invasion, and perineural invasion. We conclude that (1) MSTS is the best method for tumor sampling to detect ITH balancing high performance and sustainable cost, (2) MSTS must be adapted to tumor shape and tumor location for an optimal performance. PMID:28321395

  9. Quantitative Computed Tomographic Descriptors Associate Tumor Shape Complexity and Intratumor Heterogeneity with Prognosis in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Olya; Berglund, Anders E.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.; Dekker, Andre; Wang, Hua; Velazquez, Emmanuel Rios; Lambin, Philippe; Gu, Yuhua; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Eikman, Edward; Gatenby, Robert A.; Eschrich, Steven; Gillies, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Two CT features were developed to quantitatively describe lung adenocarcinomas by scoring tumor shape complexity (feature 1: convexity) and intratumor density variation (feature 2: entropy ratio) in routinely obtained diagnostic CT scans. The developed quantitative features were analyzed in two independent cohorts (cohort 1: n = 61; cohort 2: n = 47) of patients diagnosed with primary lung adenocarcinoma, retrospectively curated to include imaging and clinical data. Preoperative chest CTs were segmented semi-automatically. Segmented tumor regions were further subdivided into core and boundary sub-regions, to quantify intensity variations across the tumor. Reproducibility of the features was evaluated in an independent test-retest dataset of 32 patients. The proposed metrics showed high degree of reproducibility in a repeated experiment (concordance, CCC≥0.897; dynamic range, DR≥0.92). Association with overall survival was evaluated by Cox proportional hazard regression, Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and the log-rank test. Both features were associated with overall survival (convexity: p = 0.008; entropy ratio: p = 0.04) in Cohort 1 but not in Cohort 2 (convexity: p = 0.7; entropy ratio: p = 0.8). In both cohorts, these features were found to be descriptive and demonstrated the link between imaging characteristics and patient survival in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:25739030

  10. Intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma: don't forget the peritumoral brain zone

    PubMed Central

    Lemée, Jean-Michel; Clavreul, Anne; Menei, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most frequent and aggressive primary tumor of the central nervous system. Prognosis remains poor despite ongoing progress. In cases where the gadolinium-enhanced portion of the GB is completely resected, 90% of recurrences occur at the margin of surgical resection in the macroscopically normal peritumoral brain zone (PBZ). Intratumoral heterogeneity in GB is currently a hot topic in neuro-oncology, and the GB PBZ may be involved in this phenomenon. Indeed, this region, which possesses specific properties, has been less studied than the core of the GB tumor. The high rate of local recurrence in the PBZ and the limited success of targeted therapies against GB demonstrate the need for a better understanding of the PBZ. We present here a review of the literature on the GB PBZ, focusing on its radiological, cellular, and molecular characteristics. We discuss how intraoperative analysis of the PBZ is important for the optimization of surgical resection and the development of targeted therapies against GB. PMID:26203067

  11. VEGF blockade enables oncolytic cancer virotherapy in part by modulating intratumoral myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Currier, Mark A; Eshun, Francis K; Sholl, Allyson; Chernoguz, Artur; Crawford, Kelly; Divanovic, Senad; Boon, Louis; Goins, William F; Frischer, Jason S; Collins, Margaret H; Leddon, Jennifer L; Baird, William H; Haseley, Amy; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Hendrickson, Brett W; Brekken, Rolf A; Kaur, Balveen; Hildeman, David; Cripe, Timothy P

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the host response to oncolytic viruses is important to maximize their antitumor efficacy. Despite robust cytotoxicity and high virus production of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) in cultured human sarcoma cells, intratumoral (ITu) virus injection resulted in only mild antitumor effects in some xenograft models, prompting us to characterize the host inflammatory response. Virotherapy induced an acute neutrophilic infiltrate, a relative decrease of ITu macrophages, and a myeloid cell-dependent upregulation of host-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-VEGF antibodies, bevacizumab and r84, the latter of which binds VEGF and selectively inhibits binding to VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) but not VEGFR1, enhanced the antitumor effects of virotherapy, in part due to decreased angiogenesis but not increased virus production. Neither antibody affected neutrophilic infiltration but both partially mitigated virus-induced depletion of macrophages. Enhancement of virotherapy-mediated antitumor effects by anti-VEGF antibodies could largely be recapitulated by systemic depletion of CD11b(+) cells. These data suggest the combined effect of oHSV virotherapy and anti-VEGF antibodies is in part due to modulation of a host inflammatory reaction to virus. Our data provide strong preclinical support for combined oHSV and anti-VEGF antibody therapy and suggest that understanding and counteracting the innate host response may help enable the full antitumor potential of oncolytic virotherapy.

  12. Measuring intratumor heterogeneity by network entropy using RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngjune; Lim, Sangsoo; Nam, Jin-Wu; Kim, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) is observed at different stages of tumor progression, metastasis and reouccurence, which can be important for clinical applications. We used RNA-sequencing data from tumor samples, and measured the level of ITH in terms of biological network states. To model complex relationships among genes, we used a protein interaction network to consider gene-gene dependency. ITH was measured by using an entropy-based distance metric between two networks, nJSD, with Jensen-Shannon Divergence (JSD). With nJSD, we defined transcriptome-based ITH (tITH). The effectiveness of tITH was extensively tested for the issues related with ITH using real biological data sets. Human cancer cell line data and single-cell sequencing data were investigated to verify our approach. Then, we analyzed TCGA pan-cancer 6,320 patients. Our result was in agreement with widely used genome-based ITH inference methods, while showed better performance at survival analysis. Analysis of mouse clonal evolution data further confirmed that our transcriptome-based ITH was consistent with genetic heterogeneity at different clonal evolution stages. Additionally, we found that cell cycle related pathways have significant contribution to increasing heterogeneity on the network during clonal evolution. We believe that the proposed transcriptome-based ITH is useful to characterize heterogeneity of a tumor sample at RNA level. PMID:27883053

  13. Measuring intratumor heterogeneity by network entropy using RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjune; Lim, Sangsoo; Nam, Jin-Wu; Kim, Sun

    2016-11-24

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) is observed at different stages of tumor progression, metastasis and reouccurence, which can be important for clinical applications. We used RNA-sequencing data from tumor samples, and measured the level of ITH in terms of biological network states. To model complex relationships among genes, we used a protein interaction network to consider gene-gene dependency. ITH was measured by using an entropy-based distance metric between two networks, nJSD, with Jensen-Shannon Divergence (JSD). With nJSD, we defined transcriptome-based ITH (tITH). The effectiveness of tITH was extensively tested for the issues related with ITH using real biological data sets. Human cancer cell line data and single-cell sequencing data were investigated to verify our approach. Then, we analyzed TCGA pan-cancer 6,320 patients. Our result was in agreement with widely used genome-based ITH inference methods, while showed better performance at survival analysis. Analysis of mouse clonal evolution data further confirmed that our transcriptome-based ITH was consistent with genetic heterogeneity at different clonal evolution stages. Additionally, we found that cell cycle related pathways have significant contribution to increasing heterogeneity on the network during clonal evolution. We believe that the proposed transcriptome-based ITH is useful to characterize heterogeneity of a tumor sample at RNA level.

  14. Survival prediction in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy based on intratumoral somatostatin-receptor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Harun; Higuchi, Takahiro; Buck, Andreas K.; Lehner, Sebastian; Bartenstein, Peter; Bengel, Frank; Schatka, Imke; Muegge, Dirk O.; Papp, László; Zsótér, Norbert; Große-Ophoff, Tobias; Essler, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    The NETTER-1 trial demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) emphasizing the high demand for response prediction in appropriate candidates. In this multicenter study, we aimed to elucidate the prognostic value of tumor heterogeneity as assessed by somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-PET/CT. 141 patients with SSTR-expressing tumors were analyzed obtaining SSTR-PET/CT before PRRT (1-6 cycles, 177Lu somatostatin analog). Using the Interview Fusion Workstation (Mediso), a total of 872 metastases were manually segmented. Conventional PET parameters as well as textural features representing intratumoral heterogeneity were computed. The prognostic ability for PFS and overall survival (OS) were examined. After performing Cox regression, independent parameters were determined by ROC analysis to obtain cut-off values to be used for Kaplan-Meier analysis. Within follow-up (median, 43.1 months), 75 patients showed disease progression (median, 22.2 m) and 54 patients died (median, 27.6 m). Cox analysis identified 8 statistically independent heterogeneity parameters for time-to-progression and time-to-death. Among them, the textural feature Entropy predicted both PFS and OS. Conventional PET parameters failed in response prediction. Imaging-based heterogeneity assessment provides prognostic information in PRRT candidates and outperformed conventional PET parameters. Its implementation in clinical practice can pave the way for individualized patient management. PMID:27705948

  15. Initial assessment of a model relating intratumoral genetic heterogeneity to radiological morphology.

    PubMed

    Noterdaeme, O; Kelly, M; Friend, P; Soonowalla, Z; Steers, G; Brady, M

    2010-02-01

    Tumour heterogeneity has major implications for tumour development and response to therapy. Tumour heterogeneity results from mutations in the genes responsible for mismatch repair or maintenance of chromosomal stability. Cells with different genetic properties may grow at different rates and exhibit different resistance to therapeutic interventions. To date, there exists no approach to non-invasively assess tumour heterogeneity. Here we present a biologically inspired model of tumour growth, which relates intratumoral genetic heterogeneity to gross morphology visible on radiological images. The model represents the development of a tumour as a set of expanding spheres, each sphere representing a distinct clonal centre, with the sprouting of new spheres corresponding to new clonal centres. Each clonal centre may possess different characteristics relating to genetic composition, growth rate and response to treatment. We present a clinical example for which the model accurately tracks tumour growth and shows the correspondence to genetic variation (as determined by array comparative genomic hybridisation). One clinical implication of our work is that the assessment of heterogeneous tumours using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST) or volume measurements may not accurately reflect tumour growth, stability or the response to treatment. We believe that this is the first model linking the macro-scale appearance of tumours to their genetic composition. We anticipate that our model will provide a more informative way to assess the response of heterogeneous tumours to treatment, which is of increasing importance with the development of novel targeted anti-cancer treatments.

  16. Intra-Tumor Genetic Heterogeneity in Wilms Tumor: Clonal Evolution and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, George D; Apps, John R; Chagtai, Tasnim; Mifsud, Borbala; Bentley, Christopher C; Maschietto, Mariana; Popov, Sergey D; Weeks, Mark E; Olsen, Øystein E; Sebire, Neil J; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Williams, Richard D; Mifsud, William

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of pediatric solid tumors is poorly understood. There is conflicting evidence of intra-tumor genetic homogeneity vs. heterogeneity (ITGH) in a small number of studies in pediatric solid tumors. A number of copy number aberrations (CNA) are proposed as prognostic biomarkers to stratify patients, for example 1q+ in Wilms tumor (WT); current clinical trials use only one sample per tumor to profile this genetic biomarker. We multisampled 20 WT cases and assessed genome-wide allele-specific CNA and loss of heterozygosity, and inferred tumor evolution, using Illumina CytoSNP12v2.1 arrays, a custom analysis pipeline, and the MEDICC algorithm. We found remarkable diversity of ITGH and evolutionary trajectories in WT. 1q+ is heterogeneous in the majority of tumors with this change, with variable evolutionary timing. We estimate that at least three samples per tumor are needed to detect >95% of cases with 1q+. In contrast, somatic 11p15 LOH is uniformly an early event in WT development. We find evidence of two separate tumor origins in unilateral disease with divergent histology, and in bilateral WT. We also show subclonal changes related to differential response to chemotherapy. Rational trial design to include biomarkers in risk stratification requires tumor multisampling and reliable delineation of ITGH and tumor evolution.

  17. Repeated exposure to amphetamine during adolescence alters inhibitory tone in the medial prefrontal cortex following drug re-exposure in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Charles L.; Gulley, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization following repeated amphetamine (AMPH) exposure is associated with changes in GABA function in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In rats exposed to AMPH during adolescence compared to adulthood, there are unique patterns of sensitization that may reflect age-dependent differences in drug effects on prefrontal GABAergic function. In the current study, we used a sensitizing regimen of repeated AMPH exposure in adolescent and adult rats to determine if a post-withdrawal AMPH challenge would alter inhibitory transmission in the mPFC in a manner that depends on age of exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with saline or 3 mg/kg AMPH (i.p.) during adolescence [postnatal day (P) 27 to P45] or adulthood (P85 to P103) and were sacrificed either at similar ages in adulthood (~P133; Experiment 1) or after similar withdrawal times (3-4 weeks; Experiment 2). Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded in vitro from deep layer pyramidal cells in the mPFC using the whole-cell configuration. We found no effect of AMPH pre-exposure on baseline sIPSC frequency. Subsequent application of AMPH (25 μM) produced a stable increase in sIPSC frequency in controls, suggesting that AMPH increases inhibitory tone in the mPFC. However, AMPH failed to increase sIPSCs in adolescent- or adult-exposed rats. In Experiment 2, where withdrawal period was kept similar for both exposure groups, AMPH induced a suppression of sIPSC activity in adolescent-exposed rats. These results suggest that sensitizing treatment with AMPH during adolescence or adulthood dampens inhibitory influences on mPFC pyramidal cells, but potentially through different mechanisms. PMID:27085589

  18. ViscumTT induces apoptosis and alters IAP expression in osteosarcoma in vitro and has synergistic action when combined with different chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kleinsimon, Susann; Kauczor, Gwenda; Jaeger, Sebastian; Eggert, Angelika; Seifert, Georg; Delebinski, Catharina

    2017-01-07

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumor and is associated with a poor prognosis. Conventional therapies, surgery and chemotherapy, are still the standard but soon reach their limits. New therapeutic approaches are therefore needed. Conventional aqueous mistletoe extracts from the European mistletoe (Viscum album L.) are used in complementary cancer treatment. These commercial extracts are water-based and do not include water-insoluble compounds such as triterpenic acids. However, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic triterpenic acids possess anti-cancer properties. In this study, a whole mistletoe extract viscumTT re-created by combining an aqueous extract (viscum) and a triterpene extract (TT) was tested for its anti-cancer potential in osteosarcoma. Two osteosarcoma cell lines were treated with three different mistletoe extracts viscum, TT and viscumTT to compare their apoptotic potential. For this purpose, annexin/PI staining and caspase-3, -8 and -9 activity were investigated by flow cytometry. To determine the mechanism of action, alterations in expression of inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) were detected by western blot. Apoptosis induction by co-treatment of viscum, TT and viscumTT with doxorubicin, etoposide and ifosfamide was examined by flow cytometry. In vitro as well as ex vivo, the whole mistletoe extract viscumTT led to strong inhibition of proliferation and synergistic apoptosis induction in osteosarcoma cells. In the investigations of mechanism of action, inhibitors of apoptosis such as XIAP, BIRC5 and CLSPN showed a clear down-regulation after viscumTT treatment. In addition, co-treatment with doxorubicin, etoposide and ifosfamide further enhanced apoptosis induction, also synergistically. ViscumTT treatment results in synergistic apoptosis induction in osteosarcoma cells in vitro and ex vivo. Additionally, conventional standard chemotherapeutic drugs such as doxorubicin, etoposide and ifosfamide were able to dramatically enhance apoptosis induction

  19. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine in Guinea-Bissau between 2003 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Jovel, Irina Tatiana; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Ursing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, artemether-lumefantrine was introduced in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, but quinine has also been commonly prescribed for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An efficacious high-dose chloroquine treatment regimen was used previously. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine have been described. P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) K76T, pfmdr1 gene copy numbers, pfmdr1 polymorphisms N86Y and Y184F, and pfmdr1 sequences 1034 to 1246 were determined using PCR-based methods. Blood samples came from virtually all (n=1,806) children<15 years of age who had uncomplicated P. falciparum monoinfection and presented at a health center in suburban Bissau (from 2003 to 2012). The pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y frequencies were stable, and seasonal changes were not seen from 2003 to 2007. Since 2007, the mean annual frequencies increased (P<0.001) for pfcrt 76T (24% to 57%), pfmdr1 N86 (72% to 83%), and pfcrt 76+pfmdr1 86 TN (10% to 27%), and pfcrt 76T accumulated during the high transmission season (P=0.001). The pfmdr1 86+184 NF frequency increased from 39% to 66% (from 2003 to 2011; P=0.004). One sample had two pfmdr1 gene copies. pfcrt 76T was associated with a lower parasite density (P<0.001). Following the discontinuation of an effective chloroquine regimen, probably highly artemether-lumefantrine-susceptible P. falciparum (with pfcrt 76T) accumulated, possibly due to suboptimal use of quinine and despite a fitness cost linked to pfcrt 76T. (The studies reported here were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00137514 [PSB-2001-chl-amo], NCT00137566 [PSB-2004-paracetamol], NCT00426439 [PSB-2006-coartem], NCT01157689 [AL-eff 2010], and NCT01704508 [Eurartesim 2012].).

  20. Refilling drug delivery depots through the blood.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Yevgeny; Silva, Eduardo A; Kearney, Cathal J; Lewin, Sarah A; Miller, Alex; Martinick, Kathleen D; Aizenberg, Michael; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-02

    Local drug delivery depots have significant clinical utility, but there is currently no noninvasive technique to refill these systems once their payload is exhausted. Inspired by the ability of nanotherapeutics to target specific tissues, we hypothesized that blood-borne drug payloads could be modified to home to and refill hydrogel drug delivery systems. To address this possibility, hydrogels were modified with oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that provide a target for drug payloads in the form of free alginate strands carrying complementary ODNs. Coupling ODNs to alginate strands led to specific binding to complementary-ODN-carrying alginate gels in vitro and to injected gels in vivo. When coupled to a drug payload, sequence-targeted refilling of a delivery depot consisting of intratumor hydrogels completely abrogated tumor growth. These results suggest a new paradigm for nanotherapeutic drug delivery, and this concept is expected to have applications in refilling drug depots in cancer therapy, wound healing, and drug-eluting vascular grafts and stents.

  1. Impact of intratumoral expression levels of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes on treatment outcomes of adjuvant S-1 therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Shin, Eun; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dae-Won; Kim, Se-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Bang, Soo-Mee; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ju-Seog; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Keun-Wook

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the expression levels of fluoropyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes (thymidylate synthase [TS], dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase [DPD], thymidine phosphorylase [TP] and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase [OPRT]) to identify potential biomarkers related to treatment outcomes in gastric cancer (GC) patients receiving adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy. In this study, 184 patients who received curative gastrectomy (D2 lymph node dissection) and adjuvant S-1 were included. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed to measure the protein and mRNA levels of TS, DPD, TP, and OPRT in tumor tissue. In univariate analysis, low intratumoral DPD protein expression was related to poorer 5-year disease-free survival (DFS; 78% vs. 88%; P = 0.068). Low intratumoral DPD mRNA expression (1st [lowest] quartile) was also related to poorer DFS (69% vs. 90%; P < 0.001) compared to high intratumoral DPD expression (2nd to 4th quartiles). In multivariate analyses, low intratumoral DPD protein or mRNA expression was related to worse DFS (P < 0.05), irrespective of other clinical variables. TS, TP, and OPRT expression levels were not related to treatment outcomes. Severe non-hematologic toxicities (grade ≥ 3) had a trend towards more frequent development in patients with low intratumoral DPD mRNA expression (29% vs. 16%; P = 0.068). In conclusion, GC patients with high intratumoral DPD expression did not have inferior outcome following adjuvant S-1 therapy compared with those with low DPD expression. Instead, low intratumoral DPD expression was related to poor DFS.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound parametric maps to evaluate intratumoral vascularization.

    PubMed

    Pitre-Champagnat, Stephanie; Leguerney, Ingrid; Bosq, Jacques; Peronneau, Pierre; Kiessling, Fabian; Calmels, Lucie; Coulot, Jeremy; Lassau, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the reliability of parametric maps from dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) to reflect the heterogeneous distribution of intratumoral vascularization and to predict the tissue features linked to vasculature. This study was designed to compare DCE-US parametric maps with histologic vascularity measurements. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound was performed on 17 melanoma-bearing nude mice after a 0.1-mL bolus injection of SonoVue (Bracco SPA, Milan, Italy). The parametric maps were developed from raw linear data to extract pixelwise 2 semiquantitative parameters related to perfusion and blood volume, namely, area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI). The mathematical method to fit the time-intensity curve for each pixel was a polynomial model used in clinical routine and patented by the team. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on DCE-US parametric maps for whole tumors and for several local areas of 15 mm within each tumor (iROI), the latter reflecting the heterogeneity of intratumoral blood volume. As the criterion standard correlation, microvessel densities (MVDs) were determined for both ROI categories. In detail, for all iROI of 15 mm, MVD and maturity were divided separately for vessels of 0 to 10 μm, 10 to 40 μm, and greater than 40 μm in diameter, and the results were correlated with the ultrasound findings. Among the 17 studied mice, a total of 64 iROIs were analyzed. For the whole-tumor ROI set, AUC and PI values significantly correlated with MVD (rAUC = 0.52 [P = 0.0408] and rPI = 0.70 [P = 0.0026]). In the case of multiple iROI, a strong linear correlation was observed between the DCE-US parameters and the density of vessels ranging in their diameter from 0 to 10 μm (rAUC = 0.68 [P < 0.0001]; rPI = 0.63 [P < 0.0001]), 10 to 40 μm (rAUC = 0.98 [P = 0.0003]; rPI = 0.98 [P = 0.0004]), and greater than 40 μm (rAUC = 0.86 [P = 0.0120]; rPI = 0.92 [P = 0.0034]), respectively. However, the

  3. A Time-Based and Intratumoral Proteomic Assessment of a Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Priscila F.; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Nogueira, Fábio C. S.; da Fonseca, Clovis Orlando; de Souza Silva, Júlio Cesar Thomé; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria da Costa; Domont, Gilberto B.; Zanchin, Nilson I. T.; Fischer, Juliana de Saldanha da Gama

    2016-01-01

    Tumors consist of cells in different stages of transformation with molecular and cellular heterogeneity. By far, heterogeneity is the hallmark of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant and aggressive type of glioma. Most proteomic studies aim in comparing tumors from different patients, but here we dive into exploring the intratumoral proteome diversity of a single GBM. For this, we profiled tumor fragments from the profound region of the same patient’s GBM but obtained from two surgeries a year’s time apart. Our analysis also included GBM‘s fragments from different anatomical regions. Our quantitative proteomic strategy employed 4-plex iTRAQ peptide labeling followed by a four-step strong cation chromatographic separation; each fraction was then analyzed by reversed-phase nano-chromatography coupled on-line with an Orbitrap-Velos mass spectrometer. Unsupervised clustering grouped the proteomic profiles into four major distinct groups and showed that most changes were related to the tumor’s anatomical region. Nevertheless, we report differentially abundant proteins from GBM’s fragments of the same region but obtained 1 year apart. We discuss several key proteins (e.g., S100A9) and enriched pathways linked with GBM such as the Ras pathway, RHO GTPases activate PKNs, and those related to apoptosis, to name a few. As far as we know, this is the only report that compares GBM fragments proteomic profiles from the same patient. Ultimately, our results fuel the forefront of scientific discussion on the importance in exploring the richness of subproteomes within a single tissue sample for a better understanding of the disease, as each tumor is unique. PMID:27597932

  4. The degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity varies by primary tumor sub-site

    PubMed Central

    Eterovic, Agda Karina; Wick, Jo; Chen, Ken; Zhao, Hao; Tazi, Loubna; Manna, Pradip; Kerley, Spencer; Joshi, Radhika; Wang, Lin; Chiosea, Simion I.; Garnett, James David; Tsue, Terance Ted; Chien, Jeremy; Mills, Gordon B.; Grandis, Jennifer Rubin; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2016-01-01

    In an era where mutational profiles inform treatment options, it is critical to know the extent to which tumor biopsies represent the molecular profile of the primary and metastatic tumor. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) arise primarily in the mucosal lining of oral cavity and oropharynx. Despite aggressive therapy the 5-year survival rate is at 50%. The primary objective of this study is to characterize the degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity in HNSCC. We used multi-region sequencing of paired primary and metastatic tumor DNA of 24 spatially distinct samples from seven patients with HNSCC of larynx, floor of the mouth (FOM) or oral tongue. Full length, in-depth sequencing of 202 genes implicated in cancer was carried out. Larynx and FOM tumors had more than 69.2% unique SNVs between the paired primary and metastatic lesions. In contrast, the oral tongue HNSCC had only 33.3% unique SNVs across multiple sites. In addition, HNSCC of the oral tongue had fewer mutations than larynx and FOM tumors. These findings were validated on the Affymetrix whole genome 6.0 array platform and were consistent with data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). This is the first report demonstrating differences in mutational heterogeneity varying by subsite in HNSCC. The heterogeneity within laryngeal tumor specimens may lead to an underestimation of the genetic abnormalities within tumors and may foster resistance to standard treatment protocols. These findings are relevant to investigators and clinicians developing personalized cancer treatments based on identification of specific mutations in tumor biopsies. PMID:27034009

  5. High expression of intratumoral stromal proteins is associated with chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Srivastava, Supriya; Hartman, Mikael; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Chan, Ching-Wan; Iau, Philip; Khin, Lay Wai; Wong, Andrea; Tan, Sing-Huang; Goh, Boon-Cher; Lee, Soo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the changes of intratumoral stromal proteins including THBS1, TNC, FN, SPARC and α-SMA, following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The underlying mechanisms by which THBS1 and TNC regulated resistance to docetaxel were further studied using functional studies. 100 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer were treated with alternating sequential doxorubicin and docetaxel. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining for stromal proteins was performed on pre- and post-treatment core biopsies respectively. THBS1 and TNC were further validated with IHC in an independent cohort of 31 patients. A high baseline combined expression score of the 5 stromal proteins predicted independently for poor progression-free (HRadjusted 2.22, 95% CI 1.06–4.64) and overall survival (HRadjusted 5.94, 95% CI 2.25–15.71). After 1–2 cycles of chemotherapy, increased expression of THBS1, TNC, FN, SPARC and α-SMA was seen in patients with subsequent pathological lymph node involvement at surgery. Increased expression of THBS1 and TNC compared to baseline was also seen in intrinsically resistant tumors, but not in sensitive ones. Both THBS1 and TNC-associated chemoresistance were confirmed in an independent validation cohort. Exogenous THBS1 and TNC protected MCF-7 cells against proliferation inhibition induced by docetaxel through activating integrin β1/mTOR pathway. Thus, up-regulation of THBS1, TNC, FN, SPARC and α-SMA following neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer patients. Functional studies showed THBS1 and TNC to mediate chemoresistance through the integrin β1/mTOR pathway, suggesting that therapies targeting integrin β1/mTOR pathway may be a promising strategy to overcome chemotherapy resistance. PMID:27487140

  6. Turning the headlights on novel cancer biomarkers: Inspection of mechanics underlying intratumor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Michelle; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Aneja, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Although the existence of intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) in the expression of common biomarkers has been described by pathologists since the late 1890s, we have only recently begun to fathom the staggering extent and near ubiquity of this phenomenon. From the tumor’s perspective, ITH provides a stabilizing diversity that allows for the evolution of aggressive cancer phenotypes. As the weight of the evidence correlating ITH to poor prognosis burgeons, it has become increasingly important to determine the mechanisms by which a tumor acquires ITH, find clinically-adaptable means to quantify ITH and design strategies to deal with the numerous profound clinical ramifications that ITH forces upon us. Elucidation of the drivers of ITH could enable development of novel biomarkers whose interrogation might permit quantitative evaluation of the ITH inherent in a tumor in order to predict the poor prognosis risk associated with that tumor. This review proposes centrosome amplification (CA), aided and abetted by centrosome clustering mechanisms, as a critical driver of chromosomal instability (CIN) that makes a key contribution to ITH generation. Herein we also evaluate how a tumor’s inherent mitotic propensity, which reflects the cell cycling kinetics within the tumor’s proliferative cells, functions as the indispensable engine underpinning CIN, and determines the rate of CIN. We thus expound how the forces of centrosome amplification and mitotic propensity collaborate to sculpt the genetic landscape of a tumor and spawn extensive subclonal diversity. As such, centrosome amplification and mitotic propensity profiles could serve as clinically facile and powerful prognostic biomarkers that would enable more accurate risk segmentation of patients and design of individualized therapies. PMID:26024970

  7. Regional bias of intratumoral genetic heterogeneity of nucleotide repeats in colon cancers with microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Kim, Min Sung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2014-10-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) may produce regional biases in genotype and phenotype evaluation in a single tumor and may impede proper cancer diagnosis. To evaluate the extent of ITH in colorectal cancer (CRC) with microsatellite instability (MSI), we obtained 4-7 biopsies from 39 CRCs followed by MSI analysis either using the Bethesda MSI evaluation system or Promega system with 5 mononucleotide markers. We found decreased prevalence of MSI (+) by the Promega system compared to the Bethesda system. The overall discordance between the two systems was 54 %. In contrast to the previous studies that had shown discordance only in low MSI (MSI-L), our results showed the discordance not only in MSI-L, but also in high MSI (MSI-H) cases. Among the MSI (+) CRCs, ITH of MSI status was identified in 41.7 % of CRC by the Bethesda system and 22.2 % by the Promega system. In terms of MSI markers, the ITH originated from dinucleotide markers in most cases (69 %), but it originated from mononucleotide markers (31 %) as well. Pooling of DNA from a regional biopsy with MSI (+) with additional biopsies from stable MSI (MSS) showed that this approach was beneficial to increase the sensitivity of MSI detection. Our results indicate that ITH of MSI phenotype by the Bethesda system is more overestimated than previously identified. However, because there was considerable ITH of MSI subtypes and markers even by the Promega system, our data suggest that analysis of MSI status in multiple regional biopsies is needed for a better evaluation of MSI status in CRC.

  8. Intratumoral immunotherapy of established solid tumors with chitosan/IL-12.

    PubMed

    Zaharoff, David A; Hance, Kenneth W; Rogers, Connie J; Schlom, Jeffrey; Greiner, John W

    2010-09-01

    IL-12 is a potent antitumor cytokine that exhibits significant clinical toxicities after systemic administration. We hypothesized that intratumoral (i.t.) administration of IL-12 coformulated with the biodegradable polysaccharide chitosan could enhance the antitumor activity of IL-12 while limiting its systemic toxicity. Noninvasive imaging studies monitored local retention of IL-12, with and without chitosan coformulation, after i.t. injection. Antitumor efficacy of IL-12 alone and IL-12 coformulated with chitosan (chitosan/IL-12) was assessed in mice bearing established colorectal (MC32a) and pancreatic (Panc02) tumors. Additional studies involving depletion of immune cell subsets, tumor rechallenge, and CTL activity were designed to elucidate mechanisms of regression and tumor-specific immunity. Coformulation with chitosan increased local IL-12 retention from 1 to 2 days to 5 to 6 days. Weekly i.t. injections of IL-12 alone eradicated ≤10% of established MC32a and Panc02 tumors, while i.t. chitosan/IL-12 immunotherapy caused complete tumor regression in 80% to 100% of mice. Depletion of CD4(+) or Gr-1(+) cells had no impact on chitosan/IL-12-mediated tumor regression. However, CD8(+) or NK cell depletion completely abrogated antitumor activity. I.t. chitosan/IL-12 immunotherapy generated systemic tumor-specific immunity, as >80% of mice cured with i.t. chitosan/IL-12 immunotherapy were at least partially protected from tumor rechallenge. Furthermore, CTLs from spleens of cured mice lysed MC32a and gp70 peptide-loaded targets. Chitosan/IL-12 immunotherapy increased local retention of IL-12 in the tumor microenvironment, eradicated established, aggressive murine tumors, and generated systemic tumor-specific protective immunity. Chitosan/IL-12 is a well-tolerated, effective immunotherapy with considerable potential for clinical translation.

  9. Radio-responsive tumors exhibit greater intratumoral immune activity than nonresponsive tumors.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Scott A; Lim, Joanne Y H; Connolly, Kelli A; Sedlacek, Abigail L; Barlow, Margaret L; Murphy, Shawn P; Egilmez, Nejat K; Lord, Edith M

    2014-05-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) continues to be a cornerstone in the treatment for many cancers. Unfortunately, not all individuals respond effectively to RT resulting clinically in two groups consisting of nonresponders (progressive disease) and responders (tumor control/cure). The mechanisms that govern the outcome of radiotherapy are poorly understood. Interestingly, a new paradigm has emerged demonstrating that the immune system mediates many of the antitumor effects of RT. Therefore, we hypothesized that the immune response following RT may dictate the efficacy of treatment. To examine this, we developed a tumor model that mirrors this clinically relevant phenomenon in which mice bearing Colon38, a colon adenocarcinoma, were treated locally with 15Gy RT resulting in both nonresponders and responders. More importantly, we were able to distinguish responders from nonresponders as early as 4 days post-RT allowing for the unique opportunity to identify critical events that ultimately determined the effectiveness of therapy. Intratumoral immune cells and interferon-gamma were increased in responsive tumors and licensed CD8 T cells to exhibit lytic activity against tumor cells, a response that was diminished in tumors refractory to RT. Combinatorial treatment with RT and the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-12 resulted in complete remission of cancer in 100% of cases compared to a cure rate of only 12% with RT alone. Similar data were obtained when IL-12 was delivered by microspheres. Therefore, the efficacy of RT may depend on the strength of the immune response induced after radiotherapy. Additionally, immunotherapy that further stimulates the immune cells may enhance the effectiveness of RT. © 2013 UICC.

  10. Injectable polypeptide micelles that form radiation crosslinked hydrogels in situ for intratumoral radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Jeffrey L; Li, Xinghai; Mastria, Eric; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Zalutsky, Michael R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Liu, Wenge

    2016-04-28

    Intratumoral radiation therapy - 'brachytherapy' - is a highly effective treatment for solid tumors, particularly prostate cancer. Current titanium seed implants, however, are permanent and are limited in clinical application to indolent malignancies of low- to intermediate-risk. Attempts to develop polymeric alternatives, however, have been plagued by poor retention and off-target toxicity due to degradation. Herein, we report on a new approach whereby thermally sensitive micelles composed of an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) are labeled with the radionuclide (131)I to form an in situ hydrogel that is stabilized by two independent mechanisms: first, body heat triggers the radioactive ELP micelles to rapidly phase transition into an insoluble, viscous coacervate in under 2 min; second, the high energy β-emissions of (131)I further stabilize the depot by introducing crosslinks within the ELP depot over 24h. These injectable brachytherapy hydrogels were used to treat two aggressive orthotopic tumor models in athymic nude mice: a human PC-3 M-luc-C6 prostate tumor and a human BxPc3-luc2 pancreatic tumor model. The ELP depots retained greater than 52% and 70% of their radioactivity through 60 days in the prostate and pancreatic tumors with no appreciable radioactive accumulation (≤ 0.1% ID) in off-target tissues after 72h. The (131)I-ELP depots achieved >95% tumor regression in the prostate tumors (n=8); with a median survival of more than 60 days compared to 12 days for control mice. For the pancreatic tumors, ELP brachytherapy (n=6) induced significant growth inhibition (p=0.001, ANOVA) and enhanced median survival to 27 days over controls.

  11. Intratumoral injection of attenuated Salmonella vaccine can induce tumor microenvironmental shift from immune suppressive to immunogenic.

    PubMed

    Hong, Eun-Hye; Chang, Sun-Young; Lee, Bo-Ra; Pyun, A-Rim; Kim, Ji-Won; Kweon, Mi-Na; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2013-02-27

    Attenuated Salmonella vaccines show therapeutic anti-cancer effects, but the underlying mechanism has not been well investigated. In the current study, intratumoral (i.t.) injection of recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (RASV) significantly inhibited Her-2/neu-expressing tumor growth. Although depletion of CD8(+) cells in RASV-treated mice significantly restored tumor growth, the induction of Her-2/neu-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was not well correlated with the generation of the anti-tumor effect. Therefore, we hypothesized that RASV might induce a tumor microenvironmental shift, from immune suppressive to immunogenic, to reduce the suppressive force and finally elicit a successful anti-tumor response. We found that i.t. injection of RASV significantly increased the level of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cells identified as myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC), but a significant portion of these cells were TNF-α-secreting Ly6-G(high) subsets, which can function as antitumor effector cells. We further investigated whether RASV can modulate immunosuppressive Treg cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs was significantly reduced in RASV-treated mice. Thus, i.t. injection of RASV may offer a novel anti-cancer approach by eliciting transformation of immunosuppressive MDSCs into TNF-α-secreting neutrophils and reducing the generation of Treg cells, especially in the presence of tumor-specific CTLs. Collectively, these data will provide us an insight for the development of new anti-tumor approaches to overcome the immunosuppressive environment generated by tumors.

  12. Increased radiosensitivity of colorectal tumors with intra-tumoral injection of low dose of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Minghan; Paquette, Benoit; Thippayamontri, Thititip; Gendron, Louis; Guérin, Brigitte; Sanche, Léon

    2016-01-01

    The potential of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as radiosensitizers for the treatment of malignant tumors has been limited by the large quantities of GNPs that must be administered and the requirement for low-energy X-ray irradiation to optimize radiosensitization. In this study, we enhance the radiosensitivity of HCT116 human colorectal cells with tiopronin-coated GNPs (Tio-GNPs) combined with a low-energy X-ray (26 keV effective energy) source, similar to the Papillon 50 clinical irradiator used for topical irradiation of rectal tumors. Sensitizer enhancement ratios of 1.48 and 1.69 were measured in vitro, when the HCT116 cells were incubated with 0.1 mg/mL and 0.25 mg/mL of Tio-GNPs, respectively. In nude mice bearing the HCT116 tumor, intra-tumoral (IT) injection of Tio-GNPs allowed a 94 times higher quantity of Tio-GNPs to accumulate than was possible by intravenous injection and facilitated a significant tumor response. The time following irradiation, for tumors growing to four times their initial tumor volume (4Td) was 54 days for the IT injection of 366.3 μg of Tio-GNPs plus 10 Gy, compared to 37 days with radiation alone (P=0.0018). Conversely, no significant improvement was obtained when GNPs were injected intravenously before tumor irradiation (P=0.6547). In conclusion, IT injection of Tio-GNPs combined with low-energy X-rays can significantly reduce the growth of colorectal tumors. PMID:27789945

  13. MATH, a novel measure of intratumor genetic heterogeneity, is high in poor-outcome classes of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Edmund A.; Rocco, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Differences among cancer cells within a tumor are important in tumorigenesis and treatment resistance, yet no measure of intratumor heterogeneity is suitable for routine application. We developed a quantitative measure of intratumor genetic heterogeneity, based on differences among mutated loci in the mutant-allele fractions determined by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of tumor DNA. We then evaluated the application of this measure to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods We analyzed published electronically available NGS results for 74 HNSCC. For each tumor we calculated mutant-allele tumor heterogeneity (MATH) as the ratio of the width to the center of its distribution of mutant-allele fractions among tumor-specific mutated loci. Results Intratumor heterogeneity assessed by MATH was higher in 3 poor-outcome classes of HNSCC: tumors with disruptive mutations in the TP53 gene (versus wild-type TP53 or non-disruptive mutations), tumors negative versus positive for human papillomavirus (even when restricted to tumors having wild-type TP53), and HPV-negative tumors from smokers with more pack-years of cigarette exposure (with TP53 status taken into account). Conclusion The relation of this type of intratumor heterogeneity to HNSCC outcome classes supports its further evaluation as a prognostic biomarker. As NGS of tumor DNA becomes widespread in clinical research and practice, MATH should provide a simple, quantitative, and clinically practical biomarker to help evaluate relations of intratumor genetic heterogeneity to outcome in any type of cancer. PMID:23079694

  14. Modeling Tumor Clonal Evolution for Drug Combinations Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Boyang; Hemann, Michael T.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a clonal evolutionary process. This presents challenges for effective therapeutic intervention, given the constant selective pressure towards drug resistance. Mathematical modeling from population genetics, evolutionary dynamics, and engineering perspectives are being increasingly employed to study tumor progression, intratumoral heterogeneity, drug resistance, and rational drug scheduling and combinations design. In this review, we discuss promising opportunities these inter-disciplinary approaches hold for advances in cancer biology and treatment. We propose that quantitative modeling perspectives can complement emerging experimental technologies to facilitate enhanced understanding of disease progression and improved capabilities for therapeutic drug regimen designs. PMID:28435907

  15. Intratumoral Agreement of High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Profiles in the Metabolic Characterization of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Vivian Youngjean; Yoon, Dahye; Koo, Ja Seung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy data may serve as a biomarker for breast cancer, with only a small volume of tissue sample required for assessment. However, previous studies utilized only a single tissue sample from each patient. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratumoral location and biospecimen type affected the metabolic characterization of breast cancer assessed by HR-MAS MR spectroscopy This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and informed consent was obtained. Preoperative core-needle biopsies (CNBs), central, and peripheral surgical tumor specimens were prospectively collected under ultrasound (US) guidance in 31 patients with invasive breast cancer. Specimens were assessed with HR-MAS MR spectroscopy. The reliability of metabolite concentrations was evaluated and multivariate analysis was performed according to intratumoral location and biospecimen type. There was a moderate or higher agreement between the relative concentrations of 94.3% (33 of 35) of metabolites in the center and periphery, 80.0% (28 of 35) of metabolites in the CNB and central surgical specimens, and 82.9% (29 of 35) of metabolites between all 3 specimen types. However, there was no significant agreement between the concentrations of phosphocholine (PC) and phosphoethanolamine (PE) in the center and periphery. The concentrations of several metabolites (adipate, arginine, fumarate, glutamate, PC, and PE) had no significant agreement between the CNB and central surgical specimens. In conclusion, most HR-MAS MR spectroscopic data do not differ based on intratumoral location or biospecimen type. However, some metabolites may be affected by specimen-related variables, and caution is recommended in decision-making based solely on metabolite concentrations, particularly PC and PE. Further validation through future studies is needed for the clinical implementation of these biomarkers based

  16. Intratumoral mediated immunosuppression is prognostic in genetically engineered murine models of glioma and correlates to immune therapeutic responses

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wu, Adam S.; Doucette, Tiffany; Wei, Jun; Priebe, Waldemar; Fuller, Gregory N.; Qiao, Wei; Sawaya, Raymond; Rao, Ganesh; Heimberger, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pre-clinical murine model systems used for the assessment of therapeutics have not been predictive of human clinical responses, primarily because their clonotypic nature does not recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and immunosuppressive mechanisms of humans. Relevant model systems with mice that are immunologically competent are needed to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic agents, especially immunotherapeutics. Experimental Design Using the RCAS/Ntv-a system, mice were engineered to co-express platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF)-B + B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 under the control of the glioneuronal-specific Nestin promoter. The degree and type of tumor-mediated immunosuppression was determined in these endogenously arising gliomas based upon the presence of macrophages and regulatory T cells (Tregs). The immunotherapeutic agent, WP1066, was tested in vivo to assess therapeutic efficacy and immune modulation. Results N-tva mice were injected with RCAS vectors to express PDGF-B + Bcl-2, resulting in both low- and high-grade gliomas. Consistent with observations in human high-grade gliomas, mice with high-grade gliomas also developed a marked intratumoral influx of macrophages that was influenced by tumor signal transducer and activator of transduction (STAT) 3 expression. The presence of intratumoral F4/80 macrophages was a negative prognosticator for long-term survival. In mice expressing both PDGF-B + Bcl-2 that were treated with WP1066, there was 55.5% increase in median survival time (P< 0.01), with an associated inhibition of intratumoral STAT3 and macrophages. Conclusions Although randomization is necessary for including mice in a therapeutic trial, these murine model systems are more suitable for testing therapeutics, and especially immune therapeutics, in the context of translational studies. PMID:20921210

  17. Intratumoral FoxP3 expression is associated with angiogenesis and prognosis in malignant canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Gregório, Hugo; Lobo, Luis; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2016-10-01

    The activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is closely associated with the expression of FoxP3 transcription factor. FoxP3 regulatory T cells (FoxP3Treg) have immunosuppressive properties and can work for prevention of harmful autoimmune responses, however can also interfere with beneficial anti-tumor immunity. In human breast cancer these cells play a crucial role in tumor progression. In canine mammary tumors (CMT) this topic is not well-documented. This study included 80 malignant CMT and studied, by immunohistochemistry, the intratumoral FoxP3 expression together with microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and several clinicopathological characteristics. Abundant FoxP3Treg cells were associated with tumor necrosis (p=0.001), high mitotic grade (p<0.001), more marked nuclear polymorphism (p=0.001), poor differentiation of tumors (p<0.001), high histological grade of malignancy (HGM) (p<0.001), presence of neoplastic intravascular emboli (p<0.001) and presence of lymph node metastasis (p<0.001). Intratumoral FoxP3 was correlated with MVD (r=0.827; p<0.001) and associated with VEGF (p=0.001). Additionally tumors with abundant FoxP3Treg cells were associated with shorter overall survival (OS) time in univariate and multivariate analysis (p<0.001 Kaplan-Meier curves and 7.97 hazard ratio, p<0.001 Cox proportional hazard model). Results suggest that Treg cells play a role in CMT progression and may contribute to increased angiogenesis and aggression in these tumors. The association of intratumoral FoxP3 expression with shorter OS in multivariate analysis suggests the usefulness of Treg cells as an independent prognostic marker.

  18. Effects of intratumoral administration of a hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate to five dogs with soft tissue sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Venable, Rachel O.; Worley, Deanna R.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Cai, Shuang; Cohen, Mark S.; Forrest, M. Laird

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of intratumoral injection of a hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate on local and systemic platinum concentrations and systemic toxicosis. Animals 5 dogs with spontaneous soft tissue sarcomas (STSs). Procedures For each dog, approximately 1.5 mL of hyaluronan nanocarrier conjugated with 20 mg of cisplatin was injected into an external STS. Blood samples were collected immediately before (0 hours) and at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 24, and 96 hours after hyaluronan-cisplatin injection for pharmacokinetic analyses. Urine samples were obtained at 0 and at 96 hours after hyaluronan-cisplatin injection for urinalysis. Each treated STS and its sentinel lymph nodes were surgically removed 96 hours after the hyaluronan-cisplatin injection. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure platinum concentrations in blood samples, tumors, and lymph nodes. Results No tissue reactions were detected 96 hours after hyaluronan-cisplatin injection. Mean ± SD area under the curve, peak concentration, and terminal half-life for unbound (plasma) and total (serum) platinum were 774.6 ± 221.1 ng·h/mL and 3,562.1 ± 2,031.1 ng·h/mL, 56.5 ± 20.9 ng/mL and 81.6 ± 40.4 ng/mL, and 33.6 ± 16.1 hours and 51.2 ± 29.1 hours, respectively. Platinum concentrations ranged from 3,325 to 8,229 ng/g in STSs and 130 to 6,066 ng/g in STS-associated lymph nodes. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Intratumoral injection of the hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate was well tolerated in treated dogs. Following intratumoral hyaluronan-cisplatin injection, platinum concentration was 1,000-fold and 100-fold greater within treated tumors and tumor-draining lymphatics, respectively, compared with that in plasma. PMID:23176425

  19. Altered Strand Transfer Activity of a Multi-drug-resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutant with a Dipeptide Fingers Domain Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Daddacha, Waaqo; Rigby, Sean; Bambara, Robert A.; Kim, Baek

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) with multiple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients can induce the development of an HIV-1 RT harboring a dipeptide insertion at the RT fingers domain with a background thymidine analog mutation (TAM). This mutation renders viral resistance to multiple NRTIs. We investigated the effect of the dipeptide fingers domain insertion mutation on strand transfer activity using two clinical RT variants isolated during pre- and post-treatment of an infected patient, termed pre-drug RT without the dipeptide insertion and post-drug RT with the Ser-Gly insertion mutation, respectively. First, the post-drug RT displayed elevated strand transfer activity, compared to the pre-drug RT, with two different RNA templates. Second, the post-drug RT exhibited less RNA template degradation than the pre-drug RT, but higher polymerization-dependent RNase H activity. Third, the post-drug RT had a faster association rate for template binding (kon) and lower equilibrium binding constant KD to template, leading to the tighter template binding affinity than the pre-drug RT. The koff rates for pre-drug RT and post-drug RTs were similar. Finally, the removal of the dipeptide insertion from the post-drug RT abolished the elevated strand transfer activity and RNase H activity in addition to the loss of AZT resistance. These biochemical data suggests that the dipeptide insertion mutation elevates strand transfer activity by increasing the interaction of the RT with RNA donor template, promoting cleavage that generates more invasion site for the acceptor template during DNA synthesis. PMID:22100453

  20. Metaplastic thymoma with myasthenia gravis presumably caused by an accumulation of intratumoral immature T cells: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Yanagiya, Masahiro; Sato, Masaaki; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Among human neoplasms, thymomas are well known for their association with paraneoplastic autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis. However, regarding rare metaplastic thymoma, only one case of an association with myasthenia gravis has been reported. Here, we present the second case of a 44-year-old woman with metaplastic thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. In metaplastic thymoma, intratumoral terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive T-cells (immature T-cells) are generally scarce, while they were abundant in the present case. We believe that these immature T-cells could be related to the occurrence of myasthenia gravis.